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1

The Maximum Potential Intensity of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic approach to estimating maximum potential intensity (MPI) of tropical cyclones is described and compared with observations and previous studies. The approach requires an atmospheric temperature sounding, SST, and surface pressure; ...

Greg J. Holland

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Maximum Fuel Energy Saving of a Brayton Cogeneration Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An endoreversible Joule-Brayton cogeneration cycle has been optimized with fuel energy saving as an assessment criterion. The effects of power-to-heat ratio, cycle temperature ratio, and user temperature ratio on maximum fuel energy saving and efficiency ... Keywords: cogeneration cycle, fuel energy saving, thermodynamic optimization

Xiaoli Hao; Guoqiang Zhang

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential Uses for Depleted Uranium Oxide. 2009, DOE. p.15. WNA. Uranium and Depleted Uranium. 2009 [cited 2010R. , Direct Use of Depleted Uranium As Fuel in a Traveling-

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

IAEA-TECDOC-1450 Thorium fuel cycle --Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1985 - 1989 Lingen, Germany BWR Irradiation-testing 60 MW(e) Test Fuel (Th,Pu)O2 pellets Terminated achieved a maximum burnup of 60 000 MWd/t without any fuel failure. In India, there has always beenIAEA-TECDOC-1450 Thorium fuel cycle -- Potential benefits and challenges May 2005 #12;IAEA

Laughlin, Robert B.

5

Maximum Potential Intensities of Tropical Cyclones near Isla Socorro, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum potential intensity (MPI) of a tropical cyclone represents a theoretical upper limit to the strength of the storm imposed by the laws of physics and the energy available to the system in the atmosphere and the ocean. The MPI in this ...

Jay S. Hobgood

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Albright, D. , Plutonium and highly enriched uranium, 1996 :and swelling in uranium-plutonium mixed nitride fuels.products and to extract plutonium or any other actinide from

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

8

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

9

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: April 3, 2000 2: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #122: April 3, 2000 Potential Fuel Savings of Doubling Fuel Economy on

10

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Joe T. Carter, SRNL Alan J. Luptak, INL Jason Gastelum, PNNL Christine...

14

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability for Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability for Hydrogen Vehicles Project Summary Full Title: Analyzing the Potential for Stationary Fuel Cells to Augment Hydrogen Availability in the Transition to Hydrogen Vehicles Project ID: 281 Principal Investigator: David Greene Brief Description: This analysis was focused on the role that combined heat and hydrogen power (CHHP) could play in increasing hydrogen refueling availability during the transition to hydrogen vehicles. Keywords: Stationary fuel cell; hydrogen; plug-in hybrid electric vehicle; hydrogen fuel cell vehicle; combined heat, hydrogen and power; internal combustion engine Performer Principal Investigator: David Greene Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

15

Biomass fuel systems: directory of sources and potential users  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sources and potential users of technical information on biomass fuel systems are identified. Organizations and individual contacts are listed in various production and conversion categories.

Henry, J.F.; Salo, D.J.; Schauffler, M.S.; Smith, B.T.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

OPTIMIZED FUEL INJECTOR DESIGN FOR MAXIMUM IN-FURNACE NOx REDUCTION AND MINIMUM UNBURNED CARBON  

SciTech Connect

Reaction Engineering International (REI) has established a project team of experts to develop a technology for combustion systems which will minimize NO x emissions and minimize carbon in the fly ash. This much need technology will allow users to meet environmental compliance and produce a saleable by-product. This study is concerned with the NO x control technology of choice for pulverized coal fired boilers, ?in-furnace NO x control,? which includes: staged low-NO x burners, reburning, selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and hybrid approaches (e.g., reburning with SNCR). The program has two primary objectives: 1) To improve the performance of ?in-furnace? NO x control processes. 2) To devise new, or improve existing, approaches for maximum ?in-furnace? NO x control and minimum unburned carbon. The program involves: 1) fundamental studies at laboratory- and bench-scale to define NO reduction mechanisms in flames and reburning jets; 2) laboratory experiments and computer modeling to improve our two-phase mixing predictive capability; 3) evaluation of commercial low-NO x burner fuel injectors to develop improved designs, and 4) demonstration of coal injectors for reburning and low-NO x burners at commercial scale. The specific objectives of the two-phase program are to: 1 Conduct research to better understand the interaction of heterogeneous chemistry and two phase mixing on NO reduction processes in pulverized coal combustion. 2 Improve our ability to predict combusting coal jets by verifying two phase mixing models under conditions that simulate the near field of low-NO x burners. 3 Determine the limits on NO control by in-furnace NO x control technologies as a function of furnace design and coal type. 5 Develop and demonstrate improved coal injector designs for commercial low-NO x burners and coal reburning systems. 6 Modify the char burnout model in REI?s coal combustion code to take account of recently obtained fundamental data on char reactivity during the late stages of burnout. This will improve our ability to predict carbon burnout with low-NO x firing systems.

A.F. SAROFIM; BROWN UNIVERSITY. R.A. LISAUSKAS; D.B. RILEY, INC.; E.G. EDDINGS; J. BROUWER; J.P. KLEWICKI; K.A. DAVIS; M.J. BOCKELIE; M.P. HEAP; REACTION ENGINEERING INTERNATIONAL. D.W. PERSHING; UNIVERSITY OF UTAH. R.H. HURT

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

AN EVALUATION OF POTENTIAL LINER MATERIALS FOR ELIMINATING FCCI IN IRRADIATED METALLIC NUCLEAR FUEL ELEMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metallic nuclear fuels are being looked at as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Program for transmuting longlive transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products. In order to optimize the performance of these fuels, the concept of using liners to eliminate the fuel/cladding chemical interactions that can occur during irradiation of a fuel element has been investigated. The potential liner materials Zr and V have been tested using solid-solid diffusion couples, consisting of liner materials butted against fuel alloys and against cladding materials. The couples were annealed at the relatively high temperature of 700°C. This temperature would be the absolute maximum temperature present at the fuel/cladding interface for a fuel element in-reactor. Analysis was performed using a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive and wavelengthdispersive spectrometers (SEM/EDS/WDS) to evaluate any developed diffusion structures. At 700°C, minimal interaction was observed between the metallic fuels and either Zr or V. Similarly, limited interaction was observed between the Zr and V and the cladding materials. The best performing liner material appeared to be the V, based on amounts of interaction.

D. D. Keiser; J. I. Cole

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

19

Describing Current & Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D D e s c r i b i n g C u r r e n t and P o t e n t i a l M a r k e t s for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles March 1996 DOE/EIA-0604 Energy Information Administration AFV ? ? Gas FUEL DOE/EIA-0604 Distribution Category UC-950 Describing Current and Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles March 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Describing Current and Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles

20

Electrochemical sensor for monitoring electrochemical potentials of fuel cell components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical sensor comprised of wires, a sheath, and a conduit can be utilized to monitor fuel cell component electric potentials during fuel cell shut down or steady state. The electrochemical sensor contacts an electrolyte reservoir plate such that the conduit wicks electrolyte through capillary action to the wires to provide water necessary for the electrolysis reaction which occurs thereon. A voltage is applied across the wires of the electrochemical sensor until hydrogen evolution occurs at the surface of one of the wires, thereby forming a hydrogen reference electrode. The voltage of the fuel cell component is then determined with relation to the hydrogen reference electrode.

Kunz, Harold R. (Vernon, CT); Breault, Richard D. (Coventry, CT)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Potential of vegetable oils as a domestic heating fuel  

SciTech Connect

The dependence on imported oil for domestic heating has led to the examination of other potential fuel substitutes. One potential fuel is some form of vegetable oil, which could be a yearly-renewable fuel. In Western Canada, canola has become a major oilseed crop; in Eastern Canada, sunflowers increasingly are becoming a source for a similar oil; for this reason, the Canadian Combustion Research Laboratory (CCRL) has chosen these oils for experimentation. Trials have been conducted in a conventional warm air oil furnace, fitted with a flame retention head burner. Performance has been measured with pure vegetable oils as well as a series of blends with conventional No. 2 oil. The effects of increased fuel pressure and fuel preheating are established. Emissions of carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned hydrocarbons and particulates are given for both steady state and cyclic operation. Canola oil cannot be fired in cyclic operation above 50:50 blends with No. 2 oil. At any level above a 10% blend, canola is difficult to burn, even with significant increased pressure and temperature. Sunflower oil is much easier to burn and can be fired as a pure fuel, but with high emissions of incomplete combustion products. An optimum blend of 50:50 sunflower in No. 2 oil yields emissions and performance similar to No. 2 oil. This blend offers potential as a means of reducing demand of imported crude oil for domestic heating systems.

Hayden, A.C.S.; Begin, E.; Palmer, C.E.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Describing current and potential markets for alternative-fuel vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor vehicles are a major source of greenhouse gases, and the rising numbers of motor vehicles and miles driven could lead to more harmful emissions that may ultimately affect the world`s climate. One approach to curtailing such emissions is to use, instead of gasoline, alternative fuels: LPG, compressed natural gas, or alcohol fuels. In addition to the greenhouse gases, pollutants can be harmful to human health: ozone, CO. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized EPA to set National Ambient Air Quality Standards to control this. The Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPACT) was the first new law to emphasize strengthened energy security and decreased reliance on foreign oil since the oil shortages of the 1970`s. EPACT emphasized increasing the number of alternative-fuel vehicles (AFV`s) by mandating their incremental increase of use by Federal, state, and alternative fuel provider fleets over the new few years. Its goals are far from being met; alternative fuels` share remains trivial, about 0.3%, despite gains. This report describes current and potential markets for AFV`s; it begins by assessing the total vehicle stock, and then it focuses on current use of AFV`s in alternative fuel provider fleets and the potential for use of AFV`s in US households.

NONE

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry`s faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Potential transportation and stationary applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) as a primary power source in electric vehicles has received increasing attention during the last few years. This increased attention is the result of a combination of significant technical advances in this fuel cell technology and the initiation of some projects for the demonstration of a complete, PEFC-based power system a bus or in a passenger car. Such demonstration projects reflect an increase in industry's faith in the potential of this technology for transportation applications, or, at least, in the need for a detailed evaluation of this potential. Nevertheless, large scale transportation applications of PEFCs require a continued concerted effort of research on catalysis, materials and components, combined with the engineering efforts addressing the complete power system. This is required to achieve a cost effective, highly performing PEFC stack and power system. A related set of technical and cost challenges arises in the context of potential applications of PEFCs for stationary power applications, although there are clearly some differences in their nature, particularly, to do with the different types of fuels to be employed for each of these applications. We describe in this contribution some recent results of work performed by the Core Research PEFC Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory, which has addressed materials, components and single cell testing of PEFCS. Also included are some recent observations and some insights regarding the potential of this fuel cell technology for stationary Power generation.

Gottesfeld, S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assessment of Aircraft Icing Potential and Maximum Icing Altitude from Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite product that displays regions of aircraft icing potential, along with corresponding cloud-top heights, has been developed using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager and sounder. The icing ...

Gary P. Ellrod; Andrew A. Bailey

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Reactant gas composition for fuel cell potential control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell (10) system in which a nitrogen (N.sub.2) gas is used on the anode section (11) and a nitrogen/oxygen (N.sub.2 /O.sub.2) gaseous mix is used on the cathode section (12) to maintain the cathode at an acceptable voltage potential during adverse conditions occurring particularly during off-power conditions, for example, during power plant shutdown, start-up and hot holds. During power plant shutdown, the cathode section is purged with a gaseous mixture of, for example, one-half percent (0.5%) oxygen (O.sub.2) and ninety-nine and a half percent (99.5%) nitrogen (N.sub.2) supplied from an ejector (21) bleeding in air (24/28) into a high pressure stream (27) of nitrogen (N.sub.2) as the primary or majority gas. Thereafter the fuel gas in the fuel processor (31) and the anode section (11) is purged with nitrogen gas to prevent nickel (Ni) carbonyl from forming from the shift catalyst. A switched dummy electrical load (30) is used to bring the cathode potential down rapidly during the start of the purges. The 0.5%/99.5% O.sub.2 /N.sub.2 mixture maintains the cathode potential between 0.3 and 0.7 volts, and this is sufficient to maintain the cathode potential at 0.3 volts for the case of H.sub.2 diffusing to the cathode through a 2 mil thick electrolyte filled matrix and below 0.8 volts for no diffusion at open circuit conditions. The same high pressure gas source (20) is used via a "T" juncture ("T") to purge the anode section and its associated fuel processor (31).

Bushnell, Calvin L. (Glastonbury, CT); Davis, Christopher L. (Tolland, CT)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

End-of-life destructive examinations of Zircaloy maximum depletion blanket fuel plates from the Shippingport PWR Core 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Destructive examinations were performed on four Shippingport PWR Core 2 maximum fluence and depletion blanket plates for surface integrity, corrosion oxide thickness, and hydrogen absorption of the Zircaloy-4 cladding. The Shippingport PWR Core 2 operated for 23,360 effective full power hours (EFPH) (62,235 hot hours) at an average coolant temperature of 536{degrees}F (280{degrees}C) and a peak neutron flux of 0.6{times}10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}/s. The end-of-life examination program included measurements on three PWR-2 beta-quenched blanket fuel plates and one alpha-annealed blanket end plate. The examinations consisted of optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) inspections, direct metallographic oxide thickness measurements, and hydrogen extraction analyses on a joined element pair from the peak fluence (132{times}10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}), maximum depletion (13.5{times}10{sup 20} fissions/cc)PWR-2 blanket cluster.

Clayton, J.C.; Kammenzind, B.F.; Senio, P.; Sherman, J.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

On-farm use of biomass fuels: market penetration potential during normal and fuel-emergency conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for biomass fuels produced in decentralized facilities to replace the centrally produced fuels currently used in agriculture is examined. Two issues are examined. Will biomass fuels become cost-competitive relative to central fuels. And, what is the potential for biomass fuels to replace central fuels during emergency conditions when central fuels are unavailable. To answer these questions, descriptions of a range of currently available biomass technologies have been prepared and estimates made of current and projected agricultural fuel needs and biomass-feedstock availabilities. A variety of assumptions about future conditions have been adopted, the most important of which is that central fuel prices escalate at 7.5% annually relative to the commodities and inputs used to produce biomass fuel products. Under these assumptions, a number of biomass fuels will become cost-competitive during the 1980s, but most will do so late in the decade. Moreover, once these fuels become cost-competitive, penetration will occur gradually. Market forces thus will not markedly reduce the vulnerability of agriculture to energy-supply interruptions during this period. Biomass fuels could, however, play an important role during a fuel emergency. Estimates indicate they could replace up to about 60% of annual agricultural-sector fuel consumption by 1990, during the course of a fuel emergency of one year's duration.

Bjornstad, D.J.; Hillsman, E.L.; Tepel, R.C.; Mills, J.B.; CHester, C.V.; Klepper, O.H.; Borkowski, R.J.; Nichols, J.; Rainey, J.A.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Describing Current & Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Consumer Vehicle Preferences Energy Information Administration/Describing Current and Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles 4-3 4.1. Introduction The major aims of this study are to analyze and summarize the results of a national telephone survey of consumer vehicle preferences and attitudes toward alternative-fuel vehicles. The study approach, the sample design specifications, the questionnaire, and the processing specifications were developed by students enrolled in a survey practicum course at the University of Maryland. This course is one of the graduate degree requirements of the Joint Program in Survey Methodology sponsored by the University of Maryland, the University of Michigan, and Westat, Inc. The professor for the course, who

30

Describing Current & Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Fleets of Alternative Fuel Providers 422 284 78 41 18 1 All Fuels Gasoline Diesel Propane CNG Other Fuel 0 100 200 300 400 500 Thousand Vehicles Sources: Energy Information...

31

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Rev 5 The United States currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel is stored onsite in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal envisioned in a deep mined geologic repository. This report provides an estimate of potential waste inventory and waste form characteristics for the DOE used nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste and a variety of commercial fuel cycle alternatives in order to support subsequent system-level evaluations of disposal system performance. Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx More Documents & Publications Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis

32

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

33

Shale oil: potential for electric power fuels. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of the oil shale industry and the impact it will have on the electric power industry in the years 1990 to 2000. The nontechnical problems are not addressed in detail as they have been suitably dealt with elsewhere. The available technologies for producing shale oil are reviewed. The major problem most processes face today is scale-up to commercial size. An industry of nearly 400,000 BPD is anticipated for 1990. The industry could grow to 1,000,000 BPD by the year 2000 with the introduction of second generation processes in the 1990s. The availability of shale oil may have a direct impact on the electric power industry initially. As the refineries improve their ability to handle shale oil, the availability of this fuel to the electric power industry for direct firing will decrease. The offgas from the oil shale industry could be of major importance to the electric power industry. One-quarter to one-third of the energy produced by the oil shale industry will be in the form of offgas (the gas produced in the retorting process). This will usually be a low Btu gas and therefore likely to be utilized on site to make electricity. The high yield of distillate fuels from shale oil could be important to the utility industry's demand for distillate fuels in peak shaving power generation. In addition to the potential supply implications, a shale oil industry and the people to support it will represent a substantial increase in power generation required in the shale oil region.

Gragg, M.; Lumpkin, R.E.; Guthrie, H.D.; Woinsky, S.G.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Analysis of Fuel Ethanol Transportation Activity and Potential Distribution Constraints  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides an analysis of fuel ethanol transportation activity and potential distribution constraints if the total 36 billion gallons of renewable fuel use by 2022 is mandated by EPA under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. Ethanol transport by domestic truck, marine, and rail distribution systems from ethanol refineries to blending terminals is estimated using Oak Ridge National Laboratory s (ORNL s) North American Infrastructure Network Model. Most supply and demand data provided by EPA were geo-coded and using available commercial sources the transportation infrastructure network was updated. The percentage increases in ton-mile movements by rail, waterways, and highways in 2022 are estimated to be 2.8%, 0.6%, and 0.13%, respectively, compared to the corresponding 2005 total domestic flows by various modes. Overall, a significantly higher level of future ethanol demand would have minimal impacts on transportation infrastructure. However, there will be spatial impacts and a significant level of investment required because of a considerable increase in rail traffic from refineries to ethanol distribution terminals.

Das, Sujit [ORNL; Peterson, Bruce E [ORNL; Chin, Shih-Miao [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Survey of Landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2-MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cells can operate almost as efficiently on landfill gas as on natural gas. This study identified 749 landfills in the United States having the potential to support a total of nearly 3000 2-MW fuel cells.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

38

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

39

Effects of a potential drop of a shipping cask, a waste container, and a bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the effects of potential drops of a typical shipping cask, waste container, and bare fuel assembly during waste-handling operations at the prospective Yucca Mountain Repository. The waste-handling process (one stage, no consolidation configuration) is examined to estimate the maximum loads imposed on typical casks and containers as they are handled by various pieces of equipment during waste-handling operations. Maximum potential drop heights for casks and containers are also evaluated for different operations. A nonlinear finite-element model is employed to represent a hybrid spent fuel container subject to drop heights of up to 30 ft onto a reinforced concrete floor. The impact stress, strain, and deformation are calculated, and compared to the failure criteria to estimate the limiting (maximum permissible) drop height for the waste container. A typical Westinghouse 17 {times} 17 PWR fuel assembly is analyzed by a simplified model to estimate the energy absorption by various parts of the fuel assembly during a 30 ft drop, and to determine the amount of kinetic energy in a fuel pin at impact. A nonlinear finite-element analysis of an individual fuel pin is also performed to estimate the amount of fuel pellet fracture due to impact. This work was completed on May 1990.

Wu, C.L.; Lee, J.; Lu, D.L.; Jardine, L.J. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Potential Application of Coal-Derived Fuel Gases for the Glass...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mitretek Technical Report Potential Application of Coal-Derived Fuel Gases for the Glass Industry: A Scoping Analysis December 2004 David Gray Salvatore Salerno Glen Tomlinson...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Describing Current & Potential Markets for Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

C Although one may expect that electric utilities would use electric vehicles in order to promote their energy source as a transportation fuel, ...

42

Potential safety-related incidents with possible applicability to a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant  

SciTech Connect

The occurrence of certain potential events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants could lead to significant consequences involving risk to operating personnel or to the general public. This document is a compilation of such potential initiating events in nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Possible general incidents and incidents specific to key operations in fuel reprocessing are considered, including possible causes, consequences, and safety features designed to prevent, detect, or mitigate such incidents.

Perkins, W.C.; Durant, W.S.; Dexter, A.H.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Uwe A. Schneider Words): Use of biofuels diminishes fossil fuel combustion thereby also reducing net greenhouse gas. To explore the economic potential of biofuels in a greenhouse gas mitigation market, we incorporate data

McCarl, Bruce A.

44

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Bruce A. Mc Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Today society faces important prevalent greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide - CO2), it is important in the total picture. According

McCarl, Bruce A.

45

Criticality Analysis for Proposed Maximum Fuel Loading in a Standardized SNF Canister with Type 1a Baskets  

SciTech Connect

This document represents a summary version of the criticality analysis done to support loading SNF in a Type 1a basket/standard canister combination. Specifically, this engineering design file (EDF) captures the information pertinent to the intact condition of four fuel types with different fissile loads and their calculated reactivities. These fuels are then degraded into various configurations inside a canister without the presence of significant moderation. The important aspect of this study is the portrayal of the fuel degradation and its effect on the reactivity of a single canister given the supposition there will be continued moderation exclusion from the canister. Subsequent analyses also investigate the most reactive ‘dry’ canister in a nine canister array inside a hypothetical transport cask, both dry and partial to complete flooding inside the transport cask. The analyses also includes a comparison of the most reactive configuration to other benchmarked fuels using a software package called TSUNAMI, which is part of the SCALE 5.0 suite of software.

Chad Pope; Larry L. Taylor; Soon Sam Kim

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Near-term potential of wood as a fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of near-term conversion technologies, which could be used to expand utilization of wood residues and standing forests, is presented. The forest products industry is identified as a principal candidate for expanded wood-fuel use. Sources of wood-fuel are identified and conversion technologies and costs are discussed. Possible near-term incentives to encourage the use of wood as a fuel are examined. These incentives include a retirement tax credit and an investment tax credit. Suppliers of commercial wood conversion systems are identified.

Salo, D.; Gsellman, L.; Medville, D.; Price, G.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fusion fuel cycle: material requirements and potential effluents  

SciTech Connect

Environmental effluents that may be associated with the fusion fuel cycle are identified. Existing standards for controlling their release are summarized and anticipated regulatory changes are identified. The ability of existing and planned environmental control technology to limit effluent releases to acceptable levels is evaluated. Reference tokamak fusion system concepts are described and the principal materials required of the associated fuel cycle are analyzed. These materials include the fusion fuels deuterium and tritium; helium, which is used as a coolant for both the blanket and superconducting magnets; lithium and beryllium used in the blanket; and niobium used in the magnets. The chemical and physical processes used to prepare these materials are also described.

Teofilo, V.L.; Bickford, W.E.; Long, L.W.; Price, B.A.; Mellinger, P.J.; Willingham, C.E.; Young, J.K.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Demonstration of the fuel economy potential associated with M85-fueled vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasoline-fueled 1988 Chevrolet Corsica was converted to operate on M85 to demonstrate that the characteristics of methanol fuels can be exploited to emphasize vehicle fuel economy rather than vehicle performance. The results of the tests performed indicated fuel economy improvements of up to 21% at steady highway speeds, and almost 20% on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s federal test procedure city and highway cycles.

