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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Variable-Speed Wind Generator System with Maximum Output Power Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To achieve maximum output power from wind generator systems, the rotational speed of wind generators should be adjusted in real time according to natural wind speed. This chapter pays attention to an optimum rota...

Yoko Amano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Abstract-This paper proposes a neural network based approach to estimating the maximum possible output power of a solar photovoltaic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on a shaded solar panel at different hours of a day for several days. After training the neural network, its, building-integrated photovoltaic panels, and portable solar tents, it is common for a solar PV to become output power of a solar photovoltaic array under the non-uniform shadow conditions at a given geographic

Lehman, Brad

3

Output Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Every discrete-event simulation experiment with random input generates random sample paths as output. Each path usually consists of a sequence of dependent observations that serve as the raw material for estim...

George S. Fishman

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

5

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

6

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

7

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

8

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

9

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

10

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

11

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

12

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

13

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

14

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

15

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

16

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

17

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

18

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

19

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

30

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

31

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Natural Gas-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Electric Utilities 206,774 78,346 37.9 74,835 23,624 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 170,654 42,509 24.9 40,788 12,216

36

Enhanced performance CCD output amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-noise FET amplifier is connected to amplify output charge from a che coupled device (CCD). The FET has its gate connected to the CCD in common source configuration for receiving the output charge signal from the CCD and output an intermediate signal at a drain of the FET. An intermediate amplifier is connected to the drain of the FET for receiving the intermediate signal and outputting a low-noise signal functionally related to the output charge signal from the CCD. The amplifier is preferably connected as a virtual ground to the FET drain. The inherent shunt capacitance of the FET is selected to be at least equal to the sum of the remaining capacitances.

Dunham, Mark E. (Los Alamos, NM); Morley, David W. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fire. The inputs are chosen from distributions that are either gaussian, uniform, skewed, or bimodal. For each circuit, we compute the distribution on output spiking states either analytically or by sampling, approximate by a maximum entropy fit... generation is characterized by a simple static nonlinearity, or by integrate-and-fire (LIF) threshold-crossing dynamics. However, this circuit does generate substantial higher-order correlations if the common input to the three cells is bimodal. This approach...

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

Combining frequency and time domain approaches to systems with multiple spike train input and output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

between neuronal spike trains. Prog Biophys Mol Biol Vapnikto systems with multiple spike train input and output D. R.Keywords Multiple spike trains · Neural coding · Maximum

Brillinger, D. R.; Lindsay, K. A.; Rosenberg, J. R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Most efficient quantum thermoelectric at finite power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machines are only Carnot efficient if they are reversible, but then their power output is vanishingly small. Here we ask, what is the maximum efficiency of an irreversible device with finite power output? We use a nonlinear scattering theory to answer this question for thermoelectric quantum systems; heat engines or refrigerators consisting of nanostructures or molecules that exhibit a Peltier effect. We find that quantum mechanics places an upper bound on both power output, and on the efficiency at any finite power. The upper bound on efficiency equals Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decays with increasing power output. It is intrinsically quantum (wavelength dependent), unlike Carnot efficiency. This maximum efficiency occurs when the system lets through all particles in a certain energy window, but none at other energies. A physical implementation of this is discussed, as is the suppression of efficiency by a phonon heat flow.

Robert S. Whitney

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Facets for the Maximum Common Induced Subgraph Problem ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such that (i, j) ? E ? (?(i),?(j)) ? F and (i, j) ? F ? (??1(i),??1(j)) ? E. Besides, given a graph G ... therefore, there are n + 1 afine independent vectors (where n is the number of variables in the model). ...... [4] M. R. Garey and D. S. Johnson.

2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Finding the quantum thermoelectric with maximal efficiency and minimal entropy production at given power output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the nonlinear scattering theory for quantum systems with strong Seebeck and Peltier effects, and consider their use as heat-engines and refrigerators with finite power outputs. This article gives detailed derivations of the results summarized in Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 130601 (2014). It shows how to use the scattering theory to find (i) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum possible power output, and (ii) the quantum thermoelectric with maximum efficiency at given power output. The latter corresponds to a minimal entropy production at that power output. These quantities are of quantum origin since they depend on system size over electronic wavelength, and so have no analogue in classical thermodynamics. The maximal efficiency coincides with Carnot efficiency at zero power output, but decreases with increasing power output. This gives a fundamental lower bound on entropy production, which means that reversibility (in the thermodynamic sense) is impossible for finite power output. The suppression of efficiency by (nonlinear) phonon and photon effects is addressed in detail; when these effects are strong, maximum efficiency coincides with maximum power. Finally, we show in particular limits (typically without magnetic fields) that relaxation within the quantum system does not allow the system to exceed the bounds derived for relaxation-free systems, however a general proof of this remains elusive.

Robert S. Whitney

2015-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

42

Maximum of oil output of a treadle-powered peanut oil press  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The manual processing of food products has become a substantial part of the daily routine of a typical household in the developing world. Consumption of oil is an essential part of an individual's diet and thus, the ...

Patel, Ravi M. (Ravi Mahendra)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Nonlinear optics at maximum coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...D. Walls Nonlinear optics at maximum coherence S. E. Harris G. Y. Yin M. Jain H...optical processes which utilize maximum coherence of a non-allowed transition. The nonlinear...frequency. Nonlinear optics at maximum coherence B y S. E. Harris, G. Y. Yin, M...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Method of Decreasing Power Output Fluctuation of Solar Chimney Power Generating Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Severe fluctuation of power output is a common problem in the various generating systems of renewable energies. The hybrid energy storage system with water and soil is adopted to decrease the fluctuation of solar chimney power generating systems in the ... Keywords: Solar chimney power generating system, power output fluctuation, hybrid energy storage layer, collector, chimney

Meng Fanlong; Ming Tingzhen; Pan Yuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

MaximumLetThrough.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 9 Maximum Let-Through Currents in the APS Storage Ring Quadrupole, Sextupole, and Corrector Magnets J. Carwardine, D. McGhee, G. Markovich May 18, 1999 Abstract Limits are described for the maximum magnet currents, under specified fault conditions, for the storage ring quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets. Introduction In computing the maximum let-through current for the magnets for the storage ring, several factors must be considered. In general, the maximum current likely to occur even under fault conditions is less than the maximum theoretical DC current given the magnet resistance and the maximum available DC voltage. The first level of protection against magnet current overloads is the over-current interlock that is built into the converter electronics package. The threshold is set to approximately 110% of

46

Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nano heat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

Obinna Abah; Johannes Rossnagel; Georg Jacob; Sebastian Deffner; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer; Eric Lutz

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

47

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

48

A Basic Thermodynamic Derivation of the Maximum Overburden Pressure Generated in Frost Heave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can derive the maximum overburden pressure. A similar argument can also produce the maximum Heave Engine Frost heave is a common environmental process in which the freezing of water into ice can produce forces large enough to seriously damage roads and bridges [1]. Contrary to common belief, frost

Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

49

Anisotropic Grid Adaptation for Multiple Aerodynamic Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anisotropic grid–adaptive strategies are presented for viscous flow simulations in which the accurate prediction of multiple aerodynamic outputs (such as the lift, drag, and moment coefficients) is required from a single ...

Venditti, David A.

50

High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission W...Vestrand We review high-energy observations of solar flares with emphasis...expectation, high-energy emission is a common property of solar flares. Direct interpretation...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NAO Climatology: ROMS output is saved once every 3 days and written to an output file every 6 days Output after 30 days in 6th file. The Starting Month = July Example: roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0120.nc.gz : July 3 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0122.nc.gz : July 6 and July 9 roms_low_his_levts0570dg.0124.nc

Gangopadhyay, Avijit

52

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, May 2014 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

53

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

54

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Heart mass and the maximum cardiac output of birds and mammals: implications for estimating the maximum aerobic power input of flying animals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...due to the intrinsic interest of studying car- diovascular adaptation to changes in...expenditure from heart rate and doubly-labeled water in exercising geese. Ph s. ool. 65...1968 Respiratory exchange and evaporative water loss in the flying budgerigar. . Exp...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Gesture output: eyes-free output using a force feedback touch surface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose using spatial gestures not only for input but also for output. Analogous to gesture input, the proposed gesture output moves the user's finger in a gesture, which the user then recognizes. We use our concept in a mobile scenario where a motion ... Keywords: eyes free, force feedback, gestures, touch

Anne Roudaut; Andreas Rau; Christoph Sterz; Max Plauth; Pedro Lopes; Patrick Baudisch

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Kiowa County Commons Building  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This poster describes the energy efficiency features and sustainable materials used in the Kiowa County Commons Building in Greensburg, Kansas.

58

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5 V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used...

Eachempatti, Haritha

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

59

Bioenergy technology balancing energy output with environmental  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E2.3 Bioenergy technology ­ balancing energy output with environmental benefitsbenefits John standards #12;Is it right to grow bioenergy? Or How much bioenergy production is right? #12;Historical bioenergy Farmers historically used 25% land for horse feed #12;Energy crops are `solar panels' Solar energy

Levi, Ran

60

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Multi Output Filtering Effects in PCMOS Anshul Singh*, Arindam Basu, Keck-Voon Ling, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore *NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied Infodynamics (ISAID), NTU, Singapore $School of Computer Engineering, NTU, Singapore §School of ECE, Georgia

Mooney, Vincent

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title Slide "The broadband acoustic output of marine seismic airgun sources" Les Hatton CISM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns Introduction Modelling Marine Life Impact Where next Overview #12 Normal speed surface movie of airgun firing Courtesy IO limited #12;Seismic sources ­ marine airguns

Hatton, Les

62

Administrator Ready Reference Guide Customizing an Output Style  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

may be in various sections of the instructions. Some things to look for: - line spacing Preview Utility (Tools, Preview Output Styles) or by simply opening the Output Style Editor (Bibliography, Edit button -- to the right of the output style drop- down). The Output Style Preview Utility

University of Technology, Sydney

63

Generalized Input-Output Inequality Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper two types of generalized Leontief input-output inequality systems are introduced. The minimax properties for a class of functions associated with the inequalities are studied. Sufficient and necessary conditions for the inequality systems to have solutions are obtained in terms of the minimax value. Stability analysis for the solution set is provided in terms of upper semi-continuity and hemi-continuity of set-valued maps.

Liu Yingfan [Department of Mathematics, Nanjing University of Post and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: yingfanliu@hotmail.com; Zhang Qinghong [Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, Northern Michigan University, Marquette, MI 49855 (United States)], E-mail: qzhang@nmu.edu

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Effects of collector radius and chimney height on power output of a solar chimney power plant with turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive theoretical model is proposed for the performance evaluation of a solar chimney power plant (SCPP), and has been verified by the experimental data of the Spanish prototype. This model takes account of the effects of flow and heat losses, and the temperature lapse rates inside and outside the chimney. There is a maximum power output for a certain SCPP under a given solar radiation condition, due to flow and heat losses and the installation of the turbines. In addition, the design flow rate of the turbine in the SCPP system is found beneficial for power output when it is lower than that at the maximum power point. Furthermore, a limitation on the maximum collector radius exists for the maximum attainable power of the SCPP; whereas, no such limitation exists for chimney height in terms of contemporary construction technology.

Jing-yin Li; Peng-hua Guo; Yuan Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Common Help Room Hours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Help Room Hours for Spring 2015. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 10:30 am. 11:30 am. MA 16200 - MATH 205 - Nathanael Cox ...

67

Common Help Room Hours  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Help Room Hours for Spring 2015. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday. 10:30 am. 11:30 am. MA 16010 - MATH 205 - Alessandra ...

68

Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell and Thermoelectric Generator for Maximum Power Output in Micro-CHP Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the most obvious early market applications for thermoelectric generators (TEG) is decentralized micro combined heat and power (CHP) installations of 0.5 kWe to 5 ... possible to increase the electricity pr...

L. A. Rosendahl; Paw V. Mortensen; Ali A. Enkeshafi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Using Weather Data and Climate Model Output in Economic Analyses of Climate Change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Economists are increasingly using weather data and climate model output in analyses of the economic impacts of climate change. This article introduces a set of weather data sets and climate models that are frequently used, discusses the most common mistakes economists make in using these products, and identifies ways to avoid these pitfalls. We first provide an introduction to weather data, including a summary of the types of datasets available, and then discuss five common pitfalls that empirical researchers should be aware of when using historical weather data as explanatory variables in econometric applications. We then provide a brief overview of climate models and discuss two common and significant errors often made by economists when climate model output is used to simulate the future impacts of climate change on an economic outcome of interest.

Auffhammer, Maximilian [University of California at Berkeley; Hsiang, Solomon M. [Princeton University; Schlenker, Wolfram [Columbia University; Sobel, Adam H. [Columbia University

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

A numerical method for calculation of power output from ducted vertical axis hydro-current turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates effects of ducting on power output from vertical axis hydro-current turbines. A numerical two-dimensional method based on the potential flow theory is developed for calculation of non-dimensional power output from these turbines. In this method, the blades are represented by vortex filaments. The vortex shedding from the blades is modeled by discrete vortices. A boundary element method is used to incorporate the duct shape which is represented by a series of panels with constant distributions of sources and doublets. The aerodynamic loading on the blades are calculated using a quasi-steady modeling. A time-marching scheme is used for implementation of the numerical method. The results of this method are compared with experimental results for a turbine model. A good correlation between the numerical and experimental results is obtained for tip speed ratios equal and higher than 2.25. However due to a lack of dynamic stall modeling, the numerical method is not able to predict power output accurately at lower tip speed ratios wherein effects of dynamic stall are significant. Both numerical and experimental results also showed that the power output from a turbine can increase significantly when it is enclosed within a well-designed duct. The maximum power output of the turbine model investigated in this paper showed a 74% increase when the turbine is operating within the duct relative to the case it is in free-stream conditions.

Mahmoud Alidadi; Sander Calisal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Off-set stabilizer for comparator output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A stabilized off-set voltage is input as the reference voltage to a comparator. In application to a time-interval meter, the comparator output generates a timing interval which is independent of drift in the initial voltage across the timing capacitor. A precision resistor and operational amplifier charge a capacitor to a voltage which is precisely offset from the initial voltage. The capacitance of the reference capacitor is selected so that substantially no voltage drop is obtained in the reference voltage applied to the comparator during the interval to be measured.

Lunsford, James S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Common Coil Papers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on the common coil magnet design with Ramesh Gupta as a major author on the common coil magnet design with Ramesh Gupta as a major author (unless noted). There are many other papers on common coil magnet by several other authors that are not listed here. R. Gupta, et. al, "React & Wind Nb3Sn Common Coil Dipole", Presented at ASC 2006, August 27- September 1, 2006 in Seattle, WA, USA. J. Cozzolino, et. al., "Magnet Engineering and Test Results of the High Field Magnet R&D Program at BNL", Presented at the Applied Superconductivity Conference at Houston, TX, USA (2002). R. Gupta, et al., “R & D for Accelerator Magnets with React and Wind High Temperature Superconductors,” International Conference on Magnet Technology (MT-17) at Geneva, Switzerland (2001)... (Click here for Talk) J. Escallier, et al., "Technology Development for React and Wind

73

An Introduction Common Criteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Germany), NLNCSA (Netherlands), CESG (UK), NIST (USA) and NSA (USA). Contents 2 This document provides... Page 3 Page 4 Page 6 Page 8 Page 10 Page 12 Page 14 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 #12;Common Criteria

Sandhu, Ravi

74

Application of computer voice input/output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The advent of microprocessors and other large-scale integration (LSI) circuits is making voice input and output for computers and instruments practical; specialized LSI chips for speech processing are appearing on the market. Voice can be used to input data or to issue instrument commands; this allows the operator to engage in other tasks, move about, and to use standard data entry systems. Voice synthesizers can generate audible, easily understood instructions. Using voice characteristics, a control system can verify speaker identity for security purposes. Two simple voice-controlled systems have been designed at Los Alamos for nuclear safeguards applicaations. Each can easily be expanded as time allows. The first system is for instrument control that accepts voice commands and issues audible operator prompts. The second system is for access control. The speaker's voice is used to verify his identity and to actuate external devices.

Ford, W.; Shirk, D.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Coordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the generalizations of coordination of multiple linear dynamic systems to the cooperative output regulation problemCoordinated Output Regulation of Multiple Heterogeneous Linear Systems Ziyang Meng, Tao Yang, Dimos V. Dimarogonas, and Karl H. Johansson Abstract-- The coordinated output regulation problem

Dimarogonas, Dimos

76

Improved thermoelectric power output from multilayered polyethylenimine doped carbon nanotube based organic composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By appropriately selecting the carbon nanotube type and n-type dopant for the conduction layers in a multilayered carbon nanotube composite, the total device thermoelectric power output can be increased significantly. The particular materials chosen in this study were raw single walled carbon nanotubes for the p-type layers and polyethylenimine doped single walled carbon nanotubes for the n-type layers. The combination of these two conduction layers leads to a single thermocouple Seebeck coefficient of 96 ± 4??VK{sup ?1}, which is 6.3 times higher than that previously reported. This improved Seebeck coefficient leads to a total power output of 14.7 nW per thermocouple at the maximum temperature difference of 50?K, which is 44 times the power output per thermocouple for the previously reported results. Ultimately, these thermoelectric power output improvements help to increase the potential use of these lightweight, flexible, and durable organic multilayered carbon nanotube based thermoelectric modules in low powered electronics applications, where waste heat is available.

Hewitt, Corey A.; Montgomery, David S.; Barbalace, Ryan L.; Carlson, Rowland D.; Carroll, David L., E-mail: carroldl@wfu.edu [Center for Nanotechnology and Molecular Materials, Wake Forest University, 501 Deacon Blvd., Winston Salem, North Carolina 27105 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

77

MAXIMUM ADDITIONAL SCORE: 2 points Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Many-Core Accelerator Architectures 1. A Performance and Energy Comparison of Convolution on GPUs in Production Processors via Software-Guided Thread Scheduling 7. Power Gating Strategies on GPUs #12; Network. #12;1. For a given simulator record its input parameters and its output metrics. 2. Experiment

Silvano, Cristina

78

Commonizing Uncommon Sense  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Commonizing Uncommon Sense Commonizing Uncommon Sense The universe that Einstein discovered—in which time doesn’t pass at the same rate for everyone, space bends, and chance prevails where we would expect certainties—seems strange to us, but becomes easier to understand once we realize that our everyday situation is the unusual one. Imagine that you had never known how different people’s customs are in other countries. One day you travel to another country, far from your own, where they do things not just slightly differently, but very differently. Not being forewarned of this, you might be greatly surprised, and find yourself having to spend a lot more time than you expected getting used to the differences. Your understanding of the culture could develop in at least one of two

79

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations Most Commonly Identified Recommendations DOE ITP In Depth ITP Energy Assessment Webcast Presented by: Dr. Bin Wu, Director, Professor of Industrial Engineering Dr. Sanjeev Khanna, Assistant Director, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering With Contribution From MO IAC Student Engineers: Chatchai Pinthuprapa Jason Fox Yunpeng Ren College of Engineering, University of Missouri. April 16, 2009 Missouri Industrial Assessment Center Missouri IAC is one of the 26 centers founded by the U.S. DOE in the nation. Since its establishment in 2005, we have been working closely with the MoDNR, the MU University Extension, utility providers in the state, etc, to provide education, development and services in industrial energy efficiency. Our services (audits, workshops, etc), have already covered many locations across the state of Missouri.

80

Common tester platform concept.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a case study on the doctrine of a common tester platform, a concept of a standardized platform that can be applicable across the broad spectrum of testing requirements throughout the various stages of a weapons program, as well as across the various weapons programs. The common tester concept strives to define an affordable, next-generation design that will meet testing requirements with the flexibility to grow and expand; supporting the initial development stages of a weapons program through to the final production and surveillance stages. This report discusses a concept investing key leveraging technologies and operational concepts combined with prototype tester-development experiences and practical lessons learned gleaned from past weapons programs.

Hurst, Michael James

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A waveguide power divider (10) for splitting electromagnetic microwave power and directionally coupling the divided power includes an input waveguide (21) and reduced height output waveguides (23) interconnected by axial slots (22) and matched loads (25) and (26) positioned at the unused ends of input and output guides (21) and (23) respectively. The axial slots are of a length such that the wave in the input waveguide (21) is directionally coupled to the output waveguides (23). The widths of input guide (21) and output guides (23) are equal and the width of axial slots (22) is one half of the width of the input guide (21).

Moeller, Charles P. (Del Mar, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

GAMS program used to estimate capacity output using a distance function with both good and bad output, variable returns to scale and weak disposability of the bad outputs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

." VIMS Marine resource Report N. 2007-6. August 2007. Author: John B. Walden NMFS/NEFSC 166 Water St(obs) weights ; POSITIVE Variable weight, lambda; EQUATIONS CONSTR1(GOUTPUT, OBS) DEA constraint for each output

84

Evaluation of a photovoltaic energy mechatronics system with a built-in quadratic maximum power point tracking algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historically high cost of crude oil price is stimulating research into solar (green) energy as an alternative energy source. In general, applications with large solar energy output require a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm to optimize the power generated by the photovoltaic effect. This work aims to provide a stand-alone solution for solar energy applications by integrating a DC/DC buck converter to a newly developed quadratic MPPT algorithm along with its appropriate software and hardware. The quadratic MPPT method utilizes three previously used duty cycles with their corresponding power outputs. It approaches the maximum value by using a second order polynomial formula, which converges faster than the existing MPPT algorithm. The hardware implementation takes advantage of the real-time controller system from National Instruments, USA. Experimental results have shown that the proposed solar mechatronics system can correctly and effectively track the maximum power point without any difficulties. (author)

Chao, R.M.; Ko, S.H.; Lin, I.H. [Department of Systems and Naval Mechatronics Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Pai, F.S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Tainan (China); Chang, C.C. [Department of Environment and Energy, National University of Tainan (China)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Constellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

average energy are selected more frequently than constellations with higher energy. However, the resultsConstellation Shaping for Communication Channels with Quantized Outputs Chandana Nannapaneni signal constellation and the output is quantized by a uniform scalar quantizer. The goal is to jointly

Valenti, Matthew C.

