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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Ways of improving efficiency of turbine stages having high blade height to mean diameter ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose an approximate method for profiling the blades of steam-turbine last stages with a high height to ... variable slope along the height that allows better efficiency of the turbine unit to be obtained.

G. A. Filippov; A. R. Avetisyan

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 0.6 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.2 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.5 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 0.4 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Small Flume + 0.2 + Alden Wave Basin + 0.3 + B Breakwater Research Facility + 0.0 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 0.6 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 0.6 +

3

Property:Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 2 2-ft Flume Facility + 10.0 + 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + 10.0 + A Alden Large Flume + 0.0 + Alden Wave Basin + 1.0 + C Chase Tow Tank + 3.1 + Coastal Harbors Modeling Facility + 2.3 + Coastal Inlet Model Facility + 2.3 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 4.0 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 3.0 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 3.0 +

4

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk. 6 figures.

Boyd, G.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ceramic blade attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A retainer ring is arranged to mount turbine blades to a turbine disk so that aerodynamic forces produced by a gas turbine engine are transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk to cause the turbine blades and turbine disk to rotate, but so that centrifugal forces of the turbine blades resulting from the rotation of the turbine blades and turbine disk are not transferred from the turbine blades to the turbine disk.

Boyd, Gary L. (Alpine, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Space variations in axis height of the jet stream core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

height of the jet axis relative to the height of the jet maximum for slow vs. fast cases. 13 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height at the trough. 13 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height at the ridge. 15 Mean height... of the jet axis relative to the height at the jet maximum, when the maximum is near a trough. 15 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height at the minimum, when the minimum is near a ridge. 17 Mean height of the jet axis relative to the height...

Leutwyler, Cooke Hearon

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Wind Turbine Blade Design  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Blade engineering and design is one of the most complicated and important aspects of modern wind turbine technology. Engineers strive to design blades that extract as much energy from the wind as possible throughout a range of wind speeds and gusts, yet are still durable, quiet and cheap. A variety of ideas for building turbines and teacher handouts are included in this document and at the Web site.

8

PowerBlades GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PowerBlades GmbH PowerBlades GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name PowerBlades GmbH Place Lemwerder, Hamburg, Germany Zip 27809 Sector Wind energy Product Developement and production of in-house offshore rotor blades for wind energy turbines. Coordinates 53.160455°, 8.61374° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.160455,"lon":8.61374,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

9

Huayi Wind Blade Research Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huayi Wind Blade Research Center Huayi Wind Blade Research Center Jump to: navigation, search Name Huayi Wind Blade Research Center Place Baoding, Hebei Province, China Zip 71051 Sector Wind energy Product China's first research center for wind turbine blade. Coordinates 38.855011°, 115.480217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.855011,"lon":115.480217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

10

Cooled snubber structure for turbine blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine blade assembly in a turbine engine. The turbine blade assembly includes a turbine blade and a first snubber structure. The turbine blade includes an internal cooling passage containing cooling air. The first snubber structure extends outwardly from a sidewall of the turbine blade and includes a hollow interior portion that receives cooling air from the internal cooling passage of the turbine blade.

Mayer, Clinton A; Campbell, Christian X; Whalley, Andrew; Marra, John J

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Structural efficiency of a wind turbine blade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Alternative structural layouts for wind turbine blades are investigated with the aim of improving their design, minimizing weight and reducing the cost of wind energy. New concepts were identified using topology optimization techniques on a 45m wind turbine blade. Additionally, non-dimensional structural shape factors were developed for non-symmetric sections under biaxial bending to evaluate structural concepts in terms of ability to maximize stiffness and minimize stress. The topology optimization evolves a structure which transforms along the length of the blade, changing from a design with spar caps at the maximum thickness and a trailing edge mass, to a design with offset spar caps toward the tip. The shape factors indicate that the trailing edge reinforcement and the offset spar cap topology are both more efficient at maximizing stiffness and minimizing stress. In summary, an alternative structural layout for a wind turbine blade has been found and structural shape factors have been developed, which can quantitatively assess the structural efficiency under asymmetric bending.

Neil Buckney; Alberto Pirrera; Steven D. Green; Paul M. Weaver

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Wootz Damascus steel blades  

SciTech Connect

Wootz Damascus steel blades contain surface patterns produced by bands of cementite particles which are generated in situ as the blades are forged from small ingots. A process for making these blades has recently been developed which involves making ingots in a gas-fired furnace followed by forging to blade shapes. This study presents a series of additional experiments which provide strong evidence that the mechanism responsible for the formation of the aligned cementite bands is similar to the mechanism that produces banded hypoeutectoid steels. That mechanism attributes the selective formation of ferrite bands to microsegregated alloying elements. The results of this study show that the cementite bands will form in ultraclean hypereutectoid steels (P and S levels <0.003 wt. %) by the addition of small amounts of carbide-forming elements V, Cr, and Ti at a combined level of <0.02 wt. %. The results present strong evidence that the cementite bands are formed by a selective coarsening of cementite particles during the thermal cycling of the forging process. The particle coarsening is induced to occur preferentially in the interdendritic regions of the alloys by the very small additions of the carbide-forming elements.

Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D. [Ames Lab., IA (United States)] [Ames Lab., IA (United States); Pendray, A.H. [ABS Master Bladesmith, Williston, FL (United States)] [ABS Master Bladesmith, Williston, FL (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Sinomatech Wind Power Blade (aka Sinoma Science & Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd) Place Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China Zip 210012 Sector Wind energy Product Jiangsu-based wind turbine blade manufactuer. Coordinates 32.0485°, 118.778969° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.0485,"lon":118.778969,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

14

Ceramic blade with tip seal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present gas turbine engine includes a disc assembly defining a disc having a plurality of blades attached thereto. The disc has a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the plurality of blades have a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the disc. A shroud assembly is attached to the gas turbine engine and is spaced from the plurality of blades a preestablished distance forming an interface there between. Positioned in the interface is a seal having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being generally equal to the rate of thermal expansion of the plurality of blades. 4 figs.

Glezer, B.; Bhardwaj, N.K.; Jones, R.B.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

15

Wind tunnel experiments of a newly developed two-bladed Savonius-style wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wind tunnel experiments have been conducted with a newly developed two-bladed Savonius-style wind turbine specifically meant for a small-scale energy conversion. This novel shape of the turbine blade is evolved from a series of experiments with different types of blades in the recent past. The developed two-bladed turbine is tested in an open type test section and its performance is assessed in terms of power and torque coefficients. Experiments have also been conducted with other standard blades such as semi-circular, semi-elliptic, Benesh and Bach types in order to have a direct comparison. In this study, all the reported experimental data are inclusive of wind tunnel blockage corrections. Further, the effects of Reynolds number on the dynamic and static characteristics are also discussed. The present investigation demonstrates a gain of 34.8% in maximum power coefficient with the newly developed two-bladed turbine.

Sukanta Roy; Ujjwal K. Saha

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Sandia National Laboratories: Radar Friendly Blades  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MitigationRadar Friendly Blades Radar Friendly Blades Some wind farms have the potential to cause interference with the normal operation of radar systems used for security, weather...

17

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity Advanced Manufacturing Initiative Improves Turbine Blade Productivity May 20, 2011 - 2:56pm Addthis This is an...

18

Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; height, length and width. Unified fracture design (UFD) offers a method to determine the fracture dimensions providing the maximum productivity index for a specific proppant amount. Then, in order to achieve the maximum productivity index, the treatment...

Pitakbunkate, Termpan

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test  

SciTech Connect

The Optical Blade Position Tracking System Test measures the blade deflection along the span of the blade using simple off-the-shelf infrared security cameras along with blade-mounted retro-reflective tape and video image processing hardware and software to obtain these measurements.

