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1

Luminous Efficacy Standards for General Purpose Lights  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Assembly Bill 178, adopted in June 2007, established efficacy* standards for general purpose lights sold in the state of Nevada. The bill set the required efficacy at 25 lumens per watt (lm/W) of...

2

A simple evaluation of global and diffuse Luminous Efficacy for all sky conditions in tropical and humid climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reason that prompts us to study these luminous efficacy values is that simulation software for buildings introduced in the software enables illuminance values simulation using solar irradiance databases. Firstly obtained are used in CODYRUN 2 simulation software for predicted illuminance values in Reunion Island. 2

Boyer, Edmond

3

Luminant restores pre-owned draglines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Luminant, a Texas-based coal producer, brings two draglines back to life by moving and refurbishing them. 10 photos.

Donovan, A.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Sandia National Laboratories: high luminous efficacy of radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia,evaluatingfull moduleresources gridstandby positionshighhigh

5

Luminate LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpInc Place:KeystoneSolarListLiveFuelsLoupInyoLuminate LLC Jump to:

6

High efficacy plasma display panel with vertically raised bus electrodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a high efficacy alternating current plasma display panel utilizing vertically raised multilayer bus electrodes. The cell structure was designed to provide an opposite discharge mode and low discharge current in a relatively long gap. The test panels having discharge gaps of 330, 350, and 370 {mu}m were fabricated and basic properties of the panel were investigated in terms of current-voltage characteristics, luminance, and luminous efficiency. The cells with proposed structure show higher luminance and lower current simultaneously. The improvement in luminous efficiency is found to be a factor of 2 compared with the conventional coplanar structure having an electrode gap of 60 {mu}m. Emission spectra and spatio-temporal distribution of infrared light in discharge were measured. It is shown that high luminous efficiency of proposed cell originates from high excitation efficiency, low surface loss of charged particles, and enlarged discharge volume.

Ok, Jung-Woo; Lee, Hae June; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Park, Chung-Hoo; Lee, Ho-Jun; Kim, Jae-Sung; Choi, Kwang-Yeol [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pusan National University, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); PDP R and D Department, PDP Division, LG Electronics Inc., Gumi 730-030 (Korea, Republic of); Digital Display Research Laboratory, LG Electronics Inc., Seoul 137-724 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

Constancy of built-in luminance meter measurements in diagnostic displays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Liquid crystal displays used to interpret medical images are often equipped with built-in luminance meters to evaluate luminance response and Grayscale Standard Display Function conformance. This work evaluates agreement between luminance reported by the built-in meters and external measurements. Methods: The white level luminance was measured using a built-in meter and an external meter for 93 primary review workstations (Models MFGD 3420 and MDCG 3120-CB) with between 117 and 49?336 backlight hours (BLH). Measured luminance values were compared viat-test for displays with less than 25?000 BLH and those with more than 25?000 BLH. Bias between meters was also evaluated. Changes in luminance uniformity with increasing backlight hours were explored by determining the maximum luminance deviation (MLD) for subsets of these displays with less than 800 BLH and greater than 35?000 BLH. Results: The mean difference between built-in and external luminance measurements was 5.84% and 38.92% for displays with less than 25?000 and greater than 25?000 BLH, respectively, with a statistically significant difference in the means (p < 0.001). For displays with low BLH, a statistically significant bias was observed (p < 0.001) between built-in and external measurements. A high degree of correlation was observed between measurements made with two separate external meters (r = 0.999). The mean MLD was 9.5% and 11.2% for MDCG 3120-CB displays with less than 800 and greater than 35?000 BLH, respectively. The difference in the mean values was not statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Disagreement between the white level luminance measured using the built-in and external meter increased with BLH. Consequently, reliance on values reported by the built-in luminance meter may result in a reduction in image contrast with time. Recommendations have been proposed regarding luminance response testing and corrective action for failing displays.

Silosky, M., E-mail: michael.silosky@ucdenver.edu; Marsh, R. M. [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado, School of Medicine Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Colorado, School of Medicine Aurora, Colorado 80045 (United States)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

8

A New Luminous Blue Variable in M31  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the fifth confirmed Luminous Blue Variable/S Doradus variable in M31. In 2006, J004526.62+415006.3 had the spectrum of hot Fe II emission line star with strong P Cygni profiles in the Balmer lines. In 2010, its absorption line spectrum resembled an early A-type supergiant with H and Fe II emission lines with strong P Cygni profiles, and in 2013 the spectrum had fully transitioned to an F-type supergiant due to the formation of the optically thick, cool wind which characterizes LBVs at maximum light. The photometric record supports the LBV/S Dor nature of the variability. Its bolometric luminosity ~ -9.65 mag places it on the HR Diagram near the known LBVs, AE And, Var C in M33 and S Dor.

Humphreys, Roberta M; Gordon, Michael S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

AN EXTENDED GRID OF NOVA MODELS. III. VERY LUMINOUS, RED NOVAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extremely luminous, red eruptive variables like RV in M31 are being suggested as exemplars of a new class of astrophysical objects. Our greatly extended series of nova simulations shows that classical nova models can produce very red, luminous eruptions. In a poorly studied corner of three-dimensional nova parameter space (very cold, low-mass white dwarfs, accreting at very low rates) we find bona fide classical novae that are very luminous and red because they eject very slowly moving, massive envelopes. A crucial prediction of these nova models-in contrast to the predictions of merging star ('mergeburst') models-is that a hot remnant, the underlying white dwarf, will emerge after the massive ejected envelope has expanded enough to become optically thin. This blue remnant must fade on a timescale of decades-much faster than a 'mergeburst', which must fade on timescales of millennia or longer. Furthermore, the cooling nova white dwarf and its expanding ejecta must become redder in the years after eruption, while a contracting mergeburst must become hotter and bluer. We predict that red novae will always brighten to L {approx} 1000 L{sub sun} for about one year before rising to the maximum luminosity at L {approx} 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} L{sub sun}. The maximum luminosity attainable by a nova is likely to be L {approx} 10{sup 7} L{sub sun}, corresponding to M {approx} -12. In an accompanying paper, we describe a fading, luminous blue candidate for the remnant of M31-RV; it is observed with the Hubble Space Telescope to be compatible only with the nova model.

Shara, Michael M.; Zurek, David [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West and 79th Street, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Yaron, Ofer; Prialnik, Dina; Kovetz, Attay [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Ramat Aviv 69978 (Israel)

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Generalized Maximum Entropy Estimator of the Generaland Douglas Miller, Maximum Entropy Econometrics, Wiley andCalifornia Davis MELE: Maximum Entropy Leuven Estimators by

Paris, Quirino

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Maximum Entropy Correlated Equilibria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study maximum entropy correlated equilibria in (multi-player)games and provide two gradient-based algorithms that are guaranteedto converge to such equilibria. Although we do not provideconvergence rates for these ...

Ortiz, Luis E.

2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

12

attenuates luminal apoptosis: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

patch Zanker, Johannes M. 257 Classical disordered ground states: Super-ideal gases and stealth and equi-luminous materials Chemistry Websites Summary: Classical disordered...

13

antegrade colonic luminal: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

patch Zanker, Johannes M. 242 Classical disordered ground states: Super-ideal gases and stealth and equi-luminous materials Chemistry Websites Summary: Classical disordered...

14

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial sky luminance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

models that express the sky luminance as a function of diverse variables, among them, sun position... . Committee C.T., Spatial distribution of daylight - luminance...

15

Evaluation of expanded uncertainties in luminous intensity and illuminance calibrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detector-based calibrating methods and expressions for calculation of photometric uncertainties related to uncertainties in the calibrations of luminous intensity of a light source, illuminance responsivity of a photometer head, and calibration factors of an illuminance meter are discussed. These methods permit luminous intensity calibrations of incandescent light sources, luminous responsivity calibrations of photometer heads, and calibration factors of illuminance meters to be carried out with relative expanded uncertainties (with a level of confidence of 95.45%) of 0.4%, 0.4%, and 0.6%, respectively.

Sametoglu, Ferhat

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Object individuation in infancy: the value of color and luminance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBJECT INDIVIDUATION IN INFANCY: THE VALUE OF COLOR AND LUMINANCE A Dissertation by REBECCA JINDALEE WOODS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2006 Major Subject: Psychology OBJECT INDIVIDUATION IN INFANCY: THE VALUE OF COLOR AND LUMINANCE A Dissertation by REBECCA JINDALEE WOODS Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Woods, Rebecca Jindalee

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

Infants' use of luminance information in object individuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFANTS? USE OF LUMINANCE INFORMATION IN OBJECT INDIVIDUATION A Thesis by REBECCA JINDALEE WOODS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2004 Major Subject: Psychology INFANTS? USE OF LUMINANCE INFORMATION IN OBJECT INDIVIDUATION A Thesis by REBECCA JINDALEE WOODS Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Woods, Rebecca Jindalee

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Formation of Primordial Luminous Objects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scientific belief that the universe evolves in time is one of the legacies of the theory of the Big Bang. The concept that the universe has an history started to attract the interest of cosmologists soon after the first formulation of the theory: already Gamow (1948; 1949) investigated how and when galaxies could have been formed in the context of the expanding Universe. However, the specific topic of the formation (and of the fate) of the first objects dates to two decades later, when no objects with metallicities as low as those predicted by primordial nucleosynthesis (Z {approx}< 10{sup -10} {approx} 10{sup -8}Z{sub {circle_dot}}) were found. Such concerns were addressed in two seminal papers by Peebles & Dicke (1968; hereafter PD68) and by Doroshkevich, Zel'Dovich & Novikov (1967; hereafter DZN67), introducing the idea that some objects could have formed before the stars we presently observe. (1) Both PD68 and DZN67 suggest a mass of {approx} 10{sup 5} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the first generation of bound systems, based on the considerations on the cosmological Jeans length (Gamow 1948; Peebles 1965) and the possible shape of the power spectrum. (2) They point out the role of thermal instabilities in the formation of the proto-galactic bound object, and of the cooling of the gas inside it; in particular, PD68 introduces H{sub 2} cooling and chemistry in the calculations about the contraction of the gas. (3) Even if they do not specifically address the occurrence of fragmentation, these papers make two very different assumptions: PD68 assumes that the gas will fragment into ''normal'' stars to form globular clusters, while DZN67 assumes that fragmentation does not occur, and that a single ''super-star'' forms. (4) Finally, some feedback effects as considered (e.g. Peebles & Dicke considered the effects of supernovae). Today most of the research focuses on the issues when fragmentation may occur, what objects are formed and how they influence subsequent structure formation. In these notes we will leave the discussion of feedback to lecture notes by Ferrara & Salvaterra and by Madau & Haardt in this same book and focus only on the aspects of the formation of the first objects. The advent of cosmological numerical hydrodynamics in particular allow a fresh new look at these questions. Hence, these notes will touch on aspects of theoretical cosmology to chemistry, computer science, hydrodynamics and atomic physics. For further reading and more references on the subject we refer the reader to other relevant reviews such as Barkana & Loeb 2001, and more recently Ciardi & Ferrara 2004, Glover 2004 and Bromm & Larson 2004. In these notes, we try to give a brief introduction to only the most relevant aspects. We will start with a brief overview of the relevant cosmological concepts in section 2, followed by a discussion of the properties of primordial material (with particular emphasis to its cooling and its chemistry) in section 3. We will then review the technique and the results of numerical simulations in sections 4 and 5: the former will deal with detailed 3D simulations of the formation of gaseous clouds which are likely to transform into luminous objects, while the latter will examine results (mostly from 1D codes) about the modalities of such transformation. Finally, in section 6 we will critically discuss the results of the previous sections, examining their consequences and comparing them to our present knowledge of the universe.

Ripamonti, Emanuele; /Kapteyn Astron. Inst., Groningen; Abel, Tom; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

19

Catalog of Luminous Supersoft X-ray Sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This catalog comprises an up-to-date list of luminous (>10^36 erg/s) supersoft X-ray sources. We include in this catalog accreting binary sources of high luminosity which are thought to be in a state of (steady or recurrent) hydrogen burning. Since CAL 83, the prototype, is known to have an ionisation nebula, and further supersoft binaries are expected to also have one, we include also sources associated with very luminous planetary nebulae. Not included are PG 1159 stars which reach similar magnitudes but form a rather distinct class. Excluded are also supersoft active galactic nuclei which reach luminosities up to 10^45 erg/s.

J. Greiner

1996-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

WS1: one more new Galactic bona fide luminous blue variable  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this Letter, we report the results of spectroscopic and photometric monitoring of the candidate luminous blue variable (LBV) WS1, which was discovered in 2011 through the detection of a mid-infrared circular shell and follow-up optical spectroscopy of its central star. Our monitoring showed that WS1 brightened in the B, V and I bands by more than 1 mag during the last three years, while its spectrum revealed dramatic changes during the same time period, indicating that the star became much cooler. The light curve of WS1 demonstrates that the brightness of this star has reached maximum in 2013 December and then starts to decline. These findings unambiguously proved the LBV nature of WS1 and added one more member to the class of Galactic bona fide LBVs, bringing their number to sixteen (an updated census of these objects is provided).

Kniazev, A Y; Berdnikov, L N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LUMINOUS AND VARIABLE STARS IN M31 AND M33. I. THE WARM HYPERGIANTS AND POST-RED SUPERGIANT EVOLUTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progenitors of Type IIP supernovae (SNe) have an apparent upper limit to their initial masses of about 20 M{sub Sun }, suggesting that the most massive red supergiants evolve to warmer temperatures before their terminal explosion. But very few post-red supergiants are known. We have identified a small group of luminous stars in M31 and M33 that are candidates for post-red supergiant evolution. These stars have A-F-type supergiant absorption line spectra and strong hydrogen emission. Their spectra are also distinguished by the Ca II triplet and [Ca II] doublet in emission formed in a low-density circumstellar environment. They all have significant near- and mid-infrared excess radiation due to free-free emission and thermal emission from dust. We estimate the amount of mass they have shed and discuss their wind parameters and mass loss rates, which range from a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -4} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. On an H-R diagram, these stars will overlap the region of the luminous blue variables (LBVs) at maximum light; however, the warm hypergiants are not LBVs. Their non-spherical winds are not optically thick, and they have not exhibited any significant variability. We suggest, however, that the warm hypergiants may be the progenitors of the ''less luminous'' LBVs such as R71 and even SN1987A.

Humphreys, Roberta M.; Davidson, Kris; Grammer, Skyler; Kneeland, Nathan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Martin, John C. [University of Illinois, Springfield, IL (United States); Weis, Kerstin; Burggraf, Birgitta, E-mail: roberta@umn.edu [Astronomical Institute, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany)

2013-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nano heat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

Obinna Abah; Johannes Rossnagel; Georg Jacob; Sebastian Deffner; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer; Eric Lutz

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

On the maximum value of the cosmic abundance of oxygen and the oxygen yield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We search for the maximum oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies. Because this maximum value is expected to occur in the centers of the most luminous galaxies, we have constructed the luminosity - central metallicity diagram for spiral galaxies, based on a large compilation of existing data on oxygen abundances of HII regions in spiral galaxies. We found that this diagram shows a plateau at high luminosities (-22.3 oxygen abundance 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.87. This provides strong evidence that the oxygen abundance in the centers of the most luminous metal-rich galaxies reaches the maximum attainable value of oxygen abundance. Since some fraction of the oxygen (about 0.08 dex) is expected to be locked into dust grains, the maximum value of the true gas+dust oxygen abundance in spiral galaxies is 12+log(O/H) ~ 8.95. This value is a factor of ~ 2 higher than the recently estimated solar value. Based on the derived maximum oxygen abundance in galaxies, we found the oxygen yield to be about 0.0035, depending on the fraction of oxygen incorporated into dust grains.

L. S. Pilyugin; T. X. Thuan; J. M. Vilchez

2007-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Clustering of Meter-wave Luminous Objects toward Monoceros  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A distribution of the meter-wave luminous objects, which are bright at frequency 74 MHz (a wavelength of 4 m) but not detectable at 1.4 GHz (21 cm) in the VLA surveys, shows a notable concentration in a scale of a few degrees toward Monoceros [(l, b)=(225, 4)]. We argue that it is a part of giant radio relics associated with a nearby cluster of galaxies with cz~2400$ km s^{-1} centered on the spiral galaxy NGC 2377. The angular separation of these objects from the clustering center is consistent with the separation of distant relics to the cluster center if scaled by distance. This fact implies that the concentrations of meter-wave luminous objects can be used as a tracer of the structure of the Local Supercluster and it's vicinity.

Shuji Deguchi; Kazutaka Koike

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

25

INFRARED CLASSIFICATION AND LUMINOSITIES FOR DUSTY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND THE MOST LUMINOUS QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mid-infrared spectroscopic measurements from the Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) on Spitzer are given for 125 hard X-ray active galactic nuclei (AGNs; 14-195 keV) from the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) sample and for 32 AGNs with black hole masses (BHMs) from reverberation mapping. The 9.7 {mu}m silicate feature in emission or absorption defines an infrared AGN classification describing whether AGNs are observed through dust clouds, indicating that 55% of the BAT AGNs are observed through dust. The mid-infrared dust continuum luminosity is shown to be an excellent indicator of intrinsic AGN luminosity, scaling closely with the hard X-ray luminosity, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m)/L(X) = -0.31 {+-} 0.35, and independent of classification determined from silicate emission or absorption. Dust luminosity scales closely with BHM, log {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) = (37.2 {+-} 0.5) + 0.87 log BHM for luminosity in erg s{sup -1} and BHM in M{sub Sun }. The 100 most luminous type 1 quasars as measured in {nu}L{sub {nu}}(7.8 {mu}m) are found by comparing Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) optically discovered quasars with photometry at 22 {mu}m from the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), scaled to rest frame 7.8 {mu}m using an empirical template determined from IRS spectra. The most luminous SDSS/WISE quasars have the same maximum infrared luminosities for all 1.5 < z < 5, reaching total infrared luminosity L{sub IR} = 10{sup 14.4} L{sub Sun }. Comparing with dust-obscured galaxies from Spitzer and WISE surveys, we find no evidence of hyperluminous obscured quasars whose maximum infrared luminosities exceed the maximum infrared luminosities of optically discovered quasars. Bolometric luminosities L{sub bol} estimated from rest-frame optical or ultraviolet luminosities are compared to L{sub IR}. For the local AGN, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = -0.35, consistent with a covering factor of 45% for the absorbing dust clouds. For the SDSS/WISE quasars, the median log L{sub IR}/L{sub bol} = 0.1, with extremes indicating that ultraviolet-derived L{sub bol} can be seriously underestimated even for type 1 quasars.

Weedman, Daniel; Sargsyan, Lusine; Houck, James; Barry, Donald [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Lebouteiller, Vianney, E-mail: dweedman@isc.astro.cornell.edu [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universite Paris Diderot, DAPNIA/Service d'Astrophysique, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

26

A LUMINOUS AND FAST-EXPANDING TYPE Ib SUPERNOVA SN 2012au  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a set of photometric and spectroscopic observations of a bright Type Ib supernova SN 2012au from -6 days until {approx} + 150 days after maximum. The shape of its early R-band light curve is similar to that of an average Type Ib/c supernova. The peak absolute magnitude is M{sub R} = -18.7 {+-} 0.2 mag, which suggests that this supernova belongs to a very luminous group among Type Ib supernovae. The line velocity of He I {lambda}5876 is about 15,000 km s{sup -1} around maximum, which is much faster than that in a typical Type Ib supernova. From the quasi-bolometric peak luminosity of (6.7 {+-} 1.3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1}, we estimate the {sup 56}Ni mass produced during the explosion as {approx}0.30 M{sub Sun }. We also give a rough constraint to the ejecta mass 5-7 M{sub Sun} and the kinetic energy (7-18) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg. We find a weak correlation between the peak absolute magnitude and He I velocity among Type Ib SNe. The similarities to SN 1998bw in the density structure inferred from the light-curve model as well as the large peak bolometric luminosity suggest that SN 2012au had properties similar to energetic Type Ic supernovae.

Takaki, Katsutoshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Itoh, Ryosuke; Ueno, Issei; Ui, Takahiro; Urano, Takeshi [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kawabata, Koji S.; Akitaya, Hiroshi; Moritani, Yuki; Ohsugi, Takashi; Uemura, Makoto; Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Yamanaka, Masayuki [Kwasan Observatory, Kyoto University, Ohmine-cho Kita Kazan, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8471 (Japan); Maeda, Keiichi; Nomoto, Ken'ichi [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaomi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Kinugasa, Kenzo [Nobeyama Radio Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 462-2 Nobeyama, Minamimaki, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Sasada, Mahito, E-mail: takaki@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

UNUSUAL LONG AND LUMINOUS OPTICAL TRANSIENT IN THE SUBARU DEEP FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present observations of SDF-05M05, an unusual optical transient discovered in the Subaru Deep Field (SDF). The duration of the transient is > {approx} 800 days in the observer frame, and the maximum brightness during observation reached approximately 23 mag in the i' and z' bands. The faint host galaxy is clearly identified in all five optical bands of the deep SDF images. The photometric redshift of the host yields z {approx} 0.6 and the corresponding absolute magnitude at maximum is {approx} - 20. This implies that this event shone with an absolute magnitude brighter than -19 mag for approximately 300 days in the rest frame, which is significantly longer than a typical supernova and ultraluminous supernova. The total radiated energy during our observation was 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg. The light curves and color evolution are marginally consistent with some luminous IIn supernovae. We suggest that the transient may be a unique and peculiar supernova at intermediate redshift.

Urata, Yuji; Tsai, Patrick P. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Huang, Kuiyun [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro [Institute of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, University of Tokyo, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Yasuda, Naoki [Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8568 (Japan); Tanaka, Masaomi; Hayashi, Masao; Kashikawa, Nobunari [Optical and Infrared Astronomy Division, National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Ly, Chun [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States); Malkan, Matthew A., E-mail: urata@astro.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Box 951547, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

28

Estimating a mixed strategy employing maximum entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIXED STRATEGY EMPLOYING MAXIMUM ENTROPY by Amos Golan LarryMixed Strategy Employing Maximum Entropy Amos Golan Larry S.Abstract Generalized maximum entropy may be used to estimate

Golan, Amos; Karp, Larry; Perloff, Jeffrey M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

MaximumLetThrough.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG NorthMauro9 Maximum Let-Through

30

Long-term spectroscopic monitoring of the Luminous Blue Variable HD160529  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have spectroscopically monitored the galactic Luminous Blue Variable HD 160529 and obtained an extensive high-resolution data set that covers the years 1991 to 2002. During this period, the star evolved from an extended photometric minimum phase towards a new visual maximum. In several observing seasons, we covered up to four months with almost daily spectra. Our spectra typically cover most of the visual spectral range with a high spectral resolution (about 20,000 or more). This allows us to investigate the variability in many lines and on many time scales from days to years. We find a correlation between the photospheric HeI lines and the brightness of the star, both on a time scale of months and on a time scale of years. The short-term variations are smaller and do not follow the long-term trend, strongly suggesting different physical mechanisms. Metal lines also show both short-term and long-term variations in strength and also a long-term trend in radial velocity. Most of the line-profile variations can be attributed to changing strengths of lines. Propagating features in the line profiles are rarely observed. We find that the mass-loss rate of HD 160529 is almost independent of temperature, i.e. visual brightness.

Otmar Stahl; Thomas Gaeng; Chris Sterken; Andreas Kaufer; Thomas Rivinius; Thomas Szeifert; Bernhard Wolf

2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

31

Rapid Communication Orientation selectivity in luminance and color vision assessed using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapid Communication Orientation selectivity in luminance and color vision assessed using 2-d band orientation noise isolating the achromatic, red­green and blue­yellow mechanisms, and matched in multiples and boundaries primarily defined by luminance contrast (Livingstone & Hubel, 1987, 1988). For example, both red­green

Mullen, Kathy T.

32

Black hole feedback in the luminous quasar PDS 456  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of galaxies is connected to the growth of supermassive black holes in their centers. During the quasar phase, a huge luminosity is released as matter falls onto the black hole, and radiation-driven winds can transfer most of this energy back to the host galaxy. Over five different epochs, we detected the signatures of a nearly spherical stream of highly ionized gas in the broadband X-ray spectra of the luminous quasar PDS 456. This persistent wind is expelled at relativistic speeds from the inner accretion disk, and its wide aperture suggests an effective coupling with the ambient gas. The outflow's kinetic power larger than 10^46 ergs per second is enough to provide the feedback required by models of black hole and host galaxy co-evolution.

Nardini, E; Gofford, J; Harrison, F A; Risaliti, G; Braito, V; Costa, M T; Matzeu, G A; Walton, D J; Behar, E; Boggs, S E; Christensen, F E; Craig, W W; Hailey, C J; Matt, G; Miller, J M; O'Brien, P T; Stern, D; Turner, T J; Ward, M J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Simulation studies of bus electrode effect on discharge and luminous characteristics of plasma display panels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated how bus electrodes affect discharge and luminous characteristics of a discharge cell. Three-dimensional simulations have been performed in a coplanar structured alternating current plasma display panel cell, with phosphor saturation effect taken into account. There exists the optimal position of bus electrodes for high luminance and luminous efficiency. Considering bus electrode thickness, we have found that in-bus structure is a promising candidate for high luminance, high luminous efficiency, and fast operation plasma display panels. Our simulation results would be very useful to understand the influence of bus electrode on characteristics of a plasma display panel cell, and would also provide a general guidance to improve its display performances.

Lee, Insook; Choi, K.Y. [Digital Display Research Laboratory, LG Electronics Inc., 16 Woomyeon-Dong, Seocho-Gu, Seoul 137-724 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Maximum entropy principal for transportation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

Bilich, F. [University of Brasilia (Brazil); Da Silva, R. [National Research Council (Brazil)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

Testing Cosmological Models with Type Ic Super Luminous Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of type Ic Super Luminous Supernovae (SLSN Ic) to examine the cosmological expansion introduces a new standard ruler with which to test theoretical models. The sample suitable for this kind of work now includes 11 SLSNe Ic, which have thus far been used solely in tests involving $\\Lambda$CDM. In this paper, we broaden the base of support for this new, important cosmic probe by using these observations to carry out a one-on-one comparison between the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ and $\\Lambda$CDM cosmologies. We individually optimize the parameters in each cosmological model by minimizing the $\\chi^{2}$ statistic. We also carry out Monte Carlo simulations based on these current SLSN Ic measurements to estimate how large the sample would have to be in order to rule out either model at a $\\sim 99.7\\%$ confidence level. The currently available sample indicates a likelihood of $\\sim$$70-80\\%$ that the $R_{\\rm h}=ct$ Universe is the correct cosmology versus $\\sim$$20-30\\%$ for the standard model. These results are suggest...

Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Numerical simulations of super-luminous supernovae of type IIn  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present numerical simulations that include 1-D Eulerian multi-group radiation-hydrodynamics, 1-D non-LTE radiative transfer, and 2-D polarised radiative transfer for super-luminous interacting supernovae (SNe). Our reference model is a ~10Msun inner shell with 10^51erg ramming into a ~3Msun cold outer shell (the circumstellar-medium, or CSM) that extends from 10^15cm to 2x10^16cm and moves at 100km/s. We discuss the light curve evolution, which cannot be captured adequately with a grey approach. In these interactions, the shock-crossing time through the optically-thick CSM is much longer than the photon diffusion time. Radiation is thus continuously leaking from the shock through the CSM, in disagreement with the shell-shocked model that is often invoked. Our spectra redden with time, with a peak distribution in the near-UV during the first month gradually shifting to the optical range over the following year. Initially Balmer lines exhibit a narrow line core and the broad line wings that are characteristi...

Dessart, Luc; Hillier, D John

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mechanical feedback in the molecular ISM of luminous IR galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: Molecular emission lines originating in the nuclei of luminous infra-red galaxies are used to determine the physical properties of the nuclear ISM in these systems. Methods: A large observational database of molecular emission lines is compared with model predictions that include heating by UV and X-ray radiation, mechanical heating, and the effects of cosmic rays. Results: The observed line ratios and model predictions imply a separation of the observedsystems into three groups: XDRs, UV-dominated high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, and lower-density (n=10^4.5 cm-3) PDRs that are dominated by mechanical feedback. Conclusions: The division of the two types of PDRs follows naturally from the evolution of the star formation cycle of these sources, which evolves from deeply embedded young stars, resulting in high-density (n>=10^5 cm-3) PDRs, to a stage where the gas density has decreased (n=10^4.5 cm-3) and mechanical feedback from supernova shocks dominates the heating budget.

A. F. Loenen; M. Spaans; W. A. Baan; R. Meijerink

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

38

The pulsation modes, masses and evolution of luminous red giants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The period-luminosity sequences and the multiple periods of luminous red giant stars are examined using the OGLE III catalogue of long-period variables in the Large Magellanic Cloud. It is shown that the period ratios in individual multimode stars are systematically different from the ratios of the periods at a given luminosity of different period-luminosity sequences. This leads to the conclusion that the masses of stars at the same luminosity on the different period-luminosity sequences are different. An evolutionary scenario is used to show that the masses of stars on adjacent sequences differ by about 16-26% at a given luminosity, with the shorter period sequence being more massive. The mass is also shown to vary across each sequence by a similar percentage, with the mass increasing to shorter periods. On one sequence, sequence B, the mass distribution is shown to be bimodal. It is shown that the small amplitude variables on sequences A', A and B pulsate in radial and nonradial modes of angular degree l=0...

Wood, P R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The distance scale and Eddington efficiency of luminous quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relation between the central mass and quasar luminosity (M_BH \\propto L^{\\alpha}FHWM^2) links a given Eddington ratio with a value of H_0, within a cosmology with fixed (\\Omega_m,\\Omega_{\\Lambda}). We point out that because the relation is calibrated at low z using distance independent reverberation mapping to get the BLR size, the derived M_BH interestingly does not depend on H_0, while L/L_Edd is sensitive to H_0, but rather robust to changes of \\Omega_{\\Lambda} in the standard flat model. This means, e.g., that enough of extragalactic objects radiating at the Eddington limit could be used to study the global Hubble constant in a new way, bypassing the local distance ladder. The method could become practical when systematic errors in derived M_BH are understood and objects with L /leq L_Edd can be independently identified. As an illustration, if we take a sample of tranquil very luminous quasars in the redshift range 0.5 < z < 1.6, and assume that they are radiating with L_bol \\leq L_Edd, then the usual numeric factors used for calculating M_BH and L_bol would lead to the result that the Hubble constant must be larger than 45 km/s/Mpc.

P. Teerikorpi

2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

40

Infrared colour properties of nearby radio-luminous galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By combining the data of the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS), the Wide Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) and the Akari satellite, we study the infrared colour properties of a sample of 2712 nearby radio-luminous galaxies (RLGs). These RLGs are divided into radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGNs), mainly occurring at redshifts of $0.05$ 3.0. We also analyse the MIR colours of RL AGNs divided into low- and high-excitation radio galaxies (LERGs and HERGs, respectively). The ([3.4]-[4.6])$-$([4.6]-[12]) diagram clearly shows separate distributions of LERGs and HERGs and a region of overlap, which suggests that LERGs and HERGs have different MIR properties. LERGs are responsible for the double-core distribution of RL AGNs on the ([3.4]-[4.6])$-$([4.6]-[12]) diagram. In addition, we also suggest 90$-$140$\\mu$m band spectral index $\\alpha(90,140)<-1.4$ as a criterion of selecting nearby active galaxies with non-thermal emissions at FIR wavelengths.

Yang, Xiao-hong; Huang, Yan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Ho Seong [CEA Saclay/Service d'Astrophysique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Kim, Minjin; Lee, Joon Hyeop, E-mail: mglee@astro.snu.ac.kr, E-mail: jclee@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: mkim@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: jhl@kasi.re.kr, E-mail: hhwang@cfa.harvard.edu [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Overdensities of SMGs around WISE-selected, ultra-luminous, high-redshift galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Submillimetre (submm) observations of WISE-selected, dusty, luminous, high-redshift galaxies have revealed intriguing overdensities around them on arcmin scales. They could be the best signposts of overdense environments on the sky.

Jones, Suzy F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Asphericity and clumpiness in the winds of Luminous Blue Variables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the first systematic spectropolarimetric study of Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds, in order to investigate the geometries of their winds. We find that at least half of our sample show changes in polarization across the strong H$\\alpha$ emission line, indicating that the light from the stars is intrinsically polarized and therefore that asphericity already exists at the base of the wind. Multi-epoch spectropolarimetry on four targets reveals variability in their intrinsic polarization. Three of these, AG Car, HR Car and P Cyg, show a position angle (PA) of polarization which appears random with time. Such behaviour can be explained by the presence of strong wind-inhomogeneities, or `clumps' within the wind. Only one star, R 127, shows variability at a constant PA, and hence evidence for axi-symmetry as well as clumpiness. However, if viewed at low inclination, and at limited temporal sampling, such a wind would produce a seemingly random polarization of the type observed in the other three stars. Time-resolved spectropolarimetric monitoring of LBVs is therefore required to determine if LBV winds are axi-symmetric in general. The high fraction of LBVs ($>$ 50%) showing intrinsic polarization is to be compared with the lower $\\sim$ 20-25 % for similar studies of their evolutionary neighbours, O supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars. We anticipate that this higher incidence is due to the lower effective gravities of the LBVs, coupled with their variable temperatures within the bi-stability jump regime. This is also consistent with the higher incidence of wind asphericity that we find in LBVs with strong H$\\alpha$ emission and recent (last $\\sim$ 10 years) strong variability.

Ben Davies; Rene D. Oudmaijer; Jorick S. Vink

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

44

A search for rapid pulsations among 9 luminous Ap stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapidly oscillating Ap stars are of importance for studying the atmospheric structure of stars where the process of chemical element diffusion is significant. We have performed a survey for rapid oscillations in a sample of 9 luminous Ap stars, selected from their location in the colour-magnitude diagram as more evolved main-sequence Ap stars that are inside the instability strip for rapidly oscillating Ap (roAp) stars. Until recently this region was devoid of stars with observed rapid pulsations. We used the VLT UV-Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) to obtain high time resolution spectroscopy to make the first systematic spectroscopic search for rapid oscillations in this region of the roAp instability strip. We report 9 null-detections with upper limits for radial-velocity amplitudes of 20 - 65 m/s and precisions of 7 - 20 m/s for combinations of Nd and Pr lines. Cross-correlations confirm these null-results. At least six stars are magnetic and we provide magnetic field measurements for four of them, of which three are newly discovered magnetic stars. It is found that four stars have magnetic fields smaller than ~ 2 kG, which according to theoretical predictions might be insufficient for suppressing envelope convection around the magnetic poles for more evolved Ap stars. Suppression of convection is expected to be essential for the opacity mechanism acting in the hydrogen ionisation zone to drive the high-overtone roAp pulsations efficiently. Our null-results suggest that the more evolved roAp stars may require particularly strong magnetic fields to pulsate. Three of the studied stars do, however, have magnetic fields stronger than 5 kG.

L. M. Freyhammer; D. W. Kurtz; M. S. Cunha; G. Mathys; V. G. Elkin; J. D. Riley

2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

45

MEAN SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS AND BOLOMETRIC CORRECTIONS FOR LUMINOUS QUASARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explore the mid-infrared (mid-IR) through ultraviolet (UV) spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of 119,652 luminous broad-lined quasars with 0.064 < z < 5.46 using mid-IR data from Spitzer and WISE, near-infrared data from the Two Micron All Sky Survey and UKIDSS, optical data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and UV data from the Galaxy Evolution Explorer. The mean SED requires a bolometric correction (relative to 2500 A) of BC{sub 2500A} =2.75 {+-} 0.40 using the integrated light from 1 {mu}m-2 keV, and we further explore the range of bolometric corrections exhibited by individual objects. In addition, we investigate the dependence of the mean SED on various parameters, particularly the UV luminosity for quasars with 0.5 {approx}< z {approx}< 3 and the properties of the UV emission lines for quasars with z {approx}> 1.6; the latter is a possible indicator of the strength of the accretion disk wind, which is expected to be SED-dependent. Luminosity-dependent mean SEDs show that, relative to the high-luminosity SED, low-luminosity SEDs exhibit a harder (bluer) far-UV spectral slope ({alpha}{sub UV}), a redder optical continuum, and less hot dust. Mean SEDs constructed instead as a function of UV emission line properties reveal changes that are consistent with known Principal Component Analysis trends. A potentially important contribution to the bolometric correction is the unseen extreme UV (EUV) continuum. Our work suggests that lower-luminosity quasars and/or quasars with disk-dominated broad emission lines may require an extra continuum component in the EUV that is not present (or much weaker) in high-luminosity quasars with strong accretion disk winds. As such, we consider four possible models and explore the resulting bolometric corrections. Understanding these various SED-dependent effects will be important for accurate determination of quasar accretion rates.

Krawczyk, Coleman M.; Richards, Gordon T.; Mehta, Sajjan S.; Vogeley, Michael S. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Drexel University, 3141 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Gallagher, S. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Leighly, Karen M. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States)] [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Ross, Nicholas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Schneider, Donald P. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Maximum entropy segmentation of broadcast news  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

speech recognizer and subsequently segmenting the text into utterances and topics. A maximum entropy approach is used to build statistical models for both utterance and topic segmentation. The experimental work addresses the effect on performance...

Christensen, Heidi; Kolluru, BalaKrishna; Gotoh, Yoshihiko; Renals, Steve

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Development of High Efficacy, Low Cost Phosphorescent Oled Lightning Luminaire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this two year program, UDC together with Armstrong World Industries, Professor Stephen Forrest (University of Michigan) and Professor Mark Thompson (University of Southern California) planned to develop and deliver high efficiency OLED lighting luminaires as part of an integrated ceiling illumination system that exceed the Department of Energy (DOE) 2010 performance projections. Specifically the UDC team in 2010 delivered two prototype OLED ceiling illumination systems, each consisting of four individual OLED lighting panels on glass integrated into Armstrong's novel TechZone open architecture ceiling systems, at an overall system efficacy of 51 lm/W, a CRI = 85 and a projected lifetime to 70% of initial luminance to exceed 10,000 hours. This accomplishment represents a 50% increase in luminaire efficacy and a factor of two in lifetime over that outlined in the solicitation. In addition, the team has also delivered one 15cm x 15cm lighting panel fabricated on a flexible metal foil substrate, demonstrating the possibility using OLEDs in a range of form factors. During this program, our Team has pursued the commercialization of these OLED based ceiling luminaires, with a goal to launch commercial products within the next three years. We have proven that our team is ideally suited to develop these highly novel and efficient solid state lighting luminaires, having both the technical experience and commercial strategy to leverage work performed under this contract. Our calculations show that the success of our program could lead to energy savings of more than 0.5 quads or 8 MMTC (million metric tons of carbon) per year by 2016.

Michael Hack

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

49

Classical disordered ground states: Super-ideal gases and stealth and equi-luminous materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classical disordered ground states: Super-ideal gases and stealth and equi-luminous materials of Materials, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA 4 Program in Applied and Computational focus on three classes of configurations with unique radiation scattering characteristics: i "stealth

Torquato, Salvatore

50

Luminance: a New Visual Feature for Visual Christophe Collewet and Eric Marchand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Luminance: a New Visual Feature for Visual Servoing Christophe Collewet and Eric Marchand and that no Christophe Collewet and Eric Marchand INRIA, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes, France, e-mail: {christophe.collewet,eric. marchand}@inria.fr 73 inria-00548937,version1-20Dec2010 Author manuscript, published in "Visual Servoing

Boyer, Edmond

51

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MOLECULAR GAS IN LUMINOUS GALACTIC NUCLEI N. Z. SCOVILLE AND A. J. BAKER California Institute­wave interferometry has clearly shown the existence of enormous masses (10 9 \\Gamma 10 10 M fi ) of molecular gas. In these systems, molecular gas is an obvious source of fuel for nuclear starbursts and active galactic nuclei (AGN

Baker, Andrew J.

52

LED Record Efficacy and Brightness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Designed for general lighting applications such as street, industrial, and parking garage lighting, the Cree XLamp power LED sets new records for LED brightness and efficacy, up to 85 lm/W at 350 mA. The XLamp utilizes Cree's performance breakthrough EZBright LED chip; both products include technology that was developed in part with R&D funding support from DOE.

53

Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

Yuta Hamada; Hikaru Kawai; Kiyoharu Kawana

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

54

Weak Scale From the Maximum Entropy Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theory of multiverse and wormholes suggests that the parameters of the Standard Model are fixed in such a way that the radiation of the $S^{3}$ universe at the final stage $S_{rad}$ becomes maximum, which we call the maximum entropy principle. Although it is difficult to confirm this principle generally, for a few parameters of the Standard Model, we can check whether $S_{rad}$ actually becomes maximum at the observed values. In this paper, we regard $S_{rad}$ at the final stage as a function of the weak scale ( the Higgs expectation value ) $v_{h}$, and show that it becomes maximum around $v_{h}={\\cal{O}}(300\\text{GeV})$ when the dimensionless couplings in the Standard Model, that is, the Higgs self coupling, the gauge couplings, and the Yukawa couplings are fixed. Roughly speaking, we find that the weak scale is given by \\begin{equation} v_{h}\\sim\\frac{T_{BBN}^{2}}{M_{pl}y_{e}^{5}},\

Hamada, Yuta; Kawana, Kiyoharu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

QCD Level Density from Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a method to calculate the QCD level density directly from the thermodynamic quantities obtained by lattice QCD simulations with the use of the maximum entropy method (MEM). Understanding QCD thermodynamics from QCD spectral properties has its own importance. Also it has a close connection to phenomenological analyses of the lattice data as well as experimental data on the basis of hadronic resonances. Our feasibility study shows that the MEM can provide a useful tool to study QCD level density.

Shinji Ejiri; Tetsuo Hatsuda

2005-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

57

Tissue Radiation Response with Maximum Tsallis Entropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expression of survival factors for radiation damaged cells is currently based on probabilistic assumptions and experimentally fitted for each tumor, radiation, and conditions. Here, we show how the simplest of these radiobiological models can be derived from the maximum entropy principle of the classical Boltzmann-Gibbs expression. We extend this derivation using the Tsallis entropy and a cutoff hypothesis, motivated by clinical observations. The obtained expression shows a remarkable agreement with the experimental data found in the literature.