86

ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADIOS ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE CO NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TABLES ADIOS - ANALOG-DIGITAL INPUT OUTPUT SYSTEM FOR APPLE COMPUTER TABLE FOR CONTENTS Page I Module and Apple Card (Photograph) Figure 3 Complete Apple/ADIOS System (Photograph) Figure 4 Analog

Groppi, Christopher

87

Notes on Frequentist, Maximum Likelihood & Bayesian Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, theory, "gut feeling," etc. · Changes the probability distribution #12;Bayesian Statistics · ProbabilityNotes on Frequentist, Maximum Likelihood & Bayesian Statistics #12;Statistical Methods · Probability is a long-term frequency statement about the data ­ if repeated, what proportion of the time would

Ernest, Holly

88

PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 maximum depth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and a video camera to complete installation of the world's first regional cabled ocean observatory. NEPTUNE- tion systems that--using power and the internet--provide continuous, long-term monitoring of oceanPublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 THE 2.7km maximum depth beneath the ocean surface of neptune

Pedersen, Tom

89

Relationship Among Efficiency and Output Power of Heat Energy Converters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationship among efficiency and output power of heat-electric energy converters as well as of any converters for transforming of heat energy into any other kind of energy is considered. It is shown, that the parameter efficiency does not determine univocally the output power of a converter. It is proposed to use another parameter for determination of working ability of heat energy converters. It is shown, that high output power can not be achieved by any kind of Stirling-type converters in spite of their high efficiency.

Alexander Luchinskiy

2004-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Design of maximum density aggregate grading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An aggregate grading that yields maximum solid density and maximum particle interlock is highly desirable for both bound mixtures, such as asphalt concrete and plain and reinforced concrete, and for unbound mixtures such as those used in base courses. Maximum particle interlock leads to high strength. Whereas minimum voids in a certain material composition is conducive to high strength and low compression. Aggregate grading may be obtained, for instance, from the ASTM, which is based on experience or may be designed according to Lees’ method. In the present work five different types of aggregates were used, each with a variety of chosen grading. It was found that Lees’ method produced the lowest porosity of all types of aggregates as well as for the various employed gradings. Lees’ rational method of aggregate grading, however, is a very lengthy and time-consuming procedure. Therefore, programming of Lees’ method is an essential step to make such an excellent method available to practicing engineers. A program named ‘ratmix’ was developed and has incorporated 58 design graphs of the Lees’ method. ratmix is a comprehensive program for Lees’ rational method; it conducts interpolation for intermediate points within the design graphs as well as between graphs of different properties.

Yahia A Abdel-Jawad; Waddah Salman Abdullah

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fracture Toughness and Maximum Stress in a Disordered Lattice System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture in a disordered lattice system is studied. In our system, particles are initially arranged on the triangular lattice and each nearest-neighbor pair is connected with a randomly chosen soft or hard Hookean spring. Every spring has the common threshold of stress at which it is cut. We make an initial crack and expand the system perpendicularly to the crack. We find that the maximum stress in the stress-strain curve is larger than those in the systems with soft or hard springs only (uniform systems). Energy required to advance fracture is also larger in some disordered systems, which indicates that the fracture toughness improves. The increase of the energy is caused by the following two factors. One is that the soft spring is able to hold larger energy than the hard one. The other is that the number of cut springs increases as the fracture surface becomes tortuous in disordered systems.

Chiyori Urabe; Shinji Takesue

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Sparse Convolved Gaussian Processes for Multi-output Regression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concentration of different heavy metal pollutants [5]. Modelling multiple output variables is a challenge as we methodology for synthetic data and real world applications on pollution prediction and a sensor network. 1

Rattray, Magnus

93

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computability in Anonymous Networks: Revocable vs. Irrecovable Outputs Yuval Emek1 , Jochen Seidel2, and leader election. 1 Introduction We study computability in networks, referred to hereafter as distributed

94

Failure mode and effects analysis outputs: are they valid?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA) is a prospective risk assessment tool that ... this study was to explore the validity of FMEA outputs within a hospital setting in the...

Nada Atef Shebl; Bryony Dean Franklin; Nick Barber

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Grid adaptation for functional outputs of compressible flow simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An error correction and grid adaptive method is presented for improving the accuracy of functional outputs of compressible flow simulations. The procedure is based on an adjoint formulation in which the estimated error in ...

Venditti, David Anthony, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

97

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability..., power generation for offshore platforms, utility peak load 58 ESL-IE-92-04-10 Proceedings from the 14th National Industrial Energy Technology Conference, Houston, TX, April 22-23, 1992 power generation, emergency power, ship propulsion, and private...

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

98

Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter estimation for stochastic biochemical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as: Daigle et al. : Accelerated maximum likelihood parame-Gillespie DT: Approximate accelerated stochastic simulationARTICLE Open Access Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter

Daigle, Bernie J; Roh, Min K; Petzold, Linda R; Niemi, Jarad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Hybrid Maximum Principle is a consequence of Pontryagin ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We give a simple proof of the Maximum Principle for smooth hybrid control sys- ... result in the study of such problems is Hybrid Maximum Principle proved in [4] ...

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Ota City : characterizing output variability from 553 homes with residential PV systems on a distribution feeder.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes in-depth analysis of photovoltaic (PV) output variability in a high-penetration residential PV installation in the Pal Town neighborhood of Ota City, Japan. Pal Town is a unique test bed of high-penetration PV deployment. A total of 553 homes (approximately 80% of the neighborhood) have grid-connected PV totaling over 2 MW, and all are on a common distribution line. Power output at each house and irradiance at several locations were measured once per second in 2006 and 2007. Analysis of the Ota City data allowed for detailed characterization of distributed PV output variability and a better understanding of how variability scales spatially and temporally. For a highly variable test day, extreme power ramp rates (defined as the 99th percentile) were found to initially decrease with an increase in the number of houses at all timescales, but the reduction became negligible after a certain number of houses. Wavelet analysis resolved the variability reduction due to geographic diversity at various timescales, and the effect of geographic smoothing was found to be much more significant at shorter timescales.

Stein, Joshua S.; Miyamoto, Yusuke (Kandenko, Ibaraki, Japan); Nakashima, Eichi (Kandenko, Ibaraki, Japan); Lave, Matthew

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Interpreting and analyzing model output (A very cursory introduction) Here will talk briefly about using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using "ncview" and "matlab" to analyze output from your model. The model output is in netcdf format for the output. I use matlab to measure, plot, compute, etc.. Recall the the model output is stored in: /scratch shown at the top.) matlab I hope you have some experience with matlab. There are handy tutorials

Gerber, Edwin

102

Maximum mass of magnetic white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit in this work the problem of the maximum masses of magnetized White Dwarfs (WD). The impact of a strong magnetic field onto the structure equations is addressed. The pressures become anisotropic due to the presence of the magnetic field and split into a parallel and perpendicular components. We first construct stable solutions of TOV equations for the parallel pressures, and found that physical solutions vanish for the perpendicular pressure when $B \\gtrsim 10^{13}$ G. This fact establishes an upper bound for a magnetic field and the stability of the configurations in the (quasi) spherical approximation. Our findings also indicate that it is not possible to obtain stable magnetized WD with super Chandrasekhar masses because the values of the magnetic field needed for them are higher than this bound. To proceed into the anisotropic regime, we derived structure equations appropriated for a cylindrical metric with anisotropic pressures. From the solutions of the structure equations in cylindrical symme...

Paret, D Manreza; Horvath, J E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Critical insulation thickness for maximum entropy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical insulation thickness is known to refer to the insulation thickness that maximises the rate of heat transfer in cylindrical and spherical systems. The same analogy is extended to the rate of entropy generation in the present study. The possible critical insulation thickness that yields a maximum rate of entropy generation is investigated. Entropy generation is related to heat transfer through and temperature distribution within the insulation material. It is found that there exists a critical insulation thickness for maximising the rate of entropy generation that is a function of the Bi number and the surface to ambient temperature ratio. The solution of such critical thickness is formulated analytically for both cylindrical and spherical geometries. It is also found that the critical insulation thickness for the rate of entropy generation does not coincide with that for the rate of heat transfer.

Ahmet Z. Sahin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

105

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

106

Formalization of computer input and output: the Hadley model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Current digital evidence acquisition tools are effective, but are tested rather than formally proven correct. We assert that the forensics community will benefit in evidentiary ways and the scientific community will benefit in practical ways by moving beyond simple testing of systems to a formal model. To this end, we present a hierarchical model of peripheral input to and output from von Neumann computers, patterned after the Open Systems Interconnection model of networking. The Hadley model categorizes all components of peripheral input and output in terms of data flow; with constructive aspects concentrated in the data flow between primary memory and the computer sides of peripherals' interfaces. The constructive domain of Hadley is eventually expandable to all areas of the I/O hierarchy, allowing for a full view of peripheral input and output and enhancing the forensics community's capabilities to analyze, obtain, and give evidentiary force to data.

Matthew Gerber; John Leeson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Maximum likelihood continuity mapping for fraud detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author describes a novel time-series analysis technique called maximum likelihood continuity mapping (MALCOM), and focuses on one application of MALCOM: detecting fraud in medical insurance claims. Given a training data set composed of typical sequences, MALCOM creates a stochastic model of sequence generation, called a continuity map (CM). A CM maximizes the probability of sequences in the training set given the model constraints, CMs can be used to estimate the likelihood of sequences not found in the training set, enabling anomaly detection and sequence prediction--important aspects of data mining. Since MALCOM can be used on sequences of categorical data (e.g., sequences of words) as well as real valued data, MALCOM is also a potential replacement for database search tools such as N-gram analysis. In a recent experiment, MALCOM was used to evaluate the likelihood of patient medical histories, where ``medical history`` is used to mean the sequence of medical procedures performed on a patient. Physicians whose patients had anomalous medical histories (according to MALCOM) were evaluated for fraud by an independent agency. Of the small sample (12 physicians) that has been evaluated, 92% have been determined fraudulent or abusive. Despite the small sample, these results are encouraging.

Hogden, J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

An input-output approach to analyze the ways to increase total output of energy sectors: The case of Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to analyze the ways to increase total output of Japanese energy sectors in future time. In this study, Input-Output (IO) analysis is employed as a tool of analysis. This study focuses on petroleum refinery products and non-ferrous metals as analyzed sectors. The results show that positive impact observed in export and outside households consumption modifications while opposite impact is given by modification of import. The recommendations suggested based on these results are Japanese government should make breakthroughs so analyzed sector's export activities can increase and they have to careful in conducting import activities related to these sectors.

Ubaidillah Zuhdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators (U.S. EPA), August 2004  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Handbook providing practical information to help regulators decide if they want to use output-based regulations and explains how to develop an output-based emission standard

111

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING MULTI-OUTPUT FILTERING EFFECTS IN PCMOS Anshul Singh* , Arindam Basu , Keck-Voon Ling* and Vincent J. Mooney III*$§ Email: anshul.singh@research.iiit.ac.in, {arindam.basu, ekvling}@ntu, Nanyang Technological University (NTU), Singapore * NTU-Rice Institute of Sustainable and Applied

Mooney, Vincent

112

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Output-Sensitive Algorithms for Tukey Depth and Related Problems David Bremner University of New de Bruxelles Pat Morin Carleton University Abstract The Tukey depth (Tukey 1975) of a point p halfspace that contains p. Algorithms for computing the Tukey depth of a point in various dimensions

Morin, Pat

113

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soft-Input Soft-Output Sphere Decoding Christoph Studer Integrated Systems Laboratory ETH Zurich Laboratory ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: boelcskei@nari.ee.ethz.ch Abstract--Soft-input soft, 8092 Zurich, Switzerland Email: studer@iis.ee.ethz.ch Helmut Bölcskei Communication Technology

114

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximizing output from oil reservoirs without water breakthrough S.K. Lucas School of Mathematics, revised May 2003, published 45(3), 2004, 401­422 Abstract Often in oil reservoirs a layer of water lies, for example, Muskat [8], Bear [1]). When oil is removed from the reservoir by an oil well, it will generate

Lucas, Stephen

115

Commons Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commons Capital Commons Capital Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Commons Capital Name Commons Capital Address 320 Washington Street, 4th floor Place Brookline, Massachusetts Zip 02445 Region Greater Boston Area Product Early-stage venture capital fund. Phone number (617) 739-3500 Website http://www.commonscapital.com/ Coordinates 42.3333887°, -71.1201943° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3333887,"lon":-71.1201943,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

116

Simulated population responses of common carp to commercial exploitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Common carp Cyprinus carpio is a widespread invasive species that can become highly abundant and impose deleterious ecosystem effects. Thus, aquatic resource managers are interested in controlling common carp populations. Control of invasive common carp populations is difficult, due in part to the inherent uncertainty of how populations respond to exploitation. To understand how common carp populations respond to exploitation, we evaluated common carp population dynamics (recruitment, growth, and mortality) in three natural lakes in eastern South Dakota. Common carp exhibited similar population dynamics across these three systems that were characterized by consistent recruitment (ages 3 to 15 years present), fast growth (K = 0.37 to 0.59), and low mortality (A = 1 to 7%). We then modeled the effects of commercial exploitation on size structure, abundance, and egg production to determine its utility as a management tool to control populations. All three populations responded similarly to exploitation simulations with a 575-mm length restriction, representing commercial gear selectivity. Simulated common carp size structure modestly declined (9 to 37%) in all simulations. Abundance of common carp declined dramatically (28 to 56%) at low levels of exploitation (0 to 20%) but exploitation >40% had little additive effect and populations were only reduced by 49 to 79% despite high exploitation (>90%). Maximum lifetime egg production was reduced from 77 to 89% at a moderate level of exploitation (40%), indicating the potential for recruitment overfishing. Exploitation further reduced common carp size structure, abundance, and egg production when simulations were not size selective. Our results provide insights to how common carp populations may respond to exploitation. Although commercial exploitation may be able to partially control populations, an integrated removal approach that removes all sizes of common carp has a greater chance of controlling population abundance and reducing perturbations induced by this invasive species.

Weber, Michael J.; Hennen, Matthew J.; Brown, Michael L.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Comment on "Efficiency of Isothermal Molecular Machines at Maximum Power"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comment on "Efficiency of Isothermal Molecular Machines at Maximum Power" (PRL 108, 210602 (2012), arXiv:1201.6396)

Yunxin Zhang

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

118

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

119

Clock-controlled generators with large period output sequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Clock-controlled generators are a kind of pseudo-random number generators (PRNG). Recently, some clock-controlled generators based on jumping Linear Finite State Machines (LFSMs) have been proposed, such as Pomaranch and MICKEY. The period and the linear complexity of their output sequences need to be large enough to provide security against linear attacks. In this paper, a new condition for the period to reach its maximal value is presented. The condition is better than the previous one. Further, some clock-controlled generators are considered, including a new generator which uses a Feedback with Carry Shift Register (FCSR) as the control register. How to maximise the period of their output sequences is investigated.

Zhiqiang Lin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Control of XeF laser output by pulse injecton  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection locking is investigated as a means for control of optical pulse duration and polarization in a XeF laser. Intense short-pulse generation in the ultraviolet is achieved by injection of a low-level 1-ns optical pulse into a XeF oscillator. Control of laser output polarization by injection locking is demonstrated and studied as a function of injected signal level. Enhancement of XeF electric-discharge laser efficiency by injection pulse ''priming'' is observed.

Pacala, T.J.; Christensen, C.P.

1980-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classificationcapabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropyfunction, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are sufficiently strong interpretations of the second law of thermodynamics to define the approach to and the nature of patterned stable steady states. For many pattern-forming systems these principles define quantifiable stable states as maxima or minima (or both) in the dissipation. An elementary statistical-mechanical proof is offered. To turn the argument full circle, the transformations of the partitions and classes which are predicated upon such minimax entropic paths can through digital modeling be directly identified with the syntactic and inferential elements of deductive logic. It follows therefore that all self-organizing or pattern-forming systems which possess stable steady states approach these states according to the imperatives of formal logic, the optimum pattern with its rich endowment ofequivalence relations representing the central theorem of the associated calculus. Logic is thus ‘‘the stuff of the universe,’’ and biological evolution with its culmination in the human brain is the most significant example of all the irreversible pattern-forming processes. We thus conclude with a few remarks on the relevance of the contribution to the theory of evolution and to research on artificial intelligence.

J. S. Kirkaldy

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Output power characteristics of the neutral xenon long laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lasers which oscillate within inhomogeneously broadened gain media exhibit spectral hole burning and concomitant reduction in output power compared with equivalent homogeneously-broadened laser gain media. By increasing the cavity length, it may be possible to demonstrate at least a partial transition from an inhomogeneous laser cavity mode spectrum to a homogeneous spectrum. There are a number of high gain laser lines which are inhomogeneously-broadened transitions in electric discharges of neutral xenon. In neutral xenon lasers, as in the cases of many other gas lasers, the inhomogeneous spectral broadening mechanism arises from Doppler shifts, {Delta}{nu}{sub D}, of individual atoms in thermal motion within the electric discharge comprising the laser gain medium. Optical transitions corresponding to these noble gas atoms have natural linewidths, {Delta}{nu}{sub n}{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub D}. Simulations of the output power characteristics of the xenon laser were carried out as a function of laser cavity parameters, including the cavity length, L. These calculations showed that when the intracavity mode spacing frequency, c/2L{lt}{Delta}{nu}{sub n}, the inhomogeneously broadened xenon mode spectrum converted to a homogeneously broadened oscillation spectrum with an increase in output power. These simulations are compared with experimental results obtained for the long laser oscillation characteristics of the (5d[5/2]{degree}{sub 2}{r_arrow}6p[3/2]{sub 1}) transition corresponding to the strong, high-gain 3.508 {mu} line in xenon.

Linford, G.J. [TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA (United States). Space and Technology Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0: February 6, 0: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on AddThis.com...

124

CROWN/MERRILL DINING COMMONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-MERRILL APTS. TO PARKING LOT 111 TO MERRILL COLLEGE CROWN CIRCLE CROWN LIBRARY Library - 1st floor Computer Lab - 2nd floor Senior Commons - 3rd floor SCALE IN FEET 0 6030 Disabled parking space Disabled access path Disabled access ramp Power-assisted doors Emergency blue light phone Public phone Metered parking

Wilmers, Chris

125

Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Misconceptions about Software Architecture by Philippe Kruchten Rational Fellow Rational Software Canada References to architecture are everywhere: in every article, in every ad. And we take definition of software architecture. Are we all understanding the same thing? We gladly accept that software

van der Hoek, André

126

Introduction Nested common intervals on permutations Nested common intervals on sequences Conclusion Finding Nested Common Intervals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conclusion Comparing genomes Genomes evolved from a common ancestor tend to share the same varieties of gene clusters used in genomes comparison. . . . seeking for gene clusters between their genomes. A gene cluster = a set of genes appearing, in spatial proximity along the chromosome, in at least two genomes. G. Blin

Blin, Guillaume

127

NCPART: management of ICEMDDN output for numerical control users  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NCPART is a procedure developed by the Numerical Control Department at Bendix Kansas City Division to handle the entry to and exit from ICEMDDN, and process all of the local files output by ICEMDDN. The NCPART procedure is menu driven, and provides automatic access to ICEMDDN and any files necessary to process information with ICEM for numerical Control users. Basically, the procedure handles all of the ICEMDDN operations that involve operating system commands, and frees the NC programmer to concentrate on his/her work as a programmer.

Rossini, B.F.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Waveguide submillimetre laser with a uniform output beam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing non-Gaussian light beams with a uniform intensity profile is described. The method is based on the use of a combined waveguide quasi-optical resonator containing a generalised confocal resonator with an inhomogeneous mirror with absorbing inhomogeneities discretely located on its surface and a hollow dielectric waveguide whose size satisfies the conditions of self-imaging of a uniform field in it. The existence of quasi-homogeneous beams at the output of an optically pumped 0.1188-mm waveguide CH{sub 3}OH laser with a amplitude-stepped mirror is confirmed theoretically and experimentally. (lasers)

Volodenko, A V; Gurin, O V; Degtyarev, A V; Maslov, Vyacheslav A; Svich, V A; Topkov, A N [V.N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Kharkiv (Ukraine)

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses...

130

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Common Communication Interface (CCI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are many APIs for connecting and exchanging data between network peers. Each interface varies wildly based on metrics including performance, portability, and complexity. Specifically, many interfaces make design or implementation choices emphasizing some of the more desirable metrics (e.g., performance) while sacrificing others (e.g., portability). As a direct result, software developers building large, network-based applications are forced to choose a specific network API based on a complex, multi-dimensional set of criteria. Such trade-offs inevitably result in an interface that fails to deliver some desirable features. In this paper, we introduce a novel interface that both supports many features that have become standard (or otherwise generally expected) in other communication interfaces, and strives to export a small, yet powerful, interface. This new interface draws upon years of experience from network-oriented software development best practices to systems-level implementations. The goal is to create a relatively simple, high-level communication interface with low barriers to adoption while still providing important features such as scalability, resiliency, and performance. The result is the Common Communications Interface (CCI): an intuitive API that is portable, efficient, scalable, and robust to meet the needs of network-intensive applications common in HPC and cloud computing.

Shipman, Galen M [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Geoffray, Patrick [ORNL; Bosilca, George [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Squyres, Jeffrey M [ORNL; Minnich, Ronald [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter Miaosen Shen1 , Jin Wang1 , Alan Joseph1 Laboratory Abstract: This paper proposes two maximum constant boost control methods for the Z-source inverter to modulation index is analyzed in detail and verified by simulation and experiment. Keywords- Z-source inverter

Tolbert, Leon M.