Fingersh, L. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Three-dimensional Numerical Analysis on Blade Response of Vertical Axis Tidal Current Turbine Under Operational Condition  

SciTech Connect

Tidal power as a large-scale renewable source of energy has been receiving significant attention recently because of its advantages over the wind and other renewal energy sources. The technology used to harvest energy from tidal current is called a tidal current turbine. Though some of the principles of wind turbine design are applicable to tidal current turbines, the design of latter ones need additional considerations like cavitation damage, corrosion etc. for the long-term reliability of such turbines. Depending up on the orientation of axis, tidal current turbines can be classified as vertical axis turbines or horizontal axis turbines. Existing studies on the vertical axis tidal current turbine focus more on the hydrodynamic aspects of the turbine rather than the structural aspects. This paper summarizes our recent efforts to study the integrated hydrodynamic and structural aspects of the vertical axis tidal current turbines. After reviewing existing methods in modeling tidal current turbines, we developed a hybrid approach that combines discrete vortex method -finite element method that can simulate the integrated hydrodynamic and structural response of a vertical axis turbine. This hybrid method was initially employed to analyze a typical three-blade vertical axis turbine. The power coefficient was used to evaluate the hydrodynamic performance, and critical deflection was considered to evaluate the structural reliability. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted with various turbine height-to-radius ratios. The results indicate that both the power output and failure probability increase with the turbine height, suggesting a necessity for optimal design. An attempt to optimize a 3-blade vertical axis turbine design with hybrid method yielded a ratio of turbine height to radius (H/R) about 3.0 for reliable maximum power output.

Li, Ye; Karri, Naveen K.; Wang, Qi

2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Wuxi Bamboo Wind Turbine Blade Technology Co Ltd Place Wuxi, Jiangsu Province, China Sector Wind energy Product Chinese wind turbine blade manufacturer. Coordinates 31.574011°, 120.288223° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.574011,"lon":120.288223,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

Blade Testing at NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presentation of Blade Testing at NREL's National Wind Technology Center for the 2010 Sandia National Laboratories Blade Testing Workshop.

Hughes, S.

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Driver eye height measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was establish d in the early sixties when passenger vehicles were styled differentl; than tnda; . The changing design of passenger cars has resulted in a considerable lowering in the eye heights of drivers between 1960 and 1978. The objective of this ress rch... was to determine sI. atistically reliable measures of current driver eye height for different classes of vehicles and to determine the impact of these dat- on design and operating standards for streets and highways. It was found that 68 percent of drivers...

Abrahamson, Anthony Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Turbine blade tip gap reduction system  

SciTech Connect

A turbine blade sealing system for reducing a gap between a tip of a turbine blade and a stationary shroud of a turbine engine. The sealing system includes a plurality of flexible seal strips extending from a pressure side of a turbine blade generally orthogonal to the turbine blade. During operation of the turbine engine, the flexible seal strips flex radially outward extending towards the stationary shroud of the turbine engine, thereby reducing the leakage of air past the turbine blades and increasing the efficiency of the turbine engine.

Diakunchak, Ihor S.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

25

Articulated limiter blade for a tokamak fusion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A limiter blade for a large tokomak fusion reactor includes three articulated blade sections for enabling the limiter blade to be adjusted for plasmas of different sizes. Each blade section is formed of a rigid backing plate carrying graphite tiles coated with titanium carbide, and the limiter blade forms a generally elliptic contour in both the poloidal and toroidal directions to uniformly distribute the heat flow to the blade. The limiter blade includes a central blade section movable along the major radius of the vacuum vessel, and upper and lower pivotal blade sections which may be pivoted by linear actuators having rollers held to the back surface of the pivotal blade sections.

Doll, D.W.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cost Study for Large Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

The cost study for large wind turbine blades reviewed three blades of 30 meters, 50 meters, and 70 meters in length. Blade extreme wind design loads were estimated in accordance with IEC Class I recommendations. Structural analyses of three blade sizes were performed at representative spanwise stations assuming a stressed shell design approach and E-glass/vinylester laminate. A bill of materials was prepared for each of the three blade sizes using the laminate requirements prepared during the structural analysis effort. The labor requirements were prepared for twelve major manufacturing tasks. TPI Composites developed a conceptual design of the manufacturing facility for each of the three blade sizes, which was used for determining the cost of labor and overhead (capital equipment and facilities). Each of the three potential manufacturing facilities was sized to provide a constant annual rated power production (MW per year) of the blades it produced. The cost of the production tooling and overland transportation was also estimated. The results indicate that as blades get larger, materials become a greater proportion of total cost, while the percentage of labor cost is decreased. Transportation costs decreased as a percentage of total cost. The study also suggests that blade cost reduction efforts should focus on reducing material cost and lowering manufacturing labor, because cost reductions in those areas will have the strongest impact on overall blade cost.

ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Aeroelastic simulation of wind turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this chapter is to compute dynamic stresses acting on wind turbine blades. These stresses are essential in predicting fatigue of the rotor.

Z.L. Mahri; M.S. Rouabah; Z. Said

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Algorithms for processing ultrasonic echo data for height control systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimation was affected by the value of the weighting factor (M) in equation (1). The accuracy of this stubble height estimation was evaluated by using the Student's t test technique. ESTH(n) = AVS(n) ? AVG(n) (3) Computer program: A FORTRAN program... YES IS HTs'P READ AVS & AVG, STALK AND GROUND AVERAGES r---- RAISE BLADES t, READ THD OR THH & THL, SINGLE THRESHOLD OR GET NEW SAMPLE ECHO ECHO DISCRIMINATION GROUND STALK OR GROUND ? STALK AVS ~AVS + Y(I)-AVS n n-I AVG =AVG Y...

Lin, Reng Rong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

29

Adaptor assembly for coupling turbine blades to rotor disks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An adaptor assembly for coupling a blade root of a turbine blade to a root slot of a rotor disk is described. The adaptor assembly includes a turbine blade having a blade root and an adaptor body having an adaptor root. The adaptor body defines a slot having an open end configured to receive the blade root of the turbine blade such that the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are adjacent to one another when the blade root of the turbine blade is positioned within the slot. Both the adaptor root of the adaptor body and the blade root of the turbine blade are configured to be received within the root slot of the rotor disk.

Garcia-Crespo, Andres Jose; Delvaux, John McConnell

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sandia National Laboratories: New Wind Turbine Blade Design  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ClimateECEnergyNew Wind Turbine Blade Design New Wind Turbine Blade Design More Energy with Less Weight ATLAS II Data Acquisition System New Wind Turbine Blade Design On May 18,...

31

Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Sinomatech Wind Power Blade aka Sinoma Science Technology Wind Turbine Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinomatech...

32

The use of carbon fibers in wind turbine blade design: A SERI-8 blade example  

SciTech Connect

The benefit of introducing carbon fibers in a wind turbine blade was evaluated. The SERI-8 wind turbine blade was used as a baseline for study. A model of the blade strength and stiffness properties was created using the 3D-Beam code; the predicted geometry and structural properties were validated against available data and static test results. Different enhanced models, which represent different volumes of carbon fibers in the blade, were also studied for two design options: with and without bend-twist coupling. Studies indicate that hybrid blades have excellent structural properties compared to the all-glass SERI-8 blade. Recurring fabrication costs were also included in the study. The cost study highlights the importance of the labor-cost to material-cost ratio in the cost benefits and penalties of fabrication of a hybrid glass and carbon blade.

ONG,CHENG-HUAT; TSAI,STEPHEN W.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: The height distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The height distribution of tropical convective clouds The height distribution of tropical convective clouds May, Peter Bureau or Meteorology Research Centre The maximum height that towering convection reaches in the tropics has been studied using operational radar data from Northern Australia as well as cloud radar (MMCR) and polarimetric radar operating in a vertical cloud mode. This analysis was partly driven by the suggestion of Johnson et al (1999) and May and Rajopadhyaya (1999) that there were two distinct modes of deep convection, one nearing the tropopause and the other "topping" in the region 5-10 km. Operational radar storm cell tracks have been utilized and the maximum height that these cells reach in each "volume" scan has been recorded. The data has been separated into "break" season

34

Method of making a wooden wind turbine blade  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wooden wind turbine blade is formed by laminating wood veneer in a compression mold having the exact curvature needed for one side of the blade, following which the other side of the blade is ground flat along its length but twisted with respect to the blade axis. 8 figs.

