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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

"Table A52. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" 2. Nonswitchable Minimum Requirements and Maximum Consumption" " Potential by Census Region, 1991" " (Estimates in Physical Units)" ,,,,"RSE" ,"Actual","Minimum","Maximum","Row" "Type of Energy","Consumption","Consumption(a)","Consumption(b)","Factors" "RSE Column Factors:",1,1.2,0.8 ," Total United States" ,"-","-","-" "Electricity Receipts(c) (million kilowatthours)",718480,701478,766887,2 "Natural Gas (billion cubic feet)",5345,3485,5887,2 "Distillate Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",23885,19113,201081,3.7 "Residual Fuel Oil (thousand barrels)",65837,36488,201921,2.6

2

The Maximum Potential Intensity of Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermodynamic approach to estimating maximum potential intensity (MPI) of tropical cyclones is described and compared with observations and previous studies. The approach requires an atmospheric temperature sounding, SST, and surface pressure; ...

Greg J. Holland

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Maximum Potential Intensities of Tropical Cyclones near Isla Socorro, Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum potential intensity (MPI) of a tropical cyclone represents a theoretical upper limit to the strength of the storm imposed by the laws of physics and the energy available to the system in the atmosphere and the ocean. The MPI in this ...

Jay S. Hobgood

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

residential sector (50% of the electricity consumption and 80% of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings...

5

Potential for Reducing Consumption Through Distribution Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, EPRI released a Prism analysis, providing a technically and economically feasible roadmap for the electricity sector to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions. This approach has been extended to evaluate the utility distribution sector and opportunities to improve efficiency and reduce consumption. Possible improvements in efficiency are estimated by improvement category, including use of more efficient transformers and better reactive power management. Voltage optimization is a significant option ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

6

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (US DOE) has placed lighting and appliance standards at a very high priority of the U.S. energy policy. However, the maximum energy savings and CO2 emissions reduction achievable via minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) has not yet been fully characterized. The Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), first developed in 2007, is a global, generic, and modular tool designed to provide policy makers with estimates of potential impacts resulting from MEPS for a variety of products, at the international and/or regional level. Using the BUENAS framework, we estimated potential national energy savings and CO2 emissions mitigation in the US residential sector that would result from the most aggressive policy foreseeable: standards effective in 2014 set at the current maximum technology (Max Tech) available on the market. This represents the most likely characterization of what can be maximally achieved through MEPS in the US. The authors rely on the latest Technical Support Documents and Analytical Tools published by the U.S. Department of Energy as a source to determine appliance stock turnover and projected efficiency scenarios of what would occur in the absence of policy. In our analysis, national impacts are determined for the following end uses: lighting, television, refrigerator-freezers, central air conditioning, room air conditioning, residential furnaces, and water heating. The analyzed end uses cover approximately 65percent of site energy consumption in the residential sector (50percent of the electricity consumption and 80percent of the natural gas and LPG consumption). This paper uses this BUENAS methodology to calculate that energy savings from Max Tech for the U.S. residential sector products covered in this paper will reach an 18percent reduction in electricity demand compared to the base case and 11percent in Natural Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results in reductions in CO2 emissions of a similar magnitude.

Letschert, Virginie; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; McNeil, Michael; Saheb, Yamina

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

7

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 • Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth • Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade • Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards • The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s • U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on Indian Lands  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Includes information on the electricity use and needs of Indian households and tribes, the comparative electricity rates that Indian households are paying, and the potential for renewable resources development of Indian lands.

Fred Mayes

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Energy Consumption and Potential for Energy Conservation in the Steel Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The domestic steel industry, being energy-use intensive, requires between 4 and 5 percent of total annual domestic energy consumption. More than two-thirds of total steel industry energy, however, is derived from coal. During the post-World War II era specific energy consumption exhibited a steady decline of slightly less than 1 percent per year. Potential for future savings is estimated at approximately 25 percent. Full realization of potential savings will require huge sums of capital. These needs will be in competition with other capital needs for modernizing existing facilities, for expansion, and for the large investments required to meet environmental regulations.

Hughes, M. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Priority listing of industrial processes by total energy consumption and potential for savings. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A survey of eight of the most energy-intensive segments of the U.S. industry is made to quantify the energy consumed in the principal process units, to identify areas in which significant improvement appear possible, and to rank the process units in terms of total energy consumption and the potential for improvement. Data on the steel, paper, aluminum, textile, cement, and glass industries, petroleum refineries, and olefins and derivative products industries were compiled to help plan the development of new energy sources and to provide targets for energy conservation activities. (MCW)

Streb, A.J.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assessment of Aircraft Icing Potential and Maximum Icing Altitude from Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite product that displays regions of aircraft icing potential, along with corresponding cloud-top heights, has been developed using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager and sounder. The icing ...

Gary P. Ellrod; Andrew A. Bailey

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas and LPG consumption by 2030 The methodology results inin natural gas consumption by 2030 resulting from upcomingthe 2008- 2013 trend to 2030. Based on these assumptions,

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Potential nanotechnology applications for reducing freshwater consumption at coal fired power plants : an early view.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Existing Plants Research Program, which has an energy-water research effort that focuses on water use at power plants. This study complements the overall research effort of the Existing Plants Research Program by evaluating water issues that could impact power plants. A growing challenge to the economic production of electricity from coal-fired power plants is the demand for freshwater, particularly in light of the projected trends for increasing demands and decreasing supplies of freshwater. Nanotechnology uses the unique chemical, physical, and biological properties that are associated with materials at the nanoscale to create and use materials, devices, and systems with new functions and properties. It is possible that nanotechnology may open the door to a variety of potentially interesting ways to reduce freshwater consumption at power plants. This report provides an overview of how applications of nanotechnology could potentially help reduce freshwater use at coal-fired power plants. It was developed by (1) identifying areas within a coal-fired power plant's operations where freshwater use occurs and could possibly be reduced, (2) conducting a literature review to identify potential applications of nanotechnology for facilitating such reductions, and (3) collecting additional information on potential applications from researchers and companies to clarify or expand on information obtained from the literature. Opportunities, areas, and processes for reducing freshwater use in coal-fired power plants considered in this report include the use of nontraditional waters in process and cooling water systems, carbon capture alternatives, more efficient processes for removing sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides, coolants that have higher thermal conductivities than water alone, energy storage options, and a variety of plant inefficiencies, which, if improved, would reduce energy use and concomitant water consumption. These inefficiencies include air heater inefficiencies, boiler corrosion, low operating temperatures, fuel inefficiencies, and older components that are subject to strain and failure. A variety of nanotechnology applications that could potentially be used to reduce the amount of freshwater consumed - either directly or indirectly - by these areas and activities was identified. These applications include membranes that use nanotechnology or contain nanomaterials for improved water purification and carbon capture; nano-based coatings and lubricants to insulate and reduce heat loss, inhibit corrosion, and improve fuel efficiency; nano-based catalysts and enzymes that improve fuel efficiency and improve sulfur removal efficiency; nanomaterials that can withstand high temperatures; nanofluids that have better heat transfer characteristics than water; nanosensors that can help identify strain and impact damage, detect and monitor water quality parameters, and measure mercury in flue gas; and batteries and capacitors that use nanotechnology to enable utility-scale storage. Most of these potential applications are in the research stage, and few have been deployed at coal-fired power plants. Moving from research to deployment in today's economic environment will be facilitated with federal support. Additional support for research development and deployment (RD&D) for some subset of these applications could lead to reductions in water consumption and could provide lessons learned that could be applied to future efforts. To take advantage of this situation, it is recommended that NETL pursue funding for further research, development, or deployment for one or more of the potential applications identified in this report.

Elcock, D. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

Energy Consumption Status of Public Buildings and the Analysis of the Potential on Energy Efficiency in Xiamen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the survey on the preset and applied situation of the central air conditioning systems in public buildings in Xiamen, this paper analyzes the status of energy consumption, and indicates the irrational aspects of operation and management of the central air conditioning system in public buildings. At the same time, this paper comments on energy economization in Xiamen, and presents proposals and advice for energy efficiency. Presently, energy efficiency is relatively low in Xiamen, and energy consumption is a little too high, especially in public buildings. The energy consumption of central air conditioning system is very significant, and therefore energy conservation has much potential.

Pei, X.; Zhang, S.; Chen, L.; Zhang, X.; Chen, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Potential Impact of Adopting Maximum Technologies as Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards in the U.S. Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

US to achieve 18% reduction in its electricity demand compared to the base case by 2030 and 11% in Natural Gas and LPG consumption.

Letschert, Virginie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An Integrated Geovisual Analytics Framework for Analysis of Energy Consumption Data and Renewable Energy Potentials  

SciTech Connect

We present an integrated geovisual analytics framework for utility consumers to interactively analyze and benchmark their energy consumption. The framework uses energy and property data already available with the utility companies and county governments respectively. The motivation for the developed framework is the need for citizens to go beyond the conventional utility bills in understanding the patterns in their energy consumption. There is also a need for citizens to go beyond one-time improvements that are often not monitored and measured over time. Some of the features of the framework include the ability for citizens to visualize their historical energy consumption data along with weather data in their location. The quantity of historical energy data available is significantly more than what is available from utility bills. An overlay of the weather data provides users with a visual correlation between weather patterns and their energy consumption patterns. Another feature of the framework is the ability for citizens to compare their consumption on an aggregated basis to that of their peers other citizens living in houses of similar size and age and within the same or different geographical boundaries, such as subdivision, zip code, or county. The users could also compare their consumption to others based on the size of their family and other attributes. This feature could help citizens determine if they are among the best in class . The framework can also be used by the utility companies to better understand their customers and to plan their services. To make the framework easily accessible, it is developed to be compatible with mobile consumer electronics devices.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Maness, Christopher S [ORNL; Kramer, Ian S [ORNL; Kodysh, Jeffrey B [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Karthik, Rajasekar [ORNL; Nugent, Philip J [ORNL; Myers, Aaron T [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Potential impact of Thailand's alcohol program on production, consumption, and trade of cassava, sugarcane, and corn  

SciTech Connect

On the first of May 1980, Thailand's fuel-alcohol program was announced by the Thai government. According to the program, a target of 147 million liters of ethanol would be produced in 1981, from cassava, sugarcane, and other biomasses. Projecting increases in output each year, the target level of ethanol produciton was set at 482 million liters of ethanol for 1986. The proposed amount of ethanol production could create a major shift up in the demand schedule of energy crops such as cassava, sugarcane, and corn. The extent of the adjustments in price, production, consumption, and exports for these energy crops need to be evaluated. The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impact of Thailand's fuel-alcohol program on price, production, consumption, and exports of three potential energy crops: cassava, sugarcane, and corn. Econometric commodity models of cassava, sugarcane, and corn are constructed and used as a method of assessment. The overall results of the forecasting simulations of the models indicate that the fuel-alcohol program proposed by the Thai government will cause the price, production, and total consumption of cassava, sugarcane, and corn to increase; on the other hand, it will cause exports to decline. In addition, based on the relative prices and the technical coefficients of ethanol production of these three energy crops, this study concludes that only cassava should be used to produce the proposed target of ethanol production.

Boonserm, P.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

20

The maximum potential to generate wind power in the contiguous United States is more than three times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

detailed 200-meter resolution maps. The NREL analysis found enormous U.S. wind energy potential of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated Finds U.S. Wind Energy Potential Triples Previous Estimates #12;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey on Electricity Consumption Characteristics of Homethe stakes for energy consumption are high, as we hope atAir Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The federal energy policy: An example of its potential impact on energy consumption and expenditures in minority and poor households  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the relative impacts of the National Energy Strategy on majority and minority households and on nonpoor and poor households. (Minority households are defined as those headed by black or Hispanic persons; poor households are defined as those having combined household income less than or equal to 125% of the Office of Management and Budget`s poverty-income threshold.) Energy consumption and expenditures, and projected energy expenditures as a share of income, for the period 1987 to 2009 are reported. Projected consumptions of electricity and nonelectric energy over this period are also reported for each group. An analysis of how these projected values are affected under different housing growth scenarios is performed. The analysis in this report presents a preliminary set of projections generated under a set of simplifying assumptions. Future analysis will rigorously assess the sensitivity of the projected values to various changes in a number of these assumptions.

Poyer, D.A.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

A plot study of the potential for Navy utilization of solid waste derived fuels to offset fossil fuels consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A brief study was made to define problems that would be encountered in estimating potential Navy markets for various forms of waste derived fuels. Fossil fuel consumption estimates for boiler plants at several Navy activities were converted to waste derived fuel (WDF) estimates using a set of assumed rules judged technically feasible regarding boiler conversions and confirming fossil fuels and WDF. The results of this first study are presented indicating Navy boilers might represent a significant market for all the WDF a region could produce if the WDF were available in liquid as well as solid forms. The economic feasibility of conversions and WDF production are not addressed in this brief paper.

Capps, A.G.; Duffey-Armstrong, M.; Freeman, R.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Survey Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

fsidentoi fsidentoi Survey Consumption and 'Expenditures, April 1981 March 1982 Energy Information Administration Wasningtoa D '" N """"*"""*"Nlwr. . *'.;***** -. Mik>. I This publication is available from ihe your COr : 20585 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Consum ption and Expendi tures, April 1981 Through March 1982 Part 2: Regional Data Prepared by: Bruce Egan This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administra tion, the independent statistical

25

Expeditious Data Center Sustainability, Flow, and Temperature Modeling: Life-Cycle Exergy Consumption Combined with a Potential Flow Based, Rankine Vortex Superposed, Predictive Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GJ m 2 the building decommissioning exergy consumption, orJ 5.3 m 2 and that the decommissioning exergy consumption isand manufacturing. Decommissioning was counted as end-of-

Lettieri, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Consumption . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION TO INFORM DATA-DRIVEN ENERGY EFFICIENCY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Effective demand-side energy efficiency policies are needed to reduce residential electricity consumption and its harmful effects on the environment. The first step to devise such polices is to quantify the potential for energy efficiency by analyzing the factors that impact consumption. This paper proposes a novel approach to analyze large data sets of residential electricity consumption to derive insights for policy making and energy efficiency programming. In this method, underlying behavioral determinants that impact residential electricity consumption are identified using Factor Analysis. A distinction is made between long-term and short-term determinants of consumption by developing separate models for daily maximum and daily minimum consumption and analyzing their differences. Finally, the set of determinants are ranked by their impact on electricity consumption, using a stepwise regression model. This approach is then applied on a large data set of smart meter data and household information as a case example. The results of the models show that weather, location, floor area, and number of refrigerators are the most significant determinants of daily minimum (or idle) electricity consumption in residential buildings,

Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer; Amir Kavousian; Ram Rajagopal; Martin Fischer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Reduced power consumption in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a potential energy savings of over $30 Billion/year. This new approach is demanded by the exponentiallyBenefits Reduced power consumption in IC devices; hence potential energy savings of 300 Billion KWh://www.sia- online.org) CuRIE Interconnect Technology for Improved Energy Efficiency in IC Chips ARPA-E Technology

29

Table 10.1 Nonswitchable Minimum and Maximum Consumption,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 percent." " NANot available." " Notes: To obtain the RSE percentage for any table cell, multiply the cell's" "corresponding RSE column and RSE row factors. Totals may not...

30

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

years later, standards on these products alone were estimated to have reduced annual national electricity consumptionyear, given by UEC 0c (y) = UEC 0 (Income c (y),CDD) The total electricity consumption

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countries and what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Henderson (2005) Home air conditioning in Europe – how muchA.A. Pavlova ( 2003). Air conditioning market saturation and+ paper 6,306 Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997 CONSUMPTION AND ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

33

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Future Air Conditioning Energy Consumption in Developing Countriesand what can be done about it: The Potential of Efficiency in theResidential Sector  

SciTech Connect

The dynamics of air conditioning are of particular interestto energy analysts, both because of the high energy consumption of thisproduct, but also its disproportionate impact on peak load. This paperaddresses the special role of this end use as a driver of residentialelectricity consumption in rapidly developing economies. Recent historyhas shown that air conditioner ownership can grow grows more rapidly thaneconomic growth in warm-climate countries. In 1990, less than a percentof urban Chinese households owned an air conditioner; by 2003 this numberrose to 62 percent. The evidence suggests a similar explosion of airconditioner use in many other countries is not far behind. Room airconditioner purchases in India are currently growing at 20 percent peryear, with about half of these purchases attributed to the residentialsector. This paper draws on two distinct methodological elements toassess future residential air conditioner 'business as usual' electricityconsumption by country/region and to consider specific alternative 'highefficiency' scenarios. The first component is an econometric ownershipand use model based on household income, climate and demographicparameters. The second combines ownership forecasts and stock accountingwith geographically specific efficiency scenarios within a uniqueanalysis framework (BUENAS) developed by LBNL. The efficiency scenariomodule considers current efficiency baselines, available technologies,and achievable timelines for development of market transformationprograms, such as minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) andlabeling programs. The result is a detailed set of consumption andemissions scenarios for residential air conditioning.

McNeil, Michael A.; Letschert, Virginie E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

CoNNECT: Analytics for Energy Consumption Data  

• Ability to correlate data with weather patterns • Ability to benchmark consumption with peers – ... solar energy potential on individual building ...

37

MAXIMUM HUMIDITY INDICATOR  

SciTech Connect

Moisture-sensitive systems to measure and indicate the maximum level of humidity exposure are discussed. A chemical indicator utilizing deliquescent salts and water-soluble dyes provides an irreversible color change at discrete levels of relative humidity. To provide indication of the time at which the exposure occurs, a circuit employing a resistive-type sensor was developed. A small, commercially available sensor is used in a portable probe to detect humidity leaks into controlled areas.

Abel, W B

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

All Consumption Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2010 Consumption Summary Tables. Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2010 (Trillion Btu) ... Ranked by State, 2010

39

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. . Vehicle Fuel Efficiency and Consumption Fuel consumption is estimated from RTECS data on the vehicle stock (Chapter 2) and miles traveled (Chapter 3), in combination with vehicle fuel efficiency ratings, adjusted to account for individual driving circumstances. The first two sections of this chapter present estimates of household vehicle fuel efficiency and household fuel consumption calculated from these fuel efficiency estimates. These sections also discuss variations in fuel efficiency and consumption based on differences in household and vehicle characteristics. The third section presents EIA estimates of the potential savings from replacing the oldest (and least fuel-efficient) household vehicles with new (and more fuel-efficient) vehicles. The final section of this chapter focuses on households receiving (or eligible to receive) supplemental income under

40

Electricity Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Consumption Electricity Consumption EIA Electricity Consumption Estimates (million kWh) National Petroleum Council Assumption: The definition of electricity con- sumption and sales used in the NPC 1999 study is the equivalent ofwhat EIA calls "sales by utilities" plus "retail wheeling by power marketers." This A nn u al Gro wth total could also be called "sales through the distribution grid," 2o 99 99 to Sales by Utilities -012% #N/A Two other categories of electricity consumption tracked by EIA cover on site Retail Wheeling Sales by generation for host use. The first, "nonutility onsite direct use," covers the Power Marketen 212.25% #N/A traditional generation/cogeneration facilities owned by industrial or large All Sales Through Distribution

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Consumption Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

42

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

43

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

44

UK Energy Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption by Sector The energy consumption data consists of five spreadsheets: "overall data tables" plus energy consumption data for each of the following...