133

Acceleration of Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Tomosynthesis Mammography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the amount of x-ray radiation exposure to the patients, tomosynthesis uses a lower dose of x-ray than convenAcceleration of Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Tomosynthesis Mammography Juemin Zhang, Waleed twu2@partners.org Abstract Maximum likelihood (ML) estimation is used dur- ing tomosynthesis

Meleis, Waleed

134

Maximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

node consumes energy, but the receiving node does not. This assumption is not true if acknowledgementsMaximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost Qiling Xie, Chin-Tau Lea, Mordecai J-The Maximum Residual Energy Path (MREP) routing has been shown an effective routing scheme for energy

Fleischer, Rudolf

135

Inflation uncertainty, growth uncertainty, oil prices, and output growth in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the transmission and response of inflation uncertainty and output uncertainty on inflation and output growth in the UK using a bi-variate EGARCH model. Results suggest that inflation uncertain...

Ramprasad Bhar; Girijasankar Mallik

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

An Ad-Hoc Method for Obtaining chi**2 Values from Unbinned Maximum Likelihood Fits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A common goal in an experimental physics analysis is to extract information from a reaction with multi-dimensional kinematics. The preferred method for such a task is typically the unbinned maximum likelihood method. In fits using this method, the likelihood is a goodness-of-fit quantity in that it effectively discriminates between available hypotheses; however, it does not provide any information as to how well the best hypothesis describes the data. In this paper, we present an {\\em ad-hoc} procedure for obtaining chi**2/n.d.f. values from unbinned maximum likelihood fits. This method does not require binning the data, making it very applicable to multi-dimensional problems.

M. Williams; C. A. Meyer

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Maximum power point tracking of permanent magnet wind turbines equipped with direct matrix converter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel control method for Maximum Power Point Tracking of wind turbines (WTs) equipped with a Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generator (PMSG) and a Direct Matrix Converter (DMC). The method calculates the optimum wind turbine speed and maximizes the extracted power from wind turbine. This is done by Hill Climb Search method which is simple and does not need to know the generator parameters and no need to solve the complicated differential equations of generator. WT rotor speed is compared with its optimal value and then DMC controls WT until its rotor speed reaches its optimum value. Under this situation maximum power is extracted from WT and is injected to the grid with unity power factor. It is implemented by controlling the phase and the amplitude of the DMC output voltage by Venturini switching method. Simulations are done on a 2?MW PMSG WT in MATLAB/SIMULINK to obtain the results the wind speed was varied both using the Van Der Hoven method and changing the wind step. The obtained results verify the accuracy and simplicity of proposed method.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

139

Quantum teleportation scheme by selecting one of multiple output ports  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scheme of quantum teleportation, where Bob has multiple (N) output ports and obtains the teleported state by simply selecting one of the N ports, is thoroughly studied. We consider both deterministic version and probabilistic version of the teleportation scheme aiming to teleport an unknown state of a qubit. Moreover, we consider two cases for each version: (i) the state employed for the teleportation is fixed to a maximally entangled state, and (ii) the state is also optimized as well as Alice's measurement. We analytically determine the optimal protocols for all the four cases, and show the corresponding optimal fidelity or optimal success probability. All these protocols can achieve the perfect teleportation in the asymptotic limit of $N\\to\\infty$. The entanglement properties of the teleportation scheme are also discussed.

Satoshi Ishizaka; Tohya Hiroshima

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Framework to Determine the Probability Density Function for the Output Power of Wind Farms Sairaj to the power output of a wind farm while factoring in the availability of the wind turbines in the farm availability model for the wind turbines, we propose a method to determine the wind-farm power output pdf

Liberzon, Daniel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Linear model-based estimation of blood pressure and cardiac output for Normal and Paranoid cases  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Provisioning a generic simple linear mathematical model for Paranoid and Healthy cases leading to auxiliary investigation of the neuroleptic drugs effect imposed on cardiac output (CO) and blood pressure (BP). Multi-input single output system identification ... Keywords: Blood pressure, Cardiac output, Heart rate, MISO transfer function, Stroke volume, System identification

Mohamed Abdelkader Aboamer, Ahmad Taher Azar, Khaled Wahba, Abdallah S. Mohamed

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

On the maximum pressure rise rate in boosted HCCI operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the combined effects of boosting, intake air temperature, trapped residual gas fraction, and dilution on the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate (MPRR) in a boosted single cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with ...

Wildman, Craig B.

144

Nonstationary analysis of annual maximum streamflow of Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both natural climate change and anthropogenic impacts may cause nonstationarities in hydrological extremes. In this study, long-term annual maximum streamflow (AMS) records from 145 stations over Canada were used to investigate the nonstationary ...

Xuezhi Tan; Thian Yew Gan

145

Propane spectral resolution enhancement by the maximum entropy method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Burg algorithm for maximum entropy power spectral density estimation is applied to a time series of data obtained from a Michelson interferometer and compared with a standard fast...

Bonavito, N L; Yeh, K C; Stewart, K P; Inguva, R; Hurley, E J

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Computer Aids for the Solution of Common Noise?Control Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Time?shared computer systems permit the economical use of computer assistance in solving acoustic problems. Programs have been developed that provide (1) graphical outputs of measured and computed data (2) quicker and more thorough treatment of some common problems and (3) iterative solutions that assist in the noise control design process. Examples of these programs include 1 3 ? oct band plots statistical analyses room?mode frequency calculations and muffler?design calculations.

J. J. Coles, Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc., Cambridge, Massachusetts

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Is there a maximum observable redshift in an open universe?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An estimate of the maximum observable redshift is obtained using only t_{0} approximately equal to (14+- 3)10^{9}years, H_{0} approximately equal to 65 +- 10Km\\sec^{-1}Mpc^{-1}(t_{0}H_{0} approximately equal to 0.91 +- 0.08/0.18) assuming \\Lambda approximately equal to 0. The resulting maximum redshift z_{+} approximately equal to 10 appears to give a reasonable upper limit to the highest actually observed redshifts. Some implications are discussed.

J. A. Gonzalo

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Efficiency at maximum power of interacting molecular machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the efficiency of systems of molecular motors operating at maximum power. We consider two models of kinesin motors on a microtubule: for both the simplified and the detailed model, we find that the many-body exclusion effect enhances the efficiency at maximum power of the many-motor system, with respect to the single motor case. Remarkably, we find that this effect occurs in a limited region of the system parameters, compatible with the biologically relevant range.

N. Golubeva; A. Imparato

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

150

Designing the Microbial Research Commons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent decades have witnessed an ever-increasing range and volume of digital data. All elements of the pillars of science--whether observation, experiment, or theory and modeling--are being transformed by the continuous cycle of generation, dissemination, and use of factual information. This is even more so in terms of the re-using and re-purposing of digital scientific data beyond the original intent of the data collectors, often with dramatic results. We all know about the potential benefits and impacts of digital data, but we are also aware of the barriers, the challenges in maximizing the access, and use of such data. There is thus a need to think about how a data infrastructure can enhance capabilities for finding, using, and integrating information to accelerate discovery and innovation. How can we best implement an accessible, interoperable digital environment so that the data can be repeatedly used by a wide variety of users in different settings and with different applications? With this objective: to use the microbial communities and microbial data, literature, and the research materials themselves as a test case, the Board on Research Data and Information held an International Symposium on Designing the Microbial Research Commons at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC on 8-9 October 2009. The symposium addressed topics such as models to lower the transaction costs and support access to and use of microbiological materials and digital resources from the perspective of publicly funded research, public-private interactions, and developing country concerns. The overall goal of the symposium was to stimulate more research and implementation of improved legal and institutional models for publicly funded research in microbiology.

Uhlir, Paul F

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Common Carbon Metric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Common Carbon Metric Common Carbon Metric Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Common Carbon Metric Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Environment Programme, World Resources Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Publications Website: www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/Common-Carbon-Metric-for_Pilot_Testing_220410.p Common Carbon Metric Screenshot References: Common Carbon Metrics [1] "This paper is offered by the United Nations Environment Programme's Sustainable Buildings & Climate Initiative (UNEP-SBCI), a partnership between the UN and public and private stakeholders in the building sector, promoting sustainable building practices globally. The purpose of this

152

Output, efficiency, emissions improved with Cat's 3500 series B engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like most technologies, engine developments tend to follow evolutionary paths. And it's a given that the longer an engine's been around and the more successful it's been, the more likely it is that any changes made would be incremental. On the surface, such is the case with the Caterpillar 3500 Series B diesel engine, recently introduced in Europe and the United States. Based on the well-proven 3500 engine first introduced in 1980 and upgraded with a Phase II program five years later, most of the changes appear incremental. But taken as a whole, they provide a level of performance and durability that Caterpillar anticipates will make this engine an even stronger contender in power generation and marine applications for years to come. It's not hard to see why. Output has been increased between 17% and 30% on some models; fuel consumption is improved by as much as 15%; and with the new aftertreatment system introduced with the engines, emissions as low as 1.3 g/kWh NO[sub x] are said to be achieveable. This paper outlines the design, specifications, and highlights of the improvements in performance of these new engines. 3 figs.

Brezonick, M.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Efficiency of some heat engines at maximum?power conditions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the present paper a simple model is presented for a heat engine where the power output is limited by the rate of heat supply (and/or heat release). The model leads to a variety of results. Some of them are established laws such as the Carnot law the Curzon–Ahlborn efficiency and the Castańs efficiency. Other results are new and are related to phenomena as different as geothermal energy conversion and the Penfield paradox of electric circuits.

Alexis De Vos

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

COMMON KNOWLEDGE, COHERENT UNCERTAINTIES AND CONSENSUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMMON KNOWLEDGE, COHERENT UNCERTAINTIES AND CONSENSUS by Yakov Ben-Haim TECHNICAL REPORT ETR-2001 of Mechanical Engineering #12;Working Paper Common Knowledge, Coherent Uncertainties and Consensus Yakov Ben- and knowledge-functions, common knowledge and consensus. Our main results are that knowledge is constricted

Rimon, Elon

155

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS PLANNING 2007-2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDENT LEARNING COMMONS PLANNING 2007-2010 Elaine Fairey, Director, Student Learning Commons Lynn delivery 4. Space 5. Internal relations 6. External relations Introduction The Student Learning Commons (SLC) was created in response to the report on Student Learning Support Services (October 2004

156

Student Learning Commons Questions & Answers for Faculty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Learning Commons Questions & Answers for Faculty What is the SFU Student Learning Commons? The Student Learning Commons (SLC), is an academic learning centre which provides peer-based assistance with library reference, computer assistance, and other student academic support services. SLC programs

157

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.6 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Small Flume + 0.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.3 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.6 +

158

Efficiency of autonomous soft nano-machines at maximum power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider nano-sized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing non-equilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall in three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient", "strong and inefficient", and "balanced". For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

Udo Seifert

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Common Air Conditioner Problems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems May 30, 2012 - 6:41pm Addthis A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. What does this mean for me? You can eliminate the most common air conditioner problems before hiring an air conditioning technician. You can do some air conditioner maintenance and repair tasks yourself. One of the most common air conditioning problems is improper operation. If your air conditioner is on, be sure to close your home's windows and outside doors. For room air conditioners, isolate the room or a group of connected rooms as much as possible from the rest of your home.

160

Common Air Conditioner Problems | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems Common Air Conditioner Problems May 30, 2012 - 6:41pm Addthis A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. A refrigerant leak is one common air conditioning problem. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/BanksPhotos. What does this mean for me? You can eliminate the most common air conditioner problems before hiring an air conditioning technician. You can do some air conditioner maintenance and repair tasks yourself. One of the most common air conditioning problems is improper operation. If your air conditioner is on, be sure to close your home's windows and outside doors. For room air conditioners, isolate the room or a group of connected rooms as much as possible from the rest of your home.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

On using transputers to design the header and output processors for the PSi architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the complexity associatecl with general soft ware. From Upper Layer Needer Processor From Lower Leyei' Input Bus Concoction Processor Connection Processor 256 CP's Output Bus To Upper Layer Output Processor To Lower Layer Fig. 2. d. Block... yer From Lower Layer T2 T3 To Input Bus of CP's From Output Bus of CF's From Output Bus of Cfes Fig, 4. 1. e. Block diagram of Design I transputers has its own private memory. Tl acts as the header processor. Two of its serial links...

Manickam, Muralidhar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

A CSP Timed Input-Output Relation and a Strategy for Mechanised Conformance Verification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here we propose a timed input-output conformance relation (named CSPTIO) based on the process algebra CSP. In contrast to other relations, CSPTIO...

Gustavo Carvalho; Augusto Sampaio…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

FORMALIZATION OF INPUT AND OUTPUT IN MODERN OPERATING SYSTEMS: THE HADLEY MODEL.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present the Hadley model, a formal descriptive model of input and output for modern computer operating systems. Our model is intentionally inspired by the… (more)

Gerber, Matthew

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Cavity dumping versus stationary output coupling in repetitively Q-switched solid-state lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comparative theoretical analysis of continuously pumped actively Q-switched solid-state lasers differing in output coupling methods (cavity dumping versus a partially transmitting...

Grishin, Mikhail

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development of a methodology to evaluate probable maximum precipitation (PMP) under changing climate conditions: Application to southern Quebec, Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary Climate change (CC) needs to be accounted for in the estimation of probable maximum floods (PMFs). However, there does not exist a unique way to estimate \\{PMFs\\} and, furthermore the challenge in estimating them is that they should neither be underestimated for safety reasons nor overestimated for economical ones. By estimating \\{PMFs\\} without accounting for CC, the risk of underestimation could be high for Quebec, Canada, since future climate simulations indicate that in all likelihood extreme precipitation events will intensify. In this paper, simulation outputs from the Canadian Regional Climate Model (CRCM) are used to develop a methodology to estimate probable maximum precipitations (PMPs) while accounting for changing climate conditions for the southern region of the Province of Quebec, Canada. The Kénogami and Yamaska watersheds are herein of particular interest, since dam failures could lead to major downstream impacts. Precipitable water (w) represents one of the key variables in the estimation process of PMPs. Results of stationary tests indicate that CC will not only affect precipitation and temperature but also the monthly maximum precipitable water, wmax, and the ensuing maximization ratio used for the estimation of PMPs. An up-to-date computational method is developed to maximize w using a non-stationary frequency analysis, and then calculate the maximization ratios. The ratios estimated this way are deemed reliable since they rarely exceed threshold values set for Quebec, and, therefore, provide consistent PMP estimates. The results show an overall significant increase of the \\{PMPs\\} throughout the current century compared to the recent past.

Alain N. Rousseau; Iris M. Klein; Daphné Freudiger; Patrick Gagnon; Anne Frigon; Claudie Ratté-Fortin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena, Hugo Eduardo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

168

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events Lina DEAMBROGIO on the fields of ionosphere scintillations, solar energetic particles and on the implementation of operational the upcoming period of high solar activity. Emilien ROBERT got his PhD in 2005 and started to work on behalf

Boyer, Edmond

169

Rapidly Solving an Online Sequence of Maximum Flow Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... an interdictor allocates a finite amount of resources to remove arcs from a net- ... is, the next maximum flow problem in the sequence differs from the previous one by ..... the appropriate reoptimization case and then taking the appropriate action to ..... Our first set of computational experiments tested the performance of our ...

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

170

THE MAXIMUM CAPACITY OF A LINE PLAN IS INAPPROXIMABLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MAXIMUM CAPACITY OF A LINE PLAN IS INAPPROXIMABLE CHRISTINA PUHL AND SEBASTIAN STILLER Abstract a network, upper arc-capacities and a line pool. E-mail: puhl@math.tu-berlin.de, stiller of the European Commission under contract no. FP6-021235-2. 1 #12;2 CHRISTINA PUHL AND SEBASTIAN STILLER We

Nabben, Reinhard

171

Maximum-principle-satisfying and positivity-preserving high order ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation laws: Survey and new developments ..... Notice that in (2.10) we need to evaluate the maximum/minimum of a ..... total energy, p is the pressure, e is the internal energy, and ? > 1 is a constant ... under a standard CFL condition.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Maximum Entropy in Support of Semantically Annotated Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Entropy in Support of Semantically Annotated Datasets Paulo Pinheiro da Silva, Vladik whether two datasets describe the same quantity. The existing solution to this problem is to use these datasets' ontologies to deduce that these datasets indeed represent the same quantity. However, even when

Kreinovich, Vladik

173

O(1)-Approximations for Maximum Movement Piotr Berman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement of the pebbles, motivated by minimizing either execution time or energy usage. Spe- cific problems the maximum movement made by pebbles on a graph to reach a configuration in which the pebbles form a connected. For example, in the connectivity goal, the proximity of the robots should form a connected graph. Two

Demaine, Erik

174

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach Wahid FAIDI LAMSIN, ENIT for a class of robust utility function introduced in Bordigoni, Matoussi et Schweizer (2005). Our method-investment strategy which is characterized as the unique solution of a forward-backward system. Key words : Utility

Di Girolami, Cristina

175

Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

176

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel with energy harvesting. We assume that the side information of both the channel states and energy harvesting

Greenberg, Albert

177

Energy Assessment Results: Most Commonly Identified Recommendations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assessment Results: Most Commonly Identified Recommendations The Missouri Industrial Assessment Center shares its experience providing energy assessments to local industry. Energy...

178

Design of fast output sampling feedback control for smart structure model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the problem of modelling and output feedback control design for a smart structural system using piezoelectric material as a sensor/actuator is addressed. The model for a smart cantilever beam is developed by the finite element method. ... Keywords: output feedback, smart structure, vibration control

M. Umapathy; B. Bandyopadhyay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Estimating Solar PV Output Using Modern Space/Time Geostatistics (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes a project that uses mapping techniques to predict solar output at subhourly resolution at any spatial point, develop a methodology that is applicable to natural resources in general, and demonstrate capability of geostatistical techniques to predict the output of a potential solar plant.

Lee, S. J.; George, R.; Bush, B.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

180

PWM Inverter Output Filter Cost to Losses Trade Off and Optimal Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PWM Inverter Output Filter Cost to Losses Trade Off and Optimal Design Robert J. Pasterczyk Jean--This paper describes how to design the output filter of a PWM inverter used in a Uninterruptible Power SupplyVA 3-ph. PWM inverter is taken as example. B. Design Constraints Uninterruptible Power Supply (UPS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH-Input/Output-Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Supplementary sensors may be necessary for some special solar systems (e. g. solar systems with several storagesQuality assurance of solar thermal systems with the ISFH- Input/Output-Procedure Peter Paerisch/Output-Controllers for in situ and automatic function control of solar thermal systems that were developed within the research

182

Statistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistical post processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS Annemiek processing of model output from the air quality model LOTOS-EUROS Author: Annemiek Pijnappel Supervisor summary Air quality forecasts are produced routinely, focusing on concentrations of polluting gases

Stoffelen, Ad

183

Optimizing the Output of a Human-Powered Energy Harvesting System with Miniaturization and Integrated Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimizing the Output of a Human-Powered Energy Harvesting System with Miniaturization mechanical energy from human foot-strikes and explore its configuration and control towards optimized energy output. Dielectric Elastomers (DEs) are high-energy density, soft, rubber-like material

Potkonjak, Miodrag

184

Optimization on Solar Panels: Finding the Optimal Output Brian Y. Lu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization on Solar Panels: Finding the Optimal Output Brian Y. Lu January 1, 2013 1 Introduction of solar panel: Routing the configuration between solar cells with a switch matrix. However, their result models and control policies for the optimal output of solar panels. The smallest unit on a solar panel

Lavaei, Javad

185

Predicting the Energy Output of Wind Farms Based on Weather Data: Important Variables and their Correlation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind energy plays an increasing role in the supply of energy world-wide. The energy output of a wind farm is highly dependent on the weather condition present at the wind farm. If the output can be predicted more accurately, energy suppliers can coordinate the collaborative production of different energy sources more efficiently to avoid costly overproductions. With this paper, we take a computer science perspective on energy prediction based on weather data and analyze the important parameters as well as their correlation on the energy output. To deal with the interaction of the different parameters we use symbolic regression based on the genetic programming tool DataModeler. Our studies are carried out on publicly available weather and energy data for a wind farm in Australia. We reveal the correlation of the different variables for the energy output. The model obtained for energy prediction gives a very reliable prediction of the energy output for newly given weather data.

Vladislavleva, Katya; Neumann, Frank; Wagner, Markus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range. 3 figs.

Post, R.F.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity(m/s) Velocity(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alden Large Flume + 0.9 + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 2.7 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 7.2 + Carderock Rotating Arm Tow Tank + 25.8 + Carderock Tow Tank 1 + 9.3 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 10.3 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 25.8 + Chase Tow Tank + 2.5 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 18.3 + H Haynes Tow Tank + 1.8 + I Ice Towing Tank + 0.5 + L Lakefront Tow Tank + 2.7 + M MHL Free Surface Channel + 2 + MHL High Speed Cavitation + 25.9 + MHL Tow Tank + 6.7 + MIT Tow Tank + 1.5 + MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel + 5.1 + Maine Tow Tank + 3 +

188

Radiative muon capture rates and the maximum photon energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential photon spectrum for radiative muon capture is expanded about the average maximum photon energy km and the correction terms evaluated using for one a modified Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, thus extending previous work for ordinary capture. The resulting rate is much less dependent on km than the usual closure result. The ratio km? appropriate for closure calculations, with ? the average neutrino energy, is determined and found to be approximately constant and, when correction terms are included, somewhat higher than values previously used. By similar techniques a consistency relation is derived which can be solved to explicitly estimate "physical" values of km and ?.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Radiative muon capture. Differential photon spectrum, relative rate for Ca40. Dipole sum rules used to correct closure approximation, obtain estimates of mean excitation energy, average maximum photon energy.

R. S. Sloboda and Harold W. Fearing

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Maximum entanglement in squeezed boson and fermion states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A class of squeezed boson and fermion states is studied with particular emphasis on the nature of entanglement. We first investigate the case of bosons, considering two-mode squeezed states. Then we construct the fermion version to show that such states are maximum entangled, for both bosons and fermions. To achieve these results, we demonstrate some relations involving squeezed boson states. The generalization to the case of fermions is made by using Grassmann variables.