Sotolongo-Grau, O.; Rodriguez-Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.; Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar [UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain); UNED, Departamento de Fisica Matematica y de Fluidos, 28040 Madrid (Spain) and University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba); University of Havana, Catedra de Sistemas Complejos Henri Poincare, Havana 10400 (Cuba)

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

A global maximum power point tracking DC-DC converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes the design, and validation of a maximum power point tracking DC-DC converter capable of following the true global maximum power point in the presence of other local maximum. It does this without the ...

Duncan, Joseph, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Dust covering factor, silicate emission and star formation in luminous QSOs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present Spitzer IRS low resolution, mid-IR spectra of a sample of 25 high luminosity QSOs at 2silicate emission feature in the average spectrum, but also in four individual objects. These are the Silicate emission in the most luminous objects obtained so far. When combined with the silicate emission observed in local, low luminosity type-I AGNs, we find that the silicate emission strength is correlated with luminosity. The silicate strength of all type-I AGNs also follows a positive correlation with the black hole mass and with the accretion rate. The Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, expected from starburst activity, are not detected in the average spectrum of luminous, high-z QSOs. The upper limit inferred from the average spectrum points to a ratio between PAH luminosity and QSO optical luminosity significantly lower than observed in lower luminosity AGNs, implying that the correlation between star formation rate and AGN power saturates at high luminosities.

R. Maiolino; O. Shemmer; M. Imanishi; H. Netzer; E. Oliva; D. Lutz; E. Sturm

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

60

The winds of Luminous Blue Variables and the Mass of AG Car  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present radiation-driven wind models for Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) and predict their mass-loss rates. A comparison between our predictions and the observations of AG Car shows that the variable mass loss behaviour of LBVs is due the recombination/ionisation of Fe IV/III and Fe III/II. We also derive a present-day mass of 35 Msun for AG Car.

Jorick S. Vink; Alex de Koter

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter estimation for stochastic biochemical systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as: Daigle et al. : Accelerated maximum likelihood parame-Gillespie DT: Approximate accelerated stochastic simulationARTICLE Open Access Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter

Daigle, Bernie J; Roh, Min K; Petzold, Linda R; Niemi, Jarad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

articulatorily constrained maximum: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

weight spanning forests. Amitabha Bagchi; Ankur Bhargava; Torsten Suel 2005-01-01 27 Maximum Entropy Correlated Equilibria MIT - DSpace Summary: We study maximum entropy...

63

Maximum mass of magnetic white dwarfs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit in this work the problem of the maximum masses of magnetized White Dwarfs (WD). The impact of a strong magnetic field onto the structure equations is addressed. The pressures become anisotropic due to the presence of the magnetic field and split into a parallel and perpendicular components. We first construct stable solutions of TOV equations for the parallel pressures, and found that physical solutions vanish for the perpendicular pressure when $B \\gtrsim 10^{13}$ G. This fact establishes an upper bound for a magnetic field and the stability of the configurations in the (quasi) spherical approximation. Our findings also indicate that it is not possible to obtain stable magnetized WD with super Chandrasekhar masses because the values of the magnetic field needed for them are higher than this bound. To proceed into the anisotropic regime, we derived structure equations appropriated for a cylindrical metric with anisotropic pressures. From the solutions of the structure equations in cylindrical symme...

Paret, D Manreza; Horvath, J E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields $H_s$ of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness $\\sim 0.1\\; \\mu$m at the Nb surface could increase $H_s\\simeq 240$ mT of a clean Nb up to $H_s\\simeq 290$ mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb$_3$Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

Gurevich, Alex

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF SN 2012fr: A LUMINOUS, NORMAL TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA WITH EARLY HIGH-VELOCITY FEATURES AND A LATE VELOCITY PLATEAU  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present 65 optical spectra of the Type Ia SN 2012fr, 33 of which were obtained before maximum light. At early times, SN 2012fr shows clear evidence of a high-velocity feature (HVF) in the Si II {lambda}6355 line that can be cleanly decoupled from the lower velocity ''photospheric'' component. This Si II {lambda}6355 HVF fades by phase -5; subsequently, the photospheric component exhibits a very narrow velocity width and remains at a nearly constant velocity of {approx}12,000 km s{sup -1} until at least five weeks after maximum brightness. The Ca II infrared triplet exhibits similar evidence for both a photospheric component at v Almost-Equal-To 12,000 km s{sup -1} with narrow line width and long velocity plateau, as well as an HVF beginning at v Almost-Equal-To 31,000 km s{sup -1} two weeks before maximum. SN 2012fr resides on the border between the ''shallow silicon'' and ''core-normal'' subclasses in the Branch et al. classification scheme, and on the border between normal and high-velocity Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) in the Wang et al. system. Though it is a clear member of the ''low velocity gradient'' group of SNe Ia and exhibits a very slow light-curve decline, it shows key dissimilarities with the overluminous SN 1991T or SN 1999aa subclasses of SNe Ia. SN 2012fr represents a well-observed SN Ia at the luminous end of the normal SN Ia distribution and a key transitional event between nominal spectroscopic subclasses of SNe Ia.

Childress, M. J.; Scalzo, R. A.; Sim, S. A.; Tucker, B. E.; Yuan, F.; Schmidt, B. P. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Silverman, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Contreras, C.; Hsiao, E. Y.; Phillips, M.; Morrell, N. [Las Campanas Observatory, Carnegie Observatories, Casilla 601, La Serena (Chile); Jha, S. W.; McCully, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, 136 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Anderson, J. P.; De Jaeger, T.; Forster, F. [Departamento de Astronomia, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Benetti, S. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bufano, F., E-mail: mjc@mso.anu.edu.au [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); and others

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

66

PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ?1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ?(7.5-8.5) 10{sup 4} M{sub ?}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (?< 0.1 ?m, and most likely ?< 0.01 ?m). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ?10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ?> 3 10{sup 7} cm{sup 3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ?> 0.02 M{sub ?} yr{sup 1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ?100 km s{sup 1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kozasa, T. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Iye, M., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

67

STUDYING LARGE- AND SMALL-SCALE ENVIRONMENTS OF ULTRAVIOLET LUMINOUS GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studying the environments of 0.4 < z < 1.2 ultraviolet (UV)-selected galaxies, as examples of extreme star-forming galaxies (with star formation rates (SFRs) in the range of 3-30 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}), we explore the relationship between high rates of star formation, host halo mass, and pair fractions. We study the large- and small-scale environments of local ultraviolet luminous galaxies (UVLGs) by measuring angular correlation functions. We cross-correlate these systems with other galaxy samples: a volume-limited sample (ALL), a blue luminous galaxy sample, and a luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample. We determine the UVLG comoving correlation length to be r{sub 0} = 4.8{sup +11.6}{sub -2.4} h {sup -1} Mpc at (z) = 1.0, which is unable to constrain the halo mass for this sample. However, we find that UVLGs form close (separation <30 kpc) pairs with the ALL sample, but do not frequently form pairs with LRGs. A rare subset of UVLGs, those with the highest FUV surface brightnesses, are believed to be local analogs of high-redshift Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) and are called Lyman break analogs (LBAs). LBGs and LBAs share similar characteristics (i.e., color, size, surface brightness, specific SFRs, metallicities, and dust content). Recent Hubble Space Telescope images of z {approx} 0.2 LBAs show disturbed morphologies, signs of mergers and interactions. UVLGs may be influenced by interactions with other galaxies and we discuss this result in terms of other high star-forming, merging systems.

Basu-Zych, Antara R.; Schiminovich, David [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Heinis, Sebastien; Heckman, Tim; Bianchi, Luciana [Center for Astrophysical Sciences, The Johns Hopkins' University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Overzier, Roderik [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zamojski, Michel; Barlow, Tom A.; Conrow, Tim; Forster, Karl G.; Friedman, Peter G.; Martin, D. Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick [California Institute of Technology, MC 405-47, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ilbert, Olivier [Institute for Astronomy, 2680 Woodlawn Dr., University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Donas, Jose; Milliard, Bruno [Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille, BP8, Traverse du Siphon, F-13376 Marseille (France); Lee, Young-Wook [Center for Space Astrophysics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Madore, Barry F. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara St., Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Neff, Susan G. [Laboratory for Astronomy and Solar Physics, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)], E-mail: antara@astro.columbia.edu (and others)

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

68

Tunable sub-luminal propagation of narrowband x-ray pulses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Group velocity control is demonstrated for x-ray photons of 14.4 keV energy via a direct measurement of the temporal delay imposed on spectrally narrow x-ray pulses. Sub-luminal light propagation is achieved by inducing a steep positive linear dispersion in the optical response of ${}^{57}$Fe M\\"ossbauer nuclei embedded in a thin film planar x-ray cavity. The direct detection of the temporal pulse delay is enabled by generating frequency-tunable spectrally narrow x-ray pulses from broadband pulsed synchrotron radiation. Our theoretical model is in good agreement with the experimental data.

K. P. Heeg; J. Haber; D. Schumacher; L. Bocklage; H. -C. Wille; K. S. Schulze; R. Loetzsch; I. Uschmann; G. G. Paulus; R. Rffer; R. Rhlsberger; J. Evers

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Maximum Entropy Method Approach to $?$ Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Monte Carlo simulations of lattice field theory with a $\\theta$ term, one confronts the complex weight problem, or the sign problem. This is circumvented by performing the Fourier transform of the topological charge distribution $P(Q)$. This procedure, however, causes flattening phenomenon of the free energy $f(\\theta)$, which makes study of the phase structure unfeasible. In order to treat this problem, we apply the maximum entropy method (MEM) to a Gaussian form of $P(Q)$, which serves as a good example to test whether the MEM can be applied effectively to the $\\theta$ term. We study the case with flattening as well as that without flattening. In the latter case, the results of the MEM agree with those obtained from the direct application of the Fourier transform. For the former, the MEM gives a smoother $f(\\theta)$ than that of the Fourier transform. Among various default models investigated, the images which yield the least error do not show flattening, although some others cannot be excluded given the uncertainty related to statistical error.

Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

70

Table lamp with dynamically controlled lighting distribution and uniformly illuminated luminous shade  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A double lamp table or floor lamp lighting system has a pair of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) or other lamps arranged vertically, i.e. one lamp above the other, with a reflective septum in between. By selectively turning on one or both of the CFLs, down lighting, up lighting, or both up and down lighting is produced. The control system can also vary the light intensity from each CFL. The reflective septum ensures that almost all the light produced by each lamp will be directed into the desired light distribution pattern which is selected and easily changed by the user. In a particular configuration, the reflective septum is bowl shaped, with the upper CFL sitting in the bowl, and a luminous shade hanging down from the bowl. The lower CFL provides both task lighting and uniform shade luminance. Planar compact fluorescent lamps, e.g. circular CFLs, particularly oriented horizontally, are preferable. CFLs provide energy efficiency. However, other types of lamps, including incandescent, halogen, and LEDs can also be used in the fixture. The lighting system may be designed for the home, hospitality, office or other environments.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Pinole, CA); Page, Erik R. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Spitzer Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy of 70um-Selected Distant Luminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present mid-infrared spectroscopy obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope of a sample of 11 optically faint, infrared luminous galaxies selected from a Spitzer MIPS 70um imaging survey of the NDWFS Bootes field. These are the first Spitzer IRS spectra presented of distant 70um-selected sources. All the galaxies lie at redshifts 0.3infrared luminosities of L_IR~ 0.1-17 x 10^12 solar luminosities. Seven of the galaxies exhibit strong emission features attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average IRS spectrum of these sources is characteristic of classical starburst galaxies, but with much larger infrared luminosities. The PAH luminosities of L(7.7) ~ 0.4 - 7 x 10^11 solar luminosities imply star formation rates of ~ 40 - 720 solar masses per year. Four of the galaxies show deep 9.7um silicate absorption features and no significant PAH emission features (6.2um equivalent widths infrared luminosities and low f70/f24 flux density ratios suggests that these sources have AGN as the dominant origin of their large mid-infrared luminosities, although deeply embedded but luminous starbursts cannot be ruled out. If the absorbed sources are AGN-dominated, a significant fraction of all far-infrared bright, optically faint sources may be dominated by AGN.

Kate Brand; Dan W. Weedman; Vandana Desai; Emeric Le Floc'h; Lee Armus; Arjun Dey; Jim R. Houck; Buell T. Jannuzi; Howard A. Smith; B. T. Soifer

2007-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Diverse Properties of the Most Ultraviolet Luminous Galaxies Discovered by the Galaxy Evolution Explorer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the properties of a sample of ultraviolet luminous galaxies (UVLGs) selected by matching the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Surveys with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Third Data Release. Out of 25362 galaxies between 0.02x10^10 L_solar at 1530 Angstroms (observed wavelength). The properties of this population are well correlated with ultraviolet surface brightness. We find that the galaxies with low UV surface brightness are primarily large spiral systems with a mixture of old and young stellar populations, while the high surface brightness galaxies consist primarily of compact starburst systems. In terms of the behavior of surface brightness with luminosity, size with luminosity, the mass-metallicity relation, and other parameters, the compact UVLGs clearly depart from the trends established by the full sample of galaxies. The subset of compact UVLGs with the highest surface brightness (``supercompact UVLGs'') have characteristics that are remarkably similar to Lyman Break Galaxies at higher redshift. They are much more luminous than typical local ultraviolet-bright starburst galaxies and blue compact dwarf galaxies. They have metallicities that are systematically lower than normal galaxies of the same stellar mass, indicating that they are less chemically evolved. In all these respects, they are the best local analogs for Lyman Break Galaxies.

Charles G. Hoopes; Timothy M. Heckman; Samir Salim; Mark Seibert; Christy A. Tremonti; David Schiminovich; R. Michael Rich; D. Christopher Martin; Stephane Charlot; Guinevere Kauffmann; Karl Forster; Peter G. Friedman; Patrick Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; Todd Small; Ted K. Wyder; Luciana Bianchi; Jose Donas; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Bruno Milliard; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Sukyoung K. Yi

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

73

GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GMM Estimation of a Maximum Entropy Distribution with Interval Data Ximing Wu* and Jeffrey M estimate it using a simple yet flexible maximum entropy density. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that the proposed maximum entropy density is able to approximate various distributions extremely well. The two

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

74

The Ultra Luminous X-ray sources in the High Velocity System of NGC 1275  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of a study of X-ray point sources coincident with the High Velocity System (HVS) projected in front of NGC 1275. A very deep X-ray image of the core of the Perseus cluster made with the Chandra Observatory has been used. We find a population of Ultra-Luminous X-ray sources (ULX; 7 sources with LX [0.5-7 keV] > 7x10^39 erg/s). As with the ULX populations in the Antennae and Cartwheel galaxies, those in the HVS are associated with a region of very active star formation. Several sources have possible optical counterparts found on HST images, although the X-ray brightest one does not. Absorbed power-law models fit the X-ray spectra, with most having a photon index between 2 and 3.

O. Gonzalez-Martin; A. C. Fabian; J. S. Sanders

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

75

Light scattering by a rough surface of human skin. 1. The luminance factor of reflected light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on the analytical solution of Maxwell's equations, we have studied the angular structure of the luminance factor of light reflected by the rough skin surface with large-scale relief elements, illuminated by a directed radiation beam incident at an arbitrary angle inside or outside the medium. The parameters of the surface inhomogeneities are typical of human skin. The calculated angular dependences are interpreted from the point of view of the angular distribution function of micro areas. The results obtained can be used for solving direct and inverse problems in biomedical optics, in particular for determining the depth of light penetration into a biological tissue, for studying the light action spectra on tissue chromophores under the in vivo conditions, for developing diagnostic methods of structural and biophysical parameters of a medium, and for optimising the mechanisms of interaction of light with biological tissues under their noninvasive irradiation through skin. (biomedical optics)

Barun, V V [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics, Minsk (Belarus); Ivanov, A P [B.I.Stepanov Institute of Physics, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

DISCOVERY OF TWO SUPERNOVAE IN THE NUCLEAR REGIONS OF THE LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IC 883  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the discovery of two consecutive supernovae (SNe), 2010cu and 2011hi, located at 0.''37 (180 pc) and 0.''79 (380 pc) projected distance, respectively, from the center of the K-band nucleus of the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) IC 883. The SNe were discovered in an ongoing near-infrared K-band search for core-collapse SNe in such galaxies using the ALTAIR/NIRI adaptive optics system with laser guide star at the Gemini-North Telescope. These are thus the closest SNe yet discovered to an LIRG nucleus in optical or near-infrared wavelengths. The near-infrared light curves and colors of both SNe are consistent with core-collapse events. Both SNe seem to suffer from relatively low host galaxy extinction suggesting that regardless of their low projected galactocentric distances, they are not deeply buried in the nuclear regions of the host galaxy.

Kankare, E.; Mattila, S.; Takalo, A. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Ryder, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 296, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Vaeisaenen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935 (South Africa); Alberdi, A.; Perez-Torres, M.-A.; Romero-Canizales, C. [Instituto de Astrofsica de Andalucia, IAA-CSIC, Apartado 3004, 18080 Granada (Spain); Alonso-Herrero, A.; Colina, L. [Departamento de Astrofisica, Centro de Astrobiologia, CSIC/INTA, Carretera de Torrejon a Ajalvir, km 4, 28850, Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Efstathiou, A. [School of Sciences, European University Cyprus, Diogenes Street, Engomi, 1516 Nicosia (Cyprus); Kotilainen, J. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vaeisaelaentie 20, FI-21500 Piikkioe (Finland); Melinder, J., E-mail: erkki.kankare@utu.fi [Department of Astronomy, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, 106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

77

SUPER-LUMINOUS TYPE Ic SUPERNOVAE: CATCHING A MAGNETAR BY THE TAIL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report extensive observational data for five of the lowest redshift Super-Luminous Type Ic Supernovae (SL-SNe Ic) discovered to date, namely, PTF10hgi, SN2011ke, PTF11rks, SN2011kf, and SN2012il. Photometric imaging of the transients at +50 to +230 days after peak combined with host galaxy subtraction reveals a luminous tail phase for four of these SL-SNe. A high-resolution, optical, and near-infrared spectrum from xshooter provides detection of a broad He I {lambda}10830 emission line in the spectrum (+50 days) of SN2012il, revealing that at least some SL-SNe Ic are not completely helium-free. At first sight, the tail luminosity decline rates that we measure are consistent with the radioactive decay of {sup 56}Co, and would require 1-4 M{sub Sun} of {sup 56}Ni to produce the luminosity. These {sup 56}Ni masses cannot be made consistent with the short diffusion times at peak, and indeed are insufficient to power the peak luminosity. We instead favor energy deposition by newborn magnetars as the power source for these objects. A semi-analytical diffusion model with energy input from the spin-down of a magnetar reproduces the extensive light curve data well. The model predictions of ejecta velocities and temperatures which are required are in reasonable agreement with those determined from our observations. We derive magnetar energies of 0.4 {approx}< E(10{sup 51} erg) {approx}< 6.9 and ejecta masses of 2.3 {approx}< M{sub ej}(M{sub Sun }) {approx}< 8.6. The sample of five SL-SNe Ic presented here, combined with SN 2010gx-the best sampled SL-SNe Ic so far-points toward an explosion driven by a magnetar as a viable explanation for all SL-SNe Ic.

Inserra, C.; Smartt, S. J.; Jerkstrand, A.; Fraser, M.; Wright, D.; Smith, K.; Chen, T.-W.; Kotak, R.; Nicholl, M. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queens University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Valenti, S. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Dr., Suite 102 Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pastorello, A.; Benetti, S. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, vicolo dell'Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); Bresolin, F.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Flewelling, H. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Botticella, M. T. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ergon, M. [The Oskar Klein Centre, Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Fynbo, J. P. U., E-mail: c.inserra@qub.ac.uk [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); and others

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

Galaxy groups in the 2dFGRS: the luminous content of the groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2dFGRS Percolation-Inferred Galaxy Group (2PIGG) catalogue of ~29000 objects is used to study the luminous content of galaxy systems of various sizes. Mock galaxy catalogues constructed from cosmological simulations are used to gauge the accuracy with which intrinsic group properties can be recovered. A Schechter function is found to be a reasonable fit to the galaxy luminosity functions in groups of different mass in the real data. The characteristic luminosity L* is larger for more massive groups. However, the mock data show that the shape of the recovered luminosity function is expected to differ from the true shape, and this must be allowed for when interpreting the data. The variation of halo mass-to-light ratio with group size is studied in both these wavebands. A robust trend of increasing M/L with increasing group luminosity is found in the 2PIGG data. From groups with L_bj=10^{10}Lsol to those 100 times more luminous, the typical bj-band M/L increases by a factor of 5, whereas the rf-band M/L grows by a factor of 3.5. These trends agree well with the simulations, which also predict a minimum M/L on a scale corresponding to the Local Group. Our data indicate that if such a minimum exists, then it must occur at L<~10^{10}Lsol, below the range accurately probed by the 2PIGG catalogue. According to the mock data, the bj M/Ls of the largest groups are expected to be approximately 1.1 times the global value. Assuming that this correction applies to the real data yields an estimate of Omega_m=0.26+/-0.03 (statistical).

V. R. Eke; C. S. Frenk; C. M. Baugh; S. Cole; P. Norberg; J. A. Peacock; I. K. Baldry; J. Bland-Hawthorn; T. Bridges; R. Cannon; M. Colless; C. Collins; W. Couch; G. Dalton; R. De Propris; S. P. Driver; G. Efstathiou; R. S. Ellis; K. Glazebrook; C. Jackson; O. Lahav; I. Lewis; S. Lumsden; S. Maddox; D. Madgwick; B. A. Peterson; W. Sutherland; K. Taylor

2004-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

79

Dynamical modelling of luminous and dark matter in 17 Coma early-type galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamical models for 17 Coma early-type galaxies are presented. The galaxy sample consists of flattened, rotating as well as non-rotating early-types including cD and S0 galaxies with luminosities between M=-18.79 and M=-22.56. Kinematical long-slit observations cover at least the major and minor axis and extend to 1-4 effective radii. Axisymmetric Schwarzschild models are used to derive stellar mass-to-light ratios and dark halo parameters. In every galaxy models with a dark matter halo match the data better than models without. The statistical significance is over 95 percent for 8 galaxies, around 90 percent for 5 galaxies and for four galaxies it is not significant. For the highly significant cases systematic deviations between observed and modelled kinematics are clearly seen; for the remaining galaxies differences are more statistical in nature. Best-fit models contain 10-50 percent dark matter inside the half-light radius. The central dark matter density is at least one order of magnitude lower than the luminous mass density. The central phase-space density of dark matter is often orders of magnitude lower than in the luminous component, especially when the halo core radius is large. The orbital system of the stars along the major-axis is slightly dominated by radial motions. Some galaxies show tangential anisotropy along the minor-axis, which is correlated with the minor-axis Gauss-Hermite coefficient H4. Changing the balance between data-fit and regularisation constraints does not change the reconstructed mass structure significantly. Model anisotropies tend to strengthen if the weight on regularisation is reduced, but the general property of a galaxy to be radially or tangentially anisotropic, respectively, does not change. (abridged)

J. Thomas; R. P. Saglia; R. Bender; D. Thomas; K. Gebhardt; J. Magorrian; E. M. Corsini; G. Wegner

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

80

Properties of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform population synthesis modelling of a magnitude-limited sample of 4391 Luminous Red Galaxies selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 4 (SDSS DR4). We fit measured spectral indices using a large library of high resolution spectra, covering a wide range of metallicities and assuming an exponentially decaying star-formation rate punctuated by bursts, to obtain median-likelihood estimates for the light-weighted age, metallicity, stellar mass and extinction for the galaxies. The ages lie in the range 4-10 Gyr, peaking near 6 Gyr, with metallicities in the range -0.4<[Z/H]<0.4, peaking at [Z/H] ~ 0.2. Only a few per cent of the spectra are better fit allowing for a burst in addition to continuous star-formation. The total stellar masses of all the galaxies are confined to a very narrow range. Our results broadly agree with those of previous groups using an independent population synthesis code. We find, however, that our choice in priors results in ages 1-2 Gyr smaller, decreasing the peak star formation epoch from z=2.3 to z=1.3. We develop a metal evolution model incorporating stochastic star-formation quenching motivated by recent attempts to solve the `anti-hierarchical' formation problem of ellipticals. Two scenarios emerge, a closed box with an effective stellar yield of 0.26, and an accreting box with an effective stellar yield of 0.10. Both scenarios require an IMF weighted towards massive stars and characteristic star-formation quenching times of about 100 Myr, the expected lifetime of luminous QSOs. The models predict an anti-correlation between the age and mean metallicity similar to that observed.

T. Barber; A. Meiksin; T. Murphy

2006-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

60.2 / S.-W. Wang 60.2: Low-Power Consumptive Luminance Compensation for a Digital  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of AC Dept, LG Electronics Inc., Changwon-si, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea Abstract The luminance of AMOLED of California at Berkeley, California, U.S.A Ho-Min Lim OLED Circuit/Mechanism Design Team, LG Display Co., Ltd

Sanders, Seth

82

A Hubble Space Telescope Survey of X-ray Luminous Galaxy Clusters: Gravitationally Lensed Arcs and EROs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We are conducting a systematic lensing survey of X-ray luminous galaxy clusters at z~0.2 using the Hubble Space Telescope and large ground-based telescopes. We summarize initial results from our survey, including a measurement of the inner slope of the mass profile of A383, and a search for gravitationally lensed Extremely Red Objects.

Graham P. Smith

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

8.4 White Dwarfs As an asymptotic giant branch star becomes larger and more luminous, the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

8.4 White Dwarfs As an asymptotic giant branch star becomes larger and more luminous, the rate is the reminant core, the white dwarf. Our knowledge of white dwarfs began in 1850 with the discovery be both hot and faint was for Sirius B to be very, very small, and so they were called white dwarf stars

Peletier, Reynier

84

A Near Maximum Likelihood Decoding Algorithm for MIMO Systems ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jul 30, 2005 ... the randomization procedure of [43], we bijectively map the .... ?1x are also in the integer grid. ... in a Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) decoder by.

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling Problems Using Factored Masks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mar 2, 2005 ... Abstract: We present a practical approach to Anstreicher and Lee's masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling, and we describe...

Samuel Burer

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

A masked spectral bound for maximum-entropy sampling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sep 16, 2003 ... Abstract: We introduce a new masked spectral bound for the maximum-entropy sampling problem. This bound is a continuous generalization of...

Kurt Anstreicher

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

87

Maximum entropy generation in open systems: the Fourth Law?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper develops an analytical and rigorous formulation of the maximum entropy generation principle. The result is suggested as the Fourth Law of Thermodynamics.

Umberto Lucia

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

88

analog fixed maximum: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

state for given entanglement which can be viewed as an analogue of the Jaynes maximum entropy principle. Pawel Horodecki; Ryszard Horodecki; Michal Horodecki 1998-05-22...

89

IBM Research Report Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 28, 2005 ... Solving Maximum-Entropy Sampling Problems Using. Factored Masks. Samuel Burer. Department of Management Sciences. University of Iowa.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

A Requirement for Significant Reduction in the Maximum BTU Input Rate of Decorative Vented Gas Fireplaces Would Impose Substantial Burdens on Manufacturers A Requirement for...

91

Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter Miaosen Shen1 , Jin Wang1 , Alan Joseph1 Laboratory Abstract: This paper proposes two maximum constant boost control methods for the Z-source inverter to modulation index is analyzed in detail and verified by simulation and experiment. Keywords- Z-source inverter

Tolbert, Leon M.

92

Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appendix 22 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily Load for Flathead Lake, Montana. #12;11/01/01 DRAFT i October 30, 2001 Draft Nutrient Management Plan and Total Maximum Daily Load..............................................................................................................................2-11 SECTION 3.0 APPLICABLE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS

93

On the diversity of Super-luminous Supernovae: Ejected mass as the dominant factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H-poor super-luminous supernovae (SLSNe) are a rare and poorly understood class of explosion. We assemble the largest sample (24) of such objects to date, with griz light curves and optical spectra. We parameterize the light curve through rise and decline timescales, finding that these are highly correlated. Magnetar-powered models reproduce the correlation, with the diversity in rise and decline driven by the diffusion timescale. Circumstellar interaction models can exhibit a similar rise-decline relation, but for only a narrow density range, which may be problematic for these models. We see a similar correlation in normal SNe Ibc (powered by 56Ni), though SLSNe rise and decline more slowly, and their peak luminosity requires an additional energy source. We find that SLSN light curves are approximately 3.5 mag brighter and 3 times broader than SNe Ibc, but that the intrinsic shapes are similar. Some SLSNe (2007bi-like) have very broad light curves, possibly indicating two progenitor channels, but statistical...

Nicholl, M; Jerkstrand, A; Inserra, C; Sim, S A; Chen, T -W; Benetti, S; Fraser, M; Gal-Yam, A; Kankare, E; Maguire, K; Smith, K; Sullivan, M; Valenti, S; Young, D R; Baltay, C; Bauer, F E; Baumont, S; Bersier, D; Botticella, M -T; Childress, M; Dennefeld, M; Della Valle, M; Elias-Rosa, N; Feindt, U; Galbany, L; Hadjiyska, E; Guillou, L Le; Leloudas, G; Mazzali, P; McKinnon, R; Polshaw, J; Rabinowitz, D; Rostami, S; Scalzo, R; Schmidt, B P; Schulze, S; Sollerman, J; Taddia, F; Yuan, F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Herschel view of the nebula around the luminous blue variable star AG Carinae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Far-infrared Herschel PACS imaging and spectroscopic observations of the nebula around the luminous blue variable (LBV) star AG Car have been obtained along with optical imaging in the Halpha+[NII] filter. In the infrared light, the nebula appears as a clumpy ring shell that extends up to 1.2 pc with an inner radius of 0.4 pc. It coincides with the Halpha nebula, but extends further out. Dust modeling of the nebula was performed and indicates the presence of large grains. The dust mass is estimated to be ~ 0.2 Msun. The infrared spectrum of the nebula consists of forbidden emission lines over a dust continuum. Apart from ionized gas, these lines also indicate the existence of neutral gas in a photodissociation region that surrounds the ionized region. The abundance ratios point towards enrichment by processed material. The total mass of the nebula ejected from the central star amounts to ~ 15 Msun, assuming a dust-to-gas ratio typical of LBVs. The abundances and the mass-loss rate were used to constrain the e...

Vamvatira-Nakou, C; Royer, P; Cox, N L J; Naze, Y; Rauw, G; Waelkens, C; Groenewegen, M A T

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

The Nuclear Spectral Energy Distribution of NGC 4395, The Least Luminous Type 1 Seyfert Galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present X-ray (ROSAT), infrared, and radio observations of NGC 4395, which harbors the optically least luminous type 1 Seyfert nucleus discovered thus far. In combination with published optical and ultraviolet spectra, we have used these data to assemble the broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of the galaxy's nucleus. Interestingly, the SED of NGC 4395 differs markedly from the SEDs of both quasars and typical low-luminosity active galactic nuclei, which may be a manifestation of the different physical conditions (i.e., black hole masses, accretion rates, and/or accretion modes) that exist in these objects. The nuclear X-ray source in NGC 4395 is variable and has an observed luminosity of just ~ 10^38 ergs/s. Although this emission could plausibly be associated with either a weak active nucleus or a bright stellar-mass binary system, the optical and ultraviolet emission-line properties of the nucleus strongly suggest that the X-rays arise from a classical AGN.

E. C. Moran; A. V. Filippenko; L. C. Ho; J. C. Shields; T. Belloni; A. Comastri; S. L. Snowden; R. A. Sramek

1999-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

96

A Model for Most Luminous and Long Duration Cosmic Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We exploit the fact that General Theory of Relativity (GTR) predicts the existence of compact objects having surface gravitational redshift z_s burst rises dramatically with the value of z_c and can saturate to ~40%. This may explain a gamma ray burst of energy as high as ~5. 10**53 erg. By using the already existing detailed (Newtonian) calculations, it follows that the neutrino heating driven mass loss should be negligible, and the bulk Lorentz factor of the initial fireball could be ~1000. Most of the existing supernova calculations also show that it is extremely difficult to simulate the direct neutrino driven mass loss, and, the shock is not launched if the gravitational field becomes stronger. Since the gravitation potential well of the more compact NS is indded very deep, we do not expect additional baryonic mass ejection. So, without invoking any exotic physics (like strange stars) or overstretching any theory, we may explain most of the luminous GRBs in this simple model.

Abhas Mitra

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Properties of Ultraviolet-Luminous Galaxies at the Current Epoch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have used the first matched set of GALEX and SDSS data to investigate the properties of a sample of 74 nearby galaxies with far-ultraviolet luminosities chosen to overlap the luminosity range of typical high-z Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs). GALEX deep surveys have shown that ultraviolet-luminous galaxies (UVLGs) similar to these are the fastest evolving component of the UV galaxy population. Model fits to the combined GALEX and SDSS photometry yield typical FUV extinctions similar to LBGs. The implied star formation rates are SFR ~ 3 to 30 solar mass per year. This overlaps the range of SFRs for LBGs. We find a strong inverse correlation between galaxy mass and far-ultraviolet surface brightness, and on this basis divide the sample into ``large'' and ``compact'' UVLGs. The compact UVLGs have half-light radii of a few kpc or less (similar to LBGs). They are relatively low mass galaxies (~10 billion solar masses) with typical velocity dispersions of 60 to 150 km/s. They span a range in metallicity from 0.3 to 1 times solar, have blue optical-UV colors, and are forming stars at a rate sufficient to build the present galaxy in ~a Gigayear. In all these respects they appear similar to the LBG population. These ``living fossils'' may therefore provide an opportunity for detailed investigation of the physical processes occurring in typical star forming galaxies in the early universe.

Timothy M. Heckman; Charles G. Hoopes; Mark Seibert; Christopher Martin; Samir Salim; R. Michael Rich; Guinevere Kauffmann; Stephane Charlot; Tom A. Barlow; Luciana Bianchi; Yong-Ik Byun; Jose Donas; Karl Forster; Patrick N. Jelinsky; Young-Wook Lee; Barry F. Madore; Roger F. Malina; Bruno Milliard; Patrick F. Morrissey; Susan G. Neff; David Schiminovich; Oswald H. W. Siegmund; Todd Small; Alex S. Szalay; Barry Y. Welsh; Ted K. Wyder

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Clustering of Luminous Red Galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Imaging Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the 3D real space clustering power spectrum of a sample of \\~600,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) measured by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), using photometric redshifts. This sample of galaxies ranges from redshift z=0.2 to 0.6 over 3,528 deg^2 of the sky, probing a volume of 1.5 (Gpc/h)^3, making it the largest volume ever used for galaxy clustering measurements. We measure the angular clustering power spectrum in eight redshift slices and combine these into a high precision 3D real space power spectrum from k=0.005 (h/Mpc) to k=1 (h/Mpc). We detect power on gigaparsec scales, beyond the turnover in the matter power spectrum, on scales significantly larger than those accessible to current spectroscopic redshift surveys. We also find evidence for baryonic oscillations, both in the power spectrum, as well as in fits to the baryon density, at a 2.5 sigma confidence level. The statistical power of these data to constrain cosmology is ~1.7 times better than previous clustering analyses. Varying t...

Padmanabhan, N; Seljak, U; Makarov, A; Bahcall, Neta A; Blanton, M R; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Finkbeiner, D P; Gunn, J E; Hogg, D W; Ivezic, Z; Knapp, G R; Loveday, J; Lupton, R H; Nichol, R C; Schneider, D P; Strauss, M A; Tegmark, M; York, D G

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Visual Comfort Analysis of Innovative Interior and Exterior Shading Systems for Commercial Buildings using High Resolution Luminance Images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to explore how calibrated high dynamic range (HDR) images (luminance maps) acquired in real world daylit environments can be used to characterize, evaluate, and compare visual comfort conditions of innovative facade shading and light-redirecting systems. Detailed (1536 x 1536 pixel) luminance maps were time-lapse acquired from two view positions in an unoccupied full scale testbed facility. These maps were analyzed using existing visual comfort metrics to quantify how innovative interior and exterior shading systems compare to conventional systems under real sun and sky conditions over a solstice-to-solstice test interval. The results provide a case study in the challenges and potential of methods of visualizing, evaluating and summarizing daily and seasonal variation of visual comfort conditions computed from large sets of image data.

Konis, Kyle; Lee, Eleanor; Clear, Robert

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992). J. Skilling, in Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods,1989). S. F. Gull, in Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods,with the classical maximum entropy (CME) technique (MEAC-

Liu, Jian

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Improved constraints on transit time distributions from argon 39: A maximum entropy approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gull (1991), Bayesian maximum entropy image reconstruction,Atlantic venti- lated? Maximum entropy inversions of bottlefrom argon 39: A maximum entropy approach Mark Holzer 1,2

Holzer, Mark; Primeau, Francois W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Quantum Statistics Basis, Thermodynamic Analogies and the Degree of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and Estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Confidence for Maximum Entropy Restoration and EstimationApril 3, 1992) The Maximum Entropy method, using physicalare discussed. Maximum Entropy (ME) estimation has been

Soffer, Bernard H; Kikuchi, Ryoichi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

On the maximum pressure rise rate in boosted HCCI operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the combined effects of boosting, intake air temperature, trapped residual gas fraction, and dilution on the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate (MPRR) in a boosted single cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with ...

Wildman, Craig B.

104

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods LANG TONG, MEMBER, IEEE, AND SYLVIE PERREAU Invited Paper A review of recent blind channel estimation algorithms is pre-- Blind equalization, parameter estimation, system identification. I. INTRODUCTION A. What Is Blind

Tong, Lang

107

Multi-Class Classification with Maximum Margin Multiple Kernel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(named OBSCURE and UFO-MKL, respectively) are used to optimize primal versions of equivalent problems), the OBSCURE and UFO-MKL algorithms are compared against MCMKL #12;Multi-Class Classification with Maximum

Tomkins, Andrew

108

Maximum entropy method and oscillations in the diffraction cone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The maximum entropy method has been applied to investigate the oscillating structure in the pbarp- and pp-elastic scattering differential cross-section at high energy and small momentum transfer. Oscillations satisfying quite realistic reliability criteria have been found.

O. Dumbrajs; J. Kontros; A. Lengyel

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Efficiency at maximum power of interacting molecular machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the efficiency of systems of molecular motors operating at maximum power. We consider two models of kinesin motors on a microtubule: for both the simplified and the detailed model, we find that the many-body exclusion effect enhances the efficiency at maximum power of the many-motor system, with respect to the single motor case. Remarkably, we find that this effect occurs in a limited region of the system parameters, compatible with the biologically relevant range.

N. Golubeva; A. Imparato

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

110

Filtering Additive Measurement Noise with Maximum Entropy in the Mean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this note is to show how the method of maximum entropy in the mean (MEM) may be used to improve parametric estimation when the measurements are corrupted by large level of noise. The method is developed in the context on a concrete example: that of estimation of the parameter in an exponential distribution. We compare the performance of our method with the bayesian and maximum likelihood approaches.

Henryk Gzyl; Enrique ter Horst

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

The maximum entropy tecniques and the statistical description of systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The maximum entropy technique (MENT) is used to determine the distribution functions of physical values. MENT naturally combines required maximum entropy, the properties of a system and connection conditions in the form of restrictions imposed on the system. It can, therefore, be employed to statistically describe closed and open systems. Examples in which MENT is used to describe equilibrium and non-equilibrium states, as well as steady states that are far from being in thermodynamic equilibrium, are discussed.

B. Z. Belashev; M. K. Suleymanov

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

ON THE NATURE OF THE PROTOTYPE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE AG CARINAE. II. WITNESSING A MASSIVE STAR EVOLVING CLOSE TO THE EDDINGTON AND BISTABILITY LIMITS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show that the significantly different effective temperatures (T{sub eff}) achieved by the luminous blue variable AG Carinae during the consecutive visual minima of 1985-1990 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 22,800 K) and 2000-2001 (T{sub eff} {approx_equal} 17,000 K) place the star on different sides of the bistability limit, which occurs in line-driven stellar winds around T{sub eff} {approx} 21,000 K. Decisive evidence is provided by huge changes in the optical depth of the Lyman continuum in the inner wind as T{sub eff} changes during the S Dor cycle. These changes cause different Fe ionization structures in the inner wind. The bistability mechanism is also related to the different wind parameters during visual minima: the wind terminal velocity was 2-3 times higher and the mass-loss rate roughly two times smaller in 1985-1990 than in 2000-2003. We obtain a projected rotational velocity of 220 {+-} 50 km s{sup -1} during 1985-1990 which, combined with the high luminosity (L{sub *} = 1.5 x 10{sup 6} L{sub sun}), puts AG Car extremely close to the Eddington limit modified by rotation ({Omega}{Gamma} limit): for an inclination angle of 90{sup 0}, {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} {approx}> 1.0 for M{sub sun} {approx}< 60. Based on evolutionary models and mass budget, we obtain an initial mass of {approx}100 M{sub sun} and a current mass of {approx}60-70 M{sub sun} for AG Car. Therefore, AG Car is close to, if not at, the {Omega}{Gamma} limit during visual minimum. Assuming M = 70 M{sub sun}, we find that {Gamma}{sub {Omega}} decreases from 0.93 to 0.72 as AG Car expands toward visual maximum, suggesting that the star is not above the Eddington limit during maximum phases.

Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Damineli, A., E-mail: jgroh@mpifr.de [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-900, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Environment on few Mpc scales of Infrared Luminous Galaxies at Redshifts z~1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the environment of infrared luminous galaxies (L$_{IR}$[8-1000 $\\mu $m$] >10^{11}$L$_{\\sun}$). We focus on the redshift range 0.7 $\\leq$ z $\\leq$ 1, where these galaxies dominate the star formation activity and play a significant role in galaxy evolution. We employ MIPS 24$\\mu$m data to identify infrared galaxies in the Extended Groth Strip (EGS). We use a local density indicator to probe the environment on few Mpc scales and a group member catalog, both of which make use of the DEEP2 spectroscopic redshift catalog, to quantify the environment of these galaxies. We find that the local environment of LIRGs and ULIRGs is intermediate between that of blue and red galaxies. LIRGs and ULIRGs avoid underdense environments and inhabit local environments that are more dense on average than those of other DEEP2 galaxies at similar redshifts. However, when the comparison sample of the non-IR DEEP2 galaxies is restricted to have the same range of stellar mass, color, or luminosity as the IR--galaxies, there is no longer any significant difference in environment; the IR-galaxies follow the same trends in the color-environment and luminosity-environment relations observed at z$\\sim$1. We also find that about 30% of the LIRGs and ULIRGs belong to groups, associated with a minimum dark matter halo of 6$\\times10^{12}$M$_{\\odot}$h$^{-1}$. The group members constitute 20 % of the sources responsible for the IR star formation rate density and comoving energy density at z$\\sim$1.