Hodgson, J.W.; Huff, S.P. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Assured Fuel Supply: Potential Conversion and Fabrication Bottlenecks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

challenges and generate nonproliferation and other benefits? · If such services were to be offered, how would Bush proposed assuring nuclear fuel supply for countries meeting certain nonproliferation criteria

50

Analysis of U.S. School Bus Populations and Alternative Fuel Potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Clean Cities final report provides information concerning different school bus types, school bus populations, school bus miles and fuel use, school bus emissions, alternative fuel school buses, and potential for alternative fuel school bus use through 2010. It is intended to provide general information concerning the size of the school bus market in the U.S., as well as to provide some quantification of the potential for alternative fuel use in school buses in the U.S., and what that might mean for petroleum displacement and emissions reductions.

Laughlin, M.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fuels from microalgae: Technology status, potential, and research requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Although numerous options for the production of fuels from microalgae have been proposed, our analysis indicates that only two qualify for extensive development - gasoline and ester fuel. In developing the comparisons that support this conclusion, we have identified the major areas of microalgae production and processing that require extensive development. Technology success requires developing and testing processes that fully utilize the polar and nonpolar lipids produced by microalgae. Process designs used in these analyses were derived from fragmented, preliminary laboratory data. These results must be substantiated and integrated processes proposed, tested, and refined to be able to evaluate the commercial feasibility from microalgae. The production of algal feedstocks for processing to gasoline or ester fuel requires algae of high productivity and high lipid content that efficiently utilize saline waters. Species screening and development suggest that algae can achieve required standards taken individually, but algae that can meet the integrated requirements still elude researchers. Effective development of fuels from microalgae technology requires that R and D be directed toward meeting the integrated standards set out in the analysis. As technology analysts, it is inappropriate for us to dictate how the R and D effort should proceed to meet these standards. We end our role by noting that alternative approaches to meeting the feasibility targets have been identified, and it is now the task of program managers and scientists to choose the appropriate approach to assure the greatest likelihood of realizing a commercially viable technology. 70 refs., 39 figs., 35 tabs.

Neenan, B.; Feinberg, D.; Hill, A.; McIntosh, R.; Terry, K.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detailed 200-meter resolution maps. The NREL analysis found enormous U.S. wind energy potential of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated Finds U.S. Wind Energy Potential Triples Previous Estimates #12;

53

Capital requirements and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of potential PNGV fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our study reveals that supplying gasoline-equivalent demand for the low-market-share scenario requires a capital investment of less than $40 billion for all fuels except H{sub 2}, which will require a total cumulative investment of $150 billion. By contrast, cumulative capital investments under the high-market-share scenario are $50 billion for LNG, $90 billion for ethanol, $100 billion for methanol, $160 billion for CNG and DME, and $560 billion for H{sub 2}. Although these substantial capital requirements are spread over many years, their magnitude could pose a challenge to the widespread introduction of 3X vehicles. Fossil fuel use by US light-duty vehicles declines significantly with introduction of 3X vehicles because of fuel-efficiency improvements for 3X vehicles and because of fuel substitution (which applies to the nonpetroleum-fueled alternatives). Petroleum use for light-duty vehicles in 2030 is reduced by as much as 45% relative to the reference scenario. GHG emissions follow a similar pattern. Total GHG emissions decline by 25-30% with most of the propulsion system/fuel alternatives. For those using renewable fuels (i.e., ethanol and H{sub 2} from solar energy), GHG emissions drop by 33% (H{sub 2}) and 45% (ethanol). Among urban air pollutants, urban NOX emissions decline slightly for 3X vehicles using CIDI and SIDI engines and drop substantially for fuel-cell vehicles. Urban CO emissions decline for CIDI and FCV alternatives, while VOC emissions drop significantly for all alternatives except RFG-, methanol-, and ethanol-fueled SIDI engines. With the exception of CIDI engines fueled by RFD, FT50, or B20 (which increase urban PM{sub 10} emissions by over 30%), all propulsion system/fuel alternatives reduce urban PM{sub 10} emissions. Reductions are approximately 15-20% for fuel cells and for methanol-, ethanol-, CNG-, or LPG-fueled SIDI engines. Table 3 qualitatively summarizes impacts of the 13 alternatives on capital requirements and on energy use and emissions relative to the reference scenario. The table clearly shows the trade-off between costs and benefits. For example, while H{sub 2} FCVs have the greatest incremental capital needs, they offer the largest energy and emissions benefits. On the basis of the cost and benefit changes shown, methanol and gasoline FCVs appear to have particularly promising benefits-to-costs ratios.

Johnson, L.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.

1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Biomass potential for heat, electricity and vehicle fuel in Sweden.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of this thesis was to determine how far a biomass quantity, equal to the potential produced within the Swedish borders, could cover… (more)

Hagström, Peter

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Biomass-based alcohol fuels: the near-term potential for use with gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report serves as an introduction to the requirements and prospects for a nationwide alcohol-gasoline fuel system based on alcohols derived from biomass resources. Technological and economic factors of the production and use of biomass-based methanol and ethanol fuels are evaluated relative to achieving 5 or 10 percent alcohol-gasoline blends by 1990. It is concluded the maximum attainable is a nationwide 5 percent methanol or ethanol-gasoline system replacing gasoline by 1990. Relative to existing gasoline systems, costs of alcohol-gasoline systems will be substantial.

Park, W.; Price, G.; Salo, D.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Potentials for fuel cells in refineries and chlor-alkali plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. the most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Potential opportunities for nano materials to help enable enhanced nuclear fuel performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation is an overview of the technical challenges for development of nuclear fuels with enhanced performance and accident tolerance. Key specific aspects of improved fuel performance are noted. Examples of existing nanonuclear projects and concepts are presented and areas of potential focus are suggested. The audience for this presentation includes representatives from: DOE-NE, other national laboratories, industry and academia. This audience is a mixture of nanotechnology experts and nuclear energy researchers and managers.

McClellan, Kenneth J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

The potential application of fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries. [Phosphoric acid, molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market potential for fuel cell cogeneration systems within the petroleum refinery industry is evaluated. Phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells were considered. Conventional competitive systems now available including purchased power plus boiler-generated steam, gas turbine combined cycle, and a relatively new coke fluidized bed-boiler were characterized. Refineries use large quantities of steam at pressures ranging from about 15 to 650 psig. PAFCs can only meet a limited number of steam requirements because of their relatively low operating temperature. The high temperature MCFC and SOFC are technically much more attractive for this application. However, current estimates of their capital costs are too large to make the technologies competitive. The capital costs of MCFCs and SOFCs would have to decrease approx.50% from their present estimated $1300/kWe. If costs could be decreased to give a 10% energy cost advantage to fuel cells, the industry projects that fuel cells might supply about 300 MWe by the year 2000, and modules in the 5- to 20-MWe size would be of interest. The market opportunities in refineries are varied - the industry is large, each plant is unique, thermal energy consumption is large, and both domestic and international competitiveness is intense. 10 refs., 26 figs., 17 tabs.

Altseimer, J.H.; Roach, F.; Anderson, J.M.; Krupka, M.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energy Conservation Potential in Natural Gas Fueled Reciprocating Engines - A Preliminary Market Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study was undertaken of the usage rates of both fuel and lubricants in reciprocating engines fueled with natural gas. The study was conducted to determine the potential for energy conservation, if use is made of more fuel efficient natural gas engine oils. Governmental and non-governmental published reports and personal interviews with users, suppliers, and manufacturers were utilized in estimating fuel and lubricant consumption figures for the year 1976. Certain important facts emerged: 1) The installed horsepower of reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas was estimated at 38,800,000 hp. 2) Reciprocating engines fueled by natural gas operated an estimated 115.2 billion brake horsepower - hours. 3) Total natural gas consumed to operate these reciprocating engines in 1976 was estimated at 962 billion cubic feet. 4) The estimated crankcase and cylinder lubricants consumed in natural gas reciprocating engines in 1976 was 33.6 million gallons. This figure represents 2% of the total United States lubricant usage. 5) Widespread use of more fuel efficient crankcase and cylinder lubricants (containing stable colloidal additives) could result in a savings of 28,850,000,000 cubic feet of natural gas each year. The natural gas thus saved would be sufficient to serve all residential customers in the metropolitan Houston area for nine (9) months of each year.

Johnson, D. M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Potential External (non-DOE) Constraints on U.S. Fuel Cycle Options  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program will be conducting a screening of fuel cycle options in FY2013 to help focus fuel cycle R&D activities. As part of this screening, performance criteria and go/no-go criteria are being identified. To help ensure that these criteria are consistent with current policy, an effort was initiated to identify the status and basis of potentially relevant regulations, laws, and policies that have been established external to DOE. As such regulations, laws, and policies may be beyond DOE’s control to change, they may constrain the screening criteria and internally-developed policy. This report contains a historical survey and analysis of publically available domestic documents that could pertain to external constraints on advanced nuclear fuel cycles. “External” is defined as public documents outside DOE. This effort did not include survey and analysis of constraints established internal to DOE.

Steven J. Piet

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Procedure for matching synfuel users with potential suppliers. Appendix B. Proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To assist the Department of Energy, Office of Fuels Conversion (OFC), in implementing the synthetic fuel exemption under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act (FUA) of 1978, Resource Consulting Group, Inc. (RCG), has developed a procedure for matching prospective users and producers of synthetic fuel. The matching procedure, which involves a hierarchical screening process, is designed to assist OFC in: locating a supplier for a firm that wishes to obtain a synthetic fuel exemption; determining whether the fuel supplier proposed by a petitioner is technically and economically capable of meeting the petitioner's needs; and assisting the Synthetic Fuels Corporation or a synthetic fuel supplier in evaluating potential markets for synthetic fuel production. A data base is provided in this appendix on proposed and ongoing synthetic fuel production projects to be used in applying the screening procedure. The data base encompasses a total of 212 projects in the seven production technologies.

None

1981-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

Microsoft Word - Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition R5a.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Potential Fuel Cycle Potential Waste Inventory for Disposition Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Nuclear Fuel Joe T. Carter, SRNL Alan J. Luptak, INL Jason Gastelum, PNNL Christine Stockman, SNL Andrew Miller, SNL July 2012 FCR&D-USED-2010-000031 Rev 5 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial

63

The potential for Eucalyptus as a wood fuel in the UK A.D. Leslie a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The potential for Eucalyptus as a wood fuel in the UK A.D. Leslie a, , M. Mencuccini b,1 , M. Perks for utilising woody biomass, grown under short rotation forestry management systems, to produce electricity or heat. There are benefits to using biomass in generating heat and power the main environmental benefit

Mencuccini, Maurizio

64

Assessment of the Distributed Generation Market Potential for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Distributed the Distributed Generation Market Potential for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells September 29, 2013 DOE/NETL- 342/093013 NETL Contact: Katrina Krulla Analysis Team: Arun Iyengar, Dale Keairns, Dick Newby Contributors: Walter Shelton, Travish Shulltz, Shailesh Vora OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY Table of Contents Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................1 1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................2 2 DG Market Opportunity ................................................................................................................3 3 SOFC Technology Development Plan ..........................................................................................6

65

Potentials for Fuel Cells in Refineries and Chlor-Alkali Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The market potentials for fuel cell cogeneration systems in petroleum refineries and chlor-alkali plants were evaluated. Costs of the total energy consumed (power plus steam) were calculated and compared with those for more conventional cogeneration systems. Questionnaires were sent to major plants in both industries to determine technical requirements and data required for the assessment of the market potential. The most promising application appears to be in chlor-alkali plants where the production process is electricity intensive. Future anticipated changes in the production process are favorable to the use of fuel cells. The energy use in refineries is steam intensive with the required steam pressures ranging from approximately 15 to 650 psig. The near-term use of fuel cell cogeneration in refineries is not as attractive as in chlor-alkali plants. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is the most developed and the most cost competitive, but its use is limited by its being able to produce only low-pressure steam. Over the longer term, the molten carbonate and the solid oxide fuel cell, both of which operate at significantly higher temperatures, are technically very attractive. However, they do not appear to be cost competitive with conventional systems.

Altseimer, J. H.; Roach, F.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Potential impacts on air quality of the use of ethanol as an alternative fuel. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of ethanol/gasoline mixtures in motor vehicles has been proposed as an alternative fuel strategy that might improve air quality while minimizing US dependence on foreign oil. New enzymatic production methodologies are being explored to develop ethanol as a viable, economic fuel. In an attempt to reduce urban carbon monoxide (CO) and ozone levels, a number of cities are currently mandating the use of ethanol/gasoline blends. However, it is not at all clear that these blended fuels will help to abate urban pollution. In fact, the use of these fuels may lead to increased levels of other air pollutants, specifically aldehydes and peroxyacyl nitrates. Although these pollutants are not currently regulated, their potential health and environmental impacts must be considered when assessing the impacts of alternative fuels on air quality. Indeed, formaldehyde has been identified as an important air pollutant that is currently being considered for control strategies by the State of California. This report focuses on measurements taken in Albuquerque, New Mexico during the summer of 1993 and the winter of 1994 as an initial attempt to evaluate the air quality effects of ethanol/gasoline mixtures. The results of this study have direct implications for the use of such fuel mixtures as a means to reduce CO emissions and ozone in a number of major cities and to bring these urban centers into compliance with the Clean Air Act.

Gaffney, J.S.; Marley, N.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Evaluation of potential for MSRE spent fuel and flush salt storage and treatment at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The potential for interim storage as well as for treatment of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment spent fuel at INEL has been evaluated. Provided that some minimal packaging and chemical stabilization prerequisites are satisfied, safe interim storage of the spent fuel at the INEL can be achieved in a number of existing or planned facilities. Treatment by calcination in the New Waste Calcining Facility at the INEL can also be a safe, effective, and economical alternative to treatment that would require the construction of a dedicated facility. If storage at the INEL is chosen for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) spent fuel salts, their transformation to the more stable calcine solid would still be desirable as it would result in a lowering of risks. Treatment in the proposed INEL Remote-Handled Immobilization Facility (RHIF) would result in a waste form that would probably be acceptable for disposal at one of the proposed national repositories. The cost increment imputable to the treatment of the MSRE salts would be a small fraction of the overall capital and operating costs of the facility or the cost of building and operating a dedicated facility. Institutional and legal issues regarding shipments of fuel and waste to the INEL are summarized. The transfer of MSRE spent fuel for interim storage or treatment at the INEL is allowed under existing agreements between the State of idaho and the Department of energy and other agencies of the Federal Government. In contrast, current agreements preclude the transfer into Idaho of any radioactive wastes for storage or disposal within the State of Idaho. This implies that wastes and residues produced from treating the MSRE spent fuel at locations outside Idaho would not be acceptable for storage in Idaho. Present agreements require that all fuel and high-level wastes stored at the INEL, including MSRE spent fuel if received at the INEL, must be moved to a location outside Idaho by the year 2035.

Ougouag, A.M.; Ostby, P.A.; Nebeker, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Quantifying the fuel use and greenhouse gas reduction potential of electric and hybrid vehicles.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) has organized the American Tour de Sol in which a wide variety of participants operate electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for several hundred miles under various roadway conditions (e.g., city center and highway). The event offers a unique opportunity to collect on-the-road energy efficiency data for these EVs and HEVs as well as comparable gasoline-fueled conventional vehicles (CVs) that are driven under the same conditions. NESEA and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) collaborated on collecting and analyzing vehicle efficiency data during the 1998 and 1999 NESEA American Tour de Sols. Using a transportation fuel-cycle model developed at ANL with data collected on vehicle fuel economy from the two events as well as electric generation mix data from the utilities that provided the electricity to charge the EVs on the two Tours, we estimated full fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions of EVs and CVs. This paper presents the data, methodology, and results of this study, including the full fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emission reduction potential of the EVs operating on the Tour.

Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Hazard, N.; Lewis, G.; Energy Systems; Northeast Sustainable Energy Association; Univ. of Michigan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Configuration adjustment potential of the Very High Temperature Reactor prismatic cores with advanced actinide fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor actinides represent the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes. As one of their potential incineration options, partitioning and transmutation in fission reactors are seriously considered worldwide. If implemented, these technologies could also be a source of nuclear fuel materials required for sustainability of nuclear energy. The objective of this research was to evaluate performance characteristics of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) and their variations due to configuration adjustments targeting achievability of spectral variations. The development of realistic whole-core 3D VHTR models and their benchmarking against experimental data was an inherent part of the research effort. Although the performance analysis was primarily focused on prismatic core configurations, 3D pebble-bed core models were also created and analyzed. The whole-core 3D models representing the prismatic block and pebble-bed cores were created for use with the SCALE 5.0 code system. Each of the models required the Dancoff correction factor to be externally calculated. The code system DANCOFF-MCThe whole-core/system 3D models with multi-heterogeneity treatments were validated by the benchmark problems. Obtained results are in agreement with the available High Temperature Test Reactor data. Preliminary analyses of actinide-fueled VHTR configurations have indicated promising performance characteristics. Utilization of minor actinides as a fuel component would facilitate development of new fuel cycles and support sustainability of a fuel source for nuclear energy assuring future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. was utilized to perform the Dancoff factor calculations.

Ames, David E, II

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A plot study of the potential for Navy utilization of solid waste derived fuels to offset fossil fuels consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A brief study was made to define problems that would be encountered in estimating potential Navy markets for various forms of waste derived fuels. Fossil fuel consumption estimates for boiler plants at several Navy activities were converted to waste derived fuel (WDF) estimates using a set of assumed rules judged technically feasible regarding boiler conversions and confirming fossil fuels and WDF. The results of this first study are presented indicating Navy boilers might represent a significant market for all the WDF a region could produce if the WDF were available in liquid as well as solid forms. The economic feasibility of conversions and WDF production are not addressed in this brief paper.

Capps, A.G.; Duffey-Armstrong, M.; Freeman, R.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Using fine-scale fuel measurements to assess wildland fuels, potential fire behavior and hazard mitigation treatments in the southeastern USA.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The inherent spatial and temporal heterogeneity of fuelbeds in forests of the southeastern United States may require fine scale fuel measurements for providing reliable fire hazard and fuel treatment effectiveness estimates. In a series of five papers, an intensive, fine scale fuel inventory from the Savanna River Site in the southeastern United States is used for building fuelbeds and mapping fire behavior potential, evaluating fuel treatment options for effectiveness, and providing a comparative analysis of landscape modeled fire behavior using three different data sources including the Fuel Characteristic Classification System, LANDFIRE, and the Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment. The research demonstrates that fine scale fuel measurements associated with fuel inventories repeated over time can be used to assess broad scale wildland fire potential and hazard mitigation treatment effectiveness in the southeastern USA and similar fire prone regions. Additional investigations will be needed to modify and improve these processes and capture the true potential of these fine scale data sets for fire and fuel management planning.

Ottmar, Roger, D.; Blake, John, I.; Crolly, William, T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this report is to describe the strategy for coupling three process level models to produce an integrated Used Fuel Degradation Model (FDM). The FDM, which is based on fundamental chemical and physical principals, provides direct calculation of radionuclide source terms for use in repository performance assessments. The G-value for H2O2 production (Gcond) to be used in the Mixed Potential Model (MPM) (H2O2 is the only radiolytic product presently included but others will be added as appropriate) needs to account for intermediate spur reactions. The effects of these intermediate reactions on [H2O2] are accounted for in the Radiolysis Model (RM). This report details methods for applying RM calculations that encompass the effects of these fast interactions on [H2O2] as the solution composition evolves during successive MPM iterations and then represent the steady-state [H2O2] in terms of an “effective instantaneous or conditional” generation value (Gcond). It is anticipated that the value of Gcond will change slowly as the reaction progresses through several iterations of the MPM as changes in the nature of fuel surface occur. The Gcond values will be calculated with the RM either after several iterations or when concentrations of key reactants reach threshold values determined from previous sensitivity runs. Sensitivity runs with RM indicate significant changes in G-value can occur over narrow composition ranges. The objective of the mixed potential model (MPM) is to calculate the used fuel degradation rates for a wide range of disposal environments to provide the source term radionuclide release rates for generic repository concepts. The fuel degradation rate is calculated for chemical and oxidative dissolution mechanisms using mixed potential theory to account for all relevant redox reactions at the fuel surface, including those involving oxidants produced by solution radiolysis and provided by the radiolysis model (RM). The RM calculates the concentration of species generated at any specific time and location from the surface of the fuel. Several options being considered for coupling the RM and MPM are described in the report. Different options have advantages and disadvantages based on the extent of coding that would be required and the ease of use of the final product.

Buck, Edgar C.; Jerden, James L.; Ebert, William L.; Wittman, Richard S.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessment of the potential of colloidal fuels in future energy usage. Final report. [97 references  

SciTech Connect

Pulverized coal has been an increasing important source of energy over the past century. Most large utility boilers, all modern coking plants, and many industrial boilers and blast furnaces employ pulverized coal as a major feed stream. In periods of oil shortages, such as during World Wars I and II, the concept of adding powdered coal to oil for use in combustion equipment originally designed for oil has been actively pursued but rarely used. Over this same period of time, there have been attempts to use air suspensions of coal dust in diesel engines in Germany, and in turbines in various countries. The economic advantages to be enjoyed by substitution of powdered coal in oil are not generally realized. Oil costs at $30/bbl represent a fuel value of about $5.00/10/sup 6/ Btu; coal at $25/ton is equivalent to approximately $1.00/10/sup 6/ Btu. Although capital costs for the use of coal are higher than those associated with the use of oil, coal is clearly becoming the least costly fuel. Not only are considerable cost advantages possible, but an improvement in balance of payments and an increase in reliability of fuel supplies are other potential benefits. It is therefore recommended that increased national attention be given to develop these finer grinds of carbonaceous fuels to be used in various suspending fluids. Technical areas where significant additional support appear desirable are described.