Khanna, F. C. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, J. M. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santana, A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santos, E. S. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia, 40030-010, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, cancels DOE P 310.1.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Maximum Patch Method for Directional Dark Matter Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

Shawn Henderson; Jocelyn Monroe; Peter Fisher

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

192

Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

A. T. Bajkova

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

Learning Commons Project Team Report Abridged Version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, central space dedicated to the enrichment of all. In the context of a public institution of higher established to foster the learning of all. The university library is an example of a common space where each education, such as the University of Connecticut, a commons might be conceived as a space formally

Lozano-Robledo, Alvaro

195

Hough Transform Common Names: Hough transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hough Transform Common Names: Hough transform Brief Description The Hough transform is a technique that the desired features be specified in some parametric form, the classical Hough transform is most commonly used for the detection of regular curves such as lines, circles, ellipses, etc. A generalized Hough transform can

Masci, Frank

196

Property:Maximum Wave Length(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Length(m) Wave Length(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Length(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Length(m)" Showing 18 pages using this property. A Alden Small Flume + Variable + Alden Wave Basin + 1.8 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 12.2 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 12.2 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 12.2 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 15.2 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 64 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 30 + H Haynes Wave Basin + 10.7 + L Lakefront Tow Tank + 22 + M MIT Tow Tank + 4.6 + O OTRC Wave Basin + 25 + Ohmsett Tow Tank + 18 + R Richmond Field Station Tow Tank + 2 + S SAFL Channel + 6.6 + Sandia Lake Facility + 4.57 + Sheets Wave Basin + 10 + Ship Towing Tank + 6 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Maximum_Wave_Length(m)&oldid=597351

197

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the NationÂ’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

198

X-ray source assembly having enhanced output stability, and fluid stream analysis applications thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An x-ray source assembly and method of operation are provided having enhanced output stability. The assembly includes an anode having a source spot upon which electrons impinge and a control system for controlling position of the anode source spot relative to an output structure. The control system can maintain the anode source spot location relative to the output structure notwithstanding a change in one or more operating conditions of the x-ray source assembly. One aspect of the disclosed invention is most amenable to the analysis of sulfur in petroleum-based fuels.

Radley, Ian (Glenmont, NY); Bievenue, Thomas J. (Delmar, NY); Burdett, John H. (Charlton, NY); Gallagher, Brian W. (Guilderland, NY); Shakshober, Stuart M. (Hudson, NY); Chen, Zewu (Schenectady, NY); Moore, Michael D. (Alplaus, NY)

2008-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

199

Maximum likelihood reconstruction for the Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino experiment is designed to precisely determine the neutrino mixing angle theta13. In this paper, we report a maximum likelihood (ML) method to reconstruct the vertex and energy of events in the anti-neutrino detector, based on a simplified optical model that describes light propagation. We calibrate the key paramters of the optical model with Co60 source, by comparing the predicted charges of the PMTs with the observed charges. With the optimized parameters, the resolution of the vertex reconstruction is about 25cm for Co60 gamma.

Xia Dongmei

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Commonality analysis for exploration life support systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commonality, defined practically as the use of similar technologies to deliver similar functions across a range of different complex systems, offers opportunities to improve the lifecycle costs of portfolios of complex ...

Cunio, Phillip M

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

Mao, Stan

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ionization and maximum energy of nuclei in shock acceleration theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the acceleration of heavy nuclei at SNR shocks when the process of ionization is taken into account. Heavy atoms ($Z_N >$ few) in the interstellar medium which start the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) are never fully ionized at the moment of injection. The ionization occurs during the acceleration process, when atoms already move relativistically. For typical environment around SNRs the photo-ionization due to the background galactic radiation dominates over Coulomb collisions. The main consequence of ionization is the reduction of the maximum energy which ions can achieve with respect to the standard result of the DSA. In fact the photo-ionization has a timescale comparable to the beginning of the Sedov-Taylor phase, hence the maximum energy is no more proportional to the nuclear charge, as predicted by standard DSA, but rather to the effective ions' charge during the acceleration process, which is smaller than the total nuclear charge $Z_N$. This result can have a direct consequence in the pred...

Morlino, Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to study the performance of light water reactors and to develop highly sophisticated modeling that will help accelerate upgrades at existing U.S. nuclear plants. These upgrades could improve the energy output of our existing reactor fleet by as much as seven reactors' worth at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued improvements in

204

Ensemble regression : using ensemble model output for atmospheric dynamics and prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ensemble regression (ER) is a linear inversion technique that uses ensemble statistics from atmospheric model output to make dynamical inferences and forecasts. ER defines a multivariate regression operator using ensemble ...

Gombos, Daniel (Daniel Lawrence)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Primate Motor Cortex: Individual and Ensemble Neuron-Muscle Output Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The specific aims of this study were to: 1) investigate the encoding of forelimb muscle activity timing and magnitude by corticomotoneuronal (CM) cells, 2) test the stability of primary motor cortex (M1) output to forelimb ...

Griffin, Darcy Michelle

2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

Augmentation of Power Output of Axisymmetric Ducted Wind Turbines by Porous Trailing Edge Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents analytical and experimental results that demonstrated that the power output from a ducted wind turbine can be dramatically increased by the addition of a trailing edge device such as a porous disk. In ...

widnall, sheila

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Hardware Implementation of the Soft Output Viterbi Algorithm for Serially Concatenated Convolutional Codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis outlines the hardware design of a soft output Viterbi algorithm decoder for use in a serially concatenated convolutional code system. Convolutional codes and their related structures are described, as well as the algorithms used...

Werling, Brett William

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

Code design for multiple-input multiple-output broadcast channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent information theoretical results indicate that dirty-paper coding (DPC) achieves the entire capacity region of the Gaussian multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) broadcast channel (BC). This thesis presents practical code designs for Gaussian...

Uppal, Momin Ayub

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Cardiac output and stroke volume estimation using a hybrid of three models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cardiac output (CO) and stroke volume (SV) are the key hemodynamic parameters to be monitored and assessed in ambulatory and critically ill patients. The purpose of this study was to introduce and validate a new algorithm ...

Arai, Tatsuya

210

Power output enhancement of a vibration-driven electret generator for wireless sensor applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We developed a compact vibration-driven electret generator that excelled at a power output. It succeeded in the operation of wireless sensor modules only on electricity from electret generators. This electret generator can supply enough power to operate a wireless sensor module without an external power source. It was necessary for enabling this operation to enhance the power output of the electret generator. We enhanced the power output by decreasing the parasitic capacitance. To decrease the parasitic capacitance, we fabricated a collector substrate using concave electrodes. We decreased it from 25 to 17 pF. As a result, the power output from our generator was enhanced from 40 to 100 µW considerably at an acceleration of 0.15 g (1.47 m s?2) and a resonance frequency of 30 Hz.

Tatsuakira Masaki; Kenji Sakurai; Toru Yokoyama; Masayo Ikuta; Hiroshi Sameshima; Masashi Doi; Tomonori Seki; Masatoshi Oba

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Total Pollution Effect and Total Energy Cost per Output of Different Products for Polish Industrial System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For many years a broad use has been made of the indices of total energy requirements in the whole large production system corresponding to unit output of particular goods (Boustead I., Hancock G.F., 1979). The...

Henryk W. Balandynowicz

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions Common Sources of Federal Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

213

Imprinting a complete information about a quantum channel on its output state  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce a novel property of bipartite quantum states, which we call "faithfulness", and we say that a state is faithful when acting with a channel on one of the two quantum systems, the output state carries a complete information about the channel. The concept of faithfulness can also be extended to sets of states, when the output states patched together carry a complete imprinting of the channel.

Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano; Paoloplacido Lo Presti

2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

214

Modelling Dynamic Constraints in Electricity Markets and the Costs of Uncertain Wind Output  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shifts between periods. Finally, higher variable costs, incurred if power stations are operated below their optimal rating, are allocated to the locally lowest de- mand. For inflexible power stations like nuclear, combined cycle gas turbines or coal... the start of the station has to be decided several hours before delivering output. At the earlier time there is still uncertainty about the future demand, possible failures of power stations and predictions for wind-output. We represent the uncertainty...

Musgens, Felix; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

215

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance- Fact Sheet, May 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet about the Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance Program

216

Diffusion maximum as a function of size in dense liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the diffusion of small guest particles of different sizes in a host fluid at liquid densities using molecular dynamics simulations. We observe an enhancement of the diffusivity of guest particles for a size related to the structure of the void space of the host fluid, analogous to the “levitation effect” observed for guest diffusion in porous solids. Friction and activation energy are found to be minimum for the guest size with maximum self-diffusivity. Wavelength dependent self-diffusivity indicates a monotonic and oscillatory dependence on wave number k for anomalous and linear regimes, respectively. These are associated with single and bi-exponential decay of the incoherent intermediate scattering function.

Pradip Kr. Ghorai; A. V. Anil Kumar; Srikanth Sastry; S. Yashonath

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Maximum-Likelihood Continuity Mapping (MALCOM): An Alternative to HMMs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors describe Maximum-Likelihood Continuity Mapping (MALCOM) as an alternative to hidden Markov models (HMMs) for processing sequence data such as speech. While HMMs have a discrete ''hidden'' space constrained by a fixed finite-automata architecture, MALCOM has a continuous hidden space (a continuity map) that is constrained only by a smoothness requirement on paths through the space. MALCOM fits into the same probabilistic framework for speech recognition as HMMs, but it represents a far more realistic model of the speech production process. The authors support this claim by generating continuity maps for three speakers and using the resulting MALCOM paths to predict measured speech articulator data. The correlations between the MALCOM paths (obtained from only the speech acoustics) and the actual articulator movements average 0.77 on an independent test set not used to train MALCOM nor the predictor. On average, this unsupervised model achieves 92% of performance obtained using the corresponding supervised method.

Nix, D.A.; Hogden, J.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs boson mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as M H = 125.04 ± 0.25 GeV , a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel within a Higgs portal model.

Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

220

Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS~II) experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from $^{210}$Pb decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. We confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Graham, M; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, R H; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A new scanning photoemission microscope for ELETTRA: SuperMAXIMUM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High brightness third?generation synchrotrons allow diffraction?limited performance and large flux for scanning photoemission microscopes. A new microscope SuperMAXIMUM is being developed at the University of Wisconsin Center for X ray Lithography in collaboration with the Sincrotrone Trieste. The beamline being built in Trieste uses a variable angle spherical gratingmonochromator (VASGM). A combination of rotation of a plane mirror and rotation of the spherical grating keeps the slit positions and beam directions fixed. The microscope objectives are normal?incidence multilayer?coated Schwarzschild objectives. The project which is nearing completion utilizes novel designs for optics alignment sample rastering mechanics and software control. We will discuss the project status new designs and techniques.

John T. Welnak; H. Solak; J. Wallace; F. Cerrina; F. Barbo; M. Bertolo; A. Bianco; S. Di Fonzo; S. Fontana; W. Jark; F. Mazzolini; R. Rosei; A. Savoia; J.H. Underwood; G. Margaritondo

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A new scanning photoemission microscope for ELETTRA: SuperMAXIMUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High brightness, third-generation synchrotrons allow diffraction-limited performance and large flux for scanning photoemission microscopes. A new microscope, SuperMAXIMUM, is being developed at the University of Wisconsin Center for X ray Lithography in collaboration with the Sincrotrone Trieste. The beamline, being built in Trieste, uses a variable angle spherical grating monochromator (VASGM). A combination of rotation of a plane mirror and rotation of the spherical grating keeps the slit positions and beam directions fixed. The microscope objectives are normal-incidence, multilayer-coated Schwarzschild objectives. The project, which is nearing completion, utilizes novel designs for optics alignment, sample rastering mechanics, and software control. We will discuss the project status, new designs, and techniques. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Welnak, J.T.; Solak, H.; Wallace, J.; Cerrina, F.; Barbo, F.; Bertolo, M.; Bianco, A.; Di Fonzo, S.; Fontana, S.; Jark, W.; Mazzolini, F.; Rosei, R.; Savoia, A.; Underwood, J.; Margaritondo, G. [University of WI--Center for X ray Lithography, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States)] [University of WI--Center for X ray Lithography, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States); [Sincrotrone Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34012, Trieste (Italy); [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Center for X ray Optics, 1 Cyclotron Road, 80-101, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); [Institut de Physique Appliqee, Ecole Polytechnique Federale, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The effect of small field output factor measurements on IMRT dosimetry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate how changes in the measured small field output factors affect the doses in intensity-modulated treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were created using Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The plans were optimized to treat a cylindrical target 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length. Output factors for 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} field sizes were changed by {+-}5%, {+-}10%, and {+-}20% increments from the baseline measurements and entered into the planning system. The treatment units were recommissioned in the treatment planning system after each modification of the output factors and treatment plans were reoptimized. All plans were delivered to a solid water phantom and dose measurements were made using an ionization chamber. The percentage differences between measured and computed doses were calculated. An Elekta Synergy and a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator were separately evaluated. Results: For the Elekta unit, decreasing the output factors resulted in higher measured than computed doses by 0.8% for -5%, 3.6% for -10%, and 8.7% for -20% steps. Increasing the output factors resulted in lower doses by 2.9% for +5%, 5.4% for +10%, and 8.3% for +20% steps. For the Varian unit no changes were observed for either increased or decreased output factors. Conclusions: The measurement accuracy of small field output factors are of importance especially when the treatment plan consists of small segments as in IMRT. The method proposed here could be used to verify the accuracy of the measured small field output factors for certain linear accelerators as well as to test the beam model. The Pinnacle treatment planning system model uses output factors as a function of jaw setting. Consequently, plans using the Elekta unit, which conforms the jaws to the segments, are sensitive to small field measurement accuracy. On the other hand, for the Varian unit, jaws are fixed and segments are modeled as blocked fields hence, the impact of small field output factors on IMRT monitor unit calculation is not evaluable by this method.

Azimi, Rezvan; Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Global Innovation Commons | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commons Commons Jump to: navigation, search Name The Global Innovation Commons Address 210 Ridge-McIntire Road Place Charlottesville, Virginia Zip 22903 Year founded 2009 Notes www.globalinnovationcommons.org/blog Coordinates 38.0314057°, -78.4850371° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.0314057,"lon":-78.4850371,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

CommonAngels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CommonAngels CommonAngels Jump to: navigation, search Name CommonAngels Place Lexington, Massachusetts Zip 2421 Product Boston-based technology venture investor focused on Series A rounds. Coordinates 37.785485°, -79.441469° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.785485,"lon":-79.441469,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

The effect of performance-based research funding on output of R&D results in the Czech Republic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied the effects of performance-based research funding introduced to the Czech (CZ) R&D system in 2008 on outputs of R&D results. We have analyzed annual changes in number of various types of publications and applications including ... Keywords: Bibliometrics, Citation analysis, Patent output, Performance-based research funding, R&D results output

Jiri Vanecek

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Common Questions Why should I soil test?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Common Questions Why should I soil test? Soil testing is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate nutrient imbalances and understand plant growth. The most important reason to soil test is to have a basis for intelligent application of fertilizer and lime. Testing also allows for growers and homeowners to maintain

Isaacs, Rufus

229

Common Insect and Mite Pests of Humans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, in cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture. Edward G. Smith, Director, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, The Texas A&M System. Revision ... can transmit several diseases, includ- ing trench fever, relapsing fever, and typhus, which are not commonly found in the United States. Usually these lice are associated with people who seldom change their clothing. To manage body lice, wash...

Brown, Elizabeth; Troxclair, Noel N.

2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

230

Economic impacts and challenges of China’s petroleum industry: An input–output analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is generally acknowledged that the petroleum industry plays an important role in China’s national economic and social development. The direct, indirect, and induced impacts of China’s petroleum industry are analyzed in this study by using the Input–Output approach. The study also considers the main challenges that China’s economy might face in the future. The research results suggest the following: (1) The total economic impacts coefficients on output, given each unit of final demands change in extraction of petroleum and processing of petroleum, are 1.9180 and 3.2747 respectively, and the corresponding economic impacts coefficients on GDP are 1.0872 and 0.9001 respectively; (2) Extraction of petroleum has a more direct impact on GDP, while processing of petroleum has a greater effect on the total output; (3) Extraction of petroleum’s total economic impacts coefficients on both output and GDP have remained stable in recent years after a period of long decline; processing of petroleum’s total economic impacts coefficient on output is steadily increasing; (4) Import uncertainty, the likelihood of rising oil prices, and net oil exports caused by items manufactured with petroleum products (i.e. “Made in China” goods) are the main challenges the petroleum industry will cause for China’s overall economy.

Tang Xu; Zhang Baosheng; Feng Lianyong; Marwan Masri; Afshin Honarvar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

232

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 1.00 1.00 300-399 2.00 -- 4.00 6.00 400-599 14.00 -- 11.00 25.00 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 16.00 -- 16.00 32.00 Sustained Automatic Outage Hours High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 27.58 27.58 300-399 153.25 -- 15.87 169.12 400-599 3,070.88 -- 258.37 3,329.25 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 3,224.13 -- 301.82 3,525.95 Outage Hours per Outage Incident Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S.

233

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 " Pennsylvania",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 "East North Central",112,197,127,309,331,-6.8 " Illinois",34,45,29,79,66,18.9 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

234

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","Above 0","Zero2","Total Number" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50","to 10",,"of Employees" "Alabama",3415,97,655,317,160,224,54,105,5041 " Underground",2981,"-","-","-",36,88,"-",81,3190 " Surface",434,97,655,317,124,136,54,24,1851

235

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" 8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",107.73,104.51,106.57,100.17,108.71,102.69,7.6,-3.9,3.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

236

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",139,20,12410,12570 "Arkansas",96,"-","-",96 "Colorado",757,"-",22889,23646 "Illinois",18969,"-",23868,42837 "Indiana",15565,"-","-",15565 "Kentucky Total",56179,2018,"-",58198 " Kentucky (East)",22090,2010,"-",24100 " Kentucky (West)",34089,9,"-",34098 "Maryland",797,"-","-",797 "Montana","-","-",5708,5708

237

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "Alabama",1.69,"-",0.66,1.8 "Alaska","-",5.98,"-","-" "Arizona","-",7.38,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",0.59,"-" "Colorado",4.9,6.09,6.02,4.45 "Illinois",2.09,"-",5.34,4.7 "Indiana","-","-",3.23,5.41 "Kentucky Total",3.02,2.45,2.36,3.06 " Kentucky (East)","-",2.45,1.64,2.65

238

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market1","Captive2","Total3" "Alabama",85.06,"-",106.57 "Alaska","w","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w" "Colorado",38.51,43.19,37.54 "Illinois",49.04,54.71,53.08 "Indiana",49.16,54.5,52.01 "Kentucky Total",61.85,73.08,63.12 " Kentucky (East)",75.8,73.08,75.62 " Kentucky (West)",48.6,"-",48.67 "Louisiana","w","-","w"

239

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants, by State, 2011 and 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Census Division and State Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 34,766 37,698 33 58 39 37 Connecticut 8,987 8,196 7 1 12 6 Maine 3,722 4,351 8 12 7 8 Massachusetts 14,346 16,404 15 22 14 14 New Hampshire 4,295 5,127 2 23 4 5 Rhode Island 3,403 3,595 0.03 0.07 2 3 Vermont 12 24 0.05 0.09 1 1 Middle Atlantic 161,786 171,603 275 370 187 203 New Jersey 16,120 16,917 4 5 14 13 New York 35,669 37,256 31 52 40 43 Pennsylvania 109,997 117,430 240 313 133 147

240

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(million short tons)" ,2012,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Percent Change" "State","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Recoverable Coal" ,,,,,"Reserves" "Alabama",265,53.63,306,55.39,-13.2 "Alaska","w","w","w","w","w" "Arizona","w","w","w","w","w" "Arkansas","w","w","w","w","w"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

242

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2002 141,714 43,935 1,711 116,952 29,601 328 24,761 14,334 1,383 2003 121,567 45,752 1,484 97,831 28,062 378 23,736 17,691 1,105 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627 21,751 17,607 309 2005 101,137 47,414 530 77,457 29,532 374 23,680 17,882 156 2006 140,964 48,216 674 110,277 29,799 456 30,688 18,416 217

243

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 200-299 142 49 14 141 242 49 -- 484 1,121 AC 300-399 -- 88 107 95 46 56 80 165 637 AC 400-599 9 3 -- 22 86 -- -- 125 245 AC 600+ -- -- 6 9 -- -- -- -- 15 AC Total 151 140 127 267 374 105 80 774 2,018 DC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 200-299 -- 18 -- -- -- -- -- 5 23 DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 400-499 -- 5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 DC 500-599 -- -- -- 5 -- -- -- 17 22 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

244

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Continuous1","Conventional and","Longwall3","Total" ,,"Other2" "Alabama","w","-","w",107.73 "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","-",37.18,"w" "Illinois",48.08,"-",59.51,54.18 "Indiana",52.94,"-","-",52.94 "Kentucky Total","w","w","-",62.24 " Kentucky (East)","w","w","-",79.23 " Kentucky (West)",50.18,"-","-",50.18

245

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",4951041,5566950,6554494,10517991,11407664,-7.8 " Baltimore, MD",1275530,831976,1715016,2107506,2852092,-26.1 " Boston, MA",7,"-",12,7,24,-70.8 " Buffalo, NY",1180,1516,2826,2696,5257,-48.7 " New York City, NY",3088,2664,2168,5752,6106,-5.8 " Norfolk, VA",3578715,4697769,4760354,8276484,8443756,-2 " Ogdensburg, NY",36894,3610,3090,40504,6838,492.3 " Philadelphia, PA",55513,29255,34241,84768,56733,49.4

246

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and County" "Alabama",8,12570,38,6752,46,19321 " Bibb","-","-",2,119,2,119 " Blount","-","-",2,236,2,236 " Fayette",1,2249,"-","-",1,2249 " Franklin","-","-",2,137,2,137 " Jackson","-","-",3,152,3,152 " Jefferson",3,3589,9,1106,12,4695

247

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Prime Mover Coal Petroluem Natural Gas Nuclear 2007 Steam Generator 10,158 10,398 10,440 10,489 Gas Turbine -- 13,217 11,632 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,447 10,175 -- Combined Cycle W 10,970 7,577 -- 2008 Steam Generator 10,138 10,356 10,377 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,311 11,576 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,427 9,975 -- Combined Cycle W 10,985 7,642 -- 2009 Steam Generator 10,150 10,349 10,427 10,459 Gas Turbine -- 13,326 11,560 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,428 9,958 -- Combined Cycle W 10,715 7,605 -- 2010 Steam Generator 10,142 10,249 10,416 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,386 11,590 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,429 9,917 --