D. Marcillac; G. H. Rieke; C. Papovich; C. N. A. Willmer; B. J. Weiner; A. L. Coil; M. C. Cooper; B. F. Gerke; J. Woo; J. A. Newman; A. Georgakakis; E. S. Laird; K. Nandra; G. G. Fazio; J. -S. Huang; D. C. Koo

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

OBSERVATIONS OF DARK AND LUMINOUS MATTER: THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF SATELLITE GALAXIES AROUND MASSIVE RED GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the projected radial distribution of satellite galaxies around more than 28,000 luminous red galaxies (LRGs) at 0.28 < z < 0.40 and trace the gravitational potential of LRG groups in the range 15 < r/kpc < 700. We show that at large radii the satellite number-density profile is well fitted by a projected Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profile with r{sub s} {approx} 270 kpc and that at small radii this model underestimates the number of satellite galaxies. Utilizing the previously measured stellar light distribution of LRGs from deep imaging stacks, we demonstrate that this small-scale excess is consistent with a non-negligible baryonic mass contribution to the gravitational potential of massive groups and clusters. The combined NFW+scaled stellar profile provides an excellent fit to the satellite number-density profile all the way from 15 kpc to 700 kpc. Dark matter dominates the total mass profile of LRG halos at r > 25 kpc whereas baryons account for more than 50% of the mass at smaller radii. We calculate the total dark-to-baryonic mass ratio and show that it is consistent with measurements from weak lensing for environments dominated by massive early-type galaxies. Finally, we divide the satellite galaxies in our sample into three luminosity bins and show that the satellite light profiles of all brightness levels are consistent with each other outside of roughly 25 kpc. At smaller radii we find evidence for a mild mass segregation with an increasing fraction of bright satellites close to the central LRG.

Tal, Tomer; Wake, David A.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G., E-mail: tomer.tal@yale.edu [Astronomy Department, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520-8101 (United States)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

PSN J07285387+3349106 in NGC 2388: extremely rapidly declining luminous supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present CCD BVRI photometry for PSN J07285387+3349106 in NGC 2388 collected from 2015 February 17 until March 17. Decaying by 3.6 mag in the R band in the first 20 days post-maximum, this object is among the fastest supernovae observed to date. The peak absolute R magnitude exceeds -18.7 and may be as high as -20.1.

Tsvetkov, D Yu; Pavlyuk, N N

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

NGC2613, 3198, 6503, 7184: Case studies against `maximum' disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decompositions of the rotation curves of NGC2613, 3198, 6505, and 7184 are analysed. For these galaxies the radial velocity dispersions of the stars have been measured and their morphology is clearly discernible. If the parameters of the decompositions are chosen according to the `maximum' disk hypothesis, the Toomre Q stability parameter is systematically less than one and the multiplicities of the spiral arms as expected from density wave theory are inconsitent with the observed morphologies of the galaxies. The apparent Q<1 instability, in particular, is a strong argument against the `maximum' disk hypothesis.

B. Fuchs

1998-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Efficiency of autonomous soft nano-machines at maximum power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider nano-sized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing non-equilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall in three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient", "strong and inefficient", and "balanced". For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

Udo Seifert

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods? Andrea K Barreiro1*, Eric T Shea-Brown1, Fred M Rieke2,3, Julijana Gjorgjieva4 From Nineteenth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2010 San... Antonio, TX, USA. 24-30 July 2010 Recent experiments in retina and cortex have demon- strated that pairwise maximum entropy (PME) methods can approximate observed spiking patterns to a high degree of accuracy [1,2]. In this paper we examine...

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

Rong Wang; Xurong Chen

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

120

Valence quark distributions of the proton from maximum entropy approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an attempt of maximum entropy principle to determine valence quark distributions in the proton at very low resolution scale $Q_0^2$. The initial three valence quark distributions are obtained with limited dynamical information from quark model and QCD theory. Valence quark distributions from this method are compared to the lepton deep inelastic scattering data, and the widely used CT10 and MSTW08 data sets. The obtained valence quark distributions are consistent with experimental observations and the latest global fits of PDFs. Maximum entropy method is expected to be particularly useful in the case where relatively little information from QCD calculation is given.

Wang, Rong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Assessing complexity by means of maximum entropy models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss a characterization of complexity based on successive approximations of the probability density describing a system by means of maximum entropy methods, thereby quantifying the respective role played by different orders of interaction. This characterization is applied on simple cellular automata in order to put it in perspective with the usual notion of complexity for such systems based on Wolfram classes. The overlap is shown to be good, but not perfect. This suggests that complexity in the sense of Wolfram emerges as an intermediate regime of maximum entropy-based complexity, but also gives insights regarding the role of initial conditions in complexity-related issues.

Chliamovitch, Gregor; Velasquez, Lino

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena, Hugo Eduardo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Maximum-principle-satisfying and positivity-preserving high order ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conservation laws: Survey and new developments ..... Notice that in (2.10) we need to evaluate the maximum/minimum of a ..... total energy, p is the pressure, e is the internal energy, and ? > 1 is a constant ... under a standard CFL condition.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Maximum Entropy in Support of Semantically Annotated Datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Entropy in Support of Semantically Annotated Datasets Paulo Pinheiro da Silva, Vladik whether two datasets describe the same quantity. The existing solution to this problem is to use these datasets' ontologies to deduce that these datasets indeed represent the same quantity. However, even when

Kreinovich, Vladik

126

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events Lina DEAMBROGIO on the fields of ionosphere scintillations, solar energetic particles and on the implementation of operational the upcoming period of high solar activity. Emilien ROBERT got his PhD in 2005 and started to work on behalf

Boyer, Edmond

127

Rapidly Solving an Online Sequence of Maximum Flow Problems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... an interdictor allocates a finite amount of resources to remove arcs from a net- ... is, the next maximum flow problem in the sequence differs from the previous one by ..... the appropriate reoptimization case and then taking the appropriate action to ..... Our first set of computational experiments tested the performance of our...

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

128

THE MAXIMUM CAPACITY OF A LINE PLAN IS INAPPROXIMABLE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE MAXIMUM CAPACITY OF A LINE PLAN IS INAPPROXIMABLE CHRISTINA PUHL AND SEBASTIAN STILLER Abstract a network, upper arc-capacities and a line pool. E-mail: puhl@math.tu-berlin.de, stiller of the European Commission under contract no. FP6-021235-2. 1 #12;2 CHRISTINA PUHL AND SEBASTIAN STILLER We

Nabben, Reinhard

129

O(1)-Approximations for Maximum Movement Piotr Berman1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

movement of the pebbles, motivated by minimizing either execution time or energy usage. Spe- cific problems the maximum movement made by pebbles on a graph to reach a configuration in which the pebbles form a connected. For example, in the connectivity goal, the proximity of the robots should form a connected graph. Two

Demaine, Erik

130

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach Wahid FAIDI LAMSIN, ENIT for a class of robust utility function introduced in Bordigoni, Matoussi et Schweizer (2005). Our method-investment strategy which is characterized as the unique solution of a forward-backward system. Key words : Utility

Di Girolami, Cristina

131

Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

132

Maximum likelihood estimation of the equity Efstathios Avdis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

premium is usually estimated by taking the sample mean of stock returns and subtracting a measure the expected return on the aggregate stock market less the government bill rate, is of central importance an alternative esti- mator, based on maximum likelihood, that takes into account informa- tion contained

Kahana, Michael J.

133

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel with energy harvesting. We assume that the side information of both the channel states and energy harvesting

Greenberg, Albert

134

Retrocommissioning Case Study - Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RETROCOMMISSIONING CASE STUDY ?Applying Building Selection Criteria for Maximum Results? Larry Luskay, Tudi Haasl, Linda Irvine Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. Portland, Oregon Donald Frey Architectural Energy Corporation Boulder.... The building was retrocommissioned by Portland Energy Conservation, Inc. (PECI), in conjunction with Architectural Energy Corporation (AEC). The building-specific goals were: 1) Obtain cost-effective energy savings from optimizing operation...

Luskay, L.; Haasl, T.; Irvine, L.; Frey, D.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

Alves, Alexandre; da Silva, Roberto

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs Boson Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as $M_H= 125.04\\pm 0.25$ GeV, a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel. Our findings suggest that a system of Higgs bosons undergoing a collective decay to Standard Model particles is among the most fundamental ones where the Maximum Entropy Principle applies.

Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

137

Maximum entanglement in squeezed boson and fermion states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A class of squeezed boson and fermion states is studied with particular emphasis on the nature of entanglement. We first investigate the case of bosons, considering two-mode squeezed states. Then we construct the fermion version to show that such states are maximum entangled, for both bosons and fermions. To achieve these results, we demonstrate some relations involving squeezed boson states. The generalization to the case of fermions is made by using Grassmann variables.

Khanna, F. C. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, J. M. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santana, A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santos, E. S. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia, 40030-010, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

138

Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, cancels DOE P 310.1.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

139

Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

A. T. Bajkova

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

140

Occam's Razor Cuts Away the Maximum Entropy Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I show that the maximum entropy principle can be replaced by a more natural assumption, that there exists a phenomenological function of entropy consistent with the microscopic model. The requirement of existence provides then a unique construction of the related probability density. I conclude the letter with an axiomatic formulation of the notion of entropy, which is suitable for exploration of the non-equilibrium phenomena.

Rudnicki, ?ukasz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PNNL: A Supervised Maximum Entropy Approach to Word Sense Disambiguation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we described the PNNL Word Sense Disambiguation system as applied to the English All-Word task in Se-mEval 2007. We use a supervised learning approach, employing a large number of features and using Information Gain for dimension reduction. Our Maximum Entropy approach combined with a rich set of features produced results that are significantly better than baseline and are the highest F-score for the fined-grained English All-Words subtask.

Tratz, Stephen C.; Sanfilippo, Antonio P.; Gregory, Michelle L.; Chappell, Alan R.; Posse, Christian; Whitney, Paul D.

2007-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

142

Some interesting consequences of the maximum entropy production principle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two nonequilibrium phase transitions (morphological and hydrodynamic) are analyzed by applying the maximum entropy production principle. Quantitative analysis is for the first time compared with experiment. Nonequilibrium crystallization of ice and laminar-turbulent flow transition in a circular pipe are examined as examples of morphological and hydrodynamic transitions, respectively. For the latter transition, a minimum critical Reynolds number of 1200 is predicted. A discussion of this important and interesting result is presented.

Martyushev, L. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Industrial Ecology, Ural Division (Russian Federation)], E-mail: mlm@ecko.uran.ru

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE Publishes Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

a new report, SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning. The report was created in response to requests from utilities and energy efficiency...

144

aom efficacy study: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

variations in poor localities influence the capacity for community efficacy. Through a multivariate analysis using 497 households in poor localities of Addis Ababa, we...

145

Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out-of-equilibrium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1957). J. Skilling, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,4552. J. Skilling, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,e C. C. Rodriguez, in Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods,

Crooks, Gavin E.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Deriving the continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions via variational analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and V. J. DellaPietra, A maximum entropy approach to naturalJ. and R. K. Bryan, Maximum entropy image reconstruction:Heidelberg, Continuity of maximum-entropy basis functions p

Sukumar, N.; Wets, R. J. -B.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Maximum likelihood reconstruction for the Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino experiment is designed to precisely determine the neutrino mixing angle theta13. In this paper, we report a maximum likelihood (ML) method to reconstruct the vertex and energy of events in the anti-neutrino detector, based on a simplified optical model that describes light propagation. We calibrate the key paramters of the optical model with Co60 source, by comparing the predicted charges of the PMTs with the observed charges. With the optimized parameters, the resolution of the vertex reconstruction is about 25cm for Co60 gamma.

Xia Dongmei

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

148

Better Nonlinear Models from Noisy Data: Attractors with Maximum Likelihood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A new approach to nonlinear modelling is presented which, by incorporating the global behaviour of the model, lifts shortcomings of both least squares and total least squares parameter estimates. Although ubiquitous in practice, a least squares approach is fundamentally flawed in that it assumes independent, normally distributed (IND) forecast errors: nonlinear models will not yield IND errors even if the noise is IND. A new cost function is obtained via the maximum likelihood principle; superior results are illustrated both for small data sets and infinitely long data streams.

Patrick E. McSharry; Leonard A. Smith

1999-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Application of Maximum Entropy Method to Dynamical Fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Maximum Entropy Method is applied to dynamical fermion simulations of the (2+1)-dimensional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model. This model is particularly interesting because at T=0 it has a broken phase with a rich spectrum of mesonic bound states and a symmetric phase where there are resonances, and hence the simple pole assumption of traditional fitting procedures breaks down. We present results extracted from simulations on large lattices for the spectral functions of the elementary fermion, the pion, the sigma, the massive pseudoscalar meson and the symmetric phase resonances.

Jonathan Clowser; Costas Strouthos

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

150

Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, at least in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, for then it provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

Gregor Chliamovitch; Alexandre Dupuis; Bastien Chopard; Anton Golub

2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

151

Reducing Degeneracy in Maximum Entropy Models of Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on Jaynes's maximum entropy principle, exponential random graphs provide a family of principled models that allow the prediction of network properties as constrained by empirical data. However, their use is often hindered by the degeneracy problem characterized by spontaneous symmetry-breaking, where predictions simply fail. Here we show that degeneracy appears when the corresponding density of states function is not log-concave. We propose a solution to the degeneracy problem for a large class of models by exploiting the nonlinear relationships between the constrained measures to convexify the domain of the density of states. We demonstrate the effectiveness of the method on examples, including on Zachary's karate club network data.

Horvt, Szabolcs; Toroczkai, Zoltn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Improving predictability of time series using maximum entropy methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss how maximum entropy methods may be applied to the reconstruction of Markov processes underlying empirical time series and compare this approach to usual frequency sampling. It is shown that, at least in low dimension, there exists a subset of the space of stochastic matrices for which the MaxEnt method is more efficient than sampling, in the sense that shorter historical samples have to be considered to reach the same accuracy. Considering short samples is of particular interest when modelling smoothly non-stationary processes, for then it provides, under some conditions, a powerful forecasting tool. The method is illustrated for a discretized empirical series of exchange rates.

Chliamovitch, Gregor; Chopard, Bastien; Golub, Anton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Excited nucleon spectrum from lattice QCD with maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study excited states of the nucleon in quenched lattice QCD with the spectral analysis using the maximum entropy method. Our simulations are performed on three lattice sizes $16^3\\times 32$, $24^3\\times 32$ and $32^3\\times 32$, at $\\beta=6.0$ to address the finite volume issue. We find a significant finite volume effect on the mass of the Roper resonance for light quark masses. After removing this systematic error, its mass becomes considerably reduced toward the direction to solve the level order puzzle between the Roper resonance $N'(1440)$ and the negative-parity nucleon $N^*(1535)$.

K. Sasaki; S. Sasaki; T. Hatsuda; M. Asakawa

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

154

Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLE Cost-Efficacy in Wetland Restoration Projects in Coastal Louisiana Joy Merino & Christiane, such as wetland loss, influence CWPPRA project selection for funding. We found that the program was selecting cost- effective projects overall. Cost efficacy varied significantly by restoration project type, with barrier

155

Ionization and maximum energy of nuclei in shock acceleration theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the acceleration of heavy nuclei at SNR shocks when the process of ionization is taken into account. Heavy atoms ($Z_N >$ few) in the interstellar medium which start the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) are never fully ionized at the moment of injection. The ionization occurs during the acceleration process, when atoms already move relativistically. For typical environment around SNRs the photo-ionization due to the background galactic radiation dominates over Coulomb collisions. The main consequence of ionization is the reduction of the maximum energy which ions can achieve with respect to the standard result of the DSA. In fact the photo-ionization has a timescale comparable to the beginning of the Sedov-Taylor phase, hence the maximum energy is no more proportional to the nuclear charge, as predicted by standard DSA, but rather to the effective ions' charge during the acceleration process, which is smaller than the total nuclear charge $Z_N$. This result can have a direct consequence in the pred...

Morlino, Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Maximum surface level and temperature histories for Hanford waste tanks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive defense waste resulting from the chemical processing of spent nuclear fuel has been accumulating at the Hanford Site since 1944. This waste is stored in underground waste-storage tanks. The Hanford Site Tank Farm Facilities Interim Safety Basis (ISB) provides a ready reference to the safety envelope for applicable tank farm facilities and installations. During preparation of the ISB, tank structural integrity concerns were identified as a key element in defining the safety envelope. These concerns, along with several deficiencies in the technical bases associated with the structural integrity issues and the corresponding operational limits/controls specified for conduct of normal tank farm operations are documented in the ISB. Consequently, a plan was initiated to upgrade the safety envelope technical bases by conducting Accelerated Safety Analyses-Phase 1 (ASA-Phase 1) sensitivity studies and additional structural evaluations. The purpose of this report is to facilitate the ASA-Phase 1 studies and future analyses of the single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs) by compiling a quantitative summary of some of the past operating conditions the tanks have experienced during their existence. This report documents the available summaries of recorded maximum surface levels and maximum waste temperatures and references other sources for more specific data.

Flanagan, B.D.; Ha, N.D.; Huisingh, J.S.

1994-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

Probing stellar winds and accretion physics in high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources with LOFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a White Paper in support of the mission concept of the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT), proposed as a medium-sized ESA mission. We discuss the potential of LOFT for the study of high-mass X-ray binaries and ultra-luminous X-ray sources. For a summary, we refer to the paper.

Orlandini, M; Zampieri, L; Bozzo, E; Baykal, A; Blay, P; Chernyakova, M; Corbet, R; D'A, A; Enoto, T; Ferrigno, C; Finger, M; Klochkov, D; Kreykenbohm, I; Inam, S C; Jenke, P; Masetti, N; Manousakis, A; Mihara, T; Paul, B; Postnov, K; Reig, P; Romano, P; Santangelo, A; Shakura, N; Staubert, R; Torrejn, J M; Walter, R; Wilms, J; Wilson-Hodge, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

159

Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fracture Toughness and Maximum Stress in a Disordered Lattice System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fracture in a disordered lattice system is studied. In our system, particles are initially arranged on the triangular lattice and each nearest-neighbor pair is connected with a randomly chosen soft or hard Hookean spring. Every spring has the common threshold of stress at which it is cut. We make an initial crack and expand the system perpendicularly to the crack. We find that the maximum stress in the stress-strain curve is larger than those in the systems with soft or hard springs only (uniform systems). Energy required to advance fracture is also larger in some disordered systems, which indicates that the fracture toughness improves. The increase of the energy is caused by the following two factors. One is that the soft spring is able to hold larger energy than the hard one. The other is that the number of cut springs increases as the fracture surface becomes tortuous in disordered systems.

Chiyori Urabe; Shinji Takesue

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Maximum Margin Clustering for State Decomposition of Metastable Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When studying a metastable dynamical system, a prime concern is how to decompose the phase space into a set of metastable states. Unfortunately, the metastable state decomposition based on simulation or experimental data is still a challenge. The most popular and simplest approach is geometric clustering which is developed based on the classical clustering technique. However, the prerequisites of this approach are: (1) data are obtained from simulations or experiments which are in global equilibrium and (2) the coordinate system is appropriately selected. Recently, the kinetic clustering approach based on phase space discretization and transition probability estimation has drawn much attention due to its applicability to more general cases, but the choice of discretization policy is a difficult task. In this paper, a new decomposition method designated as maximum margin metastable clustering is proposed, which converts the problem of metastable state decomposition to a semi-supervised learning problem so that...

Wu, Hao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Improved Maximum Entropy Analysis with an Extended Search Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) follows Bryan and deploys a Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) to limit the dimensionality of the underlying solution space apriori. Here we present arguments based on the shape of the SVD basis functions and numerical evidence from a mock data analysis, which show that the correct Bayesian solution is not in general recovered with this approach. As a remedy we propose to extend the search basis systematically, which will eventually recover the full solution space and the correct solution. In order to adequately approach problems where an exponentially damped kernel is used, we provide an open-source implementation, using the C/C++ language that utilizes high precision arithmetic adjustable at run-time. The LBFGS algorithm is included in the code in order to attack problems without the need to resort to a particular search space restriction.

Alexander Rothkopf

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Quantum maximum entropy principle for a system of identical particles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By introducing a functional of the reduced density matrix, we generalize the definition of a quantum entropy which incorporates the indistinguishability principle of a system of identical particles. With the present definition, the principle of quantum maximum entropy permits us to solve the closure problem for a quantum hydrodynamic set of balance equations corresponding to an arbitrary number of moments in the framework of extended thermodynamics. The determination of the reduced Wigner function for equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions is found to become possible only by assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2}. Quantum contributions are expressed in powers of (Planck constant/2pi){sup 2} while classical results are recovered in the limit (Planck constant/2pi)->0.

Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Savannah River Site radioiodine atmospheric releases and offsite maximum doses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioisotopes of iodine have been released to the atmosphere from the Savannah River Site since 1955. The releases, mostly from the 200-F and 200-H Chemical Separations areas, consist of the isotopes, I-129 and 1-131. Small amounts of 1-131 and 1-133 have also been released from reactor facilities and the Savannah River Laboratory. This reference memorandum was issued to summarize our current knowledge of releases of radioiodines and resultant maximum offsite doses. This memorandum supplements the reference memorandum by providing more detailed supporting technical information. Doses reported in this memorandum from consumption of the milk containing the highest I-131 concentration following the 1961 1-131 release incident are about 1% higher than reported in the reference memorandum. This is the result of using unrounded 1-131 concentrations of I-131 in milk in this memo. It is emphasized here that this technical report does not constitute a dose reconstruction in the same sense as the dose reconstruction effort currently underway at Hanford. This report uses existing published data for radioiodine releases and existing transport and dosimetry models.

Marter, W.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Maximum Entropy Analysis of the Spectral Functions in Lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First principle calculation of the QCD spectral functions (SPFs) based on the lattice QCD simulations is reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the Bayesian inference theory and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM), which is a useful tool to extract SPFs from the imaginary-time correlation functions numerically obtained by the Monte Carlo method. Three important aspects of MEM are (i) it does not require a priori assumptions or parametrizations of SPFs, (ii) for given data, a unique solution is obtained if it exists, and (iii) the statistical significance of the solution can be quantitatively analyzed. The ability of MEM is explicitly demonstrated by using mock data as well as lattice QCD data. When applied to lattice data, MEM correctly reproduces the low-energy resonances and shows the existence of high-energy continuum in hadronic correlation functions. This opens up various possibilities for studying hadronic properties in QCD beyond the conventional way of analyzing the lattice data. Future problems to be studied by MEM in lattice QCD are also summarized.

M. Asakawa; T. Hatsuda; Y. Nakahara

2001-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

167

Improved Maximum Entropy Method with an Extended Search Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on an improvement to the implementation of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM). It amounts to departing from the search space obtained through a singular value decomposition (SVD) of the Kernel. Based on the shape of the SVD basis functions we argue that the MEM spectrum for given $N_\\tau$ data-points $D(\\tau)$ and prior information $m(\\omega)$ does not in general lie in this $N_\\tau$ dimensional singular subspace. Systematically extending the search basis will eventually recover the full search space and the correct extremum. We illustrate this idea through a mock data analysis inspired by actual lattice spectra, to show where our improvement becomes essential for the success of the MEM. To remedy the shortcomings of Bryan's SVD prescription we propose to use the real Fourier basis, which consists of trigonometric functions. Not only does our approach lead to more stable numerical behavior, as the SVD is not required for the determination of the basis functions, but also the resolution of the MEM becomes independent from the position of the reconstructed peaks.

Alexander Rothkopf

2012-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

168

Maximum entropy detection of planets around active stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(shortened for arXiv) We aim to progress towards more efficient exoplanet detection around active stars by optimizing the use of Doppler Imaging in radial velocity measurements. We propose a simple method to simultaneously extract a brightness map and a set of orbital parameters through a tomographic inversion technique derived from classical Doppler mapping. Based on the maximum entropy principle, the underlying idea is to determine the set of orbital parameters that minimizes the information content of the resulting Doppler map. We carry out a set of numerical simulations to perform a preliminary assessment of the robustness of our method, using an actual Doppler map of the very active star HR 1099 to produce a realistic synthetic data set for various sets of orbital parameters of a single planet in a circular orbit. Using a simulated time-series of 50 line profiles affected by a peak-to-peak activity jitter of 2.5 km/s, we are able in most cases to recover the radial velocity amplitude, orbital phase and o...

Petit, P; Hbrard, E; Morin, J; Folsom, C P; Bhm, T; Boisse, I; Borgniet, S; Bouvier, J; Delfosse, X; Hussain, G; Jeffers, S V; Marsden, S C; Barnes, J R

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES WITH THE SUBMILLIMETER ARRAY. IV. {sup 12}CO J = 6-5 OBSERVATIONS OF VV 114  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present high-resolution (?2.''5) observations of {sup 12}CO J = 6-5 toward the luminous infrared galaxy VV 114 using the Submillimeter Array. We detect {sup 12}CO J = 6-5 emission from the eastern nucleus of VV 114 but do not detect the western nucleus or the central region. We combine the new {sup 12}CO J = 6-5 observations with previously published or archival low-J CO observations, which include {sup 13}CO J = 1-0 Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array cycle 0 observations, to analyze the beam-averaged physical conditions of the molecular gas in the eastern nucleus. We use the radiative transfer code RADEX and a Bayesian likelihood code to constrain the temperature (T{sub kin}), density (n{sub H{sub 2}}), and column density (N{sub {sup 1}{sup 2}CO}) of the molecular gas. We find that the most probable scenario for the eastern nucleus is a cold (T{sub kin} = 38 K), moderately dense (n{sub H{sub 2}} = 10{sup 2.89} cm{sup 3}) molecular gas component. We find that the most probable {sup 12}CO to {sup 13}CO abundance ratio ([{sup 12}CO]/[{sup 13}CO]) is 229, which is roughly three times higher than the Milky Way value. This high abundance ratio may explain the observed high {sup 12}CO/ {sup 13}CO line ratio (>25). The unusual {sup 13}CO J = 2-1/J = 1-0 line ratio of 0.6 is produced by a combination of moderate {sup 13}CO optical depths (? = 0.4-1.1) and extremely subthermal excitation temperatures. We measure the CO-to-H{sub 2} conversion factor, ?{sub CO}, to be 0.5{sup +0.6}{sub -0.3} M{sub ?} (K km s{sup 1} pc{sup 2}){sup 1}, which agrees with the widely used factor for ultra luminous infrared galaxies of Downes and Solomon (?{sub CO} = 0.8 M{sub ?} (K km s{sup 1} pc{sup 2}){sup 1})

Sliwa, Kazimierz; Wilson, Christine D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Krips, Melanie [Institut de Radio Astronomie Millimetrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, Domaine Universitaire, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); Petitpas, Glen R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Iono, Daisuke [Chile Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Juvela, Mika [University of Helsinki, FI-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Matsushita, Satoki [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Peck, Alison [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Yun, Min, E-mail: sliwak@mcmaster.ca, E-mail: wilson@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: krips@iram.fr, E-mail: gpetitpa@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: d.iono@nao.ac.jp, E-mail: mika.juvela@helsinki.fi, E-mail: satoki@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: apeck@alma.cl, E-mail: myun@astro.umass.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

Tunable THz Generation by the Interaction of a Super-luminous Laser Pulse with Biased Semiconductor Plasma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terahertz (THz) radiation is electromagnetic radiation in the range between several hundred and a few thousand GHz. It covers the gap between fast-wave electronics (millimeter waves) and optics (infrared). This spectral region offers enormous potential for detection of explosives and chemical/biological agents, non-destructive testing of non-metallic structural materials and coatings of aircraft structures, medical imaging, bio-sensing of DNA stretching modes and high-altitude secure communications. The development of these applications has been hindered by the lack of powerful, tunable THz sources with controlled waveform. The need for such sources is accentuated by the strong, but selective absorption of THz radiation during transmission through air with high vapor content. The majority of the current experimental work relies on time-domain spectroscopy using fast electrically biased photoconductive sources in conjunction with femto-second mode-locked Ti:Sapphire lasers. These sources known as Large Aperture Photoconductive Antennas (LAPA) have very limited tunability, relatively low upper bound of power and no bandwidth control. The paper presents a novel source of THz radiation known as Miniature Photoconductive Capacitor Array (MPCA). Experiments demonstrated tunability between .1 - 2 THz, control of the relative bandwidth {delta}f/f between .5-.01, and controlled pulse length and pulse waveform (temporal shape, chirp, pulse-to-pulse modulation etc.). Direct scaling from the current device indicates efficiency in excess of 30% at 1 THz with 1/f2 scaling at higher frequencies, peak power of 100 kW and average power between .1-1 W. The physics underlying the MPCA is the interaction of a super-luminous ionization front generated by the oblique incidence of a Ti:Sapphire laser pulse on a semiconductor crystal (ZnSe) biased with an alternating electrostatic field, similar to that of a frozen wave generator. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the interaction results in the emission of an electromagnetic wave at the plasma frequency of the ionization front. The device resembles the well-known DARC plasma device with two significant differences. First, the frozen wave is on a semiconductor crystal and not on a gas (Azulene Vapor). Second, the ionizing front is super-luminous. These differences result in a device with superior tunability, efficiency, compactness and flexibility. The paper concludes with examples of THz imaging using the MPCA.

Papadopoulos, K. [BAE Systems-ATI, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 (United States); Zigler, A. [BAE Systems-ATI, Hebrew University (Israel)

2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microneedle delivery for improved efficacy of antiretroviral and antibiotic drugs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two classes of drugs, antiretrovirals and antibiotics, could benefit greatly from delivery through microneedles. Microneedles (MN) offer an increase in efficacy for these drugs by providing delivery to the lymphatic system ...

Stauber, Zachary Jason

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Efficacy of 45 lm/W Achieved in White OLED  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Universal Display Corporation (UDC) successfully demonstrated an all phosphorescent white organic light emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 45 lm/W at 1,000 cd/m2. This high-efficacy device was enabled by lowering the device operating voltage, increasing the outcoupling efficiency to ~40% from ~20%, and by incorporating highly efficient phosphorescent emitters that are capable of converting nearly all current passing through a WOLED into light.

173

Feedback-Driven Evolution of the Far-Infrared Spectral Energy Distributions of Luminous and Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from simulations of major galaxy mergers and study the effect of AGN and starburst driven feedback on the evolution of the SED as a function of time. We use a self-consistent three-dimensional radiative equilibrium code to calculate the emergent SEDs and to make images. To facilitate a simple description of our findings, we describe our results in reference to an approximate analytic solution for the far-IR SED. We focus mainly on the luminous infrared galaxy (LIRG) and ultraluminous infrared galaxy (ULIRG) phases of evolution. We contrast the SEDs of simulations performed with AGN feedback to simulations performed with starburst driven wind feedback. We find that the feedback processes critically determine the evolution of the SED. Changing the source of illumination (whether stellar or AGN) has virtually no impact on the reprocessed far-infrared SED. We find that AGN feedback is particularly effective at dispersing gas and rapidly injecting energy into the ISM. The observational signature of such powerful feedback is a warm SED. In general, simulations performed with starburst driven winds have colder spectra and reprocess more of their emission into the infrared, resulting in higher infrared to bolometric luminosities compared to (otherwise equivalent) simulations performed with AGN feedback. We depict our results in IRAS bands, as well as in Spitzer's MIPS bands, and in Herschel's PACS bands.

Sukanya Chakrabarti; T. J. Cox; Lars Hernquist; Philip F. Hopkins; Brant Robertson; Tiziana Di Matteo

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

NEAR-INFRARED ADAPTIVE OPTICS IMAGING OF INFRARED LUMINOUS GALAXIES: THE BRIGHTEST CLUSTER MAGNITUDE-STAR FORMATION RATE RELATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have established a relation between the brightest super star cluster (SSC) magnitude in a galaxy and the host star formation rate (SFR) for the first time in the near-infrared (NIR). The data come from a statistical sample of ?40 luminous IR galaxies (LIRGs) and starbursts utilizing K-band adaptive optics imaging. While expanding the observed relation to longer wavelengths, less affected by extinction effects, it also pushes to higher SFRs. The relation we find, M{sub K} ? 2.6log SFR, is similar to that derived previously in the optical and at lower SFRs. It does not, however, fit the optical relation with a single optical to NIR color conversion, suggesting systematic extinction and/or age effects. While the relation is broadly consistent with a size-of-sample explanation, we argue physical reasons for the relation are likely as well. In particular, the scatter in the relation is smaller than expected from pure random sampling strongly suggesting physical constraints. We also derive a quantifiable relation tying together cluster-internal effects and host SFR properties to possibly explain the observed brightest SSC magnitude versus SFR dependency.

Randriamanakoto, Z.; Visnen, P. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, 7935 Observatory, Cape Town (South Africa); Escala, A. [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Kankare, E.; Kotilainen, J.; Mattila, S. [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vislntie 20, FI-21500 Piikki (Finland)] [Finnish Centre for Astronomy with ESO (FINCA), University of Turku, Vislntie 20, FI-21500 Piikki (Finland); Ryder, S., E-mail: zara@saao.ac.za [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Study of Different Implementation Approaches for a Maximum Power Point Florent Boico Brad Lehman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will study the design of a maximum power point tracker for low power solar panels (10-50W). In the process weStudy of Different Implementation Approaches for a Maximum Power Point Tracker 1 Florent Boico Brad Lehman Northeastern University Abstract: This paper studies the design of a Maximum Power Point Tracker

Lehman, Brad

176

A Maximum Entropy Algorithm for Rhythmic Analysis of Genome-Wide Expression Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Maximum Entropy Algorithm for Rhythmic Analysis of Genome-Wide Expression Patterns Christopher James Langmead C. Robertson McClung Bruce Randall Donald ,,,§,¶ Abstract We introduce a maximum entropy-based spectral analysis, maximum entropy spectral reconstruction is well suited to signals of the type generated

Richardson, David

177

1 A MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD FOR SUBNETWORK ORIGIN-DESTINATION 2 TRIP MATRIX ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD FOR SUBNETWORK ORIGIN-DESTINATION 2 TRIP MATRIX ESTIMATION 3 4 Chi Xie 5, maximum entropy, linearization 36 algorithm, column generation 37 #12;C. Xie, K.M. Kockelman and S is the trip matrix of the simplified network. This paper discusses a5 maximum entropy method

Kockelman, Kara M.

178

Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches to the ratio problem Edward Z. Shen* Jeffrey M. Perloff** January 2001 Abstract Maximum entropy and Bayesian approaches provide superior estimates of a ratio extra information in the supports for the underlying parameters for generalized maximum entropy (GME

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

179

Comparison of Maximum Entropy and Higher-Order Entropy Estimators Amos Golan* and Jeffrey M. Perloff**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Comparison of Maximum Entropy and Higher-Order Entropy Estimators Amos Golan* and Jeffrey M. Perloff** ABSTRACT We show that the generalized maximum entropy (GME) is the only estimation method- classes of estimators may outperform the GME estimation rule. Keywords: generalized entropy, maximum

Perloff, Jeffrey M.

180

A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin-destination trip matrix estimation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A maximum entropy-least squares estimator for elastic origin- destination trip matrix estimation propose a combined maximum entropy-least squares (ME-LS) estimator, by which O- D flows are distributed-destination trip table; elastic demand; maximum entropy; least squares; subnetwork analysis; convex combination

Kockelman, Kara M.

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181

THE MAXIMUM ENERGY OF ACCELERATED PARTICLES IN RELATIVISTIC COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The afterglow emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is usually interpreted as synchrotron radiation from electrons accelerated at the GRB external shock that propagates with relativistic velocities into the magnetized interstellar medium. By means of multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we investigate the acceleration performance of weakly magnetized relativistic shocks, in the magnetization range 0 {approx}< {sigma} {approx}< 10{sup -1}. The pre-shock magnetic field is orthogonal to the flow, as generically expected for relativistic shocks. We find that relativistic perpendicular shocks propagating in electron-positron plasmas are efficient particle accelerators if the magnetization is {sigma} {approx}< 10{sup -3}. For electron-ion plasmas, the transition to efficient acceleration occurs for {sigma} {approx}< 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5}. Here, the acceleration process proceeds similarly for the two species, since the electrons enter the shock nearly in equipartition with the ions, as a result of strong pre-heating in the self-generated upstream turbulence. In both electron-positron and electron-ion shocks, we find that the maximum energy of the accelerated particles scales in time as {epsilon}{sub max}{proportional_to}t {sup 1/2}. This scaling is shallower than the so-called (and commonly assumed) Bohm limit {epsilon}{sub max}{proportional_to}t, and it naturally results from the small-scale nature of the Weibel turbulence generated in the shock layer. In magnetized plasmas, the energy of the accelerated particles increases until it reaches a saturation value {epsilon}{sub sat}/{gamma}{sub 0} m{sub i}c {sup 2} {approx} {sigma}{sup -1/4}, where {gamma}{sub 0} m{sub i}c {sup 2} is the mean energy per particle in the upstream bulk flow. Further energization is prevented by the fact that the self-generated turbulence is confined within a finite region of thickness {proportional_to}{sigma}{sup -1/2} around the shock. Our results can provide physically grounded inputs for models of non-thermal emission from a variety of astrophysical sources, with particular relevance to GRB afterglows.

Sironi, Lorenzo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Spitkovsky, Anatoly [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Arons, Jonathan, E-mail: lsironi@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astronomy, Department of Physics, and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

Infrared 3-4 Micron Spectroscopy of Infrared Luminous Galaxies with Possible Signatures of Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of infrared 2.8-4.1 micron (L-band) spectroscopy of nearby infrared luminous galaxies with possible signatures of dust-obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in data at other wavelengths. The samples are chosen to include sources with a radio excess relative to far-infrared emission, strong absorption features in mid-infrared 5-11.5 micron spectra, unusually weak [CII] 158 micron emission relative to the far-infrared continuum, and radio galaxies classified optically as narrow-line objects. Our aim is to investigate whether the signatures of possible obscured AGNs can be detected in our L-band spectra, based on the strengths of emission and absorption features. Six of nine observed sources clearly show 3.3 micron polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, a good starburst indicator. An absorption feature at 3.1 micron due to ice-covered dust is detected in IRAS 04154+1755 and IRAS 17208-0014. The signature of a bare carbonaceous dust absorption feature at 3.4 micron is seen in NGC 1377. Our L-band spectra reveal strong signatures of obscured AGNs in all three optical Seyfert 2 galaxies (IRAS 04154+1755, Cygnus A, and 3C 234), and two galaxies classified optically as non-Seyferts (NGC 828 and NGC 1377). Among the remaining optical non-Seyferts, IRAS 17208-0014 might also show a buried AGN signature, whereas no explicit AGN evidence is seen in the L-band spectra of the mid-infrared absorption-feature source IRAS 15250+3609, and two weak [CII] emitters IC 860 and CGCG 1510.8+0725.

Masatoshi Imanishi

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Phosphors for near UV-Emitting LED's for Efficacious Generation of White Light  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

1) We studied phosphors for near-UV (nUV) LED application as an alternative to blue LEDs currently being used in SSL systems. We have shown that nUV light sources could be very efficient at high current and will have significantly less binning at both the chip and phosphor levels. We identified phosphor blends that could yield 4100K lamps with a CRI of approximately 80 and LPWnUV,opt equal to 179 for the best performing phosphor blend. Considering the fact that the lamps were not optimized for light coupling, the results are quite impressive. The main bottleneck is an optimum blue phosphor with a peak near 440 nm with a full width half maximum of about 25 nm and a quantum efficiency of >95%. Unfortunately, that may be a very difficult task when we want to excite a phosphor at ~400 nm with a very small margin for Stokes shift. Another way is to have all the phosphors in the blend having the excitation peak at 400 nm or slightly shorter wavelength. This could lead to a white light source with no body color and optimum efficacy due to no self-absorption effects by phosphors in the blend. This is even harder than finding an ideal blue phosphor, but not necessarily impossible. 2) With the phosphor blends identified, light sources using nUV LEDs at high current could be designed with comparable efficacy to those using blue LEDs. It will allow us to design light sources with multiple wattages using the same chips and phosphor blends simply by varying the input current. In the case of blue LEDs, this is not currently possible because varying the current will lower the efficacy at high current and alter the color point. With improvement of phosphor blends, control over CRI could improve. Less binning at the chip level and also at the phosphor blend level could reduce the cost of SSL light sources. 3) This study provided a deeper understanding of phosphor characteristics needed for LEDs in general and nUV LEDs in particular. Two students received Ph.D. degrees and three undergraduates participated in this work. Two of the undergraduate students are now in graduate school. The results were widely disseminated 20 archival journal publications (published, accepted or in preparation) and three conference proceedings resulted. The students presented their work at 11 different national/international conferences (32 oral or poster presentations) and the PIs delivered 12 invited, keynote or plenary lectures.

McKittrick, Joanna

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cree Sets New Benchmarks for LED Efficacy and Brightness  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Cree has successfully created a cool white LED prototype that delivers 107 lm/W at 350mA. This achievement builds on the Cree EZBright LED chip platform, developed in part with prior funding support from DOE. Cree made the prototype LED under their DOE project focused on developing LED chips incorporating photonic crystal elements for improved light extraction and novel package technology for higher down-conversion efficiency compared to conventional LEDs. Based on a 1 millimeter-square chip, the new prototype LED produces white light with a CCT of 5500K and a CRI of 73. Integration of four of these prototype LEDs can produce luminous flux of more than 450 lumens.

186

Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Formalizing Concepts for Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred.lohrmann,manfred.reichert}@uni-ulm.de Abstract. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal business process management concepts yet. Moreover, process models are currently not sufficiently

Ulm, Universität

187

LANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The top three panels correspond to the southern segment of the solar minimum orbit; repeated passesLANGMUIR WAVE ACTIVITY: COMPARING THE ULYSSES SOLAR MINIMUM AND SOLAR MAXIMUM ORBITS R. J at the electron plasma frequency) during the solar minimum and solar maximum orbits of Ulysses. At high latitudes

California at Berkeley, University of

188

Comparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

second fast latitude scan (near the solar maximum) with the wave observations during the first fast Experiments (URAP) of Ulysses during its first orbit, which occurred when the solar activity was approachingComparison of VLF Wave Activity in the Solar Wind During Solar Maximum and Minimum: Ulysses

California at Berkeley, University of

189

On the duration of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum Ursula Rohl and Thomas Westerhold  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the duration of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) Ursula Ro¨hl and Thomas Westerhold of California, Santa Cruz, California 95064, USA [1] The Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum (PETM) is one of global warming and a massive perturbation of the global carbon cycle from injection of isotopically light

Zachos, James

190

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Optimal Randomized Algorithm for Maximum Tukey Depth Timothy M. Chan Abstract We present the first optimal algorithm to compute the maximum Tukey depth (also known as location or halfspace depth , the Tukey depth of a point q IRd is defined as: min{|P | : over all halfspaces containing q}. We

Chan, Timothy M.