45

Connected Consumption: The hidden networks of consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the Connected Consumption Network (CCN) that allows a community of consumers to collaboratively sense the market from a mobile device, enabling more informed financial decisions in geo-local ...

Reed, David P.

46

CSV File Documentation: Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption The State Energy Data System (SEDS) comma-separated value (CSV) files contain consumption estimates shown in the tables located on the SEDS website. There are four files that contain estimates for all states and years. Consumption in Physical Units contains the consumption estimates in physical units for all states; Consumption in Btu contains the consumption estimates in billion British thermal units (Btu) for all states. There are two data files for thermal conversion factors: the CSV file contains all of the conversion factors used to convert data between physical units and Btu for all states and the United States, and the Excel file shows the state-level conversion factors for coal and natural gas in six Excel spreadsheets. Zip files are also available for the large data files. In addition, there is a CSV file for each state, named

47

consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 32.3 KiB)

48

MaximumLetThrough.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Maximum Let-Through Currents in the APS Storage Ring Quadrupole, Sextupole, and Corrector Magnets J. Carwardine, D. McGhee, G. Markovich May 18, 1999 Abstract Limits are described for the maximum magnet currents, under specified fault conditions, for the storage ring quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets. Introduction In computing the maximum let-through current for the magnets for the storage ring, several factors must be considered. In general, the maximum current likely to occur even under fault conditions is less than the maximum theoretical DC current given the magnet resistance and the maximum available DC voltage. The first level of protection against magnet current overloads is the over-current interlock that is built into the converter electronics package. The threshold is set to approximately 110% of

49

Removal to Maximum Extent Practical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Summary Notes from 1 November 2007 Generic Technical Issue Discussion on Removal of Highly Radioactive Radionuclides/Key Radionuclides to the Maximum Extent Practical

50

The Maximum Intensity of Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An exact equation governing the maximum possible pressure fall in steady tropical cyclones is developed, accounting for the full effects of gaseous and condensed water on density and thermodynamics. The equation is also derived from Carnot's ...

Kerry A. Emanuel

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Hardness of Maximum Constraint Satisfaction.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We show optimal (up to a constant factor) NP-hardness for maximum constraint satisfaction problem with k variables per constraint (Max-k-CSP), whenever k is larger than… (more)

Chan, Siu On

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

OpenEI - consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91/0 en Operational water 91/0 en Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/969 This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions.

License

53

Energy-consumption modelling  

SciTech Connect

A highly sophisticated and accurate approach is described to compute on an hourly or daily basis the energy consumption for space heating by individual buildings, urban sectors, and whole cities. The need for models and specifically weather-sensitive models, composite models, and space-heating models are discussed. Development of the Colorado State University Model, based on heat-transfer equations and on a heuristic, adaptive, self-organizing computation learning approach, is described. Results of modeling energy consumption by the city of Minneapolis and Cheyenne are given. Some data on energy consumption in individual buildings are included.

Reiter, E.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

55

Household Energy Consumption and Expenditures  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents information about household end use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

Information Center

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

methodology used to estimate these statistics relied on data from the 1990 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption...

57

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

J Related EIA Publications on Energy Consumption Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 526 Appendix J Related EIA Publications on Energy...

58

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy Consumption in the Manufacturing Sector, 1991 In 1991, the amount of energy consumed in the manufacturing sector was as follows: * Primary Consumption of Energy for All...

59

1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

5HVLGHQWLDO (QHUJ\\ &RQVXPSWLRQ 6XUYH\\V 1997 Consumption and Expenditures Tables Appliances Consumption Tables (17 pages, 60 kb) Contents Pages CE5-1c.

60

Elements of consumption: an abstract visualization of household consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To promote sustainability consumers must be informed about their consumption behaviours. Ambient displays can be used as an eco-feedback technology to convey household consumption information. Elements of Consumption (EoC) demonstrates this by visualizing ... Keywords: a-life, eco-feedback, household consumption, sustainability

Stephen Makonin; Philippe Pasquier; Lyn Bartram

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Extreme Maximum Land Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are numerous reports in the literature of observations of land surface temperatures. Some of these, almost all made in situ, reveal maximum values in the 50°–70°C range, with a few, made in desert regions, near 80°C. Consideration of a ...

J. R. Garratt

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Maximum order of planar digraphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the degree/diameter problem for directed planar graphs. We show that planar digraphs with diameter 2 and maximum out-degree and in-degree d, d ? 41, cannot have more than 2d vertices. We show that 2d ...

Rinovia Simanjuntak; Mirka Miller

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Office Buildings - Energy Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity, and natural gas consumed by office buildings was consumed by administrative or professional office buildings (Figure 2). Table 4. Energy Consumed by Office Buildings for Major Fuels, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million sq. ft.) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings 4,859 71,658 6,523 3,559 2,100 228 636 All Non-Mall Buildings 4,645 64,783 5,820 3,037 1,928 222 634 All Office Buildings 824 12,208 1,134 719 269 18 128 Type of Office Building

64

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Natural Gas Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Lease Fuel Consumption Plant Fuel Consumption Pipeline & Distribution Use Volumes Delivered to Consumers Volumes Delivered to Residential Volumes Delivered to Commercial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Industrial Consumers Volumes Delivered to Vehicle Fuel Consumers Volumes Delivered to Electric Power Consumers Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 23,103,793 23,277,008 22,910,078 24,086,797 24,477,425 25,533,448 1949-2012 Alabama 418,512 404,157 454,456 534,779 598,514 666,738 1997-2012 Alaska 369,967 341,888 342,261 333,312 335,458 343,110 1997-2012

66

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity the NAO. ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND PRODUCTION IN NORWAY AND THE NAO The demand for heating oil in Norway

67

Reduction of Water Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling systems using water evaporation to dissipate waste heat, will require one pound of water per 1,000 Btu. To reduce water consumption, a combination of "DRY" and "WET" cooling elements is the only practical answer. This paper reviews the various options available: WET-DRY towers, or DRY-WET, or combination WET and DRY towers!

Adler, J.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Crisis and Consumption Smoothing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dramatic impact of the current crisis on performance of businesses across sectors and economies has been headlining the business press for the past several months. Extant reconciliations of these patterns in the popular press rely on ad hoc reasoning. ... Keywords: consumer behavior, consumption smoothing, crisis, econometrics, marketing strategy

Pushan Dutt; V. Padmanabhan

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Data Center Power Consumption  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Center Power Consumption Center Power Consumption A new look at a growing problem Fact - Data center power density up 10x in the last 10 years 2.1 kW/rack (1992); 14 kW/rack (2007) Racks are not fully populated due to power/cooling constraints Fact - Increasing processor power Moore's law Fact - Energy cost going up 3 yr. energy cost equivalent to acquisition cost Fact - Iterative power life cycle Takes as much energy to cool computers as it takes to power them. Fact - Over-provisioning Most data centers are over-provisioned with cooling and still have hot spots November 2007 SubZero Engineering An Industry at the Crossroads Conflict between scaling IT demands and energy efficiency Server Efficiency is improving year after year Performance/Watt doubles every 2 years Power Density is Going Up

70

101. Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Natural Gas Consumption 1. Natural Gas Consumption in the United States, 1930-1996 (Million Cubic Feet) Table Year Lease and Plant Fuel Pipeline Fuel Delivered to Consumers Total Consumption Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Total 1930 ....................... 648,025 NA 295,700 80,707 721,782 NA 120,290 1,218,479 1,866,504 1931 ....................... 509,077 NA 294,406 86,491 593,644 NA 138,343 1,112,884 1,621,961 1932 ....................... 477,562 NA 298,520 87,367 531,831 NA 107,239 1,024,957 1,502,519 1933 ....................... 442,879 NA 283,197 85,577 590,865 NA 102,601 1,062,240 1,505,119 1934 ....................... 502,352 NA 288,236 91,261 703,053 NA 127,896 1,210,446 1,712,798 1935 ....................... 524,926 NA 313,498 100,187 790,563 NA 125,239 1,329,487 1,854,413 1936 ....................... 557,404 NA 343,346

71

Residential Energy Consumption Survey:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

E/EIA-0262/2 E/EIA-0262/2 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: 1978-1980 Consumption and Expenditures Part II: Regional Data May 1981 U.S. Department of Energy Energy Information Administration Assistant Administrator for Program Development Office of the Consumption Data System Residential and Commercial Data Systems Division -T8-aa * N uojssaooy 'SOS^-m (£03) ao£ 5925 'uofSfAfQ s^onpojj aa^ndmoo - aojAaag T BU T3gN am rcoj? aig^IT^^ '(adBx Q-naugBH) TOO/T8-JQ/30Q 30^703 OQ ' d jo :moaj ajqBfT^A^ 3J^ sjaodaa aAoqe aqa jo 's-TZTOO-eoo-Tgo 'ON ^ois odo 'g^zo-via/aoQ 'TBST Sujpjjng rXaAang uojidmnsuoo XSaaug sSu-ppjprig ON ^oo^s OdO '^/ZOZO-Via/aOQ *086T aunr '6L6I ?sn§ny og aunf ' jo suja^Bd uoj^dmnsuoo :XaAjng uo^^dmnsuoQ XSaaug OS '9$ '6-ieTOO- 00-T90 OdD 'S/ZOZO-Via/aOa C

72

Maximum Building Energy Efficiency Research Laboratory secures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Network - Maximum Building Energy Efficiency Research Laboratory secures LEED Gold July 01, 2013 The recently completed 14.3m Maximum Building Energy Efficiency...

73

2009 Energy Consumption Per Person  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Per capita energy consumption across all sectors of the economy. Click on a state for more information.

74

Generalized Relativistic Wave Equations with Intrinsic Maximum Momentum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the nonperturbative effect of maximum momentum on the relativistic wave equations. In momentum representation, we obtain the exact eigen-energies and wavefunctions of one-dimensional Klein-Gordon and Dirac equation with linear confining potentials, and the Dirac oscillator. Bound state solutions are only possible when the strength of scalar potential are stronger than vector potential. The energy spectrum of the systems studied are bounded from above, whereby classical characteristics are observed in the uncertainties of position and momentum operators. Also, there is a truncation in the maximum number of bound states that is allowed. Some of these quantum-gravitational features may have future applications.

Chee Leong Ching; Wei Khim Ng

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

75

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study`s scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Food production and consumption near the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

Routine operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) result in the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere and to the Savannah River. The resulting radiological doses to the off-site maximum individual and the 80-km population are estimated on a yearly basis. These estimates are generated using dose models prescribed in the NRC Reg. Guide 1.109 for the commercial nuclear power industry. A study of land and water usage characteristics in the region of the Savannah River Site has been conducted to determine site-specific values of the NRC dose model parameters. The study's scope included local characteristics of meat, milk, vegetable production; Savannah River recreational activities and fish harvests; meat, milk, vegetable, and seafood consumption rates; and Savannah River drinking-water populations. Average and maximum consumption rates of beef, milk, vegetables, and fish have been determined for individuals residing in the southern United States. The study suggest that many of the consumption rates provided by the NRC may not be appropriate for residents of the South. Average consumption rates are slightly higher than the defaults provided by the NRC. Maximum consumption rates, however, are typically lower than NRC values. Agricultural productivity in the SRS region was found to be quite different than NRC recommendations. Off-site doses have been predicted using both NRC and SRS parameter values to demonstrate the significance of site-specific data.

Hamby, D.M.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION 5 RESIDENTIAL TRANSPORTATION ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Prepared for: UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION OFFICE OF ENERGY MARKETS AND END USE ENERGY END USE DIVISION RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERCIAL BRANCH WASHINGTON, DC 20585 Prepared by: THE ORKAND CORPORATION 8484 GEORGIA AVENUE SILVER SPRING, MD 20910 October 1986 Contract Number DE-AC01-84EI19658 TABLE OF CONTENTS FRONT MATTER Index to Program Descriptions........................................... vi List of Exhibits ....................................................... viii Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................. ix SECTION 1: GENERAL INFORMATION ........................................ 1-1 1.1. Summary ....................................................... 1-1

78

Margins up; consumption down  

SciTech Connect

The results of a survey of dealers in the domestic fuel oil industry are reported. Wholesale prices, reacting to oversupply, decreased as did retail prices; retail prices decreased at a slower rate so profit margins were larger. This trend produced competitive markets as price-cutting became the method for increasing a dealer's share of the profits. Losses to other fuels decreased, when the figures were compared to earlier y; and cash flow was very good for most dealers. In summary, profits per gallon of oil delivered increased, while the consumption of gasoline per customer decreased. 22 tables.

Mantho, M.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Essays on consumption cycles and corporate finance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the consumption cycle . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.1.6 Optimal consumption, expenditures and1.3.2 Optimal nondurable consumption and durable

Issler, Paulo Floriano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Milk consumption and acne in adolescent girls Clement Aassociation between milk consumption and occurrence of acneand 'don't drink milk'. Consumption of the specific types of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Note on the Consumption Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zeldes, S. (1989) ‘ Consumption and Liquidity Constraints:A Note on the Consumption Function Douglas G.Steigerwald Consumption Function The international

Steigerwald, Douglas G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Stock Market and Consumption: Evidence from China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. 1992. Understanding Consumption. Cambridge, UK: CambridgeStock market wealth and consumption. The Journal of Economic139–146. Stock Market and Consumption: Evidence from China

Hau, Leslie C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Indexes of Consumption and Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Figure on manufacturing production indexes and purchased energy consumption Source: Energy Information Administration and Federal Reserve Board. History of Shipments This chart presents indices of 14 years (1980-1994) of historical data of manufacturing production indexes and Purchased (Offsite-Produced) Energy consumption, using 1992 as the base year (1992 = 100). Indexing both energy consumption and production best illustrates the trends in output and consumption. Taken separately, these two indices track the relative growth rates within the specified industry. Taken together, they reveal trends in energy efficiency. For example, a steady increase in output, coupled with a decline in energy consumption, represents energy efficiency gains. Likewise, steadily rising energy consumption with a corresponding decline in output illustrates energy efficiency losses.

85

Maximum entropy principal for transportation  

SciTech Connect

In this work we deal with modeling of the transportation phenomenon for use in the transportation planning process and policy-impact studies. The model developed is based on the dependence concept, i.e., the notion that the probability of a trip starting at origin i is dependent on the probability of a trip ending at destination j given that the factors (such as travel time, cost, etc.) which affect travel between origin i and destination j assume some specific values. The derivation of the solution of the model employs the maximum entropy principle combining a priori multinomial distribution with a trip utility concept. This model is utilized to forecast trip distributions under a variety of policy changes and scenarios. The dependence coefficients are obtained from a regression equation where the functional form is derived based on conditional probability and perception of factors from experimental psychology. The dependence coefficients encode all the information that was previously encoded in the form of constraints. In addition, the dependence coefficients encode information that cannot be expressed in the form of constraints for practical reasons, namely, computational tractability. The equivalence between the standard formulation (i.e., objective function with constraints) and the dependence formulation (i.e., without constraints) is demonstrated. The parameters of the dependence-based trip-distribution model are estimated, and the model is also validated using commercial air travel data in the U.S. In addition, policy impact analyses (such as allowance of supersonic flights inside the U.S. and user surcharge at noise-impacted airports) on air travel are performed.

Bilich, F. [University of Brasilia (Brazil); Da Silva, R. [National Research Council (Brazil)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

87

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005) Dataset Summary Description The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a national survey that collects residential energy-related data. The 2005 survey collected data from 4,381 households in housing units statistically selected to represent the 111.1 million housing units in the U.S. Data were obtained from residential energy suppliers for each unit in the sample to produce the Consumption & Expenditures data. The Consumption & Expenditures and Intensities data is divided into two parts: Part 1 provides energy consumption and expenditures by census region, population density, climate zone, type of housing unit, year of construction and ownership status; Part 2 provides the same data according to household size, income category, race and age. The next update to the RECS survey (2009 data) will be available in 2011.

88

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) Heavy Oil Consumption Reduction Program (Quebec, Canada) < Back Eligibility Commercial Agricultural Industrial Construction Savings Category Solar Buying & Making Electricity Maximum Rebate $5 million per site Program Info Funding Source Government of Quebec State Quebec Program Type Rebate Program Provider Agence de l'efficacité énergétique This program helps heavy oil consumers move toward sustainable development while improving their competitive position by reducing their consumption. Financial assistance is offered to carry out various analyses as well as implement energy efficient measures relating to heavy fuel oil or to switch to other forms of energy containing fewer pollutants, such as natural gas,

89

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and ...  

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy ...

90

Map Data: State Consumption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumption Map Data: State Consumption stateconsumptionpc2009.csv More Documents & Publications Map Data: Renewable Production Map Data: State Spending...

91

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency. Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency ...

92

978-3-901882-56-2 c 2013 IFIP Effective Consumption Scheduling for Demand-Side  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grids hold the promise of connecting electricity producers, consumers, and prosumers (who act as both their consumption behavior every day. I. INTRODUCTION Today's electricity sector faces significant challenges consumption in a group of Irish residential homes occurs in the evening. Maximum electricity production

Diggavi, Suhas

93

Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols). This dataset also includes the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types by location. Source Commercial and Residential Reference Building Models Date Released April 18th, 2013 (9 months ago) Date Updated July 02nd, 2013 (7 months ago) Keywords building building demand building load Commercial data demand Energy Consumption energy data hourly kWh load profiles Residential Data Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

94

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RESIDENTIAL ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY 1997. OVERVIEW: MOST POPULOUS STATES ... Homes with air-conditioning: 95%... with a central air-conditioning system: 83%

95

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

includes descriptions of the 30 groups that comprise the strata of the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey. These are the 20 major industrial groups (two-digit SIC) and...

96

2001 Residential Energy Consumption Survey  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey ... Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. Form EIA-457A (2001) Form Approval: OMB No. 1905-0092 ...

97

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOEEIA-0464(91) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991 December 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S....

98

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas...

99

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Tables 28 Energy Information AdministrationManufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 1. In previous MECS, the term "primary energy" was used to denote the "first use" of...

100

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Appendix A How the Survey Was Conducted Introduction The Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) was designed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates Introduction The 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) has been designed by the Energy Information Administration...

102

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a regular basis at the time of the 1990 RECS personal interviews. Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Information AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991...

103

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AdministrationHousehold Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 110 Electricity: See Main Heating Fuel. Energy Used in the Home: For electricity or natural gas, the quantity is the...