Coleman, C.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Simplified Morphing Blade for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Simplified Morphing Blade for Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines Weijun WANG , St´ephane CARO, Fouad salinas@hotmail.com The aim of designing wind turbine blades is to improve the power capture ability by adjusting the twist of the blade's root and tip. To evaluate the performance of wind turbine blades

Recanati, Catherine

36

2014 Sandia Wind Turbine Blade Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The U.S. Energy Department's Sandia National Laboratories will host its 2014 Sandia Wind Turbine Blade Workshop at the Marriott Pyramid North in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The workshop provides a unique, blade focused collaborative forum that will bring together wind energy leaders from industry, academia, and government. Stay tuned for updates. Information regarding past Wind Workshops can be found at: http://windworkshops.sandia.gov/.

37

Performance of twist-coupled blades on variable speed rotors  

SciTech Connect

The load mitigation and energy capture characteristics of twist-coupled HAWT blades that are mounted on a variable speed rotor are investigated in this paper. These blades are designed to twist toward feather as they bend with pretwist set to achieve a desirable twist distribution at rated power. For this investigation, the ADAMS-WT software has been modified to include blade models with bending-twist coupling. Using twist-coupled and uncoupled models, the ADAMS software is exercised for steady wind environments to generate C{sub p} curves at a number of operating speeds to compare the efficiencies of the two models. The ADAMS software is also used to generate the response of a twist-coupled variable speed rotor to a spectrum of stochastic wind time series. This spectrum contains time series with two mean wind speeds at two turbulence levels. Power control is achieved by imposing a reactive torque on the low speed shaft proportional to the RPM squared with the coefficient specified so that the rotor operates at peak efficiency in the linear aerodynamic range, and by limiting the maximum RPM to take advantage of the stall controlled nature of the rotor. Fatigue calculations are done for the generated load histories using a range of material exponents that represent materials from welded steel to aluminum to composites, and results are compared with the damage computed for the rotor without twist-coupling. Results indicate that significant reductions in damage are achieved across the spectrum of applied wind loading without any degradation in power production.

Lobitz, D.W.; Veers, P.S.; Laino, D.J.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

ARM - Measurement - Cloud top height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud top height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the highest level of the atmosphere where...

39

ZhongHang Baoding Huiteng Windpower Equipment Co Ltd HT Blade | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ZhongHang Baoding Huiteng Windpower Equipment Co Ltd HT Blade ZhongHang Baoding Huiteng Windpower Equipment Co Ltd HT Blade Jump to: navigation, search Name ZhongHang (Baoding) Huiteng Windpower Equipment Co Ltd (HT Blade) Place Baoding, Hebei Province, China Zip 71051 Sector Wind energy Product Leading supplier of wind turbine blades in China. Coordinates 38.855011°, 115.480217° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.855011,"lon":115.480217,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

User's Guide to MBC3: Multi-Blade Coordinate Transformation Code for 3-Bladed Wind Turbine  

SciTech Connect

This guide explains how to use MBC3, a MATLAB-based script NREL developed to perform multi-blade coordinate transformation of system matrices for three-bladed wind turbines. In its current form, MBC3 can be applied to system matrices generated by FAST.2.

Bir, G. S.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The SNL100-01 blade : carbon design studies for the Sandia 100-meter blade.  

SciTech Connect

A series of design studies to investigate the effect of carbon on blade weight and performance for large blades was performed using the Sandia 100-meter All-glass Baseline Blade design as a starting point. This document provides a description of the final carbon blade design, which is termed as SNL100-01. This report includes a summary of the design modifications applied to the baseline all-glass 100-meter design and a description of the NuMAD model files that are made publicly available. This document is intended primarily to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-01.

Griffith, Daniel Todd

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ARM - Measurement - Cloud base height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

base height base height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud base height For a given cloud or cloud layer, the lowest level of the atmosphere where cloud properties are detectable. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BLC : Belfort Laser Ceilometer MPL : Micropulse Lidar MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RL : Raman Lidar VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NOAASURF : NOAA Surface Meteorology Data, collected by NWS and NCDC

43

Dynamic stall occurrence on a horizontal axis wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Surface pressure data from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s ``Combined Experiment`` were analyzed to provide a statistical representation of dynamic stall occurrence on a downwind horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT). Over twenty thousand blade rotational cycles were each characterized at four span locations by the maximum leading edge suction pressure and by the azimuth, velocity, and yaw at which it occurred. Peak suction values at least twice that seen in static wind tunnel tests were taken to be indicative of dynamic stall. The occurrence of dynamic stall at all but the inboard station (30% span) shows good quantitative agreement with the theoretical limits on inflow velocity and yaw that should yield dynamic stall. Two hypotheses were developed to explain the discrepancy at 30% span. Estimates are also given for the frequency of dynamic stall occurrence on upwind turbines. Operational regimes were identified which minimize the occurrence of dynamic stall events.

Shipley, D.E.; Miller, M.S.; Robinson, M.C. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering Sciences

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd Place Hebei Province, China Sector Wind energy Product Wind turbine blade maker. References Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd is a company located in Hebei Province, China . References ↑ "Baoding Tianwei Wind Power Blade Co Ltd" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Baoding_Tianwei_Wind_Power_Blade_Co_Ltd&oldid=342529" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

45

Vertical axis wind turbine with continuous blade angle adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author presents a concept for a vertical axis wind turbine that utilizes each blade's entire rotational cycle for power generation. Each blade has its own vertical axis of rotation and is constrained to rotate at the ...

Weiss, Samuel Bruce

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Transition length in turbine/compressor blade flows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with compressor/turbine blades. The computation...governs the spike development in central cycles...characteristic of gas turbine blades in the course...preliminary design strategy. The theoretical...pursue the nonlinear development of the emitted...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Dual-Axis Resonance Testing of Wind Turbine Blades  

Wind turbine blades must undergo strength and fatigue testing in order to be rated and marketed appropriately. Presently, wind turbine blades are fatigue-tested in the flapwise direction and in the edgewise direction independently. This testing involves placing the blades through 1 to 10 million or more load or fatigue cycles, which may take 3 to 12 months or more to complete for each tested direction. There is a need for blade testing techniques that are less expensive to use and require...

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

48

High-Resolution Simulations of Parallel BladeVortex Interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= perturbation pressure coefficient, p ps= 1 2 1U2 1 c = rotor blade chord p = instantaneous airfoil surface­vortex interaction computations Introduction A MAJOR source of rotorcraft noise is generated by the rotor blades on the rotor blades. BVI noise is especially important because it is known to propagate out

Alonso, Juan J.

49

User scripting on Android using BladeDroid Ravi Bhoraskar *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control over the app at all interesting points. 3 Status and Next Steps We have implemented BladeUser scripting on Android using BladeDroid Ravi Bhoraskar * , Dominic Langenegger* , Pingyang He to mobile applications. Using our tool, BladeDroid, users can write scripts that enable them to customize

Ernst, Michael

50

Remote Monitoring of the Structural Health of Hydrokinetic Composite Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

A health monitoring approach is investigated for hydrokinetic turbine blade applications. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs have advantages that include long life in marine environments and great control over mechanical properties. Experimental strain characteristics are determined for static loads and free-vibration loads. These experiments are designed to simulate the dynamic characteristics of hydrokinetic turbine blades. Carbon/epoxy symmetric composite laminates are manufactured using an autoclave process. Four-layer composite beams, eight-layer composite beams, and two-dimensional eight-layer composite blades are instrumented for strain. Experimental results for strain measurements from electrical resistance gages are validated with theoretical characteristics obtained from in-house finite-element analysis for all sample cases. These preliminary tests on the composite samples show good correlation between experimental and finite-element strain results. A health monitoring system is proposed in which damage to a composite structure, e.g. delamination and fiber breakage, causes changes in the strain signature behavior. The system is based on embedded strain sensors and embedded motes in which strain information is demodulated for wireless transmission. In-service monitoring is critical due to the difficult environment for blade inspection and the cost of inspection downtime. Composite blade designs provide a medium for embedding sensors into the blades for in-situ health monitoring. The major challenge with in-situ health monitoring is transmission of sensor signals from the remote rotating reference frame of the blade to the system monitoring station. In the presented work, a novel system for relaying in-situ blade health measurements in hydrokinetic systems is described and demonstrated. An ultrasonic communication system is used to transmit sensor data underwater from the rotating frame of the blade to a fixed relay station. Data are then broadcast via radio waves to a remote monitoring station. Results indicate that the assembled system can transmit simulated sensor data with an accuracy of ±5% at a maximum sampling rate of 500 samples/sec. A power investigation of the transmitter within the blade shows that continuous max-sampling operation is only possible for short durations (~days), and is limited due to the capacity of the battery power source. However, intermittent sampling, with long periods between samples, allows for the system to last for very long durations (~years). Finally, because the data transmission system can operate at a high sampling rate for short durations or at a lower sampling rate/higher duty cycle for long durations, it is well-suited for short-term prototype and environmental testing, as well as long-term commercially-deployed hydrokinetic machines.