191

Beating the maximum cooling limit with graded thermoelectric materials Zhixi Bian and Ali Shakouria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1063/1.2396895 The maximum cooling temperature is one of the perfor- mance parameters for a thermoelectric module. ExcludingBeating the maximum cooling limit with graded thermoelectric materials Zhixi Bian and Ali Shakouria cooling of a single element thermoelectric material cannot be improved by changing its geometry.3

192

Maximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chargers do not perform the maximum power point tracking [2], [3] of the solar panel. We excludeMaximum Power Transfer Tracking in a Solar USB Charger for Smartphones Abstract--Battery life poor capacity utilization during solar energy harvesting. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate

Pedram, Massoud

193

Maximum-Power-Point Tracking Method of Photovoltaic Using Only Single Current Sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar cell systems Abstract This paper describes a novel strategy of maximum-power-point tracking point using only a single current sensor, i.e., a Hall-effect CT. Output power of the photovoltaic can-climbing method is employed to seek the maximum power point, using the output power obtained from only the current

Fujimoto, Hiroshi

194

Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Vegetation and Fire at the Last Glacial Maximum in Tropical South America Francis E temperatures. Keywords Charcoal · Last Glacial Maximum · pollen · Quaternary · tropical South America F-mail: Francis.Mayle@ed.ac.uk 89F. Vimeux et al. (eds.), Past Climate Variability in South America

Binford, Michael W.

195

A Basic Thermodynamic Derivation of the Maximum Overburden Pressure Generated in Frost Heave  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

can derive the maximum overburden pressure. A similar argument can also produce the maximum Heave Engine Frost heave is a common environmental process in which the freezing of water into ice can produce forces large enough to seriously damage roads and bridges [1]. Contrary to common belief, frost

Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

196

Frequency Moments Inverse Problem and Maximum (Shannon vs. R enyi-Tsallis) Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) maximization of Shannon's entropy (MaxEnt), b) maximization of R#19;enyi-Tsallis entropy (maxTent). ConcerningEnt 4 1.2 Aims 5 2 Frequency moment constraints 5 2.1 Characteristics of MaxEnt choice 6 2.2 Maximum RFrequency Moments Inverse Problem and Maximum (Shannon vs. R#19;enyi-Tsallis) Entropy #3; A case

197

How Is the Maximum Entropy of a Quantized Surface Related to Its Area?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The maximum entropy of a quantized surface is demonstrated to be proportional to the surface area in the classical limit. The result is valid in loop quantum gravity, and in a somewhat more general class of approaches to surface quantization. The maximum entropy is calculated explicitly for some specific cases.

I. B. Khriplovich; R. V. Korkin

2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Maximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we show that the maximum conversion efficiency is limited further by the excited state entropyMaximum Theoretical Efficiency Limit of Photovoltaic Devices: Effect of Band Structure on Excited State Entropy Frank E. Osterloh* Department of Chemistry, University of CaliforniaDavis, One Shields

Osterloh, Frank

199

Unification of Field Theory and Maximum Entropy Methods for Learning Probability Densities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bayesian field theory and maximum entropy are two methods for learning smooth probability distributions (a.k.a. probability densities) from finite sampled data. Both methods were inspired by statistical physics, but the relationship between them has remained unclear. Here I show that Bayesian field theory subsumes maximum entropy density estimation. In particular, the most common maximum entropy methods are shown to be limiting cases of Bayesian inference using field theory priors that impose no boundary conditions on candidate densities. This unification provides a natural way to test the validity of the maximum entropy assumption on one's data. It also provides a better-fitting nonparametric density estimate when the maximum entropy assumption is rejected.

Kinney, Justin B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Efficacy of polymeric encapsulated C5a peptidasebased group B streptococcus vaccines in a murine model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficacy of polymeric encapsulated C5a peptidase­based group B streptococcus vaccines in a murine the efficacy of vari- ous polymeric-encapsulated C5a peptidase vaccine formulations in eliciting a long al. Efficacy of polymeric encapsulated C5a peptidase­based group B streptococcus vaccines in a murine

Salem, Aliasger K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Unified Energy-Reservoir Model Containing Contributions from $^{56}$Ni and Neutron Stars and Its Implication to Luminous Type Ic Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Most type-Ic core-collapse supernovae (CCSNe) produce $^{56}$Ni and neutron stars (NSs) or black holes (BHs). The dipole radiation of nascent NSs has usually been neglected in explaining supernovae (SNe) with peak absolute magnitude $M_{\\rm peak}$ in any band are $\\gtrsim -19.5$~mag, while the $^{56}$Ni can be neglected in fitting most type-Ic superluminous supernovae (SLSNe Ic) whose $M_{\\rm peak}$ in any band are $\\lesssim -21$~mag, since the luminosity from a magnetar (highly magnetized NS) can outshine that from a moderate amount of $^{56}$Ni. For luminous SNe Ic with $-21 \\lesssim M_{\\rm peak}\\lesssim -19.5$~mag, however, both contributions from $^{56}$Ni and NSs cannot be neglected without serious modeling, since they are not SLSNe and the $^{56}$Ni mass could be up to $\\sim 0.5 M_{\\odot}$. In this paper we propose a unified model that contain contributions from both $^{56}$Ni and a nascent NS. We select three luminous SNe Ic-BL, SN~2010ay, SN~2006nx, and SN~14475, and show that, if these SNe are powere...

Wang, S Q; Dai, Z G; Wu, X F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

SSL Pricing and Efficacy Trend Analysis for Utility Program Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An LED lamp or luminaire can generally be found that matches or exceeds the efficacy of benchmark technologies in a given product category, and LED products continue to expand into ever-higher lumen output niches. However, the price premium for LED continues to pose a barrier to adoption in many applications, in spite of expected savings from reduced energy use and maintenance. Other factorssuch as dimmability and quality of lightcan also present challenges. The appropriate type, timing, and magnitude of energy efficiency activities will vary from organization to organization based on local variables and the method of evaluation. A number of factors merit consideration when prioritizing activities for development. Category-specific projections for pricing and efficacy are provided herein to assist in efficiency program planning efforts.

Tuenge, Jason R.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Microcontroller Servomotor for Maximum Effective Power Point for Solar Cell System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper a Maximum Power point (MPP) tracking algorithm is developed using dual-axis servomotor feedback tracking control system. An efficient and accurate servomotor system is used to increase the system efficiency and reduces the solar cell...

Al-Khalidy, M.; Al-Rawi, O.; Noaman, N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Achieving Consistent Maximum Brake Torque with Varied Injection Timing in a DI Diesel Engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the characteristics of combustion for swept injection timings along the maximum brake torque plateau are determined. The research is conducted by varying injection timing at constant engine speed and load while measuring engine emissions and in-cylinder pressure...

Kroeger, Timothy H

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

Delay Analysis of Maximum Weight Scheduling in Wireless Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper studies delay properties of the well-known maximum weight scheduling algorithm in wireless ad hoc networks. We consider wireless networks with either one-hop or multihop flows. Specifically, this paper shows ...

Modiano, Eytan H.

206

Tropical climate variability from the last glacial maximum to the present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis evaluates the nature and magnitude of tropical climate variability from the Last Glacial Maximum to the present. The temporal variability of two specific tropical climate phenomena is examined. The first is the ...

Dahl, Kristina Ariel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Dynamical Reconstruction of Upper-Ocean Conditions in the Last Glacial Maximum Atlantic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proxies indicate that the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) Atlantic Ocean was marked by increased meridional and zonal near sea surface temperature gradients relative to today. Using a least squares fit of a full general circulation ...

Wunsch, Carl

208

Atlantic Ocean circulation at the last glacial maximum : inferences from data and models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on ocean circulation and atmospheric forcing in the Atlantic Ocean at the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, 18-21 thousand years before present). Relative to the pre-industrial climate, LGM atmospheric CO? ...

Dail, Holly Janine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Submodule Integrated Distributed Maximum Power Point Tracking for Solar Photovoltaic Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper explores the benefits of distributed power electronics in solar photovoltaic applications through the use of submodule integrated maximum power point trackers (MPPT). We propose a system architecture that provides ...

Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert C. N.

210

Acoustic Space Dimensionality Selection and Combination using the Maximum Entropy Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we propose a discriminative approach to acoustic space dimensionality selection based on maximum entropy modelling. We form a set of constraints by composing the acoustic space with the space of phone classes, and use a continuous...

Abdel-Haleem, Yasser H; Renals, Steve; Lawrence, Neil D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Author's personal copy Unified behaviour of maximum soot yields of methane, ethane and propane the current study and the previous measurements in similar flames with methane, ethane, and propane flames

Gülder, ?mer L.

212

A stochastic model for sediment yield using the Principle of Maximum Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 23, NO. 5, PAGES 781-793, MAY 1987 A Stochastic Model for Sediment Yield Using the Principle of Maximum Entropy V. P. SINGH AND P. F. KRSTANOVIC Department of Civil Engineering, Louisiana State University, Baton... Rouge The principle of maximum entropy was applied to derive a stochastic model for sediment yield from upland watersheds. By maximizing the conditional entropy subject to certain constraints, a probability distribution of sediment yield conditioned...

Singh, V. P.; Krstanovic, P. F.

213

Heterogeneity-corrected vs -uncorrected critical structure maximum point doses in breast balloon brachytherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent studies have reported potentially clinically meaningful dose differences when heterogeneity correction is used in breast balloon brachytherapy. In this study, we report on the relationship between heterogeneity-corrected and -uncorrected doses for 2 commonly used plan evaluation metrics: maximum point dose to skin surface and maximum point dose to ribs. Maximum point doses to skin surface and ribs were calculated using TG-43 and Varian Acuros for 20 patients treated with breast balloon brachytherapy. The results were plotted against each other and fit with a zero-intercept line. Max skin dose (Acuros) = max skin dose (TG-43) ? 0.930 (R{sup 2} = 0.995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 1.1% (max 2.8%). Max rib dose (Acuros) = max rib dose (TG-43) ? 0.955 (R{sup 2} = 0.9995). The average magnitude of difference from this relationship was 0.7% (max 1.6%). Heterogeneity-corrected maximum point doses to the skin surface and ribs were proportional to TG-43-calculated doses. The average deviation from proportionality was 1%. The proportional relationship suggests that a different metric other than maximum point dose may be needed to obtain a clinical advantage from heterogeneity correction. Alternatively, if maximum point dose continues to be used in recommended limits while incorporating heterogeneity correction, institutions without this capability may be able to accurately estimate these doses by use of a scaling factor.

Kim, Leonard, E-mail: kimlh@umdnj.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Narra, Venkat; Yue, Ning [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

LUMINOUS SUPERNOVA-LIKE UV/OPTICAL/INFRARED TRANSIENTS ASSOCIATED WITH ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS FROM METAL-POOR BLUE SUPERGIANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal-poor massive stars typically end their lives as blue supergiants (BSGs). Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from such progenitors could have an ultra-long duration of relativistic jets. For example, Population III (Pop III) GRBs at z {approx} 10-20 might be observable as X-ray-rich events with a typical duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 10{sup 4}(1 + z) s. The recent GRB111209A at z = 0.677 has an ultra-long duration of T{sub 90} {approx} 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} s and it has been suggested that its progenitor might have been a metal-poor BSG in the local universe. Here, we suggest that luminous UV/optical/infrared emission is associated with this new class of GRBs from metal-poor BSGs. Before the jet head breaks out of the progenitor envelope, the energy injected by the jet is stored in a hot plasma cocoon, which finally emerges and expands as a baryon-loaded fireball. We show that the photospheric emissions from the cocoon fireball could be intrinsically very bright (L{sub peak} {approx} 10{sup 42}-10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1}) in UV/optical bands ({epsilon}{sub peak} {approx} 10 eV) with a typical duration of {approx}100 days in the rest frame. Such cocoon emissions from Pop III GRBs might be detectable in infrared bands at {approx}years after Pop III GRBs at up to z {approx} 15 by upcoming facilities such as the James Webb Space Telescope. We also suggest that GRB111209A might have been rebrightening in UV/optical bands up to an AB magnitude of {approx}< 26. The cocoon emission from local metal-poor BSGs might have been observed previously as luminous supernovae without GRBs since they can be seen from the off-axis direction of the jet.

Kashiyama, Kazumi; Yajima, Hidenobu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Nakauchi, Daisuke; Nakamura, Takashi [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Suwa, Yudai, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

SN 2013ej in M74: A Luminous and Fast-declining Type II-P Supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present extensive ultraviolet, optical, and near-infrared observations of the type IIP supernova (SN IIP) 2013ej in the nearby spiral galaxy M74. The multicolor light curves, spanning from $\\sim$ 8--185 days after explosion, show that it has a higher peak luminosity (i.e., M$_{V}$ $\\sim$$-$17.83 mag at maximum light), a faster post-peak decline, and a shorter plateau phase (i.e., $\\sim$ 50 days) compared to the normal type IIP SN 1999em. The mass of $^{56}$Ni is estimated as 0.02$\\pm$0.01 M$_{\\odot}$ from the radioactive tail of the bolometric light curve. The spectral evolution of SN 2013ej is similar to that of SN 2004et and SN 2007od, but shows a larger expansion velocity (i.e., $v_{Fe II} \\sim$ 4600 km s$^{-1}$ at t $\\sim$ 50 days) and broader line profiles. In the nebular phase, the emission of H$\\alpha$ line displays a double-peak structure, perhaps due to the asymmetric distribution of $^{56}$Ni produced in the explosion. With the constraints from the main observables such as bolometric light curve,...

Huang, Fang; Zhang, Jujia; Brown, Peter J; Zampieri, Luca; Pumo, Maria Letizia; Zhang, Tianmeng; Chen, Juncheng; Mo, Jun; Zhao, Xulin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

On the "viscosity maximum" during the uniaxial extension of a low density polyethylene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental investigation of the viscosity overshoot phenomenon observed during uniaxial extension of a low density polyethylene is pre- sented. For this purpose, traditional integral viscosity measurements on a Muenstedt type extensional rheometer are combined with local mea- surements based on the in-situ visualization of the sample under exten- sion. For elongational experiments at constant strain rates within a wide range of Weissenberg numbers (Wi), three distinct deformation regimes are identified. Corresponding to low values of Wi (regime I), the tensile stress displays a broad maximum. This maximum can be explained by simple mathematical arguments as a result of low deformation rates and it should not be confused with the viscosity overshoot phenomenon. Corre- sponding to intermediate values of Wi (regime II), a local maximum of the integral extensional viscosity is systematically observed. However, within this regime, the local viscosity measurements reveal no maximum, but a plateau. Careful inspection of the images of samples within this regime shows that, corresponding to the maximum of the integral viscosity, sec- ondary necks develop along the sample. The emergence of a maximum of the integral elongational viscosity is thus related to the distinct in- homogeneity of deformation states and is not related to the rheological properties of the material. In the fast stretching limit (high Wi, regime III), the overall geometric uniformity of the sample is well preserved, no secondary necks are observed and both the integral and the local transient elongational viscosity show no maximum. A detailed comparison of the experimental findings with results from literature is presented.

Teodor I. Burghelea; Zdenek Stary; Helmut Muenstedt

2010-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

217

Period-luminosity and period-luminosity-colour relations for Mira variables at maximum light  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we confirm the existence of period-luminosity (PL) and period-luminosity-colour (PLC) relations at maximum light for O and C Mira variables in the LMC. We demonstrate that in the J and H bands the maximum light PL relations have a significantly smaller dispersion than their counterparts at mean light, while the K band and bolometric PL relations have a dispersion comparable to that at mean light. In the J, H and K bands the fitted PL relations for the O Miras are found to have smaller dispersion than those for the C Miras, at both mean and maximum light, while the converse is true for the relations based on bolometric magnitudes. The inclusion of a non-zero log period term is found to be highly significant in all cases except that of the C Miras in the J band, for which the data are found to be consistent with having constant absolute magnitude. This suggests the possibility of employing C Miras as standard candles. We suggest both a theoretical justification for the existence of Mira PL relations at maximum light and a possible explanation of why these relations should have a smaller dispersion than at mean light. The existence of such maximum light relations offers the possibility of extending the range and improving the accuracy of the Mira distance scale to Galactic globular clusters and to other galaxies.

S. M. Kanbur; M. A. Hendry; D. Clarke

1997-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

HFIR Vessel Maximum Permissible Pressures for Operating Period 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extending the life of the HFIR pressure vessel from 26 to 50 EFPY (100 MW) requires an updated calculation of the maximum permissible pressure for a range in vessel operating temperatures (40-120 F). The maximum permissible pressure is calculated using the equal-potential method, which takes advantage of knowledge gained from periodic hydrostatic proof tests and uses the test conditions (pressure, temperature, and frequency) as input. The maximum permissible pressure decreases with increasing time between hydro tests but is increased each time a test is conducted. The minimum values that occur just prior to a test either increase or decrease with time, depending on the vessel temperature. The minimum value of these minimums is presently specified as the maximum permissible pressure. For three vessel temperatures of particular interest (80, 88, and 110 F) and a nominal time of 3.0 EFPY(100 MVV)between hydro tests, these pressures are 677, 753, and 850 psi. For the lowest temperature of interest (40 F), the maximum permissible pressure is 295 psi.

Cheverton, R.D.; Inger, J.R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Efficacy of Lower-Body Shielding in Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy-guided interventions pose relevant radiation exposure to the interventionalist. The goal of this study was to analyze the efficacy of lower-body shielding as a simple structural method for decreasing radiation dose to the interventionalist without limiting access to the patient. Material and Methods: All examinations were performed with a 128-slice dual source CT scanner (12 Multiplication-Sign 1.2-mm collimation; 120 kV; and 20, 40, 60, and 80 mAs) and an Alderson-Rando phantom. Scatter radiation was measured with an ionization chamber and a digital dosimeter at standardized positions and heights with and without a lower-body lead shield (0.5-mm lead equivalent; Kenex, Harlow, UK). Dose decreases were computed for the different points of measurement. Results: On average, lower-body shielding decreased scatter radiation by 38.2% within a 150-cm radius around the shielding. This decrease is most significant close to the gantry opening and at low heights of 50 and 100 cm above the floor with a maximum decrease of scatter radiation of 95.9% close to the scanner's isocentre. With increasing distance to the gantry opening, the effect decreased. There is almost no dose decrease effect at {>=}150 above the floor. Scatter radiation and its decrease were linearly correlated with the tube current-time product (r{sup 2} = 0.99), whereas percent scatter radiation decrease was independent of the tube current-time product. Conclusion: Lower-body shielding is an effective way to decrease radiation exposure to the interventionalist and should routinely be used in CT fluoroscopy-guided interventions.

Mahnken, Andreas H., E-mail: mahnken@rad.rwth-aachen.de [RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Sedlmair, Martin [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany); Ritter, Christine [University of Copenhagen, Niels Bohr Institute (Denmark); Banckwitz, Rosemarie; Flohr, Thomas [Siemens, Healthcare Sector (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

An Investigation of the Effect of After-Action Reviews on Teams' Performance-Efficacy Relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work has provided strong evidence that past performance is a better predictor of future performance than self-efficacy and that self- efficacy explains very little variance in future performance when examined longitudinally after controlling for past...?s assessment of its efficacy will be more congruent with its actual past performance of the task and as such, can be used more effectively by the team in allocating resources in pursuit of successful task performance. For example, a team that performs poorly...

Schurig, Ira

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Spectral Modeling of SNe Ia Near Maximum Light: Probing the Characteristics of Hydro Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have performed detailed NLTE spectral synthesis modeling of 2 types of 1-D hydro models: the very highly parameterized deflagration model W7, and two delayed detonation models. We find that overall both models do about equally well at fitting well observed SNe Ia near to maximum light. However, the Si II 6150 feature of W7 is systematically too fast, whereas for the delayed detonation models it is also somewhat too fast, but significantly better than that of W7. We find that a parameterized mixed model does the best job of reproducing the Si II 6150 line near maximum light and we study the differences in the models that lead to better fits to normal SNe Ia. We discuss what is required of a hydro model to fit the spectra of observed SNe Ia near maximum light.

E. Baron; S. Bongard; David Branch; Peter H. Hauschildt

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fast singular value decomposition combined maximum entropy method for plasma tomography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maximum entropy method (MEM) is a widely used reconstruction algorithm in plasma physics. Drawbacks of the conventional MEM are its heavy time-consuming process and possible generation of noisy reconstruction results. In this article, a modified maximum entropy algorithm is described which speeds up the calculation and shows better noise handling capability. Similar to the rapid minimum Fisher information method, the modified maximum entropy algorithm uses simple matrix operations instead of treating a fully nonlinear problem. The preprocess for rapid tomographic calculation is based on the vector operations and the singular value decomposition (SVD). The initial guess of the sought-for emissivity is calculated by SVD and this helped reconstruction about ten times faster than the conventional MEM. Therefore, the developed fast MEM can be used for intershot tomographic analyses of fusion plasmas.

Kim, Junghee; Choe, W. [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701(Korea, Republic of)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mechanisms of NDV-3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 vaccine efficacy in MRSA skin versus invasive infectionFig. 1) and suppression of MRSA proliferation (Fig. 2). Eachseverity and suppression of MRSA bioluminescence (Figs. 1

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Personal science teaching efficacy and the beliefs and practices of elementary teachers related to science instruction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and women in mathematics, science, and technology careers.Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 45(9), 1036-1058.development of an elementary science teaching efficacy

Lardy, Corinne H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Mathematics Self-Efficacy of Community College Students in Developmental Mathematics Courses.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Mathematics self-efficacy was defined as an individual's beliefs about how he or she would perform a specific math task or in a specific mathematics or (more)

Clutts, David Walker

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

E-Print Network 3.0 - affected saflufenacil efficacy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

efficacy Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Preplant Burndown, Weed Management and Cotton Response to Saflufenacil J.W. Keeling Summary: establishment and cotton growth, and 3)...

228

Landscape Planning and Biogeochemistry: Estimating and Analyzing Carbon Sequestration Efficacy In Dryland Open Space.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Despite public demand for climate change mitigation and natural open space conservancy, existing political and design efforts are only beginning to address the declining efficacy (more)

Huck, Erick Otto

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Study on Two Optimization Problems: Line Cover and Maximum Genus Embedding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STUDY ON TWO OPTIMIZATION PROBLEMS: LINE COVER AND MAXIMUM GENUS EMBEDDING A Thesis by CHENG CAO Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 2012 Major Subject: Computer Science STUDY ON TWO OPTIMIZATION PROBLEMS: LINE COVER AND MAXIMUM GENUS EMBEDDING A Thesis by CHENG CAO Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment...

Cao, Cheng

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

What is the maximum rate at which entropy of a string can increase?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to Susskind, a string falling toward a black hole spreads exponentially over the stretched horizon due to repulsive interactions of the string bits. In this paper such a string is modeled as a self-avoiding walk and the string entropy is found. It is shown that the rate at which information/entropy contained in the string spreads is the maximum rate allowed by quantum theory. The maximum rate at which the black hole entropy can increase when a string falls into a black hole is also discussed.

Ropotenko, Kostyantyn [State Administration of Communications, Ministry of Transport and Communications of Ukraine 22, Khreschatyk, 01001, Kyiv (Ukraine)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Hydrodynamic Relaxation of an Electron Plasma to a Near-Maximum Entropy State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dynamical relaxation of a pure electron plasma in a Malmberg-Penning trap is studied, comparing experiments, numerical simulations and statistical theories of weakly dissipative two-dimensional (2D) turbulence. Simulations confirm that the dynamics are approximated well by a 2D hydrodynamic model. Statistical analysis favors a theoretical picture of relaxation to a near-maximum entropy state with constrained energy, circulation, and angular momentum. This provides evidence that 2D electron fluid relaxation in a turbulent regime is governed by principles of maximum entropy.

Rodgers, D. J.; Servidio, S.; Matthaeus, W. H.; Mitchell, T. B.; Aziz, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Montgomery, D. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2009-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

Maximum-Entropy Closures for Kinetic Theories of Neuronal Network Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyze (1+1)D kinetic equations for neuronal network dynamics, which are derived via an intuitive closure from a Boltzmann-like equation governing the evolution of a one-particle (i.e., one-neuron) probability density function. We demonstrate that this intuitive closure is a generalization of moment closures based on the maximum-entropy principle. By invoking maximum-entropy closures, we show how to systematically extend this kinetic theory to obtain higher-order (1+1)D kinetic equations and to include coupled networks of both excitatory and inhibitory neurons.

Rangan, Aaditya V.; Cai, David [Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, New York University, New York, New York 10012 (United States)

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

233

Maximum Entropy Models of Shortest Path and Outbreak Distributions in Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of networks are often characterized in terms of features such as node degree distributions, average path lengths, diameters, or clustering coefficients. Here, we study shortest path length distributions. On the one hand, average as well as maximum distances can be determined therefrom; on the other hand, they are closely related to the dynamics of network spreading processes. Because of the combinatorial nature of networks, we apply maximum entropy arguments to derive a general, physically plausible model. In particular, we establish the generalized Gamma distribution as a continuous characterization of shortest path length histograms of networks or arbitrary topology. Experimental evaluations corroborate our theoretical results.

Bauckhage, Christian; Hadiji, Fabian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN* AND DAVID S. NOLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN independent of both the maximum wind speed and the radius of maximum winds (RMW). This can be seen winds change with height. Above 2-km height, vertical profiles of Vmaxnorm are nearly independent

Nolan, David S.

235

Exact Maximum Likelihood estimator for the BL-GARCH model under elliptical distributed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exact Maximum Likelihood estimator for the BL-GARCH model under elliptical distributed innovations, Brisbane QLD 4001, Australia Abstract We are interested in the parametric class of Bilinear GARCH (BL-GARCH examine, in this paper, the BL-GARCH model in a general setting under some non-normal distributions. We

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

236

Benefits of the International Residential Code's Maximum Solar heat Gain Coefficient Requirement for Windows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Texas adopted in its residential building energy code a maximum 0.40 solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) for fenestration (e.g., windows, glazed doors and skylights)-a critical driver of cooling energy use, comfort and peak demand. An analysis...

Stone, G. A.; DeVito, E. M.; Nease, N. H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ocean Circulation During the Last Glacial Maximum Simulated by PMIP3 Climate Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the intensity of the Atlantic Overturning Circulation (distinguished by the local maximum at approximately 30 N %. In the plot corresponding to the World Ocean Circulation, an increase in the Deep Circulation, associated of the water masses as well as the impact on ocean carbon storage. References: [1] Godfrey J. S., Geophysics

Schmittner, Andreas

238

The chronology of the Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial events in central Argentine Patagonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chronology of the Last Glacial Maximum and deglacial events in central Argentine Patagonia and deglaciation in the Lago Pueyrredo´n valley of central Patagonia, 47.5 S, Argentina. The valley was a major and the onset of deglaciation occurred broadly synchronously throughout Patagonia. Deglaciation resulted

239

Single-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum tardiness  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

periods often appear in industry due to a machine breakdown (stochastic) or preventive maintenance of machine unavailability. However, in some cases (e.g. preventive maintenance), the maintenance of a machineSingle-machine scheduling with periodic and exible periodic maintenance to minimize maximum

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

240

THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to absorption of solar radiation in the climate system is found to be irrelevant to the maximized prop- erties from hot to cold places, thereby producing the kinetic energy of the fluid itself. His generalTHE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS AND THE GLOBAL CLIMATE SYSTEM: A REVIEW OF THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY

Lorenz, Ralph D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safetyefficiency trade-off  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydraulic limits on maximum plant transpiration and the emergence of the safetyefficiency trade.12126 Key words: hydraulic limitation, safety efficiency trade-off, soilplantatmosphere model, trait hydraulics constrain ecosystem productivity by setting physical limits to water transport and hence carbon

Jackson, Robert B.

242

Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performance of Photovoltaic Maximum Power Point Tracking Algorithms in the Presence of Noise tracking (MPPT) algorithms for photovoltaic systems, including how noise affects both tracking speed-performance photovoltaic sys- tems. An intelligent controller adjusts the voltage, current, or impedance seen by a solar

Odam, Kofi

243

Towards a frequency-dependent discrete maximum principle for the implicit Monte Carlo equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It has long been known that temperature solutions of the Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) equations can exceed the external boundary temperatures, a so-called violation of the 'maximum principle.' Previous attempts at prescribing a maximum value of the time-step size {Delta}{sub t} that is sufficient to eliminate these violations have recommended a {Delta}{sub t} that is typically too small to be used in practice and that appeared to be much too conservative when compared to numerical solutions of the IMC equations for practical problems. In this paper, we derive a new estimator for the maximum time-step size that includes the spatial-grid size {Delta}{sub x}. This explicitly demonstrates that the effect of coarsening {Delta}{sub x} is to reduce the limitation on {Delta}{sub t}, which helps explain the overly conservative nature of the earlier, grid-independent results. We demonstrate that our new time-step restriction is a much more accurate means of predicting violations of the maximum principle. We discuss how the implications of the new, grid-dependent timestep restriction can impact IMC solution algorithms.

Wollaber, Allan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larsen, Edward W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Densmore, Jeffery D [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Hydroelastic analysis of the floating plate optimized for maximum radiation damping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydroelastic analysis of the floating plate optimized for maximum radiation damping Christopher J t In previous work, the problem of optimizing the shape of a thin floating plate to maximize radiation damping, incompressible ocean of infinite extent. For simplicity, only rigid heave motions were considered and the damping

Damaren, Christopher J.

245

Maximum late Holocene extent of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during the late 20th century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the 20th century. This suggests a lagged ice-margin response to prior cooling, such as the Little Ice AgeMaximum late Holocene extent of the western Greenland Ice Sheet during the late 20th century Samuel Keywords: Greenland Ice Sheet Little Ice Age 10 Be exposure dating Ice-dammed lake Lake sediment core a b

Briner, Jason P.

246

Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Mixture Densities for Binned and Truncated Multivariate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Likelihood Estimation of Mixture Densities for Binned and Truncated Multivariate Data in data analysis and machine learning. This paper addresses the problem of fitting mixture densities to multivariate binned and truncated data. The EM approach proposed by McLachlan and Jones (1988

Smyth, Padhraic

247

Design of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of wind farm layout for maximum wind energy capture Andrew Kusiak*, Zhe Song Intelligent Accepted 24 August 2009 Available online 22 September 2009 Keywords: Wind farm Wind turbine Layout design Optimization Evolutionary algorithms Operations research a b s t r a c t Wind is one of the most promising

Kusiak, Andrew

248

Maximum Class Separability for Rough-Fuzzy C-Means Based Brain MR Image Segmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Class Separability for Rough-Fuzzy C-Means Based Brain MR Image Segmentation Pradipta Maji of brain MR images. The RFCM algorithm comprises a judicious integration of the of rough sets, fuzzy sets with vagueness and incompleteness in class definition of brain MR images, the membership function of fuzzy sets

Pal, Sankar Kumar

249

EXTENSION OF THE MAXIMUM POWER REGION OF DOUBLY-SALIENT VARIABLE RELUCTANCE MOTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Salient Variable Reluctance Motors (DSVRM) has been investigated and developed for variable-speed drives during, variable-frequency generators, wind wheels, machine tools, etc.). In these applications, it is generally necessary to operate in a regime of a high speed ux-weakening (zone of maximum constant power), for a better

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

250

Maximum-entropy meshfree method for nonlinear static analysis of planar reinforced concrete structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nonlinear system of equations. Maximum-entropy basis functions are used to discretize the two displacement control method is implemented to solve the nonlinear system of equations and to obtain tools in the field of structural engineering, Yaw and co-workers [1] presented a blended FE and meshfree

Sukumar, N.

251

Maximum Utility Product Pricing Models and Algorithms Based on Reservation Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum Utility Product Pricing Models and Algorithms Based on Reservation Prices R. Shioda L. Tun for pricing a product line with several customer segments under the assumption that customers' product choices utility model and formulate it as a mixed-integer programming problem, design heuristics and valid cuts

Tunçel, Levent

252

Self-Assembly for Maximum Yields Under Constraints Michael J. Fox and Jeff S. Shamma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Assembly for Maximum Yields Under Constraints Michael J. Fox and Jeff S. Shamma Abstract-- We present an algorithm that, given any target tree, synthesizes reversible self-assembly rules that provide states that cannot be recovered from the unlabeled graph. I. INTRODUCTION Self-assembly is the phenomenon

Shamma, Jeff S.

253

Generalized Local Maximum Principles for Finite-Difference Operators Author(s): Achi Brandt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generalized Local Maximum Principles for Finite-Difference Operators Author(s): Achi Brandt Source://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=ams. . Each copy of any part of a JSTOR transmission must contain the same copyright notice that appears on the screen or printed page of such transmission. JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars

254

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

0 Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated) viewed as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean to kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while

Wang, Yuqing

255

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Production, Frictional Dissipation, and Maximum Intensity of a Numerically Simulated as a heat engine converts heat energy extracted from the ocean into the kinetic energy of the TC, which is eventually dissipated due to surface friction. Since the energy production rate is a linear function while

Wang, Yuqing

256

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NOAA Technical Memorandum NWS HYDRO 39 PROBABLE MAXIMUM PRECIPITATION FOR THE UPPER DEERFIELD RIVER The Office of Hydrology (HYDRO) of the National Weather Service (NWS) develops procedures for making river agencies, and conducts pertinent research and development. NOAA Technical Memorandums in the NWS HYDRO

257

Integrating ecophysiology and plankton dynamics into projected changes in maximum fisheries catch potential under climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). In addition, average surface water pH of the ocean has dropped by 0.1 units since pre- industrial timesIntegrating ecophysiology and plankton dynamics into projected changes in maximum fisheries catch 7TJ, UK 2 Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science, Pakefield Road, Lowestoft

Pauly, Daniel

258

Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Seungjin CHOI x1 and Andrzej CICHOCKI y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blind Equalization via Approximate Maximum Likelihood Source Separation Seungjin CHOI x1, RIKEN 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-shi Saitama 351-0198, JAPAN Abstract Blind equalization of single input multiple output (SIMO) FIR channels can be refor- mulated as the problem of blind source separation

Choi, Seungjin

259

Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison of time and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photothermoacoustic imaging of biological tissues: maximum depth characterization comparison for Advanced Diffusion-Wave Technologies Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering 5 King's College induced in light-absorbing materials can be observed either as a transient signal in time domain

Mandelis, Andreas

260

Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power and Sample Size Determination for a Stepwise Test Procedure for Finding the Maximum Safe Dose This paper addresses the problem of power and sample size calculation for a stepwise multiple test procedure of a compound. A general expression for the power of this procedure is derived. It is used to find the minimum

Tamhane, Ajit C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Optimization of stomatal conductance for maximum carbon gain under dynamic soil moisture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of stomatal conductance for maximum carbon gain under dynamic soil moisture Stefano Accepted 26 September 2013 Available online 9 October 2013 Keywords: Optimization Photosynthesis Soil moisture Stomatal conductance Transpiration a b s t r a c t Optimization theories explain a variety

Katul, Gabriel

262

A Distributed Approach to Maximum Power Point Tracking for Photovoltaic Sub-Module Differential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the proposed distributed algorithm. I. INTRODUCTION IN photovoltaic (PV) energy systems, PV modules are often of the system, small size and low power ratings of the power electronics circuit components. Due1 A Distributed Approach to Maximum Power Point Tracking for Photovoltaic Sub-Module Differential

Liberzon, Daniel

263

Uncorking the bottle: What triggered the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum methane release?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Uncorking the bottle: What triggered the Paleocene/Eocene thermal maximum methane release? Miriam E realms that has been attributed to a massive methane (CH4) release from marine gas hydrate reservoirs. Previously proposed mechanisms for this methane release rely on a change in deepwater source region

264

Electrical Estimation of Conditional Probability for Maximum-likelihood Based PMD Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xi, Tulay Adali, and John Zweck Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering UniversityElectrical Estimation of Conditional Probability for Maximum-likelihood Based PMD Mitigation Wenze probability density functions in the presence of both all-order PMD and ASE noise are estimated electronically

Zweck, John

265

Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy, And Comparison with C60  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Molecules inside Fullerene C70: Quantum Dynamics, Energetics, Maximum Occupancy of Chemistry, New York UniVersity, New York, New York 10003, Department of Chemistry, Brown UniVersity, ProVidence, Rhode Island 02912, and Department of Chemistry, Columbia UniVersity, New York, New York 10027 Received

Turro, Nicholas J.

266

Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional controller like Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy "ANFIS" and fuzzy logic controller is proposed and simulated power point tracking (MPPT) technique will be used. Fuzzy logic control "FLC" and adaptive neuro-fuzzyMaximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro- Fuzzy "ANFIS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

267

Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock magnetic, and electron microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetofossil spike during the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum: Ferromagnetic resonance, rock,2 Timothy D. Raub,3,4 Dirk Schumann,5 Hojatollah Vali,5 Alexei V. Smirnov,3,6 and Joseph L. Kirschvink1 controversial hypothesis that a cometary impact triggered the PETM. Here we present ferromagnetic resonance (FMR

268

Extraction of Spectral Functions from Dyson-Schwinger Studies via the Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is shown how to apply the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to numerical Dyson-Schwinger studies for the extraction of spectral functions of correlators from their corresponding Euclidean propagators. Differences to the application in lattice QCD are emphasized and, as an example, the spectral functions of massless quarks in cold and dense matter are presented.

Dominik Nickel

2006-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

269

Parameters estimation for spatio-temporal maximum entropy distributions: application to neural spike trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a numerical method to learn Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) distributions with spatio-temporal constraints from experimental spike trains. This is an extension of two papers [10] and [4] who proposed the estimation of parameters where only spatial constraints were taken into account. The extension we propose allows to properly handle memory effects in spike statistics, for large sized neural networks.

Nasser, Hassan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out of equilibrium Gavin E. Crooks*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beyond Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics: Maximum entropy hyperensembles out of equilibrium Gavin E at equilibrium? Here, we argue the most appropriate additional parameter is the nonequilibrium entropy of ways that the same system can be out of equilibrium. That the equilibrium entropy is maximized given

271

Extraction of spectral functions from Dyson-Schwinger studies via the maximum entropy method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is shown how to apply the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to numerical Dyson-Schwinger studies for the extraction of spectral functions of correlators from their corresponding Euclidean propagators. Differences to the application in lattice QCD are emphasized and, as an example, the spectral functions of massless quarks in cold and dense matter are presented.

Nickel, Dominik [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany)]. E-mail: dominik.nickel@physik.tu-darmstadt.de

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Lattice Field Theory with the Sign Problem and the Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although numerical simulation in lattice field theory is one of the most effective tools to study non-perturbative properties of field theories, it faces serious obstacles coming from the sign problem in some theories such as finite density QCD and lattice field theory with the $\\theta$ term. We reconsider this problem from the point of view of the maximum entropy method.

Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

273

A PROXIMITY CONTROL ALGORITHM TO MINIMIZE NONSMOOTH AND NONCONVEX SEMI-INFINITE MAXIMUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the context of eigen- value optimization, and [8] gives an overview of the history. The bases for the presentA PROXIMITY CONTROL ALGORITHM TO MINIMIZE NONSMOOTH AND NONCONVEX SEMI-INFINITE MAXIMUM EIGENVALUE function, semi-infinite problem, H-norm. 1. Introduction. Proximity control for bundle methods has been

Noll, Dominikus

274

A PROXIMITY CONTROL ALGORITHM TO MINIMIZE NONSMOOTH AND NONCONVEX SEMI-INFINITE MAXIMUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the context of eigen- value optimization, and [9] gives an overview of the history. The bases for the presentA PROXIMITY CONTROL ALGORITHM TO MINIMIZE NONSMOOTH AND NONCONVEX SEMI-INFINITE MAXIMUM EIGENVALUE function, semi-infinite problem, H-norm. 1. Introduction. Proximity control for bundle methods has been

Noll, Dominikus

275

THE COSMOLOGICAL IMPACT OF LUMINOUS TeV BLAZARS. III. IMPLICATIONS FOR GALAXY CLUSTERS AND THE FORMATION OF DWARF GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A subset of blazars are powerful TeV emitters, dominating the extragalactic component of the very high energy gamma-ray universe (E {approx}> 100 GeV). These TeV gamma rays generate ultrarelativistic electron-positron pairs via pair production with the extragalactic background light. While it has generally been assumed that the kinetic energy of these pairs cascades to GeV gamma rays via inverse Compton scattering, we have argued in Broderick et al. (Paper I in this series) that plasma beam instabilities are capable of dissipating the pairs' energy locally on timescales short in comparison to the inverse Compton cooling time, heating the intergalactic medium (IGM) with a rate that is independent of density. This dramatically increases the entropy of the IGM after redshift z {approx} 2, with a number of important implications for structure formation: (1) this suggests a scenario for the origin of the cool core (CC)/non-cool core (NCC) bimodality in galaxy clusters and groups. Early-forming galaxy groups are unaffected because they can efficiently radiate the additional entropy, developing a CC. However, late-forming groups do not have sufficient time to cool before the entropy is gravitationally reprocessed through successive mergers-counteracting cooling and potentially raising the core entropy further. This may result in a population of X-ray dim groups/clusters, consistent with X-ray stacking analyses of optically selected samples. Hence, blazar heating works differently than feedback by active galactic nuclei, which we show can balance radiative cooling but is unable to transform CC into NCC clusters on the buoyancy timescale due to the weak coupling between the mechanical energy to the cluster gas. (2) We predict a suppression of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) power spectrum template on angular scales smaller than 5' due to the globally reduced central pressure of groups and clusters forming after z {approx} 1. This allows for a larger rms amplitude of the density power spectrum, {sigma}{sub 8}, and may reconcile SZ-inferred values with those by other cosmological probes even after allowing for a contribution due to patchy reionization. (3) Our redshift-dependent entropy floor increases the characteristic halo mass below which dwarf galaxies cannot form by a factor of approximately 10 (50) at mean density (in voids) over that found in models that include photoionization alone. This prevents the formation of late-forming dwarf galaxies (z {approx}< 2) with masses ranging from 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} for redshifts z {approx} 2 to 0, respectively. This may help resolve the 'missing satellite problem' in the Milky Way of the low observed abundances of dwarf satellites compared to cold dark matter simulations and may bring the observed early star formation histories into agreement with galaxy formation models. At the same time, it explains the 'void phenomenon' by suppressing the formation of galaxies within existing dwarf halos of masses <3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} with a maximum circular velocity <60 km s{sup -1} for z {approx}< 2, hence reconciling the number of dwarfs in low-density regions in simulations and the paucity of those in observations.