1980-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 was enacted by Congress to move the nation toward increased energy independence by increasing the production of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law establishes a new renewable fuel standard (RFS) that requires the nation to use 36 billion gallons annually (2.3 million barrels per day) of renewable fuel in its vehicles by 2022. Ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the US, and its production has grown dramatically over the past decade. According to EISA and RFS, ethanol (produced from corn as well as cellulosic feedstocks) will make up the vast majority of the new renewable fuel requirements. However, ethanol use limited to E10 and E85 (in the case of flex fuel vehicles or FFVs) will not meet this target. Even if all of the E0 gasoline dispensers in the country were converted to E10, such sales would represent only about 15 billion gallons per year. If 15% ethanol, rather than 10% were used, the potential would be up to 22 billion gallons. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10, that is, gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85, a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in FFVs. Although DOE remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Given this reality, DOE and others have begun assessing the viability of using intermediate ethanol blends as one way to transition to higher volumes of ethanol. In October of 2010, the EPA granted a partial waiver to the Clean Air Act allowing the use of fuel that contains up to 15% ethanol for the model year 2007 and newer light-duty motor vehicles. This waiver represents the first of a number of actions that are needed to move toward the commercialization of E15 gasoline blends. On January 2011, this waiver was expanded to include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a relatively short timeframe. Initially, these material studies included test fuels of Fuel C,

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Analysis of Underground Storage Tanks System Materials to Increased Leak Potential Associated with E15 Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 was enacted by Congress to move the nation toward increased energy independence by increasing the production of renewable fuels to meet its transportation energy needs. The law establishes a new renewable fuel standard (RFS) that requires the nation to use 36 billion gallons annually (2.3 million barrels per day) of renewable fuel in its vehicles by 2022. Ethanol is the most widely used renewable fuel in the US, and its production has grown dramatically over the past decade. According to EISA and RFS, ethanol (produced from corn as well as cellulosic feedstocks) will make up the vast majority of the new renewable fuel requirements. However, ethanol use limited to E10 and E85 (in the case of flex fuel vehicles or FFVs) will not meet this target. Even if all of the E0 gasoline dispensers in the country were converted to E10, such sales would represent only about 15 billion gallons per year. If 15% ethanol, rather than 10% were used, the potential would be up to 22 billion gallons. The vast majority of ethanol used in the United States is blended with gasoline to create E10, that is, gasoline with up to 10% ethanol. The remaining ethanol is sold in the form of E85, a gasoline blend with as much as 85% ethanol that can only be used in FFVs. Although DOE remains committed to expanding the E85 infrastructure, that market will not be able to absorb projected volumes of ethanol in the near term. Given this reality, DOE and others have begun assessing the viability of using intermediate ethanol blends as one way to transition to higher volumes of ethanol. In October of 2010, the EPA granted a partial waiver to the Clean Air Act allowing the use of fuel that contains up to 15% ethanol for the model year 2007 and newer light-duty motor vehicles. This waiver represents the first of a number of actions that are needed to move toward the commercialization of E15 gasoline blends. On January 2011, this waiver was expanded to include model year 2001 light-duty vehicles, but specifically prohibited use in motorcycles and off-road vehicles and equipment. UST stakeholders generally consider fueling infrastructure materials designed for use with E0 to be adequate for use with E10, and there are no known instances of major leaks or failures directly attributable to ethanol use. It is conceivable that many compatibility issues, including accelerated corrosion, do arise and are corrected onsite and, therefore do not lead to a release. However, there is some concern that higher ethanol concentrations, such as E15 or E20, may be incompatible with current materials used in standard gasoline fueling hardware. In the summer of 2008, DOE recognized the need to assess the impact of intermediate blends of ethanol on the fueling infrastructure, specifically located at the fueling station. This includes the dispenser and hanging hardware, the underground storage tank, and associated piping. The DOE program has been co-led and funded by the Office of the Biomass Program and Vehicle Technologies Program with technical expertise from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The infrastructure material compatibility work has been supported through strong collaborations and testing at Underwriters Laboratories (UL). ORNL performed a compatibility study investigating the compatibility of fuel infrastructure materials to gasoline containing intermediate levels of ethanol. These results can be found in the ORNL report entitled Intermediate Ethanol Blends Infrastructure Materials Compatibility Study: Elastomers, Metals and Sealants (hereafter referred to as the ORNL intermediate blends material compatibility study). These materials included elastomers, plastics, metals and sealants typically found in fuel dispenser infrastructure. The test fuels evaluated in the ORNL study were SAE standard test fuel formulations used to assess material-fuel compatibility within a relatively short timeframe. Initially, these material studies included test fuels of Fuel C,

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Fuel comsumption of heavy-duty trucks : potential effect of future technologies for improving energy efficiency and emission.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of an analysis of heavy-duty truck (Classes 2b through 8) technologies conducted to support the Energy Information Administration's long-term projections for energy use are summarized. Several technology options that have the potential to improve the fuel economy and emissions characteristics of heavy-duty trucks are included in the analysis. The technologies are grouped as those that enhance fuel economy and those that improve emissions. Each technology's potential impact on the fuel economy of heavy-duty trucks is estimated. A rough cost projection is also presented. The extent of technology penetration is estimated on the basis of truck data analyses and technical judgment.

Saricks, C. L.; Vyas, A. D.; Stodolsky, F.; Maples, J. D.; Energy Systems; USDOE

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Engineering-economic analyses of automotive fuel economy potential in the United States  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 25 years more than 20 major studies have examined the technological potential to improve the fuel economy of passenger cars and light trucks in the US. The majority has used technology/cost analysis, a combination of analytical methods from the disciplines of economics and automotive engineering. In this paper the authors describe the key elements of this methodology, discuss critical issues responsible for the often widely divergent estimates produced by different studies, review the history of its use, and present results from six recent assessments. Whereas early studies tended to confine their scope to the potential of proven technology over a 10-year time period, more recent studies have focused on advanced technologies, raising questions about how best to include the likelihood of technological change. The paper concludes with recommendations for further research.

Greene, D.L.; DeCicco, J.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Direct methanol fuel cells: Developments for portable power and for potential transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors describe here results of recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), devoted to potential application of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) as (1) portable power sources at the 50 W level, and (2) primary power sources for electric vehicles. In general, DMFC R and D efforts focus on further improvements in anode catalytic activity, fuel utilization (as related to methanol crossover) and air cathode performance in the presence of the presence of the significant flux of aqueous methanol from anode to cathode. There are significant differences between technical parameters and targets for the two different DMFC applications, which the authors have addressed. They include the lower cell temperature (about 60 C) preferred in portable power vs. operation around 100 C as target temperature for transportation applications, and the much stronger concern for cost of catalyst and any other stack materials in DMFCs developed for potential transportation applications. Most, if not all, recent DMFC work for either portable power or potential transportation applications has strongly focused on cells with polymeric (primarily PFSA) membrane electrolytes. In work at LANL, thin film catalysts bonded to the membrane, e.g., by the decal method, provided best results in terms of catalyst utilization and overall cell performance. In most tests, the single DMFC hardware consisted of uncatalyzed carbon-cloth gas-diffusion backings and graphite blocks with machined serpentine flow channels--quite similar to hardware employed in work with hydrogen/air PEFCs. However, the machined graphite hardware has recently been replaced by alternative, non-machined flow-field/bipolar plates, which enables effective air and aqueous methanol solution distribution along an active area of 50 cm{sup 2}, at a pitch per cell of 2 mm.

Ren, X.; Thomas, S.C.; Zelenay, P.; Gottesfeld, S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

World Biofuels Production Potential Understanding the Challenges to Meeting the U.S. Renewable Fuel Standard  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates the worldwide potential to produce biofuels including biofuels for export. It was undertaken to improve our understanding of the potential for imported biofuels to satisfy the requirements of Title II of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) in the coming decades. Many other countries biofuels production and policies are expanding as rapidly as ours. Therefore, we modeled a detailed and up-to-date representation of the amount of biofuel feedstocks that are being and can be grown, current and future biofuels production capacity, and other factors relevant to the economic competitiveness of worldwide biofuels production, use, and trade. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) identified and prepared feedstock data for countries that were likely to be significant exporters of biofuels to the U.S. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) calculated conversion costs by conducting material flow analyses and technology assessments on biofuels technologies. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) integrated the country specific feedstock estimates and conversion costs into the global Energy Technology Perspectives (ETP) MARKAL (MARKet ALlocation) model. The model uses least-cost optimization to project the future state of the global energy system in five year increments. World biofuels production was assessed over the 2010 to 2030 timeframe using scenarios covering a range U.S. policies (tax credits, tariffs, and regulations), as well as oil prices, feedstock availability, and a global CO{sub 2} price. All scenarios include the full implementation of existing U.S. and selected other countries biofuels policies (Table 4). For the U.S., the most important policy is the EISA Title II Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). It progressively increases the required volumes of renewable fuel used in motor vehicles (Appendix B). The RFS requires 36 billion (B) gallons (gal) per year of renewable fuels by 2022. Within the mandate, amounts of advanced biofuels, including biomass-based diesel and cellulosic biofuels, are required beginning in 2009. Imported renewable fuels are also eligible for the RFS. Another key U.S. policy is the $1.01 per gal tax credit for producers of cellulosic biofuels enacted as part of the 2008 Farm Bill. This credit, along with the DOE's research, development and demonstration (RD&D) programs, are assumed to enable the rapid expansion of U.S. and global cellulosic biofuels production needed for the U.S. to approach the 2022 RFS goal. While the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has yet to issue RFS rules to determine which fuels would meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction and land use restrictions specified in EISA, we assume that cellulosic ethanol, biomass-to-liquid fuels (BTL), sugar-derived ethanol, and fatty acid methyl ester biodiesel would all meet the EISA advanced biofuel requirements. We also assume that enough U.S. corn ethanol would meet EISA's biofuel requirements or otherwise be grandfathered under EISA to reach 15 B gal per year.

Sastri, B.; Lee, A.

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

Life-cycle assessment of corn-based butanol as a potential transportation fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Butanol produced from bio-sources (such as corn) could have attractive properties as a transportation fuel. Production of butanol through a fermentation process called acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) has been the focus of increasing research and development efforts. Advances in ABE process development in recent years have led to drastic increases in ABE productivity and yields, making butanol production worthy of evaluation for use in motor vehicles. Consequently, chemical/fuel industries have announced their intention to produce butanol from bio-based materials. The purpose of this study is to estimate the potential life-cycle energy and emission effects associated with using bio-butanol as a transportation fuel. The study employs a well-to-wheels analysis tool--the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory--and the Aspen Plus{reg_sign} model developed by AspenTech. The study describes the butanol production from corn, including grain processing, fermentation, gas stripping, distillation, and adsorption for products separation. The Aspen{reg_sign} results that we obtained for the corn-to-butanol production process provide the basis for GREET modeling to estimate life-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. The GREET model was expanded to simulate the bio-butanol life cycle, from agricultural chemical production to butanol use in motor vehicles. We then compared the results for bio-butanol with those of conventional gasoline. We also analyzed the bio-acetone that is coproduced with bio-butanol as an alternative to petroleum-based acetone. Our study shows that, while the use of corn-based butanol achieves energy benefits and reduces greenhouse gas emissions, the results are affected by the methods used to treat the acetone that is co-produced in butanol plants.

Wu, M.; Wang, M.; Liu, J.; Huo, H.; Energy Systems

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Compositional and Agronomic Evaluation of Sorghum Biomass as a Potential Feedstock for Renewable Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One goal of the Biomass Research and Development Technical Advisory Committee was to replace 30% of current U.S. petroleum consumption with biofuels by 2030. This will take mixtures of various feedstocks; an annual biomass feedstock such as sorghum will play an important role in meeting this goal. Commercial forage sorghum samples collected from field trials grown in Bushland, TX in 2007 were evaluated for both agronomic and compositional traits. Biomass compositional analysis of the samples was performed at the National Renewable Energy Lab in Golden, CO following NREL Laboratory Analytical Procedures. Depending on the specific cultivar, several additional years of yield data for this location were considered in establishing agronomic potential. Results confirm that sorghum forages can produce high biomass yields over multiple years and varied growing conditions. In addition, the composition of sorghum shows significant variation, as would be expected for most crops. Using theoretical estimates for ethanol production, the sorghum commercial forages examined in this study could produce an average of 6147 L ha{sup -1} of renewable fuels. Given its genetic variability, a known genomic sequence, a robust seed industry, and biomass composition, sorghum will be an important annual feedstock to meet the alternative fuel production goals legislated by the US Energy Security Act of 2007.

Dahlberg, J.; Wolfrum, E.; Bean, B.; Rooney, W. L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Potential {sup 14}CO{sub 2} releases from spent fuel containers at Yucca Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential release of gaseous {sup 14}CO{sub 2} from small perforations in spent fuel containers has been evaluated as a function of temperature, hole size, effective porosity of corrosion products within the hole, and time, based on the waste package design parameters and environmental conditions described in the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Report (SCP). The SCP does not specify initial fill gas (argon) pressure and temperature. It is shown that, if significant {sup 14}C oxidation takes place during the initial, inert-gas phase, an incentive exists to initially underpressurize the containers. This will avoid large, spiked releases of gaseous {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and will result in delayed, smaller, and more uniform release rates over time. Therefore larger size perforations could be tolerated while meeting the applicable regulations. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Pescatore, C.; Sullivan, T.M.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

84

Fuels from solar energy: photosynthetic systems--state of the art and potential for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on the mass culturing of microalgae has been carried out over the past 30 years in many parts of the world. Today there are numerous potential applications for algal mass cultures including protein production, wastewater treatment, water renovation, closed life-support systems, production of commercial chemicals, aquaculture, and bioconversion of energy. Photosynthetic yields over 30 gr dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ have been attained on occasion in many locations for short periods and yields between 15 to 25 gr dry wt m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ for longer periods are now common. This apparent upper limit in productivity is not coincidental. Under outdoor conditions peak yields are possible only under conditions of light limitation. Photosynthetic algae absorb light energy and convert it to stored chemical energy under rigid adherence to the laws of thermodynamics. By examining the basic physics of photosynthesis, it is possible to clearly demonstrate that under conditions of full sunlight in the most ideal locations maximum yields of 30 to 40 gr m/sup -2/ day/sup -1/ can be expected. For long-term operation of large-scale outdoor cultures, many bioengineering factors are involved and realistic yields considerably less than the maximum potential can be anticipated. Manipulation of the two independent variables, flow rate and depth, is the key to maximizing yields for varying outdoor sunlight intensities. Future applications for algal mass cultures will probably be restricted to small well-managed systems for solving specific environmental problems in individual communities and not on the grand scale envisaged in the past.

Goldman, J.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Extended-burnup LWR (light-water reactor) fuel: The amount, characteristics, and potential effects on interim storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of a study on extended-burnup, light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel are described in this report. The study was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of the study was to collect and evaluate information on the status of in-reactor performance and integrity of extended-burnup LWR fuel and initiate the investigation of the effects of extending fuel burnup on the subsequent handling, interim storage, and other operations (e.g., rod consolidation and shipping) associated with the back end of the fuel cycle. The results of this study will aid DOE and the nuclear industry in assessing the effects on waste management of extending the useful in-reactor life of nuclear fuel. The experience base with extended-burnup fuel is now substantial and projections for future use of extended-burnup fuel in domestic LWRs are positive. The basic performance and integrity of the fuel in the reactor has not been compromised by extending the burnup, and the potential limitations for further extending the burnup are not severe. 104 refs., 15 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Highly porous platinum electrodes for the use in potentially implantable glucose fuel cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Implantable glucose fuel cells are investigated as self-regenerative, long-term approach to power medical implants such as cardiac pacemakers. Such fuel cells use ambient energy of… (more)

Kloke, Arne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Study of the potential uses of the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP). Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to provide an evaluation of possible international and domestic uses for the Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant, located in South Carolina, at the conclusion of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. Four generic categories of use options for the Barnwell plant have been considered: storage of spent LWR fuel; reprocessing of LWR spent fuel; safeguards development and training; and non-use. Chapters are devoted to institutional options and integrated institutional-use options.

Not Available

1980-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

89

Fuel cells at the crossroads : attitudes regarding the investment climate for the US fuel cell industry and a projection of industry job creation potential.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel Cells at the Crossroads examines financial community and fuel cell industry views on the investment climate for the fuel cell industry. It also explores the investment history of the US fuel cell industry and projects potential future job creation. The scope of the study included the transportation, stationary power generation and portable sectors. Interviews were conducted with industry and financial experts. The results of the interviews provide a snapshot of industry perspective just prior to President Bush's endorsement of a hydrogen economy in his 2003 State of the Union address. In April 2003, we conducted a spot check to test whether the State of the Union address had changed opinions. We found little change among the financial and investment communities, but some guarded new optimism among industry leaders. The general outlook of our sample was cautiously hopeful. There is no question, however, that the current climate is one of great uncertainty, particularly when compared with the enthusiasm that existed just a few years ago. Among other things: (1) Respondents generally believed that the energy industry will undergo profound change over the next few decades, resulting in some form of hydrogen economy. They acknowledged, however, that huge technology and cost hurdles must be overcome to achieve a hydrogen economy. (2) Respondents were worried about the future of the industry, including timeframes for market development, foreign competition, technical problems, and the current poor investment environment. (3) Respondents generally believed that the US federal government must provide strong leadership to ensure American leadership in the fuel cell industry. They believe that governments in Europe and Japan are highly committed to fuel cells, thus providing European and Japanese companies with significant advantages. (4) Respondents frequently mentioned several areas of concern, including the situation in Iraq, the increased commitment to fuel cells in Europe, and recent actions by Toyota and Honda.

NONE

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fuel cells at the crossroads : attitudes regarding the investment climate for the US fuel cell industry and a projection of industry job creation potential.  

SciTech Connect

Fuel Cells at the Crossroads examines financial community and fuel cell industry views on the investment climate for the fuel cell industry. It also explores the investment history of the US fuel cell industry and projects potential future job creation. The scope of the study included the transportation, stationary power generation and portable sectors. Interviews were conducted with industry and financial experts. The results of the interviews provide a snapshot of industry perspective just prior to President Bush's endorsement of a hydrogen economy in his 2003 State of the Union address. In April 2003, we conducted a spot check to test whether the State of the Union address had changed opinions. We found little change among the financial and investment communities, but some guarded new optimism among industry leaders. The general outlook of our sample was cautiously hopeful. There is no question, however, that the current climate is one of great uncertainty, particularly when compared with the enthusiasm that existed just a few years ago. Among other things: (1) Respondents generally believed that the energy industry will undergo profound change over the next few decades, resulting in some form of hydrogen economy. They acknowledged, however, that huge technology and cost hurdles must be overcome to achieve a hydrogen economy. (2) Respondents were worried about the future of the industry, including timeframes for market development, foreign competition, technical problems, and the current poor investment environment. (3) Respondents generally believed that the US federal government must provide strong leadership to ensure American leadership in the fuel cell industry. They believe that governments in Europe and Japan are highly committed to fuel cells, thus providing European and Japanese companies with significant advantages. (4) Respondents frequently mentioned several areas of concern, including the situation in Iraq, the increased commitment to fuel cells in Europe, and recent actions by Toyota and Honda.

2004-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Review of Thorium Utilization as an option for Advanced Fuel Cycle--Potential Option for Brazil in the Future  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of Nuclear Energy Development, Thorium was considered as a potential fuel, mainly due to the potential to produce fissile uranium 233. Several Th/U fuel cycles, using thermal and fast reactors were proposed, such as the Radkwoski once through fuel cycle for PWR and VVER, the thorium fuel cycles for CANDU Reactors, the utilization in Molten Salt Reactors, the utilization of thorium in thermal (AHWR), and fast reactors (FBTR) in India, and more recently in innovative reactors, mainly Accelerator Driven System, in a double strata fuel cycle. All these concepts besides the increase in natural nuclear resources are justified by non proliferation issues (plutonium constrain) and the waste radiological toxicity reduction. The paper intended to summarize these developments, with an emphasis in the Th/U double strata fuel cycle using ADS. Brazil has one of the biggest natural reserves of thorium, estimated in 1.2 millions of tons of ThO{sub 2}, as will be reviewed in this paper, and therefore R&D programs would be of strategically national interest. In fact, in the past there was some projects to utilize Thorium in Reactors, as the ''Instinto/Toruna'' Project, in cooperation with France, to utilize Thorium in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor, in the mid of sixties to mid of seventies, and the thorium utilization in PWR, in cooperation with German, from 1979-1988. The paper will review these initiatives in Brazil, and will propose to continue in Brazil activities related with Th/U fuel cycle.

Maiorino, J.R.; Carluccio, T.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in “target ” channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium “driver ” fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the U.S. transportation sector. Technical report fourteen: Market potential and impacts of alternative fuel use in light-duty vehicles -- A 2000/2010 analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, estimates are provided of the potential, by 2010, to displace conventional light-duty vehicle motor fuels with alternative fuels--compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol from natural gas, ethanol from grain and from cellulosic feedstocks, and electricity--and with replacement fuels such as oxygenates added to gasoline. The 2010 estimates include the motor fuel displacement resulting both from government programs (including the Clean Air Act and EPACT) and from potential market forces. This report also provides an estimate of motor fuel displacement by replacement and alterative fuels in the year 2000. However, in contrast to the 2010 estimates, the year 2000 estimate is restricted to an accounting of the effects of existing programs and regulations. 27 figs., 108 tabs.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The potential for LNG as a railroad fuel in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Freight railroad operations in the US represent a substantial opportunity for liquefied natural gas (LNG) to displace diesel fuel. With the promise of achieving an overwhelming economic advantage over diesel fuel, this paper presents some discussion to the question, ``Why is the application of LNG for railroad use in the US moving so slowly?'' A brief overview of the freight railroad operations in the US is given, along with a summary of several railroad LNG demonstration projects. US Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board exhaust emission regulations may cause the railroad industry to move from small-scale LNG demonstration projects to using LNG as a primary freight railroad transportation fuel in selected regions or route-specific applications.

Fritz, S.G.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Fuel from the Sky: Solar Power's Potential for Western Energy Supply  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A reliable and affordable supply of electricity is essential to protect public health and safety and to sustain a vigorous economy in the West. Renewable energy in the form of wind or solar provides one of the means of meeting the demand for power while minimizing adverse impacts on the environment, increasing fuel diversity, and hedging against fuel price volatility. Concentrating solar power (CSP) is the most efficient and cost-effective way to generate electricity from the sun. Hundreds of megawatts of CSP solar-generating capacity could be brought on-line within a few years and make a meaningful contribution to the energy needs of the West.

Leitner, A.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Guide for Identifying and Converting High-Potential Petroleum Brownfield Sites to Alternative Fuel Stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Former gasoline stations that are now classified as brownfields can be good sites to sell alternative fuels because they are in locations that are convenient to vehicles and they may be seeking a new source of income. However, their success as alternative fueling stations is highly dependent on location-specific criteria. First, this report outlines what these criteria are, how to prioritize them, and then applies that assessment framework to five of the most popular alternative fuels--electricity, natural gas, hydrogen, ethanol, and biodiesel. The second part of this report delves into the criteria and tools used to assess an alternative fuel retail site at the local level. It does this through two case studies of converting former gasoline stations in the Seattle-Eugene area into electric charge stations. The third part of this report addresses steps to be taken after the specific site has been selected. This includes choosing and installing the recharging equipment, which includes steps to take in the permitting process and key players to include.

Johnson, C.; Hettinger, D.; Mosey, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Spent Nuclear Fuel Transportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge—to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned.

Marsha Keister; Kathryn McBride

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Quality Standards Fuel Quality Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Quality Standards The South Dakota Department of Public Safety may promulgate rules establishing: Standards for the maximum volume percentages of ethanol and methanol

102

Estimation of clearance potential index and hazard factors of Candu fuel bundle and its validation based on the measurements of radioisotopes inventories from Pickering reactor fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is related to the clearance potential levels, ingestion and inhalation hazard factors of the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes. This study required a complex activity that consisted of more steps such as: the acquisition, setting up, validation and application of procedures, codes and libraries. The paper reflects the validation stage of this study. Its objective was to compare the measured inventories of selected actinide and fission products radionuclides in an element from the Pickering Candu reactor with the inventories predicted using a recent version of the SCALE 5/ORIGEN-ARP code coupled with the time dependent cross sections library for the Candu 28 reactor (produced by the sequence SCALE4.4a/SAS2H and SCALE4.4a/ORIGEN-S). In this way, the procedures, the codes and the libraries for the characterization of radioactive material in terns of radioactive inventories, clearance, and biological hazard factors could be qualified and validated, in support of the safety management of the radioactive wastes. (authors)

Pavelescu, Alexandru Octavian [University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest (Romania); Tinti, Renato; Voukelatou, Konstantina [ENEA FIS-NUC, Bologna (Italy); Cepraga, Dan Gabriel [ENEA FIS-MET, Bologna (Italy)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

104

Spent Nuclear Fuel Trasportation: An Examination of Potential Lessons Learned From Prior Shipping Campaigns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (NWPA), as amended, assigned the Department of Energy (DOE) responsibility for developing and managing a Federal system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for accepting, transporting, and disposing of SNF and HLW at the Yucca Mountain repository (if licensed) in a manner that protects public health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits public confidence. OCRWM faces a near-term challenge--to develop and demonstrate a transportation system that will sustain safe and efficient shipments of SNF and HLW to a repository. To better inform and improve its current planning, OCRWM has extensively reviewed plans and other documents related to past high-visibility shipping campaigns of SNF and other radioactive materials within the United States. This report summarizes the results of this review and, where appropriate, lessons learned. The objective of this lessons learned study was to identify successful, best-in-class trends and commonalities from past shipping campaigns, which OCRWM could consider when planning for the development and operation of a repository transportation system. Note: this paper is for analytical and discussion purposes only, and is not an endorsement of, or commitment by, OCRWM to follow any of the comments or trends. If OCRWM elects to make such commitments at a future time, they will be appropriately documented in formal programmatic policy statements, plans and procedures. Reviewers examined an extensive study completed in 2003 by DOE's National Transportation Program (NTP), Office of Environmental Management (EM), as well as plans and documents related to SNF shipments since issuance of the NTP report. OCRWM examined specific planning, business, institutional and operating practices that have been identified by DOE, its transportation contractors, and stakeholders as important issues that arise repeatedly. In addition, the review identifies lessons learned or activities/actions which were found not to be productive to the planning and conduct of SNF shipments (i.e., negative impacts). This paper is a 'looking back' summary of lessons learned across multiple transportation campaigns. Not all lessons learned are captured here, and participants in some of the campaigns have divergent opinions and perspectives about which lessons are most critical. This analysis is part of a larger OCRWM benchmarking effort to identify best practices to consider in future transportation of radioactive materials ('looking forward'). Initial findings from this comprehensive benchmarking analysis are expected to be available in late fall 2006.