104

Modeling energy consumption of residential furnaces and boilers in U.S. homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ENERGY CONSUMPTIONENERGY CONSUMPTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lutz, James; Dunham-Whitehead, Camilla; Lekov, Alex; McMahon, James

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and energy savings potential of video game consoles in thethe energy efficiency of video game consoles. NaturalVideo game console usage and national energy consumption:

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

GENII dose calculations for offsite maximum individual and populations from Plutonium Finishing Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Document describes the potential dose consequences to the offsite maximum individual and population for ground and stack level releases at the offsite receptors from the Plutonium Finishing Plant.

Nguyen, L.V.

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

107

World energy consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical and projected world energy consumption information is displayed. The information is presented by region and fuel type, and includes a world total. Measurements are in quadrillion Btu. Sources of the information contained in the table are: (1) history--Energy Information Administration (EIA), International Energy Annual 1992, DOE/EIA-0219(92); (2) projections--EIA, World Energy Projections System, 1994. Country amounts include an adjustment to account for electricity trade. Regions or country groups are shown as follows: (1) Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), US (not including US territories), which are included in other (ECD), Canada, Japan, OECD Europe, United Kingdom, France, Germany, Italy, Netherlands, other Europe, and other OECD; (2) Eurasia--China, former Soviet Union, eastern Europe; (3) rest of world--Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) and other countries not included in any other group. Fuel types include oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear, and other. Other includes hydroelectricity, geothermal, solar, biomass, wind, and other renewable sources.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Electricity Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Electricity Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_electricity_net_consumption_1980_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 50.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

109

Biofuels Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption Biofuels Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Data is presented as thousand barrels per day. Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels Biofuels Consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_biofuels_production_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) text/csv icon total_biofuels_consumption_2000_2010thousand_barrels_per_day.csv (csv, 9.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2000 - 2010 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

110

Coal consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

consumption consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal Coal consumption EIA world Data text/csv icon total_coal_consumption_1980_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 38.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 1980 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating Average vote Your vote Comments Login or register to post comments

111

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching (MECS) > MECS 1994 Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey 1994 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Manufacturing Energy Consumption Logo Full Report - (file size 5.4 MB) pages:531 Selected Sections (PDF format) Contents (file size 56 kilobytes, 10 pages). Overview (file size 597 kilobytes, 11 pages). Chapters 1-3 (file size 265 kilobytes, 9 pages). Chapter 4 (file size 1,070 kilobytes, 15 pages). Appendix A - Detailed Tables Tables A1 - A8 (file size 1,031 kilobytes, 139 pages). Tables A9 - A23 (file size 746 kilobytes, 119 pages). Tables A24 - A29 (file size 485 kilobytes, 84 pages). Tables A30 - A44 (file size 338 kilobytes, 39 pages). Appendix B (file size 194 kilobytes, 24 pages). Appendix C (file size 116 kilobytes, 16 pages).

112

Optimization of Electric Energy Consumption in Marginal California Oilfields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a pilot study of electricity consumption in California oilfields that found significant potential for reducing costs through energy efficiency improvements. It offers suggestions for reducing electricity consumption that, if implemented, could result in a system-wide demand reduction and reduce the need for additional generation and power infrastructure capacity. Moreover, reducing oilfield energy costs would reduce the overall cost of oil production, helping marginal wells remain a...

2003-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

113

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

114

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

115

US ENC MI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MI MI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC MI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC MI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Michigan households use 123 million Btu of energy per home, 38% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Michigan households spending 6% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

116

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. energy data used in this report do not reflect adjustments for losses in electricity generation or transmission. 1 The manufacturing sector is composed of establishments classified in Standard Industrial Classification 20 through 39 of the U.S. economy as defined 2 by the Office of Management and Budget. The manufacturing sector is a part of the industrial sector, which also includes mining; construction; and agriculture, forestry, and fishing. The EIA also conducts energy consumption surveys in the residential, commercial buildings, and residential transportation sectors: the Residential Energy 3 Consumption Survey (RECS); the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS); and, until recently, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS).

117

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

17 17 Table C12. Total Energy Consumption, Gross Domestic Product (GDP), Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Total Energy Consumption Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Energy Consumption per Real Dollar of GDP State Trillion Btu State Billion Chained (2005) Dollars State Thousand Btu per Chained (2005) Dollar 1 Texas 12,206.6 California 1,735.4 Louisiana 19.7 2 California 7,858.4 Texas 1,149.9 Wyoming 17.5 3 Florida 4,217.1 New York 1,016.4 North Dakota 15.4 4 Louisiana 4,055.3 Florida 661.1 Alaska 14.3 5 Illinois 3,977.8 Illinois 582.1 Mississippi 13.8 6 Ohio 3,827.6 Pennsylvania 500.4 Kentucky 13.5

118

US ENC IL Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

IL IL Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC IL Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US ENC IL Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Illinois households use 129 million Btu of energy per home, 44% more than the U.S. average. * High consumption, combined with low costs for heating fuels compared to states with a similar climate, result in Illinois households spending 2% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

119

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

120

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

W as hi ng to n, DC DOEEIA-0464(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 August 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Financing retirement consumption and bequests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of three essays that evaluate possible vehicles for financing either retirement consumption or bequests. Chapter 1 compares the use of Roth and tax-deferred retirement accounts for retirement ...

Bishop, Tonja Bowen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Progressive consumption : strategic sustainable excess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Trends in the marketplace show that urban dwellers are increasingly supporting locally produced foods. This thesis argues for an architecture that responds to our cultures consumptive behaviors. Addressing the effects of ...

Bonham, Daniel J. (Daniel Joseph MacLeod)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Energy consumption of building 39  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further expand our understanding of how the MIT campus consumes energy and ...

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S Y M n i 1 y 2 i (W i ) (W i 1) , Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey: Methodological Report 1985. Although this report describes 44...

125

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C2. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources in Physical Units, 2011 State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power f Fuel Ethanol g...

126

Maximum Urban Heat Island Intensity in Seoul  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The maximum urban heat island (UHI) intensity in Seoul, Korea, is investigated using data measured at two meteorological observatories (an urban site and a rural site) during the period of 1973–96. The average maximum UHI is weakest in summer and ...

Yeon-Hee Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

OpenEI - Electricity Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annual Electricity Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/877 Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). License

Type of License:  Other (please specify below)
Source of data

128

Manufacturing consumption of energy 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates on energy consumption in the manufacturing sector of the US economy. These estimates are based on data from the 1991 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS). This survey--administered by the Energy End Use and Integrated Statistics Division, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration (EIA)--is the most comprehensive source of national-level data on energy-related information for the manufacturing industries.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

EVSE Features Power Button for Zero Consumption Auto-restart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Button for Zero Consumption Auto-restart Button for Zero Consumption Auto-restart Multi Colored Charge Indicator Led Power Indicator EVSE Specifications Grid connection Plug and cord NEMA 6-50 Connector type J1772 Test lab certifications ETL Listed Approximate size (H x W x D inches) 16 x 24 x 6 Charge level AC Level 2 Input voltage 208-240 VAC Maximum input current 30 Amp Circuit breaker rating 40 Amp Test Conditions 1 Test date 10/29/2012 Nominal supply voltage (Vrms) 208.38 Supply frequency (Hz) 59.99 Initial ambient temperature (°F) 64 Test Vehicle 1,3 Make and model 2012 Chevrolet Volt Battery type Li-ion Steady state charge power (AC kW) 3.07 Maximum charge power (AC kW) 3.32 EVSE Test Results

130

Dimming Controllers Offer Potential Energy Savings in Outdoor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sheet: * Introduction * HID Dimming * Conclusions Dimming Controllers Offer Potential Energy Savings in Outdoor Lighting Lighting control technology reduces energy consumption...

131

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot...

132

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of...

133

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

134

Natural gas consumption reflects shifting sectoral patterns ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. natural gas consumption since 1997 reflects shifting patterns. Total U.S. natural gas consumption rose 7% between 1997 and 2011, but this modest ...

135

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

RECS data show decreased energy consumption per household. RECS 2009 — Release date: June 6, 2012. Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained ...

136

The Potential for Increased Atmospheric CO2 Emissions and Accelerated Consumption of Deep Geologic CO2 Storage Resources Resulting from the Large-Scale Deployment of a CCS-Enabled Unconventional Fossil Fuels Industry in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Desires to enhance the energy security of the United States have spurred significant interest in the development of abundant domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources including oil shale and coal to produce unconventional liquid fuels to supplement conventional oil supplies. However, the production processes for these unconventional fossil fuels create large quantities of carbon dioxide (CO2) and this remains one of the key arguments against such development. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies could reduce these emissions and preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited within the U.S. indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. Nevertheless, even assuming wide-scale availability of cost-effective CO2 capture and geologic storage resources, the emergence of a domestic U.S. oil shale or coal-to-liquids (CTL) industry would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The authors present modeling results of two future hypothetical climate policy scenarios that indicate that the oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d from the Eocene Green River Formation of the western U.S. using an in situ retorting process would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2, in addition to storing potentially 900-5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations via CCS in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized, but geographically more dispersed domestic CTL industry could result in 4000-5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000-22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period. While this analysis shows that there is likely adequate CO2 storage capacity in the regions where these technologies are likely to deploy, the reliance by these industries on large-scale CCS could result in an accelerated rate of utilization of the nation’s CO2 storage resource, leaving less high-quality storage capacity for other carbon-producing industries including electric power generation.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.; Davidson, Casie L.

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

137

Maximum Likelihood Ensemble Filter: Theoretical Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ensemble-based data assimilation method, named the maximum likelihood ensemble filter (MLEF), is presented. The analysis solution maximizes the likelihood of the posterior probability distribution, obtained by minimization of a cost ...

Milija Zupanski

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

139

US WSC TX Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

WSC TX WSC TX Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US WSC TX Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US WSC TX Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Texas households consume an average of 77 million Btu per year, about 14% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption per Texas home is 26% higher than the national average, but similar to the amount used in neighboring states. * The average annual electricity cost per Texas household is $1,801, among the highest in the nation, although similar to other warm weather states like Florida. * Texas homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of

140

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

US ENC WI Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

120 120 US ENC WI Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US ENC WI Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US ENC WI Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Wisconsin households use 103 million Btu of energy per home, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Lower electricity and natural gas rates compared to states with a similar climate, such as New York, result in households spending 5% less for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S.

142

US ESC TN Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ESC TN ESC TN Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US ESC TN Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $400 $800 $1,200 $1,600 US ESC TN Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Tennessee households consume an average of 79 million Btu per year, about 12% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption for Tennessee households is 33% higher than the national average and among the highest in the nation, but spending for electricity is closer to average due to relatively low electricity prices. * Tennessee homes are typically newer, yet smaller in size, than homes in other parts of the country.

143

Today in Energy - Residential Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent residential consumption and efficiency issues and trends

144

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data. ... Commercial Buildings - CBECS. Manufacturing - MECS.

145

Railroad fuel-oil consumption in 1928  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented, by districts, covering the consumption of fuel oil for various uses by railroads.

Redfield, A.H.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and efficiency issues and trends

147

OpenEI - Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Commercial and Commercial and Residential Hourly Load Profiles for all TMY3 Locations in the United States http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/961 This dataset contains hourly load profile data for 16 commercial building types (based off the DOE commercial reference building models) and residential buildings (based off the Building America House Simulation Protocols).  This dataset also includes the consumption/residential/">Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) for statistical references of building types

148

Monitoring Energy Consumption of Smartphones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the rapid development of new and innovative applications for mobile devices like smartphones, advances in battery technology have not kept pace with rapidly growing energy demands. Thus energy consumption has become a more and more important issue of mobile devices. To meet the requirements of saving energy, it is critical to monitor and analyze the energy consumption of applications on smartphones. For this purpose, we develop a smart energy monitoring system called SEMO for smartphones using Android operating system. It can profile mobile applications with battery usage information, which is vital for both developers and users.

Ding, Fangwei; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Xuhai; Ma, Chengchuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Explaining cross-country variation in cigarette consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. This short paper uses cross-country data on per capita cigarette consumption and selected socioeconomic variables to explain inter-country differentials in consumption. It is found that the proportion of the aged in the total population and higher literacy among women have relatively greater and positive impact on cigarette consumption. Even after controlling for the effect of the two variables, a country's industrialized status has a positive impact on consumption. It would thus seem that aging and economic, and social developments are pro-cigarette consumption. Background The US Surgeon General's initial report on smoking was nearly 40 years old. All these years, health warnings on cigarette packs have been in place. Despite the "warnings" and concerted efforts to dissuade potential smokers, cigarettes are here to stay. Global cigarette production and consumption have been rising steadily since cigarettes were introduced at the beginning of the 20 th century (see Table 1 for evidence on growth during 1960–2000). It is estimated that at present about 1.1 billion people – close to a fifth of the global population – are smokers and the number is expected to rise to more than 1.6 billion by

Kolluru Srinivas; Bhanoji Rao; Open Access

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

US NE MA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

151

Conspicuous Consumption and Dynamic Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do firms develop marketing strategy when consumers seek to satisfy both quality and status-related considerations? We develop an analytical model to study this issue, examining both pricing and product management decisions in markets for conspicuous ... Keywords: conspicuous consumption, durable goods, dynamic pricing, game theory, status

Raghunath Singh Rao, Richard Schaefer

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Reduces a processor's energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Clearly, this is energy inefficient and wasteful of energy. 2 More precisely, the faster that a processor decide that energy is being wasted and will decrease the frequency/voltage level. Translation: LowerReduces a processor's energy consumption by up to 70% Diminishes greenhouse gas emissions Improves

153

US NE MA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

NE MA NE MA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US NE MA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US NE MA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Massachusetts households use 109 million Btu of energy per home, 22% more than the U.S. average. * The higher than average site consumption results in households spending 22% more for energy than the U.S. average. * Less reliance on electricity for heating, as well as cool summers, keeps average site electricity consumption in the state low relative to other parts of the U.S. However, spending on electricity is closer to the national average due to higher

154

The 1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey -- Two Decades  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Residential Energy Consumption Survey presents two decades of changes in energy consumption related Household Characteristics

155

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preliminary Analysis of Energy Consumption For Cool Roofing Measures By Joe Mellott, Joshua New to reduce energy demand by reflecting sunlight away from structures and back into the atmosphere. By use of commonly available calculators, one can analyze the potential energy savings based on environmental

Tennessee, University of

156

Maximum Entropy Production in Climate Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

R. D. Lorenz et al. claim that recent data on Mars and Titan show that planetary atmospheres are in unconstrained states of maximum entropy production (MEP). Their model as it applies to Venus, Earth, Mars, and Titan is reexamined, and it is ...

Richard Goody

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling Maximum Hail Size in Alberta Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional steady-state cloud model was combined with a time-dependent hail growth model to predict the maximum hailstone size on the ground. Model runs were based on 160 proximity soundings recorded within the Alberta Hail Project area ...

Julian C. Brimelow; Gerhard W. Reuter; Eugene R. Poolman

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Integrating Correlated Bayesian Networks Using Maximum Entropy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the problem of generating a joint distribution for a pair of Bayesian networks that preserves the multivariate marginal distribution of each network and satisfies prescribed correlation between pairs of nodes taken from both networks. We derive the maximum entropy distribution for any pair of multivariate random vectors and prescribed correlations and demonstrate numerical results for an example integration of Bayesian networks.

Jarman, Kenneth D.; Whitney, Paul D.

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

159

Energy Consumption and Renewable Energy Development Potential on ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PV/Wind/Solar hot water system: North Dakota: Three Affiliated Tribes: 200,000: 50,000: Wind 100 Kw turbine installation Ft. Berthold Resv. South Dakota:

160

Vending Machine Energy Consumption and VendingMiser Evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As an effort to decrease the amount of non-critical energy used on the Texas A&M campus, and to assist Dixie Narco in evaluating the efficiency of their vending machines, the Texas A&M Energy Systems Laboratory investigated the power consumption of soda vending machines on the Texas A&M campus. Several vending machines were evaluated to determine the power consumption for the individual components, and the whole machine. Recommendations were made from the results. The VendingMiser device was also tested to evaluate the potential energy savings of this device.

Ritter, J.; Hugghins, J.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Forms Form EIA-846A (4-6-95) U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of the Census Acting as Collecting and Compiling Agent For 1994 MANUFACTURING ENERGY CONSUMPTION SURVEY Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 9 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Energy Information Administration, Office of Statistical Standards, EI-73, 1707 H-Street, NW, Washington, DC 20585; and to the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, Office of

162

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Detailed Detailed Tables The following tables present detailed characteristics of vehicles in the residential sector. Data are from the 1991 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. The "Glossary" contains the definitions of terms used in the tables. Table Organization The "Detailed Tables" section consists of three types of tables: (1) Tables of totals such as number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT) or gallons consumed; (2) Tables of per household statistics such as VMT per household; and (3) Tables of per vehicle statistics such as vehicle fuel consumption per vehicle. The tables have been grouped together by specific topics such as model year data, or family income data to facilitate finding related information. The Quick-Reference Guide to the detailed tables indicates major topics of each table. Row and Column Factors These tables present estimates

163

US WNC MO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

WNC MO WNC MO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US WNC MO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 US WNC MO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Missouri households consume an average of 100 million Btu per year, 12% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Missouri are slightly less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower residential electricity prices in the state. * Missouri homes are typically larger than homes in other states and are more likely to be attached or detached single-family housing units.