Pfrommer, Christoph [Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies, Schloss-Wolfsbrunnenweg 35, D-69118 Heidelberg (Germany); Chang, Philip; Broderick, Avery E., E-mail: christoph.pfrommer@h-its.org, E-mail: aeb@cita.utoronto.ca, E-mail: pchang@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

2012-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

276

ULTRALUMINOUS STAR-FORMING GALAXIES AND EXTREMELY LUMINOUS WARM MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION AT z = 2.16 IN THE PKS 1138-26 RADIO GALAXY PROTOCLUSTER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A deep Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph map of the PKS 1138-26 galaxy protocluster reveals ultraluminous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from obscured star formation in three protocluster galaxies, including H{alpha}-emitter (HAE) 229, HAE 131, and the central Spiderweb Galaxy. Star formation rates of {approx}500-1100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} are estimated from the 7.7 {mu}m PAH feature. At such prodigious formation rates, the galaxy stellar masses will double in 0.6-1.1 Gyr. We are viewing the peak epoch of star formation for these protocluster galaxies. However, it appears that extinction of H{alpha} is much greater (up to a factor of 40) in the two ULIRG HAEs compared to the Spiderweb. This may be attributed to different spatial distributions of star formation-nuclear star formation in the HAEs versus extended star formation in accreting satellite galaxies in the Spiderweb. We find extremely luminous mid-IR rotational line emission from warm molecular hydrogen in the Spiderweb Galaxy, with L(H{sub 2} 0-0 S(3)) = 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} (3.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} L{sub Sun }), {approx}20 times more luminous than any previously known H{sub 2} emission galaxy (MOHEG). Depending on the temperature, this corresponds to a very large mass of >9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6}-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} of T > 300 K molecular gas, which may be heated by the PKS 1138-26 radio jet, acting to quench nuclear star formation. There is >8 times more warm H{sub 2} at these temperatures in the Spiderweb than what has been seen in low-redshift (z < 0.2) radio galaxies, indicating that the Spiderweb may have a larger reservoir of molecular gas than more evolved radio galaxies. This is the highest redshift galaxy yet in which warm molecular hydrogen has been directly detected.

Ogle, P.; Davies, J. E.; Helou, G. [IPAC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. N. [NHSC, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bertincourt, B. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Seymour, N., E-mail: ogle@ipac.caltech.edu [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

277

SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY: DETERMINATION OF THE PROBABLE MAXIMUM WATER TABLE ELEVATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coverage depicting the configuration of the probable maximum water table elevation in the vicinity of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) was developed to support the Saltstone program. This coverage is needed to support the construction of saltstone vaults to assure that they remain above the maximum elevation of the water table during the Performance Assessment (PA) period of compliance. A previous investigation to calculate the historical high water table beneath the SDF (Cook, 1983) was built upon to incorporate new data that has since become available to refine that estimate and develop a coverage that could be extended to the perennial streams adjacent to the SDF. This investigation incorporated the method used in the Cook, 1983 report to develop an estimate of the probable maximum water table for a group of wells that either existed at one time at or near the SDF or which currently exist. Estimates of the probable maximum water table at these wells were used to construct 2D contour lines depicting this surface beneath the SDF and extend them to the nearby hydrologic boundaries at the perennial streams adjacent to the SDF. Although certain measures were implemented to assure that the contour lines depict a surface above which the water table will not rise, the exact elevation of this surface cannot be known with complete certainty. It is therefore recommended that the construction of saltstone vaults incorporate a vertical buffer of at least 5-feet between the base of the vaults and the depicted probable maximum water table elevation. This should provide assurance that the water table under the wet extreme climatic condition will never rise to intercept the base of a vault.

Hiergesell, R

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A Highly Efficacious Lymphocyte Chemoattractant, Stromal Cell-derived Factor 1 (SDF-1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Highly Efficacious Lymphocyte Chemoattractant, Stromal Cell-derived Factor 1 (SDF-1) By Conrad C-derived factor 1 (SDF-1). SDF-1 acts on lymphocytes and monocytes but not neutrophils in vitro and is both a highly efficacious and highly potent mononuclear cell attractant in vivo. In addition, SDF-1 induces

Springer, Timothy A.

279

Discovery of a nearby twin of SN1987A's nebula around the luminous blue variable HD168625: Was Sk--69 202 an LBV?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spitzer images of the luminous blue variable (LBV) candidate HD168625 reveal the existence of a bipolar nebula several times larger than its previously-known equatorial dust torus. The outer nebula of HD168625 has a full extent of about 80 arcsec or 0.85 pc, and one of the lobes has a well-defined polar ring. The nebula is a near twin of the triple-ring system around SN1987A. Because of these polar rings, and accounting for stellar/progenitor luminosity, HD168625 is an even closer twin of SN1987A than the B supergiant Sher 25 in NGC3603. HD168625's nebula was probably ejected during a giant LBV eruption and not during a red supergiant phase, so its similarity to the nebula around SN1987A may open new possibilities for the creation of SN1987A's rings. Namely, the hypothesis that Sk-69 202 suffered an LBV-like eruption would avert the complete surrender of single star models for its bipolar nebula by offering an alternative to an unlikely binary merger scenario. It also hints that LBVs are the likely progenitors of some type II supernovae, and that HD168625's nebula is a good example of a pre-explosion environment.

Nathan Smith

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

280

The Spatial Clustering of ROSAT All-Sky Survey AGN: I. The cross-correlation function with SDSS Luminous Red Galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the clustering properties of ~1550 broad-line AGNs at =0.25 detected in the ROSAT All-Sky Survey (RASS) through their measured cross-correlation function (CCF) with ~46000 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. By measuring the cross-correlation of our AGN sample with a larger tracer set of LRGs, we both minimize shot noise errors due to the relatively small AGN sample size and avoid systematic errors due to the spatially-varying Galactic absorption that would affect direct measurements of the auto-correlation function (ACF) of the AGN sample. The measured ACF correlation length for the total RASS-AGN sample (=1.5 x 10^(44) erg/s) is r_0=4.3^{+0.4}_{-0.5} h^(-1) Mpc and the slope \\gamma=1.7^{+0.1}_{-0.1}. Splitting the sample into low and high L_X samples at L_(0.5-10 keV)=10^(44) erg/s, we detect an X-ray luminosity-dependence of the clustering amplitude at the ~2.5 \\sigma level. The low L_X sample has r_0=3.3^{+0.6}_{-0.8} h^(-1) Mpc (\\gamma=1.7^{+0.4}_{-0.3}), which is...

Krumpe, Mirko; Coil, Alison L

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

ALMA DETECTION OF THE VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN J = 4-3 EMISSION LINE IN THE AGN-HOSTING LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IRAS 205514250  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present results from our ALMA Cycle 0 observations, at the frequencies around the HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 transition lines, of the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS 205514250 at z = 0.043, which is known to host an energetically important obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). In addition to the targeted HCN, HCO{sup +}, and HNC J = 4-3 emission lines, two additional strong emission lines are seen, which we attribute to H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 3}CN(+CCH). The HCN-to-HCO{sup +} J = 4-3 flux ratio (?0.7) is higher than in the other starburst-dominated galaxy (?0.2) observed in our ALMA Cycle 0 program. We tentatively (?5?) detected the vibrationally excited (v {sub 2} = 1) HCN J = 4-3 (l = 1f) emission line, which is important for testing an infrared radiative pumping scenario for HCN. This is the second detection of this molecular transition in external galaxies. The most likely reason for this detection is not only the high flux of this emission line, but also the small molecular line widths observed in this galaxy, suggesting that vibrational excitation of HCN may be relatively common in AGN-hosting galaxies.

Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, Hawaii, 96720 (United States); Nakanishi, Kouichiro, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Crdova 3107, Vitacura 763-0355, Santiago de Chile (Chile)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

Strobel, K; Strobel, Klaus; Weigel, Manfred K.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

On the minimum and maximum mass of neutron stars and the delayed collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The minimum and maximum mass of protoneutron stars and neutron stars are investigated. The hot dense matter is described by relativistic (including hyperons) and non-relativistic equations of state. We show that the minimum mass ($\\sim$ 0.88 - 1.28 $M_{\\sun}$) of a neutron star is determined by the earliest stage of its evolution and is nearly unaffected by the presence of hyperons. The maximum mass of a neutron star is limited by the protoneutron star or hot neutron star stage. Further we find that the delayed collapse of a neutron star into a black hole during deleptonization is not only possible for equations of state with softening components, as for instance, hyperons, meson condensates etc., but also for neutron stars with a pure nucleonic-leptonic equation of state.

Klaus Strobel; Manfred K. Weigel

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

A comparison of maximum likelihood and other estimators of eigenvalues from several correlated Monte Carlo samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maximum likelihood method for the multivariate normal distribution is applied to the case of several individual eigenvalues. Correlated Monte Carlo estimates of the eigenvalue are assumed to follow this prescription and aspects of the assumption are examined. Monte Carlo cell calculations using the SAM-CE and VIM codes for the TRX-1 and TRX-2 benchmark reactors, and SAM-CE full core results are analyzed with this method. Variance reductions of a few percent to a factor of 2 are obtained from maximum likelihood estimation as compared with the simple average and the minimum variance individual eigenvalue. The numerical results verify that the use of sample variances and correlation coefficients in place of the corresponding population statistics still leads to nearly minimum variance estimation for a sufficient number of histories and aggregates.

Beer, M.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

An Ad-Hoc Method for Obtaining chi**2 Values from Unbinned Maximum Likelihood Fits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A common goal in an experimental physics analysis is to extract information from a reaction with multi-dimensional kinematics. The preferred method for such a task is typically the unbinned maximum likelihood method. In fits using this method, the likelihood is a goodness-of-fit quantity in that it effectively discriminates between available hypotheses; however, it does not provide any information as to how well the best hypothesis describes the data. In this paper, we present an {\\em ad-hoc} procedure for obtaining chi**2/n.d.f. values from unbinned maximum likelihood fits. This method does not require binning the data, making it very applicable to multi-dimensional problems.

M. Williams; C. A. Meyer

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

286

Maximum-Entropy Meshfree Method for Compressible and Near-Incompressible Elasticity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical integration errors and volumetric locking in the near-incompressible limit are two outstanding issues in Galerkin-based meshfree computations. In this paper, we present a modified Gaussian integration scheme on background cells for meshfree methods that alleviates errors in numerical integration and ensures patch test satisfaction to machine precision. Secondly, a locking-free small-strain elasticity formulation for meshfree methods is proposed, which draws on developments in assumed strain methods and nodal integration techniques. In this study, maximum-entropy basis functions are used; however, the generality of our approach permits the use of any meshfree approximation. Various benchmark problems in two-dimensional compressible and near-incompressible small strain elasticity are presented to demonstrate the accuracy and optimal convergence in the energy norm of the maximum-entropy meshfree formulation.

Ortiz, A; Puso, M A; Sukumar, N

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

How multiplicity determines entropy and the derivation of the maximum entropy principle for complex systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The maximum entropy principle (MEP) is a method for obtaining the most likely distribution functions of observables from statistical systems, by maximizing entropy under constraints. The MEP has found hundreds of applications in ergodic and Markovian systems in statistical mechanics, information theory, and statistics. For several decades there exists an ongoing controversy whether the notion of the maximum entropy principle can be extended in a meaningful way to non-extensive, non-ergodic, and complex statistical systems and processes. In this paper we start by reviewing how Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy is related to multiplicities of independent random processes. We then show how the relaxation of independence naturally leads to the most general entropies that are compatible with the first three Shannon-Khinchin axioms, the (c,d)-entropies. We demonstrate that the MEP is a perfectly consistent concept for non-ergodic and complex statistical systems if their relative entropy can be factored into a general...

Hanel, Rudolf; Gell-Mann, Murray

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Exact computation of the Maximum Entropy Potential of spiking neural networks models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding how stimuli and synaptic connectivity in uence the statistics of spike patterns in neural networks is a central question in computational neuroscience. Maximum Entropy approach has been successfully used to characterize the statistical response of simultaneously recorded spiking neurons responding to stimuli. But, in spite of good performance in terms of prediction, the ?tting parameters do not explain the underlying mechanistic causes of the observed correlations. On the other hand, mathematical models of spiking neurons (neuro-mimetic models) provide a probabilistic mapping between stimulus, network architecture and spike patterns in terms of conditional proba- bilities. In this paper we build an exact analytical mapping between neuro-mimetic and Maximum Entropy models.

Cofre, Rodrigo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Maximum-entropy principle for static and dynamic high-field transport in semiconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the maximum entropy principle we present a general theory able to provide, in a dynamical context, the macroscopic relevant variables for carrier transport under electric fields of arbitrary strength. For the macroscopic variables the linearized maximum entropy approach is developed including full-band effects within a total energy scheme. Under spatially homogeneous conditions, we construct a closed set of hydrodynamic equations for the small-signal (dynamic) response of the macroscopic variables. The coupling between the driving field and the energy dissipation is analyzed quantitatively by using an arbitrary number of moments of the distribution function. The theoretical approach is applied to n-Si at 300 K and is validated by comparing numerical calculations with ensemble Monte Carlo simulations and with experimental data.

Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, 95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione e Nanotechnology National Laboratory of CNR-INFM, Universita di Lecce, Via Arnesano s/n, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Measuring the Efficacy of Leaders to Assess Information and Make Decisions in a Crisis: The C-LEAD Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on literature and expert interviews, we developed the Crisis Leader Efficacy in Assessing and Deciding scale (C-LEAD) to capture the efficacy of leaders to assess information and make decisions in a public health and ...

Pittinsky, Todd L.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Computation of the maximum loadability of a power system using nonlinear optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Between Generator and Load. . . . . . . . . 34 E. Flowchart for Optimization Program F. Tutorial Example G. Conclusion. . 35 36 44 V SIMULATION RESULTS. 45 A. Introduction. B. Results of Simulation for Maximum Loadability of the Total System. I... of this work starting from the basics. Chapter III will cover concepts of power flow and loadability along with tutorial example. The literature survey over this topic and previous work as well as problem statement and solution method will be covered...

Khabirov, Abdufarrukh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

An Analysis of Maximum Residential Energy Efficiency in Hot and Humid Climates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the high efficiency instantaneous water heater with electronic ignition. The largest equipment energy savings (20%) was achieved from the horizontal-axis clothes washer. Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) saved 75% lighting energy use. Among all...AN ANALYSIS OF MAXIMUM RESIDENTIAL ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATES Mini Malhotra Graduate Research Assistant Jeff Haberl, Ph.D., P.E. Professor/Associate Director Energy Systems Laboratory, Texas A&M University College...

Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J. S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A maximum entropy theorem with applications to the measurement of biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is a preliminary article stating and proving a new maximum entropy theorem. The entropies that we consider can be used as measures of biodiversity. In that context, the question is: for a given collection of species, which frequency distribution(s) maximize the diversity? The theorem provides the answer. The chief surprise is that although we are dealing not just with a single entropy, but a one-parameter family of entropies, there is a single distribution maximizing all of them simultaneously.

Leinster, Tom

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Hydrodynamic equations for electrons in graphene obtained from the maximum entropy principle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maximum entropy principle is applied to the formal derivation of isothermal, Euler-like equations for semiclassical fermions (electrons and holes) in graphene. After proving general mathematical properties of the equations so obtained, their asymptotic form corresponding to significant physical regimes is investigated. In particular, the diffusive regime, the Maxwell-Boltzmann regime (high temperature), the collimation regime and the degenerate gas limit (vanishing temperature) are considered.

Barletti, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.barletti@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica Ulisse Dini, Universit degli Studi di Firenze, Viale Morgagni 67/A, 50134 Firenze (Italy)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

REMARKS ON THE MAXIMUM ENTROPY METHOD APPLIED TO FINITE TEMPERATURE LATTICE QCD.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We make remarks on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) for studies of the spectral function of hadronic correlators in finite temperature lattice QCD. We discuss the virtues and subtlety of MEM in the cases that one does not have enough number of data points such as at finite temperature. Taking these points into account, we suggest several tests which one should examine to keep the reliability for the results, and also apply them using mock and lattice QCD data.

UMEDA, T.; MATSUFURU, H.

2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Towards the application of the Maximum Entropy Method to finite temperature Upsilon Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the Narnhofer Thirring Theorem interacting systems at finite temperature cannot be described by particles with a sharp dispersion law. It is therefore mandatory to develop new methods to extract particle masses at finite temperature. The Maximum Entropy method offers a path to obtain the spectral function of a particle correlation function directly. We have implemented the method and tested it with zero temperature Upsilon correlation functions obtained from an NRQCD simulation. Results for different smearing functions are discussed.

M. Oevers; C. Davies; J. Shigemitsu

2000-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

297

Maximum entropy deconvolution of resonant inelastic x-ray scattering spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) has become a powerful tool in the study of the electronic structure of condensed matter. Although the linewidths of many RIXS features are narrow, the experimental broadening can often hamper the identification of spectral features. Here, we show that the Maximum Entropy technique can successfully be applied in the deconvolution of RIXS spectra, improving the interpretation of the loss features without a severe increase in the noise ratio.

J. Laverock; A. R. H. Preston; D. Newby Jr; K. E. Smith; S. B. Dugdale

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Remarks on the Maximum Entropy Method applied to finite temperature lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We make remarks on the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) for studies of the spectral function of hadronic correlators in finite temperature lattice QCD. We discuss the virtues and subtlety of MEM in the cases that one does not have enough number of data points such as at finite temperature. Taking these points into account, we suggest several tests which one should examine to keep the reliability for the results, and also apply them using mock and lattice QCD data.

Takashi Umeda; Hideo Matsufuru

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

299

Maximum Neutral Buoyancy Depth of Juvenile Chinook Salmon: Implications for Survival during Hydroturbine Passage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigated the maximum depth at which juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha can acclimate by attaining neutral buoyancy. Depth of neutral buoyancy is dependent upon the volume of gas within the swim bladder, which greatly influences the occurrence of injuries to fish passing through hydroturbines. We used two methods to obtain maximum swim bladder volumes that were transformed into depth estimations - the increased excess mass test (IEMT) and the swim bladder rupture test (SBRT). In the IEMT, weights were surgically added to the fishes exterior, requiring the fish to increase swim bladder volume in order to remain neutrally buoyant. SBRT entailed removing and artificially increasing swim bladder volume through decompression. From these tests, we estimate the maximum acclimation depth for juvenile Chinook salmon is a median of 6.7m (range = 4.6-11.6 m). These findings have important implications to survival estimates, studies using tags, hydropower operations, and survival of juvenile salmon that pass through large Kaplan turbines typical of those found within the Columbia and Snake River hydropower system.

Pflugrath, Brett D.; Brown, Richard S.; Carlson, Thomas J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Where and how long ago was water in the western North Atlantic ventilated? Maximum entropy inversions of bottle data from WOCE line A20  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gull (1991), Bayesian maximum entropy image reconstruction,F. Primeau (2006), A maximum entropy approach to water massSouth- ern Ocean? A maximum entropy approach to global water

Holzer, Mark; Primeau, Francois W; Smethie, William M; Khatiwala, Samar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Imaging Molecular Gas in the Luminous Merger NGC 3256 : Detection of High-Velocity Gas and Twin Gas Peaks in the Double Nucleus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Molecular gas in the merging starburst galaxy NGC 3256 has been imaged with the Submillimeter Array at a resolution of 1'' x 2'' (170 x 340 pc at 35 Mpc). This is the first interferometric imaging of molecular gas in the most luminous galaxy within z=0.01. There is a large disk of molecular gas (r > 3 kpc) in the center of the merger with a strong gas concentration toward the double nucleus. The gas disk having a mass of ~3*10^9 Msun in the central 3 kpc rotates around a point between the two nuclei that are 850 pc apart on the sky. The molecular gas is warm and turbulent and shows spatial variation of the intensity ratio between CO isotopomers. High-velocity molecular gas is discovered at the galactic center. Its velocity in our line of sight is up to 420 km/s offset from the systemic velocity of the galaxy; the terminal velocity is twice as large as that due to the rotation of the main gas disk. The high-velocity gas is most likely due to a molecular outflow from the gas disk, entrained by the starburst-driven superwind in the galaxy. The molecular outflow is estimated to have a rate of ~10 Msun/yr and to play a significant role in the dispersal or depletion of molecular gas from the galactic center. A compact gas concentration and steep velocity gradient are also found around each of the twin nuclei. They are suggestive of a small gas disk rotating around each nucleus. If these are indeed mini-disks, their dynamical masses are ~10^9 Msun within a radius of 170 pc.

Kazushi Sakamoto; Paul T. P. Ho; Alison B. Peck

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

302

BONA FIDE, STRONG-VARIABLE GALACTIC LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE STARS ARE FAST ROTATORS: DETECTION OF A HIGH ROTATIONAL VELOCITY IN HR CARINAE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report optical observations of the luminous blue variable (LBV) HR Carinae which show that the star has reached a visual minimum phase in 2009. More importantly, we detected absorptions due to Si IV lambdalambda4088-4116. To match their observed line profiles from 2009 May, a high rotational velocity of v{sub rot} approx = 150 +- 20 km s{sup -1} is needed (assuming an inclination angle of 30 deg.), implying that HR Car rotates at approx =0.88 +- 0.2 of its critical velocity for breakup (v{sub crit}). Our results suggest that fast rotation is typical in all strong-variable, bona fide galactic LBVs, which present S-Dor-type variability. Strong-variable LBVs are located in a well-defined region of the HR diagram during visual minimum (the 'LBV minimum instability strip'). We suggest this region corresponds to where v{sub crit} is reached. To the left of this strip, a forbidden zone with v{sub rot}/v{sub crit}>1 is present, explaining why no LBVs are detected in this zone. Since dormant/ex LBVs like P Cygni and HD 168625 have low v{sub rot}, we propose that LBVs can be separated into two groups: fast-rotating, strong-variable stars showing S-Dor cycles (such as AG Car and HR Car) and slow-rotating stars with much less variability (such as P Cygni and HD 168625). We speculate that supernova (SN) progenitors which had S-Dor cycles before exploding (such as in SN 2001ig, SN 2003bg, and SN 2005gj) could have been fast rotators. We suggest that the potential difficulty of fast-rotating Galactic LBVs to lose angular momentum is additional evidence that such stars could explode during the LBV phase.

Groh, J. H. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Damineli, A.; Moises, A. P.; Teodoro, M. [Instituto de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Rua do Matao 1226, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Hillier, D. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O'Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Barba, R. [Departamento de fisica, Universidad de La Serena, Benavente 980, La Serena (Chile); Fernandez-Lajus, E.; Gamen, R. C.; Solivella, G., E-mail: jgroh@mpifr-bonn.mpg.d [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, and Instituto de Astrofisica de La Plata (CCT La Plata-CONICET), Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA, La Plata (Argentina)

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

LUMINOUS AND HIGH STELLAR MASS CANDIDATE GALAXIES AT z Almost-Equal-To 8 DISCOVERED IN THE COSMIC ASSEMBLY NEAR-INFRARED DEEP EXTRAGALACTIC LEGACY SURVEY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One key goal of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Assembly Near-Infrared Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey is to track galaxy evolution back to z Almost-Equal-To 8. Its two-tiered ''wide and deep'' strategy bridges significant gaps in existing near-infrared surveys. Here we report on z Almost-Equal-To 8 galaxy candidates selected as F105W-band dropouts in one of its deep fields, which covers 50.1 arcmin{sup 2} to 4 ks depth in each of three near-infrared bands in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey southern field. Two of our candidates have J < 26.2 mag, and are >1 mag brighter than any previously known F105W-dropouts. We derive constraints on the bright end of the rest-frame ultraviolet luminosity function of galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 8, and show that the number density of such very bright objects is higher than expected from the previous Schechter luminosity function estimates at this redshift. Another two candidates are securely detected in Spitzer Infrared Array Camera images, which are the first such individual detections at z Almost-Equal-To 8. Their derived stellar masses are on the order of a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, from which we obtain the first measurement of the high-mass end of the galaxy stellar mass function at z Almost-Equal-To 8. The high number density of very luminous and very massive galaxies at z Almost-Equal-To 8, if real, could imply a large stellar-to-halo mass ratio and an efficient conversion of baryons to stars at such an early time.

Yan Haojing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Finkelstein, Steven L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Huang, Kuang-Han [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ryan, Russell E.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Grogin, Norman A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Dickinson, Mark [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Newman, Jeffrey A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Somerville, Rachel S. [Physics and Astronomy Department, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Dave, Romeel [Astronomy Department, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Papovich, Casey [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Guo Yicheng; Giavalisco, Mauro [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Lee, Kyoung-soo [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Reddy, Naveen; Siana, Brian D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Cooray, Asantha R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Hathi, Nimish P. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

304

Map-making in small field modulated CMB polarisation experiments: approximating the maximum-likelihood method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Map-making presents a significant computational challenge to the next generation of kilopixel CMB polarisation experiments. Years worth of time ordered data (TOD) from thousands of detectors will need to be compressed into maps of the T, Q and U Stokes parameters. Fundamental to the science goal of these experiments, the observation of B-modes, is the ability to control noise and systematics. In this paper, we consider an alternative to the maximum-likelihood method, called destriping, where the noise is modelled as a set of discrete offset functions and then subtracted from the time-stream. We compare our destriping code (Descart: the DEStriping CARTographer) to a full maximum-likelihood map-maker, applying them to 200 Monte-Carlo simulations of time-ordered data from a ground based, partial-sky polarisation modulation experiment. In these simulations, the noise is dominated by either detector or atmospheric 1/f noise. Using prior information of the power spectrum of this noise, we produce destriped maps of T, Q and U which are negligibly different from optimal. The method does not filter the signal or bias the E or B-mode power spectra. Depending on the length of the destriping baseline, the method delivers between 5 and 22 times improvement in computation time over the maximum-likelihood algorithm. We find that, for the specific case of single detector maps, it is essential to destripe the atmospheric 1/f in order to detect B-modes, even though the Q and U signals are modulated by a half-wave plate spinning at 5-Hz.

D. Sutton; B. R. Johnson; M. L. Brown; P. Cabella; P. G. Ferreira; K. M. Smith

2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

305

On Weyl channels being covariant with respect to the maximum commutative group of unitaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the Weyl channels being covariant with respect to the maximum commutative group of unitary operators. This class includes the quantum depolarizing channel and the "two-Pauli" channel as well. Then, we show that our estimation of the output entropy for a tensor product of the phase damping channel and the identity channel based upon the decreasing property of the relative entropy allows to prove the additivity conjecture for the minimal output entropy for the quantum depolarizing channel in any prime dimesnsion and for the "two Pauli" channel in the qubit case.

G. G. Amosov

2006-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

A reliable, fast and low cost maximum power point tracker for photovoltaic applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents a new maximum power point tracker system for photovoltaic applications. The developed system is an analog version of the ''P and O-oriented'' algorithm. It maintains its main advantages: simplicity, reliability and easy practical implementation, and avoids its main disadvantages: inaccurateness and relatively slow response. Additionally, the developed system can be implemented in a practical way at a low cost, which means an added value. The system also shows an excellent behavior for very fast variables in incident radiation levels. (author)

Enrique, J.M.; Andujar, J.M.; Bohorquez, M.A. [Departamento de Ingenieria Electronica, de Sistemas Informaticos y Automatica, Universidad de Huelva (Spain)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

A New Maximum-Likelihood Change Estimator for Two-Pass SAR Coherent Change Detection.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we derive a new optimal change metric to be used in synthetic aperture RADAR (SAR) coherent change detection (CCD). Previous CCD methods tend to produce false alarm states (showing change when there is none) in areas of the image that have a low clutter-to-noise power ratio (CNR). The new estimator does not suffer from this shortcoming. It is a surprisingly simple expression, easy to implement, and is optimal in the maximum-likelihood (ML) sense. The estimator produces very impressive results on the CCD collects that we have tested.

Wahl, Daniel E.; Yocky, David A.; Jakowatz, Charles V,

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Application of Maximum Entropy Method to Lattice Field Theory with a Topological Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Monte Carlo simulation, lattice field theory with a $\\theta$ term suffers from the sign problem. This problem can be circumvented by Fourier-transforming the topological charge distribution $P(Q)$. Although this strategy works well for small lattice volume, effect of errors of $P(Q)$ becomes serious with increasing volume and prevents one from studying the phase structure. This is called flattening. As an alternative approach, we apply the maximum entropy method (MEM) to the Gaussian $P(Q)$. It is found that the flattening could be much improved by use of the MEM.

M. Imachi; Y. Shinno; H. Yoneyama

2003-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

Conditional maximum-entropy method for selecting prior distributions in Bayesian statistics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The conditional maximum-entropy method (abbreviated here as C-MaxEnt) is formulated for selecting prior probability distributions in Bayesian statistics for parameter estimation. This method is inspired by a statistical-mechanical approach to systems governed by dynamics with largely-separated time scales and is based on three key concepts: conjugate pairs of variables, dimensionless integration measures with coarse-graining factors and partial maximization of the joint entropy. The method enables one to calculate a prior purely from a likelihood in a simple way. It is shown in particular how it not only yields Jeffreys's rules but also reveals new structures hidden behind them.

Abe, Sumiyoshi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Charmonium spectra at finite temperature from QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charmonia spectral functions at finite temperature are studied using QCD sum rules in combination with the maximum entropy method. This approach enables us to directly obtain the spectral function from the sum rules, without having to introduce any specific assumption about its functional form. As a result, it is found that while J/psi and eta_c manifest themselves as significant peaks in the spectral function below the deconfinement temperature T_c, they quickly dissolve into the continuum and almost completely disappear at temperatures between 1.0 T_c and 1.1 T_c.

Philipp Gubler; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Spectral density analysis of time correlation functions in lattice QCD using the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study various aspects of extracting spectral information from time correlation functions of lattice QCD by means of Bayesian inference with an entropic prior, the maximum entropy method (MEM). Correlator functions of a heavy-light meson-meson system serve as a repository for lattice data with diverse statistical quality. Attention is given to spectral mass density functions, inferred from the data, and their dependence on the parameters of the MEM. We propose to employ simulated annealing, or cooling, to solve the Bayesian inference problem, and discuss practical issues of the approach.

H. Rudolf Fiebig

2002-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Maximum Entropy and the Stress Distribution in Soft Disk Packings Above Jamming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the maximum entropy hypothesis can successfully explain the distribution of stresses on compact clusters of particles within disordered mechanically stable packings of soft, isotropically stressed, frictionless disks above the jamming transition. We show that, in our two dimensional case, it becomes necessary to consider not only the stress but also the Maxwell-Cremona force-tile area, as a constraining variable that determines the stress distribution. The importance of the force-tile area was suggested by earlier computations on an idealized force-network ensemble.

Yegang Wu; S. Teitel

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Spectral Functions, Maximum Entropy Method and Unconventional Methods in Lattice Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present two unconventional methods of extracting information from hadronic 2-point functions produced by Monte Carlo simulations. The first is an extension of earlier work by Leinweber which combines a QCD Sum Rule approach with lattice data. The second uses the Maximum Entropy Method to invert the 2-point data to obtain estimates of the spectral function. The first approach is applied to QCD data, and the second method is applied to the Nambu--Jona-Lasinio model in (2+1)D. Both methods promise to augment the current approach where physical quantities are extracted by fitting to pure exponentials.

Chris Allton; Danielle Blythe; Jonathan Clowser

2002-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

On Weyl channels being covariant with respect to the maximum commutative group of unitaries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the Weyl channels being covariant with respect to the maximum commutative group of unitary operators. This class includes the quantum depolarizing channel and the 'two-Pauli' channel as well. Then, we show that our estimation of the output entropy for a tensor product of the phase damping channel and the identity channel based upon the decreasing property of the relative entropy allows to prove the additivity conjecture for the minimal output entropy for the quantum depolarizing channel in any prime dimension and for the two-Pauli channel in the qubit case.

Amosov, Grigori G. [Department of Higher Mathematics, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny 141700 (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Maximum entropy analysis of hadron spectral functions and excited states in quenched lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Employing the maximum entropy method we extract the spectral functions from meson correlators at four lattice spacings in quenched QCD with the Wilson quark action. We confirm that the masses and decay constants, obtained from the position and the area of peaks, agree well with the results from the conventional exponential fit. For the first excited state, we obtain $m_{\\pi_1} = 660(590)$ MeV, $m_{\\rho_1} = 1540(570)$ MeV, and $f_{\\rho_1} = 0.085(36)$ in the continuum limit.

CP-PACS Collaboration; :; S. Aoki; R. Burkhalter; M. Fukugita; S. Hashimoto; N. Ishizuka; Y. Iwasaki; K. Kanaya; T. Kaneko; Y. Kuramashi; M. Okawa; Y. Taniguchi; A. Ukawa; T. Yamazaki; T. Yoshi

2001-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

316

Abstract--The many different techniques for maximum power point tracking of photovoltaic arrays are discussed. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--The many different techniques for maximum power point tracking of photovoltaic arrays on implementation. This manuscript should serve as a convenient reference for future work in photovoltaic power generation. Index Terms--maximum power point tracking, MPPT, photovoltaic, PV. I. INTRODUCTION RACKING

Chapman, Patrick

317

On Maximum Available Feedback and PID Control -1 IEEE SMC UK&RI Applied Cybernetics Dr Richard Mitchell 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Maximum Available Feedback and PID Control - 1 IEEE SMC UK&RI Applied Cybernetics © Dr Richard Mitchell 2005 ON MAXIMUM AVAILABLE FEEDBACK AND PID CONTROL Dr Richard Mitchell, Cybernetics, University frequencies A recent IEEE SMC Paper describes a robust PID controller whose phase is flat at key frequencies

Mitchell, Richard

318

One of the most clearly established and widely known facts in locomotor physiology is that the maximum force exerted by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(musculoskeletal systems and man-made machines such as piston engines, jets, and electric motors that use rotary) that simulated in vivo maximum musculoskeletal performance was proportional to muscle mass0.83, a significant increase in the scaling exponent over that of maximum isometric force output. The dynamic performance

Marden, James

319

Blind Joint Maximum Likelihood Channel Estimation and Data Detection for Single-Input Multiple-Output Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Blind Joint Maximum Likelihood Channel Estimation and Data Detection for Single-Input Multiple of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ, U.K. Abstract--A blind adaptive scheme is proposed for joint maximum. A simulation example is used to demon- strate the effectiveness of this joint ML optimization scheme for blind

Chen, Sheng

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-irritants ii efficacy Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

mailbox in the facultystaff mailbox area in front of the elevator at the college. Student Self-Efficacy... this form at the end of the semester for SocW 570 Field Instruction...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Structured communication: effects on teaching efficacy of student teachers and student teacher - cooperating teacher relationships  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Teaching efficacy beliefs of agricultural science student teachers, and their relationship with their cooperating teachers during field experiences, are variables that may affect the number of student teachers entering the profession. The purpose...

Edgar, Don Wayne

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

Efficacy of Misuse Detection in Adhoc Networks Dhanant Subhadrabandhu, Saswati Sarkar, and Farooq Anjum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Efficacy of Misuse Detection in Adhoc Networks Dhanant Subhadrabandhu, Saswati Sarkar, and Farooq. Subhadrabandhu and S. Sarkar are at the department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University

Sarkar, Saswati

323

Variable Selection for Modeling the Absolute Magnitude at Maximum of Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates of the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux-ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernova: i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested to add more va...

Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Analysis to determine the maximum dimensions of flexible apertures in sensored security netting products.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although technological advances provide new capabilities to increase the robustness of security systems, they also potentially introduce new vulnerabilities. New capability sometimes requires new performance requirements. This paper outlines an approach to establishing a key performance requirement for an emerging intrusion detection sensor: the sensored net. Throughout the security industry, the commonly adopted standard for maximum opening size through barriers is a requirement based on square inches-typically 96 square inches. Unlike standard rigid opening, the dimensions of a flexible aperture are not fixed, but variable and conformable. It is demonstrably simple for a human intruder to move through a 96-square-inch opening that is conformable to the human body. The longstanding 96-square-inch requirement itself, though firmly embedded in policy and best practice, lacks a documented empirical basis. This analysis concluded that the traditional 96-square-inch standard for openings is insufficient for flexible openings that are conformable to the human body. Instead, a circumference standard is recommended for these newer types of sensored barriers. The recommended maximum circumference for a flexible opening should be no more than 26 inches, as measured on the inside of the netting material.

Murton, Mark; Bouchier, Francis A.; vanDongen, Dale T.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Cutler, Robert Paul; Ross, Michael P.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Quantifying extrinsic noise in gene expression using the maximum entropy framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a maximum entropy framework to separate intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to noisy gene expression solely from the profile of expression. We express the experimentally accessible probability distribution of the copy number of the gene product (mRNA or protein) by accounting for possible variations in extrinsic factors. The distribution of extrinsic factors is estimated using the maximum entropy principle. Our results show that extrinsic factors qualitatively and quantitatively affect the probability distribution of the gene product. We work out, in detail, the transcription of mRNA from a constitutively expressed promoter in {\\it E. coli}. We suggest that the variation in extrinsic factors may account for the observed {\\it wider than Poisson} distribution of mRNA copy numbers. We successfully test our framework on a numerical simulation of a simple gene expression scheme that accounts for the variation in extrinsic factors. We also make falsifiable predictions, some of which are tested on previous experiments in {\\it E. coli} while others need verification. Application of the current framework to more complex situations is also discussed.

Purushottam D. Dixit

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

326

Quantum maximum-entropy principle for closed quantum hydrodynamic transport within a Wigner function formalism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By introducing a quantum entropy functional of the reduced density matrix, the principle of quantum maximum entropy is asserted as fundamental principle of quantum statistical mechanics. Accordingly, we develop a comprehensive theoretical formalism to construct rigorously a closed quantum hydrodynamic transport within a Wigner function approach. The theoretical formalism is formulated in both thermodynamic equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions, and the quantum contributions are obtained by only assuming that the Lagrange multipliers can be expanded in powers of ({h_bar}/2{pi}){sup 2}. In particular, by using an arbitrary number of moments, we prove that (1) on a macroscopic scale all nonlocal effects, compatible with the uncertainty principle, are imputable to high-order spatial derivatives, both of the numerical density n and of the effective temperature T; (2) the results available from the literature in the framework of both a quantum Boltzmann gas and a degenerate quantum Fermi gas are recovered as a particular case; (3) the statistics for the quantum Fermi and Bose gases at different levels of degeneracy are explicitly incorporated; (4) a set of relevant applications admitting exact analytical equations are explicitly given and discussed; (5) the quantum maximum entropy principle keeps full validity in the classical limit, when ({h_bar}/2{pi}){yields}0.

Trovato, M. [Dipartimento di Matematica, Universita di Catania, Viale A. Doria, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Reggiani, L. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione and CNISM, Universita del Salento, Via Arnesano s/n, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Luminant Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowell Point, Alaska: EnergyLudlow,Lumeta Inc Jump

328

EXPLAINING THE [C II]157.7 {mu}m DEFICIT IN LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES-FIRST RESULTS FROM A HERSCHEL/PACS STUDY OF THE GOALS SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the first results of a survey of the [C II]157.7 {mu}m emission line in 241 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) comprising the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) sample, obtained with the PACS instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. The [C II] luminosities, L{sub [C{sub II]}}, of the LIRGs in GOALS range from {approx}10{sup 7} to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} L{sub Sun }. We find that LIRGs show a tight correlation of [C II]/FIR with far-IR (FIR) flux density ratios, with a strong negative trend spanning from {approx}10{sup -2} to 10{sup -4}, as the average temperature of dust increases. We find correlations between the [C II]/FIR ratio and the strength of the 9.7 {mu}m silicate absorption feature as well as with the luminosity surface density of the mid-IR emitting region ({Sigma}{sub MIR}), suggesting that warmer, more compact starbursts have substantially smaller [C II]/FIR ratios. Pure star-forming LIRGs have a mean [C II]/FIR {approx} 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, while galaxies with low polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) equivalent widths (EWs), indicative of the presence of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), span the full range in [C II]/FIR. However, we show that even when only pure star-forming galaxies are considered, the [C II]/FIR ratio still drops by an order of magnitude, from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -3}, with {Sigma}{sub MIR} and {Sigma}{sub IR}, implying that the [C II]157.7 {mu}m luminosity is not a good indicator of the star formation rate (SFR) for most local LIRGs, for it does not scale linearly with the warm dust emission most likely associated to the youngest stars. Moreover, even in LIRGs in which we detect an AGN in the mid-IR, the majority (2/3) of galaxies show [C II]/FIR {>=} 10{sup -3} typical of high 6.2 {mu}m PAH EW sources, suggesting that most AGNs do not contribute significantly to the FIR emission. We provide an empirical relation between the [C II]/FIR and the specific SFR for star-forming LIRGs. Finally, we present predictions for the starburst size based on the observed [C II] and FIR luminosities which should be useful for comparing with results from future surveys of high-redshift galaxies with ALMA and CCAT.

Diaz-Santos, T.; Armus, L.; Howell, J. H.; Surace, J. A. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, MS 220-6, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [IESL/Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas, GR-71110, Heraklion (Greece); Stierwalt, S.; Evans, A. S.; Mazzarella, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Murphy, E. J. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield NSW 2122 (Australia); Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Malhotra, S. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Meijerink, R. [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, NL-9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Stacey, G. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Petric, A. O.; Lu, N. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Veilleux, S. [Joint Space-Science Institute, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Van der Werf, P. P. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Lord, S.; Appleton, P., E-mail: tanio@ipac.caltech.edu [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, California Institute of Technology, MS 100-22, Cech, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Bayesian and maximum entropy methods for fusion diagnostic measurements with compact neutron spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, it is advantageous to use methods of data analysis which can extract information from the spectrum that is directly related to the parameters of interest that describe the plasma. We present here methods of data analysis which were developed with this goal in mind, and which were applied to spectrometric measurements made with an organic liquid scintillation detector (type NE213). In our approach, we combine Bayesian parameter estimation methods and unfolding methods based on the maximum entropy principle. This two-step method allows us to optimize the analysis of the data depending on the type of information that we want to extract from the measurements. To illustrate these methods, we analyze neutron measurements made at the PTB accelerator under controlled conditions, using accelerator-produced neutron beams. Although the methods have been chosen with a specific application in mind, they are general enough to be useful for many other types of measurements.