M. Keister; K, McBride

2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

105

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

offering cleaner, more-efficient alternatives to the combustion of gasoline and other fossil fuels. Fuel cells have the potential to replace the internal-combustion engine in...

106

Photoacoustically Measured Speeds of Sound of Liquid HBO2: On Unlocking the Fuel Potential of Boron  

SciTech Connect

Elucidation of geodynamic, geochemical, and shock induced processes is often limited by challenges to accurately determine molecular fluid equations of state (EOS). High pressure liquid state reactions of carbon species underlie physiochemical mechanisms such as differentiation of planetary interiors, deep carbon sequestration, propellant deflagration, and shock chemistry. Here we introduce a versatile photoacoustic technique developed to measure accurate and precise speeds of sound (SoS) of high pressure molecular fluids and fluid mixtures. SoS of an intermediate boron oxide, HBO{sub 2} are measured up to 0.5 GPa along the 277 C isotherm. A polarized Exponential-6 interatomic potential form, parameterized using our SoS data, enables EOS determinations and corresponding semi-empirical evaluations of > 2000 C thermodynamic states including energy release from bororganic formulations. Our thermochemical model propitiously predicts boronated hydrocarbon shock Hugoniot results.

Bastea, S; Crowhurst, J; Armstrong, M; ., N T

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

107

Technical Potential of Solar Water Heating to Reduce Fossil Fuel Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of solar water heating (SWH) in the United States grew significantly in the late 1970s and early 1980s, as a result of increasing energy prices and generous tax credits. Since 1985, however, expiration of federal tax credits and decreased energy prices have virtually eliminated the U.S. market for SWH. More recently, increases in energy prices, concerns regarding emissions of greenhouse gases, and improvements in SWH systems have created new interest in the potential of this technology. SWH, which uses the sun to heat water directly or via a heat-transfer fluid in a collector, may be particularly important in its ability to reduce natural gas use. Dependence on natural gas as an energy resource in the United States has significantly increased in the past decade, along with increased prices, price volatility, and concerns about sustainability and security of supply. One of the readily deployable technologies available to decrease use of natural gas is solar water heating. This report provides an overview of the technical potential of solar water heating to reduce fossil fuel consumption and associated greenhouse gas emissions in U.S. residential and commercial buildings.

Denholm, P.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

MAXIMUM HUMIDITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

Moisture-sensitive systems to measure and indicate the maximum level of humidity exposure are discussed. A chemical indicator utilizing deliquescent salts and water-soluble dyes provides an irreversible color change at discrete levels of relative humidity. To provide indication of the time at which the exposure occurs, a circuit employing a resistive-type sensor was developed. A small, commercially available sensor is used in a portable probe to detect humidity leaks into controlled areas.

Abel, W B

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Proton Conductor based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells based Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT 84119 S. (Elango) Elangovan, Joseph Hartvigsen, Insoo Bay, and Feng Zhao High efficiency operation is one of the primary attractions to use solid oxide fuel cells as the energy conversion device. High efficiency requires maximizing of the product of operating voltage and fuel utilization. The maximum possible operating voltage however is limited by the Nernst potential near the fuel exhaust. In oxygen conducting electrolyte based fuel cells (O-SOFC) as the fuel utilization increases, the Nernst potential continues to decrease with the dilution of fuel by the reaction products. In contrast, in a proton conducting electrolyte based fuel cell (P-SOFC) the reaction product is formed on the cathode side allowing for high operating voltage at high fuel

110

Accurate and Reliable Quantification of Total Microalgal Fuel Potential as Fatty Acid Methyl Esters by in situ Transesterfication  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the context of algal biofuels, lipids, or better aliphatic chains of the fatty acids, are perhaps the most important constituents of algal biomass. Accurate quantification of lipids and their respective fuel yield is crucial for comparison of algal strains and growth conditions and for process monitoring. As an alternative to traditional solvent-based lipid extraction procedures, we have developed a robust whole-biomass in situ transesterification procedure for quantification of algal lipids (as fatty acid methyl esters, FAMEs) that (a) can be carried out on a small scale (using 4-7 mg of biomass), (b) is applicable to a range of different species, (c) consists of a single-step reaction, (d) is robust over a range of different temperature and time combinations, and (e) tolerant to at least 50% water in the biomass. Unlike gravimetric lipid quantification, which can over- or underestimate the lipid content, whole biomass transesterification reflects the true potential fuel yield of algal biomass. We report here on the comparison of the yield of FAMEs by using different catalysts and catalyst combinations, with the acid catalyst HCl providing a consistently high level of conversion of fatty acids with a precision of 1.9% relative standard deviation. We investigate the influence of reaction time, temperature, and biomass water content on the measured FAME content and profile for 4 different samples of algae (replete and deplete Chlorella vulgaris, replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum, and replete Nannochloropsis sp.). We conclude by demonstrating a full mass balance closure of all fatty acids around a traditional lipid extraction process.

Laurens, L. M. L.; Quinn, M.; Van Wychen, S.; Templeton, D. W.; Wolfrum, E. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Potential use of wood and agriculture wastes as steam generator fuel for thermal enhanced oil recovery. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced oil recovery by steam injection methods produces over 200,000 barrels per day of crude oil in California. A sizeable portion of the produced crude, up to 40% for some projects, may be burned to generate steam for injection into the reservoir. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential to use wood and agriculture wastes to replace crude oil as steam generator fuel. The Bakersfield area of California's San Joaquin Valley is the focus for this paper. Production from thermal EOR methods centers around Bakersfield and agriculture and wood wastes are available from the San Joaquin Valley and the nearby Sierra Nevada mountains. This paper documents the production of waste materials by county, estimated energy value of each material, and estimated transportation cost for each material. Both agriculture and wood wastes were found to be available in sizeable quantities and could become attractive steam generation fuels. However, some qualifications need to be made on the use of these materials. Transportation costs will probably limit the range of shipping these materials to perhaps 50 to 100 miles. Availability is subject to competition from existing and developing uses of these materials, such as energy sources in their immediate production area. Existing steam generators probably cannot be retrofitted to burn these materials. Fluidized bed combustion, or low Btu gasification, may be a good technology for utilization. FBC or FBG could accept a variety of waste materials. This will be important because the amount of any single waste may not be large enough to support the energy requirements of a good size thermal f a good size thermal EOR operation.

Kosstrin, H.M.; McDonald, R.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Assessment to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Assessment on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Assessment The U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) prepared a report, Opportunities for DOD Use of Alternative and Renewable Fuels, on the use and potential use of

113

BWR fuel design options for self-sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

In this work, we investigate a number of fuel assembly design options for a BWR core operating in a closed self-sustainable Th-{sup 233}U fuel cycle. The designs rely on axially heterogeneous fuel assembly structure in order to improve fertile to fissile conversion ratio. One of the main assumptions of the current study was to restrict the fuel assembly geometry to a single axial fissile zone 'sandwiched' between two fertile blanket zones. The main objective was to study the effect of the most important design parameters, such as dimensions of fissile and fertile zones and average void fraction, on the net breeding of {sup 233}U. The main design challenge in this respect is that the fuel breeding potential is at odds with axial power peaking and therefore limits the maximum achievable core power rating. The calculations were performed with BGCore system, which consists of MCNP code coupled with fuel depletion and thermo-hydraulic feedback modules. A single 3-dimensional fuel assembly with reflective radial boundaries was modeled applying simplified restrictions on maximum central line fuel temperature and Critical Power Ratio. It was found that axially heterogeneous fuel assembly design with single fissile zone can potentially achieve net breeding. In this case however, the achievable core power density is roughly one third of the reference BWR core. (authors)

Shaposhnik, Y.; Shwageraus, E. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, P. O. B. 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Elias, E. [Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technion - Israel Inst. of Technology, Technion city, 32000 Haifa (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A comparison of geospatially modeled fire behavior and potential application to fire and fuels management for the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates modeled fire behavior for the Savannah River Site in the Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern U.S. using three data sources: FCCS, LANDFIRE, and SWRA. The Fuel Characteristic Classification System (FCCS) was used to build fuelbeds from intensive field sampling of 629 plots. Custom fire behavior fuel models were derived from these fuelbeds. LANDFIRE developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy attributes for the U.S. using satellite imagery informed by field data. The Southern Wildfire Risk Assessment (SWRA) developed surface fire behavior fuel models and canopy cover for the southeastern U.S. using satellite imagery.

Kurth, Laurie; Hollingsworth, LaWen; Shea, Dan

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fuel from wastewater : harnessing a potential energy source in Canada through the co-location of algae biofuel production to sources of effluent, heat and CO2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is collaborating with the National Research Council (NRC) Canada and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a decision-support model that will evaluate the tradeoffs associated with high-latitude algae biofuel production co-located with wastewater, CO2, and waste heat. This project helps Canada meet its goal of diversifying fuel sources with algae-based biofuels. The biofuel production will provide a wide range of benefits including wastewater treatment, CO2 reuse and reduction of demand for fossil-based fuels. The higher energy density in algae-based fuels gives them an advantage over crop-based biofuels as the 'production' footprint required is much less, resulting in less water consumed and little, if any conversion of agricultural land from food to fuel production. Besides being a potential source for liquid fuel, algae have the potential to be used to generate electricity through the burning of dried biomass, or anaerobically digested to generate methane for electricity production. Co-locating algae production with waste streams may be crucial for making algae an economically valuable fuel source, and will certainly improve its overall ecological sustainability. The modeling process will address these questions, and others that are important to the use of water for energy production: What are the locations where all resources are co-located, and what volumes of algal biomass and oil can be produced there? In locations where co-location does not occur, what resources should be transported, and how far, while maintaining economic viability? This work is being funded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Biomass Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and is part of a larger collaborative effort that includes sampling, strain isolation, strain characterization and cultivation being performed by the NREL and Canada's NRC. Results from the NREL / NRC collaboration including specific productivities of selected algal strains will eventually be incorporated into this model.

Passell, Howard David; Whalen, Jake (SmartWhale Consulting, Dartmouth, NS, CA); Pienkos, Philip P. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO); O'Leary, Stephen J. (National Research Council Canada, Institute for Marine Biosciences, Halifax, NS, CA); Roach, Jesse Dillon; Moreland, Barbara D.; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

End-of-Life Rod Internal Pressures in Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The end-of-reactor-life (EOL) rod internal pressure (RIP) is the primary protagonist for several evolutionary changes during long-term dry storage, which affect cladding resistance to failure when spent fuel assemblies are subjected to normal and accident conditions of transport. At the maximum temperature attained, either during vacuum drying or dry storage, EOL RIP determines the maximum stress state in the fuel rod cladding, which in turn sets the initial conditions for potential time-dependent ...

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Enlarging the Potential Market for Stationary Fuel Cells Through System Design Optimization - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Chris Ainscough (Primary Contact), Sam Sprik, Michael Penev National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3781 Email: chris.ainscough@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Kathi Epping Martin Phone: (202) 586-7425 Email: Kathi.Epping@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (planned) Project Start Date: January 1, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a complete stationary fuel cell model user's * guide including: Operational details on the model with guidance on - appropriate inputs. Documentation of control strategy algorithms. -

118

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Front Load (Contender, Atlantic, Low-Profile) Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 2...

119

Studies and research concerning BNFP. Spent fuel disassembly and canning program at Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Plant (BNFP) preliminary process assessment studies  

SciTech Connect

Studies being performed to assess nuclear fuel disassembly and encapsulation to enhance spent fuel storage have not revealed any conditions which unfavorably impact the feasibility of the concept. The studies are aimed at evaluating various issues warranting resolution preliminary to licensing a facility for this spent fuel management concept. The areas assessed are potential accidents and their results; maximum temperature level of canned fuel rods; radiation exposure to personnel during operation and fuel storage; criticality risks during storage and as a result of abnormal incidents; physical security requirements and material accountability measures; the impact of safeguards on economics; and a license schedule projection.

Tepp, H.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Use Requirement West Virginia higher education governing boards must use alternative fuels to the maximum extent feasible. (Reference West Virginia Code 18B-5-9

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fuel quality issues in stationary fuel cell systems.  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell systems are being deployed in stationary applications for the generation of electricity, heat, and hydrogen. These systems use a variety of fuel cell types, ranging from the low temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) to the high temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). Depending on the application and location, these systems are being designed to operate on reformate or syngas produced from various fuels that include natural gas, biogas, coal gas, etc. All of these fuels contain species that can potentially damage the fuel cell anode or other unit operations and processes that precede the fuel cell stack. These detrimental effects include loss in performance or durability, and attenuating these effects requires additional components to reduce the impurity concentrations to tolerable levels, if not eliminate the impurity entirely. These impurity management components increase the complexity of the fuel cell system, and they add to the system's capital and operating costs (such as regeneration, replacement and disposal of spent material and maintenance). This project reviewed the public domain information available on the impurities encountered in stationary fuel cell systems, and the effects of the impurities on the fuel cells. A database has been set up that classifies the impurities, especially in renewable fuels, such as landfill gas and anaerobic digester gas. It documents the known deleterious effects on fuel cells, and the maximum allowable concentrations of select impurities suggested by manufacturers and researchers. The literature review helped to identify the impurity removal strategies that are available, and their effectiveness, capacity, and cost. A generic model of a stationary fuel-cell based power plant operating on digester and landfill gas has been developed; it includes a gas processing unit, followed by a fuel cell system. The model includes the key impurity removal steps to enable predictions of impurity breakthrough, component sizing, and utility needs. These data, along with process efficiency results from the model, were subsequently used to calculate the cost of electricity. Sensitivity analyses were conducted to correlate the concentrations of key impurities in the fuel gas feedstock to the cost of electricity.

Papadias, D.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

122

MaximumLetThrough.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Maximum Let-Through Currents in the APS Storage Ring Quadrupole, Sextupole, and Corrector Magnets J. Carwardine, D. McGhee, G. Markovich May 18, 1999 Abstract Limits are described for the maximum magnet currents, under specified fault conditions, for the storage ring quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets. Introduction In computing the maximum let-through current for the magnets for the storage ring, several factors must be considered. In general, the maximum current likely to occur even under fault conditions is less than the maximum theoretical DC current given the magnet resistance and the maximum available DC voltage. The first level of protection against magnet current overloads is the over-current interlock that is built into the converter electronics package. The threshold is set to approximately 110% of

123

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

124

Enhanced Power Stability for Proton Conducting Solid Oxides Fuel Cells. Calculated energy barriers for proton diffusion in Y-doped BaZrO3. Potential electrode materials for application in proton ceramic fuel cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of Quantum Mechanical (QM) calculations on Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} (BYZ) periodic structures have been performed and calculated energy barriers for the intra-octahedra and inter-octahedra proton transfer have been found. The inter-octahedra proton transfer dominates in the BYZ electrolyte. Several potential cathode materials for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} system were synthesized via glycine nitrate combustion method. Of the five potential cathode materials examined BaZr{sub 0.40}Pr{sub 0.40}Gd{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} and BaZr{sub 0.60}Y{sub 0.20}Co{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} appear to be the most promising for further applications in proton ceramic fuel cells (PCFCs). Potential anode electrocatalysts (metals) have been screened for reactivity with BaZr{sub 1-x}Y{sub x}O{sub 3-d}, fabrication compatibility, and chemical stability in fuel cell environment.

Boris Merinov; Sossina Haile; William A. Goddard III

2005-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Impact of Alternative Fuels and Blends: Simple Tool for Ranking Coal and Blends Based on Slagging Potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of ongoing work to identify, develop, and validate advanced tools to assess the impact of fuel quality on boiler performance.BackgroundThe deposition of ash particles during the combustion of coal—or blends of coals—is one of the major issues associated with power companies’ lost generation. The ash deposition process, driven by accumulation of molten/sticky, sintered, or loosely condensed deposits on ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

MECS Fuel Oil Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas : Actual, Minimum and Maximum Use Values for Fuel Oils and Natural Gas Year Distillate Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 185 148 1224 3.4% 1994 152 125 1020 3.1% Residual Fuel Oil (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 505 290 1577 16.7% 1994 441 241 1249 19.8% Natural Gas (TBtu) Actual Minimum Maximum Discretionary Rate 1985 4656 2702 5233 77.2% 1994 6141 4435 6758 73.4% Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, 1985 and 1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Surveys. Table 2: Establishments That Actually Switched Between Natural Gas and Residual Fuel Oil Type of Switch Number of Establishments in Population Number That Use Original Fuel Percentage That Use Original Fuel Number That Can Switch to Another Fuel Percentage That Can Switch to Another Fuel Number That Actually Made a Switch Percentage That Actually Made a Switch

127

The Maximum Intensity of Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exact equation governing the maximum possible pressure fall in steady tropical cyclones is developed, accounting for the full effects of gaseous and condensed water on density and thermodynamics. The equation is also derived from Carnot's ...

Kerry A. Emanuel

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hardness of Maximum Constraint Satisfaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We show optimal (up to a constant factor) NP-hardness for maximum constraint satisfaction problem with k variables per constraint (Max-k-CSP), whenever k is larger than… (more)

Chan, Siu On

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

REACTIVE FORCE FIELDS FOR Y-DOPED BaZrO3 ELECTROLYTE AND NI-ANODE. POTENTIAL CATHODE MATERIALS FOR APPLICATION IN PROTON CERAMIC FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on quantum mechanical data obtained for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} electrolyte and Ni-anode Reactive Force Field parameters have been developed for further molecular dynamics simulations of the proton diffusion and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. Electronic and atomic structures of different terminations of the (001) BaZrO{sub 3} surface have been studied using first-principles calculations. Several potential cathode materials for the Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} system were synthesized via glycine nitrate combustion method. Of the five potential cathode materials examined BaZr{sub 0.40}Pr{sub 0.40}Gd{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} and BaZr{sub 0.60}Y{sub 0.20}Co{sub 0.20}O{sub 3} appear to be the most promising for further applications in proton ceramic fuel cells. Fuel cell test of a Y-doped BaZrO{sub 3} thin film using platinum ink for both electrodes have been performed. The obtained results shows that a robust method for fabricating crack-free thin membranes, as well as methods for sealing anode and cathode chambers, have successfully been developed.

Boris Merinov; Adri van Duin; Sossina Haile; William A. Goddard III

2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Maximum order of planar digraphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the degree/diameter problem for directed planar graphs. We show that planar digraphs with diameter 2 and maximum out-degree and in-degree d, d ? 41, cannot have more than 2d vertices. We show that 2d ...

Rinovia Simanjuntak; Mirka Miller

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°–70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a ...

J. R. Garratt

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

without need for uranium enrichment capability or actinidesfor expanding the uranium enrichment capacity and withoutleft over from the uranium enrichment process: (1) Per unit

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

if(tvar~/^102/)rxName="SNG" else if(tvar~/^16/)rxName="SN2N"=NR&&c1==2&&$1~/^SNA$/{sna[iso]=$2} FNR==NR&&c1==2&&$1~/^SNG$/{sng[iso]=$2} FNR==NR&&c1==2&&$1~/^SNAB$/{snab[iso]=$2}

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood, Completely automated nuclear reactors for long- termhandbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. 1993. (121 p).The analysis of any nuclear reactor system is closely

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the DOE handbook [57], a shutdown margin largerp. 812. Not, A. , DOE fundamentals handbook: Nuclear physics

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Thin-film solid-oxide fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are energy conversion devices that would save billions of dollars in fuel costs alone each year in the United States if they could be implemented today for stationary and transportation applications (1-5). There are a wide variety of fuel cells available, e.g. molten carbonate, phosphoric acid, proton exchange membrane and solid-oxide. However, solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCS) are potentially more efficient and less expensive per kilowatt of power in comparison to other fuel cells. For transportation applications, the energy efficiency of a conventional internal combustion engine would be increased two-fold as replaced with a zero-emission SOFC. The basic unit of a SOFC consists of an anode and cathode separated by an oxygen-ion conducting, electrolyte layer. Manifolded stacks of fuel cells, with electrical interconnects, enable the transport and combination of a fuel and oxidant at elevated temperature to generate electrical current. Fuel cell development has proceeded along different paths based on the configuration of the anode-electrolyte-cathode. Various configurations include the tubular, monolithic and planar geometries. A planar geometry for the anode-electrolyte-cathode accompanied by a reduction in layer thickness offers the potential for high power density. Maximum power densities will require yet additional innovations in the assembly of fuel cell stacks with all of the manifolding stipulations for gas flow and electrical interconnects.

Jankowski, A.F.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of potential domestic fossil-fuel resources for SNG (substitute natural gas) production. Final report, February 1983-August 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality and availability of naturally occurring resources and industrial by-products which could be gasified and thereby serve as feedstock for SNG plants were studied to identify those resources with the greatest potential for exploitation in this regard. KRSI accumulated information from a large number of literature sources relative to the resources identified by GRI for study. To the extent possible, KRSI then organized this information to highlight for each resource the grades available, typical chemical compositions, quantities and locations of reserves, recovery methods and rates of production and consumption. This information clearly shows that coal is the most practical source of long-term feedstock for SNG in the contiguous USA. Coal resources amount to 84% (by quads) of the energy resources which were studied. In comparison, peat, shale oil and tar sand contain about 11% of the total.