J.L. Rovey

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOEs New Large Blade Test Facility in Massachusetts Completes First Commercial Blade Tests  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Since opening its doors for business in May, the Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC), in Boston, Massachusetts, has come up to full speed testing the long wind turbine blades produced for today's larger wind turbines.

52

Energy consumption during impact cutting of canola stalk as a function of moisture content and cutting height  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study surveys the needed energy for cutting canola stems in different levels of cutting height and moisture content. The canola was harvested from the experimental farm in Gorgan, Iran. Test device fabricated and then calibrated. The device works on the principle of conservation of energy. The tests were repeated 15 times for any level of moisture content and cutting height and they were analyzed using split plot design. The results showed the effect of height and moisture content on cutting energy is significant (Penergy was 1.1kJ in 25.5 (w.b.%) moisture content and 10cm cutting height. Also the minimum cutting energy was 0.76kJ in 11.6 (w.b.%) moisture content and 30cm cutting height. Blade velocity was 2.64m/s in cutting moment.

Mohsen Azadbakht; Ebrahim Esmaeilzadeh; Mostafa Esmaeili-Shayan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

An experimental investigation of turbine blade heat transfer and turbine blade trailing edge cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

studies have investigated the fluid flow and heat transfer behavior in high Reynolds number flows. Blair [7,8] investigated the effect of grid generated turbulence on flat plate heat transfer. He showed that turbulent heat transfer coefficient in flow... AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF TURBINE BLADE HEAT TRANSFER AND TURBINE BLADE TRAILING EDGE COOLING A Dissertation by JUNGHO CHOI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment...

Choi, Jungho

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

Marine wind and wave height trends at different ERA-Interim forecast ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Trends in marine wind speed and significant wave height are investigated using the global reanalysis ERA-Interim over the period 1979-2012, based on monthly mean and maximum data. Besides the traditional reanalysis, we include trends obtained at ...

Ole Johan Aarnes; Saleh Abdalla; Jean-Raymond Bidlot; yvind Breivik

55

UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process UMass Lowell Smoothing Out Wrinkles in Blade Manufacturing Process August 4, 2010 - 2:04pm Addthis Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell work on a wind blade project. | Photo courtesy of University of Massachusetts Lowell Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Lowell work on a wind blade project. | Photo courtesy of University of Massachusetts Lowell Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE A research team at the University of Massachusetts Lowell is ironing out the kinks in blade manufacturing to make way for safer, lighter and cheaper blades. The Wind Turbine Research Group (WTRG) at UMass Lowell has received $401,885 in American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds to figure out

56

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN* AND DAVID S. NOLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Vertical Decay Rate of the Maximum Tangential Winds in Tropical Cyclones DANIEL P. STERN independent of both the maximum wind speed and the radius of maximum winds (RMW). This can be seen winds change with height. Above 2-km height, vertical profiles of Vmaxnorm are nearly independent

Nolan, David S.

57

Turbine blade with contoured chamfered squealer tip  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A squealer tip formed from a pressure side tip wall and a suction side tip wall extending radially outward from a tip of the turbine blade is disclosed. The pressure and suction side tip walls may be positioned along the pressure sidewall and the suction sidewall of the turbine blade, respectively. The pressure side tip wall may include a chamfered leading edge with film cooling holes having exhaust outlets positioned therein. An axially extending tip wall may be formed from at least two outer linear surfaces joined together at an intersection forming a concave axially extending tip wall. The axially extending tip wall may include a convex inner surface forming a radially outer end to an inner cavity forming a cooling system. The cooling system may include one or more film cooling holes in the axially extending tip wall proximate to the suction sidewall, which promotes increased cooling at the pressure and suction sidewalls.

Lee, Ching-Pang

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

58

Creep life prediction of service-exposed turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this research work was to study the possibility of predicting the operational creep life of service-exposed blades used in industrial gas turbines. This prediction is based on the determination of blades creep life using stressrupture test under accelerated test conditions where the applied stresses were 400,500 and 600MPa and the test temperature was 850C. The study concentrated on creep behavior of service-exposed blades having different actual service lifes. The test specimens were prepared from first stage turbine blades made of Ni-based superalloy (IN-738). LarsonMiller parameter was used to extrapolate the stressrupture test results to the actual operating conditions of blades. The operational creep life and the residual life of service-exposed blades were determined employing the life fraction rule.

G. Marahleh; A.R.I. Kheder; H.F. Hamad

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Multi-objective structural optimization of a HAWT composite blade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The AOC 15/50 wind turbine blade has been considered as the baseline configuration for a structural optimization process based on a multi-objective genetic algorithm. Through the optimization of several combinations of both the type and the layup of the laminas, an improved rotor blade has been obtained without changing the composite materials adopted for the original architecture. The design variables of the optimization are both the choice of the employed materials and their placement in the layout of the blade skin. A marked reduction of the overall blade weight and a corresponding increment of its flapwise rigidity have been obtained. An unwanted small increase of the edgewise deformation has also been registered, requiring a further optimization process starting from the obtained optimal rotor blade configuration, in order to enhance also the edgewise rigidity of the blade.

Andrea Dal Monte; Marco Raciti Castelli; Ernesto Benini

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Failure Analysis of a Compressor Blade of Gas Turbine Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The stage II compressor stator blade of a developmental gas turbine engine was found damaged during dismantling of the engine after test run. A portion of the blade was found fractured from the hub region at leading edge. A crack was also observed extending from the fractured surface towards the centre of the airfoil region of the blade. Low magnification stereo-binocular observation revealed presence of beach marks on the fractured surface indicating the blade failure in progressive mode. This observation was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The crack origin was at the blade hub-stem junction on the leading edge side. Presence of machining/filing marks appeared to be the reason for the fatigue crack initiation from this region. No metallurgical abnormalities were present at the crack origin. However, deep filing/machining lines were observed at the stem region of the blade attributing to the cause of failure.

Swati Biswas; M.D. Ganeshachar; Jivan Kumar; V.N. Satish Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sandia National Laboratories: Wind-Turbine Blade Materials and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration Wind-Turbine Blade Materials and Reliability Progress On May 21, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy,...

62

SNL Begins Field Testing on First SMART Blades  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department of Energy (DOE) Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed fabrication and began field testing a set of wind turbine blades with active load control capabilities.

63

Sandia National Laboratories: The Influence of Rotor Blade Design...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Rotor Testbed (NRT) includes research to quantify the degree to which the blade design load distribution influences the rotor near- and mid-wake velocity deficits and...

64

SciTech Connect: Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Org: Other Non-EERE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY BLADE TESTING; TRENDS; BIAXIAL TESTING; NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER; NWTC;...

65

Maximum height in a conifer is associated with conflicting requirements for xylem design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...David R. Woodruff Jeffrey M. Warren Katherine A. McCulloh *Department of Forestry...13 Pittermann J Sperry JS Hacke UG Wheeler JK Sikkema E ( 2005 ) Torus-margo pits help conifers...23 Pittermann J Sperry JS Hacke UG Wheeler JK Sikkema E ( 2006 ) Inter-tracheid...

Jean-Christophe Domec; Barbara Lachenbruch; Frederick C. Meinzer; David R. Woodruff; Jeffrey M. Warren; Katherine A. McCulloh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for the Sandia 100-meter Blade.  