Reginatto, Marcel; Zimbal, Andreas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Maximum Achievable Control Technology for New Industrial Boilers (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

As part of Clean Air Act 90 (CAAA90, the EPA on February 26, 2004, issued a final rulethe National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) to reduce emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from industrial, commercial, and institutional boilers and process heaters. The rule requires industrial boilers and process heaters to meet limits on HAP emissions to comply with a Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) floor level of control that is the minimum level such sources must meet to comply with the rule. The major HAPs to be reduced are hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, and nickel. The EPA predicts that the boiler MACT rule will reduce those HAP emissions from existing sources by about 59,000 tons per year in 2005.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Netest: A Tool to Measure the Maximum Burst Size, Available Bandwidth and Achievable Throughput  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distinguishing available bandwidth and achievable throughput is essential for improving network applications' performance. Achievable throughput is the throughput considering a number of factors such as network protocol, host speed, network path, and TCP buffer space, where as available bandwidth only considers the network path. Without understanding this difference, trying to improve network applications' performance is like ''blind men feeling the elephant'' [4]. In this paper, we define and distinguish bandwidth and throughput, and debate which part of each is achievable and which is available. Also, we introduce and discuss a new concept - Maximum Burst Size that is crucial to the network performance and bandwidth sharing. A tool, netest, is introduced to help users to determine the available bandwidth, and provides information to achieve better throughput with fairness of sharing the available bandwidth, thus reducing misuse of the network.

Jin, Guojun; Tierney, Brian

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

From Physics to Economics: An Econometric Example Using Maximum Relative Entropy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Econophysics, is based on the premise that some ideas and methods from physics can be applied to economic situations. We intend to show in this paper how a physics concept such as entropy can be applied to an economic problem. In so doing, we demonstrate how information in the form of observable data and moment constraints are introduced into the method of Maximum relative Entropy (MrE). A general example of updating with data and moments is shown. Two specific econometric examples are solved in detail which can then be used as templates for real world problems. A numerical example is compared to a large deviation solution which illustrates some of the advantages of the MrE method.

Giffin, Adom

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

A. Vaudrey; P. Baucour; F. Lanzetta; R. Glises

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

Detailed analysis of an endoreversible fuel cell : Maximum power and optimal operating temperature determination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing useful electrical work in consuming chemical energy, the fuel cell have to reject heat to its surrounding. However, as it occurs for any other type of engine, this thermal energy cannot be exchanged in an isothermal way in finite time through finite areas. As it was already done for various types of systems, we study the fuel cell within the finite time thermodynamics framework and define an endoreversible fuel cell. Considering different types of heat transfer laws, we obtain an optimal value of the operating temperature, corresponding to a maximum produced power. This analysis is a first step of a thermodynamical approach of design of thermal management devices, taking into account performances of the whole system.

Vaudrey, A; Lanzetta, F; Glises, R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Combustion Process in a Spark Ignition Engine: Analysis of Cyclic Maximum Pressure and Peak Pressure Angle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we analyze the cycle-to-cycle variations of maximum pressure $p_{max}$ and peak pressure angle $\\alpha_{pmax}$ in a four-cylinder spark ignition engine. We examine the experimental time series of $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$ for three different spark advance angles. Using standard statistical techniques such as return maps and histograms we show that depending on the spark advance angle, there are significant differences in the fluctuations of $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$. We also calculate the multiscale entropy of the various time series to estimate the effect of randomness in these fluctuations. Finally, we explain how the information on both $p_{max}$ and $\\alpha_{pmax}$ can be used to develop optimal strategies for controlling the combustion process and improving engine performance.

G. Litak; T. Kaminski; J. Czarnigowski; A. K. Sen; M. Wendeker

2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Online Robot Dead Reckoning Localization Using Maximum Relative Entropy Optimization With Model Constraints  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle of Maximum relative Entropy optimization was analyzed for dead reckoning localization of a rigid body when observation data of two attached accelerometers was collected. Model constraints were derived from the relationships between the sensors. The experiment's results confirmed that accelerometers each axis' noise can be successfully filtered utilizing dependency between channels and the dependency between time series data. Dependency between channels was used for a priori calculation, and a posteriori distribution was derived utilizing dependency between time series data. There was revisited data of autocalibration experiment by removing the initial assumption that instantaneous rotation axis of a rigid body was known. Performance results confirmed that such an approach could be used for online dead reckoning localization.

Urniezius, Renaldas [Kaunas University of Technology, Kaunas (Lithuania)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

337

Azimuthal Anisotropy in Heavy Ion Collisions from the Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new parameters delta and lambda2. The parameter delta describes the deformation of transverse configuration space and is related to the anisotropy of the overlap zone of the two nuclei. The parameter lambda2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space. Assuming deformed flux tubes at the early stage of the collision we relate the momentum to the space asymmetry i.e. lambda2 to delta with the uncertainty relation. We compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity using gluon-hadron duality. The general features of LHC data are reproduced.

Pirner, Hans J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Source Function Determined from HBT Correlations by the Maximum Entropy Principle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the reconstruction of the source function in space-time directly from the measured HBT correlation function using the Maximum Entropy Principle. We find that the problem is ill-defined without at least one additional theoretical constraint as input. Using the requirement of a finite source lifetime for the latter we find a new Gaussian parametrization of the source function directly in terms of the measured HBT radius parameters and its lifetime, where the latter is a free parameter which is not directly measurable by HBT. We discuss the implications of our results for the remaining freedom in building source models consistent with a given set of measured HBT radius parameters.

Wu Yuanfang; Ulrich Heinz

1996-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

339

Spectral Analysis of Excited Nucleons in Lattice QCD with Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the mass spectra of excited baryons with the use of the lattice QCD simulations. We focus our attention on the problem of the level ordering between the positive-parity excited state N'(1440) (the Roper resonance) and the negative-parity excited state N^*(1535). Nearly perfect parity projection is accomplished by combining the quark propagators with periodic and anti-periodic boundary conditions in the temporal direction. Then we extract the spectral functions from the lattice data by utilizing the maximum entropy method. We observe that the masses of the N' and N^* states are close for wide range of the quark masses (M_pi=0.61-1.22 GeV), which is in contrast to the phenomenological prediction of the quark models. The role of the Wilson doublers in the baryonic spectral functions is also studied.

Kiyoshi Sasaki; Shoichi Sasaki; Tetsuo Hatsuda

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

340

A maximum-entropy approach to the adiabatic freezing of a supercooled liquid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I employ the van der Waals theory of Baus and coworkers to analyze the fast, adiabatic decay of a supercooled liquid in a closed vessel with which the solidification process usually starts. By imposing a further constraint on either the system volume or pressure, I use the maximum-entropy method to quantify the fraction of liquid that is transformed into solid as a function of undercooling and of the amount of a foreign gas that could possibly be also present in the test tube. Upon looking at the implications of thermal and mechanical insulation for the energy cost of forming a solid droplet within the liquid, I identify one situation where the onset of solidification inevitably occurs near the wall in contact with the bath.

Santi Prestipino

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Lyapunov exponent and natural invariant density determination of chaotic maps: An iterative maximum entropy ansatz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the maximum entropy principle to construct the natural invariant density and Lyapunov exponent of one-dimensional chaotic maps. Using a novel function reconstruction technique that is based on the solution of Hausdorff moment problem via maximizing Shannon entropy, we estimate the invariant density and the Lyapunov exponent of nonlinear maps in one-dimension from a knowledge of finite number of moments. The accuracy and the stability of the algorithm are illustrated by comparing our results to a number of nonlinear maps for which the exact analytical results are available. Furthermore, we also consider a very complex example for which no exact analytical result for invariant density is available. A comparison of our results to those available in the literature is also discussed.

Parthapratim Biswas; H. Shimoyama; L. R. Mead

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

342

Spectral function and excited states in lattice QCD with maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the maximum entropy method to extract the spectral functions for pseudoscalar and vector mesons from hadron correlators previously calculated at four different lattice spacings in quenched QCD with the Wilson quark action. We determine masses and decay constants for the ground and excited states of the pseudoscalar and vector channels from position and area of peaks in the spectral functions. We obtain the results, $m_{\\pi_1} = 660(590)$ MeV and $m_{\\rho_1} = 1540(570)$ MeV for the masses of the first excited state masses, in the continuum limit of quenched QCD. We also find unphysical states which have infinite mass in the continuum limit, and argue that they are bound states of two doublers of the Wilson quark action. If the interpretation is correct, this is the first time that the state of doublers is identified in lattice QCD numerical simulations.

CP-PACS Collaboration; :; T. Yamazaki; S. Aoki; R. Burkhalter; M. Fukugita; S. Hashimoto; N. Ishizuka; Y. Iwasaki; K. Kanaya; T. Kaneko; Y. Kuramashi; M. Okawa; Y. Taniguchi; A. Ukawa; T. Yoshi

2001-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

343

Application of the Maximum Entropy Method to the (2+1)d Four-Fermion Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate spectral functions extracted using the Maximum Entropy Method from correlators measured in lattice simulations of the (2+1)-dimensional four-fermion model. This model is particularly interesting because it has both a chirally broken phase with a rich spectrum of mesonic bound states and a symmetric phase where there are only resonances. In the broken phase we study the elementary fermion, pion, sigma and massive pseudoscalar meson; our results confirm the Goldstone nature of the pi and permit an estimate of the meson binding energy. We have, however, seen no signal of sigma -> pi pi decay as the chiral limit is approached. In the symmetric phase we observe a resonance of non-zero width in qualitative agreement with analytic expectations; in addition the ultra-violet behaviour of the spectral functions is consistent with the large non-perturbative anomalous dimension for fermion composite operators expected in this model.

C. R. Allton; J. E. Clowser; S. J. Hands; J. B. Kogut; C. G. Strouthos

2002-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

Azimuthal Anisotropy in Heavy Ion Collisions from the Maximum Entropy Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the azimuthal anisotropy v2 of particle production in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the maximum entropy approach. This necessitates two new parameters delta and lambda2. The parameter delta describes the deformation of transverse configuration space and is related to the anisotropy of the overlap zone of the two nuclei. The parameter lambda2 defines the anisotropy of the particle distribution in momentum space. Assuming deformed flux tubes at the early stage of the collision we relate the momentum to the space asymmetry i.e. lambda2 to delta with the uncertainty relation. We compute the anisotropy v2 as a function of centrality, transverse momentum and rapidity using gluon-hadron duality. The general features of LHC data are reproduced.

Hans J. Pirner

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

CP$^{N-1}$ model with the theta term and maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A $\\theta$ term in lattice field theory causes the sign problem in Monte Carlo simulations. This problem can be circumvented by Fourier-transforming the topological charge distribution $P(Q)$. This strategy, however, has a limitation, because errors of $P(Q)$ prevent one from calculating the partition function ${\\cal Z}(\\theta)$ properly for large volumes. This is called flattening. As an alternative approach to the Fourier method, we utilize the maximum entropy method (MEM) to calculate ${\\cal Z}(\\theta)$. We apply the MEM to Monte Carlo data of the CP$^3$ model. It is found that in the non-flattening case, the result of the MEM agrees with that of the Fourier transform, while in the flattening case, the MEM gives smooth ${\\cal Z}(\\theta)$.

Masahiro Imachi; Yasuhiko Shinno; Hiroshi Yoneyama

2004-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

346

MADmap: A Massively Parallel Maximum-Likelihood Cosmic Microwave Background Map-Maker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MADmap is a software application used to produce maximum-likelihood images of the sky from time-ordered data which include correlated noise, such as those gathered by Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) experiments. It works efficiently on platforms ranging from small workstations to the most massively parallel supercomputers. Map-making is a critical step in the analysis of all CMB data sets, and the maximum-likelihood approach is the most accurate and widely applicable algorithm; however, it is a computationally challenging task. This challenge will only increase with the next generation of ground-based, balloon-borne and satellite CMB polarization experiments. The faintness of the B-mode signal that these experiments seek to measure requires them to gather enormous data sets. MADmap is already being run on up to O(1011) time samples, O(108) pixels and O(104) cores, with ongoing work to scale to the next generation of data sets and supercomputers. We describe MADmap's algorithm based around a preconditioned conjugate gradient solver, fast Fourier transforms and sparse matrix operations. We highlight MADmap's ability to address problems typically encountered in the analysis of realistic CMB data sets and describe its application to simulations of the Planck and EBEX experiments. The massively parallel and distributed implementation is detailed and scaling complexities are given for the resources required. MADmap is capable of analysing the largest data sets now being collected on computing resources currently available, and we argue that, given Moore's Law, MADmap will be capable of reducing the most massive projected data sets.

Cantalupo, Christopher; Borrill, Julian; Jaffe, Andrew; Kisner, Theodore; Stompor, Radoslaw

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

347

Is the friction angle the maximum slope of a free surface of a non cohesive material?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from a symmetric triangular pile with a horizontal basis and rotating the basis in the vertical plane, we have determined the evolution of the stress distribution as a function of the basis inclination using Finite Elements method with an elastic-perfectly plastic constitutive model, defined by its friction angle, without cohesion. It is found that when the yield function is the Drucker-Prager one, stress distribution satisfying equilibrium can be found even when one of the free-surface slopes is larger than the friction angle. This means that piles with a slope larger than the friction angle can be (at least) marginally stable and that slope rotation is not always a destabilising perturbation direction. On the contrary, it is found that the slope cannot overpass the friction angle when a Mohr-Coulomb yield function is used. Theoretical explanation of these facts is given which enlightens the role plaid by the intermediate principal stress in both cases of the Mohr-Coulomb criterion and of the Drucker-Prager one. It is then argued that the Mohr-Coulomb criterion assumes a spontaneous symmetry breaking, as soon as the two smallest principal stresses are different ; this is not physical most likely; so this criterion shall be replaced by a Drucker-Prager criterion in the vicinity of the equality, which leads to the previous anomalous behaviour ; so these numerical computations enlighten the avalanche process: they show that no dynamical angle larger than the static one is needed to understand avalanching. It is in agreement with previous experimental results. Furthermore, these results show that the maximum angle of repose can be modified using cyclic rotations; we propose a procedure that allows to achieve a maximum angle of repose to be equal to the friction angle .

A. Modaressi; P. Evesque

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

348

Occurrence of high-speed solar wind streams over the Grand Modern Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the declining phase of the solar cycle, when the new-polarity fields of the solar poles are strengthened by the transport of same-signed magnetic flux from lower latitudes, the polar coronal holes expand and form non-axisymmetric extensions toward the solar equator. These extensions enhance the occurrence of high-speed solar wind streams (HSS) and related co-rotating interaction regions in the low-latitude heliosphere, and cause moderate, recurrent geomagnetic activity in the near-Earth space. Here, using a novel definition of geomagnetic activity at high (polar cap) latitudes and the longest record of magnetic observations at a polar cap station, we calculate the annually averaged solar wind speeds as proxies for the effective annual occurrence of HSS over the whole Grand Modern Maximum (GMM) from 1920s onwards. We find that a period of high annual speeds (frequent occurrence of HSS) occurs in the declining phase of each solar cycle 16-23. For most cycles the HSS activity clearly maximizes during one year...

Mursula, Kalevi; Holappa, Lauri

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Parametric study on maximum transportable distance and cost for thermal energy transportation using various coolants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as district heating, desalination, hydrogen production and other process heat applications, etc. The process heat industry/facilities will be located outside the nuclear island due to safety measures. This thermal energy from the reactor has to be transported a fair distance. In this study, analytical analysis was conducted to identify the maximum distance that thermal energy could be transported using various coolants such as molten-salts, helium and water by varying the pipe diameter and mass flow rate. The cost required to transport each coolant was also analyzed. The coolants analyzed are molten salts (such as: KClMgCl2, LiF-NaF-KF (FLiNaK) and KF-ZrF4), helium and water. Fluoride salts are superior because of better heat transport characteristics but chloride salts are most economical for higher temperature transportation purposes. For lower temperature water is a possible alternative when compared with He, because low pressure He requires higher pumping power which makes the process very inefficient and economically not viable for both low and high temperature application.

Su-Jong Yoon; Piyush Sabharwall

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Maximum Reasonable Radioxenon Releases from Medical Isotope Production Facilities and Their Effect on Monitoring Nuclear Explosions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fission gases such as 133Xe are used extensively for monitoring the world for signs of nuclear testing in systems such as the International Monitoring System (IMS). These gases are also produced by nuclear reactors and by fission production of 99Mo for medical use. Recently, medical isotope production facilities have been identified as the major contributor to the background of radioactive xenon isotopes (radioxenon) in the atmosphere (Saey, et al., 2009). These releases pose a potential future problem for monitoring nuclear explosions if not addressed. As a starting point, a maximum acceptable daily xenon emission rate was calculated, that is both scientifically defendable as not adversely affecting the IMS, but also consistent with what is possible to achieve in an operational environment. This study concludes that an emission of 5109 Bq/day from a medical isotope production facility would be both an acceptable upper limit from the perspective of minimal impact to monitoring stations, but also appears to be an achievable limit for large isotope producers.

Bowyer, Ted W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kephart, Rosara F.; Eslinger, Paul W. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Friese, Judah I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miley, Harry S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Saey, Paul R. [Vienna University of Technology, Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities, Vienna (Austria)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Structure of Turbulence in Katabatic Flows below and above the Wind-Speed Maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of small-scale turbulence made over the complex-terrain atmospheric boundary layer during the MATERHORN Program are used to describe the structure of turbulence in katabatic flows. Turbulent and mean meteorological data were continuously measured at multiple levels at four towers deployed along the East lower slope (2-4 deg) of Granite Mountain. The multi-level observations made during a 30-day long MATERHORN-Fall field campaign in September-October 2012 allowed studying of temporal and spatial structure of katabatic flows in detail, and herein we report turbulence and their variations in katabatic winds. Observed vertical profiles show steep gradients near the surface, but in the layer above the slope jet the vertical variability is smaller. It is found that the vertical (normal to the slope) momentum flux and horizontal (along the slope) heat flux in a slope-following coordinate system change their sign below and above the wind maximum of a katabatic flow. The vertical momentum flux is directed...

Grachev, Andrey A; Di Sabatino, Silvana; Fernando, Harindra J S; Pardyjak, Eric R; Fairall, Christopher W

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Thermal modification of bottomonium spectra from QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The bottomonium spectral functions at finite temperature are analyzed by employing QCD sum rules with the maximum entropy method. This approach enables us to extract the spectral functions without any phenomenological parametrization, and thus to visualize deformation of the spectral functions due to temperature effects estimated from quenched lattice QCD data. As a result, it is found that \\Upsilon and \\eta_b survive in hot matter of temperature up to at least 2.3T_c and 2.1T_c, respectively, while \\chi_{b0} and \\chi_{b1} will disappear at T<2.5T_c. Furthermore, a detailed analysis of the vector channel shows that the spectral function in the region of the lowest peak at T=0 contains contributions from the excited states, \\Upsilon(2S) and \\Upsilon(3S), as well as the ground states \\Upsilon (1S). Our results at finite T are consistent with the picture that the excited states of bottomonia dissociate at lower temperature than that of the ground state. Assuming this picture, we find that \\Upsilon(2S) and \\Upsilon(3S) disappear at T=1.5-2.0T_c.

Kei Suzuki; Philipp Gubler; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

2012-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

353

Maximum-entropy calculation of end-to-end distance distribution of force stretching chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the maximum-entropy method, we calculate the end-to-end distance distribution of the force stretched chain from the moments of the distribution, which can be obtained from the extension-force curves recorded in single-molecule experiments. If one knows force expansion of the extension through the $(n-1)$th power of force, it is enough information to calculate the $n$ moments of the distribution. We examine the method with three force stretching chain models, Gaussian chain, free-joined chain and excluded-volume chain on two-dimension lattice. The method reconstructs all distributions precisely. We also apply the method to force stretching complex chain molecules: the hairpin and secondary structure conformations. We find that the distributions of homogeneous chains of two conformations are very different: there are two independent peaks in hairpin distribution; while only one peak is observed in the distribution of secondary structure conformations. Our discussion also shows that the end-to-end distance distribution may discover more critical physical information than the simpler extension-force curves can give.

Luru Dai; Fei Liu; Zhong-can Ou-Yang

2002-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

354

Linearized semiclassical initial value time correlation functions with maximum entropy analytic continuation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maximum entropy analytic continuation (MEAC) method is used to extend the range of accuracy of the linearized semiclassical initial value representation (LSC-IVR)/classical Wigner approximation for real time correlation functions. The LSC-IVR provides a very effective 'prior' for the MEAC procedure since it is very good for short times, exact for all time and temperature for harmonic potentials (even for correlation functions of nonlinear operators), and becomes exact in the classical high temperature limit. This combined MEAC+LSC/IVR approach is applied here to two highly nonlinear dynamical systems, a pure quartic potential in one dimensional and liquid para-hydrogen at two thermal state points (25K and 14K under nearly zero external pressure). The former example shows the MEAC procedure to be a very significant enhancement of the LSC-IVR, for correlation functions of both linear and nonlinear operators, and especially at low temperature where semiclassical approximations are least accurate. For liquid para-hydrogen, the LSC-IVR is seen already to be excellent at T = 25K, but the MEAC procedure produces a significant correction at the lower temperature (T = 14K). Comparisons are also made to how the MEAC procedure is able to provide corrections for other trajectory-based dynamical approximations when used as priors.

Liu, Jian; Miller, William H.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

MID-INFRARED ATOMIC FINE-STRUCTURE EMISSION-LINE SPECTRA OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES: SPITZER/IRS SPECTRA OF THE GOALS SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the data and our analysis of mid-infrared atomic fine-structure emission lines detected in Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph high-resolution spectra of 202 local Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs) observed as part of the Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS). We readily detect emission lines of [S IV], [Ne II], [Ne V], [Ne III], [S III]{sub 18.7{sub ?m}}, [O IV], [Fe II], [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}, and [Si II]. More than 75% of these galaxies are classified as starburst-dominated sources in the mid-infrared, based on the [Ne V]/[Ne II] line flux ratios and equivalent width of the 6.2 ?m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon feature. We compare ratios of the emission-line fluxes to those predicted from stellar photo-ionization and shock-ionization models to constrain the physical and chemical properties of the gas in the starburst LIRG nuclei. Comparing the [S IV]/[Ne II] and [Ne III]/[Ne II] line ratios to the Starburst99-Mappings III models with an instantaneous burst history, the emission-line ratios suggest that the nuclear starbursts in our LIRGs have ages of 1-4.5 Myr, metallicities of 1-2 Z{sub ?}, and ionization parameters of 2-8 10{sup 7} cm s{sup 1}. Based on the [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}/[S III]{sub 18.7{sub ?m}} ratios, the electron density in LIRG nuclei is typically one to a few hundred cm{sup 3}, with a median electron density of ?300 cm{sup 3}, for those sources above the low density limit for these lines. We also find that strong shocks are likely present in 10 starburst-dominated sources of our sample. A significant fraction of the GOALS sources (80) have resolved neon emission-line profiles (FWHM ?600 km s{sup 1}) and five show clear differences in the velocities of the [Ne III] or [Ne V] emission lines, relative to [Ne II], of more than 200 km s{sup 1}. Furthermore, six starburst and five active galactic nucleus dominated LIRGs show a clear trend of increasing line width with ionization potential, suggesting the possibility of a compact energy source and stratified interstellar medium in their nuclei. We confirm a strong correlation between the sum of the [Ne II]{sub 12.8{sub ?m}} and [Ne III]{sub 15.5{sub ?m}} emission, as well as [S III]{sub 33.5{sub ?m}}, with both the infrared luminosity and the 24 ?m warm dust emission measured from the spectra, consistent with all three lines tracing ongoing star formation. Finally, we find no correlation between the hardness of the radiation field or the emission-line width and the ratio of the total infrared to 8 ?m emission (IR8), a measure of the strength of the starburst and the distance of the LIRGs from the star-forming main sequence. This may be a function of the fact that the infrared luminosity and the mid-infrared fine-structure lines are sensitive to different timescales over the starburst, or that IR8 is more sensitive to the geometry of the region emitting the warm dust than the radiation field producing the H II region emission.

Inami, H. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Armus, L.; Stierwalt, S.; Daz-Santos, T.; Surace, J.; Howell, J.; Marshall, J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, CA 91125 (United States); Charmandaris, V. [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical and Computational Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece); Groves, B. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Knigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kewley, L. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Cotter Road, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Petric, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MS 320-47, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Rich, J. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institute of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Haan, S. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Marsfield, NSW 2122 (Australia); Evans, A. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Mazzarella, J.; Lord, S. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Appleton, P. [NASA Herschel Science Center, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Spoon, H. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Frayer, D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 2, Green Bank, WV 24944 (United States); Matsuhara, H., E-mail: inami@noao.edu [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (Japan); and others

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

356

SPITZER SPECTROSCOPY OF INFRARED-LUMINOUS GALAXIES: DIAGNOSTICS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI AND STAR FORMATION AND CONTRIBUTION TO TOTAL INFRARED LUMINOSITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy from the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph to study the nature of star-formation and supermassive black hole accretion for a sample of 65 IR-luminous galaxies at 0.02 < z < 0.6 with F(24 {mu}m) > 1.2 mJy. The MIR spectra cover wavelengths 5-38 {mu}m, spanning the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features and important atomic diagnostic lines. Our sample of galaxies corresponds to a range of total IR luminosity, L{sub IR} = L(8-1000 {mu}m) = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} (median L{sub IR} of 3.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} L{sub Sun }). We divide our sample into a subsample of galaxies with Spitzer Infrared Array Camera 3.6-8.0 {mu}m colors indicative of warm dust heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN; IRAGN) and those galaxies whose colors indicate star-formation processes (non-IRAGN). Compared to the non-IRAGN, the IRAGN show smaller PAH emission equivalent widths, which we attribute to an increase in mid-IR continuum from the AGN. We find that in both the IRAGN and star-forming samples, the luminosity in the PAH features correlates strongly with [Ne II] {lambda}12.8 {mu}m emission line, from which we conclude that the PAH luminosity directly traces the instantaneous star-formation rate (SFR) in both the IRAGN and star-forming galaxies. We compare the ratio of PAH luminosity to the total IR luminosity, and we show that for most IRAGN star-formation accounts for 10%-50% of the total IR luminosity. We also find no measurable difference between the PAH luminosity ratios of L{sub 11.3}/L{sub 7.7} and L{sub 6.2}/L{sub 7.7} for the IRAGN and non-IRAGN, suggesting that AGN do not significantly excite or destroy PAH molecules on galaxy-wide scales. Interestingly, a small subset of galaxies (8 of 65 galaxies) show a strong excess of [O IV] {lambda}25.9 {mu}m emission compared to their PAH emission, which indicates the presence of heavily-obscured AGN, including 3 galaxies that are not otherwise selected as IRAGN. The low PAH emission and low [Ne II] emission of the IRAGN and [O IV]-excess objects imply the IR luminosity of these objects is dominated by processes associated with the AGN. Because these galaxies lie in the ''green valley'' of the optical color-magnitude relation and have low implied SFRs, we argue their hosts have declining SFRs and these objects will transition to the red sequence unless some process restarts their star-formation.

Shipley, Heath V.; Papovich, Casey [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242 (United States); Rieke, George H.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Weiner, Benjamin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ, 85719 (United States); Moustakas, John, E-mail: heath.shipley@tamu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Siena College, Loudonville, NY 12211 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

357

Setting the Renormalization Scale in QCD: The Principle of Maximum Conformality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale {mu} of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}): The purpose of the running coupling in any gauge theory is to sum all terms involving the {beta} function; in fact, when the renormalization scale is set properly, all non-conformal {beta} {ne} 0 terms in a perturbative expansion arising from renormalization are summed into the running coupling. The remaining terms in the perturbative series are then identical to that of a conformal theory; i.e., the corresponding theory with {beta} = 0. The resulting scale-fixed predictions using the 'principle of maximum conformality' (PMC) are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme - a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC is also the theoretical principle underlying the BLM procedure, commensurate scale relations between observables, and the scale-setting method used in lattice gauge theory. The number of active flavors nf in the QCD {beta} function is also correctly determined. We discuss several methods for determining the PMC/BLM scale for QCD processes. We show that a single global PMC scale, valid at leading order, can be derived from basic properties of the perturbative QCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increase the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of collider experiments to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC /Southern Denmark U., CP3-Origins; Di Giustino, Leonardo; /SLAC

2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

358

Evaluation of a photovoltaic energy mechatronics system with a built-in quadratic maximum power point tracking algorithm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The historically high cost of crude oil price is stimulating research into solar (green) energy as an alternative energy source. In general, applications with large solar energy output require a maximum power point tracking (MPPT) algorithm to optimize the power generated by the photovoltaic effect. This work aims to provide a stand-alone solution for solar energy applications by integrating a DC/DC buck converter to a newly developed quadratic MPPT algorithm along with its appropriate software and hardware. The quadratic MPPT method utilizes three previously used duty cycles with their corresponding power outputs. It approaches the maximum value by using a second order polynomial formula, which converges faster than the existing MPPT algorithm. The hardware implementation takes advantage of the real-time controller system from National Instruments, USA. Experimental results have shown that the proposed solar mechatronics system can correctly and effectively track the maximum power point without any difficulties. (author)

Chao, R.M.; Ko, S.H.; Lin, I.H. [Department of Systems and Naval Mechatronics Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan 701 (China); Pai, F.S. [Department of Electronic Engineering, National University of Tainan (China); Chang, C.C. [Department of Environment and Energy, National University of Tainan (China)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

359

Collective efficacy as identified by teachers at Heritage Middle School, East Central Independent School District, San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the students at Heritage Middle School successful. iv The second question studied was, What is the relationship between selected demographic variables and the perceptions of the teachers regarding collective efficacy at Heritage Middle School, East Central... Based on Ethnicity ............................................................................................. 64 10 Independent Samples t-test of the White and Hispanic Teachers From Heritage Middle School in the Perceived Collective Efficacy Survey...

Naumann, Luisa Maria

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

360

OBIT DEVELOPMENT MEMO SERIES NO. 21 1 Efficacy of Obit Threading on an EVLA Dataset  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBIT DEVELOPMENT MEMO SERIES NO. 21 1 Efficacy of Obit Threading on an EVLA Dataset W. D. Cotton, R of the Obit wide bandwidth imager MFImage in realistic tests on an EVLA dataset including multiple iterations://www.cv.nrao.edu/bcotton/Obit.html) to do wide- band imaging of a recent EVLA dataset. This test uses multiple iterations of self

Groppi, Christopher

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361

Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficacy-aware Business Process Modeling Matthias Lohrmann and Manfred Reichert Ulm University. In business process design, business objective models can ful- fill the role of formal requirement definitions for progressive appli- cations like automated process optimization. Key words: Business Process Modeling

Ulm, Universität

362

Comparison of the Efficacy of Popular Weight Loss Programs in Sedentary Overweight Women  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study compared the efficacy of the Curves Complete 90-day Challenge (CC), Weight Watchers Points Plus (WW), Jenny Craig At Home (JC), and Nutrisystem Advance Select (NS) on weight loss, body composition and/or markers of health and fitness...

Baetge, Claire

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

363

Heat of the Moment: Characterizing the Efficacy of Thermal Camera-Based Attacks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat of the Moment: Characterizing the Efficacy of Thermal Camera-Based Attacks Keaton Mowery UC to analyze the data. First, we present code recovery re- sults from human review of our test data set lock on an industrial safe, he found that body heat from the user transferred to the individual keys

364

Efficacy of Imazapyr and Glyphosate in the Control of Non-Native Phragmites australis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficacy of Imazapyr and Glyphosate in the Control of Non-Native Phragmites australis Thomas J reed (Phragmites australis) has been expanding into previously unoccupied wetland habitats throughout, phragmites, wetlands. Introduction The common reed (Phragmites australis (Cav.) Trin. Ex Steud.) has been

McGlathery, Karen

365

Eliminating the Renormalization Scale Ambiguity for Top-Pair Production Using the Principle of Maximum Conformality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uncertainty in setting the renormalization scale in finite-order perturbative QCD predictions using standard methods substantially reduces the precision of tests of the Standard Model in collider experiments. It is conventional to choose a typical momentum transfer of the process as the renormalization scale and take an arbitrary range to estimate the uncertainty in the QCD prediction. However, predictions using this procedure depend on the choice of renormalization scheme, leave a non-convergent renormalon perturbative series, and moreover, one obtains incorrect results when applied to QED processes. In contrast, if one fixes the renormalization scale using the Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC), all non-conformal {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling, and one obtains a unique, scale-fixed, scheme-independent prediction at any finite order. The PMC renormalization scale {mu}{sub R}{sup PMC} and the resulting finite-order PMC prediction are both to high accuracy independent of choice of the initial renormalization scale {mu}{sub R}{sup init}, consistent with renormalization group invariance. Moreover, after PMC scale-setting, the n!-growth of the pQCD expansion is eliminated. Even the residual scale-dependence at fixed order due to unknown higher-order {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms is substantially suppressed. As an application, we apply the PMC procedure to obtain NNLO predictions for the t{bar t}-pair hadroproduction cross-section at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. There are no renormalization scale or scheme uncertainties, thus greatly improving the precision of the QCD prediction. The PMC prediction for {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is larger in magnitude in comparison with the conventional scale-setting method, and it agrees well with the present Tevatron and LHC data. We also verify that the initial scale-independence of the PMC prediction is satisfied to high accuracy at the NNLO level: the total cross-section remains almost unchanged even when taking very disparate initial scales {mu}{sub R}{sup init} equal to m{sub t}, 20 m{sub t}, {radical}s.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Wu, Xing-Gang; /Chongqing U.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Destruction of the Tertiary Ozone Maximum During a Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Maximum During a Solar Proton Event A. Sepp¨al¨a, P. T. Verronen, V. F. Sofieva, J. Tamminen, E. Kyr¨ol¨a Finnish Meteorological Institute, Earth Observation, Helsinki, Finland C. J. Rodger Physics Department to study the effects of the January 2005 solar storms on the polar winter middle atmosphere. The model

Otago, University of

367

The Effect of Equilibrating Mounted Dental Stone Casts in Maximum Intercuspation on the Occlusal Harmony of an Indirect Restoration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/CO discrepancy. Ramfjord found 0.3 to 0.5 forward of CO to be physiologic [8]. Celenza, using the RUM definition of CR, found MI to be 0.02 to 0.36 mm forward of CO [9]. Parker recommends a maximum MI/CO discrepancy of 0.5 mm forward as a criterion... .............................................. 8 Overview.............................................................................................................. .8 Introduction .......................................................................................................... .9...

Benson, Peter Andrew

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Improved maximum cooling by optimizing the geometry of thermoelectric leg elements Yan Zhang, Zhixi Bian and Ali Shakouri*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in improving the thermoelectric efficiency and maximum cooling mainly focuses on improving materials' figure , power factor; , thermal conductivity. Bi2Te3 has been the most popular thermoelectric material at room a high power factor. Most of the recent research on thermoelectrics focuses on improving the material

369

Detecting Anomalies in Network Traffic Using Maximum Entropy Estimation Yu Gu, Andrew McCallum, Don Towsley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the network administrator a multi dimensional view of the network traffic. Our method can detect anomalies classes that increase the relative entropy thus providing the network administrator information related1 Detecting Anomalies in Network Traffic Using Maximum Entropy Estimation Yu Gu, Andrew Mc

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

370

Maximum-Intensity Volumes for Fast Contouring of Lung Tumors Including Respiratory Motion in 4DCT Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the accuracy of maximum-intensity volumes (MIV) for fast contouring of lung tumors including respiratory motion. Methods and Materials: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) data of 10 patients were acquired. Maximum-intensity volumes were constructed by assigning the maximum Hounsfield unit in all CT volumes per geometric voxel to a new, synthetic volume. Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on all CT volumes, and their union was constructed. The GTV with all its respiratory motion was contoured on the MIV as well. Union GTVs and GTVs including motion were compared visually. Furthermore, planning target volumes (PTVs) were constructed for the union of GTVs and the GTV on MIV. These PTVs were compared by centroid position, volume, geometric extent, and surface distance. Results: Visual comparison of GTVs demonstrated failure of the MIV technique for 5 of 10 patients. For adequate GTV{sub MIV}s, differences between PTVs were <1.0 mm in centroid position, 5% in volume, {+-}5 mm in geometric extent, and {+-}0.5 {+-} 2.0 mm in surface distance. These values represent the uncertainties for successful MIV contouring. Conclusion: Maximum-intensity volumes are a good first estimate for target volume definition including respiratory motion. However, it seems mandatory to validate each individual MIV by overlaying it on a movie loop displaying the 4DCT data and editing it for possible inadequate coverage of GTVs on additional 4DCT motion states.

Rietzel, Eike [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Abteilung Biophysik, Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany)], E-mail: eike@rietzel.net; Liu, Arthur K.; Chen, George T.Y.; Choi, Noah C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Development of a branch and price approach involving vertex cloning to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a novel branch-and-price (B&P) approach to solve the maximum weighted independent set problem (MWISP). Our approach uses clones of vertices to create edge-disjoint partitions from vertex-disjoint partitions. We solve the MWISP on sub...

Sachdeva, Sandeep

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three) study. The new analysis is based on the latest computer models and examines the wind potential at wind responsible for the increased wind potential in the study. Developed in collaboration with renewable energy

373

TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 46 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident Coverage y 24-Hour Business Travel y

374

TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100,000 of Accidental Death and Dismemberment (Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 53 - TRAVEL ACCIDENT INSURANCE CHUBB Benefits The maximum benefit (Principal Sum) is $100 of the accident, the policy will pay as follows: Payment Schedule Injury or Dismemberment Policy Pays Loss of Life to seven days Aggregate Limit of Insurance: $1,000,000 per Accident NOTE: The insurance coverage described

375

Glacier recession on Cerro Charquini (168 S), Bolivia, since the maximum of the Little Ice Age (17th century)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glacier recession on Cerro Charquini (168 S), Bolivia, since the maximum of the Little Ice Age (17 de Miraflores, La Paz, Bolivia 3 CP 9214, La Paz, Bolivia 4 Maison des Sciences de l'Eau, BP 64501, 34394 Montpellier, France ABSTRACT. Cerro Charquini, Bolivia (Cordillera Real, 5392 m a

Rabatel, Antoine

376

Application of the Principle of Maximum Conformality to Top-Pair Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major contribution to the uncertainty of finite-order perturbative QCD predictions is the perceived ambiguity in setting the renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}. For example, by using the conventional way of setting {mu}{sub r} {element_of} [m{sub t}/2, 2m{sub t}], one obtains the total t{bar t} production cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} with the uncertainty {Delta}{sigma}{sub t{bar t}}/{sigma}{sub t{bar t}} {approx} (+3%/-4%) at the Tevatron and LHC even for the present NNLO level. The Principle of Maximum Conformality (PMC) eliminates the renormalization scale ambiguity in precision tests of Abelian QED and non-Abelian QCD theories. By using the PMC, all nonconformal {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms in the perturbative expansion series are summed into the running coupling constant, and the resulting scale-fixed predictions are independent of the renormalization scheme. The correct scale-displacement between the arguments of different renormalization schemes is automatically set, and the number of active flavors n{sub f} in the {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-function is correctly determined. The PMC is consistent with the renormalization group property that a physical result is independent of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial renormalization scale {mu}{sub r}{sup init}. The PMC scale {mu}{sub r}{sup PMC} is unambiguous at finite order. Any residual dependence on {mu}{sub r}{sup init} for a finite-order calculation will be highly suppressed since the unknown higher-order {l_brace}{beta}{sub i}{r_brace}-terms will be absorbed into the PMC scales higher-order perturbative terms. We find that such renormalization group invariance can be satisfied to high accuracy for {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the NNLO level. In this paper we apply PMC scale-setting to predict the t{bar t} cross-section {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} at the Tevatron and LHC colliders. It is found that {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} remains almost unchanged by varying {mu}{sub r}{sup init} within the region of [m{sub t}/4, 4m{sub t}]. The convergence of the expansion series is greatly improved. For the (q{bar q})-channel, which is dominant at the Tevatron, its NLO PMC scale is much smaller than the top-quark mass in the small x-region, and thus its NLO cross-section is increased by about a factor of two. In the case of the (gg)-channel, which is dominant at the LHC, its NLO PMC scale slightly increases with the subprocess collision energy {radical}s, but it is still smaller than m{sub t} for {radical} {approx}< 1 TeV, and the resulting NLO cross-section is increased by {approx}20%. As a result, a larger {sigma}{sub t{bar t}} is obtained in comparison to the conventional scale-setting method, which agrees well with the present Tevatron and LHC data. More explicitly, by setting m{sub t} = 172.9 {+-} 1.1 GeV, we predict {sigma}{sub Tevatron, 1.96 TeV} = 7.626{sub -0.257}{sup +0.265} pb, {sigma}{sub LHC, 7 TeV} = 171.8{sub -5.6}{sup +5.8} pb and {sigma}{sub LHC, 14 TeV} = 941.3{sub -26.5}{sup +28.4} pb.

Brodsky, Stanley J.; /SLAC; Wu, Xing-Gang; /SLAC /Chongqing U.

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

377

VLT-SINFONI integral field spectroscopy of low-z luminous and ultraluminous infrared galaxies I. Atlas of the 2D gas structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an atlas of a sample of local (U)LIRGs covering the luminosity range log(L_IR/L_sun)=11.1-12.4. The atlas is based on near-infrared H and K-band VLT-SINFONI IFS, and presents the ionised, partially ionised, and warm molecular gas 2D flux distributions and kinematics over a FoV of 3x3 kpc (LIRGs) and 12x12kpc (ULIRGs) and with average linear resolutions of 0.2kpc and 0.9kpc, respectively. The different phases of the gas show a wide morphological variety with the nucleus as the brightest Br_g source for 33% of the LIRGs and 71% of the ULIRGs, whereas all the (U)LIRGs have their maximum H_2 emission in their nuclear regions. In LIRGs, the ionised gas distribution is dominated by the emission from the star-forming rings or giant HII regions in the spiral arms. The Br_g and [FeII] line at 1.644 micron trace the same structures, although the emission peaks at different locations in some of the objects, and the [FeII] seems to be more extended and diffuse. The ULIRG subsample contains mainly pre-coalescen...