248

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 0 0 -- -- -- -- 18,671 18,256 3.44 3.52 24.7 3.03 2003 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 18,169 17,827 4.96 5.06 30.5 4.02 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804 5.93 6.07 21.9 4.58 2005 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 17,600 17,142 8.38 8.60 25.2 6.25 2006 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 21,369 20,819 8.33 8.55 30.7 6.42

249

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 395,943 22,241 8,368 378,044 1,763 272,684 18,189 44,466 -1,309 8,612 1,149,001 2003 452,433 35,818 7,949 380,337 2,404 304,904 21,890 46,060 -1,003 8,088 1,258,879 2004 443,547 33,574 7,410 427,510 3,194 312,846 19,518 48,636 -962 7,856 1,303,129 2005 507,199 37,096 9,664 445,625 3,767 345,690 21,486 51,708 -1,174 6,285 1,427,346 2006 498,316 10,396 8,409 452,329 4,223 361,877 24,390 59,345 -1,277 6,412 1,424,421

250

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

251

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

252

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",65.1,63.67,73.81,64.48,78.9,-18.3 " Canada*",59.34,55.22,63.02,57.57,73.63,-21.8 " Dominican Republic",78.47,74.41,73.89,75.4,76.61,-1.6 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",69.42,73.33,82.64,70.83,86.44,-18.1 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

253

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal Thickness (inches)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Under 7","-",17,17 "7 - Under 13","-",2108,2108 "13 - Under 19",429,6688,7117 "19 - Under 25",111,14107,14217 "25 - Under 31",4147,12913,17060 "31 - Under 37",15128,19022,34150 "37 - Under 43",23868,17285,41153 "43 - Under 49",26035,15597,41632 "49 - Under 55",18909,22544,41453 "55 - Under 61",36946,11285,48231 "61 - Under 67",43146,15074,58220 "67 - Under 73",40983,8783,49766 "73 - Under 79",32914,10193,43107 "79 - Under 85",27011,3554,30565

254

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Factor (Pounds of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 1 205.30000 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO Source: 1 161.38600 Geothermal GEO Estimate from EIA, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting 16.59983 Jet Fuel JF Source: 1 156.25800 Kerosene KER Source: 1 159.53500 Lignite Coal LIG Source: 1 215.40000 Municipal Solid Waste MSW Source: 1 (including footnote 2 within source) 91.90000 Natural Gas NG Source: 1 117.08000 Petroleum Coke PC Source: 1 225.13000 Propane Gas PG Sources: 1 139.17800 Residual Fuel Oil RFO Source: 1 173.90600 Synthetic Coal SC Assumed to have the emissions similar to Bituminous Coal. 205.30000

255

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Imports by Customs District" Coal Imports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",469878,331008,156004,800886,350124,128.7 " Baltimore, MD","-","-",106118,"-",154318,"-" " Boston, MA",373985,154438,"-",528423,51185,"NM" " Buffalo, NY",44,"-","-",44,"-","-" " New York City, NY",1373,1402,487,2775,507,447.3 " Norfolk, VA","-",68891,"-",68891,35856,92.1 " Ogdensburg, NY","-",1,12,1,12,-91.7

256

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Exports" U.S. Coke Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",162796,79217,201795,242013,340944,-29 " Canada*",73859,17837,112348,91696,161596,-43.3 " Mexico",88535,60517,86721,149052,176163,-15.4 " Other**",402,863,2726,1265,3185,-60.3 "South America Total",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 " Other**",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 "Europe Total",48972,59197,"-",108169,6,"NM" " Other**",347,11743,"-",12090,"-","-"

257

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

258

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Unit of Measure Equivalents 5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours Terawatthours (TWh) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watthours Gigawatthours 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatthours Thousand Gigawatthours 1,000,000,000(One Billion Kilowatthours U.S. Dollar 1,000 (One Thousand) Mills U.S. Cent 10 (Ten) Mills Barrel of Oil 42 Gallons

259

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 75,711 2,677 0.63 17.68 4.98 126.0 1,680,518 1,634,734 3.68 3.78 72.3 1.53 2003 89,618 3,165 0.74 20.94 5.51 124.0 1,486,088 1,439,513 5.59 5.77 81.6 1.74 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10 92.0 1,542,746 1,499,933 6.15 6.33 82.9 1.87 2005 102,450 3,632 1.29 36.31 5.16 87.9 1,835,221 1,780,721 8.32 8.57 83.4 2.38

260

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 Census Division and State Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroleum Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change New England 1,030 1,389 -26% 2,483 2,680 -7.3% 0 0 -- Connecticut W W W 1,300 954 36% 0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 675 W 837 990 -15% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 51 49 3.0% 0 0 -- Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% 5,496 6,591 -17% W W W New Jersey 926 871 6.3% 1,084 1,113 -2.6% 0 0 --

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261

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",25,54,32,79,90,-12 " Pennsylvania",25,54,32,79,90,-12 "East North Central",115,183,117,298,301,-0.9 " Illinois",31,42,28,73,67,8.1 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

262

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",627,587,637,1214,1254,-3.1 " New York",214,178,194,392,377,4

263

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" "Rank","Mine Name / Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining Ll","Surface","Wyoming",107639188 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company Llc","Surface","Wyoming",93082919 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining Llc","Surface","Wyoming",39204736 4,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal Llc","Surface","Wyoming",34316314 5,"Belle Ayr Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",24227846 6,"Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",22466733

264

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

265

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 2005 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Year Internal Combustion Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Hydro Wind Photovoltaic Storage Other Wind and Other Total Number of Generators Distributed Generators 2005 4,025.0 1,917.0 1,830.0 999.0 -- -- -- -- 995.0 9,766.0 17,371 2006 3,646.0 1,298.0 2,582.0 806.0 -- -- -- -- 1,081.0 9,411.0 5,044 2007 4,624.0 1,990.0 3,596.0 1,051.0 -- -- -- -- 1,441.0 12,702.0 7,103 2008 5,112.0 1,949.0 3,060.0 1,154.0 -- -- -- -- 1,588.0 12,863.0 9,591 2009 4,339.0 4,147.0 4,621.0 1,166.0 -- -- -- -- 1,729.0 16,002.0 13,006 2010 886.8 186.0 109.9 97.4 98.9 236.3 -- 372.7 -- 1,988.0 15,630

266

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

267

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,11139,8786,14702,8405,16198,10559,17124,8597,59163,36347 2008,15802,7640,23069,8982,20321,8485,22329,9101,81519,34208 2009,13335,6325,12951,5426,15159,5441,17653,5447,59097,22639 2010,17807,4803,21965,5058,21074,4680,20870,4811,81716,19353 2011,26617,3381,26987,3419,25976,3588,27679,2700,107259,13088 2012,28642,2022,37534,2329,31563,2415,28006,2394,125746,9159

268

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

269

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors 2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 1.20 1.20 1.20 N/A 1.20 Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); EIA estimates Lbs per MMCF 15.40 15.40 15.40 N/A 15.40 Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 33.00 5.00 12.00 31.00 11.00 Black Liquor BLQ Source: 1 Lbs per ton ** 1.50 1.50 1.50 N/A 1.50

270

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

271

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",240.59,241.38,218.4,240.85,225.8,6.7 " Canada*",147.49,330.47,243.04,183.08,286.56,-36.1 " Mexico",316.57,211.63,189.12,273.97,171.71,59.6 " Other**",612.42,485.63,134.48,525.92,135.04,289.5 "South America Total",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 " Other**",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 "Europe Total",259.26,255.24,"-",257.06,427.83,-39.9

272

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program 2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 15,284 24,803 10,242 -- 50,328 2003 12,914 24,758 10,031 551 48,254 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790 50,732 23,061 76 120,659 2012 54,516 58,894 25,023 92 138,525 Energy Efficiency - Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2002 5,300 5,389 2,768 -- 13,457 2003 5,909 4,911 2,671 94 13,585

273

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,933,130 78,701 15,867 691,006 11,463 780,064 264,329 79,109 -8,743 13,527 3,858,452 2003 1,973,737 102,734 16,672 649,908 15,600 763,733 275,806 79,487 -8,535 14,045 3,883,185 2004 1,978,301 100,391 20,754 710,100 15,252 788,528 268,417 83,067 -8,488 14,232 3,970,555 2005 2,012,873 99,840 22,385 760,960 13,464 781,986 270,321 87,329 -6,558 12,821 4,055,423 2006 1,990,511 44,460 19,706 816,441 14,177 787,219 289,246 96,525 -6,558 12,974 4,064,702

274

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

275

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Natural Gas Fired Combustion Turbine Other Natural Gas Coal Petroleum Coke Petroleum Liquids Other Gases Total Fossil Fuels Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 12,190.5 11,593.8 1,090.0 1,058.9 876.4 830.1 2,546.1 2,755.5 0.0 0.0 7,916.1 7,915.3 0.0 0.0 24,619.1 24,153.6 Connecticut 2,513.4 2,447.7 458.1 432.7 61.0 44.7 389.1 564.4 0.0 0.0 3,186.1 3,185.0 0.0 0.0 6,607.7 6,674.5 Maine 1,250.0 1,250.0 306.0 302.2 119.0 93.0 85.0 85.0 0.0 0.0 1,004.9 1,007.2 0.0 0.0 2,764.9 2,737.4

276

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" "NAICS Code","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "311 Food Manufacturing",875,926,1015,-13.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",26,17,19,35.8 "313 Textile Mills",22,22,25,-13.9 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "322 Paper Manufacturing",570,583,743,-23.3 "324 Petroleum and Coal Products*",127,113,156,-18.7

277

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Mine Production Range","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery" "(thousand short tons)","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage" "Over 1,000",4874,57.96,11153,91.28,16028,81.15 "Over 500 to 1,000",531,47.14,226,81.9,757,57.49 "Over 200 to 500",604,52.72,333,69.16,938,58.57

278

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

279

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 18.64 W W 21.43 21.12 18.47 W Connecticut W 21.91 W 23.87 NM W 21.93 Maine W W W -- NM W W Massachusetts 17.17 19.76 -13% 17.45 NM 17.16 19.66 New Hampshire 23.23 W W 23.23 19.90 -- W Rhode Island -- W W -- NM -- W Vermont 24.11 NM NM 24.11 NM -- -- Middle Atlantic W 20.15 W 21.01 19.21 W 20.66 New Jersey 19.77 18.36 7.7% -- NM 19.77 20.28 New York W 19.66 W 21.01 20.00 W 19.36 Pennsylvania 21.84 22.19 -1.6% -- NM 21.84 22.19

280

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",14594,7967,22561,16102,8911,25013,-9.4,-10.6,-9.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2007,66,1967,26864,3663,50,3425,311,36347 2008,149,2027,26262,3374,45,2312,39,34208 2009,152,1288,17787,2084,9,1297,21,22639 2010,380,1767,14584,1904,53,582,83,19353 2011,62,1680,9500,856,22,779,188,13088 2012 " January - March","-",260,1594,59,7,80,22,2022 " April - June","-",281,1728,49,21,170,80,2329 " July - September","-",297,1762,266,39,"-",51,2415

282

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",39,19021,106.57 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Blount",2,"w","w" " Fayette",1,"w","w" " Franklin",1,"w","w" " Jackson",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,4298,146.04 " Marion",1,"w","w" " Tuscaloosa",7,8599,111.55 " Walker",11,2370,81.88

283

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic",62,58,56,10.9 " Pennsylvania",62,58,56,10.9 "East North Central",168,171,197,-14.7 " Illinois","w","w","w","w" " Indiana",75,76,75,0.5 " Michigan","w","w","w","w" " Ohio",25,15,19,27 " Wisconsin",5,5,3,59.1 "West North Central",66,75,97,-32.2

284

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Coal Receipts","Average Price of Coal Receipts","Coal Used","Coal Stocks1" "Quarter",,"(dollars per short ton)" 2012 " January - March",2151,27.47,1756,771 " April - June",3844,25.42,3688,825 " July - September",5399,24.32,5286,812 " October - December",4919,24.55,4680,787 " Total",16313,25.06,15410 2013 " January - March",5067,24.6,4989,793 " April - June",4015,25.24,3754,756 " Total",9082,24.88,8744 "1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter." "Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

285

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 (Circuit Miles of Transmission) Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2015 Year 2016 Year 2017 Year 2018 Year 2019 All Years AC 100-199 954 1,222 992 1,047 392 382 176 5,165 AC 200-299 1,003 792 1,398 319 539 427 118 4,596 AC 300-399 4,779 839 1,532 1,527 502 1,650 349 11,178 AC 400-599 399 708 669 643 660 1,151 334 4,564 AC 600+ -- -- 14 -- -- 69 -- 83 AC Total 7,134 3,562 4,606 3,536 2,092 3,679 978 25,586 DC 100-199 2 11 5 -- -- 7 -- 25 DC 200-299 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- 333 -- -- 333 DC 400-599 -- -- 10 -- -- -- -- 10 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

286

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) 3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Description 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Utility Operating Revenues 219,609 230,151 238,759 265,652 275,501 270,964 ......Electric Utility 200,360 206,268 213,012 234,909 246,736 240,864 ......Other Utility 19,250 23,883 25,747 30,743 28,765 30,100 Utility Operating Expenses 189,062 201,057 206,960 236,786 245,589 241,198 ......Electric Utility 171,604 179,044 183,121 207,830 218,445 213,076 ............Operation 116,660 125,436 131,560 150,645 158,893 153,885 ..................Production 90,715 98,305 103,871 120,586 127,494 121,700 ........................Cost of Fuel 24,149 26,871 28,544 36,106 37,945 39,548

287

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Imports" U.S. Coke Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",10284,2293,159462,12577,183712,-93.2 " Canada",3009,2293,159462,5302,183712,-97.1 " Panama",7275,"-","-",7275,"-","-" "South America Total",25267,13030,88424,38297,106612,-64.1 " Brazil","-","-",78595,"-",78595,"-" " Colombia",25267,13030,9829,38297,28017,36.7 "Europe Total",6044,40281,165027,46325,485791,-90.5

288

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" ,"Production (thousand short tons)",,,"Thickness (inches)" "Coalbed ID Number1","Underground","Surface","Total","Average2","Low","High" "Coalbed Name" "1699 Wyodak","-",351188,351188,778,160,913 "0036 Pittsburgh",52476,3871,56348,74,18,138 "0489 No. 9",42193,12181,54374,61,24,74 "0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6)",48526,1910,50436,71,46,89 "0212 Pittsburgh",27355,76,27431,75,27,98 "1701 Smith","-",23847,23847,822,745,912 "1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2","-",18992,18992,932,660,960

289

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

290

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

291

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1503162,764701,1411897,2267863,2261900,0.3 " Canada*",975783,343309,1260473,1319092,1895263,-30.4 " Dominican Republic",94,51064,"-",51158,"-","-" " Mexico",527285,370328,151424,897613,366637,144.8 "South America Total",2091488,2561772,2389018,4653260,4543747,2.4 " Argentina",104745,155806,203569,260551,253841,2.6 " Brazil",1921144,2352098,2185449,4273242,4022618,6.2

292

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 " Pennsylvania",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 "East North Central",87.62,97.3,87.11,93.56,95.13,-1.7 " Illinois",59.27,60.3,62.17,59.86,66.69,-10.2 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

293

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",87.05,93.03,93.73,89.93,95.68,-6 " New York",102.14,105.8,117.15,103.8,117.61,-11.7

294

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",1313,1177,1326,-1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",2500,2207,2295,8.9 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure." "Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

295

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 3,710,847 182,482 1.37 27.96 1.15 87.0 186,271 30,043 4.19 25.98 0.61 76.4 2003 4,365,996 223,984 1.34 26.20 1.15 90.4 347,546 56,138 5.41 33.50 0.58 89.7 2004 4,410,775 227,700 1.41 27.27 1.13 93.3 337,011 54,152 5.35 33.31 0.61 93.6 2005 4,459,333 229,071 1.56 30.39 1.10 83.0 381,871 61,753 8.30 51.34 0.54 97.2

296

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",11716074,14136513,15167377,25852587,27578514,-6.3 " Baltimore, MD",2736470,4225450,5123600,6961920,9037970,-23 " Boston, MA","-","-","-","-",28873,"-" " Buffalo, NY",247714,121347,524040,369061,725698,-49.1 " Norfolk, VA",8730257,9784866,9519119,18515123,17784479,4.1 " Ogdensburg, NY",1633,4850,618,6483,1494,333.9 "Southern Total",3551564,3824484,4264938,7376048,8976503,-17.8

297

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by Census Divison, 2012 and 2011 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Census Division December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 December 2012 December 2011 Coal (Thousand Tons) New England 1,030 1,389 -25.9% W W W W Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% W W W W East North Central 36,139 37,262 -3.0% 27,069 27,316 9,070 9,946 West North Central 30,554 28,544 7.0% 30,554 28,544 0 0 South Atlantic 38,859 36,920 5.3% 35,527 33,163 3,331 3,757 East South Central 19,657 17,185 14.4% 19,657 17,185 0 0 West South Central 28,807 22,910 25.7% 17,047 15,125 11,760 7,785

298

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

299

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,514,670 52,838 6,286 229,639 206 507,380 242,302 3,089 -7,434 480 2,549,457 2003 1,500,281 62,774 7,156 186,967 243 458,829 249,622 3,421 -7,532 519 2,462,281 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 3,692 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 4,945 -5,383 643 2,474,846 2006 1,471,421 31,269 9,634 282,088 30 425,341 261,864 6,588 -5,281 700 2,483,656

300

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) 2007 2,202,222 262,159 9,106 2 2,473,489 2008 4,190,244 444,003 12,757 12 4,647,016 2009 8,712,297 876,419 22,675 10 9,611,401 2010 18,369,908 1,904,983 59,567 67 20,334,525 2011 33,453,548 3,682,159 154,659 7 37,290,373

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 2003 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Historical Data 2003 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,870 775 168 -- 6,813 2004 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 14,114 1,494 215 3 15,826 2005 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19,244 1,565 337 -- 21,146 2006 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 30,689 2,553 376 -- 33,618 2007 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44,450 3,513 391 -- 48,354 2008 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740

302

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 (From Table 2.1.) Number of Ultimate Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

303

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Disposition by State, 2012" Coal Disposition by State, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market Sales1","Captive Sales / Transactions2","Exports3","Total" "Alabama",8688,"-",10333,19021 "Alaska","w","-",968,"w" "Arizona","w","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado",20836,4552,3468,28856 "Illinois",29252,5113,12341,46705 "Indiana",17127,18404,375,35906 "Kentucky Total",76602,6884,5668,89154 " Kentucky (East)",37324,6884,3588,47796 " Kentucky (West)",39277,"-",2081,41358

304

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

305

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

306

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

307

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production1","Imports","Waste Coal","Producer and","Consumption","Exports","Consumer","Losses and" "Quarter",,,"Supplied","Distributor",,,"Stocks2","Unaccounted" ,,,,"Stocks2",,,,"For3" 2007 " January - March",286041,8786,3264,34007,278727,11139,149588 " April - June",285687,8405,3387,32484,267106,14702,162849 " July - September",286035,10559,3697,30090,303665,16198,150448 " October - December",288872,8597,3727,33977,278500,17124,158781 " Total",1146635,36347,14076,,1127998,59163,,4085

308

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 294,234 13,659 1.45 31.29 1.56 52.1 29,137 4,638 3.55 22.33 1.24 26.5 2003 322,547 15,076 1.45 31.01 1.37 60.7 27,538 4,624 4.85 28.86 1.25 23.2 2004 326,495 15,324 1.63 34.79 1.43 57.6 25,491 4,107 4.98 30.93 1.38 18.5 2005 339,968 16,011 1.94 41.17 1.42 61.9 36,383 5,876 6.64 41.13 1.36 26.4

309

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

310

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity" "State","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization" ,,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent" "Alabama","w","w","-","-","w","w",14594,85.99

311

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

312

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 AC & DC Circuit Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning 6.00 27.00 3.00 30.00 63.00 12.00 -- 69.00 210.00 Lightning 5.00 10.00 8.00 5.00 31.00 16.00 13.00 57.00 145.00 Environmental -- 1.00 1.00 5.00 -- 1.00 -- -- 8.00 Contamination 14.00 -- -- -- 22.00 3.00 6.00 7.00 52.00 Foreign Interference 34.00 3.00 -- 4.00 13.00 1.00 2.00 14.00 71.00 Fire -- 2.00 -- 1.00 6.00 3.00 1.00 85.00 98.00 Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 2.00 -- -- 1.00 3.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment 18.00 16.00 35.00 63.00 57.00 16.00 15.00 65.00 285.00

313

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 / 2013 36,409 45,545 386,359 4,925 74,430 122,566 149,359 35,079 46,909 101,706 616,927 Projected 2013 / 2014 43,384 46,008 399,149 5,385 75,320 132,229 145,657 40,558 51,435 107,341 647,317 Projected 2014 / 2015 44,060 46,090 403,883 5,500 76,252 134,742 146,130 41,259 53,742 109,418 657,192 Projected 2015 / 2016 44,596 46,184 408,927 5,563 77,058 137,338 147,201 41,767 55,346 110,814 665,866

314

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Summer Peak Load (Megawatts) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 468,092 5,051 96,769 154,339 161,687 50,246 66,548 130,465 767,762 Projected 2013 45,668 59,969 469,857 5,109 96,192 155,553 159,032 53,971 67,998 133,523 777,015 Projected 2014 46,338 60,654 475,005 5,249 96,879 158,717 159,457 54,703 69,289 132,731 784,017 Projected 2015 47,053 61,428 484,637 5,360 97,565 162,216 164,150 55,346 71,423 134,183 798,724