164

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2(94) 2(94) Distribution Category UC-950 Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 December 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. ii Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Contacts This publication was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the general direction of W. Calvin

165

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Introduction The market for natural gas has been changing for quite some time. As part of natural gas restructuring, gas pipelines were opened to multiple users. Manufacturers or their representatives could go directly to the wellhead to purchase their natural gas, arrange the transportation, and have the natural gas delivered either by the local distribution company or directly through a connecting pipeline. More recently, the electricity markets have been undergoing change. When Congress passed the Energy Policy Act of 1992, requirements were included not only to open access to the ownership of electricity generation, but also to open access to the transmission lines so that wholesale trade in electricity would be possible. Now several States, including California and

166

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. 3. Vehicle Miles Traveled This chapter presents information on household vehicle usage, as measured by the number of vehicle miles traveled (VMT). VMT is one of the two most important components used in estimating household vehicle fuel consumption. (The other, fuel efficiency, is discussed in Chapter 4). In addition, this chapter examines differences in driving behavior based on the characteristics of the household and the type of vehicle driven. Trends in household driving patterns are also examined using additional information from the Department of Transportation's Nationwide Personal Transportation Survey (NPTS). Household VMT is a measure of the demand for personal transportation. Demand for transportation may be viewed from either an economic or a social perspective. From the economic point-of-view, the use of a household vehicle represents the consumption of one

167

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C11. Energy Consumption by Source, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum b Retail Electricity Sales State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu State Trillion Btu 1 Texas 1,695.2 Texas 3,756.9 Texas 5,934.3 Texas 1,283.1 2 Indiana 1,333.4 California 2,196.6 California 3,511.4 California 893.7 3 Ohio 1,222.6 Louisiana 1,502.9 Louisiana 1,925.7 Florida 768.0 4 Pennsylvania 1,213.0 New York 1,246.9 Florida 1,680.3 Ohio 528.0 5 Illinois 1,052.2 Florida 1,236.6 New York 1,304.0 Pennsylvania 507.6 6 Kentucky 1,010.6 Pennsylvania 998.6 Pennsylvania 1,255.6 New York 491.5

168

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E E U.S. Census Regions and Divisions 489 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Source: U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, Statistical Abstract of the United States,1996 (Washington, DC, October 1996), Figure 1. Appendix E U.S. Census Regions and Divisions Appendix F Descriptions of Major Industrial Groups and Selected Industries Executive Office of the President, Office of Management and Budget, Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 1987, pp. 67-263. 54 493 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Appendix F Descriptions of Major Industrial Groups and Selected Industries This appendix contains descriptions of industrial groups and selected industries taken from the Standard Industrial

169

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 3. Energy Consumption per Capita by End-Use Sector, Ranked by State, 2011 Rank Residential Sector Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Transportation Sector Total Consumption State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu State Million Btu 1 North Dakota 99.8 District of Columbia 193.1 Louisiana 585.8 Alaska 277.3 Wyoming 974.7 2 West Virginia 90.9 Wyoming 119.2 Wyoming 568.2 Wyoming 200.7 Louisiana 886.5 3 Missouri 89.4 North Dakota 106.9 Alaska 435.7 North Dakota 172.8 Alaska 881.3 4 Tennessee 87.8 Alaska 94.1 North Dakota 388.9 Louisiana 158.0 North Dakota 768.4 5 Kentucky 87.4 Montana 78.4 Iowa 243.4 Oklahoma 122.3 Iowa 493.6

170

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) June 2007 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2004 2004 Consumption Summary Tables Table S1. Energy Consumption Estimates by Source and End-Use Sector, 2004 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydro- electric Power d Biomass e Other f Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/Losses g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Alabama 2,159.7 853.9 404.0 638.5 329.9 106.5 185.0 0.1 -358.2 393.7 270.2 1,001.1 494.7 Alaska 779.1 14.1 411.8 334.8 0.0 15.0 3.3 0.1 0.0 56.4 63.4 393.4 266.0 Arizona 1,436.6 425.4 354.9 562.8 293.1 69.9 8.7 3.6 -281.7 368.5 326.0 231.2 511.0 Arkansas 1,135.9 270.2 228.9 388.3 161.1 36.5 76.0 0.6 -25.7 218.3 154.7 473.9 288.9 California 8,364.6 68.9 2,474.2 3,787.8 315.6 342.2

171

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9) 9) June 2011 State Energy Consumption Estimates 1960 Through 2009 2009 Consumption Summary Tables Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity/ Losses f Net Electricity Imports Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,906.8 631.0 473.9 583.9 1,688.8 415.4 272.9 -470.3 0.0 383.2 266.0 788.5 469.2 Alaska 630.4 14.5 344.0 255.7 614.1 0.0 16.3 0.0 (s) 53.4 61.0 325.4 190.6 Arizona 1,454.3 413.3 376.7 520.8 1,310.8 320.7 103.5 -279.9 -0.8 400.8 352.1 207.8 493.6 Arkansas 1,054.8 264.1 248.1 343.1 855.3 158.7 126.5 -85.7 0.0 226.3 167.0 372.5

172

Household vehicles energy consumption 1994  

SciTech Connect

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 reports on the results of the 1994 Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS). The RTECS is a national sample survey that has been conducted every 3 years since 1985. For the 1994 survey, more than 3,000 households that own or use some 6,000 vehicles provided information to describe vehicle stock, vehicle-miles traveled, energy end-use consumption, and energy expenditures for personal vehicles. The survey results represent the characteristics of the 84.9 million households that used or had access to vehicles in 1994 nationwide. (An additional 12 million households neither owned or had access to vehicles during the survey year.) To be included in then RTECS survey, vehicles must be either owned or used by household members on a regular basis for personal transportation, or owned by a company rather than a household, but kept at home, regularly available for the use of household members. Most vehicles included in the RTECS are classified as {open_quotes}light-duty vehicles{close_quotes} (weighing less than 8,500 pounds). However, the RTECS also includes a very small number of {open_quotes}other{close_quotes} vehicles, such as motor homes and larger trucks that are available for personal use.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Mildly Context Sensitive Grammars For Estimating Maximum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction The maximum-entropy framework provides great flexibility in specifying what features a model may take into account, making it e#ective for a wide range of natural language processing tasks. But because parameter estimation in this framework involves computations over the whole space of possible labelings, it is unwieldy for the parsing problem, where this space is very large. Researchers have tried several strategies for e#ciently training parsing models in the maximum-entropy framework. Ratnaparkhi's parser (1997) models the probabilities of actions of a pushdown automaton instead of the probabilities of entire parses, but for this reason is susceptible to the label-bias problem (La#erty et al. 2001). Abney (1997) proposes random sampling of the parse space. Johnson et al. (1999) propose using conditional estimation instead of joint estimation. This reduces the space to the possible parses of a single sentence, which is much smaller but can still be unmanageably large f

David Chiang

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Discontinuities in the Maximum-Entropy Inference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit the maximum-entropy inference of the state of a finite-level quantum system under linear constraints. The constraints are specified by the expected values of a set of fixed observables. We point out the existence of discontinuities in this inference method. This is a pure quantum phenomenon since the maximum-entropy inference is continuous for mutually commuting observables. The question arises why some sets of observables are distinguished by a discontinuity in an inference method which is still discussed as a universal inference method. In this paper we make an example of a discontinuity and we explain a characterization of the discontinuities in terms of the openness of the (restricted) linear map that assigns expected values to states.

Stephan Weis

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C31A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

176

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C25A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

177

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C32A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

178

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C10A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption...

179

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C30A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption...

180

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C35A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The benefits of fish consumption outweigh the risks, according to a joint expert consultation released in October 2011 by two United Nations agencies. Benefits vs. risks of fish consumption News Inform Magazine Inform Archives Health Nutrition Omega

182

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W XYZ ‹ Consumption & Efficiency Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Glossary ...

183

State energy data report 1992: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect

This is a report of energy consumption by state for the years 1960 to 1992. The report contains summaries of energy consumption for the US and by state, consumption by source, comparisons to other energy use reports, consumption by energy use sector, and describes the estimation methodologies used in the preparation of the report. Some years are not listed specifically although they are included in the summary of data.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Below are historical data tables from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). These tables cover the total number of households ...

185

Energy Consumption and Expenditures RECS 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Heating. Space Heating. Appliances. Air-Conditioning. About the Data. Tables: Total Energy Consumption in U.S ...

186

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... State Energy Data System: Noncombustible Renewable Energy for 2011 ...

187

EIA - Analysis of Natural Gas Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption 2010 Natural Gas Year-In-Review 2009 This is a special report that provides an overview of the natural gas industry and markets in 2009 with special focus on the first complete set of supply and disposition data for 2009 from the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include natural gas end-use consumption trends, offshore and onshore production, imports and exports of pipeline and liquefied natural gas, and above-average storage inventories. Categories: Prices, Production, Consumption, Imports/Exports & Pipelines, Storage (Released, 7/9/2010, Html format) Trends in U.S. Residential Natural Gas Consumption This report presents an analysis of residential natural gas consumption trends in the United States through 2009 and analyzes consumption trends for the United States as a whole (1990 through 2009) and for each Census Division (1998 through 2009). It examines a long-term downward per-customer consumption trend and analyzes whether this trend persists across Census Divisions. The report also examines some of the factors that have contributed to the decline in per-customer consumption. To provide a more meaningful measure of per-customer consumption, EIA adjusted consumption data presented in the report for weather. Categories: Consumption (Released, 6/23/2010, pdf format)

188

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical models of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan of natural gas consumption Kristian Sabo, Rudolf Scitovski, Ivan Vazler , Marijana Zeki-Susac ksabo of natural gas consumption hourly fore- cast on the basis of hourly movement of temperature and natural gas

Scitovski, Rudolf

189

DOE/EIA-0321/HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

/HRIf /HRIf Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Consumption and Expenditures, April 1981 Through March 1982 an Part I: National Data Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. (202) 20fr02 'O'Q 'uoifkjjUSBM ujiuud juaoiujeAog 'S'n siuawnooQ jo luapuaiuuadns - 0088-292 (202) 98S02 '0'Q 8f 0-d I 6ujp|ing uoiieflSjUjiup v UOIIBUJJOJU | ABjau 3 02-13 'jaiuao UOIJBUJJOJUI XBjaug IBUO!;BN noA pasopua s; uujoi japjo uy 'MO|aq jeadde sjaqoinu auoydajaj PUB sassajppv 'OI3N 9>4i oi papajip aq pinoqs X6jaue uo suotjsenQ '(OIBN) J9»ueo aqjeiMJO^ui ASjaug (BUOIJEN s,vi3 QMi JO OdO 941 UUGJJ peuiBiqo eq ABOI suoijBonqnd (vi3) UO!JBJ;S!UILUPV UOIIBUUJO|U| XBjeug jaiflo PUB SJMJ p ssBiiojnd PUB UOIIBLUJO^JI 6uuepjQ (Od9) 90IWO Bujjuud luetuujaAOQ -g'n 'sjuaiunooa p juapuaiuuedng aqt LUOJI aiqB||BAB si uoHBOjiqnd sjt|i

190

Modelling Energy Consumption in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy consumption in China has attracted considerable research interest since the middle 1990s. This is largely prompted by the environmental ramifications of the extensive use of fossil fuels in the country to propel two decades of high economic growth. Since the late 1980s, there has been an increasing awareness on the part of the Chinese government of the imperative for the balance of economic growth and environmental protection. The government has since taken various measures ranging from encouraging energy-saving practice, controlling waste discharges to financing R & D programs on improving energy efficiency. Against this backdrop has seen a constant decline of the energy intensity of the economy, measured as the ratio of total energy consumed in standard coal equivalent to the real GDP since 1989. Using the 1987 and 1997 input-output tables for China, the present study examines the impact of technical and structural changes in the economy on industry fuel consumption over the 10-year period. Technical changes are reflected in changes in direct input-output coefficients, which capture the technical evolvement of intermediate production processes. Structural changes refer to shifts in the pattern of final demand for energy, including the import and export composition of various fuels. Six fuels are included in the study, namely, coal, oil, natural gas, electricity, petroleum and coke and gas, which cover all of the energy types available in the input-output tables. It is found that the predominant force of falling energy intensity was changes in direct energy input requirements in various industries. Such changes were responsible for a reduction in the consumption of four of the six fuels per unit of total output. Structural changes were not conducive for improv...

Baiding Hu Department; Baiding Hu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008 Standby Power Consumption Report”, March. http://of measurement for the power consumption of audio, video andand Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency in

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Addressing Water Consumption of Evaporative Coolers with Greywater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 3. Water Consumption of Evaporative7 3.1.2. Water Consumption Due to9 3.1.4. Water Consumption due to

Sahai, Rashmi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Alcohol consumption, medical conditions and health behavior in older adults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alcohol consumption In press, American JournalHealth Behavior Alcohol Consumption, Medical Conditions andin the association of alcohol consumption with health and

Satre, Derek; Gordon, Nancy P.; Weisner, Constance

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Whole-house measurements of standby power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whole-House Measurements of Standby Power Consumption" InStudy on Miscellaneous Standby Consumption of HouseholdA. , Murakoshi, C. 1997. Standby Electricity Consumption in

Ross, J.P.; Meier, Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Modelling the impact of user behaviour on heat energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategies impact on energy consumption in residentialBEHAVIOUR ON HEAT ENERGY CONSUMPTION Nicola Combe 1 ,2 ,nearly 60% of domestic energy consumption and 27% of total

Combe, Nicola Miss; Harrison, David Professor; Way, Celia Miss

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Low Power Mode Energy Consumption”, Energy Efficiency inEnergy Consumption ..26 3.1.3. 3D TV Energy Consumption and Efficiency

Park, Won Young

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

2009 Energy Consumption Per Person | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption Per Person 2009 Energy Consumption...

198

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Electrical appliance energy consumption control methods and electrical energy consumption systems are described. In one aspect, an electrical appliance energy consumption control method includes providing an electrical appliance coupled with a power distribution system, receiving electrical energy within the appliance from the power distribution system, consuming the received electrical energy using a plurality of loads of the appliance, monitoring electrical energy of the power distribution system, and adjusting an amount of consumption of the received electrical energy via one of the loads of the appliance from an initial level of consumption to an other level of consumption different than the initial level of consumption responsive to the monitoring.

Donnelly, Matthew K. (Kennewick, WA); Chassin, David P. (Pasco, WA); Dagle, Jeffery E. (Richland, WA); Kintner-Meyer, Michael (Richland, WA); Winiarski, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Pratt, Robert G. (Kennewick, WA); Boberly-Bartis, Anne Marie (Alexandria, VA)

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

200

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Figure 1.6 State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Figure 1.6 State-Level Energy Consumption Estimates and Estimated Consumption per Capita, 2010 Consumption Consumption per Capita

202

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C3. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Fossil Fuels Fossil Fuels (as commingled) Coal Natural Gas excluding Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Petroleum Total Natural Gas including Supplemental Gaseous Fuels a Motor Gasoline including Fuel Ethanol a Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline excluding Fuel Ethanol a Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Alabama ........... 651.0 614.8 156.5 13.4 12.8 304.5 13.4 49.1 549.5 1,815.4 614.8 319.8 Alaska ............... 15.5 337.0 85.1 118.2 1.3 31.9 1.9 28.6 267.1 619.6 337.0 34.6 Arizona ............. 459.9 293.7 151.8 21.5 9.1 297.3 (s) 21.1 500.9 1,254.5 293.7 323.4 Arkansas ........... 306.1 288.6 134.9 5.9 9.4 165.4 0.2 19.8 335.7 930.5 288.6 175.6 California .......... 55.3 2,196.6 567.0 549.7 67.2 1,695.4 186.9 339.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 2,196.6

203

The Perils of Consumption and the Gift Economy as the Solution Daniel Miller’s Consumption and Its Consequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Press. Miller, D. (2012). Consumption and its consequences.The Perils of Consumption and the Gift Economy asSolution Daniel Miller’s ‘Consumption and Its Consequences’

Leahy, Terry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

Murphy, T W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

206

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Data - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Housing Characteristics; Consumption & Expenditures; Microdata; Consumption & Expenditures Tables + EXPAND ALL. Summary Statistics (revised January 2009) PDF (all tables)

207

Table 6a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

a. Total Electricity Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Electricity (thousand) Total Electricity Consumption...

208

1997 Consumption and Expenditures-Detailed Data Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1997 Resdiential Energy Consumption Survey(RECS)-1997 Consumption and Expenditures-1997 Detailed Tables, Energy Information Administration

209

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1d Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Electricity

210

Table 2.1e Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.1e Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949-2011 (Trillion Btu) Year: Primary Consumption 1: Electricity

211

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (cords) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table US8.

212

Consumption & Efficiency | U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption and efficiency analysis & projections. Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Reference Case: consumption by sector projections; energy intensity projections

213

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Glossary Anthracite: A hard, black, lustrous coal containing a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter. Often referred to as hard coal. Barrel: A volumetric unit of measure equivalent to 42 U.S. gallons. Biomass: Organic nonfossil material of biological origin constituting a renewable energy source. Bituminous Coal: A dense, black coal, often with well-defined bands of bright and dull material, with a moisture content usually less than 20 percent. Often referred to as soft coal. It is the most common coal. Blast Furnace: A shaft furnace in which solid fuel (coke) is burned with an air blast to smelt ore in a continuous operation. Blast Furnace Gas: The waste combustible gas generated in a blast furnace when iron ore is being reduced with coke to

214

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. 1. Introduction The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is mandated by Congress to collect, analyze, and disseminate impartial, comprehensive data about energy--how much is produced, who uses it, and the purposes for which it is used. To comply with this mandate, EIA collects energy data from a variety of sources covering a range of topics 1 . Background The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted

215

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Manufacturing Manufacturing Sector Overview 1991-1994 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 xiii Why Do We Investigate Energy Use in the Manufacturing Sector? What Data Do EIA Use To Investigate Energy Use in the Manufacturing Sector? In 1991, output in the manufactur- ing sector fell as the country went into a recession. After 1991, however, output increased as the country slowly came out of the recession. Between 1991 and 1994, manufacturers, especially manu- facturers of durable goods such as steel and glass, experienced strong growth. The industrial production index for durable goods during the period increased by 21 percent. Real gross domestic product for durable goods increased a corre- sponding 16 percent. The growth of nondurables was not as strong-- the production index increased by only 9 percent during this time period.

216

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1991  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C C Quality of the Data Appendix C Quality of the Data Introduction This appendix discusses several issues relating to the quality of the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS) data and to the interpretation of conclusions based on these data. The first section discusses under- coverage of the vehicle stock in the residential sector. The second section discusses the effects of using July 1991 as a time reference for the survey. The remainder of this appendix discusses the treatment of sampling and nonsampling errors in the RTECS, the quality of specific data items such as the Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) and fuel prices, and poststratification procedures used in the 1991 RTECS. The quality of the data collection and the processing of the data affects the accuracy of estimates based on survey data. All the statistics published in this report such as total

217

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A24. A24. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected Industries, and Type of Energy- Management Program, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Trillion Btu) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 285 SIC Management Any Type of Sponsored Self-Sponsored Sponsored Sponsored Code Industry Group and Industry Program Sponsorship Involvement Involvement Involvement Involvement a No Energy Electric Utility Government Third Party Type of Sponsorship of Management Programs (1992 through 1994) RSE Row Factors Federal, State, or Local RSE Column Factors: 0.7 1.1 1.0 0.7 1.9 0.9 20-39 ALL INDUSTRY GROUPS Participation in One or More of the Following Types of Programs . .