Lpez, J Piqueras; Arribas, S; Alonso-Herrero, A; Bedregal, A G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Exploring wind-driving dust species in cool luminous giants III. Wind models for M-type AGB stars: dynamic and photometric properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stellar winds observed in asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are usually attributed to a combination of stellar pulsations and radiation pressure on dust. Shock waves triggered by pulsations propagate through the atmosphere, compressing the gas and lifting it to cooler regions, which create favourable conditions for grain growth. If sufficient radiative acceleration is exerted on the newly formed grains through absorption or scattering of stellar photons, an outflow can be triggered. Strong candidates for wind-driving dust species in M-type AGB stars are magnesium silicates (Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ and MgSiO$_3$). Such grains can form close to the stellar surface, they consist of abundant materials and, if they grow to sizes comparable to the wavelength of the stellar flux maximum, they experience strong acceleration by photon scattering. We use a frequency-dependent radiation-hydrodynamics code with a detailed description for the growth of Mg$_2$SiO$_4$ grains to calculate the first extensive set of time-dependent wi...

Bladh, S; Aringer, B; Eriksson, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Influence of Agricultural Dual Credit on Student College Readiness Self-Efficacy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INFLUENCE OF AGRICULTURAL DUAL CREDIT ON STUDENT COLLEGE READINESS SELF-EFFICACY A Record of Study by ALANNA LEE NEELY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... should consider earning postsecondary degrees and credentials. The Completion Agenda states: This increased focus on college completion (not simply college access) is reflected in, for example, President Obama?s goal for the United States...

Neely, Alanna L.

2013-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

OSRAM SYLVANIA Demonstrates 1,439-Lumen Downlight with Efficacy of 82 lm/W  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

OSRAM SYLVANIA researchers have demonstrated a downlight luminaire that achieves 1,439 lumens at an efficacy of 82 lm/W in steady-state operation. These results exceed the project goals of achieving 1,300 lumens and 70 lm/W at a CCT of 3500K and CRI of 80. Improvements in LED chips, phosphors, optics, electronics, and thermal management at OSRAM all contributed to the higher-than-projected luminaire performance.

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381

Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Room at the Mountain: Estimated Maximum Amounts of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel Capable of Disposal in a Yucca Mountain Repository  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present an initial analysis of the maximum amount of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) that could be emplaced into a geological repository at Yucca Mountain. This analysis identifies and uses programmatic, material, and geological constraints and factors that affect this estimation of maximum amount of CSNF for disposal. The conclusion of this initial analysis is that the current legislative limit on Yucca Mountain disposal capacity, 63,000 MTHM of CSNF, is a small fraction of the available physical capacity of the Yucca Mountain system assuming the current high-temperature operating mode (HTOM) design. EPRI is confident that at least four times the legislative limit for CSNF ({approx}260,000 MTHM) can be emplaced in the Yucca Mountain system. It is possible that with additional site characterization, upwards of nine times the legislative limit ({approx}570,000 MTHM) could be emplaced. (authors)

Kessler, John H. [Electric Power Research Institute - EPRI, 3420 Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94304 (United States); Kemeny, John [University of Arizona, Tucson AZ 85721 (United States); King, Fraser [Integrity Corrosion Consulting, Ltd., 6732 Silverview Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Ross, Alan M. [Alan M. Ross and Associates, 1061 Gray Fox Circle Pleasanton, CA 94566 (Canada); Ross, Benjamen [Disposal Safety, Inc., Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Dependence of maximum realizable convective energy on horizontal scale in a one-dimensional entraining jet model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEPENDENCE OF MAXIMUM REALIZABLE CONVECTIVE ENERGY ON HORIZONTAL SCALE IN A ONE ? DIMENSIONAL ENTRAINING JET MODEL A Thesis by DAVID BILLINGS WOLFF Submitted to the Graduate College of Twas A&M University in partial fulfillment... on Horizontal Scale in a One ? Dimensional Entraining Jet Model. (May 1988) David Billings Wolff, B. S. , Texas AkM University Chairman of Advisory Committe: Phanindramohan Das A one dimensional numerical model of convective clouds was implemented in which...

Wolff, David Billings

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Compact stars with a small electric charge: the limiting radius to mass relation and the maximum mass for incompressible matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the stiffest equations of state for matter in a compact star is constant energy density and this generates the interior Schwarzschild radius to mass relation and the Misner maximum mass for relativistic compact stars. If dark matter populates the interior of stars, and this matter is supersymmetric or of some other type, some of it possessing a tiny electric charge, there is the possibility that highly compact stars can trap a small but non-negligible electric charge. In this case the radius to mass relation for such compact stars should get modifications. We use an analytical scheme to investigate the limiting radius to mass relation and the maximum mass of relativistic stars made of an incompressible fluid with a small electric charge. The investigation is carried out by using the hydrostatic equilibrium equation, i.e., the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation, together with the other equations of structure, with the further hypothesis that the charge distribution is proportional to the energy density. The approach relies on Volkoff and Misner's method to solve the TOV equation. For zero charge one gets the interior Schwarzschild limit, and supposing incompressible boson or fermion matter with constituents with masses of the order of the neutron mass one gets that the maximum mass is the Misner mass. For a small electric charge, our analytical approximating scheme valid in first order in the star's electric charge, shows that the maximum mass increases relatively to the uncharged case, whereas the minimum possible radius decreases, an expected effect since the new field is repulsive aiding the pressure to sustain the star against gravitational collapse.

Jos P. S. Lemos; Francisco J. Lopes; Gonalo Quinta; Vilson T. Zanchin

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

385

'Maximum' entropy production in self-organized plasma boundary layer: A thermodynamic discussion about turbulent heat transport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model of a plasma boundary layer, characterized by enhanced temperature contrasts and ''maximum entropy production,'' is proposed. The system shows bifurcation if the heat flux entering through the inner boundary exceeds a critical value. The state with a larger temperature contrast (larger entropy production) sustains a self-organized flow. An inverse cascade of energy is proposed as the underlying physical mechanism for the realization of such a heat engine.

Yoshida, Z. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Mahajan, S. M. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Separation of Stochastic and Deterministic Information from Seismological Time Series with Nonlinear Dynamics and Maximum Entropy Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a procedure developed to detect stochastic and deterministic information contained in empirical time series, useful to characterize and make models of different aspects of complex phenomena represented by such data. This procedure is applied to a seismological time series to obtain new information to study and understand geological phenomena. We use concepts and methods from nonlinear dynamics and maximum entropy. The mentioned method allows an optimal analysis of the available information.

Gutierrez, Rafael M.; Useche, Gina M.; Buitrago, Elias [Centro de Investigaciones, Universidad Antonio Narino, Carrera 3 Este No. 47A--15 Bogota (Colombia)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

Identification of the feature that causes the I-band secondary maximum of a type Ia supernova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtained a time series of spectra covering the secondary maximum in the I-band of the bright Type Ia supernova 2014J in M82 with the TIGRE telescope. Comparing the observations with theoretical models calculated with the time dependent extension of the PHOENIX code, we identify the feature that causes the secondary maximum in the I-band light curve. Fe II 3d6(3D)4s-3d6(5D)4p and similar high excitation transitions produce a blended feature at 7500 {\\AA}, which causes the rise of the light curve towards the secondary maximum. The series of observed spectra of SN 2014J and archival data of SN 2011fe confirm this conclusion. We further studied the plateau phase of the Rband light curve of SN 2014J and searched for features which contribute to the flux. The theoretical models do not clearly indicate a new feature that may cause the Rband plateau phase. However, Co II features in the range of 6500 - 7000 {\\AA} and the Fe II feature of the I-band are clearly seen in the theoretical spectra, but do not appear to ...

Jack, D; Hauschildt, P H

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Encapsulated interferon-tau during Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease: efficacy of treatment and immune response profile  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant number suffer severe negative side effects and must cease treatment. Thus, alternative therapeutics that offer less cytotoxicity and greater efficacy are a major objective of research. This dissertation evaluated a novel type I interferon...

Dean, Dana Deanna

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Teacher self-efficacy in Cape Town : a bottom up approach to enhancing the quality of education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Personal teacher self-efficacy (PTE), or the belief in one's own ability to overcome a particular challenge, often acts as a catalyst for teachers to improve the effectiveness of their teaching. Gaining PTE can translate ...

Kim, YeSeul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

SUZAKU VIEW OF THE SWIFT/BAT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI. V. TORUS STRUCTURE OF TWO LUMINOUS RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI (3C 206 AND PKS 0707-35)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results from broadband X-ray spectral analysis of 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35 with Suzaku and Swift/BAT, two of the most luminous unobscured and obscured radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with hard X-ray luminosities of 10{sup 45.5} erg s{sup -1} and 10{sup 44.9} erg s{sup -1} (14-195 keV), respectively. Based on the radio core luminosity, we estimate that the X-ray spectrum of 3C 206 contains a significant ({approx}60% in the 14-195 keV band) contribution from the jet, while it is negligible in PKS 0707-35. We can successfully model the spectra with the jet component (for 3C 206), the transmitted emission, and two reflection components from the torus and the accretion disk. The reflection strengths from the torus are found to be R{sub torus}({identical_to} {Omega}/2{pi}) = 0.29 {+-} 0.18 and 0.41 {+-} 0.18 for 3C 206 and PKS 0707-35, respectively, which are smaller than those in typical Seyfert galaxies. Utilizing the torus model by Ikeda et al., we quantify the relation between the half-opening angle of a torus ({theta}{sub oa}) and the equivalent width of an iron-K line. The observed equivalent width of 3C 206, < 71 eV, constrains the column density in the equatorial plane to N{sub H}{sup eq} <10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}, or the half-opening angle to {theta}{sub oa} > 80 Degree-Sign if N{sub H}{sup eq} =10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} is assumed. That of PKS 0707-35, 72 {+-} 36 eV, is consistent with N{sub H}{sup eq} {approx}10{sup 23} cm{sup -2}. Our results suggest that the tori in luminous radio-loud AGNs are only poorly developed. The trend is similar to that seen in radio-quiet AGNs, implying that the torus structure is not different between AGNs with jets and without jets.

Tazaki, Fumie; Ueda, Yoshihiro [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Terashima, Yuichi [Department of Physics, Ehime University, Matsuyama 790-8577 (Japan); Mushotzky, Richard F.; Tombesi, Francesco [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

391

Analysis of unstable particle with the maximum entropy method in O(4) $?^4$ theory on the lattice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore applications of the maximum entropy method (MEM) to determine properties of unstable particles using the four-dimensional O(4) $\\phi^4$ theory as a laboratory. The spectral function of the correlation function of the unstable $\\sigma$ particle is calculated with MEM, and shown to yield reliable results for both the mass of $\\sigma$ and the energy of the two-pion state. Calculations are also made for the case in which $\\sigma$ is stable. Distinctive differences in the volume dependence of the $\\sigma$ mass and two-pion energy for the stable and unstable cases are analyzed in terms of perturbation theory.

T. Yamazaki; N. Ishizuka

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

The XMM-Newton X-ray Spectra of the Most X-ray Luminous Radio-quiet ROSAT Bright Survey-QSOs: A Reference Sample for the Interpretation of High-redshift QSO Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the broadband X-ray properties of four of the most X-ray luminous (L_X >= 10^{45} erg/s in the 0.5-2 keV band) radio-quiet QSOs found in the ROSAT Bright Survey. This uniform sample class, which explores the extreme end of the QSO luminosity function, exhibits surprisingly homogenous X-ray spectral properties: a soft excess with an extremely smooth shape containing no obvious discrete features, a hard power law above 2 keV, and a weak narrow/barely resolved Fe K-alpha fluorescence line for the three high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The soft excess can be well fitted with only a soft power law. No signatures of warm or cold intrinsic absorbers are found. The Fe K-alpha centroids and the line widths indicate emission from neutral Fe (E=6.4 keV) originating from cold material from distances of only a few light days or further out. The well-constrained equivalent widths (EW) of the neutral Fe lines are higher than expected from the X-ray Baldwin effect which has been only poorly constrained at...

Krumpe, Mirko; Markowitz, Alex; Corral, Amalia; 10.1088/0004-637X/725/1/1

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Statistical analysis of COMPTEL maximum likelihood-ratio distributions: evidence for a signal from previously undetected AGN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The maximum likelihood-ratio method is frequently used in COMPTEL analysis to determine the significance of a point source at a given location. In this paper we do not consider whether the likelihood-ratio at a particular location indicates a detection, but rather whether distributions of likelihood-ratios derived from many locations depart from that expected for source free data. We have constructed distributions of likelihood-ratios by reading values from standard COMPTEL maximum-likelihood ratio maps at positions corresponding to the locations of different categories of AGN. Distributions derived from the locations of Seyfert galaxies are indistinguishable, according to a Kolmogorov-Smirnov test, from those obtained from ''random'' locations, but differ slightly from those obtained from the locations of flat spectrum radio loud quasars, OVVs, and BL Lac objects. This difference is not due to known COMPTEL sources, since regions near these sources are excluded from the analysis. We suggest that it might arise from a number of sources with fluxes below the COMPTEL detection threshold.

Williams, O. R.; Bennett, K.; Much, R. [Astrophysics Division, ESTEC, P.O. Box 299, NL-2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Schoenfelder, V. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, P.O. Box 1603, 85740 Garching (Germany); Blom, J. J. [SRON-Utrecht, Sorbonnelaan 2, NL-3584 CA Utrecht (Netherlands); Ryan, J. [Space Science Center, Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham New Hampshire 03824 (United States)

1997-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Maximum possible fidelity in $1\\rightarrow 2$ qubits cloning is same for state independent and state dependent cloning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-analyse the Bu\\v{z}ek-Hillery state independent Universal Quantum Cloning machine protocol and show that it allows better values for fidelity and Hilbert-Schmidt norm than hitherto reported. This higher value for the fidelity is identical to the maximum fidelity of phase covariant quantum cloning (i.e. state dependent cloning) of Bru\\ss -Cinchetti-D'Ariano-Macchiavello. This value of fidelity has also been obtained by Niu and Griffiths in their work without machine states. This is the maximum possible fidelity obtainable in $1\\rightarrow 2$ qubits cloning. We then describe a different and new state dependent cloning protocol with four machine states where all non-exact copies of input states are taken into account in the output and we use the Hessian method of determining extrema of multivariate functions. The fidelity for the best overall quantum cloning in this protocol is $\\bar{F}=0.847$ with an associated von-Neumann entropy of $\\bar{S}=0.825$.

D. Gangopadhyay; A. Sinha Roy

2015-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

395

Modification of hadronic spectral functions under extreme conditions: An approach based on QCD sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studies of quarkonium spectral functions at finite temperature, based on an approach combining QCD sum rules and the maximum entropy method are briefly reviewed. QCD sum rules for heavy quarkonia incorporate finite temperature effects in form of changing values of gluonic condensates that appear in the operator product expansion. These changes depend on the energy density and pressure at finite temperature, which we extract from quenched lattice QCD calculations. The maximum entropy method then allows us to obtain the most probable spectral function from the sum rules, without having to introduce any specific assumption about its functional form. Our findings suggest that the charmonium ground states of both S-wave and P-wave channels dissolve into the continuum already at temperatures around or slightly above the critical temperature T_c, while the bottomonium states are less influenced by temperature effects, surviving up to about 2.5 T_c or higher for S-wave and up to about 2.0 T_c for P-wave states.

Philipp Gubler; Kei Suzuki; Kenji Morita; Makoto Oka

2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

396

Maximum-likelihood  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImportsBG NorthMauro

397

anhydrous transcurium halides: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of metal halide lamps are investigated, including acoustic resonance, spectral energy, and luminous efficacy. To operate metal halide lamps at intended conditions, (more)...

398

Daylighting Calculation in DOE-2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

46 3.2.2 Luminous Efficacy of Solar Radiation . . . . . . .The Availability of Solar Radiation. and Daylight",incidence TSOLNM for solar radiation. TSOLDF =

Winkelmann, F.C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Density Functional Theory for Fractional Particle Number: Derivative Discontinuity of the Energy at the Maximum Number of Bound Electrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The derivative discontinuity in the exact exchange-correlation potential of ensemble Density Functional Theory (DFT) is investigated at the specific integer number that corresponds to the maximum number of bound electrons, $J_{max}$. A recently developed complex-scaled analog of DFT is extended to fractional particle numbers and used to study ensembles of both bound and metastable states. It is found that the exact exchange-correlation potential experiences discontinuous jumps at integer particle numbers including $J_{max}$. For integers below $J_{max}$ the jump is purely real because of the real shift in the chemical potential. At $J_{max}$, the jump has a non-zero imaginary component reflecting the finite lifetime of the $(J_{max}+1)$ state.

Daniel L. Whitenack; Yu Zhang; Adam Wasserman

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

400

Finite Future Cosmological Singularity Times and Maximum Predictability Times in a Nonlinear FRW-KG Scalar Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the relative time scales associated with finite future cosmological singularities, especially those classified as Big Rip cosmologies, and the maximum predictability time of a coupled FRW-KG scalar cosmology with chaotic regimes. Our approach is to show that by starting with a FRW-KG scalar cosmology with a potential that admits an analytical solution resulting in a finite time future singularity there exists a Lyapunov time scale that is earlier than the formation of the singularity. For this singularity both the cosmological scale parameter a(t) and the Hubble parameter H(t) become infinite at a finite future time, the Big Rip time. We compare this time scale to the predictability time scale for a chaotic FRW-KG scalar cosmology. We find that there are cases where the chaotic time scale is earlier than the Big Rip singularity calling for special care in interpreting and predicting the formation of the future cosmological singularity.

John Max Wilson; Keith Andrew

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Switching characteristics and maximum repetitive frequency of InGaAsP/InP bistable injection lasers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switching characteristics of nonuniformly pumped InGaAsP/InP BH Structure bistable lasers are investigated both experimentally and theoretically. First observation of automatic turn-on phenomenon was made, which is found to be a random process. For repetitive operation, turn-on delay time and necessary duration of switch-off pulse practically limited the maximum repetitive frequency. For ''switch-on,'' triggering the saturable absorption region is more effective. For reducing the minimum switch-off pulse width, either higher doping or reverse biasing at the absorption region is recommended. Tradeoff relation of OFF pulse width with threshold current and stable operation are discussed. With some improvements in device parameters, bistable operation at repetitive frequency over 1 GHz is expected.

Liu, H.F.; Hashimoto, Y.; Kamiya, T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

403

THE XMM-NEWTON X-RAY SPECTRA OF THE MOST X-RAY LUMINOUS RADIO-QUIET ROSAT BRIGHT SURVEY-QSOs: A REFERENCE SAMPLE FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QSO SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the broadband X-ray properties of four of the most X-ray luminous (L{sub X} {>=} 10{sup 45} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.5-2 keV band) radio-quiet QSOs found in the ROSAT Bright Survey. This uniform sample class, which explores the extreme end of the QSO luminosity function, exhibits surprisingly homogenous X-ray spectral properties: a soft excess with an extremely smooth shape containing no obvious discrete features, a hard power law above 2 keV, and a weak narrow/barely resolved Fe K{alpha} fluorescence line for the three high signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) spectra. The soft excess can be well fitted with only a soft power law. No signatures of warm or cold intrinsic absorbers are found. The Fe K{alpha} centroids and the line widths indicate emission from neutral Fe (E = 6.4 keV) originating from cold material from distances of only a few light days or further out. The well-constrained equivalent widths (EW) of the neutral Fe lines are higher than expected from the X-ray Baldwin effect which has been only poorly constrained at very high luminosities. Taking into account our individual EW measurements, we show that the X-ray Baldwin effect flattens above L{sub X} {approx} 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} (2-10 keV band) where an almost constant (EW) of {approx}100 eV is found. We confirm the assumption of having very similar X-ray active galactic nucleus properties when interpreting stacked X-ray spectra. Our stacked spectrum serves as a superb reference for the interpretation of low S/N spectra of radio-quiet QSOs with similar luminosities at higher redshifts routinely detected by XMM-Newton and Chandra surveys.

Krumpe, M.; Markowitz, A. [University of California, San Diego, Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0424 (United States); Lamer, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, 14482 Potsdam (Germany); Corral, A., E-mail: mkrumpe@ucsd.ed [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Brera 28, 20121 Milan (Italy)

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mapping seasonal habitat suitability for the Gunnison sage-grouse in southwestern Colorado, USA: species distribution models using maximum entropy modelling and autoregression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

behavioural patterns or dispersal limitations. This research uses two methods which have recently been applied to ecological modelling to overcome these limitations: maximum entropy modelling (MaxEnt) and simultaneous autoregression (SAR). The study focuses...

Carlson, Amanda

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

405

Thoracic target volume delineation using various maximum-intensity projection computed tomography image sets for radiotherapy treatment planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) is commonly used to account for respiratory motion of target volumes in radiotherapy to the thorax. From the 4D-CT acquisition, a maximum-intensity projection (MIP) image set can be created and used to help define the tumor motion envelope or the internal gross tumor volume (iGTV). The purpose of this study was to quantify the differences in automatically contoured target volumes for usage in the delivery of stereotactic body radiation therapy using MIP data sets generated from one of the four methods: (1) 4D-CT phase-binned (PB) based on retrospective phase calculations, (2) 4D-CT phase-corrected phase-binned (PC-PB) based on motion extrema, (3) 4D-CT amplitude-binned (AB), and (4) cine CT built from all available images. Methods: MIP image data sets using each of the four methods were generated for a cohort of 28 patients who had prior thoracic 4D-CT scans that exhibited lung tumor motion of at least 1 cm. Each MIP image set was automatically contoured on commercial radiation treatment planning system. Margins were added to the iGTV to observe differences in the final simulated planning target volumes (PTVs). Results: For all patients, the iGTV measured on the MIP generated from the entire cine CT data set (iGTV{sub cine}) was the largest. Expressed as a percentage of iGTV{sub cine}, 4D-CT iGTV (all sorting methods) ranged from 83.8% to 99.1%, representing differences in the absolute volume ranging from 0.02 to 4.20 cm{sup 3}; the largest average and range of 4D-CT iGTV measurements was from the PC-PB data set. Expressed as a percentage of PTV{sub cine} (expansions applied to iGTV{sub cine}), the 4D-CT PTV ranged from 87.6% to 99.6%, representing differences in the absolute volume ranging from 0.08 to 7.42 cm{sup 3}. Regions of the measured respiratory waveform corresponding to a rapid change of phase or amplitude showed an increased susceptibility to the selection of identical images for adjacent bins. Duplicate image selection was most common in the AB implementation, followed by the PC-PB method. The authors also found that the image associated with the minimum amplitude measurement did not always correlate with the image that showed maximum tumor motion extent. Conclusions: The authors identified cases in which the MIP generated from a 4D-CT sorting process under-represented the iGTV by more than 10% or up to 4.2 cm{sup 3} when compared to the iGTV{sub cine}. They suggest utilization of a MIP generated from the full cine CT data set to ensure maximum inclusive tumor extent.

Zamora, David A.; Riegel, Adam C.; Sun Xiaojun; Balter, Peter; Starkschall, George; Mawlawi, Osama; Pan Tinsu [Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Imaging Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

Validation of a 4D-PET Maximum Intensity Projection for Delineation of an Internal Target Volume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The delineation of internal target volumes (ITVs) in radiation therapy of lung tumors is currently performed by use of either free-breathing (FB) {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) or 4-dimensional (4D)-CT maximum intensity projection (MIP). In this report we validate the use of 4D-PET-MIP for the delineation of target volumes in both a phantom and in patients. Methods and Materials: A phantom with 3 hollow spheres was prepared surrounded by air then water. The spheres and water background were filled with a mixture of {sup 18}F and radiographic contrast medium. A 4D-PET/CT scan was performed of the phantom while moving in 4 different breathing patterns using a programmable motion device. Nine patients with an FDG-avid lung tumor who underwent FB and 4D-PET/CT and >5 mm of tumor motion were included for analysis. The 3 spheres and patient lesions were contoured by 2 contouring methods (40% of maximum and PET edge) on the FB-PET, FB-CT, 4D-PET, 4D-PET-MIP, and 4D-CT-MIP. The concordance between the different contoured volumes was calculated using a Dice coefficient (DC). The difference in lung tumor volumes between FB-PET and 4D-PET volumes was also measured. Results: The average DC in the phantom using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was lowest for FB-PET/CT (DCAir = 0.72/0.67, DCBackground 0.63/0.62) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DCAir = 0.84/0.83, DCBackground = 0.78/0.73). The average DC in the 9 patients using 40% and PET edge, respectively, was also lowest for FB-PET/CT (DC = 0.45/0.44) and highest for 4D-PET/CT-MIP (DC = 0.72/0.73). In the 9 lesions, the target volumes of the FB-PET using 40% and PET edge, respectively, were on average 40% and 45% smaller than the 4D-PET-MIP. Conclusion: A 4D-PET-MIP produces volumes with the highest concordance with 4D-CT-MIP across multiple breathing patterns and lesion sizes in both a phantom and among patients. Freebreathing PET/CT consistently underestimates ITV when compared with 4D PET/CT for a lesion affected by respiration.

Callahan, Jason, E-mail: jason.callahan@petermac.org [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Schneider-Kolsky, Michal [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia)] [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiation Science, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria (Australia); Dunn, Leon [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia)] [Department of Applied Physics, RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Thompson, Mick [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Siva, Shankar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Aarons, Yolanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Binns, David [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia)] [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Hicks, Rodney J. [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia) [Centre for Molecular Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

199USDAForestServiceGen.Tech.Rep.PSW-GTR-160.1997. Efficacy of HerbicideApplication Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

version of this paper was presented at the Symposium on Oak Woodlands: Ecology,Management,andUrban199USDAForestServiceGen.Tech.Rep.PSW-GTR-160.1997. Efficacy of HerbicideApplication Methods Used tanoak (although tanoak is presently useful for fuelwood in the Santa Cruz area). Finding an effective

Standiford, Richard B.

408

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficacy of salmon carcass analogs for enhancing stream and fish production in the Wind River watershed, Washington, to evaluate the effects of nutrient enhancement on measures of stream and fish production. We compared low level water chemistry, water quality, and periphyton, insect, and fish production

409

Using the Maximum X-ray Flux Ratio and X-ray Background to Predict Solar Flare Class  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the discovery of a relationship between the maximum ratio of the flare flux (namely, 0.5-4 Ang to the 1-8 Ang flux) and non-flare background (namely, the 1-8 Ang background flux), which clearly separates flares into classes by peak flux level. We established this relationship based on an analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) X-ray observations of ~ 50,000 X, M, C, and B flares derived from the NOAA/SWPC flares catalog. Employing a combination of machine learning techniques (K-nearest neighbors and nearest-centroid algorithms) we show a separation of the observed parameters for the different peak flaring energies. This analysis is validated by successfully predicting the flare classes for 100% of the X-class flares, 76% of the M-class flares, 80% of the C-class flares and 81% of the B-class flares for solar cycle 24, based on the training of the parametric extracts for solar flares in cycles 22-23.

Winter, Lisa M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Liquid-Liquid Transition at Tg and Stable-Glass Phase Nucleation Rate Maximum at the Kauzmann Temperature TK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Dp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm*Dp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at temperatures smaller than Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atoms, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates.

Robert Felix Tournier

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

411

Binary versus non-binary information in real time series: empirical results and maximum-entropy matrix models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dynamics of complex systems, from financial markets to the brain, can be monitored in terms of time series of activity of their fundamental elements (such as stocks or neurons respectively). While the main focus of time series analysis is on the magnitude of temporal increments, a significant piece of information is encoded into the binary projection (i.e. the sign) of such increments. In this paper we provide further evidence of this by showing strong nonlinear relationships between binary and non-binary properties of financial time series. We then introduce an information-theoretic approach to the analysis of the binary signature of single and multiple time series. Through the definition of maximum-entropy ensembles of binary matrices, we quantify the information encoded into the simplest binary properties of real time series and identify the most informative property given a set of measurements. Our formalism is able to replicate the observed binary/non-binary relations very well, and to mathematically...

Almog, Assaf

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2008 the University of California at Santa Barbara (UCSB) initiated investigations of water column methane oxidation in methane hydrate environments, through a project funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) entitled: assessing the efficacy of the aerobic methanotrophic biofilter in methane hydrate environments. This Final Report describes the scientific advances and discoveries made under this award as well as the importance of these discoveries in the broader context of the research area. Benthic microbial mats inhabit the sea floor in areas where reduced chemicals such as sulfide reach the more oxidizing water that overlies the sediment. We set out to investigate the role that methanotrophs play in such mats at locations where methane reaches the sea floor along with sulfide. Mats were sampled from several seep environments and multiple sets were grown in-situ at a hydrocarbon seep in the Santa Barbara Basin. Mats grown in-situ were returned to the laboratory and used to perform stable isotope probing experiments in which they were treated with 13C-enriched methane. The microbial community was analyzed, demonstrating that three or more microbial groups became enriched in methane?s carbon: methanotrophs that presumably utilize methane directly, methylotrophs that presumably consume methanol excreted by the methanotrophs, and sulfide oxidizers that presumably consume carbon dioxide released by the methanotrophs and methylotrophs. Methanotrophs reached high relative abundance in mats grown on methane, but other bacterial processes include sulfide oxidation appeared to dominate mats, indicating that methanotrophy is not a dominant process in sustaining these benthic mats, but rather a secondary function modulated by methane availability. Methane that escapes the sediment in the deep ocean typically dissolved into the overlying water where it is available to methanotrophic bacteria. We set out to better understand the efficacy of this process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date, with five more circulating in draft form, and several others planned.

Valentine, David

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

413

THE LICK AGN MONITORING PROJECT: VELOCITY-DELAY MAPS FROM THE MAXIMUM-ENTROPY METHOD FOR Arp 151  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present velocity-delay maps for optical H I, He I, and He II recombination lines in Arp 151, recovered by fitting a reverberation model to spectrophotometric monitoring data using the maximum-entropy method. H I response is detected over the range 0-15 days, with the response confined within the virial envelope. The Balmer-line maps have similar morphologies but exhibit radial stratification, with progressively longer delays for H{gamma} to H{beta} to H{alpha}. The He I and He II response is confined within 1-2 days. There is a deficit of prompt response in the Balmer-line cores but strong prompt response in the red wings. Comparison with simple models identifies two classes that reproduce these features: free-falling gas and a half-illuminated disk with a hot spot at small radius on the receding lune. Symmetrically illuminated models with gas orbiting in an inclined disk or an isotropic distribution of randomly inclined circular orbits can reproduce the virial structure but not the observed asymmetry. Radial outflows are also largely ruled out by the observed asymmetry. A warped-disk geometry provides a physically plausible mechanism for the asymmetric illumination and hot spot features. Simple estimates show that a disk in the broad-line region of Arp 151 could be unstable to warping induced by radiation pressure. Our results demonstrate the potential power of detailed modeling combined with monitoring campaigns at higher cadence to characterize the gas kinematics and physical processes that give rise to the broad emission lines in active galactic nuclei.

Bentz, Misty C.; Barth, Aaron J.; Walsh, Jonelle L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Horne, Keith [SUPA Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Bennert, Vardha Nicola; Treu, Tommaso [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Canalizo, Gabriela [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gates, Elinor L. [Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States); Malkan, Matthew A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024 (United States); Minezaki, Takeo [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Woo, Jong-Hak, E-mail: mbentz@uci.ed [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Climate response and radiative forcing from mineral aerosols during the last glacial maximum, pre-industrial, current and doubled-carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate response and radiative forcing from mineral aerosols during the last glacial maximum, pre-industrial, current and doubled-carbon dioxide climates Natalie M. Mahowald,1,2 Masaru Yoshioka,1,2 William D. Collins July 2006; accepted 9 August 2006; published 27 October 2006. [1] Mineral aerosol impacts on climate

Mahowald, Natalie

415

Appears in IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, Madison, Wisconsin, 2003. Feature Selection by Maximum Marginal Diversity: optimality and implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is a discriminant quantity and can be computed with great efficiency, the principle of maximum marginal diver- sity solutions, and 2) show that there is a family of classification problems for which the two are identical with currently predominant criteria such as energy compaction, and 3) the extracted features are detectors

Vasconcelos, Nuno M.

416

Verification and validation of the maximum entropy method for reconstructing neutron flux, with MCNP5, Attila-7.1.0 and the GODIVA experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification and validation of reconstructed neutron flux based on the maximum entropy method is presented in this paper. The verification is carried out by comparing the neutron flux spectrum from the maximum entropy method with Monte Carlo N Particle 5 version 1.40 (MCNP5) and Attila-7.1.0-beta (Attila). A spherical 100% 235U critical assembly is modeled as the test case to compare the three methods. The verification error range for the maximum entropy method is 1521% where MCNP5 is taken to be the comparison standard. Attila relative error for the critical assembly is 2035%. Validation is accomplished by comparing a neutron flux spectrum that is back calculated from foil activation measurements performed in the GODIVA experiment (GODIVA). The error range of the reconstructed flux compared to GODIVA is 010%. The error range of the neutron flux spectrum from MCNP5 compared to GODIVA is 020% and the Attila error range compared to the GODIVA is 035%. The maximum entropy method is shown to be a fast reliable method, compared to either Monte Carlo methods (MCNP5) or 30 multienergy group methods (Attila) and with respect to the GODIVA experiment.

Douglas S. Crawford; Tony Saad; Terry A. Ring

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

On a necessary criterion for stability of steady solutions of complex Ginzburg-Landau equation -- a counterexample to the 'maximum entropy production principle'  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A maximum entropy production principle (MEPP) has been postulated to be a criterion of stability for steady states of open systems [Martyushev et al., Phys. Rep. 426, 1 (2006)]. We find a necessary condition for stability of steady solutions of the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation. This condition violates MEPP.

Di Vita, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

An Empirical Comparison between the NEO-FFI and the WPI and the Relationship between Self-Efficacy and Workplace Personality  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

satisfaction, with self-esteem and generalized self-efficacy contributing the most. Judge and Bono (2001) point out that Conscientiousness is often thought of as the ?primary dispositional predictor of job performance? (p. 85). They were able to show...

Orozco, Lauren Michel

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

419

Safety and Efficacy of Bevacizumab With Hypofractionated Stereotactic Irradiation for Recurrent Malignant Gliomas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Preclinical studies suggest that inhibition of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) improves glioma response to radiotherapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody against VEGF, has shown promise in recurrent gliomas, but the safety and efficacy of concurrent bevacizumab with brain irradiation has not been extensively studied. The objectives of this study were to determine the safety and activity of this combination in malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: After prior treatment with standard radiation therapy patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) and anaplastic gliomas (AG) received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) every 2 weeks of 28-day cycles until tumor progression. Patients also received 30 Gy of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HFSRT) in five fractions after the first cycle of bevacizumab. Results: Twenty-five patients (20 GBM, 5 AG; median age 56 years; median Karnofsky Performance Status 90) received a median of seven cycles of bevacizumab. One patient did not undergo HFSRT because overlap with prior radiotherapy would exceed the safe dose allowed to the optic chiasm. Three patients discontinued treatment because of Grade 3 central nervous system intratumoral hemorrhage, wound dehiscence, and bowel perforation. Other nonhematologic and hematologic toxicities were transient. No radiation necrosis was seen in these previously irradiated patients. For the GBM cohort, overall response rate was 50%, 6-month progression-free survival was 65%; median overall survival was 12.5 months, and 1-year survival was 54%. Discussion: Bevacizumab with HFSRT is safe and well tolerated. Radiographic responses, duration of disease control, and survival suggest that this regimen is active in recurrent malignant glioma.

Gutin, Philip H. [Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurological Surgery, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York (United States)], E-mail: gutinp@mskcc.org; Iwamoto, Fabio M. [Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Beal, Kathryn [Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Mohile, Nimish A. [Department of Neurology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Karimi, Sasan [Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Hou, Bob L. [Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lymberis, Stella [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya [Brain Tumor Center, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Chang, Jenghwa [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)] (and others)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Efficacy of Ultraviolet Radiation for Sterilizing Tools Used for Surgically Implanting Transmitters into Fish  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Telemetry is frequently used to examine the behavior of fish, and the transmitters used are normally surgically implanted into the coelom of fish. Implantation requires the use of surgical tools such as scalpels, forceps, needle holders, and sutures. When several fish are implanted consecutively for large telemetry studies, it is common for surgical tools to be sterilized or, at minimum, disinfected between each use so that pathogens that may be present are not spread among fish. However, autoclaving tools can take a long period of time, and chemical sterilants or disinfectants can be harmful to both humans and fish and have varied effectiveness. Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is commonly used to disinfect water in aquaculture facilities. However, this technology has not been widely used to sterilize tools for surgical implantation of transmitters in fish. To determine its efficacy for this application, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers used UV radiation to disinfect surgical tools (i.e., forceps, needle holder, stab scalpel, and suture) that were exposed to one of four aquatic organisms that typically lead to negative health issues for salmonids. These organisms included Aeromonas salmonicida, Flavobacterium psychrophilum, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Saprolegnia parasitica. Surgical tools were exposed to the bacteria by dipping them into a confluent suspension of three varying concentrations (i.e., low, medium, high). After exposure to the bacterial culture, tools were placed into a mobile Millipore UV sterilization apparatus. The tools were then exposed for three different time periods2, 5, or 15 min. S. parasitica, a water mold, was tested using an agar plate method and forceps-pinch method. UV light exposures of 5 and 15 min were effective at killing all four organisms. UV light was also effective at killing Geobacillus stearothermophilus, the organism used as a biological indicator to verify effectiveness of steam sterilizers. These techniques appear to provide a quick alternative disinfection technique for some surgical tools that is less harmful to both humans and fish while not producing chemical waste. However, we do not recommend using these methods with tools that have overlapping parts or other structures that cannot be directly exposed to UV light such as needle holders.

Walker, Ricardo W.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Colotelo, Alison HA; Gay, Marybeth E.; Woodley, Christa M.; Brown, Richard S.

2013-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Derivation of the Blackbody Radiation Spectrum from a Natural Maximum-Entropy Principle Involving Casimir Energies and Zero-Point Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By numerical calculation, the Planck spectrum with zero-point radiation is shown to satisfy a natural maximum-entropy principle whereas alternative choices of spectra do not. Specifically, if we consider a set of conducting-walled boxes, each with a partition placed at a different location in the box, so that across the collection of boxes the partitions are uniformly spaced across the volume, then the Planck spectrum correspond to that spectrum of random radiation (having constant energy kT per normal mode at low frequencies and zero-point energy (1/2)hw per normal mode at high frequencies) which gives maximum uniformity across the collection of boxes for the radiation energy per box. The analysis involves Casimir energies and zero-point radiation which do not usually appear in thermodynamic analyses. For simplicity, the analysis is presented for waves in one space dimension.

Timothy H. Boyer

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

Ayad, K. E.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F. [Faculty of Physical Therapy, Cairo University (Egypt); El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Bekheet, A. B. [Al Sahel Teaching Hospital, Cairo (Egypt)

2009-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

423

Verification of maximum radial power peaking factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Verification of Maximum Radial Power Peaking Factor due to insertion of FPM-LEU target in the core of RSG-GAS Reactor. Radial Power Peaking Factor in RSG-GAS Reactor is a very important parameter for the safety of RSG-GAS reactor during operation. Data of radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of Fission Product Molybdenum with Low Enriched Uranium (FPM-LEU) was reported by PRSG to BAPETEN through the Safety Analysis Report RSG-GAS for FPM-LEU target irradiation. In order to support the evaluation of the Safety Analysis Report incorporated in the submission, the assessment unit of BAPETEN is carrying out independent assessment in order to verify safety related parameters in the SAR including neutronic aspect. The work includes verification to the maximum radial power peaking factor change due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target in RSG-GAS Reactor by computational method using MCNP5and ORIGEN2. From the results of calculations, the new maximum value of the radial power peaking factor due to the insertion of FPM-LEU target is 1.27. The results of calculations in this study showed a smaller value than 1.4 the limit allowed in the SAR.

Setyawan, Daddy, E-mail: d.setyawan@bapeten.go.id [Center for Assessment of Regulatory System and Technology for Nuclear Installations and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN), Jl. Gajah Mada No. 8 Jakarta 10120 (Indonesia); Rohman, Budi [Licensing Directorate for Nuclear Installations and Materials, Indonesian Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN), Jl. Gajah Mada No. 8 Jakarta 10120 (Indonesia)

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Gubler, Philipp; Hatsuda, Tetsuo; Nishida, Yusuke

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Single-particle spectral density of the unitary Fermi gas: Novel approach based on the operator product expansion, sum rules and the maximum entropy method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Making use of the operator product expansion, we derive a general class of sum rules for the imaginary part of the single-particle self-energy of the unitary Fermi gas. The sum rules are analyzed numerically with the help of the maximum entropy method, which allows us to extract the single-particle spectral density as a function of both energy and momentum. These spectral densities contain basic information on the properties of the unitary Fermi gas, such as the dispersion relation and the superfluid pairing gap, for which we obtain reasonable agreement with the available results based on quantum Monte-Carlo simulations.

Philipp Gubler; Naoki Yamamoto; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Yusuke Nishida

2015-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

VOLUME 81, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 JULY 1998 Maximum Entropy Principle for Lattice Kinetic Equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOLUME 81, NUMBER 1 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 JULY 1998 Maximum Entropy Principle of the entropy maximum principle to take into account additional constraints. We consider a class of lattices, I-00161 Roma, Italy (Received 17 September 1997; revised manuscript received 7 May 1998) The entropy

Gorban, Alexander N.

427

The Principle of Maximum Conformality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key problem in making precise perturbative QCD predictions is the uncertainty in determining the renormalization scale of the running coupling {alpha}{sub s}({mu}{sup 2}). It is common practice to guess a physical scale {mu} = Q which is of order of a typical momentum transfer Q in the process, and then vary the scale over a range Q/2 and 2Q. This procedure is clearly problematic since the resulting fixed-order pQCD prediction will depend on the renormalization scheme, and it can even predict negative QCD cross sections at next-to-leading-order. Other heuristic methods to set the renormalization scale, such as the 'principle of minimal sensitivity', give unphysical results for jet physics, sum physics into the running coupling not associated with renormalization, and violate the transitivity property of the renormalization group. Such scale-setting methods also give incorrect results when applied to Abelian QED. Note that the factorization scale in QCD is introduced to match nonperturbative and perturbative aspects of the parton distributions in hadrons; it is present even in conformal theory and thus is a completely separate issue from renormalization scale setting. The PMC provides a consistent method for determining the renormalization scale in pQCD. The PMC scale-fixed prediction is independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a key requirement of renormalization group invariance. The results avoid renormalon resummation and agree with QED scale-setting in the Abelian limit. The PMC global scale can be derived efficiently at NLO from basic properties of the PQCD cross section. The elimination of the renormalization scheme ambiguity using the PMC will not only increases the precision of QCD tests, but it will also increase the sensitivity of colliders to new physics beyond the Standard Model.