Cover, A.E.; Hubbard, D.A.; Shah, K.V.; Koneru, P.B.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

THORIUM BREEDER REACTOR EVALUATION. PART 1. FUEL YIELD AND FUEL CYCLE COSTS IN FIVE THERMAL BREEDERS  

SciTech Connect

The performances of aqueous-homogeneous (AHBR), molten-salt (MSBR), liquid-bismuth (LBBR), gas-cooled graphite-moderated (GGBR), and deuterium- moderated gas-cooled (DGBR) breeder reactors were evaluated in respect to fuel yield, fuel cycle costs, and development status. A net electrical plant capability of 1000 Mwe was selected, and the fuel and fertile streams were processed continuously on-site. The maximum annual fuel yields were 1.5 mills/ kwhr. The minimum estimated fuel cycle costs were 0.9, 0.6, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 mills/kwhr at fuel yields of were 0.9, 0.9, 1.5, 1.5, and 1.3 mills/kwhr. Only the AHBR and the MSBR are capable of achieving fuel yields substantially in excess of 4%/yr, and therefore, in view of the uncertainties in nuclear data and efficiencies of processing methods, only these two can be listed with confidence as being able to satisfy the main criterion of the AEC longrange thorium breeder program, viz. a doubling time of 25 years or less. The development effort required to bring the various concepts to the stage where a prototype station could be designed was estimated to be least for the AHBR, somewhat more for the MSBR, and several times as much for the other systems. The AHBR was judged to rank first in regard to nuclear capability, fuel cycle potential, and status of development. (auth)

Alexander, L.G.; Carter, W.L.; Chapman, R.H.; Kinyon, R.W.; Miller, J.W.; Van Winkle, R.

1961-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

139

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential sector (50% of the electricity consumption and 80% of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings...

140

Fuels - Biodiesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Biodiesel * Biodiesel * Butanol * Ethanol * Hydrogen * Natural Gas * Fischer-Tropsch Batteries Cross-Cutting Assessments Engines GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Clean Diesel Fuels Background Reducing our country's dependence on foreign oil and the rising costs of crude oil are primary reasons for a renewed interest in alternative fuels for the transportation sector. Stringent emissions regulations and public concern about mobile sources of air pollution provide additional incentives to develop fuels that generate fewer emissions, potentially reducing the need for sophisticated, expensive exhaust after-treatment devices.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure and hydrogen res

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hydrogen Scenario Analysis Summary Report: Analysis of the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles and the Potential Hydrogen Energy Infrastructure Requirements  

SciTech Connect

Achieving a successful transition to hydrogen-powered vehicles in the U.S. automotive market will require strong and sustained commitment by hydrogen producers, vehicle manufacturers, transporters and retailers, consumers, and governments. The interaction of these agents in the marketplace will determine the real costs and benefits of early market transformation policies, and ultimately the success of the transition itself. The transition to hydrogen-powered transportation faces imposing economic barriers. The challenges include developing and refining a new and different power-train technology, building a supporting fuel infrastructure, creating a market for new and unfamiliar vehicles, and achieving economies of scale in vehicle production while providing an attractive selection of vehicle makes and models for car-buyers. The upfront costs will be high and could persist for a decade or more, delaying profitability until an adequate number of vehicles can be produced and moved into consumer markets. However, the potential rewards to the economy, environment, and national security are immense. Such a profound market transformation will require careful planning and strong, consistent policy incentives. Section 811 of the Energy Policy Act (EPACT) of 2005, Public Law 109-59 (U.S. House, 2005), calls for a report from the Secretary of Energy on measures to support the transition to a hydrogen economy. The report was to specifically address production and deployment of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and the hydrogen production and delivery infrastructure needed to support those vehicles. In addition, the 2004 report of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS, 2004), The Hydrogen Economy, contained two recommendations for analyses to be conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen hydrogen energy transition and infrastructure planning for the hydrogen economy. In response to the EPACT requirement and NAS recommendations, DOE's Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program (HFCIT) has supported a series of analyses to evaluate alternative scenarios for deployment of millions of hydrogen fueled vehicles and supporting infrastructure. To ensure that these alternative market penetration scenarios took into consideration the thinking of the automobile manufacturers, energy companies, industrial hydrogen suppliers, and others from the private sector, DOE held several stakeholder meetings to explain the analyses, describe the models, and solicit comments about the methods, assumptions, and preliminary results (U.S. DOE, 2006a). The first stakeholder meeting was held on January 26, 2006, to solicit guidance during the initial phases of the analysis; this was followed by a second meeting on August 9-10, 2006, to review the preliminary results. A third and final meeting was held on January 31, 2007, to discuss the final analysis results. More than 60 hydrogen energy experts from industry, government, national laboratories, and universities attended these meetings and provided their comments to help guide DOE's analysis. The final scenarios attempt to reflect the collective judgment of the participants in these meetings. However, they should not be interpreted as having been explicitly endorsed by DOE or any of the stakeholders participating. The DOE analysis examined three vehicle penetration scenarios: Scenario 1--Production of thousands of vehicles per year by 2015 and hundreds of thousands per year by 2019. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 2.0 million fuel cell vehicles (FCV) by 2025. Scenario 2--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013 and hundreds of thousands by 2018. This option is expected to lead to a market penetration of 5.0 million FCVs by 2025. Scenario 3--Production of thousands of FCVs by 2013, hundreds of thousands by 2018, and millions by 2021 such that market penetration is 10 million by 2025. Scenario 3 was formulated to comply with the NAS recommendation: 'DOE should map out and evaluate a transition plan consistent with developing the infrastructure a

Greene, David L [ORNL; Leiby, Paul Newsome [ORNL; James, Brian [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Perez, Julie [Directed Technologies, Inc.; Melendez, Margo [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Milbrandt, Anelia [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Unnasch, Stefan [Life Cycle Associates; Rutherford, Daniel [TIAX, LLC; Hooks, Matthew [TIAX, LLC

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Final safety analysis report for the irradiated fuels storage facility  

SciTech Connect

A fuel storage facility has been constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to provide safe storage for spent fuel from two commercial HTGR's, Fort St. Vrain and Peach Bottom, and from the Rover nuclear rocket program. The new facility was built as an addition to the existing fuel storage basin building to make maximum use of existing facilities and equipment. The completed facility provides dry storage for one core of Peach Bottom fuel (804 elements), 1$sup 1$/$sub 2$ cores of Fort St. Vrain fuel (2200 elements), and the irradiated fuel from the 20 reactors in the Rover program. The facility is designed to permit future expansion at a minimum cost should additional storage space for graphite-type fuels be required. A thorough study of the potential hazards associated with the Irradiated Fuels Storage Facility has been completed, indicating that the facility is capable of withstanding all credible combinations of internal accidents and pertinent natural forces, including design basis natural phenomena of a 10,000 year flood, a 175-mph tornado, or an earthquake having a bedrock acceleration of 0.33 g and an amplification factor of 1.3, without a loss of integrity or a significant release of radioactive materials. The design basis accident (DBA) postulated for the facility is a complete loss of cooling air, even though the occurrence of this situation is extremely remote, considering the availability of backup and spare fans and emergency power. The occurrence of the DBA presents neither a radiation nor an activity release hazard. A loss of coolant has no effect upon the fuel or the facility other than resulting in a gradual and constant temperature increase of the stored fuel. The temperature increase is gradual enough that ample time (28 hours minimum) is available for corrective action before an arbitrarily imposed maximum fuel centerline temperature of 1100$sup 0$F is reached. (LK)

Bingham, G.E.; Evans, T.K.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparative Assessment of Fuel Cell Cars, Massachusettselectric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of PowerTransition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the Potential

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Maximum Building Energy Efficiency Research Laboratory secures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Network - Maximum Building Energy Efficiency Research Laboratory secures LEED Gold July 01, 2013 The recently completed 14.3m Maximum Building Energy Efficiency...

146

Generalized Relativistic Wave Equations with Intrinsic Maximum Momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nonperturbative effect of maximum momentum on the relativistic wave equations. In momentum representation, we obtain the exact eigen-energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional Klein-Gordon and Dirac equation with linear confining potentials, and the Dirac oscillator. Bound state solutions are only possible when the strength of scalar potential are stronger than vector potential. The energy spectrum of the systems studied are bounded from above, whereby classical characteristics are observed in the uncertainties of position and momentum operators. Also, there is a truncation in the maximum number of bound states that is allowed. Some of these quantum-gravitational features may have future applications.

Chee Leong Ching; Wei Khim Ng

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Van Hool - A300L Fuel Cel Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hydrogen Maximum Seating: 28 Power Source(s): UTC Power - PureMotion Model 120 Fuel Cell System...

148

FUEL ASSAY REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor having maximum sensitivity to perturbations is described comprising a core consisting of a horizontally disposed, rectangular, annular fuel zone containing enriched uranium dioxide dispersed in graphite, the concentration of uranium dioxide increasing from the outside to the inside of the fuel zone, an internal reflector of graphite containing an axial test opening disposed within the fuel zone, an external graphite reflector, means for changing the neutron spectrum in the test opening, and means for measuring perturbations in the neutron flux caused by the introduction of different fuel elements into the test opening. (AEC)

Spinrad, B.I.; Sandmeier, H.A.; Martens, F.H.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

149

FCT Fuel Cells: Basics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics to someone by E-mail Basics to someone by E-mail Share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Facebook Tweet about FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Twitter Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Google Bookmark FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Delicious Rank FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on Digg Find More places to share FCT Fuel Cells: Basics on AddThis.com... Home Basics Current Technology DOE R&D Activities Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis Contacts Basics Photo of a fuel cell stack A fuel cell uses the chemical energy of hydrogen to cleanly and efficiently produce electricity with water and heat as byproducts. (How much water?) Fuel cells are unique in terms of the variety of their potential applications; they can provide energy for systems as large as a utility

150

Joint Fuel Cell Bus Workshop Summary Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

equipment is heavy and costly * Slow response time of the fuel cell adversely affects regenerative energy recovery potential and efficiency Barriers to full fuel cell bus...

151

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not...

152

Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

NETL

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Maximum entropy principal for transportation  

SciTech Connect

In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

Bilich, F. [University of Brasilia (Brazil); Da Silva, R. [National Research Council (Brazil)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

154

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- tions, distributed power generation, and cogeneration (in which excess heat released during electricity the imported petroleum we currently use in our cars and trucks. Why Fuel Cells? Fuel cells directly convert the chemical energy in hydrogen to electricity, with pure water and potentially useful heat as the only

155

Fuel Cells Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Judith Valerio at one of our 31 single-cell test stands Fuel Cell Team The FC team focus is R&D on polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells for commercial and military applications. Our program has had ongoing funding in the area of polymer electrolyte fuel cells since 1977 and has been responsible for enabling breakthroughs in the areas of thin film electrodes and air bleed for CO tolerance. For more information on the history of fuel cell research at Los Alamos, please click here. Fuel cells are an important enabling technology for the Hydrogen Economy and have the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation and the world. The FC team is exploring the potential of fuel cells as energy-efficient, clean, and fuel-flexible alternatives that will

156

GENII dose calculations for offsite maximum individual and populations from Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document describes the potential dose consequences to the offsite maximum individual and population for ground and stack level releases at the offsite receptors from the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Nguyen, L.V.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

157

SPATIAL AND SEASONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL-FUEL COMBUSTION; GLOBAL, REGIONAL, AND NATIONAL POTENTIAL FOR SUSTAINABLE BIOENERGY FROM RESIDUE BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combustion of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, and has led to an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2. CO2 is… (more)

Gregg, Jay Sterling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Fuel-cycle cost comparisons with oxide and silicide fuels  

SciTech Connect

This paper addresses fuel cycle cost comparisons for a generic 10 MW reactor with HEU aluminide fuel and with LEU oxide and silicide fuels in several fuel element geometries. The intention of this study is to provide a consistent assessment of various design options from a cost point of view. Fuel cycle cost benefits could result if a number of reactors were to utilize fuel elements with the same number or different numbers of the same standard fuel plate. Data are presented to quantify these potential cost benefits. This analysis shows that there are a number of fuel element designs using LEU oxide or silicide fuels that have either the same or lower total fuel cycle costs than the HEU design. Use of these fuels with the uranium densities considered requires that they are successfully demonstrated and licensed.

Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Nitride fuel performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to assess the potential of nitride fuels in the current context of the nuclear industry. Nitride fuels systems have indeed been for the past decade the subject of new interest from the international community. This renewal of interest can be explained by the strong potential that nitride fuel systems exhibit for applications such as advanced fast reactor technology, waste transmutation and nuclear space power. To assess this potential, a review of the nitride physical properties was performed in comparison to oxide or metal fuel properties. The potential applications of nitride systems were also detailed. A fuel performance computer code was developed to obtain a more quantitative comparison between nitride and oxide fuel. The oxide code FUELROD was taken as a basis for the new code. After modernization, nitride fuel property correlations were implemented to obtain a nitride version of the code. Using this new tool, a comparison between oxide and nitride fuels was performed to highlight their difference in irradiation behavior in order to confirm their potential.

Reynaud, Sylvie Marie Aurel?ie

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fossil fuels -- future fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Do alternative fuel vehicles Do alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) improve air quality? How does the use of alternative fuels affect smog formation? You may find answers to these and other questions through the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)-the nation's most com- prehensive repository of perfor- mance data and general informa- tion on AFVs. To date, more than 600 vehi- cles-including light-duty cars, trucks, vans, transit buses, and heavy-duty trucks-have been tested on various alternative and conventional fuels with the goal of identifying the potential for alter- native fuels to displace petroleum and improve our nation's air quality. Although comparing regu- lated emissions between fuels may seem straightforward, evaluating emissions is complicated by

162

Fuel and emission impacts of heavy hybrid vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hybrid powertrains for certain heavy vehicles may improve fuel economy and reduce emissions. Of particular interest are commercial vehicles, typically in Classes 3-6, that travel in urban areas. Hybrid strategies and associated energy/emissions benefits for these classes of vehicles could be significantly different from those for passenger cars. A preliminary analysis has been conducted to investigate the energy and emissions performance of Class 3 and 6 medium-duty trucks and Class 6 school buses under eight different test cycles. Three elements are associated with this analysis: (1) establish baseline fuel consumption and emission scenario's from selected, representative baseline vehicles and driving schedules; (2) identify sources of energy inefficiency from baseline technology vehicles; and (3) assess maximum and practical potentials for energy savings and emissions reductions associated with heavy vehicle hybridization under real-world driving conditions. Our analysis excludes efficiency gains associated with such other measures as vehicle weight reduction and air resistance reduction, because such measures would also benefit conventional technology vehicles. Our research indicates that fuel economy and emission benefits of hybridization can be very sensitive to different test cycles. We conclude that, on the basis of present-day technology, the potential fuel economy gains average about 60-75% for Class 3 medium-duty trucks and 35% for Class 6 school buses. The fuel economy gains can be higher in the future, as hybrid technology continues to improve. The practical emissions reduction potentials associated with vehicle hybridization are significant as well.

An, F.; Eberhardt, J. J.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Fueling Infrastructure Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

164

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

165

Maximum Urban Heat Island Intensity in Seoul  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum urban heat island (UHI) intensity in Seoul, Korea, is investigated using data measured at two meteorological observatories (an urban site and a rural site) during the period of 1973–96. The average maximum UHI is weakest in summer and ...

Yeon-Hee Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development  

SciTech Connect

This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Analysis of Severe Accident Scenarios and Proposals for Safety Improvements for ADS Transmuters with Dedicated Fuel  

SciTech Connect

So-called dedicated fuels will be utilized to obtain maximum transmutation and incineration rates of minor actinides (MAs) in accelerator-driven systems (ADSs). These fuels are characterized by a high-MA content and the lack of the classical fertile materials such as {sup 238}U or {sup 232}Th. Dedicated fuels still have to be developed; however, programs are under way for their fabrication, irradiation, and testing. In Europe, mainly the oxide route is investigated and developed. A dedicated core will contain multiple 'critical' fuel masses, resulting in a certain recriticality potential under core degradation conditions. The use of dedicated fuels may also lead to strong deterioration of the safety parameters of the reactor core, such as, e.g., the void worth, Doppler or the kinetics quantities, neutron generation time, and {beta}{sub eff}. Critical reactors with this kind of fuel might encounter safety problems, especially under severe accident conditions. For ADSs, it is assumed that because of the subcriticality of the system, the poor safety features of such fuels could be coped with. Analyses reveal some safety problems for ADSs with dedicated fuels. Additional inherent and passive safety measures are proposed to achieve the required safety level. A safety strategy along the lines of a defense approach is presented where these measures can be integrated. The ultimate goal of these measures is to eliminate any mechanistic severe accident scenario and the potential for energetics.

Maschek, Werner [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (Germany); Rineiski, Andrei [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (Germany); Flad, Michael [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies (Germany); Morita, Koji [Kyushu University Institute of Environmental Systems (Japan); Coste, Pierre [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CE Grenoble (France)

2003-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Electrochemical Performance and Stability of the Cathode for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells. I. Cross Validation of Polarization Measurements by Impedance Spectroscopy and Current-Potential Sweep  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to address three issues in solid oxide fuel cells: (1) cross-validation of the polarization of a single cell measured using both dc and ac approaches, (2) the precise determination of the total areal specific resistance (ASR), and (3) understanding cathode polarization with LSCF cathodes. The ASR of a solid oxide fuel cell is a dynamic property, meaning that it changes with current density. The ASR measured using ac impedance spectroscopy (low frequency interception with real Z´ axis of ac impedance spectrum) matches with that measured from a dc IV sweep (the tangent of dc i-V curve). Due to the dynamic nature of ASR, we found that an ac impedance spectrum measured under open circuit voltage or on a half cell may not represent cathode performance under real operating conditions, particularly at high current density. In this work, the electrode polarization was governed by the cathode activation polarization; the anode contribution was negligible.

Zhou, Xiao Dong; Pederson, Larry R.; Templeton, Jared W.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

169

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

170

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants and Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

171

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel...

172

Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

Carpenter, David Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Assessment of Direct Carbon Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been under development for stationary power applications because of their high fuel efficiency and low emission characteristics. Research and development of direct carbon fuel cells (DCFC) that can use carbon as a fuel have been identified as an emerging option that needs further assessment and test validation. This project is one of several EPRI fuel cell projects that is investigating the technical and performance characteristics of fuel cells and their potential to impact electric util...

2005-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fuel cell market applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

Williams, M.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

175

Automotive Fuel Processor Development and Demonstration with Fuel Cell Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential for fuel cell systems to improve energy efficiency and reduce emissions over conventional power systems has generated significant interest in fuel cell technologies. While fuel cells are being investigated for use in many applications such as stationary power generation and small portable devices, transportation applications present some unique challenges for fuel cell technology. Due to their lower operating temperature and non-brittle materials, most transportation work is focusing on fuel cells using proton exchange membrane (PEM) technology. Since PEM fuel cells are fueled by hydrogen, major obstacles to their widespread use are the lack of an available hydrogen fueling infrastructure and hydrogen's relatively low energy storage density, which leads to a much lower driving range than conventional vehicles. One potential solution to the hydrogen infrastructure and storage density issues is to convert a conventional fuel such as gasoline into hydrogen onboard the vehicle using a fuel processor. Figure 2 shows that gasoline stores roughly 7 times more energy per volume than pressurized hydrogen gas at 700 bar and 4 times more than liquid hydrogen. If integrated properly, the fuel processor/fuel cell system would also be more efficient than traditional engines and would give a fuel economy benefit while hydrogen storage and distribution issues are being investigated. Widespread implementation of fuel processor/fuel cell systems requires improvements in several aspects of the technology, including size, startup time, transient response time, and cost. In addition, the ability to operate on a number of hydrocarbon fuels that are available through the existing infrastructure is a key enabler for commercializing these systems. In this program, Nuvera Fuel Cells collaborated with the Department of Energy (DOE) to develop efficient, low-emission, multi-fuel processors for transportation applications. Nuvera's focus was on (1) developing fuel processor subsystems (fuel reformer, CO cleanup, and exhaust cleanup) that were small enough to integrate on a vehicle and (2) evaluating the fuel processor system performance for hydrogen production, efficiency, thermal integration, startup, durability and ability to integrate with fuel cells. Nuvera carried out a three-part development program that created multi-fuel (gasoline, ethanol, natural gas) fuel processing systems and investigated integration of fuel cell / fuel processor systems. The targets for the various stages of development were initially based on the goals of the DOE's Partnership for New Generation Vehicles (PNGV) initiative and later on the Freedom Car goals. The three parts are summarized below with the names based on the topic numbers from the original Solicitation for Financial Assistance Award (SFAA).

Nuvera Fuel Cells

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Vision Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 77 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane fuel...

177

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Minotour Propane Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane...

178

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Collins Bus Corp. - NexBus Propane Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V8 - CleanFUEL USA liquid propane...

179

Maximum Likelihood Ensemble Filter: Theoretical Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble-based data assimilation method, named the maximum likelihood ensemble filter (MLEF), is presented. The analysis solution maximizes the likelihood of the posterior probability distribution, obtained by minimization of a cost ...

Milija Zupanski

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fuel pin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

1987-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Preliminary Screening -- Technical and Economic Assessment of Synthesis Gas to Fuels and Chemicals with Emphasis on the Potential for Biomass-Derived Syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In principle, syngas (primarily consisting of CO and H2) can be produced from any hydrocarbon feedstock, including: natural gas, naphtha, residual oil, petroleum coke, coal, and biomass. The lowest cost routes for syngas production, however, are based on natural gas, the cheapest option being remote or stranded reserves. Economic considerations dictate that the current production of liquid fuels from syngas translates into the use of natural gas as the hydrocarbon source. Nevertheless, the syngas production operation in a gas-to-liquids plant amounts to greater than half of the capital cost of the plant. The choice of technology for syngas production also depends on the scale of the synthesis operation. Syngas production from solid fuels can require an even greater capital investment with the addition of feedstock handling and more complex syngas purification operations. The greatest impact on improving the economics of gas-to liquids plants is through (1) decreasing capital costs associated with syngas production and (2) improving the thermal efficiency with better heat integration and utilization. Improved thermal efficiency can be obtained by combining the gas-to-liquids plant with a power generation plant to take advantage of the availability of low-pressure steam. The extensive research and development efforts devoted to syngas conversion to fuels and chemicals are documented in a vast amount of literature that tracks the scientific and technological advancements in syngas chemistry. The purpose of this report is to review the many syngas to products processes and summarize the salient points regarding the technology status and description, chemistry, catalysts, reactors, gas cleanliness requirements, process and environmental performances, and economics. Table 1 lists the products examined in this study and gives some facts about the technology as well as advantages and disadvantages. Table 2 summarizes the catalysts, process conditions, conversions, and selectivities for the various syngas to products processes. Table 3 presents catalyst poisons for the various products.

Spath, P. L.; Dayton, D. C.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Leveraging Intelligent Vehicle Technologies to Maximize Fuel Economy (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advancements in vehicle electronics, along with communication and sensing technologies, have led to a growing number of intelligent vehicle applications. Example systems include those for advanced driver information, route planning and prediction, driver assistance, and crash avoidance. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is exploring ways to leverage intelligent vehicle systems to achieve fuel savings. This presentation discusses several potential applications, such as providing intelligent feedback to drivers on specific ways to improve their driving efficiency, and using information about upcoming driving to optimize electrified vehicle control strategies for maximum energy efficiency and battery life. The talk also covers the potential of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and related technologies to deliver significant fuel savings in addition to providing safety and convenience benefits.

Gonder, J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Heil Environmental - RapidRail Application: Refuse hauler Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

184

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XLT Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 50 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

185

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

T370 hybrid truck Application: Vocational truck Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 2 Hybrid System(s): Eaton - Diesel Electric Hybrid Additional Description:...

186

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

New Flyer - Xcelsior Applications: Bus - Transit, Trolley Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Electricity, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: varies Power Source(s): Cummins...

187

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Peterbilt Motors - 384 Application: Tractor Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Maximum Seating: 2 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

188

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

ElDorado National - XHF Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG Maximum Seating: 39 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

189

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Champion Bus Inc. - CTS - Front Engine Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 32 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

190

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner C2e Hybrid Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 81...

191

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Motor Coach Industries - D4500 CT Hybrid Commuter Coach Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 57 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

192

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Gillig Corp. - Diesel-Electric Hybrid Bus and CNG Bus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport -...