218

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

219

Household vehicles energy consumption 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide information on the use of energy in residential vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Included are data about: the number and type of vehicles in the residential sector, the characteristics of those vehicles, the total annual Vehicle Miles Traveled (VMT), the per household and per vehicle VMT, the vehicle fuel consumption and expenditures, and vehicle fuel efficiencies. The data for this report are based on the household telephone interviews from the 1991 RTECS, conducted during 1991 and early 1992. The 1991 RTECS represents 94.6 million households, of which 84.6 million own or have access to 151.2 million household motor vehicles in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Not Available

1993-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

220

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Design, Survey Design, Implementation, and Estimates 411 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 Overview of Changes from Previous Surveys Sample Design. The MECS has increased its sample size by roughly 40 percent since the 1991 survey, increasing the designed sample size from 16,054 establishments to 22,922. This increase in size and change in sampling criteria required a departure from using the Annual Survey of Manufactures (ASM) as the MECS sampling frame. For 1994, establishments were selected directly from the 1992 Census of Manufactures (CM) mail file, updated by 1993 ASM. Sample Frame Coverage. The coverage in the 1994 MECS is 98 percent of the manufacturing population as measured in total payroll. The sampling process itself provided that level of coverage, and no special adjustments were

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. 0. Number of Establishments that Actually Switched Fuels from Natural Gas to Residual Fuel Oil, by Industry Group and Selected Industries, 1994 369 Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 SIC Residual Fuel Oil Total Code Industry Group and Industry (billion cu ft) Factors (counts) (counts) (percents) (counts) (percents) a Natural Gas Switchable to Establishments RSE Row Able to Switch Actually Switched RSE Column Factors: 1.3 0.1 1.4 1.7 1.6 1.8 20 Food and Kindred Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 14,698 702 4.8 262 1.8 5.6 2011 Meat Packing Plants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 759 23 3.0 10 1.3 9.0 2033 Canned Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 531 112 21.2 33 6.2 11.6 2037 Frozen Fruits and Vegetables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 232 Q 5.3

222

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

State State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 11 Table C8. Transportation Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy Electrical System Energy Losses e Total Aviation Gasoline Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Lubricants Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Total Alabama ............. 0.0 23.5 0.4 124.4 13.4 0.3 2.3 316.3 6.7 463.7 0.0 487.2 0.0 487.2 Alaska ................. 0.0 3.5 0.8 44.4 118.2 (s) 0.4 32.9 0.4 197.2 0.0 200.7 0.0 200.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 15.6 1.0 111.3 21.5 0.8 1.6 318.2 0.0 454.5 0.0 470.1 0.0 470.1 Arkansas ............. 0.0 11.5 0.4 99.7 5.9 0.4 2.0 171.3 0.0 279.8 (s) 291.2 (s) 291.2 California ............ 0.0 25.7 1.9 440.9 549.7 3.8 13.3 1,770.1 186.9 2,966.5 2.8 2,995.1 5.5 3,000.5 Colorado ............. 0.0 14.7 0.6 83.2 58.3 0.3

223

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C7. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power e Biomass Geo- thermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy h,i Electrical System Energy Losses j Total h,i Distillate Fuel Oil LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Other d Total Wood and Waste f Losses and Co- products g Alabama ............. 65.0 179.1 23.9 3.7 3.3 6.7 46.3 83.9 0.0 147.2 0.0 (s) 115.1 590.4 219.5 810.0 Alaska ................. 0.1 253.8 19.2 0.1 1.0 0.0 27.1 47.4 0.0 0.1 0.0 0.0 4.5 306.0 9.4 315.4 Arizona ............... 10.0 22.0 33.2 1.4 4.6 (s) 18.4 57.6 0.0 1.4 3.1 0.2 42.1 136.5 84.7 221.2 Arkansas ............. 5.6 93.1 31.1 2.6 4.0 0.1 17.4 55.1 0.0 72.7 0.0 (s) 58.0 284.5 120.5 405.0 California ............ 35.6 767.4 77.2 23.9 29.6 (s) 312.5

224

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C9. Electric Power Sector Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Nuclear Electric Power Hydroelectric Power b Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV d Wind Net Electricity Imports e Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Petroleum Coke Residual Fuel Oil Total Wood and Waste c Alabama ............. 586.1 349.4 1.1 0.0 0.0 1.1 411.8 86.3 4.6 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 1,439.3 Alaska ................. 6.0 42.3 3.3 0.0 1.5 4.8 0.0 13.1 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.1 (s) 66.3 Arizona ............... 449.9 183.9 0.6 0.0 0.0 0.6 327.3 89.1 2.4 0.0 0.8 2.5 1.5 1,057.9 Arkansas ............. 300.5 109.2 0.5 0.0 0.1 0.6 148.5 28.7 1.3 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 588.9 California ............ 19.7 630.1 0.4 11.1 (s) 11.5 383.6 413.4 69.0 122.0 8.4 75.3 20.1 1,753.1 Colorado ............. 362.4 88.1 0.3 0.0 0.0 0.3 0.0 20.2 0.9

225

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 . Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a Fossil Fuels Nuclear Electric Power Renewable Energy e Net Interstate Flow of Electricity f Net Electricity Imports g Residential Commercial Industrial b Transportation Coal Natural Gas c Petroleum d Total Alabama 1,931.3 651.0 614.8 549.5 1,815.4 411.8 260.6 -556.6 0.0 376.9 257.2 810.0 487.2 Alaska 637.9 15.5 337.0 267.1 619.6 0.0 18.4 0.0 (s) 53.7 68.2 315.4 200.7 Arizona 1,431.5 459.9 293.7 500.9 1,254.5 327.3 136.6 -288.4 1.5 394.7 345.5 221.2 470.1 Arkansas 1,117.1 306.1 288.6 335.7 930.5 148.5 123.7 -85.6 0.0 246.3 174.7 405.0 291.2 California 7,858.4 55.3 2,196.6 3,405.8 5,657.6 383.6 928.5 868.6 20.1 1,516.1 1,556.1 1,785.7 3,000.5 Colorado 1,480.8 368.9 476.5 472.9 1,318.3

226

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 C4. Total End-Use Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric power f Biomass Geo- thermal Solar/PV i Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy j,k Electrical System Energy Losses l Total j,k Distillate Fuel Oil Jet Fuel b LPG c Motor Gasoline d Residual Fuel Oil Other e Total Wood and Waste g Losses and Co- products h Alabama ........... 65.0 265.4 155.4 13.4 12.8 319.8 13.4 49.1 563.8 0.0 154.1 0.0 0.1 0.2 303.7 1,352.2 579.1 1,931.3 Alaska ............... 9.5 294.7 81.8 118.2 1.3 34.6 0.4 28.6 265.0 0.0 2.3 0.0 0.2 (s) 21.6 593.2 44.7 637.9 Arizona ............. 10.0 109.8 151.3 21.5 9.1 323.4 (s) 21.1 526.5 0.0 4.4 3.1 0.3 7.9 255.7 917.8 513.7 1,431.5 Arkansas ........... 5.6 179.4 134.5 5.9 9.4 175.6 0.1 19.8 345.4 0.0 82.6 0.0 0.7 0.2 163.5 777.4 339.8 1,117.1 California ..........

227

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 State Energy Data 2011: Consumption Table C5. Residential Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal a Natural Gas b Petroleum Biomass Geothermal Solar/PV e Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy f Electrical System Energy Losses g Total f Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG c Total Wood d Alabama ............. 0.0 37.2 0.1 0.1 6.0 6.2 6.0 0.1 0.2 112.6 162.2 214.7 376.9 Alaska ................. 0.0 20.5 8.1 0.1 0.5 8.8 1.9 0.1 (s) 7.3 38.6 15.1 53.7 Arizona ............... 0.0 39.1 (s) (s) 5.5 5.5 2.6 (s) 7.9 112.9 168.0 226.8 394.7 Arkansas ............. 0.0 34.2 0.1 (s) 5.2 5.3 8.6 0.7 0.2 64.1 113.1 133.2 246.3 California ............ 0.0 522.4 0.6 0.6 30.9 32.2 33.3 0.2 43.2 301.6 932.9 583.1 1,516.1 Colorado ............. 0.0 134.2 0.1 (s) 12.3 12.4 8.3 0.2 0.7 62.4 216.5 136.5 353.0 Connecticut ......... 0.0 46.0 59.6

228

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

229

Renewable Energy Consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Consumption Dataset Summary Description Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA renewable electricity Renewable Energy Consumption world Data text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009billion_kwh.csv (csv, 8.5 KiB) text/csv icon total_renewable_electricity_net_consumption_2005_2009quadrillion_btu.csv (csv, 8.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

230

annual energy consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy consumption energy consumption Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008. This data was published and compiled by the Energy Information Administration. Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords annual energy consumption consumption EIA renewable energy Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon historical_renewable_energy_consumption_by_sector_and_energy_source_1989-2008.xls (xls, 41 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 1989-2008 License License Creative Commons CCZero Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset

231

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presents information about household end-use consumption of energy and expenditures for that energy. These data were collected in the 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey; more than 7,000 households were surveyed for information on their housing units, energy consumption and expenditures, stock of energy-consuming appliances, and energy-related behavior. The information represents all households nationwide (97 million). Key findings: National residential energy consumption was 10.0 quadrillion Btu in 1993, a 9% increase over 1990. Weather has a significant effect on energy consumption. Consumption of electricity for appliances is increasing. Houses that use electricity for space heating have lower overall energy expenditures than households that heat with other fuels. RECS collected data for the 4 most populous states: CA, FL, NY, TX.

NONE

1995-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

232

Trends in Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents a summary of the nation’s renewable energy consumption in 2010 along with detailed historical data on renewable energy consumption by energy source and end-use sector. Data presented also includes renewable energy consumption for electricity generation and for non-electric use by energy source, and net summer capacity and net generation by energy source and State. The report covers the period from 2006 through 2010.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Maximum Rate of Pulverized Coal Injection into Blast Furnace with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pulverized coal consumption efficiency is determined by means of microscopic and chemical analysis. The carbon structure of coke fines in the blast furnace ...

234

Qualms concerning Tsallis ’ Use of the Maximum Entropy Formalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tsallis ’ ‘statistical thermodynamic ’ formulation of the nonadditive entropy of degree-? is neither correct nor self-consistent. It is well known that the maximum entropy formalism [1], the minimum discrimination information [2], and Gauss ’ principle [3, 4] all lead to the same results when a certain condition on the prior probability distribution is imposed [5]. All these methods lead to the same form of the posterior probability distribution; namely, the exponential family of distributions. Tsallis and collaborators [6] have tried to adapt the maximum entropy formalism that uses the Shannon entropy to one that uses a nonadditive entropy of degree-?. In order to come out with analytic expressions for the probabilities that maximize the nonadditive entropy they found it necessary to use ‘escort probabilities’[7] of the same power as the nonadditive entropy. If the procedure they use is correct then it follows that Gauss ’ principle should give the same optimum probabilities. Yet, we will find that the Tsallis result requires that the prior probability distribution be given by the same unphysical condition as the maximum entropy formalism and, what is worse, the potential of the error law be required to vanish. The potential of the error law is what information theory refers to as the error [8]; that is, the difference between the inaccuracy and the entropy. Unless the ‘true ’ probability distribution, P = (p(x1), p(x2)...,p(xm)) coincides with the estimated probability distribution, Q = (q(x1), q(x2),...q(xm)), the error does not vanish. Moreover, we shall show that two procedures of averaging, one using the escort probabilities explicitly, do not give the same result, and the relation between the potential of the error law and the nonadditive entropy requires the latter to vanish when the former vanishes. Let X be a random variable whose values x1, x2,..., xm are obtained at m independent trials. Prior to the observations the distribution is Q, and after the observations the unknown probability distribution is P. The observer has 1 at his disposal the statistic â = 1

B. H. Lavenda; J. Dunning-davies

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

,"Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

236

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen. Release Date: ... and water consumption for hospital buildings greater than 200,000 squar ...

237

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Maps by energy source and topic, includes ... Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy ...

238

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

239

2005 RECS Consumption and Expenditures Detailed Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Detailed Consumption and Expenditures (C&E) tables containing Space Heating, Air-Conditioning, Water Heating, and Appliance residential energy data are now available.

240

,"Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release Date:","9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

242

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

may not sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Form EIA-871A of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

243

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... Annual state-level estimates of consumption for hydroelectric power, wind, geothermal, and solar energy. Annual Energy Outlook 2013.

244

A Green Solution To Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, MAX HT® Bayer Sodalite Scale Inhibiter: A Green Solution To Energy Consumption. Author(s), Morris E. Lewellyn, Alan Rothenberg, Calvin ...

245

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A video about changes in home heating in the United States. Annual Energy Review Consumption Statistics. Released September 27, 2012. A report of annual energy ...

246

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... video - Keeping Our Homes Warm, released November 2, 2012. Energy consumption per home has steadily declined over the last three decades ...

247

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

248

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

249

,"New Hampshire Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Hampshire Natural...

250

,"Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

251

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use",6,"Monthly","102013","1151989" ,"Release...

252

Household Vehicles Energy Consumption 1994 - PDF Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 1 U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 Table 2 U.S. per Household Vehicle Miles Traveled, Vehicle Fuel ...

253

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The gross output for the petroleum and coal products subsector grew by about 3 percent, ... Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, MECS Definition of Fuel Use, ...

254

Figure 70. Delivered energy consumption for transportation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 70. Delivered energy consumption for transportation by mode, 2011 and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Total Rail Pipeline Marine ...

255

,"California Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural...

256

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural...

257

,"Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural...

258

,"Washington Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Washington Natural...

259

,"Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Virginia Natural...

260

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Consumption externalities, habit formation and equilibrium efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the welfare properties of the competitive equilibrium in a capital accumulation model where individual preferences are subject to both habit formation and consumption spillovers. Using an additive specification for preferences, according to which the argument in the utility function is a linear combination of present and past values of own consumption and consumption spillovers, we analyze the circumstances under which these spillovers are a source of inefficiency. It is shown that consumption externalities have to interact with habits in order to generate an inefficient dynamic equilibrium. Finally, we characterize optimal tax policies aimed at restoring efficient decentralized paths.

Jaime Alonso-carrera; Jordi Caballé; Xavier Raurich

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania...

263

Optimal consumption policies in illiquid markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate optimal consumption policies in the liquidity risk model introduced in Pham and Tankov (2007). Our main result is to derive smoothness results for the value functions of the portfolio/consumption choice problem. As an important consequence, we can prove the existence of the optimal control (portfolio/consumption strategy) which we characterize both in feedback form in terms of the derivatives of the value functions and as the solution of a second-order ODE. Finally, numerical illustrations of the behavior of optimal consumption strategies between two trading dates are given.

Cretarola, Alessandra; Pham, Huyên; Tankov, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural...

265

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural...

266

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural...

267

,"Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural...

268

,"Delaware Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Delaware Natural...

269

,"Maryland Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Maryland Natural...

270

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural...

271

,"Missouri Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Missouri Natural...

272

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural...

273

Resource Consumption of Additive Manufacturing Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The degradation of natural resources as a result of consumption to support the economic growth of humans society represents one of the greatest sustainability challenges.… (more)

Nopparat, Nanond

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

This Week in Petroleum › Weekly Petroleum Status Report › Weekly Natural Gas ... Total United States energy consumption in homes has remained relatively ...

275

,"California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

276

Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity Preliminary ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Renewable Energy Consumption and Electricity Preliminary Statistics 2010 June 2011 ... and Job Creation Act of 2010 (H.R. 4853) was signed in December

277

All Consumption Tables - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table C1. Energy Consumption Overview: Estimates by Energy Source and End-Use Sector, 2009 (Trillion Btu) State Total Energy b Sources End-Use Sectors a

278

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) 2009 Technical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) Using the 2009 microdata file to compute estimates and standard errors (RSEs) February 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis

279

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

(92) Distribution Category UC-950 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992 April 1995 Contacts The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepared this...

280

Residential Energy Consumption Survey data show decreased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total U.S. energy consumption in homes has remained relatively stable for many years as increased energy efficiency has offset the increase in the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

282

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Utility (1990-2009) Electricity consumption by Utility company for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight, Industry, Mining & Construction and Total...

283

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by Planning...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Planning Area (1990-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission by planning area for Commercial, Residential, Ag & Water Pump, Streetlight,...

284

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

285

,"Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

286

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

287

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

288

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

289

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

290

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

291

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

292

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWhsquare foot)...

293

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

294

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity...

295

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

296

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

297

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

298

Maximum Error Modeling for Fault-Tolerant Computation using Maximum a posteriori (MAP) Hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of current generation computing machines in safety-centric applications like implantable biomedical chips and automobile safety has immensely increased the need for reviewing the worst-case error behavior of computing devices for fault-tolerant computation. In this work, we propose an exact probabilistic error model that can compute the maximum error over all possible input space in a circuit specific manner and can handle various types of structural dependencies in the circuit. We also provide the worst-case input vector, which has the highest probability to generate an erroneous output, for any given logic circuit. We also present a study of circuit-specific error bounds for fault-tolerant computation in heterogeneous circuits using the maximum error computed for each circuit. We model the error estimation problem as a maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimate, over the joint error probability function of the entire circuit, calculated efficiently through an intelligent search of the entire input space using probabilistic traversal of a binary join tree using Shenoy-Shafer algorithm. We demonstrate this model using MCNC and ISCAS benchmark circuits and validate it using an equivalent HSpice model. Both results yield the same worst-case input vectors and the highest % difference of our error model over HSpice is just 1.23%. We observe that the maximum error probabilities are significantly larger than the average error probabilities, and provides a much tighter error bounds for fault-tolerant computation. We also find that the error estimates depend on the specific circuit structure and the maximum error probabilities are sensitive to the individual gate failure probabilities.

Karthikeyan Lingasubramanian; Syed M. Alam; Sanjukta Bhanja

2009-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Residential energy consumption survey. Consumption patterns of household vehicles, supplement: January 1981-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information on the fuel consumption characteristics on household vehicles in the 48 contiguous States and the District of Columbia is presented by monthly statistics of fuel consumption, expenditures, miles per gallon, and miles driven.

Not Available

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Conservation Potential of Compact Fluorescent Lamps in India and Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1988. The private sector in Brazil owned (in 1986) 40% ofElectricity Conservation in Brazil: Potential and Pro-electricity consumption in Brazil's residential sector was

Gadgil, A.J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

302

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

303

Prediction of domestic warm-water consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents methodologies able to predict dynamic warm water consumption in district heating systems, using time-series analysis. A simulation model according to the day of a week has been chosen for modeling the domestic warm water consumption ... Keywords: autoregressive model, district heating systems, domestic warm water, prediction, simulation, time series models

Elena Serban; Daniela Popescu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Energy Consumption Issues on Mobile Network Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes energy consumption demographic data in operating real mobile networks. We examine published data from NTT DoCoMo, which is the largest mobile telecommunication operator in Japan and operating nation-wide 3G networks, and identify ... Keywords: Moble Network, Power Consumption, Battery, CO2, Green Network

Minoru Etoh; Tomoyuki Ohya; Yuji Nakayama

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modelling Office Energy Consumption: An Agent Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling Office Energy Consumption: An Agent Based Approach Tao Zhang, Peer-Olaf Siebers, Uwe · Overall Project Background · Office Energy Consumption · Case Study · Simulation Experiments · Conclusions #12;Overall Project Background · EPSRC funded City Energy Future Project ­ Under Energy & Complexity

Aickelin, Uwe

306

Energy consumption of personal computer workstations  

SciTech Connect

A field study directly measured the electric demand of 189 personal computer workstations for 1-week intervals, and a survey recorded the connected equipment at 1,846 workstations in six buildings. Each separate workstation component (e.g., computer, monitor, printer, modem, and other peripheral) was individually monitored to obtain detailed electric demand profiles. Other analyses included comparison of nameplate power rating with measured power consumption and the energy savings potential and cost-effectiveness of a controller that automatically turns off computer workstation equipment during inactivity. An important outcome of the work is the development of a standard workstation demand profile and a technique for estimating a whole-building demand profile. Together, these provide a method for transferring this information to utility energy analysts, design engineers, building energy modelers, and others. A life-cycle cost analysis was used to determine the cost-effectiveness of three energy conservation measures: (1) energy awareness education, (2) retrofit power controller installation, and (3) purchase of energy-efficient PCs.