Brodsky, Stanley J; /SLAC; Giustino, Di; /SLAC

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hardness of Maximum Constraint Satisfaction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.4 Non-boolean Max-k-CSP . . . . . .Techniques 3 Preliminaries 4 Max-CSP given by a predicate 5Results for Every CSP?. In Symposium on Theory of

Chan, Siu On

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Maximum output at minimum cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University) + FFA-W3 Material Preimpregnated epoxy glass fiber + carbon fiber Total blade weight 5,800 kg.0 MW wind turbine generator uses the "total lightning protection" system, in accordance with standard working life of the turbine. Gamesa WindNet The new generation SCADA System (a wind farm control system

Firestone, Jeremy

430

Efficacy of Aqui-S as an Anesthetic for Market-Sized Striped Bass L. CURRY WOODS III,* DANIEL D. THEISEN, AND SHUYANG HE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the temperate striped bass Morone saxatilis. Methods Source of fish and anesthetic.--All of the striped bassEfficacy of Aqui-S as an Anesthetic for Market-Sized Striped Bass L. CURRY WOODS III,* DANIEL D 20742, USA Abstract.--Market-sized 2-year-old striped bass Morone saxatilis (average weight, 645 g) were

Hamza, Iqbal

431

Investigation of a high spatial resolution method based on polar coordinate maximum entropy method for analyzing electron density fluctuation data measured by laser phase contrast  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser phase contrast is a powerful diagnostic method to determine the spatial distribution of electron density fluctuations in magnetically confined plasmas, although its applicability depends on magnetic field configurations. The spatial resolution of fluctuations is linked with the resolution of the propagation direction that is derived from the two-dimensional spectral analysis of the wavenumber for the fluctuations. The method was applied to fluctuation measurements in a compact helical system. In order to improve the resolution of the propagation direction with a relatively small number of data points, the maximum entropy method with polar coordinates was employed. A spatial resolution of the order of 1 cm was obtained, which is satisfactory in a plasma with a 20 cm minor radius.

Matsuo, K. [Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Fukuoka 811-0295 (Japan); Iguchi, H.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Larger Maximum Tumor Diameter at Radical Prostatectomy Is Associated With Increased Biochemical Failure, Metastasis, and Death From Prostate Cancer After Salvage Radiation for Prostate Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the maximum tumor diameter (MTD) of the dominant prostate cancer nodule in the radical prostatectomy specimen as a prognostic factor for outcome in patients treated with salvage external beam radiation therapy (SRT) for a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value after radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From an institutional cohort of 575 patients treated with SRT, data on MTD were retrospectively collected. The impact of MTD on biochemical failure (BF), metastasis, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM) was assessed on univariate and multivariate analysis using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 173 patients with MTD data available, median follow-up was 77 months (interquartile range, 47-104 months) after SRT, and median MTD was 18 mm (interquartile range, 13-22 mm). Increasing MTD correlated with increasing pT stage, Gleason score, presence of seminal vesicle invasion, and lymph node invasion. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis identified MTD of >14 mm to be the optimal cut-point. On univariate analysis, MTD >14 mm was associated with an increased risk of BF (P=.02, hazard ratio [HR] 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.8), metastasis (P=.002, HR 4.0, 95% CI 2.1-7.5), and PCSM (P=.02, HR 8.0, 95% CI 2.9-21.8). On multivariate analysis MTD >14 mm remained associated with increased BF (P=.02, HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1-3.2), metastasis (P=.02, HR 3.4, 95% CI 1.2-9.2), and PCSM (P=.05, HR 9.7, 95% CI 1.0-92.4), independent of extracapsular extension, seminal vesicle invasion, positive surgical margins, pre-RT PSA value, Gleason score, and pre-RT PSA doubling time. Conclusions: For patients treated with SRT for a rising PSA value after prostatectomy, MTD at time of radical prostatectomy is independently associated with BF, metastasis, and PCSM. Maximum tumor diameter should be incorporated into clinical decision making and future clinical risk assessment tools for those patients receiving SRT.

Johnson, Skyler B.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Jackson, William C.; Zhou, Jessica; Foster, Benjamin; Foster, Corey; Song, Yeohan; Li, Darren [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Palapattu, Ganesh S. [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kunju, Lakshmi; Mehra, Rohit [Department of Pathology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Feng, Felix Y., E-mail: ffeng@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

One-Shot Percutaneous Ethanol Injection of Liver Tumors Under General Anesthesia: Preliminary Data on Efficacy and Complications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To verify the efficacy of ultrasound (US)-guided injection of large amounts of ethanol into large or multiple liver lesions, in a single session under general anesthesia (one-shot PEI) for percutaneous ablation of hepatic tumors. Methods: Twenty-nine patients (27 with 51 hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) nodules on cirrhosis, diameter range 1.0<+>-<+>9.0 cm; two patients with a single metastasis from the gastroenteric tract, 5.0 and 9.0 cm, respectively, in diameter) were treated with one-shot PEI. Results: The total volume of alcohol delivered per patient ranged from 16 to 210 ml. Mean ethanol volume in all patients was 49 ml. Dynamic computed tomography (CT) examination showed complete necrosis in 41 of 50 lesions. Two patients died of hypovolemic shock due to massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 3 and 7 days, respectively, after the interventional procedure. All the remaining patients are alive (follow-up 5<+>-<+>14 months) except one who died of liver failure 5 months after. New HCC nodules occurred in six patients within 6 months and one intralesional relapse was recorded. Conclusion: In this preliminary experience, one-shot PEI is as effective in inducing liver tumor necrosis as traditional PEI; its advantages are shorter treatment time and the capability of treating larger and multiple liver lesions.

Giorgio, Antonio; Tarantino, Luciano; Francica, Giampiero; Mariniello, Nicola; Nuzzo, Antonio [Department of Infectious Diseases, Ospedale D. Cotugno, via Quagliariello, 1, Naples (Italy); Del Viscovo, Luca; Rotondo, Antonio [Department of Radiology, II Policlinico Universita Federico II, Via Pansini, 5 Naples (Italy)

1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Measured Off-Grid LED Lighting System Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a product of our ongoing effort to support the development of high-quality yet affordable products for off-grid lighting in the developing world that have good potential to succeed in the market. The effort includes work to develop low-cost testing procedures, to identify useful performance metrics, and to facilitate the development of industry standards and product rating protocols. We conducted laboratory testing of nine distinct product lines. In some cases we also tested multiple generations of a single product line and/or operating modes for a product. The resultsare summarized in Table 1. We found that power consumption and light output varied by nearly a factor of 12, with efficacy varying by a factor of more than six. Of particular note, overall luminous efficacy varied from 8.2 to 53.1 lumens per watt. Color quality indices variedmaterially, especially for correlated color temperature. Maximum illuminance, beamcandlepower, and luminance varied by 8x, 32x, and 61x respectively, suggesting considerable differences among products in terms of service levels and visual comfort. Glare varied by1.4x, and was above acceptable thresholds in most cases. Optical losses play a role in overall performance, varying by a factor of 3.2 and ranging as high as 24percent. These findings collectively indicate considerable potential for improved product design.

Granderson, Jessica; Galvin, James; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Clear, Robert; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

435

Atmospheric multiple scattering of fluorescence light from extensive air showers and effect of the aerosol size on the reconstruction of energy and depth of maximum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The reconstruction of the energy and the depth of maximum $X_{\\rm max}$ of an extensive air shower depends on the multiple scattering of fluorescence photons in the atmosphere. In this work, we explain how atmospheric aerosols, and especially their size, scatter the fluorescence photons during their propagation. Using a Monte Carlo simulation for the scattering of light, the dependence on the aerosol conditions of the multiple scattered light contribution to the recorded signal is fully parameterised. A clear dependence on the aerosol size is proposed for the first time. Finally, using this new parameterisation, the effect of atmospheric aerosols on the energy and on the $X_{\\rm max}$ reconstructions is presented for a vertical extensive air shower observed by a ground-based detector at $30~$km: for typical aerosol conditions, multiple scattering leads to a systematic over-estimation of $5\\pm1.5\\%$ for the energy and $4.0\\pm 1.5~$g/cm$^2$ for the $X_{\\rm max}$, where the uncertainties refer to a variation of the aerosol size.

K. Louedec; J. Colombi

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Petroleum production at Maximum Efficient Rate Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California. Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides an analysis of the potential impacts associated with the proposed action, which is continued operation of Naval Petroleum Reserve No. I (NPR-1) at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER) as authorized by Public law 94-258, the Naval Petroleum Reserves Production Act of 1976 (Act). The document also provides a similar analysis of alternatives to the proposed action, which also involve continued operations, but under lower development scenarios and lower rates of production. NPR-1 is a large oil and gas field jointly owned and operated by the federal government and Chevron U.SA Inc. (CUSA) pursuant to a Unit Plan Contract that became effective in 1944; the government`s interest is approximately 78% and CUSA`s interest is approximately 22%. The government`s interest is under the jurisdiction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The facility is approximately 17,409 acres (74 square miles), and it is located in Kern County, California, about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield and 100 miles north of Los Angeles in the south central portion of the state. The environmental analysis presented herein is a supplement to the NPR-1 Final Environmental Impact Statement of that was issued by DOE in 1979 (1979 EIS). As such, this document is a Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS).

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fragile-to-fragile Liquid Transition at Tg and Stable-Glass Phase Nucleation Rate Maximum at the Kauzmann Temperature TK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An undercooled liquid is unstable. The driving force of the glass transition at Tg is a change of the undercooled-liquid Gibbs free energy. The classical Gibbs free energy change for a crystal formation is completed including an enthalpy saving. The crystal growth critical nucleus is used as a probe to observe the Laplace pressure change Dp accompanying the enthalpy change -Vm *Dp at Tg where Vm is the molar volume. A stable glass-liquid transition model predicts the specific heat jump of fragile liquids at temperatures smaller than Tg, the Kauzmann temperature TK where the liquid entropy excess with regard to crystal goes to zero, the equilibrium enthalpy between TK and Tg, the maximum nucleation rate at TK of superclusters containing magic atom numbers, and the equilibrium latent heats at Tg and TK. Strong-to-fragile and strong-to-strong liquid transitions at Tg are also described and all their thermodynamic parameters are determined from their specific heat jumps. The existence of fragile liquids quenched in the amorphous state, which do not undergo liquid-liquid transition during heating preceding their crystallization, is predicted. Long ageing times leading to the formation at TK of a stable glass composed of superclusters containing up to 147 atoms, touching and interpenetrating, are evaluated from nucleation rates. A fragile-to-fragile liquid transition occurs at Tg without stable-glass formation while a strong glass is stable after transition.

Robert Felix Tournier

2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

438

The Development of Career Maturity and Career Decision Self-Efficacy Among High-School Aged Youth Enrolled in the Texas 4-H Healthy Lifestyles Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

predictor of career immaturity. Similarly, numerous research studies have discovered a relationship between career decision-making self-efficacy and career indecision (Betz, Klein & Taylor, 1996; Choi et al., 2011; Taylor & Popma, 1990). Career maturity... suggest a career choice should be made by the end of the eighth grade (Hirschi, 2011), the expectation is typically that a career decision is made by the end of high school (Super, Savickas, & Super, 1996). This career decision making is often viewed...

Dodd, Courtney Felder

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase inhibitors for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Part 3: X-ray crystallographic characterization, core and urea optimization and in vivo efficacy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Key binding interactions of the anthranilimide based glycogen phosphorylase a (GPa) inhibitor 2 from X-ray crystallography studies are described. This series of compounds bind to the AMP site of GP. Using the binding information the core and the phenyl urea moieties were optimized. This work culminated in the identification of compounds with single nanomolar potency as well as in vivo efficacy in a diabetic model.

Thomson, Stephen A.; Banker, Pierette; Bickett, D. Mark; Boucheron, Joyce A.; Carter, H. Luke; Clancy, Daphne C.; Cooper, Joel P.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Garrido, Dulce M.; Nolte, Robert T.; Peat, Andrew J.; Sheckler, Lauren R.; Sparks, Steven M.; Tavares, Francis X.; Wang, Liping; Wang, Tony Y.; Weiel, James E.; (GSKNC)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Maximum Entropy Method and Charge Flipping, a Powerful Combination to Visualize the True Nature of Structural Disorder from in situ X-ray Powder Diffraction Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a systematic approach, the ability of the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) to reconstruct the most probable electron density of highly disordered crystal structures from X-ray powder diffraction data was evaluated. As a case study, the ambient temperature crystal structures of disordered {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] and {alpha}-Rb{sub 2}[CO{sub 3}] and ordered {delta}-K{sub 2}[C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] were investigated in detail with the aim of revealing the 'true' nature of the apparent disorder. Different combinations of F (based on phased structure factors) and G constraints (based on structure-factor amplitudes) from different sources were applied in MEM calculations. In particular, a new combination of the MEM with the recently developed charge-flipping algorithm with histogram matching for powder diffraction data (pCF) was successfully introduced to avoid the inevitable bias of the phases of the structure-factor amplitudes by the Rietveld model. Completely ab initio electron-density distributions have been obtained with the MEM applied to a combination of structure-factor amplitudes from Le Bail fits with phases derived from pCF. All features of the crystal structures, in particular the disorder of the oxalate and carbonate anions, and the displacements of the cations, are clearly obtained. This approach bears the potential of a fast method of electron-density determination, even for highly disordered materials. All the MEM maps obtained in this work were compared with the MEM map derived from the best Rietveld refined model. In general, the phased observed structure factors obtained from Rietveld refinement (applying F and G constraints) were found to give the closest description of the experimental data and thus lead to the most accurate image of the actual disorder.

Samy, A.; Dinnebier, R; van Smaalen, S; Jansen, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Efficacy of an integrated continuing medical education (CME) and quality improvement (QI) program on radiation oncologist (RO) clinical practice  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: There has been little radiation oncologist (RO)-specific research in continuing medical education (CME) or quality improvement (QI) program efficacy. Our aim was to evaluate a CME/QI program for changes in RO behavior, performance, and adherence to department protocols/studies over the first 12 months of the program. Methods and Materials: The CME/QI program combined chart audit with feedback (C-AWF), simulation review AWF (SR-AWF), reminder checklists, and targeted CME tutorials. Between April 2003 and March 2004, management of 75 patients was evaluated by chart audit with feedback (C-AWF) and 178 patients via simulation review audit (SR-AWF) using a validated instrument. Scores were presented, and case management was discussed with individualized educational feedback. RO behavior and performance was compared over the first year of the program. Results: Comparing the first and second 6 months, there was a significant improvement in mean behavior (12.7-13.6 of 14, p = 0.0005) and RO performance (7.6-7.9 of 8, p = 0.018) scores. Protocol/study adherence significantly improved from 90.3% to 96.6% (p = 0.005). A total of 50 actions were generated, including the identification of learning needs to direct CME tutorials, the systematic change of suboptimal RO practice, and the alteration of deficient management of 3% of patients audited during the program. Conclusion: An integrated CME/QI program combining C-AWF, SR-AWF, QI reminders, and targeted CME tutorials effectively improved targeted RO behavior and performance over a 12-month period. There was a corresponding increase in departmental protocol and study adherence.

Leong, Cheng Nang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore) and Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore)]. E-mail: Cheng_Nang_Leong@mail.nhg.com.sg; Shakespeare, Thomas Philip [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); North Coast Cancer Institute, Coffs Harbour (Australia); Mukherjee, Rahul K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Back, Michael F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Lee, Khai Mun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Lu, Jiade Jay [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Wynne, Christopher J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Lim, Keith [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Tang, Johann [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, National University Hospital (Singapore); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Institute, Tan Tock Seng Hospital (Singapore); Zhang Xiaojian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Fudan Hospital, Shanghai (China)

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Determination of zero-field size percent depth doses and tissue maximum ratios for stereotactic radiosurgery and IMRT dosimetry: Comparison between experimental measurements and Monte Carlo simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, zero-field percent depth dose (PDD) and tissue maximum ratio (TMR) for 6 MV x rays have been determined by extrapolation from dosimetric measurements over the field size range 1x1-10x10 cm{sup 2}. The key to small field dosimetry is the selection of a proper dosimeter for the measurements, as well as the alignment of the detector with the central axis (CAX) of beam. The measured PDD results are compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to examine the consistency and integrity of the measured data from which the zero-field PDD is extrapolated. Of the six most commonly used dosimeters in the clinic, the stereotactic diode field detector (SFD), the PTW Pinpoint, and the Exradin A14 are the most consistent and produce results within 2% of each other over the entire field size range 1x1-40x40 cm{sup 2}. Although the diamond detector has the smallest sensitive volume, it is the least stable and tends to disagree with all other dosimeters by more than 10%. The zero-field PDD data extrapolated from larger field measurements obtained with the SFD are in good agreement with the MC results. The extrapolated and MC data agree within 2.5% over the clinical depth range (d{sub max}-30 cm), when the MC data for the zero field are derived from a 1x1 cm{sup 2} field simulation using a miniphantom (1x1x48 cm{sup 3}). The agreement between the measured PDD and the MC data based on a full phantom (48x48x48 cm{sup 3}) simulation is fairly good within 1% at shallow depths to approximately 5% at 30 cm. Our results seem to indicate that zero-field TMR can be accurately calculated from PDD measurements with a proper choice of detector and a careful alignment of detector axis with the CAX.

Cheng, C.-W.; Sang, Hyun Cho; Taylor, Michael; Das, Indra J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Morristown Memorial Hospital, Morristown, New Jersey 07962 (United States); Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Portland Kaiser Permanente, Portland, Oregon 97227 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Audio-Visual Biofeedback Does Not Improve the Reliability of Target Delineation Using Maximum Intensity Projection in 4-Dimensional Computed Tomography Radiation Therapy Planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate whether coaching patients' breathing would improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} (internal target volume generated by contouring in the maximum intensity projection scan) and ITV{sub 10} (generated by combining the gross tumor volumes contoured in 10 phases of a 4-dimensional CT [4DCT] scan). Methods and Materials: Eight patients with a thoracic tumor and 5 patients with an abdominal tumor were included in an institutional review board-approved prospective study. Patients underwent 3 4DCT scans with: (1) free breathing (FB); (2) coaching using audio-visual (AV) biofeedback via the Real-Time Position Management system; and (3) coaching via a spirometer system (Active Breathing Coordinator or ABC). One physician contoured all scans to generate the ITV{sub 10} and ITV{sub MIP}. The match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} was quantitatively assessed with volume ratio, centroid distance, root mean squared distance, and overlap/Dice coefficient. We investigated whether coaching (AV or ABC) or uniform expansions (1, 2, 3, or 5 mm) of ITV{sub MIP} improved the match. Results: Although both AV and ABC coaching techniques improved frequency reproducibility and ABC improved displacement regularity, neither improved the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10} over FB. On average, ITV{sub MIP} underestimated ITV{sub 10} by 19%, 19%, and 21%, with centroid distance of 1.9, 2.3, and 1.7 mm and Dice coefficient of 0.87, 0.86, and 0.88 for FB, AV, and ABC, respectively. Separate analyses indicated a better match for lung cancers or tumors not adjacent to high-intensity tissues. Uniform expansions of ITV{sub MIP} did not correct for the mismatch between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. Conclusions: In this pilot study, audio-visual biofeedback did not improve the match between ITV{sub MIP} and ITV{sub 10}. In general, ITV{sub MIP} should be limited to lung cancers, and modification of ITV{sub MIP} in each phase of the 4DCT data set is recommended.

Lu, Wei, E-mail: wlu@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Neuner, Geoffrey A.; George, Rohini; Wang, Zhendong; Sasor, Sarah [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Huang, Xuan [Research and Development, Care Management Department, Johns Hopkins HealthCare LLC, Glen Burnie, Maryland (United States); Regine, William F.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; D'Souza, Warren D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

7-122 A solar pond power plant operates by absorbing heat from the hot region near the bottom, and rejecting waste heat to the cold region near the top. The maximum thermal efficiency that the power plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

calculated above. 7-123 A Carnot heat engine cycle is executed in a closed system with a fixed mass of steam can have is to be determined. Analysis The highest thermal efficiency a heat engine operating between transfer. Therefore, the maximum efficiency of the actual heat engine will be lower than the value

Bahrami, Majid

445

D i i f S t i bilit i th B ilt E i tDesigning for Sustainability in the Built Environment Exterior Facade Design for Maximum Daylighting and Solar Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facade Design for Maximum Daylighting and Solar Power GenerationGeneration A frank assessment of issues "...the art and science of daylighting is not so much about how to provide enough daylighting as how to do LIGHTING CHARACTER DUE TO DAYLIGHT VARIABILITY · PSYCHOLOGICAL BENEFITS OF· PSYCHOLOGICAL BENEFITS

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

446

The construction manager is typically selected at the beginning of the design process. The Guaranteed Maximum Price is usually prepared based on 50% Construction Documents. In these typical cases the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The construction manager is typically selected at the beginning of the design process. The Guaranteed Maximum Price is usually prepared based on 50% Construction Documents. In these typical cases and 50% Construction Documents. The deliverable at 50% Construction Documents includes the Guaranteed

Sura, Philip

447

A Connection between Obscuration and Star Formation in Luminous Quasars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a measurement of the star formation properties of a uniform sample of mid-IR selected, unobscured and obscured quasars (QSO1s and QSO2s) in the Bo\\"otes survey region. We use an spectral energy distribution (SED) analysis for photometric data spanning optical to far-IR wavelengths to decompose AGN and host galaxy components. We find that when compared to a matched sample of QSO1s, the QSO2s have higher far-IR detection fractions, far-IR fluxes and infrared star formation luminosities ($L_{\\rm IR}^{\\rm SF}$) by a factor of $\\sim2$. Correspondingly, we show that the AGN obscured fraction rises from 0.3 to 0.7 between $4-40\\times10^{11}L_\\odot$. We also find evidence associating the absorption in the X-ray emission with the presence of far-IR emitting dust. Overall, these results are consistent with galaxy evolution models in which quasar obscurations can be associated with a dust-enshrouded starburst galaxies.

Chen, Chien-Ting J; Alberts, Stacey; Harrison, Chris M; Alexander, David M; Assef, Roberto; Brown, Michael J I; Del Moro, Agnese; Forman, William R; Gorjian, Varoujan; Goulding, Andrew D; Hainline, Kevin N; Jones, Christine; Kochanek, Christopher S; Murray, Stephen S; Pope, Alexandra; Rovilos, Emmanouel; Stern, Daniel

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Overview of the Milky Way Galaxy Luminous (stellar) Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's SNR (1572) 1546 -1601 7500 light years away Tycho Brahe Wednesday, March 30, 2011 #12;Cassiopeia A SNR, March 30, 2011 #12;Dying Stars (Planetary Nebulae with White Dwarf) Wednesday, March 30, 2011 #12;Tycho

Colorado at Boulder, University of

449

Human Mammary Luminal Epithelial Cells Contain Progenitors to Myoepithelial Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18 and 19 (K18K19), vimentin (vim) and ?-sm actin (ASMA) inDako), and vimentin (VIM; MEDAC, GmbH). Other antibodiesa mAb against vimentin (VIM, IgG1). The secondary antibodies

Pechoux, Christine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fast Luminous Blue Transients from Newborn Black Holes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Newborn black holes in collapsing massive stars can be accompanied by a fallback disk. The accretion rate is typically super-Eddington and strong disk outflows are expected. Such outflows could be directly observed in some failed explosions of compact (blue supergiants or Wolf-Rayet stars) progenitors, and may be more common than long-duration gamma-ray bursts. Using an analytical model, we show that the fallback disk outflows produce blue UV-optical transients with a peak bolometric luminosity of ~10^(42-43) erg s^-1 (peak R-band absolute AB magnitudes of -16 to -18) and an emission duration of ~ a few to ~ 10 days. The spectra are likely dominated intermediate mass elements, but will lack much radioactive nuclei and iron-group elements. The above properties are broadly consistent with some of the rapid blue transients detected by Pan-STARRS and PTF. This scenario can be distinguished from alternative models using radio observations within a few years after the optical peak.

Kashiyama, Kazumi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Star-formation histories of local luminous infrared galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the analysis of the integrated spectral energy distribution (SED) from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared and H$\\alpha$ of a sample of 29 local systems and individual galaxies with infrared (IR) luminosities between 10^11 Lsun and 10^11.8 Lsun. We have combined new narrow-band H$\\alpha$+[NII] and broad-band g, r optical imaging taken with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), with archival GALEX, 2MASS, Spitzer, and Herschel data. The SEDs (photometry and integrated H$\\alpha$ flux) have been fitted with a modified version of the MAGPHYS code using stellar population synthesis models for the UV-near-IR range and thermal emission models for the IR emission taking into account the energy balance between the absorbed and re-emitted radiation. From the SED fits we derive the star-formation histories (SFH) of these galaxies. For nearly half of them the star-formation rate appears to be approximately constant during the last few Gyrs. In the other half, the current star-formation rate seems to be enha...

Pereira-Santaella, Miguel; Colina, Luis; Miralles-Caballero, Daniel; Prez-Gonzlez, Pablo G; Arribas, Santiago; Bellocchi, Enrica; Cazzoli, Sara; Daz-Santos, Tanio; Lpez, Javier Piqueras

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Luminal flow amplifies stent-based drug deposition in arterial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: Treatment of arterial bifurcation lesions using drug-eluting stents (DES) is now common clinical practice and yet the mechanisms governing drug distribution in these complex morphologies are incompletely ...

Levine, Evan G.

453

Unveiling the Hearts of Luminous and Ultra-Luminous Infrared Galaxy Mergers with Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Boker, T. , Falc on-Barroso, J. , Schinnerer, E. , Knapen,ApJ, 675, L69 Falc on-Barroso, J. , Bacon, R. , Bureau,MNRAS, 369, 529 Falc on-Barroso, J. , Bacon, R. , Bureau,

Medling, Anne Marie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Definition 0.1. Let D be any set and f W D ! R a function. An element 2 D is a (global or absolute) maximum for f on D if for all x 2 D, f ./ f .x/. The  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Definition 0.1. Let D be any set and f W D ! R a function. An element 2 D is a (global or absolute the maximum value. Minimum is defined similarly. Definition 0.2. Let f W D ! R as above. The function f. The function f is said to be bounded if it is bounded both above and below. Now let D be a subset of R (the

Goodman, Fred

455

RTOG 0417: Efficacy of Bevacizumab in Combination With Definitive Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin Chemotherapy in Untreated Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Carcinoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0417 was a phase II study that explored the safety and efficacy of the addition of bevacizumab to chemoradiation therapy. The safety results have been previously reported. Herein we report the secondary efficacy endpoints of overall survival (OS), locoregional failure (LRF), para-aortic nodal failure (PAF), distant failure (DF), and disease-free survival (DFS). Methods and Materials: Eligible patients with bulky Stage IB-IIIB disease were treated with once-weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m{sup 2}) chemotherapy and standard pelvic radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Bevacizumab was administered at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks for 3 cycles during chemoradiation. For OS, failure was defined as death of any cause and was measured from study entry to date of death. LRF was defined as any failure in the pelvis. PAF was defined as any para-aortic nodal failure. DF was analyzed both including and excluding PAF. DFS was measured from study entry to date of first LRF. DF was measured with or without PAF or death. OS and DFS were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method, and LRF and DF rates were estimated by the cumulative incidence method. Results: 49 eligible patients from 28 institutions were enrolled between 2006 and 2009. The median follow-up time was 3.8 years (range, 0.8-6.0 years). The surviving patients had a median follow-up time of 3.9 years (range, 2.1-6.0 years). Most patients had tumors of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IIB (63%), and 80% were squamous. The 3-year OS, DFS, and LRF were 81.3% (95% confidence interval [CI], 67.2%-89.8%), 68.7% (95% CI, 53.5%-79.8%), and 23.2% (95% CI, 11%-35.4%), respectively. The PAF, DF without PAF, and DF with PAF at 3 years were 8.4% (95% CI, 0.4%-16.3%), 14.7% (95% CI, 4.5%-24.9%), and 23.1% (95% CI 11.0%-35.2%), respectively. Conclusion: In this study, bevacizumab in combination with standard pelvic chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer showed efficacy results that are promising and may warrant further investigation.

Schefter, Tracey, E-mail: tracey.schefter@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Kwon, Janice S. [University of British Columbia and BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Stuhr, Kelly [University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Balaraj, Khalid [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Yaremko, Brian Patrick [Western University, London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Small, William [Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Sause, William [Intermountain Medical Center, Murray, Utah (United States); Gaffney, David [University of Utah Health Sciences Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Neutron powder diffraction and difference maximum entropy method analysis of protium- and deuterium-dissolved BaSn{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}O{sub 2.75+{alpha}}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a new method, a difference maximum entropy method (MEM) analysis of the neutron diffraction data, for revealing the detailed structure around hydrogen atoms in proton-conducting oxides. This MEM analysis uses the differences between the structure factors of protium- and deuterium-dissolved crystals. Simulations demonstrate that it not only provides the distribution of hydrogen atoms alone, but also improves the spatial resolution of MEM mapping around hydrogen atoms. Applied to actual diffraction data of protium- and deuterium-dissolved BaSn{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}O{sub 2.75+{alpha}} at 9 K, difference MEM analysis reveals that O-D bonds mostly tilt towards the second nearest oxygen atoms, and that the distributions of deuterium and oxygen atoms are probably insignificant in interstitial regions. - Graphical abstract: A novel method, difference maximum entropy method (MEM) analysis of the neutron diffraction data, is proposed for revealing the detailed structure around hydrogen atoms in proton-conducting oxides. This MEM analysis uses the differences between the structure factors of protium- and deuterium-dissolved crystals and improves the spatial resolution of the MEM mapping around the hydrogen atoms.

Nagasaki, Takanori, E-mail: nagasaki@esi.nagoya-u.ac.j [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Shiotani, Shinya [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Igawa, Naoki [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Yoshino, Masahito; Iwasaki, Kouta [Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Fukazawa, Hiroshi; Utsumi, Wataru [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Maximum-Demand Rectangular Location Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 1, 2014 ... Demand and service can be defined in the most general sense. ... Industrial and Systems Engineering, Texas A&M University, September 2014.

Manish Bansal

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Maximum Delay Computation for Interdomain Path Selection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and establishment of interdomain QoS-constrained tunnels, that mainly rely on RSVP-TE [3] and the PCE architecture tunnels, like the PCE-based mechanisms, since they are more suitable in the context we are working on

459

MAXIMUM ADDITIONAL SCORE: 2 points Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; Many-Core Accelerator Architectures 1. A Performance and Energy Comparison of Convolution on GPUs in Production Processors via Software-Guided Thread Scheduling 7. Power Gating Strategies on GPUs #12; Network. #12;1. For a given simulator record its input parameters and its output metrics. 2. Experiment

Silvano, Cristina

460

Speech processing using maximum likelihood continuity mapping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Speech processing is obtained that, given a probabilistic mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator positions, allows sequences of speech sounds to be mapped to smooth sequences of pseudo-articulator positions. In addition, a method for learning a probabilistic mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator position is described. The method for learning the mapping between static speech sounds and pseudo-articulator position uses a set of training data composed only of speech sounds. The said speech processing can be applied to various speech analysis tasks, including speech recognition, speaker recognition, speech coding, speech synthesis, and voice mimicry.

Hogden, John E. (Santa Fe, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum luminous efficacy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Incremental Network Design with Maximum Flows - Optimization ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 21, 2013 ... for adding arcs to the network, (2) a performance measure, which prescribes ... network is evaluated (for instance by the shortest s-t path or by the ...... Smart grid design for efficient and flexible power networks operation and.

2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

462

: runout specimen max : maximum fatigue stress  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High Performance Fibre Reinforced Concrete (UHPFRC) layer to concrete bridge deck slab was conceived was drawn without runout specimens .) Figure 6 Fatigue fracture surface of (a) UHPFRC, (b) steel rebar (a influenced by fibre distribution and orientation. Fatigue fracture surface of UHPFRC is similar

463

Higher Order Maximum Persistency and Comparison Theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

discrete variables (energy minimization in graphical models, weighted constraint ... 1.2 Energy Minimization . ...... This is useful in proofs, providing an alternative.

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

464

Maximum Vacation Carryover Balance & Upcoming Holiday Shutdown...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

24, 2014 through Sunday, January 4, 2015 for the annual holiday shutdown. The Lab will resume normal business operations on Monday, January 5, 2015. As a reminder, December 24, 25,...

465

ON SEMIDEFINITE PROGRAMMING RELAXATIONS OF MAXIMUM ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ... 1Department of Econometrics and OR, Tilburg University, The Netherlands, Warandelaan 2,. 5000 LE, Tilburg, The Netherlands; e.deklerk@uvt.

2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

Monthly and Annual Maximum Temperatures - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fundProject8Mistakes toMolecularMonitoring‹3and Annual

467

Higher Order Maximum Persistency and Comparison Theorems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 15, 2014 ... ... of discrete variables (energy minimization in graphical models, ... for Computer Graphics and Vision, Graz Univeristy of Technology, Oct.

Alexander Shekhovtsov

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

468

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional (ICI) Boilers and Process Heaters, February 2013 Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators, July 2004...

469

The efficacy of oxidative coupling for promoting in-situ immobilization of hydroxylated aromatics in contaminated soil and sediment systems. Progress report, September 15, 1996--September 14, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

'The principal objective for Year 1 of this study has included sorbent collection, preparation and characterization, as well as investigation of the efficacy of abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions on the irreversible binding of phenolic compounds on natural soils and sediments. In response to a budget reduction request specific modifications were made without compromising the integrity of the proposed work. The modified Phase 1 experimental matrix consists of four natural sorbents and three phenolic sorbates. Preliminary experiments with Chelsea soil indicated excessive release of soil organic matter (SOM) into solution, thereby complicating determination of aqueous phase phenol concentrations. It was therefore decided to substitute Lachine shale for the Chelsea soil. This shale is a well-characterized natural sorbent used previously in the laboratory. Additionally two field soils having similar soil morphology were identified based on their particle size distribution and organic matter content. These soils were located from US Department of Agriculture soil survey data and collected aseptically from a forested and a grassland site. Another deviation from the proposed schedule of tasks was the initiation of work from Phase 2 and Phase 3. In addition to experiments with natural systems, preliminary work with model and engineered systems was initiated earlier than scheduled in order to integrate and relate all three aspects of the study and provide a more robust perspective of field applications of this remediation technology.'

Weber, W.J. Jr.; Bhandari, A.

1997-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

470

Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

Bullard, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Controls for Solid-State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study predicts new hybrid lighting applications for LEDs. In hybrid lighting, LEDs provide a low-energy 'standby' light level while another, more powerful, efficient light source provides light for occupied periods. Lighting controls will allow the two light sources to work together through an appropriate control strategy, typically motion-sensing. There are no technical barriers preventing the use of low through high CRI LEDs for standby lighting in many interior and exterior applications today. The total luminous efficacy of LED systems could be raised by increasing the electrical efficiency of LED drivers to the maximum practically achievable level (94%). This would increase system luminous efficacy by 20-25%. The expected market volumes for many types of LEDs should justify the evolution of new LED drivers that use highly efficient ICs and reduce parts count by means of ASICs. Reducing their electronics parts count by offloading discrete components onto integrated circuits (IC) will allow manufacturers to reduce the cost of LED driver electronics. LED luminaire manufacturers will increasingly integrate the LED driver and thermal management directly in the LED fixture. LED luminaires of the future will likely have no need for separable lamp and ballast because the equipment life of all the LED luminaire components will all be about the same (50,000 hours). The controls and communications techniques used for communicating with conventional light sources, such as dimmable fluorescent lighting, are appropriate for LED illumination for energy management purposes. DALI has been used to control LED systems in new applications and the emerging ZigBee protocol could be used for LEDs as well. Major lighting companies are already moving in this direction. The most significant finding is that there is a significant opportunity to use LEDs today for standby lighting purposes. Conventional lighting systems can be made more efficient still by using LEDs to provide a low-energy standby state when lower light levels are acceptable.

Rubinstein, Francis

2007-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

472

Habitat reclamation plan to mitigate for the loss of habitat due to oil and gas production activities under maximum efficient rate, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Kern County, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Activities associated with oil and gas development under the Maximum Efficiency Rate (MER) from 1975 to 2025 will disturb approximately 3,354 acres. Based on 1976 aerial photographs and using a dot grid methodology, the amount of land disturbed prior to MER is estimated to be 3,603 acres. Disturbances on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) were mapped using 1988 aerial photography and a geographical information system. A total of 6,079 acres were classified as disturbed as of June, 1988. The overall objective of this document is to provide specific information relating to the on-site habitat restoration program at NPRC. The specific objectives, which relate to the terms and conditions that must be met by DOE as a means of protecting the San Joaquin kit fox from incidental take are to: (1) determine the amount and location of disturbed lands on NPR-1 and the number of acres disturbed as a result of MER activities, (2) develop a long term (10 year) program to restore an equivalent on-site acres to that lost from prior project-related actions, and (3) examine alternative means to offset kit fox habitat loss.

Anderson, D.C.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Probing local structure in the yellow phosphor LaSr[subscript 2]AlO[subscript 5]:Ce[superscript 3+], by the maximum entropy method and pair distribution function analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compound LaSr{sub 2}AlO{sub 5} was recently introduced as a competitive Ce{sup 3+} host material for blue-pumped yellow phosphors for use in white light emitting diodes. A crucial feature of the crystal structure of LaSr{sub 2}AlO{sub 5} is that La, which is the host site for Ce{sup 3+}, is located in the 8h positions of the I4/mcm crystal structure, a site equally shared with Sr. While the average crystal structure of LaSr{sub 2}AlO{sub 5} as revealed by Rietveld analysis of laboratory and synchrotron X-ray diffraction data suggests nothing untoward, maximum entropy method analysis of the synchrotron X-ray data reveals the existence of conspicuous non-sphericity of the electron density. Pair distribution function analysis of the data suggests that despite their occupying the same crystallographic site, La and Sr possess distinct coordination environments, and the environment around La is more compact and regular than the environment suggested by the Rietveld refinement of the average structure. The absorption and emission from Ce{sup 3+} centers is controlled by the local coordination and symmetry, and the use of powerful new tools in unraveling details of these strengthens the rational search for new phosphors for solid state white lighting.

Im, Won Bin; Page, Katharine; DenBaars, Steven P.; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB); (LANL)

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

474

Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Discovery of N-(4-(2-Amino-3-chloropyridin-4-yloxy)-3-fluorophenyl)-4-ethoxy-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamide (BMS-777607), a Selective and Orally Efficacious Inhibitor of the Met Kinase Superfamily  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Substituted N-(4-(2-aminopyridin-4-yloxy)-3-fluoro-phenyl)-1-(4-fluorophenyl)-2-oxo-1,2-dihydropyridine-3-carboxamides were identified as potent and selective Met kinase inhibitors. Substitution of the pyridine 3-position gave improved enzyme potency, while substitution of the pyridone 4-position led to improved aqueous solubility and kinase selectivity. Analogue 10 demonstrated complete tumor stasis in a Met-dependent GTL-16 human gastric carcinoma xenograft model following oral administration. Because of its excellent in vivo efficacy and favorable pharmacokinetic and preclinical safety profiles, 10 has been advanced into phase I clinical trials.

Schroeder, Gretchen M.; An, Yongmi; Cai, Zhen-Wei; Chen, Xiao-Tao; Clark, Cheryl; Cornelius, Lyndon A.M.; Dai, Jun; Gullo-Brown, Johnni; Gupta, Ashok; Henley, Benjamin; Hunt, John T.; Jeyaseelan, Robert; Kamath, Amrita; Kim, Kyoung; Lippy, Jonathan; Lombardo, Louis J.; Manne, Veeraswamy; Oppenheimer, Simone; Sack, John S.; Schmidt, Robert J.; Shen, Guoxiang; Stefanski, Kevin; Tokarski, John S.; Trainor, George L.; Wautlet, Barri S.; Wei, Donna; Williams, David K.; Zhang, Yingru; Zhang, Yueping; Fargnoli, Joseph; Borzilleri, Robert M.; (BMS)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Safety profile, efficacy, and biodistribution of a bicistronic high-capacity adenovirus vector encoding a combined immunostimulation and cytotoxic gene therapy as a prelude to a phase I clinical trial for glioblastoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adenoviral vectors (Ads) are promising gene delivery vehicles due to their high transduction efficiency; however, their clinical usefulness has been hampered by their immunogenicity and the presence of anti-Ad immunity in humans. We reported the efficacy of a gene therapy approach for glioma consisting of intratumoral injection of Ads encoding conditionally cytotoxic herpes simplex type 1 thymidine kinase (Ad-TK) and the immunostimulatory cytokine fms-like tyrosine kinase ligand 3 (Ad-Flt3L). Herein, we report the biodistribution, efficacy, and neurological and systemic effects of a bicistronic high-capacity Ad, i.e., HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L. HC-Ads elicit sustained transgene expression, even in the presence of anti-Ad immunity, and can encode large therapeutic cassettes, including regulatory elements to enable turning gene expression on or off according to clinical need. The inclusion of two therapeutic transgenes within a single vector enables a reduction of the total vector load without adversely impacting efficacy. Because clinically the vectors will be delivered into the surgical cavity, normal regions of the brain parenchyma are likely to be transduced. Thus, we assessed any potential toxicities elicited by escalating doses of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L (1 10{sup 8}, 1 10{sup 9}, or 1 10{sup 10} viral particles [vp]) delivered into the rat brain parenchyma. We assessed neuropathology, biodistribution, transgene expression, systemic toxicity, and behavioral impact at acute and chronic time points. The results indicate that doses up to 1 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered into the normal rat brain and underpin further developments for its implementation in a phase I clinical trial for glioma. - Highlights: ? High capacity Ad vectors elicit sustained therapeutic gene expression in the brain. ? HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L encodes two therapeutic genes and a transcriptional switch. ? We performed a dose escalation study at acute and chronic time points. ? Doses up to 1 10{sup 9} vp of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L can be safely delivered in the brain. ? Efficacy and safety of HC-Ad-TK/TetOn-Flt3L merits its use in a GBM Phase I trial.

Puntel, Mariana [Department of Neurosurgery, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Michigan School of Medicine, MSRB II, RM 4570C, 1150 West Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-5689 (United States); Gene Therapeutics Research Institute, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA 90