SciTech Connect

A series of design studies were performed to inv estigate the effects of flatback airfoils on blade performance and weight for large blades using the Sandi a 100-meter blade designs as a starting point. As part of the study, the effects of varying the blade slenderness on blade structural performance was investigated. The advantages and disadvantages of blad e slenderness with respect to tip deflection, flap- wise & edge-wise fatigue resistance, panel buckling capacity, flutter speed, manufacturing labor content, blade total weight, and aerodynamic design load magn itude are quantified. Following these design studies, a final blade design (SNL100-03) was prod uced, which was based on a highly slender design using flatback airfoils. The SNL100-03 design with flatback airfoils has weight of 49 tons, which is about 16% decrease from its SNL100-02 predecessor that used conventional sharp trailing edge airfoils. Although not systematically optimized, the SNL100 -03 design study provides an assessment of and insight into the benefits of flatback airfoils for la rge blades as well as insights into the limits or negative consequences of high blade slenderness resulting from a highly slender SNL100-03 planform as was chosen in the final design definition. This docum ent also provides a description of the final SNL100-03 design definition and is intended to be a companion document to the distribution of the NuMAD blade model files for SNL100-03, which are made publicly available. A summary of the major findings of the Sandia 100-meter blade development program, from the initial SNL100-00 baseline blade through the fourth SNL100-03 blade study, is provided. This summary includes the major findings and outcomes of blade d esign studies, pathways to mitigate the identified large blade design drivers, and tool development that were produced over the course of this five-year research program. A summary of large blade tec hnology needs and research opportunities is also presented.

Griffith, Daniel; Richards, Phillip William

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

On the impact of variability and assembly on turbine blade cooling flow and oxidation life  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The life of a turbine blade is dependent on the quantity and temperature of the cooling flow sup- plied to the blade. The focus of this thesis is the impact of variability on blade cooling flow and, subsequently, its impact ...

Sidwell, Carroll Vincent, 1972-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER SENSORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DAMAGE DETECTION METHODS ON WIND TURBINE BLADE TESTING WITH WIRED AND WIRELESS ACCELEROMETER for nonstationary blade excitations. KEYWORDS : Structural Health Monitoring, Damage Detection, Wind Turbine, Wireless sensing, Wavelets. INTRODUCTION Detecting damage in wind turbine blades is a very

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

Multiple piece turbine blade/vane  

SciTech Connect

An air cooled turbine blade or vane of a spar and shell construction with the shell made from a high temperature resistant material that must be formed from an EDM process. The shell and the spar both have a number of hooks extending in a spanwise direction and forming a contact surface that is slanted such that a contact force increases as the engaging hooks move away from one another. The slanted contact surfaces on the hooks provides for an better seal and allows for twisting between the shell and the spar while maintaining a tight fit.

Kimmel, Keith D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

70

The SNL100-03 Blade: Design Studies with Flatback Airfoils for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the figure), which demonstrates the weight reduction trajectory in this series of blade design studies. The industry survey includes recent large blades including the...

71

Vibration of Axial Turbomachinery Blades: Measurement and Fluid-Structure Interactions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The focus of this dissertation is on turbomachinery blade vibration measurements and unsteady fluid-structure interactions. Vibration of turbomachinery blades are critical to jet engine (more)

Mikrut, Paul Louis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

E-Print Network 3.0 - arc blade type Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Langley Research Center Collection: Engineering 8 Sparkr Blade Test Centre Wind turbines with a rotor diameter exceed- Summary: Sparkr Blade Test Centre Wind...

73

Vibration based damage detection of rotor blades in a gas turbine engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the problems concerning turbine rotor blade vibration that seriously impact the structural integrity of a developmental aero gas turbine. Experimental determination of vibration characteristics of rotor blades in an engine is very important from fatigue failure considerations. The blades under investigation are fabricated from nickel base super alloy through directionally solidified investment casting process. The blade surfaces are coated with platinum aluminide for oxidation protection. A three dimensional finite element modal analysis on a bladed disk was performed to know the likely blade resonances for a particular design in the speed range of operation. Experiments were conducted to assess vibration characteristics of bladed disk rotor during engine tests. Rotor blade vibrations were measured using non-intrusive stress measurement system, an indirect method of blade vibration measurement utilizing blade tip timing technique. Abnormalities observed in the vibration characteristics of the blade tip timing data measured during engine tests were used to detect the blade damage. Upon disassembly of the engine and subsequent fluorescent penetrant inspection, it was observed that three blades of the rotor assembly were identified to have damaged. These are the blades that exhibited vibration abnormalities as a result of large resonant vibration response while engine tests. Further, fractographic analysis performed on the blades revealed the mechanism of blade failures as fatigue related. The root cause of blade failure is established to be high cycle fatigue from the engine run data history although the blades were put into service for just 6 h of engine operation.

S. Madhavan; Rajeev Jain; C. Sujatha; A.S. Sekhar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company July 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Last year, Israel Sanchez, a 31-year-old Newton, Kan., resident, was painting the blades of wind turbines for Enertech, Inc., a small-scale wind manufacturer. Now he's assembling the entire system. "They promoted me," says Sanchez, taking a quick break from the assembly line in the 10,000 square-foot plant in Newton. "It's a new field for me, but I'm excited because it's all new experiences every day." Sanchez is assembling Enertech's new wind models using an innovative blade design licensed from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo., on its 40 kW turbines.

75

Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company Help Wanted at Kansas Wind Blade Company July 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE Last year, Israel Sanchez, a 31-year-old Newton, Kan., resident, was painting the blades of wind turbines for Enertech, Inc., a small-scale wind manufacturer. Now he's assembling the entire system. "They promoted me," says Sanchez, taking a quick break from the assembly line in the 10,000 square-foot plant in Newton. "It's a new field for me, but I'm excited because it's all new experiences every day." Sanchez is assembling Enertech's new wind models using an innovative blade design licensed from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colo., on its 40 kW turbines.

76

Wind turbine blade testing system using base excitation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus (500) for fatigue testing elongate test articles (404) including wind turbine blades through forced or resonant excitation of the base (406) of the test articles (404). The apparatus (500) includes a testing platform or foundation (402). A blade support (410) is provided for retaining or supporting a base (406) of an elongate test article (404), and the blade support (410) is pivotally mounted on the testing platform (402) with at least two degrees of freedom of motion relative to the testing platform (402). An excitation input assembly (540) is interconnected with the blade support (410) and includes first and second actuators (444, 446, 541) that act to concurrently apply forces or loads to the blade support (410). The actuator forces are cyclically applied in first and second transverse directions. The test article (404) responds to shaking of its base (406) by oscillating in two, transverse directions (505, 507).

Cotrell, Jason; Thresher, Robert; Lambert, Scott; Hughes, Scott; Johnson, Jay

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

77

Definition of a 5MW/61.5m wind turbine blade reference model.  

SciTech Connect

A basic structural concept of the blade design that is associated with the frequently utilized %E2%80%9CNREL offshore 5-MW baseline wind turbine%E2%80%9D is needed for studies involving blade structural design and blade structural design tools. The blade structural design documented in this report represents a concept that meets basic design criteria set forth by IEC standards for the onshore turbine. The design documented in this report is not a fully vetted blade design which is ready for manufacture. The intent of the structural concept described by this report is to provide a good starting point for more detailed and targeted investigations such as blade design optimization, blade design tool verification, blade materials and structures investigations, and blade design standards evaluation. This report documents the information used to create the current model as well as the analyses used to verify that the blade structural performance meets reasonable blade design criteria.

Resor, Brian Ray

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Vantage Pomona Heights | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIS at na for na Environmental Impact Statement for the Vanage to Pomona Heights 239kV Transmission Line Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Transmission...

79

Steam turbine blade reliability seminar and workshop: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

An EPRI workshop to address steam turbine blade reliability improvement was cohosted by Boston Edison Company in Boston, Massachusetts on July 7-9, 1982. The 142 attendees represented a broad spectrum of US utilities, equipment manufacturers, and consultants, as well as representatives from Canada, Europe, and Japan. These proceedings contain the text of the formal presentations as well as summaries of the working group sessions which were devoted to topics of particular interest to the workshop participants. The formal presentations were organized under the following general session titles: utility experience with turbine blades; blade failure mechanisms and causes; blade design for high reliability; problem solutions for operating units; and failure analysis, NDE, and diagnostics. In addition to the technical presentations, working group sessions were held on selected topics relevant to steam turbine blade reliability improvement. Each group provided a forum for engineers to exchange ideas and information in a less formal environment. These discussions focused on key issues in more detail and addressed some subjects not covered in the formal presentations. The subjects of these working groups were: low pressure turbine blade problems; solid particle erosion; steam chemistry; failure analysis, NDE, and diagnostics; effect of boiler and balance-of-plant; and retrofittable fixes for blade problems. Individual papers have been entered into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

Brown, R.G.; Quilliam, J.F. (eds.)