Szydlowski, R.F.; Chvala, W.D. Jr.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

308

US SoAtl GA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

GA GA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl GA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl GA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Site energy consumption (89.5 million Btu) and energy expenditures per household ($2,067) in Georgia are similar to the U.S. household averages. * Per household electricity consumption in Georgia is among the highest in the country, but similar to other states in the South. * Forty-five percent of homes in Georgia were built since 1990, a characteristic typically associated with lower per household consumption. Georgia homes,

309

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

310

TCP over low-power and lossy networks: tuning the segment size to minimize energy consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-power and Lossy Networks (LLNs), like wireless networks based upon the IEEE 802.15.4 standard, have strong energy constraints, and are moreover subject to frequent transmission errors, not only due to congestion but also to collisions and to radio channel conditions. This paper introduces an analytical model to compute the total energy consumption in an LLN due to the TCP protocol. The model allows us to highlight some tradeoffs as regards the choice of the TCP maximum segment size, of the Forward Error Correction (FEC) redundancy ratio, and of the number of link-layer retransmissions, in order to minimize the total energy consumption.

Ayadi, Ahmed; Ros, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A structural analysis of natural gas consumption by income class from 1987 to 1993  

SciTech Connect

This study had two major objectives: (1) assess and compare changes in natural gas consumption between 1987 and 1993 by income group and (2) assess the potential influence of energy policy on observed changes in natural gas consumption over time and across income groups. This analysis used U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) data files and involved both the generation of simple descriptive statistics and the use of multivariate regression analysis. The consumption of natural gas by the groups was studied over a six-year period. The results showed that: (1) natural gas use was substantially higher for the highest income group than for the two lower income groups and (2) natural gas consumption declined for the lowest and middle income quintiles and increased for the highest income quintile between 1987 and 1990; between 1990 and 1993, consumption increased for the lowest and middle income quintile, but remained relatively constant for the highest income quintile. The relative importance of the structural and variable factors in explaining consumption changes between survey periods varies by income group. The analysis provides two major energy policy implications: (1) natural gas intensity has been the highest for the lowest income group, indicating that this group is more vulnerable to sudden changes in demand-indicator variables, in particular weather-related variables, than increase natural gas consumption, and (2) the fall in natural gas intensity between 1987 and 1993 may indicate that energy policy has had some impact on reducing natural gas consumption. 11 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

Poyer, D.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

All Consumption Tables.vp  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Table C6. Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 2011 (Trillion Btu) State Coal Natural Gas a Petroleum Hydro- electric Power e Biomass Geothermal Retail Electricity Sales Net Energy g Electrical System Energy Losses h Total g Distillate Fuel Oil Kerosene LPG b Motor Gasoline c Residual Fuel Oil Total d Wood and Waste f Alabama ............. 0.0 25.5 7.0 (s) 2.7 0.2 0.0 10.0 0.0 0.9 0.0 75.9 112.4 144.8 257.2 Alaska ................. 9.4 16.9 10.1 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.0 11.5 0.0 0.3 0.1 9.7 48.0 20.2 68.2 Arizona ............... 0.0 33.1 6.8 (s) 1.5 0.7 0.0 8.9 0.0 0.5 (s) 100.7 143.2 202.3 345.5 Arkansas ............. 0.0 40.6 3.6 (s) 1.2 0.4 0.0 5.2 0.0 1.3 0.0 41.4 88.6 86.1 174.7 California ............ 0.0 250.9 47.9 0.1 8.7 1.4 0.0 58.1 (s) 17.4 0.7 418.9 746.2 809.9 1,556.1 Colorado ............. 3.2 57.6 5.9 (s) 2.9 0.2 0.0 9.1 0.0 1.2 0.2

313

Air toxics from heavy oil production and consumption  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the potential impact of recent Federal and state regulations for airborne toxic substances on the production and consumption of heavy fuel oils. Emissions of nickel from heavy oil production in California are considered in some detail, in conjunction with California state regulations for toxic emissions. Although the use of thermal energy from heavy crude oils could in theory be impacted by toxic air pollution regulations, recent trends towards the use of natural gas for the required extraction energy appear to provide substantial relief, in addition to reducing emissions of criteria air pollutants. However, the consumption of residual fuel oils containing toxic metals could result in higher population exposures to these substances and their attendant risks may be worthy of more detailed analysis.

Lipfert, F.W.; DePhillips, M.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1992-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

314

A tool for automated resource consumption profiling of distributed transactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In this paper, we present a tool, called Autoprofiler, that automates the discovery of resource consumption by transactions on distributed systems. Such information is required as input to performance analysis tools, which may be used for capacity planning, for rearchitecting a distributed system, or to identify potential bottlenecks. Deriving this information using existing tools is a tedious and error prone process. In contrast, our tool requires minimal human intervention, and brings down the time required to profile complex distributed systems to a few minutes. It does this by co-ordinating the process of load generation and server resource profiling. Our tool also works with a Java profiler, called LiteJava Profiler, which we have built, to fully automate the process of resource consumption discovery for J2EE servers. 1

B. Nagaprabhanjan; Varsha Apte

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy consumption, conservation and recovery in municipal wastewater treatment: an overview  

SciTech Connect

The potentials for energy consumption, conservation, and recovery at municipal wastewater treatment plants are relatively small compared to the national energy figures. Nevertheless they are significant, particularly to local owners and operators. Estimates of energy consumption, as well as opportunities for conservation and energy recovery in municipal wastewater treatment operations, are reviewed. The relationship between energy conservation and aquaculture based wastewater treatment systems is also introduced. Finally, current DOE activities in this area are presented.

Bender, M F

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Predicting summer energy consumption from homeowners attitudes  

SciTech Connect

Two surveys examined the relationship between homeowners attitudes toward energy use and their actual summer electric consumption. In Survey 1, 56 couples filled out questionnaires concerning their energy attitudes. A factor analysis of their responses revealed four factors: comfort and health concerns, effort to conserve and monetary savings, role of the individual, and legitimacy of the energy crisis. The factors were entered into a multiple regression analysis to predict actual summer electric consumption. The attitudinal factors together significantly accounted for 55% of the variance in summer electric consumption. The comfort and health factor by itself explained 30% of the consumption variance. Survey 2, consisting of 69 couples, was conducted to elaborate the meaning of the factors. The results of the factor analysis of Survey 2 revealed six factors: comfort, health, individual's role, belief in science, legitimacy of the energy crisis, and effort to conserve. An overall regression analysis showed that the factors significantly explained nearly 60% of the summer consumption variance. The comfort factor was again the best predictor of summer electric consumption, accounting for 42% of the variance. It was concluded that attitudes about one's comfort are significantly related to household energy consumption (primarily air conditioning). The implications for energy conservation campaigns were discussed. 10 references, 3 tables.

Seligman, C.; Kriss, M.; Darley, J.M.; Fazio, R.H.; Becker, L.J.; Pryor, J.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy Information Administration - Transportation Energy Consumption by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Consumption Energy Consumption Transportation Energy Consumption Surveys energy used by vehicles EIA conducts numerous energy-related surveys and other information programs. In general, the surveys can be divided into two broad groups: supply surveys, directed to the suppliers and marketers of specific energy sources, that measure the quantities of specific fuels produced for and/or supplied to the market; and consumption surveys, which gather information on the types of energy used by consumer groups along with the consumer characteristics that are associated with energy use. In the transportation sector, EIA's core consumption survey was the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey. RTECS belongs to the consumption group because it collects information directly from the consumer, the household. For roughly a decade, EIA fielded the RTECS--data were first collected in 1983. This survey, fielded for the last time in 1994, was a triennial survey of energy use and expenditures, vehicle miles-traveled (VMT), and vehicle characteristics for household vehicles. For the 1994 survey, a national sample of more than 3,000 households that own or use some 5,500 vehicles provided data.

318

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

319

State energy data report 1993: Consumption estimates  

SciTech Connect

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Quality Profile  

SciTech Connect

The Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) is a periodic national survey that provides timely information about energy consumption and expenditures of U.S. households and about energy-related characteristics of housing units. The survey was first conducted in 1978 as the National Interim Energy Consumption Survey (NIECS), and the 1979 survey was called the Household Screener Survey. From 1980 through 1982 RECS was conducted annually. The next RECS was fielded in 1984, and since then, the survey has been undertaken at 3-year intervals. The most recent RECS was conducted in 1993.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Consumption processes and positively homogeneous projection properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We constructively prove the existence of time-discrete consumption processes for stochastic money accounts that fulfill a pre-specified positively homogeneous projection property (PHPP) and let the account always be positive and exactly zero at the end. One possible example is consumption rates forming a martingale under the above restrictions. For finite spaces, it is shown that any strictly positive consumption strategy with restrictions as above possesses at least one corresponding PHPP and could be constructed from it. We also consider numeric examples under time-discrete and -continuous account processes, cases with infinite time horizons and applications to income drawdown and bonus theory.

Fischer, Tom

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Consumption processes and positively homogeneous projection properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We constructively prove the existence of time-discrete consumption processes for stochastic money accounts that fulfill a pre-specified positively homogeneous projection property (PHPP) and let the account always be positive and exactly zero at the end. One possible example is consumption rates forming a martingale under the above restrictions. For finite spaces, it is shown that any strictly positive consumption strategy with restrictions as above possesses at least one corresponding PHPP and could be constructed from it. We also consider numeric examples under time-discrete and-continuous account processes, cases with infinite time horizons and applications to income drawdown and bonus theory.

Tom Fischer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

State Energy Data Report, 1991: Consumption estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to the Government, policy makers, and the public; and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

325

Natural gas consumption | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

gas consumption gas consumption Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 136, and contains only the reference case. This dataset is in trillion cubic feet. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, electric power and transportation. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Natural gas consumption Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Natural Gas Consumption by End-Use Sector and Census Division- Reference Case (xls, 138.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

326

Iowa Natural Gas Consumption by End Use  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History Total Consumption 293,274 325,772 315,186...

327

Compiler Support for Reducing Leakage Energy Consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current trends indicate that leakage energy consumption will be an important concern in upcoming process technologies. In this paper, we propose a compiler-based leakage energy optimization strategy. Our strategy is built upon a data-flow analysis that ...

W. Zhang; M. Kandemir; N. Vijaykrishnan; M. J. Irwin; V. De

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

US SoAtl VA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SoAtl VA SoAtl VA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 4,000 8,000 12,000 16,000 US SoAtl VA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $300 $600 $900 $1,200 $1,500 $1,800 US SoAtl VA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Virginia households consume an average of 86 million Btu per year, about 4% less than the U.S. average. * Average electricity consumption and costs are higher for Virginia households than the national average, but similar to those in neighboring states where electricity is the most common heating fuel. * Virginia homes are typically newer and larger than homes in other parts of the country. CONSUMPTION BY END USE

329

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

330

US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

in New Jersey homes is for space heating. Air conditioning accounts for a larger share of household consumption than other Northeast states, but still only accounts for 3% of the...

331

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C12A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

332

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major...

333

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C29A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Natural Gas...

334

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C7A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1...

335

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C28A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas...

336

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C27A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas...

337

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C9A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Division for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3...

338

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C11A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Building Size for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

339

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Released: Dec 2006 Next CBECS will be conducted in 2007 Table C5A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Census Region for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 Sum of...

340

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

sum to totals. Source: Energy Information Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Forms EIA-871A, C, and E of the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey....

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Idaho Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Idaho Natural Gas...

342

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas...

343

,"Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas...

344

,"Oregon Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oregon Natural Gas...

345

,"Alabama Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alabama Natural Gas...

346

,"Florida Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas...

347

,"Arizona Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arizona Natural Gas...

348

,"Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas...

349

,"Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas...

350

,"Nevada Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nevada Natural Gas...

351

,"Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas...

352

,"Indiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Indiana Natural Gas...

353

,"Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas...

354

,"Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption by End Use" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas...

355

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Networked Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing the Energy Consumption of Networked Devices Speaker(s): Ken Christensen Date: July 19, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: 90-4133 When Personal Computers are networked, energy...

356

California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1960's: 522,122 ...

357

Energy consumption metrics of MIT buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With world energy demand on the rise and greenhouse gas levels breaking new records each year, lowering energy consumption and improving energy efficiency has become vital. MIT, in a mission to help improve the global ...

Schmidt, Justin David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

TECHNICAL DOCUMENTATION Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This is the technical documentation for the public use data set based on the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), the national sample survey of commercial buildings and their energy suppliers conducted by the Energy Information Administration.

Information Center

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heating and cooling no longer majority of U.S. home energy use Pie chart of energy consumption in homes by end uses Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Residential...

360

US MidAtl NJ Site Consumption  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

than the average U.S. household. * New Jersey homes are 20% larger than the average U.S. home. CONSUMPTION BY END USE Nearly half the energy consumed in New Jersey homes is for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

California Energy Commission - Electricity Consumption by County  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County (2006-2009) Electricity consumption data from the California Energy Commission sorted by County for Residential and Non-residential from 2006 to 2009.


...

362

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570STX2" "Date","Texas...

363

State energy data report 1996: Consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the Combined State Energy Data System (CSEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining CSEDS is to create historical time series of energy consumption by State that are defined as consistently as possible over time and across sectors. CSEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models. To the degree possible, energy consumption has been assigned to five sectors: residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, and electric utility sectors. Fuels covered are coal, natural gas, petroleum, nuclear electric power, hydroelectric power, biomass, and other, defined as electric power generated from geothermal, wind, photovoltaic, and solar thermal energy. 322 tabs.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(S) AZ Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 3,000 6,000 9,000 12,000 15,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 US Mnt(S) AZ Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Arizona households use 66 million Btu of energy per home, 26% less than the U.S. average. * The combination of lower than average site consumption of all energy, but above average electricity which is relatively expensive, results in Arizona households spending 3% less for energy than the U.S. average. * More reliance on air conditioning keeps average site electricity consumption in the state high relative to other parts of the U.S.

365

Illinois energy consumption 1963-1977  

SciTech Connect

This report contains current and historical Illinois energy consumption data by consuming sector and fuel type. It also contains detailed description of mapping techniques used in developing the data.

Hill, L.; Biermann, W.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM2" "Date","New Mexico...

367

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035NM2" "Date","New Mexico...

368

OpenEI - Renewable Energy Consumption  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jul 2011 18:05:28 +0000 Meredith1219 758 at http:en.openei.orgdatasets EIA Data: 2009 United States Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source http:en.openei.org...

369

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

viii Figure 4.1: Electrical power usage breakdown for a3:30PM. The total HVAC electrical power consumption for thepower consumption, over Electrical Power Consumption (in kW)

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Solar Adoption and Energy Consumption in the Residential Sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & PostGWh total Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 2 YearsInstall Total Electricity Consumption 1 Year Pre & 3 Years

McAllister, Joseph Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Figure 4.4: Power consumption of a desktop PC + 3 LCDChapter 2 Trends in Building Consumption 2.1 UCSD as abreakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- use

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

breakdown of the energy consumption of the CSE mixed- useFigure 3.7: The energy consumption of HVAC during ourSpring 2011 tests - Energy consumption for electricity and

Balaji, Bharathan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Estimates of US biomass energy consumption 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the seventh in a series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to quantify the biomass-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It presents estimates of 1991 and 1992 consumption. The objective of this report is to provide updated estimates of biomass energy consumption for use by Congress, Federal and State agencies, biomass producers and end-use sectors, and the public at large.

Not Available

1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

374

State energy data report 1994: Consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sector. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), operated by EIA. SEDS provides State energy consumption estimates to members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and provides the historical series needed for EIA`s energy models. Division is made for each energy type and end use sector. Nuclear electric power is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: February 6, 0: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on AddThis.com...

376

An Eddy Parameterization Based on Maximum Entropy Production with Application to Modeling of the Arctic Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eddy parameterization derived from statistical mechanics of potential vorticity is applied for inviscid shallow-water equations. The solution of a variational problem based on the maximum entropy production (MEP) principle provides, with some ...

Igor Polyakov

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

378

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2006;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,,"Consumption" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)" ,,"Total United States" " 311 - 339","ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES"

379

" Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 3 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments within NAICS Codes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." " "," ",,,"Consumption"," " " "," ",,"Consumption","per Dollar" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "NAICS",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristic(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

380

Maximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

converter. II. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF PHOTOVOLTAIC CELL A PV cell can be represented by an equivalentMaximum Power Point Tracking Control for Photovoltaic System Using Adaptive Neuro- Fuzzy "ANFIS availability and vast potential, world has turned to solar photovoltaic energy to meet out its ever increasing

Recanati, Catherine

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An Analysis of Energy Consumption in Grocery Stores in a Hot and Humid Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intent of this study was to investigate the efficient use of energy by developing an energy efficient grocery store combined with cogeneration. This study demonstrated the potential to reduce the energy use in buildings, by implementing a decentralized source of energy generation that allowed for the use of a portion of the energy generated to be shared across building boundaries. This study considered a high energy use building such as a grocery store to be a part of a residential community, which could potentially participate in the sharing of energy across building boundaries. To better utilize energy resources the study proposed the implementation of a cogeneration facility to supply energy primarily to the store. Surplus energy generated by this cogeneration system was then shared with the requirements of the surrounding residential community. Finally, in order to better account for energy consumption of these buildings both site and source energy was considered. The study focused on hot and humid climates. This study was presented in two parts: Analyzing conventional grocery store systems to determine the maximum savings possible; and examining the option of co-generation systems to provide power to grocery stores and a portion of the community in order to reduce source energy use for the grocery store and a portion of the surrounding community. Source energy savings were in the range of 47% to 54% depending on the energy efficiency measures selected and the cogeneration configuration determined in the grocery store. Economic payback periods in the range of 4 to 7 years (time until zero net present value) were observed. The selection of appropriate options was narrowed down to two options that utilized more thermal energy within the boundaries of the store and generated more amount of surplus energy to be absorbed by the neighboring residential buildings.

Mukhopadhyay, Jaya

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

383

Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Center Energy Data Center Energy Consumption Trends to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Data Center Energy Consumption Trends on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Greenhouse Gases Water Efficiency Data Center Energy Efficiency Energy Consumption Trends

384

Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

385

Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

-- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore -- Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

386

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, ...