315

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" 3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","10 or Under","Total2" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50" "Alabama",1.69,2.5,1.95,1.72,1.83,0.69,0.55,1.68 " Underground",1.73,"-","-","-",1.08,0.31,"-",1.64 " Surface",1.36,2.5,1.95,1.72,2.11,1.19,0.55,1.75

316

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Connecticut -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic -- W W -- -- -- W New Jersey -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New York -- W W -- -- -- W Pennsylvania -- -- -- -- -- -- -- East North Central W W W 4.10 4.01 W W

317

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

318

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

319

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery" "State","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage" ,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing"

320

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 151.00 163.00 127.00 272.00 374.00 105.00 80.00 796.00 2,068.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 77.00 44.00 97.00 230.00 192.00 27.00 45.00 337.00 1,049.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 2,650.00 453.00 512.00 2,050.00 2,450.00 369.00 472.00 2,744.00 11,700.00 Circuit Outage Hours Automatic Outages (Sustained) 2,852.28 1,312.97 14,244.87 19,857.23 7,123.70 1,509.51 682.60 24,238.64 71,821.80 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 186.87 27.08 67.68 186.08 426.59 3.32 13.96 67.59 979.17 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 872.65 710.33 1,222.36 1,095.46 503.01 357.44 105.06 1,105.43 5,971.74

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321

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

322

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

323

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

324

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

325

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",51.17,49.59,50.96,50.35,50.94,-1.2 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",111.56,115.95,113.47,113.49,117.55,-3.5 "313 Textile Mills",115.95,118.96,127.41,117.4,128.07,-8.3 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

326

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

327

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2002 884,287 0.94 1.25 25.52 120,851 1.64 3.34 20.77 5,607,737 3.56 1.86 2003 986,026 0.97 1.28 26.00 185,567 1.53 4.33 26.78 5,500,704 5.39 2.28 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42 186,655 1.66 4.29 26.56 5,734,054 5.96 2.48 2005 1,021,437 0.98 1.54 31.20 194,733 1.61 6.44 39.65 6,181,717 8.21 3.25

328

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 9,580 399 2.10 50.44 2.59 28.4 503 91 5.38 29.73 0.02 7.5 2003 8,835 372 1.99 47.24 2.43 20.5 248 43 7.00 40.82 0.04 3.1 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20 26.9 2005 11,081 464 2.57 61.21 2.43 24.2 1,684 289 8.28 48.22 0.17 18.3 2006 12,207 518 2.63 61.95 2.51 27.5 798 137 13.50 78.70 0.17 15.5

329

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",2303,2314,2365,4617,4754,-2.9 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",4152,4098,4104,8249,8233,0.2 "Coke Total",3954,3841,3863,7795,7721,1

330

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2002 1,838,901 5,757,283 943,531 28,963 8,568,678 2003 1,824,030 3,906,220 1,156,796 33,909 6,920,954 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399 1,295,857 33,139 5,065,031 2010 1,541,554 2,946,452 1,404,137 37,068 5,929,211 2011 1,529,434 2,206,981 1,372,306 34,400 5,143,121

331

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

332

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

333

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" 3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",3051,2997,3092,6048,6156,-1.8 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",5471,5280,5296,10751,10579,1.6 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

334

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

335

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 37,951 55,164 430,396 101,251 54,296 53,267 -- -- 28,825 -- -- 154,459 38,298 55,833 117,032 696,376 2003 40,387 53,936 422,253 98,487 53,566 53,617 -- -- 28,775 -- -- 148,380 39,428 59,282 120,894 696,752 2004 42,243 51,580 419,349 95,300 52,049 50,499 -- -- 29,094 -- -- 153,024 39,383 58,531 121,205 692,908

336

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

337

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

338

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports" U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1619502,1246181,2153814,2865683,3065683,-6.5 " Canada*",797861,599752,841061,1397613,1280803,9.1 " Dominican Republic",51698,160672,124720,212370,312741,-32.1 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",717687,407422,1116653,1125109,1331754,-15.5 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

339

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2002 423,128 1.47 10.1 391,785 0.36 6.2 65,555 0.93 13.3 2003 467,286 1.50 10.0 432,513 0.38 6.4 79,869 1.03 14.4 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677 1.02 14.0 2006 489,550 1.59 10.5 504,947 0.35 6.1 75,742 0.95 14.4 2007 467,817 1.62 10.3 505,155 0.34 6.0 71,930 0.90 14.0

340

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w",20,"w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",583,589,651,1171,1237,-5.3 " New York",155,181,206,337,374,-10.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

342

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

343

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" 4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",157.29,176.84,199.7,166.21,198.26,-16.2 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",157.26,171.51,191.48,163.85,190.51,-14

344

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Dollars) Year Energy Efficiency Load Management Direct Cost Indirect Cost Total Cost 2002 1,032,911 410,323 1,443,234 206,169 1,649,403 2003 807,403 352,137 1,159,540 137,670 1,340,686 2004 910,816 510,281 1,421,097 132,295 1,560,578 2005 1,180,576 622,287 1,802,863 127,925 1,939,115 2006 1,270,602 663,980 1,934,582 128,886 2,072,962 2007 1,677,969 700,362 2,378,331 160,326 2,604,711 2008 2,137,452 836,359 2,973,811 181,843 3,186,742 2009 2,221,480 944,261 3,165,741 394,193 3,607,076 2010 2,906,906 1,048,356 3,955,262 275,158 4,230,420 2011 4,002,672 1,213,102 5,215,774 328,622 5,544,396 2012 4,397,635 1,270,391 5,668,026 332,440 6,000,466

345

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

346

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

347

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) 4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) Operation Maintenance Year Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale 2002 9.00 2.59 3.71 3.26 5.04 2.67 2.62 2.38 2003 9.12 2.74 3.47 3.50 5.23 2.72 2.32 2.26 2004 8.97 3.13 3.83 4.27 5.38 2.96 2.76 2.14 2005 8.26 3.21 3.95 3.69 5.27 2.98 2.73 1.89 2006 9.03 3.57 3.76 3.51 5.69 3.19 2.70 2.16 2007 9.54 3.63 5.44 3.26 5.79 3.37 3.87 2.42 2008 9.89 3.72 5.78 3.77 6.20 3.59 3.89 2.72 2009 10.00 4.23 4.88 3.05 6.34 3.96 3.50 2.58 2010 10.50 4.04 5.33 2.79 6.80 3.99 3.81 2.73

348

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Imports" Price of U.S. Coal Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",147.86,138.39,191.01,144.86,197.96,-26.8 " Canada",147.86,138.39,191,144.86,197.95,-26.8 " Mexico","-","-",286.23,"-",286.23,"-" "South America Total",75.29,80.74,86.52,77.2,87.17,-11.4 " Argentina","-","-",504.7,"-",504.7,"-" " Colombia",74.87,80.74,83.03,76.96,85.25,-9.7 " Peru",87.09,"-","-",87.09,"-","-"

349

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

350

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2256,2561,1864,4817,4343,10.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",38,50,48,88,95,-7.7 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,21,60,59,2.2 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

351

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

352

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Period Average Btu per Pound Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Gallon Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Cubic Foot 2002 10,168 0.94 8.7 147,903 1.64 0.2 1,025 2003 10,137 0.97 9.0 147,086 1.53 0.1 1,030 2004 10,074 0.97 9.0 147,286 1.66 0.2 1,027 2005 10,107 0.98 9.0 146,481 1.61 0.2 1,028 2006 10,063 0.97 9.0 143,883 2.31 0.2 1,027 2007 10,028 0.96 8.8 144,546 2.10 0.1 1,027 2008 9,947 0.97 9.0 142,205 2.21 0.3 1,027 2009 9,902 1.01 8.9 141,321 2.14 0.2 1,025 2010 9,842 1.16 8.8 140,598 2.14 0.2 1,022

353

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

354

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",78.29,77.25,102.62,77.88,105.14,-25.9 " Canada*",81.61,80.7,110.67,81.3,112.16,-27.5 " Dominican Republic",78.54,75.09,73.89,75.77,76.61,-1.1 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",73.45,75.81,94.36,74.35,100.95,-26.3 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

355

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

5. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu)...

356

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Weighted Average Cost of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Fossil Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite All Coal Ranks...

357

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Type of Prime Mover, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Prime Mover Type Number of Generators...

358

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

" Italy","-","-","-","-",3,"-" " Netherlands","-","-","-","-",1046,"-" " Russia",42439,"-","-",42439,"-","-" " Ukraine",80025,23142,"-",103167,22155,365.7 " United...

359

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

455,214 Other Gases 94 2,253 1,946 1,933 Nuclear 104 107,938 101,885 104,182 Hydroelectric Conventional 4,023 78,241 78,738 78,215 Wind 947 59,629 59,075 59,082 Solar...

360

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

3,001 2,267 2,431 Other Gases 1 * * * 4 120 152 152 Nuclear -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Hydroelectric Conventional 15 345 344 342 28 317 315 314 Wind 149 12,953 12,885 12,885 1 13 12...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Conventional) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors...

362

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

because of independent rounding." "Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production Report.'...

363

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 (From Chapter 2.) Supply (Million Megawatthours) Generation Year Electric Utilities IPP (Non-CHP) IPP (CHP) Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Total Imports Total...

364

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

- Electricity Purchases, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total...

365

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2014,2013,"Percent" ,2014,2014,2013,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",14307904,16331296,16667115,3063920...

366

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,,,"Year to Date" "Commodity","April - June","January - March","April - June",2014,2013,"Percent" ,2014,2014,2013,,,"Change" "Coke" " Sales",1969,1865,1969,3834,3905,-1.8 "...

367

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

18,481,678 1,320,095 624,502 45,083,186 19,106,180 2011 51,075,952 14,398,470 1,223,758 650,082 52,299,710 15,048,552 2012 57,971,110 11,392,267 1,285,959 603,382...

368

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,"Number of Mining Operations2",,,"Number of Employees3",,,"Average Production per Employee Hour" ,,,"(short tons)4"...

369

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground - Minable...

370

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Bituminous",,"Subbituminous",,"Lignite",,"Anthracite",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number...

371

SAS Output  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B. U.S. Transformer Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 16.00 --...

372

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2012 2,162,230 102,223 1,509 -- 2,265,963 In 2006 the single largest provider of green pricing services in the country discontinued service in two States. More than...

373

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 469,273 4,967 96,769 156,319 158,041 53,177 66,548 130,465 768,943 Projected 2013 42,532 59,969 447,171 5,022 91,644 144,378 152,949 53,177 65,901 129,278 744,851 Projected 2014 43,142 60,654 448,912 5,161 92,331 144,497 152,843 54,080 67,592 128,200 748,499 Projected 2015 43,812 61,428 457,865 5,270 93,017 147,568 157,287 54,722 69,679 129,553 762,336

374

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 21,525 3,196 1,207 79,013 9,493 0 3,825 30,489 0 3,832 152,580 2003 19,817 3,726 1,559 78,705 12,953 0 4,222 28,704 0 4,843 154,530 2004 19,773 4,128 1,839 78,959 11,684 0 3,248 29,164 0 5,129 153,925 2005 19,466 3,804 1,564 72,882 9,687 0 3,195 29,003 0 5,137 144,739 2006 19,464 2,567 1,656 77,669 9,923 0 2,899 28,972 0 5,103 148,254 2007 16,694 2,355 1,889 77,580 9,411 0 1,590 28,919 0 4,690 143,128

375

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewable Sources Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total Total (All Sectors) 2002 315,350 59,651 312,512 2,008 98,657 79,356 16,710 20,371 686 905,301 2003 313,019 60,730 355,442 1,994 99,209 78,694 18,153 20,522 684 948,446 2004 313,020 59,119 371,011 2,296 99,628 77,641 18,717 20,764 746 962,942 2005 313,380 58,548 383,061 2,063 99,988 77,541 21,205 21,347 887 978,020 2006 312,956 58,097 388,294 2,256 100,334 77,821 24,113 21,461 882 986,215 2007 312,738 56,068 392,876 2,313 100,266 77,885 30,069 21,886 788 994,888

376

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.69 4.94 -25% 4.73 5.70 3.68 4.93 Connecticut 3.88 4.97 -22% 6.45 NM 3.87 4.96 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 3.55 4.88 -27% 4.47 5.75 3.53 4.87 New Hampshire W W W 5.54 6.01 W W Rhode Island 3.86 5.01 -23% -- -- 3.86 5.01 Vermont 4.06 5.22 -22% 4.06 5.22 -- -- Middle Atlantic 3.52 5.14 -32% 3.86 5.32 3.46 5.11 New Jersey 3.52 5.11 -31% -- -- 3.52 5.11 New York 3.85 5.45 -29% 3.86 5.32 3.84 5.50

377

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

378

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

379

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "Pennsylvania" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "East North Central" " Btu",11928,12228,11682,12112,11933,1.5

380

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" "Rank","Controlling Company Name","Production (thousand short tons)","Percent of Total Production" 1,"Peabody Energy Corp",192563,18.9 2,"Arch Coal Inc",136992,13.5 3,"Alpha Natural Resources LLC",104306,10.3 4,"Cloud Peak Energy",90721,8.9 5,"CONSOL Energy Inc",55752,5.5 6,"Alliance Resource Operating Partners LP",35406,3.5 7,"Energy Future Holdings Corp",31032,3.1 8,"Murray Energy Corp",29216,2.9 9,"NACCO Industries Inc",28207,2.8 10,"Patriot Coal Corp",23946,2.4 11,"Peter Kiewit Sons Inc",22725,2.2 12,"Westmoreland Coal Co",22215,2.2 13,"BHP Billiton Ltd",12580,1.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

382

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

383

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

384

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 732 0.87 10.5 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.80 7.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 700 0.88 10.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

385

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.59 3.68 -2.4% 4.07 3.55 3.34 3.74 Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.07 3.55 15% 4.07 3.55 -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic 2.50 2.68 -6.7% -- 2.92 2.50 2.63 New Jersey 4.05 4.18 -3.1% -- -- 4.05 4.18 New York 3.12 3.27 -4.6% -- 3.88 3.12 3.27 Pennsylvania 2.43 2.55 -4.7% -- 2.91 2.43 2.45

386

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 . Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewables Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total (All Sectors) 2002 633 1,147 1,649 40 66 1,426 682 38 28 2003 629 1,166 1,693 40 66 1,425 741 38 27 2004 625 1,143 1,670 46 66 1,425 749 39 28 2005 619 1,133 1,664 44 66 1,422 781 39 29 2006 616 1,148 1,659 46 66 1,421 843 39 29 2007 606 1,163 1,659 46 66 1,424 929 39 25 2008 598 1,170 1,655 43 66 1,423 1,076 39 29 2009 593 1,168 1,652 43 66 1,427 1,219 39 28 2010 580 1,169 1,657 48 66 1,432 1,355 39 32

387

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 3,846 138 0.76 21.20 5.91 9.1 852,547 828,439 3.36 3.46 66.8 2.88 2003 16,383 594 1.04 28.74 5.73 47.3 823,681 798,996 5.32 5.48 69.9 4.20 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4 839,886 814,843 6.04 6.22 68.4 4.76 2005 16,620 594 1.21 33.75 5.44 58.2 828,882 805,132 8.00 8.24 74.3 6.18

388

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- AC 200-299 6,018 7,813 1,538 6,933 21,757 2,948 -- 38,410 85,416 AC 300-399 -- 7,362 5,850 13,429 3,650 5,303 9,529 10,913 56,036 AC 400-599 1,201 543 -- 2,618 8,876 94 -- 12,794 26,125 AC 600-799 -- -- 190 2,226 -- -- -- -- 2,416 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 200-299 1,198 686 36 2,008 4,156 9 -- -- 8,092 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 300-399 -- 372 274 3,706 313 153 2,747 -- 7,564 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 400-599 -- -- -- 90 857 -- -- -- 947 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 600-799 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

389

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 211,116 286,199 2,301,321 567,897 273,907 279,264 -- -- 150,058 -- -- 835,319 194,876 280,269 666,696 3,745,601 2003 219,021 288,791 2,255,233 545,109 276,600 267,068 -- -- 153,918 -- -- 826,964 185,574 283,868 664,754 3,711,667 2004 220,335 292,725 2,313,180 553,236 283,646 274,760 -- -- 152,975 -- -- 856,734 191,829 289,146 682,053 3,797,439 2005 226,544 303,607 2,385,461 -- -- -- -- -- 216,633 -- 1,005,226 962,054 201,548 299,225 685,624 3,900,461

390

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports" U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",3122664,2010882,3565711,5133546,5327583,-3.6 " Canada*",1773644,943061,2101534,2716705,3176066,-14.5 " Dominican Republic",51792,211736,124720,263528,312741,-15.7 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",1244972,777750,1268077,2022722,1698391,19.1 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

391

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning -- -- -- -- 1.00 -- -- -- 1.00 Lightning -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Environmental -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Contamination 1.00 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1.00 Foreign Interference -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Fire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed AC Substation Equipment 3.00 1.00 -- 1.00 5.00 -- -- 4.00 14.00 Failed AC/DC Terminal Equipment -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed Protection System Equipment -- 1.00 -- -- 3.00 -- -- -- 4.00

392

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Renewable Sources Fossil Fuels Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Storage Nuclear All Other Sources All Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,157.7 3,805.2 24,619.1 24,153.6 1,753.4 1,709.4 3.0 3.0 4,630.3 4,653.7 48.0 26.0 35,211.5 34,350.9 Connecticut 294.7 299.9 6,607.7 6,674.5 29.4 29.4 0.0 0.0 2,102.5 2,102.5 26.0 26.0 9,060.3 9,132.3 Maine 1,704.5 1,640.8 2,764.9 2,737.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.0 0.0 4,491.4 4,378.2 Massachusetts 761.5 710.9 11,155.2 10,637.8 1,724.0 1,680.0 3.0 3.0 677.3 684.7 0.0 0.0 14,321.0 13,716.4

393

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State" by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Alabama",4649,4410,5171,9059,10150,-10.8 "Alaska",442,300,542,742,1091,-32 "Arizona",2184,1825,2002,4009,4169,-3.8 "Arkansas",2,4,11,6,33,-83.1 "Colorado",5297,5781,6885,11079,13914,-20.4 "Illinois",13474,13996,12487,27470,24419,12.5 "Indiana",9516,9422,9147,18938,18794,0.8 "Kansas",5,5,5,9,8,23.7 "Kentucky Total",20683,20594,22803,41276,49276,-16.2 " Eastern (Kentucky)",10392,10144,12444,20536,27516,-25.4

394

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

395

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 / 2003 42,001 45,980 360,748 84,844 46,159 39,974 -- -- 23,090 -- -- 137,541 29,140 44,719 94,554 588,002 2003 / 2004 36,229 47,850 357,026 86,332 45,625 39,955 -- -- 24,042 -- -- 133,244 27,828 41,988 100,337 583,430 2004 / 2005 41,449 47,859 371,011 91,800 45,565 40,618 -- -- 24,446 -- -- 139,486 29,096 44,010 101,002 605,331

396

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, ND, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, VA, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical Company","TN" "Georgia-Pacific LLC","AL, GA, OK, VA, WI" "Holcim (US) Inc","AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT" "NewPage Corporation","MD, MI, WI" "U S Steel Corporation","AL, IN, MI, MN"

397

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

398

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

399

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England" " Btu",13323,13196,13391,13253,13339,-0.6 " Sulfur",0.84,0.89,0.72,0.87,0.72,20.3 " Ash",5.95,5.81,5.93,5.87,6.09,-3.6 "Maine" " Btu","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Sulfur","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Ash","w","w","w","w","w","w"

400

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids 8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 413 639 -35.4% 52 120 267 374 49 55 45 90 Connecticut 112 166 -32.6% 4 5 104 155 0.05 0 4 5 Maine 84 178 -52.8% 0.17 1 65 89 2 3 16 85 Massachusetts 174 197 -11.2% 15 40 98 128 37 28 25 NM New Hampshire 22 78 -72.1% 20 57 0.12 1 2 20 0.17 0.10 Rhode Island 18 14 31.0% 11 10 0.12 1 7 2 0 0 Vermont 3 8 -58.1% 2 6 0 0 1 2 0 0

402

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2012" Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2012" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "and Region1" "Alabama",3044,70,89,1677 "Alaska","-",143,"-","-" "Arizona","-",432,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",70,"-" "Colorado",174,212,1858,261 "Illinois",647,58,3291,534 "Indiana","-","-",2054,1868 "Kentucky Total",564,93,10122,4595 " Kentucky (East)",48,93,6821,3943 " Kentucky (West)",516,"-",3301,652

403

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 992 426 6 4,310 0.01 0 13 1,065 0 603 7,415 2003 1,206 416 8 3,899 0 0 72 1,302 0 594 7,496 2004 1,340 493 7 3,969 0 0 105 1,575 0 781 8,270 2005 1,353 368 7 4,249 0 0 86 1,673 0 756 8,492 2006 1,310 228 7 4,355 0.04 0 93 1,619 0 758 8,371 2007 1,371 180 9 4,257 0 0 77 1,614 0 764 8,273 2008 1,261 136 6 4,188 0 0 60 1,555 0 720 7,926 2009 1,096 157 5 4,225 0 0 71 1,769 0 842 8,165

404

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State and Region1" "Alabama",3190,1851,5041,3138,1618,4756,1.7,14.4,6 "Alaska","-",143,143,"-",136,136,"-",5.1,5.1 "Arizona","-",432,432,"-",419,419,"-",3.1,3.1 "Arkansas",70,3,73,67,3,70,4.5,"-",4.3 "Colorado",2032,473,2505,1927,478,2405,5.4,-1,4.2 "Illinois",3938,574,4512,3563,542,4105,10.5,5.9,9.9

405

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(percent)" ,2012,,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",85.99,83.96,85.28,67.52,90.91,75.85 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w" "Colorado","w","w",76.65,"w","w",74.63 "Illinois",71.02,57.41,69.11,71.73,53.22,68.54

406

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production","Imports","Producer and","Consumption2","Exports" "Quarter",,,"Distributor" ,,,"Stocks1" 2007 " January - March",4000,454,717,4078,343 " April - June",4083,685,767,4428,291 " July - September",4063,521,637,4371,344 " October - December",4055,800,632,4394,466 " Total",16201,2460,,17270,1444 2008 " January - March",4036,850,478,4723,316 " April - June",3810,1243,505,4559,466 " July - September",4107,998,464,4494,653 " October - December",3694,512,916,3229,524