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

NEW HEIGHTS A Handbook for Developing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REACHING NEW HEIGHTS A Handbook for Developing Community Based Ecosystem Health Goals, Objectives and Indicators REACHING NEW HEIGHTS A Handbook for Developing Community Based Ecosystem Health Goals, Objectives's Fraser River Action Plan. The content of this report does not necessarily reflect the views and policies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Raman lidar/AERI PBL Height Product  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) heights have been computed using potential temperature profiles derived from Raman lidar and AERI measurements. Raman lidar measurements of the rotational Raman scattering from nitrogen and oxygen are used to derive vertical profiles of potential temperature. AERI measurements of downwelling radiance are used in a physical retrieval approach (Smith et al. 1999, Feltz et al. 1998) to derive profiles of temperature and water vapor. The Raman lidar and AERI potential temperature profiles are merged to create a single potential temperature profile for computing PBL heights. PBL heights were derived from these merged potential temperature profiles using a modified Heffter (1980) technique that was tailored to the SGP site (Della Monache et al., 2004). PBL heights were computed on an hourly basis for the period January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2011. These heights are provided as meters above ground level.

Ferrare, Richard

82

Gas turbine blade with intra-span snubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas turbine blade (10) including a hollow mid-span snubber (16). The snubber is affixed to the airfoil portion (14) of the blade by a fastener (20) passing through an opening (24) cast into the surface (22) of the blade. The opening is defined during an investment casting process by a ceramic pedestal (38) which is positioned between a ceramic core (32) and a surrounding ceramic casting shell (48). The pedestal provides mechanical support for the ceramic core during both wax and molten metal injection steps of the investment casting process.

Merrill, Gary B.; Mayer, Clinton

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers M. Rossgatterera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medial design of blades for hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers M. Rossgatterera , B. J Abstract We present a method for constructing blades of hydroelectric turbines and ship propellers based. Keywords: CAD-model, B-spline representation, hydroelectric turbine blade, propeller blade, medial axis

Jüttler, Bert

84

Structural modal interaction of a four degree of freedom bladed disk and casing model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural modal interaction of a four degree of freedom bladed disk and casing model Mathias specific interaction phenomenon that may occur in turbo- machines due to radial rub between a bladed disk requirements leading to reduced clearance between blade-tips and casing together with the rotation of the blade

Boyer, Edmond

85

Nonlinear optics at maximum coherence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...D. Walls Nonlinear optics at maximum coherence S. E. Harris G. Y. Yin M. Jain H...optical processes which utilize maximum coherence of a non-allowed transition. The nonlinear...frequency. Nonlinear optics at maximum coherence B y S. E. Harris, G. Y. Yin, M...

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Infrared thermography to detect residual ceramic in gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A serious problem in the production of gas turbine blades is the detection of residual ceramic cores inside the cooling passages; in ... the presence of even small ceramic pieces affects turbine performance and m...

C. Meola; G.M. Carlomagno; M. Di Foggia; O. Natale

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Lean implementation across value stream in main rotor blade area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary goal for this project was to help expand the existing capability of Sikorsky's main rotor blade business from raw material (titanium) through final assembly. The project helped to facilitate the ongoing lean ...

Phoenix, Casey J. (Casey John)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

First wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

wind turbine blade delivered to Pantex Work crews began to erect the first of five wind turbines that will make up the Pantex Renewable Energy Project (PREP). The first wind...

89

Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Determining effects of turbine blades on fluid motion  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a technique for simulating wind interaction with wind turbines. A turbine blade is divided into radial sections. The effect that each of these radial sections has on the velocities in Eulerian computational cells they overlap is determined. The effect is determined using Lagrangian techniques such that the calculations need not include wind components in the radial direction. A force on each radial section of turbine blade is determined. This force depends on the axial and azimuthal components of the fluid flow in the computational cell and the geometric properties of the turbine blade. The force on the turbine blade is fed back to effect the fluid flow in the computational cell for the next time step.

Linn, Rodman Ray (Los Alamos, NM); Koo, Eunmo (Los Alamos, NM)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

CX-100 and TX-100 blade field tests.  

SciTech Connect

In support of the DOE Low Wind Speed Turbine (LWST) program two of the three Micon 65/13M wind turbines at the USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS) center in Bushland, Texas will be used to test two sets of experimental blades, the CX-100 and TX-100. The blade aerodynamic and structural characterization, meteorological inflow and wind turbine structural response will be monitored with an array of 75 instruments: 33 to characterize the blades, 15 to characterize the inflow, and 27 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. For both tests, data will be sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using the ATLAS II (Accurate GPS Time-Linked Data Acquisition System) data acquisition system. The system features a time-synchronized continuous data stream and telemetered data from the turbine rotor. This paper documents the instruments and infrastructure that have been developed to monitor these blades, turbines and inflow.

Holman, Adam (USDA-Agriculture Research Service, Bushland, TX); Jones, Perry L.; Zayas, Jose R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Dynamic characteristics analysis of the offshore wind turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The topic of offshore wind energy is attracting more and more attention ... . The blades are the key components of offshore wind turbines, and their dynamic characteristics directly determine the effectiveness of...

Jing Li; Jianyun Chen; Xiaobo Chen

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Coherent testing and simulation of composite blade repair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COHERENT TESTING AND SIMULATION OF COMPOSITE BLADE REPAIR A Thesis by BRIAN GLENN MCNICHOLS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1997 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering COHERENT TESTING AND SIMULATION OF COMPOSITE BLADE REPAIR A Thesis by BRIAN GLENN MCNICHOLS Submitted to Texas A&M University In partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

McNichols, Brian Glenn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Acoustic and biological studies of pitched blade mixing systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of blade construction on coalesence. Van't Riet also showed the dependence of power consumption on vessel geometry, hold up, bubble size, and the number of impeller blades present. Warmoeskerken et s. l (51 described gas loading regimes of the pitched... also be obtained with Fourier transforms. Strasberg reviewed sound emissions from: 1) bubble formation at a nozzle; 2) bubble coalescence and splitting; 3) bubble flow past bodies and constrictions; and 4) rising bubbles; all of which may have...

Hsi, Randolph Paul

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

An evaluation of oscillating digging blades for carrot harvesters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN EVALUATION OF OSCILLATING DIGGING BLADES FOR CARROT HARVESTERS A Thesis by ROBERT DWIGHT CHENOWETH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1972 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering AN EVALUATION OF OSCILLATING DIGGING BLADES FOR CARROT HARVESTERS A Thesis by ROBERT DWIGHT CHENOWETH Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) Head of Department) (Member...

Chenoweth, Robert Dwight

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides regulations for stacks for industrial facilities. "Stack" means any chimney, flue, conduit or duct arranged to conduct any emissions to the ambient air, excluding flares. "Stack height" means the distance from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack to the crown of the stack. If a stack arises from a building or other structure, the ground-level elevation of that building or structure will be

97

Property:Height (m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Height (m) Height (m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Height (m) Property Type Number Pages using the property "Height (m)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) M MHK Technologies/Aegir Dynamo + 12 + MHK Technologies/AirWEC + 8 + MHK Technologies/Deep Green + 2.5 + MHK Technologies/Deep water capable hydrokinetic turbine + 5 + MHK Technologies/European Pico Pilot Plant + 22 + MHK Technologies/Evopod E35 + 4.25 + MHK Technologies/Float Wave Electric Power Station + 12 + MHK Technologies/Floating anchored OTEC plant + 540 + MHK Technologies/GyroWaveGen + 4.5 + MHK Technologies/HyPEG + 20 + MHK Technologies/HydroGen 10 + 3.5 + MHK Technologies/Hydroflo + 5 + MHK Technologies/ITRI WEC + 17.9 + MHK Technologies/IVEC Floating Wave Power Plant + 5 +

98

ARM - Measurement - Planetary boundary layer height  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height govMeasurementsPlanetary boundary layer height ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Planetary boundary layer height Top of the planetary boundary layer; also known as depth or height of the mixing layer. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments VCEIL : Vaisala Ceilometer External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments

99

MaximumLetThrough.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 Maximum Let-Through Currents in the APS Storage Ring Quadrupole, Sextupole, and Corrector Magnets J. Carwardine, D. McGhee, G. Markovich May 18, 1999 Abstract Limits are described for the maximum magnet currents, under specified fault conditions, for the storage ring quadrupole, sextupole, and corrector magnets. Introduction In computing the maximum let-through current for the magnets for the storage ring, several factors must be considered. In general, the maximum current likely to occur even under fault conditions is less than the maximum theoretical DC current given the magnet resistance and the maximum available DC voltage. The first level of protection against magnet current overloads is the over-current interlock that is built into the converter electronics package. The threshold is set to approximately 110% of

100

Microsoft PowerPoint - STP Blade Failure_Hentschel_SWPA Conf (11 Jun 09).ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STRONG STRONG Stockton Turbine Blade Failure Spillway Tainter Gates Tailrace Powerhouse Switchyard BUILDING STRONG Stockton Power Plant Cross Section Location of failed blade section Runner Blade Draft Tube Bulkheads Intake Gates Intake Bulkheads BUILDING STRONG Runner Blade Failure * Unit experience severe vibration the morning of 4 Feb 09 activating the vibration alarms * Plant personnel observed cyclic banging and water leakage at the draft tube hatch door * Unit was immediately shut down * A failed blade section (blade #4) was discovered by divers at the bottom of the draft tube * Partial dewatering was performed to inspect turbine runner * Turbine blade #4 experienced a catastrophic failure * Potential cracks were observed on three of the other five blades (blades #2, #5, and #6)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluation of active flow control applied to wind turbine blade section  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A feasibility study for implementing active flow control (AFC) methods to improve the performance of wind turbines was performed. The experimental effort investigated the impact of zero-mass-flux (ZMF) piezofluidic actuators attempting to controlboundary layer separation from thick airfoils that are suitable for wind turbine rotor blades. It was demonstrated that the ZMF actuators can replace passive vortexgenerators that are commonly used for boundary layer separation delay without the inherent drag penalty that the passive devices impose. It has been shown that ZMF fluidic actuators are suitable for flow control in wind turbine application due to the fact that they are adjustable for wider Reynolds number range while vortexgenerators are tuned to perform well in one design point. It was demonstrated that AFC can effectively double the maximum lift of this airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. A possible application is a significant reduction of the turbine start-up velocity. It was also found that even for a contaminated blade AFC is capable to delay the stall and decrease the drag using low energy expenditure therefore restoring and even surpassing the clean airfoil performance. The effectiveness of the AFC method was examined using a newly defined aerodynamic figure of merit. Various scaling options for collapsing the effect of the excitation magnitude on the lift alternation due to the activation of zero-mass-flux periodic excitation for boundary layer separation control are proposed and examined using experimental data.

O. Stalnov; A. Kribus; A. Seifert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Investigation of rotor blade roughness effects on turbine performance  

SciTech Connect

The cold air test program was completed on the SSME (Space Shuttle Main Engine) HPFTP (High-Pressure Fuel Turbopump) turbine with production nozzle vane rings and polished coated rotor blades with a smooth surface finish of 30[mu]in. (0.76 [mu]m) rms (root mean square). The smooth blades were polished by an abrasive flow machining process. The test results were compared with the air test results from production rough-coated rotor blades with a surface finish of up to 400 [mu]in. (10.16 [mu]m) rms. Turbine efficiency was higher for the smooth blades over the entire range tested. Efficiency increased 2.1 percentage points at the SSME 104 percent RPL (Rated Power Level) conditions. This efficiency improvement could reduce the SSME HPFTP turbine inlet temperature by 57 R (32K), increasing turbine durability. The turbine flow parameter increased and the midspan outlet swirl angle became more axial with the smooth rotor blades.

Boynton, J.L.; Tabibzadeh, R. (Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.); Hudson, S.T. (NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Incipient Crack Detection in Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents some analysis results for incipient crack detection in a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading to failure. The blade was manufactured to standard specifications, and it underwent harmonic excitation at its first resonance using a hydraulically-actuated excitation system until reaching catastrophic failure. This work investigates the ability of an ultrasonic guided wave approach to detect incipient damage prior to the surfacing of a visible, catastrophic crack. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, which were used in an active, pitchcatch mode with guided waves over a range of excitation frequencies. The performance results in detecting incipient crack formation in the fiberglass skin of the blade is assessed over the range of frequencies in order to determine the point at which the incipient crack became detectable. Higher excitation frequencies provide consistent results for paths along the rotor blade's carbon fiber spar cap, but performance falls off with increasing excitation frequencies for paths off of the spar cap. Lower excitation frequencies provide more consistent performance across all sensor paths.

Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Choi, Mijin [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, Jae Kyeong [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyuhae [Chonnam National University, Korea; Farinholt, Kevin [Commonwealth Center for Advanced Manufacturing, VA; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Jung-Ryul [Chonbuk National University, Korea

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

104

Development of integral bladed rotor using linear optimisation technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bladed disks are the most flexible elements in high speed rotating machinery. Stress analysis of these elements present some challenges. These challenges stem from high stress gradients due to contact faces, the non-linearities attending conforming contact with friction. Thermal gradients are also encountered across the disc bore and rim due to uneven temperature distribution. The rim of the disc is made heavier to resist the centrifugal pull of the blade, thus making the assembly heavier. Investigations have been carried out to develop and improve 'blisks' which are integrated version of blades and disc, offering significant weight saving. The present paper describes the possible development process of upgrading a general purpose conventional bladed disc of a single stage compressor into blisk, using linear programme, a finite element analysis tool for linear optimisation, as a dedicated 'design-tool' keeping the same operating conditions and the allowable design limits through numerical models. Design methodology, burst-failure criteria of blisk and bladed disc are discussed in full length. This tool developed exploits the quick convergence ability of a linear system for handling large iterations and overcomes the limitation imposed by material non-linearity, over-speed and burst margin for all decision points based on stress, strain and displacement, in the design-flow process.

K. Kumar; S.L. Ajit Prasad; K. Ramachandra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Providence Heights Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Farm Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Providence Heights Wind Farm Facility Providence Heights Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Iberdrola Renewables Developer Midwest Wind Energy Location Bureau County IL Coordinates 41.264075°, -89.580853° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.264075,"lon":-89.580853,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

106

Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nano heat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

Obinna Abah; Johannes Rossnagel; Georg Jacob; Sebastian Deffner; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer; Eric Lutz

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

107

NREL: Wind Research - National Wind Technology Center Blade Testing Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Blade Testing Video (Text Version) Center Blade Testing Video (Text Version) Below is the text version for the National Wind Technology Center Blade Testing Video. The video opens with the NREL and NWTC logos, surrounded by black screen and including the title: "NWTC Test Facility Introduction, Dr. Fort Felker, Director of the National Wind Technology Center, TRT 1:42, May 29, 2013." Fort Felker is in a yellow helmet and vest, standing in the NWTC's testing facility. There is a railing to his left, construction cones behind him, and a ladder to his right. Fort Felker: "I'm Fort Felker, I'm the director at the Department of Energy's National Wind Technology Center." Fort's name and title cut in on the right. Fort walks toward the camera while talking. Fort Felker: "Here at the NWTC, we have been conducting structural testing

108

Dual-axis resonance testing of wind turbine blades  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus (100) for fatigue testing test articles (104) including wind turbine blades. The apparatus (100) includes a test stand (110) that rigidly supports an end (106) of the test article (104). An actuator assembly (120) is attached to the test article (104) and is adapted for substantially concurrently imparting first and second forcing functions in first and second directions on the test article (104), with the first and second directions being perpendicular to a longitudinal axis. A controller (130) transmits first and second sets of displacement signals (160, 164) to the actuator assembly (120) at two resonant frequencies of the test system (104). The displacement signals (160, 164) initiate the actuator assembly (120) to impart the forcing loads to concurrently oscillate the test article (104) in the first and second directions. With turbine blades, the blades (104) are resonant tested concurrently for fatigue in the flapwise and edgewise directions.