387

Global natural gas consumption doubled from 1980 to 2010 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although consumption in North America saw the slowest regional ... trends in regional natural gas consumption and production are more similar because of the limited ...

388

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy Sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

R A D O. U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 89 Table CT6. Industrial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960 ...

389

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How can we compare or add up our energy consumption? To compare or aggregate energy consumption across different energy sources like oil, natural gas, and electricity ...

390

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

have the highest water consumption values when using a recirculating cooling system. Non-thermal renewables, such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind, have the lowest water consumption...

391

Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)...

392

Texas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)...

393

Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

394

Table CT1. Energy Consumption Estimates for Major Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration State Energy Data 2011: Consumption 365 Table CT2. Primary Energy Consumption Estimates, Selected Years, 1960-2011, North ...

395

Whole-house measurements of standby power consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kWh/year of non-heating electricity consumption correlatesof electricity consumption. The home at 20,000 kWh/year has

Ross, J.P.; Meier, Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Annul Coal Consumption by Country (1980 -2009) Total annual coal consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available as Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information Administration...

397

Essays on the effects of demographics on household consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??My dissertation analyses the relationship between households' consumption behavior and changes in family demographic characteristics. The first paper studies consumption over the period of the… (more)

Stepanova, Ekaterina, 1977-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Study on optimal train movement for minimum energy consumption.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The presented thesis project is a study on train energy consumption calculation and optimal train driving strategies for minimum energy consumption. This study is… (more)

Gkortzas, Panagiotis

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Table 8: Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals, 2007 Table H8. RSEs for Water Consumption Information for Large Hospitals, 2007 Number of Large Hospital Buildings

400

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy consumption is from ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Biofuels Consumption and Production by Country (2000 - 2010)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Consumption and Production by Country (2000 - 2010) Total annual biofuels consumption and production data by country was compiled by the Energy Information Administration...

402

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 37. Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Technology Type and Fuel Type (trillion Btu) Light-Duty Consumption by Technology Type Conventional Vehicles 1/

403

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Biofuels Consumption (2005 - 2009) Total annual biofuels consumption (Thousand Barrels Per Day) for 2005 - 2009 for over 230 countries and regions.      ...

404

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - Data - U.S....  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

| 1998 | 1994 | 1991 | Archive Data Methodology & Forms + EXPAND ALL Consumption of Energy for All Purposes (First Use) Total First Use (formerly Primary Consumption) of Energy...

405

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Fact Sheet: Gas Prices and Oil Consumption Would Increase Without Biofuels Secretary of Energy Samuel W....

406

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

407

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Data: Total International Primary Energy Consumption

This table lists total primary energy consumption by country and region in Quadrillion Btu.  Figures in this table...

408

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy Consumption for Nonelectric Use by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 This dataset provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion Btu)...

409

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Residential Energy Consumption for Water Heating (2005) Provides total and average annual residential energy consumption for water heating in U.S. households in 2005, measured in...

410

Residential Energy Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumptio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption Survey Results: Total Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Intensities (2005)

411

Annual Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Electricity Consumption by Country (2005 - 2009) Total annual renewable electricity consumption by country, 2005 to 2009 (available in Billion Kilowatt-hours or as...

412

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historical Renewable Energy Consumption by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 1989-2008 Provides annual renewable energy consumption by source and end use between 1989 and 2008....

413

Natural Gas Consumption by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Consumption by Country (1980 - 2009) Total annual dry natural gas consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (available in Quadrillion Btu). Compiled by Energy Information...

414

Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit:...

415

Annual Electricity Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consumption (1980 - 2009) Total annual electricity consumption by country, 1980 to 2009 (billion kilowatthours). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA).
...

416

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options Title TV Energy Consumption Trends and Energy-Efficiency Improvement Options Publication Type Report LBNL...

417

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

418

South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (Million...

419

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

420

South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Residential Consumption...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Total Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)...

422

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

423

California Energy Commission - Natural Gas Consumption by Utility  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California Energy Commission - Natural Gas Consumption by Utility (1990-2009) California Energy Commission natural gas consumption data by Utility company for Commercial,...

424

Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State, 2009 The EIA dataset is a state by state comparison of natural gas production, transmission, and consumption for the...

425

Energy consumption of building 39; Energy consumption of building thirty-nine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT community has embarked on an initiative to the reduce energy consumption and in accordance with the Kyoto Protocol. This thesis seeks to further… (more)

Hopeman, Lisa Maria

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Video game console usage and national energy consumption: Results from a field-metering study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

console usage and national energy consumption: Results fromNational Energy Consumption .Discussion National Energy Consumption Under the assumption

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial). National Energy Consumption Estimates We usedsection entitled “National Energy Consumption Estimates”).section entitled “National Energy Consumption Estimates”).

Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Impact of 1980 scheduled capacity additions on electric-utility oil consumption  

SciTech Connect

The electric-utility sector currently consumes approximately 8% of the total oil used in the Nation. This oil represented about 15% of total fuel consumed by electric utilities in 1979. Two important factors that affect the level of utility oil consumption in 1980 are the substantial increase in coal-fired generating capacity and the uncertainty surrounding nuclear-plant licensing. With particular emphasis on these considerations, this report analyzes the potential for changes in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980 relative to the 1979 level. Plant conversions, oil to coal, for example, that may occur in 1980 are not considered in this analysis. Only the potential reduction in oil consumption resulting from new generating-capacity additions is analyzed. Changes in electric-utility oil consumption depend on, among other factors, regional-electricity-demand growth and generating-plant mix. Five cases are presented using various electricity-demand-growth rate assumptions, fuel-displacement strategies, and nuclear-plant-licensing assumptions. In general, it is likely that there will be a reduction in electric-utility oil consumption in 1980. Using the two reference cases of the report, this reduction is projected to amount to a 2 to 5% decrease from the 1979 oil-consumption level; 7% reduction is the largest reduction projected.

Gielecki, M.; Clark, G.; Roberts, B.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

System-level max power (SYMPO): a systematic approach for escalating system-level power consumption using synthetic benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively design a computer system for the worst case power consumption scenario, system architects often use hand-crafted maximum power consuming benchmarks at the assembly language level. These stressmarks, also called power viruses, are very ... Keywords: synthetic benchmark, system-level power virus, thermal design point

Karthik Ganesan; Jungho Jo; W. Lloyd Bircher; Dimitris Kaseridis; Zhibin Yu; Lizy K. John

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Approaches for Monitoring and Reduction of Energy Consumption in the Home  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By now, energy consumption in the home or even for single devices has not been monitored widely, except for billing and accounting reasons. Consumers are not able to track individual load profiles, therefore positive or negative trends in consumption were not noticed immediately. This work is based on the importance of direct feedback and its savings potential in terms of energy consumption: If you can’t measure it, you can’t improve it. We compare various monitoring approaches such as metering on device level, smart meters and non intrusive load monitoring of electrical devices. Furthermore, the In a world of highly developed countries and emerging economics, energy supply plays a major role. In a modern household, hardly any device runs without electricity. Load profiles are the overlay of a household’s energy demand. Consumers are not able to keep track of individual energy consumption. The basic idea of this work is: If you

Faculty Of Informatics; Tobias Hochwallner; Lukas Lang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jan 29, 2008 ... Fast Local Search for the Maximum Independent Set Problem. Diogo V. Andrade (diogo ***at*** google.com) Mauricio G. C. Resende (mgcr ...

432

THE MAXIMUM k-COLORABLE SUBGRAPH PROBLEM AND ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this paper is to investigate the polyhedral con- .... The resulting graph with a maximum (black,white,crossed)-colorable ...... Due to the ad-.

433

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Estimate of Maximum Underground Working Gas Storage Capacity in the United States: 2007 Update This report provides an update to an estimate for U.S. aggregate ...

434

Household energy consumption and expenditures 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report is the third in the series of reports presenting data from the 1987 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS). The 1987 RECS, seventh in a series of national surveys of households and their energy suppliers, provides baseline information on household energy use in the United States. Data from the seven RECS and its companion survey, the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey (RTECS), are made available to the public in published reports such as this one, and on public use data files. This report presents data for the four Census regions and nine Census divisions on the consumption of and expenditures for electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and kerosene (as a single category), and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). Data are also presented on consumption of wood at the Census region level. The emphasis in this report is on graphic depiction of the data. Data from previous RECS surveys are provided in the graphics, which indicate the regional trends in consumption, expenditures, and uses of energy. These graphs present data for the United States and each Census division. 12 figs., 71 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

435

Energy Consumption of Die Casting Operations  

SciTech Connect

Molten metal processing is inherently energy intensive and roughly 25% of the cost of die-cast products can be traced to some form of energy consumption [1]. The obvious major energy requirements are for melting and holding molten alloy in preparation for casting. The proper selection and maintenance of melting and holding equipment are clearly important factors in minimizing energy consumption in die-casting operations [2]. In addition to energy consumption, furnace selection also influences metal loss due to oxidation, metal quality, and maintenance requirements. Other important factors influencing energy consumption in a die-casting facility include geographic location, alloy(s) cast, starting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting form of alloy (solid or liquid), overall process flow, casting yield, scrap rate, cycle times, number of shifts per day, days of operation per month, type and size of die-casting machine, related equipment (robots, trim presses), and downstream processing (machining, plating, assembly, etc.). Each of these factors also may influence the casting quality and productivity of a die-casting enterprise. In a die-casting enterprise, decisions regarding these issues are made frequently and are based on a large number of factors. Therefore, it is not surprising that energy consumption can vary significantly from one die-casting enterprise to the next, and within a single enterprise as function of time.

Jerald Brevick; clark Mount-Campbell; Carroll Mobley

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 8A. District Heat Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Thousand Pounds (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 9,470 113.98 108.4 1.31 11.45 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ Q Q Q Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... Q Q Q Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 17,452 118.10 Q Q Q

437

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

438

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Fuel Oil Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million gallons) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 465 16,265 35 228 1,644 1,826 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 211 606 3 34 249 292 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 102 736 7 36 262 307 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 66 1,043 16 28 201 238 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 24 895 38 17 124 134 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 25 1,852 76 29 209 229

439

Purifying mixed-use electrical consumption data  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes several analytical techniques for obtaining pure end-use load information from mixed end-use consumption data. This process is frequently necessary to make metered data useful to those involved in electric utility load forecasting and conservation assessment. Analyses based on traditional thermal models can be greatly augmented by these data sets if the measured entities correspond to those for which modeled estimates are necessary. We present two scenarios in which greater end-use resolution was needed than was available in existing data. The first involves segregating measured total HVAC consumption data into its heating, cooling, and ventilation constituents. The second discusses a technique to separate measurements of mixed equipment consumption into equipment type categories. These techniques were successfully applied to a large number of metered commercial buildings. We conclude with suggestions for extending these techniques to applications involving high-time-resolution building total data. 3 refs., 8 figs.

Taylor, Z.T.; Pratt, R.G.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 7A. Total District Heat Consumption and Expenditures for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using District Heat District Heat Consumption District Heat Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 67 5,576 83 636 7,279 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q Q Q Q Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q Q Q Q Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 18 289 16 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 10 369 35 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8 574 70 Q Q 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 9 1,399 148 165 Q

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

International Energy Outlook 2001 - World Energy Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Consumption World Energy Consumption picture of a printer Printer Friendly Version (PDF) This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and issues related to electricity, transportation, and the environment. The International Energy Outlook 2001 (IEO2001) presents the Energy Information Administration (EIA) outlook for world energy markets to 2020. Current trends in world energy markets are discussed in this chapter, followed by a presentation of the IEO2001 projections for energy consumption by primary energy source and for carbon emissions by fossil fuel. Uncertainty in the forecast is highlighted by an examination of alternative assumptions about economic growth and their impacts on the

442

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 3A. Total Natural Gas Consumption and Expenditures in All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Using Natural Gas Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion cubic feet) Total (million dollars) All Buildings ................................ 2,538 48,473 19.1 2,100 2,037 16,010 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,134 3,175 2.8 257 249 2,227 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 531 3,969 7.5 224 218 1,830 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 500 7,824 15.6 353 343 2,897 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 185 6,604 35.8 278 270 2,054

443

US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mnt(N) CO Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US Mnt(N) CO Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US Mnt(N) CO Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Colorado households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Average household energy costs in Colorado are 23% less than the national average, primarily due to historically lower natural gas prices in the state. * Average electricity consumption per household is lower than most other states, as Colorado residents do not commonly use electricity for main space heating, air

444

Metropolitan functional specialization, transportation, and gasoline consumption  

SciTech Connect

This study examines metropolitan functional specialization relative to urban commuting patterns and per capita gasoline consumption in 55 Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas throughout the United States. Under the concept of sustenance organization in human ecology, social scientists have documented support for the importance of the key urban economic function for composition and distribution of population and firms in cities. However, sociological and ecological knowledge of the relationships of functional specialization, commuting, and transportation energy use is extremely limited. The present research utilizes the concept of function specialization and the framework of the ecological complex in developing relationships and models of personal daily urban travel patterns and gasoline use. The effort is made to examine human ecological factors in a physical approach to energy consumption. Relationships are tested using correlation matrices, regression analyses, and scatterplots where necessary. The findings indicate that the functional specialization of communities is significant in accounting for variance and patterns in their commuting travel and per capita gasoline consumption.

Hoffman, W.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

State Energy Data System Consumption Estimates Technical Notes  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

as street lighting and public services; and the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey covers only manufacturing establishments,

446

1997 Consumption and Expenditures-Data Tables RECS  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Residential Sector energy Intensities for 1978-1997 using data from EIA Residential Energy Consumption Survey.

447

Renewable energy consumption and economic efficiency: Evidence from European countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the relationship between renewable energy consumption and economic efficiency. For this reason

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Estimates of US biofuels consumption, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the sixth in the series of publications developed by the Energy Information Administration to quantify the amount of biofuel-derived primary energy used by the US economy. It provides preliminary estimates of 1990 US biofuels energy consumption by sector and by biofuels energy resource type. The objective of this report is to provide updated annual estimates of biofuels energy consumption for use by congress, federal and state agencies, and other groups involved in activities related to the use of biofuels. 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Performance Evaluation of Energy Consumption in MANETs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mobility of nodes in MANET may result in dynamic topology with high rate of link breakage and network partitions leading to interruption in communication and packet loss. Many routing protocols have been proposed in the literature with different characteristics and properties. The routing protocols suffer from various overheads causing energy loss which is further aggravated by link breaks. The present work concentrate on the energy consumption issues of routing protocols. We have evaluated the performance of DSDV, DSR and AODV routing protocols with respect to energy consumption indicating their usage of node’s energy.

Ashish Kumar; M. Q. Rafiq; Kamal Bansal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

State energy data report 1995 - consumption estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The State Energy Data Report (SEDR) provides annual time series estimates of State-level energy consumption by major economic sectors. The estimates are developed in the State Energy Data System (SEDS), which is maintained and operated by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The goal in maintaining SEDS exists for two principal reasons: (1) to provide State energy consumption estimates to Members of Congress, Federal and State agencies, and the general public, and (2) to provide the historical series necessary for EIA`s energy models.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Maximum a posteriori based kernel classifier trained by linear programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new approach for classification problem based on the maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimation. The necessary and sufficient condition for the cost function to estimate a posteriori probability was obtained. It was clarified by the condition ... Keywords: cost function, kernel function, linear programming, maximum a posteriori

Nopriadi Nopriadi; Yukihiko Yamashita

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Estimating Maximum Surface Winds from Hurricane Reconnaissance Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radial profiles of surface winds measured by the Stepped Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) are compared to radial profiles of flight-level winds to determine the slant ratio of the maximum surface wind speed to the maximum flight-level wind ...

Mark D. Powell; Eric W. Uhlhorn; Jeffrey D. Kepert

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Maximum likelihood estimation of Gaussian mixture models using stochastic search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaussian mixture models (GMM), commonly used in pattern recognition and machine learning, provide a flexible probabilistic model for the data. The conventional expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm for the maximum likelihood estimation of the parameters ... Keywords: Covariance parametrization, Expectation-maximization, Gaussian mixture models, Identifiability, Maximum likelihood estimation, Particle swarm optimization, Stochastic search

Ça?lar Ar?; Selim Aksoy; Orhan Ar?kan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSTRAINED MINIMUM ENTROPY AND MAXIMUM NEGENTROPY BLIND DECONVOLUTION AND EQUALIZATION Seungjin on the variance of decon­ volved signal. We also consider the maximum negen­ tropy principle and show that the CME version, without any prior knowledge (such as channel impulse response, training data). As the demand

Choi, Seungjin

455

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart VAMSI K. MOOTHA, ANDREW E. ARAI, AND ROBERT S. BALABAN Laboratory of Cardiac Energetics, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National. Maximum oxidative phosphorylation capacity of the mammalian heart. Am. J. Physiol. 272 (Heart Circ

Mootha, Vamsi K.

456

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Title Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential and Commercial Building Stock Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-60146 Year of Publication 2006 Authors Apte, Joshua S., and Dariush K. Arasteh Call Number LBNL-60146 Abstract We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

457

Credit Constraints, Learning and Aggregate Consumption Volatility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper documents three empirical facts. First, consumption volatility relative to income volatility rose from 1947-1960 and then fell dramatically by 75 percent from the 1960s to the 1990s. Second, the correlation between consumption growth and personal income growth fell by about 75 percent over the same time period. Finally, absolute deviations of consumption changes from their mean exhibit two breaks in U.S. data, and the mean size of the absolute deviations has again fallen by about 75 percent. First, I find that a standard benchmark permanent income hypothesis model is unable to explain these facts. Then, I examine the ability of two hypotheses: a fall in credit constraints and changing beliefs about the permanence of income shocks to explain these facts. I find evidence for both explanations and find that these facts can be almost completely explained by a model with learning about the nature of income shocks and a reduction in credit constraints. Importantly, I find that estimated changes in beliefs about the permanence of income shocks have substantial explanatory power for consumption changes.

Daniel L. Tortorice

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Comfort, Indoor Air Quality, and Energy Consumption in Low Energy Homes  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of an in-depth evaluation of energy consumption and thermal comfort for two potential net zero-energy homes (NZEHs) in Massachusetts, as well as an indoor air quality (IAQ) evaluation performed in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL).

Engelmann, P.; Roth, K.; Tiefenbeck, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Trends of Maximum and Minimum Temperatures in Northern South America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of testing the homogeneity of the basic data used in this study, that is, the mean monthly maximum and minimum temperature (as derived from daily observations) of several long-term climatological stations of ...

Ramon A. Quintana-Gomez

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A maximum likelihood approach towards aggregating partial orders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many of the possible applications as well as the theoretical models of computational social choice, the agents' preferences are represented as partial orders. In this paper, we extend the maximum likelihood approach for defining "optimal" voting rules ...