407

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012" 2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1 and Mine Type","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",0.71,"-",1.69,1.66 "Arkansas",0.59,"-","-",0.59 "Colorado",1.9,"-",6.38,5.93 "Illinois",3.65,"-",6.6,4.86 "Indiana",3.25,"-","-",3.25 "Kentucky Total",2.43,1.77,"-",2.39 " Kentucky (East)",1.61,1.77,"-",1.62 " Kentucky (West)",3.61,"-","-",3.56 "Maryland",1.8,"-","-",1.8

408

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" 1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" "Alabama",106.57,"-","-","-",106.57 "Alaska","-","w","-","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","w","-","-",37.54 "Illinois",53.08,"-","-","-",53.08 "Indiana",52.01,"-","-","-",52.01

409

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(dollars per short ton)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,74.13,45.91,64.3,46.86,72.1,47.38,71.09,50.51,70.25,47.64 2008,81.81,52.91,97.24,55.59,102.51,64.65,104.97,65.33,97.68,59.83 2009,113.08,61.03,93.28,65.44,98.7,64.93,100.98,64.72,101.44,63.91 2010,106.52,62.02,121.36,71.91,125.45,77.12,126.16,76.18,120.41,71.77 2011,139.34,86,153,105.86,155.88,112.06,147.38,110.19,148.86,103.32

410

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June","Percent Change" ,2013,2013,2012,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",724,510,509,42.1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",914,690,674,35.6 "Coke Total",757,573,594,27.5 "Breeze Total",157,117,80,95.2 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

411

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity 2013 U.S. Total 513 15,144 179 12,604 334 2,540 Coal 4 1,482 28 4,465 -24 -2,983 Petroleum 21 45 41 1,401 -20 -1,356 Natural Gas 87 6,818 55 2,950 32 3,868 Other Gases -- -- 1 4 -1 -4 Nuclear -- -- 4 3,576 -4 -3,576 Hydroelectric Conventional 17 385 36 185 -19 201 Wind 25 2,225 -- -- 25 2,225 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic 277 3,460 1 1 276 3,459 Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels 10 489 -- -- 10 489 Geothermal 5 50 1 11 4 39

412

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,2011,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and Region1" "Alabama",46,19321,52,19071,-11.5,1.3 " Underground",8,12570,9,10879,-11.1,15.5 " Surface",38,6752,43,8192,-11.6,-17.6 "Alaska",1,2052,1,2149,"-",-4.5 " Surface",1,2052,1,2149,"-",-4.5 "Arizona",1,7493,1,8111,"-",-7.6 " Surface",1,7493,1,8111,"-",-7.6 "Arkansas",2,98,2,133,"-",-26.4

413

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Biomass 8. Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,229 7,138 1.3% 570 515 4,428 4,544 125 94 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 3,212 3,788 -15.2% 0 0 1,581 1,714 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,724 1,140 51.2% 0 0 1,157 1,137 1 3 566 0 New Hampshire 1,173 1,025 14.4% 347 291 795 734 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 101 127 -21.1% 0 0 101 127 0 0 0 0

414

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,141 N/A N/A 8,300 N/A N/A N/A 13,089 18,189 N/A 2003 10,834 0 532 8,645 4,435 7,227 1,211 13,175 21,890 67,949 2004 13,739 0 569 8,528 4,377 6,978 884 13,563 19,518 68,154 2005 16,764 0 535 8,741 4,308 7,092 701 13,566 21,486 73,195 2006 24,238 0 493 8,404 4,771 7,259 774 13,406 24,390 83,736 2007 30,089 6 595 8,486 5,177 7,061 839 13,498 19,109 84,860 2008 48,464 60 787 8,750 6,057 6,975 1,040 13,643 23,451 109,226

415

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

416

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy 2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 36,116 34,283 5.3% 0 0 36,116 34,283 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 17,078 15,928 7.2% 0 0 17,078 15,928 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 5,860 5,085 15.2% 0 0 5,860 5,085 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 8,189 8,363 -2.1% 0 0 8,189 8,363 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 4,989 4,907 1.7% 0 0 4,989 4,907 0 0 0 0

417

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Net Generation from Coal 7. Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,103 6,848 -40.1% 1,268 2,208 2,793 4,592 0 0 42 47 Connecticut 653 526 24.2% 0 0 653 526 0 0 0 0 Maine 45 55 -18.0% 0 0 30 38 0 0 15 18 Massachusetts 2,137 4,059 -47.4% 0 0 2,110 4,029 0 0 27 30 New Hampshire 1,268 2,208 -42.6% 1,268 2,208 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

418

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors 4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology EIA-Code(s) Reduction Factor Advanced Overfire Air AA 30% Alternate Burners BF 20% Flue Gas Recirculation FR 40% Fluidized Bed Combustor CF 20% Fuel Reburning FU 30% Low Excess Air LA 20% Low NOx Burners LN 30% Other (or Unspecified) OT 20% Overfire Air OV 20% Selective Catalytic Reduction SR 70% Selective Catalytic Reduction With Low Nitrogen Oxide Burners SR and LN 90% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction SN 30% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction With Low NOx Burners SN and LN 50% Slagging SC 20% Notes: Starting with 1995 data, reduction factors for Advanced Overfire Air, Low NOx Burners, and Overfire Air were reduced by 10 percent.

419

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2002 1,265,179,869 1,104,496,607 990,237,631 N/A 105,551,904 3,465,466,011 166,184,296 3,631,650,307 2003 1,275,823,910 1,198,727,601 1,012,373,247 6,809,728 N/A 3,493,734,486 168,294,526 3,662,029,012 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 N/A 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 N/A 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 N/A 3,669,918,840 146,926,612 3,816,845,452

420

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 Net Generation and Consumption of Fuels for January through December Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Fuel Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Net Generation (Thousand Megawatthours) Coal 1,514,043 1,733,430 -12.7% 1,146,480 1,301,107 354,076 416,783 883 1,049 12,603 14,490 Petroleum Liquids 13,403 16,086 -16.7% 9,892 11,688 2,757 3,655 191 86 563 657 Petroleum Coke 9,787 14,096 -30.6% 5,664 9,428 1,758 3,431 6 3 2,359 1,234 Natural Gas 1,225,894 1,013,689 20.9% 504,958 414,843 627,833 511,447 6,603 5,487 86,500 81,911

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421

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Dollars) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,418 7,546 6,137 6,441 3,292 3,504 38 45 16,885 17,536 Connecticut 2,213 2,339 1,901 2,038 452 486 19 19 4,584 4,882 Maine 657 674 467 494 242 268 0 0 1,366 1,436 Massachusetts 3,029 3,003 2,453 2,547 2,127 2,270 17 22 7,627 7,842 New Hampshire 713 736 598 629 231 238 0 0 1,543 1,602 Rhode Island 450 449 432 453 99 103 2 4 982 1,008 Vermont 356 346 285 281 142 139 0 0 784 766

422

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 47,805 1,639 1.03 29.98 4.85 44.4 3,198,108 3,126,308 3.55 3.63 91.6 2.42 2003 59,377 2,086 0.60 17.16 4.88 64.3 3,335,086 3,244,368 5.33 5.48 96.2 3.15 2004 73,745 2,609 0.72 20.30 4.95 81.0 3,491,942 3,403,474 5.86 6.01 93.1 3.43 2005 92,706 3,277 0.90 25.42 5.09 82.9 3,675,165 3,578,722 8.20 8.42 95.8 4.69

423

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" 9. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "New England","w","w",21,"w" " Maine","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",295,251,286,3.2 " New York",137,78,107,27.6 " Pennsylvania",158,172,179,-11.5 "East North Central",734,692,761,-3.5 " Illinois",160,152,187,-14.1

424

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Period Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Coal Total End of Year Stocks 2002 70,704 66,593 4,417 141,714 2003 57,716 59,884 3,967 121,567 2004 49,022 53,618 4,029 106,669 2005 52,923 44,377 3,836 101,137 2006 67,760 68,408 4,797 140,964 2007 63,964 82,692 4,565 151,221 2008 65,818 91,214 4,556 161,589 2009 91,922 92,448 5,097 189,467 2010 81,108 86,915 6,894 174,917 2011 82,056 85,151 5,179 172,387 2012 86,437 93,833 4,846 185,116 2010, End of Month Stocks January 86,354 86,893 4,845 178,091 February 82,469 83,721 4,836 171,026 March 86,698 86,014 5,030 177,742 April 92,621 89,545 7,095 189,260 May 93,069 91,514 7,085 191,669

425

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 8. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2214,2356,1994,4570,4353,5 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",48,37,53,85,90,-5.6 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,22,59,63,-6.1 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

426

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",92.5,99.4,146.56,94.82,140.7,-32.6 " Canada*",99.83,125.2,142.46,106.43,138.19,-23 " Dominican Republic",114.6,77.21,"-",77.27,"-","-" " Mexico",78.93,78.54,180.76,78.77,153.65,-48.7 "South America Total",119.26,117.51,167.05,118.3,168.12,-29.6 " Argentina",146.7,131.08,182.47,137.36,196.37,-30.1 " Brazil",119.21,117.38,165.61,118.2,171.84,-31.2

427

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "State and Region1" "Alabama",12410,"-",139,6669,12549,6669 "Alaska","-",2052,"-","-","-",2052 "Arizona","-",7493,"-","-","-",7493 "Arkansas","-","-",96,"-",96,"-" "Colorado",1673,2655,21955,2265,23628,4920 "Illinois",2897,"-",39939,5649,42837,5649

428

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,354 N/A N/A 38,665 N/A N/A N/A 14,491 264,329 N/A 2003 11,187 2 532 37,529 5,077 8,306 2,428 14,424 275,806 355,293 2004 14,144 6 569 38,117 5,128 8,151 2,141 14,811 268,417 351,485 2005 17,811 16 535 38,856 5,142 8,330 1,948 14,692 270,321 357,651 2006 26,589 15 493 38,762 5,677 8,478 1,944 14,568 289,246 385,772 2007 34,450 16 596 39,014 6,158 8,304 2,063 14,637 247,510 352,747

429

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Tangential Boiler All Other Boiler Types Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 0.08 0.01 0.08 0.08 0.08 0.08 N/A N/A Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); 2, Table 1.4-2 (including footnote d within source) Lbs per MMCF 0.60 0.06 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 Bituminous Coal* BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 38.00 3.80 38.00 38.00 38.00 38.00 N/A N/A

430

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",263.21,252.66,353.05,261.29,356.01,-26.6 " Canada",263.51,252.66,353.05,258.82,356.01,-27.3 " Panama",263.09,"-","-",263.09,"-","-" "South America Total",196.86,194.14,175.88,195.94,181.01,8.2 " Brazil","-","-",157.6,"-",157.6,"-" " Colombia",196.86,194.14,322.06,195.94,246.68,-20.6

431

Installation of the MAXIMUM microscope at the ALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MAXIMUM scanning x-ray microscope, developed at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison was implemented on the Advanced Light Source in August of 1995. The microscope`s initial operation at SRC successfully demonstrated the use of multilayer coated Schwarzschild objective for focusing 130 eV x-rays to a spot size of better than 0.1 micron with an electron energy resolution of 250meV. The performance of the microscope was severely limited, because of the relatively low brightness of SRC, which limits the available flux at the focus of the microscope. The high brightness of the ALS is expected to increase the usable flux at the sample by a factor of 1,000. The authors will report on the installation of the microscope on bending magnet beamline 6.3.2 at the ALS and the initial measurement of optical performance on the new source, and preliminary experiments with surface chemistry of HF etched Si will be described.

Ng, W.; Perera, R.C.C.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Stoughton, WI (United States). Center for X-ray Lithography

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Building a Common Identity Common identity is an important tool in ensuring appropriate access to corporate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

complex heterogeneous systems, significant challenges arise. These can include high help-desk costs capabilities. Empower people Productivity suffers and your IT costs go up when users have to call the help deskBuilding a Common Identity Common identity is an important tool in ensuring appropriate access

Chaudhuri, Surajit

434

A maximum entropy framework for non-exponential distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probability distributions having power-law tails are observed in a broad range of social, economic, and biological systems. We describe here a potentially useful common framework. We derive distribution functions $\\{p_k\\}$ for situations in which a `joiner particle' $k$ pays some form of price to enter a `community' of size $k-1$, where costs are subject to economies-of-scale (EOS). Maximizing the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy subject to this energy-like constraint predicts a distribution having a power-law tail; it reduces to the Boltzmann distribution in the absence of EOS. We show that the predicted function gives excellent fits to 13 different distribution functions, ranging from friendship links in social networks, to protein-protein interactions, to the severity of terrorist attacks. This approach may give useful insights into when to expect power-law distributions in the natural and social sciences.

Peterson, Jack; Dill, Ken A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Input–output signal selection for damping of power system oscillations using wind power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract During the last years wind power has emerged as one of the most important sources in the power generation share. Due to stringent Grid Code requirements, wind power plants (WPPs) should provide ancillary services such as fault ride-through and damping of power system oscillations to resemble conventional generation. Through an adequate selection of input–output signal pairs, \\{WPPs\\} can be effectively used to provide electromechanical oscillations damping. In this paper, different analysis techniques considering both controllability and observability measures and input–output interactions are compared and critically examined. Recommendations are drawn to select the best signal pairs available from \\{WPPs\\} to contribute to power oscillations damping. Control system design approaches including single-input single-output and multivariable control are considered. The recommendation of analysis techniques is justified through the tools usage in a test system including a WPP.

José Luis Domínguez-García; Carlos E. Ugalde-Loo; Fernando Bianchi; Oriol Gomis-Bellmunt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy Calculator- Common Units and Conversions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Energy Calculator - Common Units and Conversions Calculators for Energy Used in the United States: Coal Electricity Natural Gas Crude Oil Gasoline Diesel & Heating Oil Coal Conversion Calculator Short Tons Btu Megajoules Metric Tons Clear Calculate 1 Short Ton = 20,169,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007) Electricity Conversion Calculator KilowattHours Btu Megajoules million Calories Clear Calculate 1 KilowattHour = 3,412 Btu Natural Gas Conversion Calculator Cubic Feet Btu Megajoules Cubic Meters Clear Calculate 1 Cubic Foot = 1,028 Btu (based on U.S. consumption, 2007); 1 therm = 100,000 Btu; 1 terajoule = 1,000,000 megajoules Crude Oil Conversion Calculator Barrels Btu Megajoules Metric Tons* Clear Calculate 1 Barrel = 42 U.S. gallons = 5,800,000 Btu (based on U.S. consumption,

437

A Common Solution of Two Cosmic Puzzles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The origin of the diffuse extragalactic gamma-ray background, which was measured with the large area telescope (LAT) aboard the Fermi satellite at energy below 820 GeV, and of the diffuse cosmic background of neutrinos, which was observed at much higher energies with the IceCube detector deep under the south pole ice, are among the current unsolved major cosmic puzzles. Here we show that their properties indicate a common origin: the decay of mesons produced in collisions of cosmic rays accelerated in relativistic jets with matter in/near source. Moreover, their properties are those expected if their common source is the highly relativistic jets that produce the long duration gamma ray bursts in core collapse supernovae of type Ic, which take place mostly in the densest regions of giant molecular clouds in star forming galaxies.

Dado, Shlomo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

COOH-terminal truncation of flightin decreases myofilament lattice organization, cross-bridge binding, and power output in Drosophila indirect flight muscle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The indirect flight muscle (IFM) of insects is characterized by a near crystalline myofilament lattice structure that likely evolved to achieve high power output. In Drosophila IFM, the myosin rod binding protein flightin plays a crucial role in thick filament organization and sarcomere integrity. Here we investigate the extent to which the COOH terminus of flightin contributes to IFM structure and mechanical performance using transgenic Drosophila expressing a truncated flightin lacking the 44 COOH-terminal amino acids (fln{sup {Delta}C44}). Electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements show decreased myofilament lattice order in the fln{sup {Delta}C44} line compared with control, a transgenic flightin-null rescued line (fln{sup +}). fln{sup {Delta}C44} fibers produced roughly 1/3 the oscillatory work and power of fln{sup +}, with reduced frequencies of maximum work (123 Hz vs. 154 Hz) and power (139 Hz vs. 187 Hz) output, indicating slower myosin cycling kinetics. These reductions in work and power stem from a slower rate of cross-bridge recruitment and decreased cross-bridge binding in fln{sup {Delta}C44} fibers, although the mean duration of cross-bridge attachment was not different between both lines. The decreases in lattice order and myosin kinetics resulted in fln{sup {Delta}C44} flies being unable to beat their wings. These results indicate that the COOH terminus of flightin is necessary for normal myofilament lattice organization, thereby facilitating the cross-bridge binding required to achieve high power output for flight.

Tanner, Bertrand C.W.; Miller, Mark S.; Miller, Becky M.; Lekkas, Panagiotis; Irving, Thomas C.; Maughan, David W.; Vigoreaux, Jim O. (IIT); (Vermont)

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

439

Probable maximum point rainfall estimation for the southern half of the Indian peninsula  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Preparation of a generalized chart of probable maximum precipitation (PMP) for the southern half of the Indian peninsula lying between lat. 8°N to 16°N has been attempted in this study. Maximum 1-day rainfall ...

O N Dhar; A K Kulkarni; P R Rakhecha

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Central bank independence and the price-output-variability trade-off  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on central bank independence (CBI) and implementation dates of CBI-reforms were used to investigate the relationship between CBI and a possible trade-off between inflation variability and output variability. No such trade-off was found, but there might still be stabilisation gains from CBI-reform.

Mats Landström

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Generalized Mercury/Waterfilling for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized Mercury/Waterfilling for Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Channels Fernando P procedure that generalizes the mercury/waterfilling algorithm, previously proposed for parallel non-interfering chan- nels. In this generalization the mercury level accounts for the sub- optimal (non-Gaussian) input

VerdĂş, Sergio

442

SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally accepted 1/2010) QUANTIFYING PV POWER OUTPUT VARIABILITY Thomas E create major problems that will require major mitigation efforts. #12;SOLAR ENERGY (conditionally industry believe it could constrain the penetration of gridconnected PV. The U.S. Department of Energy

Perez, Richard R.

443

Information Technology and Intangible Output: The Impact of IT Investment on Innovation Productivity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prior research concerning IT business value has established a link between firm-level IT investment and tangible returns such as output productivity. Research also suggests that IT is vital to intermediate processes such as those that produce intangible ... Keywords: IT business value, breakthrough innovation, information technology, innovation, knowledge production function, patents, productivity, research and development

Landon Kleis; Paul Chwelos; Ronald V. Ramirez; Iain Cockburn

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SHORT TERM PREDICTIONS FOR THE POWER OUTPUT OF ENSEMBLES OF WIND TURBINES AND PV-GENERATORS Hans. For the conventional power park, the power production of the wind turbines presents a fluctuating 'negative load PRODUCTION OF WIND TURBINES For the forecast of the power production of wind turbines two approaches may

Heinemann, Detlev

445

Economic Input?Output Life-Cycle Assessment of Trade Between Canada and the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use an economic input?output life-cycle assessment (EIO-LCA) technique to estimate the economy-wide energy intensity and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions intensity for 45 manufacturing and resource sectors in Canada and the United States. ... Support?Activities?for?Agriculture ...

Jonathan Norman; Alex D. Charpentier; Heather L. MacLean

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

446

Nuclear norm system identification with missing inputs and outputs Zhang Liua,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear norm system identification with missing inputs and outputs Zhang Liua, , Anders Hanssonb,1 formulation and uses the nuclear norm heuristic for structured low-rank matrix approximation, with the missing of the alternating direc- tion method of multipliers (ADMM) to solve regularized or non-regularized nuclear norm

Vandenberghe, Lieven

447

Handling Ambiguity via Input-Output Kernel Learning Xinxing Xu Ivor W. Tsang Dong Xu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Computer Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore xuxi0006@ntu.edu.sg IvorTsang@ntu.edu.sg dongxu@ntu.edu.sg Abstract--Data ambiguities exist in many data mining and machine learning applications the effectiveness of our proposed IOKL framework. Keywords-Group Multiple Kernel Learning; Input-Output Kernel

Tsang Wai Hung "Ivor"

448

Resampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the simulation of extreme river flows. This is important to assess the impact of climate change on river flooding biases in the RCM data, the simulated extreme flood quantiles correspond quite well with those obtainedResampling of regional climate model output for the simulation of extreme river flows Robert

Haak, Hein

449

Uni-Traveling-Carrier Photodiodes with Increased Output Response and Low Intermodulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uni-Traveling-Carrier Photodiodes with Increased Output Response and Low Intermodulation Distortion-traveling-carrier photodiodes have been fabricated and tested to investigate the influence of the doping profile in several of the device layers on saturation characteristics and linearity. Two particular photodiode (PD) structures

Bowers, John

450

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets for the Hawaiian Islands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March 2009, AWS Truepower was engaged by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to develop a set of wind resource and plant output data for the Hawaiian Islands. The objective of this project was to expand the methods and techniques employed in the Eastern Wind Integration and Transmission Study (EWITS) to include the state of Hawaii.

Manobianco, J.; Alonge, C.; Frank, J.; Brower, M.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A comparison between raw EPS output, (modied) BMA and extended LR using ECMWF EPS precipitation reforecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comparison between raw EPS output, (modied) BMA and extended LR using ECMWF EPS precipitation (EPS). 2. Data sets, statistical methods and predictand denitions The data sets used in this study [1 and precipitation data from a reforecasting exper- iment with the ECMWF EPS system. Figure 1: BMA-tted pdf of 24-h

Schmeits, Maurice

452

Abstract: Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) produce fluctuating output power, which may cause voltage fluctuations and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract: Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) produce fluctuating output power, which may cause, solar energy conversion, virtual test bed simulation. Preprint Order Number: PE-531EC (02- plying its market-clearing mechanism. This mechanism determines the accepted and unaccepted energy bids

Gross, George

453

Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance variability (1988-2004) from calibrated Polar MM5 output in Environmental Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USA 4 National Snow and Ice Data Center, University coherent regional patterns of Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB) change over a 17-year period

Howat, Ian M.