193

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - All American Rear Engine Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 84 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

194

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Funding and Technical Assistance on Digg

195

Microstructure Characterization and Processing of U-Mo Alloy Fuels ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

molybdenum (Mo) fuels have been identified as a potential replacement for highly enriched uranium (HEU) dispersion fuels in high performance research ...

196

NETL: News Release - Fuel Cell-Powered Ice Resurfacer Smoothes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

power-generation system. Fuel cells have the potential to provide America with greater energy security, extend our fossil fuel reserves, and reduce our dependence on imported...

197

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen & Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.

198

Processing of Soybean Oil into Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abundant and easily refined, petroleum has provided high energy density liquid fuels for a century. However, recent price fluctuations, shortages, and concerns over the long term supply and greenhouse gas emissions have encouraged the development of alternatives to petroleum for liquid transportation fuels (Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004). Plant-based fuels include short chain alcohols, now blended with gasoline, and biodiesels, commonly derived from seed oils. Of plant-derived diesel feedstocks, soybeans yield the most of oil by weight, up to 20% (Mushrush, Willauer et al. 2009), and so have become the primary source of biomass-derived diesel in the United States and Brazil (Lin, Cunshan et al. 2011). Worldwide ester biodiesel production reached over 11,000,000 tons per year in 2008 (Emerging Markets 2008). However, soybean oil cannot be burned directly in modern compression ignition vehicle engines as a direct replacement for diesel fuel because of its physical properties that can lead to clogging of the engine fuel line and problems in the fuel injectors, such as: high viscosity, high flash point, high pour point, high cloud point (where the fuel begins to gel), and high density (Peterson, Cook et al. 2001). Industrial production of biodiesel from oil of low fatty-acid content often follows homogeneous base-catalyzed transesterification, a sequential reaction of the parent triglyceride with an alcohol, usually methanol, into methyl ester and glycerol products. The conversion of the triglyceride to esterified fatty acids improves the characteristics of the fuel, allowing its introduction into a standard compression engine without giving rise to serious issues with flow or combustion. Commercially available biodiesel, a product of the transesterification of fats and oils, can also be blended with standard diesel fuel up to a maximum of 20 vol.%. In the laboratory, the fuel characteristics of unreacted soybean oil have also been improved by dilution with petroleum based fuels, or by aerating and formation of microemulsions. However, it is the chemical conversion of the oil to fuel that has been the area of most interest. The topic has been reviewed extensively (Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004), so this aspect will be the focus in this chapter. Important aspects of the chemistry of conversion of oil into diesel fuel remain the same no matter the composition of the triglyceride. Hence, although the focus in this book is on soybean oil, studies on other plant based oils and simulated oils have occasional mention in this chapter. Valuable data can be taken on systems that are simpler than soybean based oils, with fewer or shorter chain components. Sometimes the triglycerides will behave differently under reaction conditions, and when relevant, these have been noted in the text. Although the price of diesel fuel has increased, economical production of biodiesel is a challenge because of (1) the increasing price of soybean oil feedstocks and reagent methanol, (2) a distributed supply of feedstocks that reduces the potential for economies of scale, (3) processing conditions that include pressures and temperatures above ambient, and (4) multiple processing steps needed to reduce contaminant levels to ASTM specification D6751 limits (Vasudevan & Briggs 2008). Much of the cost of biodiesel production is related to the conversion of the oil to the methyl ester and so there has been an emphasis to research improved methods of converting soybean oil to biodiesel. However, most of these studies have taken place at the bench scale, and have not demonstrated a marked improvement in yield or reduced oil-to-methanol ratio in comparison with standard base-catalyzed transesterification. One aspect that has a short term chance of implementation is the improvement of the conversion process by the use of a continuous rather than batch process, with energy savings generated by combined reaction and separation, online analysis, and reagent methanol added by titration as needed to produce ASTM specification grade fuel. By adapting process intensif

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Special Fuel Definitions

200

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Motor Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Motor Carrier Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, a person who operates a commercial motor vehicle

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fuels Technology - Capabilities - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities Fuels Technology Advanced petroleum-based fuels Fuel-borne reductants On-board reforming Alternative fuels...

202

Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions Title Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and...

203

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The definition of an alternative fuel includes natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, electricity, hydrogen, fuel mixtures containing not less

204

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fueling Stations Photo of an ethanol fueling station. Thousands of ethanol fueling stations are available in the United States.

205

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Promotion The Missouri Alternative Fuels Commission (Commission) promotes the continued production and use of alternative transportation fuels in

206

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Fueling Stations Photo of a hydrogen fueling station. A handful of hydrogen fueling stations are available in the United States

207

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fueling Stations Photo of a biodiesel fueling station. Hundreds of biodiesel fueling stations are available in the United States.

208

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Hydrogen Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Hydrogen is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from diverse domestic energy sources. Research is under way to make hydrogen vehicles practical for widespread use.

209

Modeling Maximum Hail Size in Alberta Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional steady-state cloud model was combined with a time-dependent hail growth model to predict the maximum hailstone size on the ground. Model runs were based on 160 proximity soundings recorded within the Alberta Hail Project area ...

Julian C. Brimelow; Gerhard W. Reuter; Eugene R. Poolman

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Maximum Entropy Production in Climate Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R. D. Lorenz et al. claim that recent data on Mars and Titan show that planetary atmospheres are in unconstrained states of maximum entropy production (MEP). Their model as it applies to Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan is reexamined, and it is ...

Richard Goody

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from...

213

Energy Basics: Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Hydrogen as a Transportation Fuel Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced...

214

Fuel Cell Vehicles | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to...

215

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cells Search Search Help Fuel Cells EERE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Fuel Cells...

216

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Loans on AddThis.com...

217

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com...

219

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Fund on AddThis.com... More in this section...

220

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel and Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Tax Exemption on AddThis.com...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Recovery Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation Act Projects Funded for Fuel Cell Market Transformation Following the fuel cell funding announcement, DOE funded the fuel cell market transformation projects listed below. These projects focus on fuel cell systems in emergency backup power, material handling, and combined heat and power applications, with the goal of improving the potential of fuel cells to provide power in stationary, portable, and specialty vehicles. The Fuel Cell Technologies Office is collecting and analyzing data from these projects to show potential adopters the benefits and real-world performance of fuel cells. These data are aggregated across industries and sites as composite data products to provide relevant technology status results and fuel cell performance data without revealing proprietary information. These publicly available data products build the business case for fuel cells and help fuel cell developers understand the state of technologies while identifying ways to improve them.

222

Mildly Context Sensitive Grammars For Estimating Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction The maximum-entropy framework provides great flexibility in specifying what features a model may take into account, making it e#ective for a wide range of natural language processing tasks. But because parameter estimation in this framework involves computations over the whole space of possible labelings, it is unwieldy for the parsing problem, where this space is very large. Researchers have tried several strategies for e#ciently training parsing models in the maximum-entropy framework. Ratnaparkhi's parser (1997) models the probabilities of actions of a pushdown automaton instead of the probabilities of entire parses, but for this reason is susceptible to the label-bias problem (La#erty et al. 2001). Abney (1997) proposes random sampling of the parse space. Johnson et al. (1999) propose using conditional estimation instead of joint estimation. This reduces the space to the possible parses of a single sentence, which is much smaller but can still be unmanageably large f

David Chiang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Discontinuities in the Maximum-Entropy Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the maximum-entropy inference of the state of a finite-level quantum system under linear constraints. The constraints are specified by the expected values of a set of fixed observables. We point out the existence of discontinuities in this inference method. This is a pure quantum phenomenon since the maximum-entropy inference is continuous for mutually commuting observables. The question arises why some sets of observables are distinguished by a discontinuity in an inference method which is still discussed as a universal inference method. In this paper we make an example of a discontinuity and we explain a characterization of the discontinuities in terms of the openness of the (restricted) linear map that assigns expected values to states.

Stephan Weis

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Fuel Cell Seminar, 1992: Program and abstracts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This year`s theme, ``Fuel Cells: Realizing the Potential,`` focuses on progress being made toward commercial manufacture and use of fuel cell products. Fuel cell power plants are competing for market share in some applications and demonstrations of market entry power plants are proceeding for additional applications. Development activity on fuel cells for transportation is also increasing; fuel cell products have potential in energy and transportation industries, with very favorable environmental impacts. This Seminar has the purpose of fostering communication by providing a forum for the international community interested in development, application, and business opportunities related fuel cells. Over 190 technical papers are included, the majority being processed for the data base.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

225

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) and Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com...

226

Hydrogen Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

explored as a fuel for passenger vehicles. It can be used in fuel cells to power electric motors or burned in internal combustion engines (ICEs). It is an environmentally...

227

Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services (Fact Sheet), Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technical Highlights (HFCTH), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

658 * July 2012 658 * July 2012 Potential for Distributed and Central Electrolysis to Provide Grid Support Services Project: Renewable Electrolysis Integrated System Development and Testing NREL Team: Kevin Harrison, Marc Mann, Danny Terlip, and Mike Peters Accomplishment: NREL operated both commercially available low-temperature electrolyzer technologies (PEM and alkaline) to evaluate their response to commands to increase and decrease stack power that shorten frequency disturbances on an alternating current (AC) mini-grid (Figure 1). Results show that both the PEM and alkaline electrolyzers are capable of adding or removing stack power to provide sub-second response that reduced the duration of frequency disturbances. Context: Management of distributed power systems is expected to become more commonplace as grids and devices

228

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 5 th International Conference on Polymer Batteries & Fuel Cells Argonne, Illinois Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Activities Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager August 4, 2011 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cells: Benefits & Market Potential The Role of Fuel Cells Key Benefits Very High Efficiency Reduced CO 2 Emissions * 35-50%+ reductions for CHP systems (>80% with biogas) * 55-90% reductions for light- duty vehicles * up to 60% (electrical) * up to 70% (electrical, hybrid fuel cell / turbine) * up to 85% (with CHP) Reduced Oil Use * >95% reduction for FCEVs (vs. today's gasoline ICEVs)

229

Cermet fuel reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Production of jet fuel from coal-derived liquids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco and Lummus Crest are evaluating the process options and economics for upgrading the naphtha, crude phenols, and tar oil by-products from the Great Plains Coal Gasification Plant to jet fuels and other salable products. Analytical characterizations of these three by-products indicate the range of products that can be manufactured from each, and potential problems which could be encountered during refining. These characterizations, along with limited experimental data and Amoco's proprietary process models, were used to design conceptual processing schemes for maximizing the production of Grades JP-4, JP-8, and high density (JP-8X) jet fuels from the by-product liquids. In addition to the maximum jet fuel schemes, conceptual designs have also been formulated for maximizing profits from refining of the Great Plains by-products. Conceptual processing schemes for profitable production of JP-4, JP-8, and JP-8X have been developed, as has a maximum profit'' case. All four of these additional cases have now been transferred to Lummus for design and integration studies. Development of these schemes required the use of linear programming technology. This technology includes not only conventional refining processes which have been adapted for use with coal-derived liquids (e.g. hydrotreating, hydrocracking), but also processes which may be uniquely suited to the Great Plains by-products such as cresylic acid extraction, hydordealkylation, and needle coking. 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Furlong, M.W.; Fox, J.D.; Masin, J.G.; Soderberg, D.J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of “debonds” and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) States Energy Advisory Board (STEAB) Washington, DC Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 3/14/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov * Introduction - Technology and Market Overview * DOE Program Overview - Mission & Structure - R&D Progress - Demonstration & Deployments * State Activities - Examples of potential opportunities Outline 3 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 3/19/2013 eere.energy.gov Fuel cells - convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy, bypassing inefficiencies associated with thermal energy conversion. Available energy is equal to the Gibbs free energy. Combustion Engines - convert chemical energy into thermal energy and

233

Hydrogen as a fuel  

SciTech Connect

A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

235

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

236

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

237

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Animation to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation on...

238

Fuel Cycle Comparison for Distributed Power Technologies  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report examines backup power and prime power systems and addresses the potential energy and environmental effects of substituting fuel cells for existing combustion technologies based on microtur

239

Alcohol fuel from Ohio farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This booklet provides an introduction to technical, marketing, and regulatory issues involved in on-farm alcohol fuel production. Discussed are ethanol production provcesses, investment, potential returns, regulations and permits, and sources of financial and technical assistance. 2 figures. (DMC)

Jones, J.D.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

Murphy, T W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Lifecycle Emissions Model (LEM): Lifecycle Emissions from Transportation Fuels, Motor Vehicles, Transportation Modes, Electricity Use, Heating and Cooking Fuels, and Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

maximum, and restricts regenerative energy to be less thanthe extra energy made available by regenerative braking. Theregenerative braking (for fuel-cell vehicles without electro-chemical energy

Delucchi, Mark

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science » Materials Science » Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Melissa Fox Applied Energy Email Catherine Padro Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Fernando Garzon Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Piotr Zelenay Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Rod Borup Sensors & Electrochemical Devices Email Karen E. Kippen Experimental Physical Sciences Email Like a battery, a fuel cell consists of two electrodes separated by an electrolyte-in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, the separator is made of a thin polymeric membrane. Unlike a battery, a fuel cell does not need recharging-it continues to produce electricity as long as fuel flows

244

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Part A  

SciTech Connect

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation’s CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

246

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

247

Novel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2009. Symposium, Energy Materials. Presentation Title, Novel Fuel. Author(s), Naum Gosin, Igor ...

248

Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fuel cells are an emerging technology that can provide heat and electricity for buildings and electrical power for vehicles and electronic devices.

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Prices on AddThis.com... Fuel Prices As gasoline prices increase, alternative fuels appeal more to vehicle fleet managers and consumers. Like gasoline, alternative fuel prices can fluctuate based on location, time of year, and political climate. Alternative Fuel Price Report

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Any person acting as an alternative fuels dealer must hold a valid alternative fuel license and certificate from the Wisconsin Department of Administration. Except for alternative fuels that a dealer delivers into a

251

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel License to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel License on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel License Alternative fuel providers, bulk users, and retailers, or any person who fuels an alternative fuel vehicle from a private source that does not pay

252

Qualms concerning Tsallis ’ Use of the Maximum Entropy Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsallis ’ ‘statistical thermodynamic ’ formulation of the nonadditive entropy of degree-? is neither correct nor self-consistent. It is well known that the maximum entropy formalism [1], the minimum discrimination information [2], and Gauss ’ principle [3, 4] all lead to the same results when a certain condition on the prior probability distribution is imposed [5]. All these methods lead to the same form of the posterior probability distribution; namely, the exponential family of distributions. Tsallis and collaborators [6] have tried to adapt the maximum entropy formalism that uses the Shannon entropy to one that uses a nonadditive entropy of degree-?. In order to come out with analytic expressions for the probabilities that maximize the nonadditive entropy they found it necessary to use ‘escort probabilities’[7] of the same power as the nonadditive entropy. If the procedure they use is correct then it follows that Gauss ’ principle should give the same optimum probabilities. Yet, we will find that the Tsallis result requires that the prior probability distribution be given by the same unphysical condition as the maximum entropy formalism and, what is worse, the potential of the error law be required to vanish. The potential of the error law is what information theory refers to as the error [8]; that is, the difference between the inaccuracy and the entropy. Unless the ‘true ’ probability distribution, P = (p(x1), p(x2)...,p(xm)) coincides with the estimated probability distribution, Q = (q(x1), q(x2),...q(xm)), the error does not vanish. Moreover, we shall show that two procedures of averaging, one using the escort probabilities explicitly, do not give the same result, and the relation between the potential of the error law and the nonadditive entropy requires the latter to vanish when the former vanishes. Let X be a random variable whose values x1, x2,..., xm are obtained at m independent trials. Prior to the observations the distribution is Q, and after the observations the unknown probability distribution is P. The observer has 1 at his disposal the statistic â = 1

B. H. Lavenda; J. Dunning-davies

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Westinghouse BWR Fuel Performance Program--Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Fuel Reliability Program (FRP) joined the Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB (WES) Fuel Performance Program – Phase 2 to investigate the performance of ultra-high-burnup fuel to assess the potential for extending Westinghouse fuel burnups in the BWR fleet. Fuel rods irradiated in the Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt (KKL) reactor in Switzerland for up to nine annual cycles were examined in the spent fuel pool as well as in two hot cells (Paul Scherer Institute in Switzerl...

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

254

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Fuel Electricity Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Electricity Fuel Basics Photo of a plug-in hybrid vehicle fueling. Electricity is considered an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act

255

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The following fuels are defined as alternative fuels by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992: pure methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols; blends of

256

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax A state excise tax is imposed on the use of alternative fuels. Alternative fuels include liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane), compressed natural gas (CNG), and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The current tax rates are as

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard RFS Volumes by Year Enlarge illustration The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) is a federal program that requires transportation fuel sold in the U.S. to contain a minimum volume of

258

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Excise taxes on alternative fuels are imposed on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rate for each alternative fuel type is based on the number of motor vehicles licensed in the state that use the specific

259

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Loans Fuel Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Loans The Oregon Department of Energy administers the State Energy Loan Program (SELP) which offers low-interest loans for qualified projects. Eligible alternative fuel projects include fuel production facilities, dedicated

260

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels are subject to an excise tax at a rate of $0.205 per gasoline gallon equivalent, with a variable component equal to at least 5% of the average wholesale price of the fuel. (Reference Senate Bill 454,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax The excise tax imposed on an alternative fuel distributed in New Mexico is $0.12 per gallon. Alternative fuels subject to the excise tax include liquefied petroleum gas (or propane), compressed natural gas, and liquefied

262

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The Minnesota Department of Revenue imposes an excise tax on the first licensed distributor that receives E85 fuel products in the state and on distributors, special fuel dealers, or bulk purchasers of other alternative

263

Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Federal Technology Alert on alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs), prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), is intended for fleet managers in government agencies and other government officials who need to use more alternative fuels and AFVs in their fleets of cars and trucks. This publication describes the government's plans and progress in meeting goals for the use of AFVs, which are stated in the Energy Policy Act and various Executive Orders. It describes the types of AFVs available, lists actual and potential federal uses, makes some general recommendations, and presents field experiences to date.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fuel Cells: Identifying Promising Development Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low temperature PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells are in the initial stage of commercialization, while high temperature SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) are under development because they hold promise of higher efficiency and lower costs. To assess their future market potential, this study analyzed several innovative market applications and technical improvements: PEM fuel cells for peak shaving, PEM fuel cells for uninterruptible power supply (UPS), tubular and planar SOFC units for residential use...

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

265

Improved nuclear fuel assembly grid spacer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fuel assembly grid spacer and method of retaining the basic fuel rod support elements in position within the fuel assembly containment channel. The improvement involves attachment of the grids to the hexagonal channel and of forming the basic fuel rod support element into a grid structure, which provides a design which is insensitive to potential channel distortion (ballooning) at high fluence levels. In addition the improved method eliminates problems associated with component fabrication and assembly.

Marshall, John (San Jose, CA); Kaplan, Samuel (Los Gatos, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Development Plan for the Fuel Cycle Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fuel Cycle Simulator (FCS) project was initiated late in FY-10 as the activity to develop a next generation fuel cycle dynamic analysis tool for achieving the Systems Analysis Campaign 'Grand Challenge.' This challenge, as documented in the Campaign Implementation Plan, is to: 'Develop a fuel cycle simulator as part of a suite of tools to support decision-making, communication, and education, that synthesizes and visually explains the multiple attributes of potential fuel cycles.'

Brent Dixon

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Maximum Error Modeling for Fault-Tolerant Computation using Maximum a posteriori (MAP) Hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of current generation computing machines in safety-centric applications like implantable biomedical chips and automobile safety has immensely increased the need for reviewing the worst-case error behavior of computing devices for fault-tolerant computation. In this work, we propose an exact probabilistic error model that can compute the maximum error over all possible input space in a circuit specific manner and can handle various types of structural dependencies in the circuit. We also provide the worst-case input vector, which has the highest probability to generate an erroneous output, for any given logic circuit. We also present a study of circuit-specific error bounds for fault-tolerant computation in heterogeneous circuits using the maximum error computed for each circuit. We model the error estimation problem as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate, over the joint error probability function of the entire circuit, calculated efficiently through an intelligent search of the entire input space using probabilistic traversal of a binary join tree using Shenoy-Shafer algorithm. We demonstrate this model using MCNC and ISCAS benchmark circuits and validate it using an equivalent HSpice model. Both results yield the same worst-case input vectors and the highest % difference of our error model over HSpice is just 1.23%. We observe that the maximum error probabilities are significantly larger than the average error probabilities, and provides a much tighter error bounds for fault-tolerant computation. We also find that the error estimates depend on the specific circuit structure and the maximum error probabilities are sensitive to the individual gate failure probabilities.

Karthikeyan Lingasubramanian; Syed M. Alam; Sanjukta Bhanja

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

268

Design of high-ionic conductivity electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon-supported porous electrodes are used in low-temperature fuel cells to provide maximum catalyst surface area, while taking up little volume and using minimum catalyst material. In Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs), ...

Schrauth, Anthony J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Fuel cells for the '90s  

SciTech Connect

Nontraditional power plants may be needed to help utilities meet the need for additional generating capacity in the late 1980s. Fuel cell power plants can be built in small factory-assembled modules and installed in just 2 or 3 years. Because the fuel cell converts fuel-oil, gas, even coal distillates and other synthetic fuels-directly to electricity without combustion, it has almost no sulfur and nitrogen oxide emissions. With no harmful emissions, fuel cells can be sited in populated areas. And because there is no combustion cycle to waste much of the fuel's energy, fuel cells have potentially higher efficiencies than thermal power plants. As a result of 12 years of intensive development by EPRI, DOE, utilities, manufacturers, and a fuel cell users group, the fuel cell technology will be ready when it is needed.

Lihach, N.; Fickett, A.; Gillis, E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Blends Production & Distribution Specifications Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Biodiesel Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Biodiesel is a domestically produced, renewable fuel that can be

271

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard At least 2% of all diesel fuel sold in Washington must be biodiesel or renewable diesel. This requirement will increase to 5% 180 days after the

272

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Fuel Use to Biodiesel Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The Iowa Department of Transportation (IDOT) may purchase biodiesel for use in IDOT vehicles through the biodiesel fuel revolving fund created in the state treasury. The fund consists of money received from the sale of Energy

273

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax Special fuels, including biodiesel, biodiesel blends, biomass-based diesel, biomass-based diesel blends, and liquefied natural gas, have a reduced tax rate of $0.27 per gallon. Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) and

274

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Special Fuel Tax to Special Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Special Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Special Fuel Tax Effective January 1, 2014, certain special fuels sold or used to propel motor vehicles are subject to a license tax. Liquefied natural gas is subject to a tax of $0.16 per diesel gallon equivalent. Compressed natural

275

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Basics to Fuel Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Blends Specifications Production & Distribution Feedstocks Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Ethanol Fuel Basics Related Information National Biofuels Action Plan Ethanol is a renewable fuel made from various plant materials collectively

276

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use to Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Fuel Use The South Dakota Department of Transportation and employees using state diesel vehicles must stock and use fuel blends containing a minimum of 2% biodiesel (B2) that meets or exceeds the most current ASTM specification

277

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen Fuel Specifications to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Fuel Specifications on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Hydrogen Fuel Specifications The California Department of Food and Agriculture, Division of Measurement Standards (DMS) established interim specifications for hydrogen fuels for

278

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles on AddThis.com... More in this section... Ethanol Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Conversions Emissions Laws & Incentives Flexible Fuel Vehicles Photo of a flexible fuel vehicle.