Lirong Xia; Vincent Conitzer

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Synoptic Reorganization of Atmospheric Flow during the Last Glacial Maximum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled global atmosphere–ocean model of intermediate complexity is used to study the influence of glacial boundary conditions on the atmospheric circulation during the Last Glacial Maximum in a systematical manner. A web of atmospheric ...

Flávio Justino; Axel Timmermann; Ute Merkel; Enio P. Souza

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

On Determinations of Maximum Hailstone Sizes from Hallpad Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reports of hailstones larger than those indicated by hailpad observations being found on the ground around the hailpad sites raise questions about the validity of maximum-size determinations. Data from the Grossversuch IV hailpad network ...

Paul L. Smith; Albert Waldvogel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Characteristics of Maximum Concentrations from Multiple Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple quasi-Newton numerical scheme is applied to determine the hypothetical worst-case meteorology that will result in the maximum combined concentrations at any receptor location in air quality modeling over short distances for multiple ...

N. M. Zoumakis

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Effects of Tides on Maximum Tsunami Wave Heights: Probability Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical study was carried out to understand how the probability distribution for maximum wave heights (?m) during tsunamis depends on the initial tsunami amplitude (A) and the tides. It was assumed that the total wave height is the linear ...

Harold O. Mofjeld; Frank I. González; Vasily V. Titov; Angie J. Venturato; Jean C. Newman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Normalized Maximum-Likelihood Estimators of the Directional Wave Spectrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new family of data-adaptative directional wave spectrum estimators is proposed. These estimators may be considered as an improvement over the well-known extended maximum-likelihood method (EMLM). The normalization is based on the idea of ...

M. A. Arribas; J. J. Egozcue

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Maximum likelihood sequence estimation from the lattice viewpoint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considers the problem of data detection in multilevel lattice-type modulation systems in the presence of intersymbol interference and additive white Gaussian noise. The conventional maximum likelihood sequence estimator using the Viterbi algorithm has ...

Wai Ho Mow

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Humidity Profile Retrieval Using a Maximum Entropy Principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite data inversion method based on a maximum entropy principle is presented. The method is both physical since a radiative transfer model with its adjoint is needed, and also statistical since errors of the observed radiances and of a ...

Bernard Urban

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Maximum Likelihood Estimation Using Parallel Computing: An Introduction to MPI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The computational difficulty of econometric problems has increased dramatically in recent years as econometricians examine more complicated models and utilize more sophisticated estimation techniques. Many problems in econometrics are `embarrassingly ... Keywords: MPI, maximum likelihood estimation, parallel computing, parallel programming

Christopher A. Swann

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Maximum containment : the most controversial labs in the world  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 2002, following the September 11th attacks and the anthrax letters, the United States allocated money to build two maximum containment biology labs. Called Biosafety Level 4 (BSL-4) facilities, these labs were built to ...

Bruzek, Alison K. (Allison Kim)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Computing maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider computing a maximum non-crossing matching in convex bipartite graphs. For a convex bipartite graph of n vertices and m edges, we present an O (n logn ...

Danny Z. Chen; Xiaomin Liu; Haitao Wang

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Consumption risk and the cross section of expected returns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the central insight of the consumption capital asset pricing model that an asset’s expected return is determined by its equilibrium risk to consumption. Rather than measure risk by the contemporaneous covariance of an asset’s return and consumption growth, we measure risk by the covariance of an asset’s return and consumption growth cumulated over many quarters following the return. While contemporaneous consumption risk explains little of the variation in average returns across the 25 Fama-French portfolios, our measure of ultimate consumption risk at a horizon of three years explains a large fraction of this variation. I.

Jonathan A. Parker; Christian Julliard; John Cochrane; Kent Daniel; Albina Danilova; Pierre-olivier Gourinchas; Sydney Ludvigson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Aerobic composting of waste activated sludge: Kinetic analysis for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption  

SciTech Connect

In order to examine the optimal design and operating parameters, kinetics for microbiological reaction and oxygen consumption in composting of waste activated sludge were quantitatively examined. A series of experiments was conducted to discuss the optimal operating parameters for aerobic composting of waste activated sludge obtained from Kawagoe City Wastewater Treatment Plant (Saitama, Japan) using 4 and 20 L laboratory scale bioreactors. Aeration rate, compositions of compost mixture and height of compost pile were investigated as main design and operating parameters. The optimal aerobic composting of waste activated sludge was found at the aeration rate of 2.0 L/min/kg (initial composting mixture dry weight). A compost pile up to 0.5 m could be operated effectively. A simple model for composting of waste activated sludge in a composting reactor was developed by assuming that a solid phase of compost mixture is well mixed and the kinetics for microbiological reaction is represented by a Monod-type equation. The model predictions could fit the experimental data for decomposition of waste activated sludge with an average deviation of 2.14%. Oxygen consumption during composting was also examined using a simplified model in which the oxygen consumption was represented by a Monod-type equation and the axial distribution of oxygen concentration in the composting pile was described by a plug-flow model. The predictions could satisfactorily simulate the experiment results for the average maximum oxygen consumption rate during aerobic composting with an average deviation of 7.4%.

Yamada, Y. [Research Center for Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan); Kawase, Y. [Research Center for Biochemical and Environmental Engineering, Department of Applied Chemistry, Toyo University, Kawagoe, Saitama, 350-8585 (Japan)]. E-mail: bckawase@mail.eng.toyo.ac.jp

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

New York State annual energy review: energy consumption, supply and price statistics, 1960-1981  

SciTech Connect

Since 1960, annual natural gas consumption in New York State rose from 419 billion CF to 762 billion in 1981, supplying 21% of the state's primary energy. Although total energy consumption peaked in 1973 and 4281.5 trillion Btu, gas usage dropped after 1972 and then rose steadily to a maximum of 782 trillion Btu in 1981. Statistics show that (1) residential gas consumption peaked in 1972 and declined 0.9%/yr thereafter, (2) commercial gas usage was the highest ever in 1981, (3) industrial sales also peaked in 1981, and (4) after a 1978 low of 1.3 trillion Btu of gas usage for power generation, utility consumption rose to 135.2 trillion Btu by 1981, reflecting efforts to cut oil usage. New York consumers spent $734 million on gas in 1970 and $3105 million in 1981. Of the natural gas consumed, only 2.5% was produced in New York; 51% came from fields offshore Louisiana.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table C13. Total Electricity Consumption and Expenditures for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Using Electricity Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Primary Site Total (million dollars) Total (trillion Btu) Total (trillion Btu) Total (billion kWh) All Buildings* ............................... 4,404 63,307 14.4 9,168 3,037 890 69,032 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,384 6,346 2.7 1,164 386 113 10,348 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 834 6,197 7.4 790 262 77 7,296 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 727 11,370 15.6 1,229 407 119 10,001

476

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

477

Estimation of 1945 to 1957 food consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details the methods used and the results of the study on the estimated historic levels of food consumption by individuals in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) study area from 1945--1957. This period includes the time of highest releases from Hanford and is the period for which data are being collected in the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study. These estimates provide the food-consumption inputs for the HEDR database of individual diets. This database will be an input file in the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Code (HEDRIC) computer model that will be used to calculate the radiation dose. The report focuses on fresh milk, eggs, lettuce, and spinach. These foods were chosen because they have been found to be significant contributors to radiation dose based on the Technical Steering Panel dose decision level.

Anderson, D.M.; Bates, D.J.; Marsh, T.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Measuring energy consumption of a database cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Energy consumption of database servers is a growing concern for companies as it is a critical part of a data center’s cost. To address the rising cost and the waste of energy, a new paradigm called GreenIT arose. Hardware and software developers are aiming at more energy-efficient systems. To improve the energy footprint of database servers, we developed a cluster of small-scale nodes, that can be dynamically powered dependent on the workload. This demo shows the measurement framework we set up to measure hardware components as well as an entire cluster of nodes. We’ll exhibit the measurement devices for components and servers and show the system’s behavior under varying workloads. Attendees will be able to adjust workloads and experience their impact on energy consumption. 1

Volker Hudlet; Daniel Schall; Ag Dbis; Tu Kaiserslautern

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Electricity Demand and Energy Consumption Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project describes the electricity demand and energy consumption management system and its application to the Smelter Plant of Southern Peru. It is composted of an hourly demand-forecasting module and of a simulation component for a plant electrical system. The first module was done using dynamic neural networks, with backpropagation training algorithm; it is used to predict the electric power demanded every hour, with an error percentage below of 1%. This information allows management the peak demand before this happen, distributing the raise of electric load to other hours or improving those equipments that increase the demand. The simulation module is based in advanced estimation techniques, such as: parametric estimation, neural network modeling, statistic regression and previously developed models, which simulates the electric behavior of the smelter plant. These modules allow the proper planning because it allows knowing the behavior of the hourly demand and the consumption patterns of the plant, in...

Sarmiento, Juan Ojeda

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Estimating the Observed Atmospheric Response to SST Anomalies: Maximum Covariance Analysis, Generalized Equilibrium Feedback Assessment, and Maximum Response Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three multivariate statistical methods to estimate the influence of SST or boundary forcing on the atmosphere are discussed. Lagged maximum covariance analysis (MCA) maximizes the covariance between the atmosphere and prior SST, thus favoring ...

Claude Frankignoul; Nadine Chouaib; Zhengyu Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum consumption potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy consumption in the pipeline industry  

SciTech Connect

Estimates are developed of the energy consumption and energy intensity (EI) of five categories of U.S. pipeline industries: natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, coal slurry, and water. For comparability with other transportation modes, it is desirable to calculate EI in Btu/Ton-Mile, and this is done, although the necessary unit conversions introduce additional uncertainties. Since water and sewer lines operate by lift and gravity, a comparable EI is not definable.

Banks, W. F.

1977-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

482

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

483

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Fuel Oil Consumption Fuel Oil Expenditures per Building (gallons) per Square Foot (gallons) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per Gallon (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 3,533 0.10 3.9 0.11 1.11 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 1,177 0.41 1.4 0.48 1.18 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 2,573 0.36 3.0 0.42 1.17 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 3,045 0.19 3.6 0.23 1.18 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 5,184 0.14 5.6 0.15 1.09 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 8,508 0.11 9.3 0.12 1.10 100,001 to 200,000 ........................ 12,639 0.09 13.1 0.09 1.03

484

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific West South Central Moun- tain Pacific All Buildings ................................ 141 68 117 8,634 4,165 8,376 16.3 16.3 14.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 17 7 12 696 439 857 24.1 15.7 14.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 12 5 15 865 451 868 13.8 12.1 17.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 16 12 16 1,493 933 1,405 11.0 13.0 11.5

485

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ................................ 162 538 343 17,509 32,945 19,727 9.2 16.3 17.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 24 54 38 2,072 2,767 1,640 11.4 19.4 23.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 16 41 29 1,919 3,154 1,572 8.2 13.0 18.4 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 28 69 45 3,201 5,610 3,683 8.7 12.3 12.2

486

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) Distribution of Building-Level Intensities (kWh/square foot) 25th Per- centile Median 75th Per- centile per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) All Buildings ................................ 226 14.9 3.8 8.8 18.1 17.9 1.18 0.079 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 48 17.8 3.8 9.0 20.0 4.4 1.63 0.092 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 96 12.9 4.0 8.2 15.5 9.2 1.23 0.096 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 178 11.4 3.1 7.2 15.0 15.2 0.97 0.086

487

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 2A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings ............................... 580 986 471 12,407 22,762 13,304 46.8 43.3 35.4 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................... 86 103 61 1,245 1,271 659 69.0 81.0 92.1 5,001 to 10,000 ............................. 57 101 60 1,154 1,932 883 49.4 52.3 67.6 10,001 to 25,000 ........................... 105 174 65 2,452 3,390 1,982 42.6 51.2 32.7

488

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 41 131 168 3,430 10,469 12,202 12.0 12.5 13.8 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 5 9 20 369 662 921 12.9 13.9 21.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 3 8 9 360 768 877 8.4 10.4 10.8 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 16 24 674 1,420 2,113 Q 11.6 11.2

489

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 5A. Fuel Oil Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Fuel Oil Consumption (million gallons) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Fuel Oil (million square feet) Fuel Oil Energy Intensity (gallons/square foot) North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West North- east Mid- west South West All Buildings .............................. 1,302 172 107 64 6,464 2,909 4,663 2,230 0.20 0.06 0.02 Q Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 10,000 ............................ 381 Q Q Q 763 Q 274 Q 0.50 Q 0.10 Q 10,001 to 100,000 ........................ 404 63 Q Q 1,806 648 985 351 0.22 0.10 Q Q Over 100,000 ............................... 517 21 45 Q 3,894 2,055 3,404 1,780 0.13 0.01 0.01 Q

490

US MidAtl NY Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MidAtl NY MidAtl NY Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl NY Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl NY Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * New York households consume an average of 103 million Btu per year, 15% more than the U.S. average. * Electricity consumption in New York homes is much lower than the U.S. average, because many households use other fuels for major energy end uses like space heating, water heating, and cooking. Electricity costs are closer to the national average due to higher than average electricity prices in the state.

491

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 C3A. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 14.7 6,523 1,342 91.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 2.7 685 265 99.0 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 7.4 563 594 80.0 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 15.6 899 1,110 71.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 36.0 742 2,843 79.0

492

US MidAtl PA Site Consumption  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MidAtl PA MidAtl PA Site Consumption million Btu $0 $500 $1,000 $1,500 $2,000 $2,500 $3,000 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ALL ENERGY average per household (excl. transportation) 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 US MidAtl PA Site Consumption kilowatthours $0 $250 $500 $750 $1,000 $1,250 $1,500 US MidAtl PA Expenditures dollars ELECTRICITY ONLY average per household * Pennsylvania households consume an average of 96 million Btu per year, 8% more than the U.S. average. Pennsylvania residents also spend 16% more than the average U.S. households for energy consumed in their homes. * Average electricity consumption in Pennsylvania homes is 10,402 kWh per year, which is lower than the national average, but 58% more than New York households and 17% more than New Jersey residents.

493

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 C3. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 All Buildings* Sum of Major Fuel Consumption Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Floorspace per Building (thousand square feet) Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) per Worker (million Btu) All Buildings* ............................... 4,645 64,783 13.9 5,820 1,253 89.8 79.9 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,552 6,789 2.7 672 263 98.9 67.6 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 889 6,585 7.4 516 580 78.3 68.7 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 738 11,535 15.6 776 1,052 67.3 72.0 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 241 8,668 35.9 673 2,790 77.6 75.8

494

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 7A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central New England Middle Atlantic East North Central All Buildings ................................ 85 364 550 1,861 8,301 10,356 45.4 43.8 53.1 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ Q 42 69 Q 427 741 Q 98.4 92.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. Q 32 49 Q 518 743 Q 62.1 65.5 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ Q 47 102 Q 952 1,860 Q 49.7 54.6

495

Minneapolis residential energy consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report deals with residential energy consumption in single - family, townhouse, low - rise, and high - rise structures in Minnapolis, Minn., with the year 1957 chosen as a typical weather year for the area. Design and structural features considered important in defining the residences were structural parameters (construction details, dimensions, and materials), energy consumption parameters (heating and cooling equipment, types of fuels and energy used, and appliances and their energy consumption levels), and lifestyle parameters (thermostat set points, relative humidity set points, type and number of appliances, daily profile of appliance use, and use of ventilation fans). Annual heating and cooling loads and resultant energy requirements were calculated using a time - response computer program. This program included subroutines for determining hourly load contributions throughout the year due to conduction, convection, air infiltration, radiation, and internal heat gain. The heating load was significantly higher than the cooling load for single - family and townhouse residences, as would be expected for the cold Minneapolis climate. Due to increased internal heat generation, low - rise and high - rise cooling and heating loads were similar in magnitude. Energy - conserving modifications involving both structural and comfort control system changes resulted in the following: single - family residences consumed 47 percent, townhouse residences consumed 52 percent, low - rise residences consumed 53 percent, and high - rise residences consumed 34 percent of the primary energy required by the characteristic residence. Supporting data, layouts of the residences, and references are included.

Reed, J.E.; Barber, J.E.; White, B.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 8A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central West North Central South Atlantic East South Central All Buildings ................................ 178 238 104 3,788 7,286 2,521 47.0 32.7 41.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 23 27 11 346 360 218 66.6 75.8 51.9 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 14 36 Q 321 662 Q 45.1 53.8 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 31 33 Q 796 1,102 604 39.5 29.9 Q

497

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 1A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square feet) Electricity Energy Intensity (kWh/square foot) 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet 1,001 to 10,000 Square Feet 10,001 to 100,000 Square Feet Over 100,000 Square Feet All Buildings ................................ 201 412 431 13,124 31,858 25,200 15.3 12.9 17.1 Principal Building Activity Education ....................................... 9 55 45 806 5,378 3,687 11.1 10.2 12.2 Food Sales ..................................... 36 24 Q 747 467 Q 48.8 51.1 Q

498

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 . Consumption and Gross Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Sum of Major Fuels for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Sum of Major Fuel Consumption (trillion Btu) Total Floorspace of Buildings (million square feet) Energy Intensity for Sum of Major Fuels (thousand Btu/square foot) 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 1959 or Before 1960 to 1989 1990 to 2003 All Buildings* ............................. 1,488 2,794 1,539 17,685 29,205 17,893 84.1 95.7 86.0 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................. 191 290 190 2,146 2,805 1,838 89.1 103.5 103.5 5,001 to 10,000 ............................ 131 231 154 1,972 2,917 1,696 66.2 79.2 91.0 10,001 to 25,000 .......................... 235 351 191 3,213 4,976 3,346 73.1 70.5 57.0

499

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 0A. Natural Gas Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Natural Gas Consumption (billion cubic feet) Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Natural Gas (million square feet) Natural Gas Energy Intensity (cubic feet/square foot) Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 Zone 1 Zone 2 Zone 3 Zone 4 Zone 5 All Buildings .............................. 454 715 356 378 134 8,486 14,122 8,970 11,796 5,098 53.5 50.6 39.7 32.0 26.3 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ............................. 57 84 35 58 16 666 1,015 427 832 234 84.8 83.1 81.9 69.6 66.6 5,001 to 10,000 ........................... 50 57 33 61 17 666 1,030 639 1,243 392 75.2 54.9 51.2 49.2 44.0

500

Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption Survey-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for All Buildings, 2003 All Buildings Total Energy Consumption (trillion Btu) Number of Buildings (thousand) Floorspace (million square feet) Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat Primary Site All Buildings ................................ 4,859 71,658 6,523 10,746 3,559 2,100 228 636 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................ 2,586 6,922 685 1,185 392 257 34 Q 5,001 to 10,000 .............................. 948 7,033 563 883 293 224 36 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................ 810 12,659 899 1,464 485 353 28 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................ 261 9,382 742 1,199 397 278 17 Q 50,001 to 100,000 .......................... 147 10,291 913 1,579 523 277 29 Q