454

Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators A. El the problem of controlling wind energy conversion (WEC) systems involving permanent magnet synchronous is to maximize wind energy extraction which cannot be achieved without letting the wind turbine rotor operate

Boyer, Edmond

455

Analytical input-output and supply chain study of China's coke and steel sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I design an input-output model to investigate the energy supply chain of coal-coke-steel in China. To study the demand, supply, and energy-intensity issues for coal and coke from a macroeconomic perspective, I apply the ...

Li, Yu, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Using input-output techniques to address economic and energy issues in Malaysia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

activities. Expand the basic activity: manufacturing into two activities: 1) high energy intensity 2) low energy intensity Assume they have equal share of output and their input structure is similar: Then assume? Assume electricity intensity: · high energy intensity 1.4 · low energy intensity 0.4 Now calculate

457

Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module W. A. Stygar,1 W. E. Fowler,1 K. R a linear-transformer- driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)]. DOI: 10

458

Soliton quenching NLTL impulse circuit with a pulse forming network at the output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An impulse forming circuit is disclosed which produces a clean impulse from a nonlinear transmission line compressed step function without customary soliton ringing by means of a localized pulse shaping and differentiating network which shunts the nonlinear transmission line output to ground.

McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA); Dallum, Gregory E. (Livermore, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Soliton quenching NLTL impulse circuit with a pulse forming network at the output  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An impulse forming circuit is disclosed which produces a clean impulse from a nonlinear transmission line compressed step function without customary soliton ringing by means of a localized pulse shaping and differentiating network which shunts the nonlinear transmission line output to ground. 5 figs.

McEwan, T.E.; Dallum, G.E.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

460

Probabilistic Forecasting of (Severe) Thunderstorms in the Netherlands Using Model Output Statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Forecasting of (Severe) Thunderstorms in the Netherlands Using Model Output Statistics MAURICE J. SCHMEITS, KEES J. KOK, AND DAAN H. P. VOGELEZANG Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), De Bilt, Netherlands (Manuscript received 29 April 2004, in final form 7 September 2004

Schmeits, Maurice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

How Common is Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is the most common  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND IBS Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) symptoms are commonly reported by IBS patients. 25 to 50% of patients). Overlapping symptoms are more challenging to separate and treat, as the treatments for IBS and UGI symptoms

Virginia Tech

462

Estimation of annual energy output from a tidal barrage using two different methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, there have been growing international challenges relating to climate change and global warming, with a conflict developing between the need to create a low-carbon economy and rapid depleting reserves of fossil fuels. In addition to these challenges there continues to be the added complexity of a significant global increase in energy demand. Marine renewable energy from tidal barrages is carbon-free and has the potential to make a significant contribution to energy supplies now and in the future. Therefore, it is appropriate to evaluate the total energy that can be extracted from such barrages. In this study two different methods are proposed to estimate the total annual energy output from a barrage, including a theoretical estimation based on the principle associated with tidal hydrodynamics, and a numerical estimation based on the solutions obtained from a 2D hydrodynamic model. The proposed Severn Barrage in the UK was taken as a case study, and these two methods were applied to estimate the potential annual energy output from the barrage. The predicted results obtained using the two methods indicate that the magnitude of the annual energy output would range from 13 to 16 TWh, which is similar to the value of 15.6 TWh reported by the Department of Energy and Climate Change, in the UK. Further investigations show that the total annual energy output would increase by about 15% if a higher discharge coefficient were to be adopted for the sluice gates, or if the turbine performance were to be improved. However, the estimated annual energy output could exceed the value of 16 TWh if future technological advances in both sluice gate construction and turbine performance are included.

Junqiang Xia; Roger A. Falconer; Binliang Lin; Guangming Tan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by the INL NSTB Program Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System Assessments by...

464

Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine P-3 Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine P-3 Gregory Lilik, Jos Martn...

465

Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine Hydrogen Assisted Diesel Combustion in a Common Rail Turbodiesel Engine This study measured the effects of hydrogen...

466

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES (Revision 2) This schedule provides for the disposal of certain...

467

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 23: RECORDS COMMON TO MOST OFFICES This schedule covers those administrative management activities not covered by...

468

Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas Common Products Made from Oil and Natural Gas Educational poster developed by the Office of Fossil Energy that graphically displays...

469

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ford Motor Company, “Diesel Engine Aftertreatment: How FordNational Laboratory, “Engine Combustion Network”, http://High Power Output without Engine Knock and with Ultra-Low

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Maximizing Power Output in Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines and Enabling Effective Control of Combustion Timing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat loss, while excessively delayed combustion timing (before misfire) can cause power output and efficiency losses because of incomplete oxidation of hydrocarbons

Saxena, Samveg

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Impact of risk on the maximum bid price for farm land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

37 40 5. Sample Output for Computer Simulation Model 6. Final Page of Computer Output . . . . . . . 7. Assumptions Made in Model Solutions . 8. Alternative Assumptions About the Buyer' s Annual Subjective Probability Distributions for the Net... when developing the computer simulation model are: (I) The buyer's portfolio of non-farm assets (i. e. , stocks, bonds, nonfarm bus1ness assets, etc. ) represents a small and insig- n1ficant part of his total investment portfol1o. This allows one...

Miles, Jennifer Doughty

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

472

CMLOG: A common message logging system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Common Message Logging (CMLOG) system is an object-oriented and distributed system that not only allows applications and systems to log data (messages) of any type into a centralized database but also lets applications view incoming messages in real-time or retrieve stored data from the database according to selection rules. It consists of a concurrent Unix server that handles incoming logging or searching messages, a Motif browser that can view incoming messages in real-time or display stored data in the database, a client daemon that buffers and sends logging messages to the server, and libraries that can be used by applications to send data to or retrieve data from the database via the server. This paper presents the design and implementation of the CMLOG system meanwhile it will also address the issue of integration of CMLOG into existing control systems.

Chen, J.; Akers, W.; Bickley, M.; Wu, D.; Watson, W. III [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States). Control Software Group

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Programovn v Common Lispu ter, 9. jna 12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-LISPWORKS :LW-EDITOR :CAPI :COCOA :UNIX-WITHOUT-MOTIF :COMPILER :ANSI-CL :COMMON-LISP :IEEE-PERSONAL-EDITION :COMMON-LISPWORKS :LW-EDITOR :CAPI :COCOA :UNIX-WITHOUT-MOTIF :COMPILER :ANSI-CL :COMMON-LISP :IEEE-LISPWORKS :LW-EDITOR :CAPI :COCOA :UNIX-WITHOUT-MOTIF :COMPILER :ANSI-CL :COMMON-LISP :IEEE

Krupka, Michal

474

WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions Presentation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation contains information on WIPP Weatherization: Common Errors and Innovative Solutions.

475

The feasibility of co-existence between conventional and genetically modified crops: Using machine learning to analyse the output of simulation models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulation models are a commonly used tool for the study of the co-existence of conventional and genetically modified (GM) crops. Among other things, they allow us to investigate the effects of using different crop varieties, cropping systems and farming practices on the levels of adventitious presence of GM material in conventional crops. We propose to use machine learning methods to analyse the output of simulation models to learn co-existence rules that directly link the above mentioned causes and effects. The outputs of the GENESYS model, designed to study the co-existence of conventional and GM oilseed rape crops, were analysed by using the machine learning methods of regression tree induction and relational decision tree induction. Co-existence and adventitious presence of GM material were studied in several contexts, including gene flow between pairs of fields, the interactions of this process with farming practices (cropping systems), and gene flow in the context of an entire field plan. Accurate models were learned, which also make use of the relational aspects of a field plan, using information on the neighboring fields of a field, and the farming practices applied in it. The use of relational decision tree induction to analyse the results of simulation models is a novel approach and holds the promise of learning more general co-existence rules by allowing us to vary the target field within a chosen field plan, as well as to consider completely different field plans at the same time.

Aneta Ivanovska; Celine Vens; Nathalie Colbach; Marko Debeljak; Sašo Džeroski

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

U.S. Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Motor Vehicle Output and Other GDP, 1968-2007 Danilo J. Santini, Ph. D. Senior Economist Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Phone: 630 252 3758 Fax: 630 252 3443 E-mail: dsantini@anl.gov David A Poyer, Ph.D. Associate Professor of Economics Morehouse College 830 Westview Dr. SW Atlanta, GA 30314 Phone: 404 681 2800, ext. 2553 E-mail: dpoyer@morehouse.edu THE 66th INTERNATIONAL ATLANTIC ECONOMIC CONFERENCE Montreal, Canada 9-12 October 2008 BUSINESS FLUCTUATIONS AND CYCLES 12 October 2008 Sunday 11:15 AM - 1:15 PM The submitted manuscript has been created by UChicago Argonne, LLC, Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne"). Argonne, a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science laboratory, is operated under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357. . The U.S. Government

477

Output feedback control for robust tracking of position trajectories for DC electric motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A generalized PI-like output feedback dynamic control scheme with additional integral compensation of the output error is proposed for robust tracking tasks of position reference trajectories for direct current electric motors with speed reduction gear head, using measurements of angular displacement only. The integral compensation is used to improve the robustness property of the controller, in regards to parametric uncertainty and variable load torque, and avoid the application of asymptotic estimation methods of the state vector. A family of Taylor polynomials approximates the perturbation signals, in order to reduce the control design complexity. These signals are compensated by the integral control action directly. Experimental and simulation results describe the effective performance of the control scheme proposed in this paper as an alternative solution to the efficient angular position control problem of direct current electric motors.

Francisco Beltran-Carbajal; Antonio Favela-Contreras; Antonio Valderrabano-Gonzalez; Julio Cesar Rosas-Caro

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Scalable extraction of error models from the output of error detection circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate methods of assessing the performance of quantum gates are extremely important. Quantum process tomography and randomized benchmarking are the current favored methods. Quantum process tomography gives detailed information, but significant approximations must be made to reduce this information to a form quantum error correction simulations can use. Randomized benchmarking typically outputs just a single number, the fidelity, giving no information on the structure of errors during the gate. Neither method is optimized to assess gate performance within an error detection circuit, where gates will be actually used in a large-scale quantum computer. Specifically, the important issues of error composition and error propagation lie outside the scope of both methods. We present a fast, simple, and scalable method of obtaining exactly the information required to perform effective quantum error correction from the output of continuously running error detection circuits, enabling accurate prediction of large-scale behavior.

Austin G. Fowler; D. Sank; J. Kelly; R. Barends; John M. Martinis

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of a 402.5 MHz 140 kW Inductive Output Tube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results of Phase I of an SBIR to develop a Pulsed Inductive Output Tube (IOT) with 140 kW at 400 MHz for powering H-proton beams. A number of sources, including single beam and multiple beam klystrons, can provide this power, but the IOT provides higher efficiency. Efficiencies exceeding 70% are routinely achieved. The gain is typically limited to approximately 24 dB; however, the availability of highly efficient, solid state drivers reduces the significance of this limitation, particularly at lower frequencies. This program initially focused on developing a 402 MHz IOT; however, the DOE requirement for this device was terminated during the program. The SBIR effort was refocused on improving the IOT design codes to more accurately simulate the time dependent behavior of the input cavity, electron gun, output cavity, and collector. Significant improvement was achieved in modeling capability and simulation accuracy.

R. Lawrence Ives; Michael Read, Robert Jackson

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

480

Variable gas spring for matching power output from FPSE to load of refrigerant compressor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The power output of a free piston Stirling engine is matched to a gas compressor which it drives and its stroke amplitude is made relatively constant as a function of power by connecting a gas spring to the drive linkage from the engine to the compressor. The gas spring is connected to the compressor through a passageway in which a valve is interposed. The valve is linked to the drive linkage so it is opened when the stroke amplitude exceeds a selected limit. This allows compressed gas to enter the spring, increase its spring constant, thus opposing stroke increase and reducing the phase lead of the displacer ahead of the piston to reduce power output and match it to a reduced load power demand.

Chen, Gong (Athens, OH); Beale, William T. (Athens, OH)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum output commonly" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Output power characteristics and performance of TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element No. 24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of single cell TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) No. 24 is presented. Thermal power tests were conducted for over 3000 hours to investigate converter performance under normal and adverse operating conditions. Experiments conducted include low power testing, high power testing, air introduction to the interelectrode gap, collector temperature optimization, thermal modeling, and output power characteristic measurements. During testing, no unexpected degradation in converter performance was observed. The TFE has been removed from the test stand and returned to Scientific Industrial Association {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} for materials analysis and report. This research was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the Topaz International Program (TIP) by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Luchau, D.W.; Bruns, D.R. [Team Specialty Services, Inc., TOPAZ International Program, 901 University Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Izhvanov, O.; Androsov, V. [JV INERTEK, Scientific Industrial Association ``Luch``, 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya, Podolsk, (Russia) 142100

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Investigating Output Accuracy for a Discrete Event Simulation Model and an Agent Based Simulation Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we investigate output accuracy for a Discrete Event Simulation (DES) model and Agent Based Simulation (ABS) model. The purpose of this investigation is to find out which of these simulation techniques is the best one for modelling human reactive behaviour in the retail sector. In order to study the output accuracy in both models, we have carried out a validation experiment in which we compared the results from our simulation models to the performance of a real system. Our experiment was carried out using a large UK department store as a case study. We had to determine an efficient implementation of management policy in the store's fitting room using DES and ABS. Overall, we have found that both simulation models were a good representation of the real system when modelling human reactive behaviour.

Majid, Mazlina Abdul; Siebers, Peer-Olaf

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Spin-on-doping for output power improvement of silicon nanowire array based thermoelectric power generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The output power of a silicon nanowire array (NWA)-bulk thermoelectric power generator (TEG) with Cu contacts is improved by spin-on-doping (SOD). The Si NWAs used in this work are fabricated via metal assisted chemical etching (MACE) of 0.01–0.02 ? cm resistivity n- and p-type bulk, converting ?4% of the bulk thickness into NWs. The MACE process is adapted to ensure crystalline NWs. Current-voltage and Seebeck voltage-temperature measurements show that while SOD mainly influences the contact resistance in bulk, it influences both contact resistance and power factor in NWA-bulk based TEGs. According to our experiments, using Si NWAs in combination with SOD increases the output power by an order of 3 under the same heating power due to an increased power factor, decreased thermal conductivity of the NWA and reduced Si-Cu contact resistance.

Xu, B., E-mail: bin.xu09@imperial.ac.uk; Fobelets, K. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, SW7 2BT London (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

484

Input/Output of ab-initio nuclear structure calculations for improved performance and portability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many modern scientific applications rely on highly computation intensive calculations. However, most applications do not concentrate as much on the role that input/output operations can play for improved performance and portability. Parallelizing input/output operations of large files can significantly improve the performance of parallel applications where sequential I/O is a bottleneck. A proper choice of I/O library also offers a scope for making input/output operations portable across different architectures. Thus, use of parallel I/O libraries for organizing I/O of large data files offers great scope in improving performance and portability of applications. In particular, sequential I/O has been identified as a bottleneck for the highly scalable MFDn (Many Fermion Dynamics for nuclear structure) code performing ab-initio nuclear structure calculations. We develop interfaces and parallel I/O procedures to use a well-known parallel I/O library in MFDn. As a result, we gain efficient I/O of large datasets along with their portability and ease of use in the down-stream processing. Even situations where the amount of data to be written is not huge, proper use of input/output operations can boost the performance of scientific applications. Application checkpointing offers enormous performance improvement and flexibility by doing a negligible amount of I/O to disk. Checkpointing saves and resumes application state in such a manner that in most cases the application is unaware that there has been an interruption to its execution. This helps in saving large amount of work that has been previously done and continue application execution. This small amount of I/O provides substantial time saving by offering restart/resume capability to applications. The need for checkpointing in optimization code NEWUOA has been identified and checkpoint/restart capability has been implemented in NEWUOA by using simple file I/O.

Laghave, Nikhil

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

NETL: News Release - DOE-Led Partnership Creates Tool to Raise Output of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

16, 2007 16, 2007 DOE-Led Partnership Creates Tool to Raise Output of Non-Conventional Natural Gas Improves Ability to Optimize Development of Reserves Critical to Domestic Production WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy and Pinnacle Technologies have successfully demonstrated a new technology that will help optimize the output of natural gas from the often-grudging non-conventional reserves on which the U.S. will have to depend for half its domestic production in the future. Non-conventional natural gas reserves found in tight sandstone formations, gas shales and coal seams are critical to maintaining the level of domestic production in the near term, according to the National Petroleum Council. Current projections of the Energy Information Administration see non-conventional production growing by 2.2 trillion cubic feet (Tcf), or 28 percent through 2030. Such production was 34 percent of domestic output, or 8 Tcf, in 2005 and is expected to be 50 percent, or 10.2 Tcf, in 2030.

486

Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Mutually exclusive muscle designs: the power output of the locomotory and sonic muscles of the oyster toadfish (Opsanus tau)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Chicago, IL, USA). Data at 0.8 Hz were excluded...reduction in mechanical power output due to this trade-o...e ciency of mechanical power development during muscular...shortening and its relation to load. Proc. R. Soc. Lond...determinants of work loop power output. P gers Arch...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

An examination of the relationship between energy consumption and performance of transportation sector in Malaysia: output multipliers approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of the current study is to investigate the energy consumption and the performance of Malaysia's transportation sector. It applied output multiplier approach which is based on input-output model. Three input-output tables of Malaysia covering the 1991, 2000 and 2005 periods were used. The results indicate significant changes in the output multipliers of the transportation sector for the (1991-2005) period. Also, the transportation-to-energy subsector multipliers were found to increase over time. The increasing importance of transportation sector to the development of Malaysian economy resulted in a noticeable increase in the consumption of each energy subsector's output especially 'petrol and coal industries' products. Based on the research findings, several policy implications were suggested for the betterment of both sectors' performance and generally for the improvement of Malaysian economy.

Hussain Ali Bekhet; Azlina Abdullah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Statistics in Crystallography: a Review of Practical Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The applications of the maximum entropy and Bayesian methods to problems in X-ray, neutron and electron crystallography are reviewed.

Gilmore, C.J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Regulatory Reform to Promote Clean Energy: The Potential of Output-Based Emissions Standards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barriers to industrial energy-efficient technologies hinder their use. A number of EPA analyses and industrial experts have found that the utilization of input-based emissions standards (measured in parts-per-million or pounds/MMBtu) in the Clean Air Act creates a regulatory barrier to the installation and deployment of technologies that emit fewer criteria pollutants and use energy more efficiently. Changing emission management strategies to an output-based emissions standard (measured in tons of pollutant emitted) is a way to ameliorate some of these barriers. Combined heat and power (CHP) is one of the key technologies that would see increased industrial application if the emissions standards were modified. Many states have made this change since the EPA first approved it in 2000, although direction from the Federal government could speed implementation modifications. To analyze the national impact of accelerated state adoption of output-based standards on CHP technologies, this paper uses detailed National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) and spreadsheet analysis illustrating two phased-in adoption scenarios for output-based emissions standards in the industrial sector. Benefit/cost metrics are calculated from a private and public perspective, and also a social perspective that considers the criteria and carbon air pollution emissions. These scenarios are compared to the reference case of AEO 2010 and are quite favorable, with a social benefit-cost ratio of 16.0 for a five-year phase-in scenario. In addition, the appropriateness of the Federal role, applicability, technology readiness, and administrative feasibility are discussed.

Cox, Matthew [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Brown, Dr. Marilyn Ann [Georgia Institute of Technology] [Georgia Institute of Technology; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

An Improved Maximum Likelihood Formulation for Accurate Genome Assembly Aditya Varma, Abhiram Ranade and Srinivas Aluru  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Improved Maximum Likelihood Formulation for Accurate Genome Assembly Aditya Varma, Abhiram maximum likelihood method for genome assembly. We formulate the problem as one of direct convex estimate of the length of the genome or the need to use further expectation minimization to predict

Ranade, Abhiram G.

493

A 6/5-approximation algorithm for the maximum 3-cover problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the maximum cover problem, we are given a collection of sets over a ground set of elements and a positive integer w, and we are asked to compute a collection of at most w sets whose union contains the maximum ...

Ioannis Caragiannis; Gianpiero Monaco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

California at Berkeley, University of

495

Comparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

second fast latitude scan (near the solar maximum) with the wave observations during the first fast Experiments (URAP) of Ulysses during its first orbit, which occurred when the solar activity was approachingComparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum: Ulysses

California at Berkeley, University of

496

On the duration of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum Ursula Rohl and Thomas Westerhold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the duration of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) Ursula Ro¨hl and Thomas Westerhold of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA [1] The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) is one of global warming and a massive perturbation of the global carbon cycle from injection of isotopically light

Zachos, James

497

Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America Francis E temperatures. Keywords Charcoal · Last Glacial Maximum · pollen · Quaternary · tropical South America F-mail: Francis.Mayle@ed.ac.uk 89F. Vimeux et al. (eds.), Past Climate Variability in South America

Binford, Michael W.

498

Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum northern polar passage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum northern polar passage D. Reisenfeld, and T. R. Sanderson (2004), Low-energy particle response to CMEs during the Ulysses solar maximum, New Mexico, USA T. R. Sanderson Research and Scientific Support Department of European Space Agency

Sanahuja, Blai

499

Use of Two Distillation Columns in Systems with Maximum Temperature Limitations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Two Distillation Columns in Systems with Maximum Temperature Limitations Rebecca H. Masel, Pennsylvania 18015, United States ABSTRACT: Maximum temperature limitations are encountered in distillation of the bottoms product fixes the column base pressure and, hence, the condenser pressure. The distillate

Gilchrist, James F.

500

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan Abstract We present the first optimal algorithm to compute the maximum Tukey depth (also known as location or halfspace depth , the Tukey depth of a point q IRd is defined as: min{|P | : over all halfspaces containing q}. We

Chan, Timothy M.