279

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Use Fuel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Use on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Use All state employees operating flexible fuel or diesel vehicles as part of the state fleet must use E85 or biodiesel blends whenever reasonably available. Additionally, the Nebraska Transportation Services Bureau and

280

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Tax Fuels Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Tax Alternative fuels used to propel vehicles of any kind on public highways are taxed at a rate determined on a gasoline gallon equivalent basis. The tax rates are posted in the Pennsylvania Bulletin. (Reference Title 75

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Mississippi Incentives and Laws Mississippi Incentives and Laws The following is a list of expired, repealed, and archived incentives, laws, regulations, funding opportunities, or other initiatives related to alternative fuels and vehicles, advanced technologies, or air quality. Natural Gas Fuel Rate Reduction and Vehicle Incentives Archived: 06/01/2013 Atmos Energy offers incentives for natural gas vehicles on a case-by-case basis and offers special rates for natural gas when used to operate a vehicle. Biodiesel Committee Archived: 01/01/2007 A Study Committee on the Potential Use of Biodiesel Fuel was created in 2006 to study the need for mandated use of biodiesel and the agricultural and environmental benefits of biodiesel use. (Reference Senate Bill 2942, 2006) Economic Development Fund

282

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Type Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Development Program The Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation provides funding for alternative fueling infrastructure...

283

Fuel Chemistry Preprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following symposia titles: advances in fuel cell research; biorefineries - renewable fuels and chemicals; chemistry of fuels and emerging fuel technologies; fuel processing for hydrogen production; membranes for energy and fuel applications; new progress in C1 chemistry; research challenges for the hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage; SciMix fuel chemistry; and ultraclean transportation fuels.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

284

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

Bean, R.W.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

HIGH DENSITY NUCLEAR FUEL COMPOSITION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A nuclear fuel consisting essentially of uranium monocarbide and containing 2.2 to 4.6 wt% carbon, 0.1 to 2.3 wt% oxygen, 0.05 to 2.5 wt% nitrogen, and the balance uranium was developed. The maximum oxygen content was less than one-half the carbon content by weight and the carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen are present as a single phase substituted solid solution of UC, C, O, and N. A method of preparing the fuel composition is described. (AEC)

Litton, F.B.

1962-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate,

287

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Promotion Recognizing that biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel will be an important part of the state's energy economy and advanced research in

288

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate One year after in-state production has reached 350 million gallons of cellulosic ethanol and sustained this volume for three months, all gasoline

289

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuels Alternative Fuels Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Promotion The state of Hawaii has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the U.S. Department of Energy to collaborate to produce 70% of the state's

290

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Tax Alternative Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The excise tax imposed on compressed natural gas (CNG), liquefied natural gas (LNG), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or propane) used to operate a vehicle can be paid through an annual flat rate sticker tax based on the

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Promotion The Texas Bioenergy Policy Council and the Texas Bioenergy Research Committee were established to promote the goal of making biofuels a

292

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuel Standard Within six months following the point at which monthly production of denatured ethanol produced in Louisiana equals or exceeds a minimum annualized production volume of 50 million gallons, at least 2% of the

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Tax Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Tax The state road tax for vehicles that operate on propane (liquefied petroleum gas, or LPG) or natural gas is paid through the purchase of an annual flat fee sticker, and the amount is based on the vehicle's gross

294

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Stations to someone by E-mail Stations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Fueling Stations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Propane Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Locations Infrastructure Development Vehicles Laws & Incentives Propane Fueling Stations Photo of a liquefied petroleum gas fueling station. Thousands of liquefied petroleum gas (propane) fueling stations are

295

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Study Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Study As directed by the Nevada Legislature, the Legislative Commission (Commission) conducted an interim study in 2011 concerning the production and use of energy in the state. The study included information on the use

296

Hydrogen Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Hydrogen is a clean fuel that, when consumed, produces only water. Hydrogen can be produced from a variety of domestic sources, such as coal, natural gas, nuclear power, and renewable power. These...

297

Fuel Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Selling your car? Advertise its fuel economy with our Used Car Label tool. Download a label for on-line ads. Print a label to attach to your car. Did you know? You can purchase...

298

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blend Mandate Blend Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Blend Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Blend Mandate All Gasoline sold or offered for sale in Minnesota must contain at least: 10% corn-based ethanol by volume or the maximum percent by volume of corn-based ethanol authorized in a waiver issued by the U.S. Environmental

299

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Liquefied Gas Tax to Liquefied Gas Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Liquefied Gas Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Liquefied Gas Tax A use tax of $0.14 per gallon is imposed on liquefied gas used for operating motor vehicles on public highways in addition to a pre-paid annual vehicle tax according to the following: Maximum Gross Vehicle Weight Rating Tax

300

RECIPIENT:EnerFuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EnerFuel EnerFuel u.s. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MANAGEMENT CENTER NEPA DFTFRlIllNATION PROJECT TITLE: Hydrogen Technology Electric Vehicle Charging Station Page 1 of2 STATE : FL Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procurement Instrument Number NEPA Control Number em Number DE-FC36-04G014255 DE FC36-04G014225 GFO-04-221d G014225 Based on my review offhe information concerning tbe proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Offi(cr (authorized under DOE On::ler 451 .1A), I have made the (0110 wing determination: ex, EA, EIS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: 85.1 Actions to conserve energy, demonstrate potential energy conservation, and promote energy-efficiency that do not Increase the Indoor concentrations of potentially harmful substances. These actions may involve financial and technical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Liquid fuel reformer development: Autothermal reforming of Diesel fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing a process to convert hydrocarbon fuels to clean hydrogen feeds for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. The process incorporates an autothermal reforming catalyst that can process hydrocarbon feeds at lower temperatures than existing commercial catalysts. The authors have tested the catalyst with three diesel-type fuels: hexadecane, certified low-sulfur grade 1 diesel, and a standard grade 2 diesel. Hexadecane yielded products containing 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis at 850 C, while maximum hydrogen product yields for the two diesel fuels were near 50%. Residual products in all cases included CO, CO{sub 2}, ethane, and methane. Further studies with grade 1 diesel showed improved conversion as the water:fuel ratio was increased from 1 to 2 at 850 C. Soot formation was reduced when the oxygen:carbon ratio was maintained at 1 at 850 C. There were no significant changes in hydrogen yield as the space velocity and the oxygen:fuel ratio were varied. Tests with a microchannel monolithic catalyst yielded similar or improved hydrogen levels at higher space velocities than with extruded pellets in a packed bed.

Pereira, C.; Bae, J-M.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

302

EFFECT OF FUEL IMPURITIES ON FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE AND DURABILITY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fuel cell is an electrochemical energy conversion device that produces electricity during the combination of hydrogen and oxygen to produce water. Proton exchange membranes fuel cells are favored for portable applications as well as stationary ones due to their high power density, low operating temperature, and low corrosion of components. In real life operation, the use of pure fuel and oxidant gases results in an impractical system. A more realistic and cost efficient approach is the use of air as an oxidant gas and hydrogen from hydrogen carriers (i.e., ammonia, hydrocarbons, hydrides). However, trace impurities arising from different hydrogen sources and production increases the degradation of the fuel cell. These impurities include carbon monoxide, ammonia, sulfur, hydrocarbons, and halogen compounds. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has set maximum limits for trace impurities in the hydrogen stream; however fuel cell data is needed to validate the assumption that at those levels the impurities will cause no degradation. This report summarizes the effect of selected contaminants tested at SRNL at ISO levels. Runs at ISO proposed concentration levels show that model hydrocarbon compound such as tetrahydrofuran can cause serious degradation. However, the degradation is only temporary as when the impurity is removed from the hydrogen stream the performance completely recovers. Other molecules at the ISO concentration levels such as ammonia don't show effects on the fuel cell performance. On the other hand carbon monoxide and perchloroethylene shows major degradation and the system can only be recovered by following recovery procedures.

Colon-Mercado, H.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

303

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Definition to someone by E-mail Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition Alternative fuel is defined as compressed natural gas, propane, ethanol, or any mixture containing 85% or more ethanol (E85) with gasoline or other

304

An Eddy Parameterization Based on Maximum Entropy Production with Application to Modeling of the Arctic Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eddy parameterization derived from statistical mechanics of potential vorticity is applied for inviscid shallow-water equations. The solution of a variational problem based on the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle provides, with some ...

Igor Polyakov

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to revolutionize our transportation system. They are more efficient than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles and produce no harmful tailpipe exhaust-their only emission is water. Fuel cell vehicles and the hydrogen infrastructure to fuel them are in an early stage of development. The U.S. Department of Energy is leading government and industry efforts to make hydrogen-powered vehicles an affordable, environmentally friendly, and safe transportation option. Visit the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center to learn more

306

Biomass fuels: a national plan  

SciTech Connect

The options and potentials of biomass fuel production for the U.S. are reviewed. The following options are discussed: plant or vegetable oils, direct combustion of wood, production of biogas, and alcohol fuels. It is considered essential that a national planning model is developed to integrate the biofuel requirements for arable land and commercial forests with those for food and other traditional uses. (Refs. 32)

Mitchell, T.E.; Schroer, B.J.; Ziemke, M.C.; Peters, J.F.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Spent fuel integrity during transportation  

SciTech Connect

The conditions of recent shipments of light water reactor spent fuel were surveyed. The radioactivity level of cask coolant was examined in an attempt to find the effects of transportation on LWR fuel assemblies. Discussion included potential cladding integrity loss mechanisms, canning requirements, changes of radioactivity levels, and comparison of transportation in wet or dry media. Although integrity loss or degradation has not been identified, radioactivity levels usually increase during transportation, especially for leaking assemblies.

Funk, C.W.; Jacobson, L.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Melvin Calvin: Fuels from Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A logical extension of his early work on the path of carbon during photosynthesis, Calvin's studies on the production of hydrocarbons by plants introduced many in the scientific and agricultural worlds to the potential of renewable fuel and chemical feedstocks. He and his co-workers identified numerous candidate compounds from plants found in tropical and temperate climates from around the world. His travels and lectures concerning the development of alternative fuel supplies inspired laboratories worldwide to take up the investigation of plant-derived energy sources as an alternative to fossil fuels.

Taylor, S.E.; Otvos, J.W.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison Transmission -...

310

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Nova Bus - LFS Artic HEV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 62 Power Source(s): Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

311

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Kenworth - T370 diesel electric tractor Application: Tractor Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 3 Power Source(s): Paccar - PX-6 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

312

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

IC Bus - HC Hybrid Series Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 45 Power Source(s): Navistar - MaxxForce DT Hybrid System(s): Eaton -...

313

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Axess Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hydrogen, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Ballard Power Systems -...

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - 42BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

315

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

60BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 43 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L Hybrid...

316

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

E-Z Rider II BRT Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, LNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L...

317

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Blue Bird Corp. - Micro Bird G5 Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Propane Maximum Seating: 30 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V10 Engine - Roush CleanTech liquid propane...

318

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Turtle Top - Van Terra Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 15 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Turtle Top...

319

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

North American Bus Industries - CompoBus Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 47 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - Eco-Smart 1 Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 28 Power Source(s): Bosch Rexroth - Two 120kW induction motors Additional...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

DesignLine Corp. - EcoSaver IV Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: Hybrid - CNG Electric, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. -...

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

StarTrans - Senator Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 17 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Ford Motor Co. - 5.4L V-8 Additional Description: May...

323

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

31LFW 35LFW 40LFW Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Types: CNG, Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: 40 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L Cummins - ISL 8.9L...

324

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey XL Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 41 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Available as a Ford F-550...

325

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ebus - EBUS22FC Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: Hydrogen, Hybrid - Gasoline Electric Maximum Seating: 22 Power Source(s): Capstone Turbine Corp. - C30 (30kW) Micro Turbine...

326

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

LFX Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Hybrid - Diesel Electric Maximum Seating: Varies Power Source(s): Cummins - ISL 8.9L Cummins - ISB 6.7L Hybrid System(s): Allison...

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Thomas Built Buses - Saf-T-Liner HDX CNG Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: CNG Maximum Seating: 90 Power Source(s): Cummins Westport - ISL G 8.9L...

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Odyssey Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 24 Power Source(s): Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional Description: Available as Chevrolet G4500 or...

329

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Goshen Coach - GCIIG-Force Application: Bus - Shuttle Fuel Types: CNG, Propane Maximum Seating: 33 Power Source(s): General Motors - 6.0L V-8 Ford Motor Co. - 6.8L V-10 Additional...

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Proterra - EcoRide BE35 Application: Bus - Transit Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 35 Power Source(s): UQM - PowerPhase 150kW permanent magnet motor Hybrid System(s):...

331

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Heavy-Duty Vehicle and Engine...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Trans Tech - ETrans Application: Bus - School Fuel Type: Electricity Maximum Seating: 52 Power Source(s): Smith Electric Vehicles - 120kW induction motor with lithium-ion...

332

Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

converter. II. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL A PV cell can be represented by an equivalentMaximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro- Fuzzy "ANFIS availability and vast potential, world has turned to solar photovoltaic energy to meet out its ever increasing

Recanati, Catherine

333

Status of the US Fuel Cell Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring major programs to develop high efficiency fuel cell technologies to produce electric power from natural gas and other hydrogen sources. Fuel cell systems offer attractive potential for future electric power generation and are expected to have worldwide markets. They offer ultra-high energy conversion efficiency and extremely low environmental emissions. As modular units for distributed power generation, fuel cells are expected to be particularly beneficial where their by-product, heat, can be effectively used in cogeneration applications. Advanced fuel cell power systems fueled with natural gas are expected to be commercially available after the turn of the century.

Williams, M.C.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: February 6, 0: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on AddThis.com...

335

Increasing the Fuel Economy and Safety of New Light-Duty Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automotive Technology and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through2004. “The effect of fuel economy on automobile safety: aM. , 2002. “Near-term fuel economy potential for light-duty

Wenzel, Tom; Ross, Marc

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

The fuel cell industry, which has experienced continued increases in sales, is an emerging clean energy industry with the potential for significant growth in the stationary, portable, and transportation sectors. Fuel cells produce electricity in a highly efficient electrochemical process from a variety of fuels with low to zero emissions. This report describes data compiled in 2008 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2007 with some comparison to two previous years. The report begins with a discussion of worldwide trends in units shipped and financing for the fuel cell industry for 2007. It continues by focusing on the North American and U.S. markets. After providing this industry-wide overview, the report identifies trends for each of the major fuel cell applications -- stationary power, portable power, and transportation -- including data on the range of fuel cell technologies -- polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), and direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) -- used for these applications.

McMurphy, K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

Schobert, H.H.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

338

Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

Shuffler, Carter Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Wire wrapped fuel pin hexagonal arrays for PWR service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). Core design is ...

Diller, Peter Ray

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

1961-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Basics: Fuel Cells  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Fuel Cells Photo of...

344

Energy Basics: Hydrogen Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydrogen Fuel Fuel Cells Hydropower Ocean Solar Wind Hydrogen Fuel Hydrogen...

345

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuelcomparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel121, 2011. C. Fischer. Renewable Portfolio Standards: When

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Characteristics of potential repository wastes: Volume 4, Appendix 4A, Nuclear reactors at educational institutions of the United States; Appendix 4B, Data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions; Appendix 4C, Supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; Appendix 4D, Supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; Appendix 4E, Supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 contains the following appendices: nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States; data sheets for nuclear reactors at educational institutions in the United States(operational reactors and shut-down reactors); supplemental data for Fort St. Vrain spent fuel; supplemental data for Peach Bottom 1 spent fuel; and supplemental data for Fast Flux Test Facility.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Acquisition and Alternative Fuel Use Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative

348

BioFacts: Fueling a stronger economy, Biodiesel. Revision 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biodiesel is a substitute for or an additive to diesel fuel that is derived from the oils and fats of plants. It is an alternative fuel that can be used in diesel engines and provides power similar to conventional diesel fuel. It is a biodegradable transportation fuel that contributes little, if any, net carbon dioxide or sulfur to the atmosphere, and is low in particulate emission. It is a renewable, domestically produced liquid fuel that can help reduce US dependence on foreign oil imports. This overview presents the resource potential, history, processing techniques, US DOE programs cost and utilization potential of biodiesel fuels.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign will identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. This Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign supports achievement of the overarching Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program mission and objectives. Activities will be sufficiently flexible to accommodate any of the potential fuel cycle options for used fuel management. Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan

350

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Risk analysis of shipping plutonium pits and mixed oxide fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the end of the cold war, there no longer seems to be a credible threat of war between nuclear superpowers, with its possible consequence of billions of fatalities. However, the residue of the cold war, most notably the now excess weapons plutonium, has been identified as the source of a number of potential catastrophes. For example, just a single crude nuclear weapon in the hands of a terrorist organization or rogue state and detonated in even a medium-sized city could lead to hundreds of thousands of deaths. For this reason, the ultimate disposition of this excess plutonium has been identified as a national priority. The process of carrying out this disposition itself carries some risks, and even though any conceivable consequences clearly will be much smaller in magnitude than those cited above, U.S. federal law (the National Environmental Protection Act) mandates that such risks must be analyzed. The ability to carry out one type of such an analysis is demonstrated in this thesis. Specifically, one possible option that has been identified for disposition of excess U.S. weapons plutonium is the transformation into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, that then would be used as fuel in a commercial nuclear power plant. Any such process will involve the transportation of the MOX fuel from the MOX fuel fabrication facility to the nuclear power plant, and possibly transportation of the plutonium from a storage site to the fuel fabrication facility. This thesis is intended to demonstrate the capability to analyze the risks associated with such transportation campaigns. The primary tool used for these analyses was RADTRAN, a code developed by Sandia National Laboratories for evaluating risk associated with the transportation of radioactive materials. Two sample scenarios were explored relative to the transformation of plutonium pits to MOX fuel. First, the pits would be converted to MOX fuel at a fuel fabrication facility located either at the Pantex Plant or the Savannah River Site (SRS), and then the MOX fuel would be ultimately shipped to a final destination of a commercial power plant, the Palo Verde Generating Station in Arizona. For the scenario of placing the MOX fuel fabrication facility at SRS, pits would need to be shipped from Pantex to SRS and then the MOX fuel would be shipped to Palo Verde. The total number of expected fatalities over a 25 year campaign duration for this scenario would be 1.06, with 0. 1 73 fatalities resulting from latent cancer fatalities due to radiation exposure and 0.89 resulting from traffic accidents. For the placement of the MOX fuel fabrication facility at Pantex, only the MOX fuel would need to be transported from one facility to another, in this case from Pantex to Palo Verde. The total fatalities for this scenario over 25 years would be 0.413, resulting from 5.29 x 10-2 latent cancer fatalities and 0.36 traffic accident fatalities. The maximum exposed individual along any of the three routes would receive 1.0 X 10-5 rem per year or 0.25 mrem over 25 years.

Caldwell, Amy Baker

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The effect of fuel type in unsaturated spent fuel tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two well-characterized types of spent nuclear fuel (ATM-103 and ATM-106) were tested under simulated unsaturated conditions with simulated groundwater at 90{degree}C. The actinides present in the leachate were measured after periods of approximately 60, 120, and 275 days. The vessels were acid stripped after 120 and 275 days. Both colloidal and soluble actinide species were detected in the leachates which had pHs ranging from 4 to 7. Alpha spectroscopy studies of filtered and unfiltered leachates showed that large amounts of actinides may be bound in colloids. The uranium phases identified in the colloids were schoepite and soddyite. The actinide release behavior of the two fuels appears to be different. The ATM-106 fuel began to release actinides later than the ATM-103 fuel, but after 275 days, it had released more. The amount of americium released from the two fuels was a higher percentage of the maximum amount of americium present than was the percentage of the simultaneous amount of uranium released.

Finn, P.A.; Gong, M.; Bates, J.K.; Emery, J.W.; Hoh, J.C.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Role of fuel cells in industrial cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

During the early years (1958 to 1963), three types of fuel cells were under development: phosphoric acid (PAFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and solid oxide (SOFC) fuel cells. Between 1963 and 1971, the IGT research and development effort concentrated on the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate technologies; since 1971, emphasis has been on the molten carbonate fuel cell. IGT believes MCFC is best suited to meet the goals of the electric industry and the requirements of industrial cogeneration. Through the years, IGT has conducted system studies to evaluate the role that each one of the three fuel cell types can play in industrial cogeneration. This paper briefly discusses the status of the three technologies, the potential industrial cogeneration market, the application of fuel cells to this market, and the potential fuel savings for several industrial categories.

Camara, E.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 29, 2008 ... Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem. Diogo V. Andrade (diogo ***at*** google.com) Mauricio G. C. Resende (mgcr ...

355

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate ...

356

THE MAXIMUM k-COLORABLE SUBGRAPH PROBLEM AND ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to investigate the polyhedral con- .... The resulting graph with a maximum (black,white,crossed)-colorable ...... Due to the ad-.

357

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

| Diesel Vehicles Electricity | Hybrid & Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane |...

358

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Fuel Cell Animation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Fuel Cell Technologies Office Search Search Help Fuel Cell Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

359

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell ...  

Customizable Fuel Processor Technology Benefits Fuel Cell Power Industry (ANL-IN-00-030) Argonne National Laboratory. Contact ANL About This ...

360

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

M. Gomez

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

362

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition,  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Acquisition, Fuel Use, and Emissions Reductions Requirements on Digg

363

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

364

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Basics to Basics to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Basics on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Basics Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a

365

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen Transportation Fuel Basics - Hydrogen August 19, 2013 - 5:45pm Addthis Hydrogen (H2) is a potentially emissions-free alternative fuel that can be produced from domestic resources. Although not widely used today as a transportation fuel, government and industry research and development are working toward the goal of clean, economical, and safe hydrogen production and hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles. Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the universe. However, it is rarely found alone in nature. Hydrogen is locked up in enormous quantities in water (H2O), hydrocarbons (such as methane, CH4), and other organic matter. Efficiently producing hydrogen from these compounds is one of the challenges of using hydrogen as a fuel. Currently,

366

NETL: Turbines - Oxy-Fuel Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-Fuel Turbines Oxy-fuel combustion potentially can be used in plants based on both conventional and advanced technology. Studies have shown that plants equipped with oxy-fuel systems could reach nominal efficiencies in the 30 percent range with today's steam turbines when fueled with natural gas and when capturing the CO2. With anticipated advances in gasification, oxygen separation, and steam turbine technology, plants using oxy-fuel systems are expected to achieve efficiencies in the mid-40 percent range, with near-100 percent CO2 capture and near-zero NOx emissions. By 2012: In the near-term, efforts are focused on the development of oxy- fuel turbine and combustor technologies for highly efficient (50-60 percent), near-zero emissions, coal-based power systems

367

Chemistry Monitoring and Control for Fuel Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water chemistry has been identified as a known or potential contributing cause in recent corrosion-induced fuel failures and anomalies such as fuel crud spallation and enhanced nodular corrosion. The 2004 revision of the BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines (EPRI report 1008192) addressed these concerns by recommending tighter chemistry control limits and additional monitoring for contaminants and additives that can have an adverse effect on fuel cladding corrosion. The revision focused on chemistry control fo...

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

Unknown

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Alternative fuels and chemicals from synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

Unknown

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

Unknown

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

371

ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

Unknown

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

NONE

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). The program will involve a continuation of the work performed under the Alternative Fuels from Coal-Derived Synthesis Gas Program and will draw upon information and technologies generated in parallel current and future DOE-funded contracts.

Unknown

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Minimally refined biomass fuels: an economic shortcut  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economic shortcut can be realized if the sugars from which ethanol is made are utilized directly as concentrated aqueous solutions for fuels rather than by further refining them through fermentation and distillation steps. Simple evaporation of carbohydrate solutions from sugar cane or sweet sorghum, or from hydrolysis of starch or cellulose content of many plants yield potential liquid fuels of energy contents (on a volume basis) comparable to highly refined liquid fuels like methanol and ethanol. The potential utilization of such minimally refined biomass derived fuels is discussed and the burning of sucrose-ethanol-water solutions in a small modified domestic burner is demonstrated. Other potential uses of sugar solutions or emulsion and microemulsions in fuel oils for use in diesel or turbine engines are proposed and discussed.

Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel Greenhouse Gases Converted to Fuel carbon-conversion-fig-1.jpg Key Challenges: An important strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it to fuels and chemicals. Although researchers working toward that goal demonstrated in 1992 such a reaction in the lab, a key outstanding scientific challenge was explaining the details of how the reaction took place - its "mechanism." Why it Matters: An important potential strategy for reducing global CO2 emissions calls for capturing the greenhouse gas and converting it electrochemically to fuels and chemicals. Accomplishments: Computation to explain how carbon dioxide can be converted to small organic molecules with little energy input. The

376

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Advanced fuel concepts and applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite their more stringent plasma heating and confinement requirements, advanced fuel (AF) fusion cycles potentially offer improved environmental compatibility and lower costs. This comes about by elimination of tritium breeding requirements and by a reduction in neutron flux (hence, activation and radiation damage). Also a larger energy fraction carried by charged particles makes direct energy conversion more suitable. As a first application, a symbiotic system of semi-catalyzed-deuterium fueled hybrid fuel factories, supplying both fissle fuel to light water reactors and /sup 3/He to D-/sup 3/He satellite fusion reactors, is proposed. Subsequently, an evolution into a system of synfuel factories with satellite D-/sup 3/He reactors is envisioned.

Miley, G.H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION Seungjin on the variance of decon­ volved signal. We also consider the maximum negen­ tropy principle and show that the CME version, without any prior knowledge (such as channel impulse response, training data). As the demand

Choi, Seungjin

379

Maximum a posteriori based kernel classifier trained by linear programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new approach for classification problem based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. The necessary and sufficient condition for the cost function to estimate a posteriori probability was obtained. It was clarified by the condition ... Keywords: cost function, kernel function, linear programming, maximum a posteriori

Nopriadi Nopriadi; Yukihiko Yamashita

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Estimating Maximum Surface Winds from Hurricane Reconnaissance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radial profiles of surface winds measured by the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) are compared to radial profiles of flight-level winds to determine the slant ratio of the maximum surface wind speed to the maximum flight-level wind ...

Mark D. Powell; Eric W. Uhlhorn; Jeffrey D. Kepert

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Maximum likelihood estimation of Gaussian mixture models using stochastic search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaussian mixture models (GMM), commonly used in pattern recognition and machine learning, provide a flexible probabilistic model for the data. The conventional expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters ... Keywords: Covariance parametrization, Expectation-maximization, Gaussian mixture models, Identifiability, Maximum likelihood estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Stochastic search

Ça?lar Ar?; Selim Aksoy; Orhan Ar?kan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart VAMSI K. MOOTHA, ANDREW E. ARAI, AND ROBERT S. BALABAN Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National. Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart. Am. J. Physiol. 272 (Heart Circ

Mootha, Vamsi K.

383

Synthetic fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In January 1982, the Department of Energy guaranteed a loan for the construction and startup of the Great Plains project. On August 1, 1985, the partnership defaulted on the $1.54 billion loan, and DOE acquired control of, and then title to, the project. DOE continued to operate the plant, through the ANG Coal Gasification Company, and sell synthetic fuel. The DOE's ownership and divestiture of the plant is discussed.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Advanced Planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced fuel cells have many potential utility applications including new multi-megawatt central power plants, repowering existing plants, and dispersed generation. A newly designed 25 kW planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system offers simplicity of construction, low cost manufacturing, efficient recovery of by product heat, and straight-forward system integration.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Economic Analysis of Alternative Fuel School Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Clean Cities final report provides a general idea of the potential economic impacts of choosing alternative fuels for school bus fleets. It provides information on different school bus types, as well as analysis of the three main types of alternative fuel used in school bus fleets today (natural gas, propane, and biodiesel).

Laughlin, M.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

California Fuel Cell Partnership Alternative Fuels Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories · Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories · RSD

387

Alternative flow-field and backing concepts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

New concepts for potentially low cost flow-field and electrode backing components for polymer electrolyte fuel cells are investigated.

Wilson, M.S.; Springer, T.E.; Davey, J.R.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Fuel cell systems for personal and portable power applications  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert fuel, usually hydrogen gas, to directly produce electricity. Fuel cells were initially developed for use in the space program to provide electricity and drinking water for astronauts. Fuel cells are under development for use in the automobile industry to power cars and buses with the advantage of lower emissions and higher efficiency than internal combustion engines. Fuel cells also have great potential to be used in portable consumer products like cellular phones and laptop computers, as well as military applications. In fact, any products that use batteries can be powered by fuel cells. In this project, we examine fuel cell system trade-offs between fuel cell type and energy storage/hydrogen production for portable power generation. The types of fuel cells being examined include stored hydrogen PEM (polymer electrolyte), direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and indirect methanol fuel cells, where methanol is reformed producing hydrogen. These fuel cells systems can operate at or near ambient conditions, which make them potentially optimal for use in manned personal power applications. The expected power production for these systems is in the range of milliwatts to 500 watts of electrical power for either personal or soldier field use. The fuel cell system trade-offs examine hydrogen storage by metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, and compressed hydrogen tanks. We examine the weights each system, volume, fuel storage, system costs, system peripherals, power output, and fuel cell feasibility in portable devices.

Fateen, S. A. (Shaheerah A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and lower emissions. Running the vehicle’s motor on hydrogen rather than ...

390

Improving Costs and Efficiency of PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles by ...  

Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to reduce our dependence on foreign oil and lower emissions. Running the vehicle’s motor on hydrogen rather than gasoline ...

391

An analysis of distributed solar fuel systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While solar fuel systems offer tremendous potential to address global clean energy needs, most existing analyses have focused on the feasibility of large centralized systems and applications. Not much research exists on ...

Thomas, Alex, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center on AddThis.com... Fuel Properties Search Fuel Properties Comparison Create a custom chart comparing fuel properties and characteristics for multiple fuels. Select the fuel and properties of interest. Select Fuels Clear all All Fuels Gasoline Diesel (No. 2) Biodiesel Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Electricity Ethanol Hydrogen Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Propane (LPG)

394

Impact of Fuel Failure on Criticality Safety of Used Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Commercial used nuclear fuel (UNF) in the United States is expected to remain in storage for considerably longer periods than originally intended (e.g., <40 years). Extended storage (ES) time and irradiation of nuclear fuel to high-burnup values (>45 GWd/t) may increase the potential for fuel failure during normal and accident conditions involving storage and transportation. Fuel failure, depending on the severity, can result in changes to the geometric configuration of the fuel, which has safety and regulatory implications. The likelihood and extent of fuel reconfiguration and its impact on the safety of the UNF is not well understood. The objective of this work is to assess and quantify the impact of fuel reconfiguration due to fuel failure on criticality safety of UNF in storage and transportation casks. This effort is primarily motivated by concerns related to the potential for fuel degradation during ES periods and transportation following ES. The criticality analyses consider representative UNF designs and cask systems and a range of fuel enrichments, burnups, and cooling times. The various failed-fuel configurations considered are designed to bound the anticipated effects of individual rod and general cladding failure, fuel rod deformation, loss of neutron absorber materials, degradation of canister internals, and gross assembly failure. The results quantify the potential impact on criticality safety associated with fuel reconfiguration and may be used to guide future research, design, and regulatory activities. Although it can be concluded that the criticality safety impacts of fuel reconfiguration during transportation subsequent to ES are manageable, the results indicate that certain configurations can result in a large increase in the effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}. Future work to inform decision making relative to which configurations are credible, and therefore need to be considered in a safety evaluation, is recommended.

Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Gas-to-liquids synthetic fuels for use in fuel cells : reformability, energy density, and infrastructure compatibility.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel cell has many potential applications, from power sources for electric hybrid vehicles to small power plants for commercial buildings. The choice of fuel will be critical to the pace of its commercialization. This paper reviews the various liquid fuels being considered as an alternative to direct hydrogen gas for the fuel cell application, presents calculations of the hydrogen and carbon dioxide yields from autothermal reforming of candidate liquid fuels, and reports the product gas composition measured from the autothermal reforming of a synthetic fuel in a micro-reactor. The hydrogen yield for a synthetic paraffin fuel produced by a cobalt-based Fischer-Tropsch process was found to be similar to that of retail gasoline. The advantages of the synthetic fuel are that it contains no contaminants that would poison the fuel cell catalyst, is relatively benign to the environment, and could be transported in the existing fuel distribution system.

Ahmed, S.; Kopasz, J. P.; Russell, B. J.; Tomlinson, H. L.

1999-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Behavior of spent fuel under unsaturated conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the performance of spent fuel in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, spent fuel fragments are being exposed to small and intermittent amounts of simulated groundwater under unsaturated conditions. Both the leachate and the visual appearance of the spent fuel have been characterized for 581 days of testing. The amount of Am and Cm measured in the leachates was one to two orders of magnitude greater than that released from spent fuel under saturated conditions. The cause of this difference has not been firmly identified but may be attributable to the presence of large amounts of actinide-containing colloids in the leachate of the unsaturated tests.

Finn, P.A.; Hoh, J.C.; Bates, J.K.; Wolf, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemical Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

397

Dry Transfer Systems for Used Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential need for a dry transfer system (DTS) to enable retrieval of used nuclear fuel (UNF) for inspection or repackaging will increase as the duration and quantity of fuel in dry storage increases. This report explores the uses for a DTS, identifies associated general functional requirements, and reviews existing and proposed systems that currently perform dry fuel transfers. The focus of this paper is on the need for a DTS to enable transfer of bare fuel assemblies. Dry transfer systems for UNF canisters are currently available and in use for transferring loaded canisters between the drying station and storage and transportation casks.

Brett W. Carlsen; Michaele BradyRaap

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Rate Reduction...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

& Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane | Propane Vehicles Emerging Fuels Fuel Prices...

399

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Fuel Fleet Services  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

& Plug-In Electric Vehicles Ethanol | Flex Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen | Fuel Cell Vehicles Natural Gas | Natural Gas Vehicles Propane | Propane Vehicles Emerging Fuels Fuel Prices...

400

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs draft environmental impact statement. Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a programmatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For programmatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Department of Energy Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel Management and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Draft Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document analyzes at a pregrammatic level the potential environmental consequences over the next 40 years of alternatives related to the transportation, receipt, processing, and storage of spent nuclear fuel under the responsibility of the US Department of Energy. It also analyzes the site-specific consequences of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sitewide actions anticipated over the next 10 years for waste and spent nuclear fuel management and environmental restoration. For pregrammatic spent nuclear fuel management, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, decentralization, regionalization, centralization and the use of the plans that existed in 1992/1993 for the management of these materials. For the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, this document analyzes alternatives of no action, ten-year plan, minimum and maximum treatment, storage, and disposal of US Department of Energy wastes.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

System for adding sulfur to a fuel cell stack system for improved fuel cell stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for adding sulfur to a reformate stream feeding a fuel cell stack, having a sulfur source for providing sulfur to the reformate stream and a metering device in fluid connection with the sulfur source and the reformate stream. The metering device injects sulfur from the sulfur source to the reformate stream at a predetermined rate, thereby providing a conditioned reformate stream to the fuel cell stack. The system provides a conditioned reformate stream having a predetermined sulfur concentration that gives an acceptable balance of minimal drop in initial power with the desired maximum stability of operation over prolonged periods for the fuel cell stack.

Mukerjee, Subhasish; Haltiner, Jr., Karl J; Weissman, Jeffrey G

2013-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

403

BWR Fuel Assembly BWR Fuel Assembly PWR Fuel Assembly  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Spacer Grid Structural Guide Tube End Fitting Fuel Rod Upper Tie Plate ULTRAFLOW Spacer Water Channel Part-length Fuel Rod Lower Tie Plate PWR pressurized water reactor BWR ...

404

Trends of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in Northern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of testing the homogeneity of the basic data used in this study, that is, the mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature (as derived from daily observations) of several long-term climatological stations of ...

Ramon A. Quintana-Gomez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

A maximum likelihood approach towards aggregating partial orders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many of the possible applications as well as the theoretical models of computational social choice, the agents' preferences are represented as partial orders. In this paper, we extend the maximum likelihood approach for defining "optimal" voting rules ...

Lirong Xia; Vincent Conitzer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

On Determinations of Maximum Hailstone Sizes from Hallpad Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports of hailstones larger than those indicated by hailpad observations being found on the ground around the hailpad sites raise questions about the validity of maximum-size determinations. Data from the Grossversuch IV hailpad network ...

Paul L. Smith; Albert Waldvogel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Characteristics of Maximum Concentrations from Multiple Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple quasi-Newton numerical scheme is applied to determine the hypothetical worst-case meteorology that will result in the maximum combined concentrations at any receptor location in air quality modeling over short distances for multiple ...

N. M. Zoumakis

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Synoptic Reorganization of Atmospheric Flow during the Last Glacial Maximum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled global atmosphere–ocean model of intermediate complexity is used to study the influence of glacial boundary conditions on the atmospheric circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum in a systematical manner. A web of atmospheric ...

Flávio Justino; Axel Timmermann; Ute Merkel; Enio P. Souza

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Humidity Profile Retrieval Using a Maximum Entropy Principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite data inversion method based on a maximum entropy principle is presented. The method is both physical since a radiative transfer model with its adjoint is needed, and also statistical since errors of the observed radiances and of a ...

Bernard Urban

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Maximum Likelihood Estimation Using Parallel Computing: An Introduction to MPI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational difficulty of econometric problems has increased dramatically in recent years as econometricians examine more complicated models and utilize more sophisticated estimation techniques. Many problems in econometrics are `embarrassingly ... Keywords: MPI, maximum likelihood estimation, parallel computing, parallel programming

Christopher A. Swann

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Maximum likelihood sequence estimation from the lattice viewpoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considers the problem of data detection in multilevel lattice-type modulation systems in the presence of intersymbol interference and additive white Gaussian noise. The conventional maximum likelihood sequence estimator using the Viterbi algorithm has ...

Wai Ho Mow

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Computing maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider computing a maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs. For a convex bipartite graph of n vertices and m edges, we present an O (n logn ...

Danny Z. Chen; Xiaomin Liu; Haitao Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Effects of Tides on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights: Probability Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical study was carried out to understand how the probability distribution for maximum wave heights (?m) during tsunamis depends on the initial tsunami amplitude (A) and the tides. It was assumed that the total wave height is the linear ...

Harold O. Mofjeld; Frank I. González; Vasily V. Titov; Angie J. Venturato; Jean C. Newman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Fuel Cell Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Links Fuel Cell Links The links below are provided as additional resources for fuel-cell-related information. Most of the linked sites are not part of, nor affiliated with, fueleconomy.gov. We do not endorse or vouch for the accuracy of the information found on such sites. Fuel Cell Vehicles and Manufacturers Chevrolet General Motors press release about the Chevrolet Fuel Cell Equinox Ford Ford overview of their hydrogen fuel cell vehicles Honda FCX Clarity official site Hyundai Hyundai press release announcing the upcoming Tucson Fuel Cell Mercedes-Benz Ener-G-Force Fuel-cell-powered concept SUV Nissan Nissan TeRRA concept SUV Toyota Overview of Toyota fuel cell technology Hydrogen- and Fuel-Cell-Related Information and Tools Fuel Cell Vehicles Brief overview of fuel cell vehicles provided by DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC)

418

Fuel Guide Economy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS IN POPULAR VEHICLE CLASSES Listed below are the vehicles with the highest fuel economy for the most popular classes, including both automatic and manual transmissions and gasoline and diesel vehicles. Please be aware that many of these vehicles come in a range of engine sizes and trim lines, resulting in different fuel economy values. Check the fuel economy guide or the fuel economy sticker on new vehicles to find the values for a particular version of a vehicle. CONTENTS MODEL YEAR 2000 FUEL ECONOMY LEADERS ................. 1 HOW TO USE THIS GUIDE ..................................................... 2 FUEL ECONOMY AND YOUR ANNUAL FUEL COSTS .......... 3 WHY FUEL ECONOMY IS IMPORTANT .................................

419

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Weight Idle Reduction Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Weight Exemption A vehicle equipped with a fully functional idle reduction system designed to reduce fuel use and emissions from engine idling may exceed the maximum

420

Energy Basics: Fuel Cell Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Energy Basics: Flexible Fuel Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Fuels Vehicles Electric Vehicles Flexible Fuel Vehicles Fuel Cell Vehicles Hybrid Electric Vehicles Natural Gas Vehicles Propane...

422

Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1  

SciTech Connect

Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

423

Apparatus for inspecting fuel elements  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is an alpha monitor usable in an automated nuclear fuel pin loading and processing unit. Fuel pins or other elongated pins are fed laterally into the alpha monitor in a singular fashion and are translated by a first roller assembly into a weld flare machining and decontamination substation not forming a part of the invention. Pins return and are lifted upwardly and transferred across to a combined pin lifting and electrode operating means which lifts the pins upwardly into a clamshell electrode assembly which is spread open by a combined pin lifting and electrode operating means. Once inserted the clamshell type electrode arrangement closes around the fuel pins so that inspection can occur. Fuel pins are inspected by charging electrodes to a negative potential and measuring the change in charge occurring when positively charged alpha particles strike the negatively charged electrodes. After inspection, the fuel pins are lowered by the pin lifting and electrode operating means into a second roller assembly which longitudinally conveys approved pins from the airtight enclosure in which the alpha monitor is mounted. If the fuel pins are rejected then they are moved laterally by a second transfer means and onto another system for further processing.

Oakley, David J. (Richland, WA); Groves, Oliver J. (Seattle, WA); Kaiser, Bruce J. (Wilmington, NC)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Apparatus for inspecting fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure describes an alpha monitor usable in an automated nuclear fuel pin loading and processing unit. Fuel pins or other elongated pins are fed laterally into the alpha monitor in a singular fashion and are translated by a first roller assembly into a weld flare machining and decontamination substation not forming a part of the invention. Pins return and are lifted upwardly and transferred across to a combined pin lifting and electrode operating means which lifts the pins upwardly into a clamshell electrode assembly which is spread open by a combined pin lifting and electrode operating means. Once inserted the clamshell type electrode arrangement closes around the fuel pins so that inspection can occur. Fuel pins are inspected by charging electrodes to a negative potential and measuring the change in charge occurring when positively charged alpha particles strike the negatively charged electrodes. After inspection, the fuel pins are lowered by the pin lifting and electrode operating means into a second roller assembly which longitudinally conveys approved pins from the airtight enclosure in which the alpha monitor is mounted. If the fuel pins are rejected then they are moved laterally by a second transfer means and onto another system for further processing.

Kaiser, B.J.; Oakley, D.J.; Groves, O.J.

1984-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

425

Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/South (HFEF/S). The proposed action, to modify the existing HFEF/S at the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in southeastern Idaho, would allow important aspects of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) concept, offering potential advantages in nuclear safety and economics, to be demonstrated. It would support fuel cycle experiments and would supply fresh fuel to the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) at the INEL. 35 refs., 12 figs., 13 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOE Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop was held on March 16-17, 2010, to discuss the most relevant fuel cell technology research and development topics in fuel cells and fuel cell systems appropriate for government funding in stationary and transportation applications as well as cross-cutting stack and balance of plant component technology. Fuel Cell Pre-Solicitation Workshop was held on March 16-17, 2010, to discuss the most relevant fuel cell technology research and development topics in fuel cells and fuel cell systems appropriate for government funding in stationary and transportation applications as well as cross-cutting stack and balance of plant component technology. This public workshop, held at the Sheraton Denver West Hotel in Lakewood, Colorado, was attended by more than 150 researchers, fuel cell developers, and other industry representatives. An additional 50 joined the presentations via webinar. Plenary overview presentations were followed by facilitated breakout group discussions, organized into five general topic areas: (1) catalysts, (2) MEAs, components and integration, (3) high-temperature (SOFC) system and balance of plant, (4) low-temperature fuel cell system balance of plant and fuel processors, and (5) long-term innovative technologies. The input from workshop participants and from the DOE Request for Information will be used to assist in the development of potential Fuel Cell Funding Opportunity Announcements in the future.

427

Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Basics Vehicle Basics Fuel Cell Vehicle Basics August 20, 2013 - 9:11am Addthis Photo of a blue car with 'The Road to Hydrogen' written on it, filling up at a hydrogen fueling station. Fuel cell vehicles, powered by hydrogen, have the potential to revolutionize our transportation system. They are more efficient than conventional internal combustion engine vehicles and produce no harmful tailpipe exhaust-their only emission is water. Fuel cell vehicles and the hydrogen infrastructure to fuel them are in an early stage of development. The U.S. Department of Energy is leading government and industry efforts to make hydrogen-powered vehicles an affordable, environmentally friendly, and safe transportation option. Visit the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center to learn more

428

Hydrogen and fuel cell research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen and fuel cell research Hydrogen and fuel cell research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hydrogen and fuel cell research Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/proj_fc_bus_eval.html This webside contributes to the growing role that advanced technologies play in addressing the nation's energy challenges. Their projects focus on hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and manufacturing. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydrogen_and_fuel_cell_research&oldid=515025" Categories: Transportation Toolkits

429

Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian Fuel Cell Commercialization Roadmap Update: Progress of Canada's Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Industry Focus Area: Hydrogen Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.chfca.ca/files/IC_FC_PDF_final.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-fuel-cell-commercialization- Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This roadmap update provides an overview of global hydrogen and fuel cell markets as context for the activities of the Canadian industry. It presents

430

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Benefits and Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Benefits and Considerations Hydrogen can be produced from diverse domestic resources with the potential

431

Fuel processing for fuel cell powered vehicles.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of auto companies have announced plans to have fuel cell powered vehicles on the road by the year 2004. The low-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells to be used in these vehicles require high quality hydrogen. Without a hydrogen-refueling infrastructure, these vehicles need to convert the available hydrocarbon fuels into a hydrogen-rich gas on-board the vehicle. Earlier analysis has shown that fuel processors based on partial oxidation reforming are well suited to meet the size and weight targets and the other performance-related needs of on-board fuel processors for light-duty fuel cell vehicles (1).

Ahmed, S.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Lee, S. H. D.; Carter, J. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fuel-cycle costs for alternative fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper compares the fuel cycle cost and fresh fuel requirements for a range of nuclear reactor systems including the present day LWR without fuel recycle, an LWR modified to obtain a higher fuel burnup, an LWR using recycle uranium and plutonium fuel, an LWR using a proliferation resistant /sup 233/U-Th cycle, a heavy water reactor, a couple of HTGRs, a GCFR, and several LMFBRs. These reactor systems were selected from a set of 26 developed for the NASAP study and represent a wide range of fuel cycle requirements.

Rainey, R.H.; Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Unger, W.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Grants

434

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Vehicle Replacement Grants

435

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Vehicle (AFV) Conversion

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fueling Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Vehicle Labeling Requirement

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuel Fueling Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuel Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Promotion and Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Promotion and Information

440

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Ethanol Fuel Blend Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol Fuel Blend Dispensing Regulations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum potential fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Fuels Taxation Study Commission to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuels Taxation Study Commission

442

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fueling Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fueling Infrastructure Tax Credit

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel and Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel and Conversion Definitions