Hughes, Scott; Musial, Walter; White, Darris

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hempstead Rd FederalHeightsDr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WolcottSt 2030 East Hempstead Rd FederalHeightsDr. MedicalDr. North 100 South ConnorRd Red Butte Canyon Rd W asatch D r. FortDouglasBlvd UniversityStreet W akaraW ay 500 South North Campus Dr. North Care ACC Parking Terrace Eccles Business Building Health Professions Merrill Engineering The Children

Tipple, Brett

110

Architecture TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

School of Architecture #12;TAKING ARCHITECTURE TO NEW HEIGHTS This is a time of tremendous momentum at the School of Architecture. Looking ahead, we have the unique opportunity to build on our strengths immediate and long term, and enable us to stake our ground as one of the country's premier architecture

McConnell, Terry

111

Complex Non-Linear Modal Analysis for Mechanical Systems: Application to Turbomachinery Bladings With Friction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex Non-Linear Modal Analysis for Mechanical Systems: Application to Turbomachinery Bladings of a turbomachinery blade, with dry-friction interfaces is proposed. In the latter, an original framework

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

112

Developments of cast superalloys and technology for gas turbine blades in BIAM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since 1960's many important subjects relating to cast turbine blades including alloy developments, directional solidification (DS) and single crystal (SC) technique and casting technology for blades have been ...

R. Z. Chen

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Cooled turbine blades in the GT-65 gas turbine power unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experience with the development, study, and manufacturing of cooled blades for the GT-65 high temperature gas turbine is described.

V. V. Rtishchev; V. V. Krivonosova; Yu. M. Sundukov

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

QUANTITATIVE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADES BY ENERGY BASED ACOUSTIC EMISSION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy with higher efficiency and cost-effective considerations, the size of the wind turbine blade hasQUANTITATIVE DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF HYBRID COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADES BY ENERGY BASED ACOUSTIC in the wind turbine blade. It was tried to apply a new source location method, which has a developed algorithm

Boyer, Edmond

115

DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DETECTION OF IMPULSE-LIKE AIRBORNE SOUND FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN ROTOR BLADES OF WIND TURBINES burdens of wind turbines. To detect damage of rotor blades, several research projects focus on an acoustic, rotor blade, wind turbine INTRODUCTION There are several publications of non destructive damage

Boyer, Edmond

116

LOSS OF ROTOR ISOTROPY AS A BLADE DAMAGE INDICATOR FOR WIND TURBINE STRUCTURE HEALTH MONITORING SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOSS OF ROTOR ISOTROPY AS A BLADE DAMAGE INDICATOR FOR WIND TURBINE STRUCTURE HEALTH MONITORING to simulated vibrations of a rotating rotor. KEYWORDS : wind turbine blade, rotor anisotropy, Floquet analysis, OMA INTRODUCTION Blades of modern wind turbines are complex high-tech structures, and their cost

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

Physical Aspects of Blade Erosion by Wet Steam in Turbines [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Aspects of Blade Erosion by Wet Steam in Turbines [and Discussion] A. Smith J. Caldwell...Christie Blade erosion in wet steam turbines is considered to be preceded by the collection...the trailing edges has been obtained on turbine blade cascades in a wet air tunnel...

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN-SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a wind turbine, including turbine blades, tower, gears, generator bearings etc. [2]. However, due to highDEVELOPMENT OF AN ULTRASONIC NDT SYSTEM FOR AUTOMATED IN- SITU INSPECTION OF WIND TURBINE BLADES Abington, Cambridge, CB21 6AL, UK bic@brunel.ac.uk ABSTRACT It is crucial to maintain wind turbine blades

Boyer, Edmond

119

Height modification in grain sorghum lines homozygous for four major height genes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is mainly controlled by four major genes which affect elon. ai ion of internodcs. Tl. ere is variation. Eor height aazong and within varier. i. es identical and homozygous for these known genes . Three varietie. . of th height genotype dw ~a dw. du... and three vsrieries of t'ne genotype cw dw dH dwa wore used to dote mine th effectiveness of election for height within major I:e-'. ht genoty:. ;-, . grd ries consisted of each variety as well as progenIes from all possi- ble cro=s s and reciprocal...

Thompson, Tommy Earl

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

120

Mixing blade system for high-resistance media  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A blade system is described for stirring and agitating a medium, comprising a shaft bearing a plurality of paddles, each having a different geometry and each having approximately the same rotational moment. The geometrically different paddles sweep through different volumes of the medium to minimize shear zone development and maximize the strength of the system with respect to medium-induced stress. 6 figures.

Kronberg, J.W.

1991-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

National Wind Tecnology Center Provides Dual Axis Resonant Blade Testing  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing as well as office space for industry researchers. Fort Felker, center director at the NWTC, discusses NREL's state-of-the-art structural testing capabilities and shows a flapwise and edgewise blade test in progress.

Felker, Fort

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

122

Estimation of the pressing force in blade forming application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a 3-D FE model to simulate the hot forming process for the turbine blades based on elastic-plastic theory and unilateral contact friction theory under isothermal assumption. Due to the quasi-static assumption, an explicit dynamic formulation ... Keywords: finite element, hot forming, modelling, optimisation, simulation

Thibaut Bellizzi; Jonathan Boisvert; Henri Champliaud; Thien-My Dao

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

TECHNICAL PAPER Time dependent simulation of active flying height control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) sliders have been recently used to reduce flying height at the head disk interface and obtain more stableTECHNICAL PAPER Time dependent simulation of active flying height control of TFC sliders Pablo- dure is implemented to simulate the flying height response of a typical thermal flying height control

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

124

Effects of flying height deviations on glide height tests for manufacturing hard disks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, theoretical analysis and experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of avalanche-point deviation and the deviation between the calibration and test-flying heights during the glide head...

Z.W. Zhong; Z. Zheng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Energy Future Blades of Glory: Wind Technology Bringing Us Closer To a Clean Energy Future July 17, 2012 - 2:14pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? The Energy Department is supporting the validation of newly developed technologies at wind testing facilities across America. There's a simple truth in wind energy -- the bigger the blade, the more watts generated. 

In the 1980s, blades were typically 65 feet long. Today, as the wind industry continues to grow, blades measure over 150 feet. Looking down the road, the next generation of wind turbine blades is expected to span beyond the length of a football field.



126

NREL: Technology Transfer - Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines Cheaper and More Efficient Fabric-Covered Blades Could Make Wind Turbines Cheaper and More Efficient A photo of a crew of workers watching as a wind blade is hauled up to a turbine for assembly. A new fabric-wrapped wind blade could eventually replace the traditional fiberglass blade, providing for lighter turbine components that could be built and assembled on site. January 2, 2013 A new design that calls for wrapping architectural fabric around metal wind turbine blades-instead of the traditional fiberglass-could be the latest revolution in dramatically reducing the cost of wind-produced power. That's the focus of a new project that partners NREL with General Electric (GE) and Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University. Together, they are rethinking the way wind blades are designed,

127

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades VP 100: New Facility in Boston to Test Large-Scale Wind Blades July 23, 2010 - 1:19pm Addthis Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Boston's Wind Technology Testing Center, funded in part with Recovery Act funds, will be first in U.S. to test blades up to 300 feet long. | Photo Courtesy of Massachusetts Clean Energy Center Stephen Graff Former Writer & editor for Energy Empowers, EERE America's first-of-its-kind wind blade testing facility - capable of testing a blade as long as a football field - almost never was. Because of funding woes, the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC),

128

Power performance of canted blades for a vertical axis wind turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small scale vertical axis wind turbines have a number of advantages for deployment in an urban environment but are subject to highly varying thrust and radial aerodynamic forces. Helical blade shapes for vertical axis wind turbines can reduce load fluctuations during turbine operation; however a helix has complicated three-dimensional geometry that can be difficult to manufacture resulting in expensive blades. A new blade configuration based on twisted straight blades that are mounted at an angle to the vertical a cant has been developed and tested in a wind tunnel in a number of different configurations and conditions. They offer the benefits of distributing the fluctuating aerodynamic loads but incorporate a linear axis so that they can be manufactured at a comparable cost to simple straight blades. The power performance data from the tunnel testing show that canted blades have comparable power output to similar straight blades and that aerodynamic fences can be used to improve power performance.

Shawn Armstrong; Stephen Tullis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Optimisation of NSLS-II Blade X-ray Beam Position Monitors: from Photoemission type to Diamond Detector  

SciTech Connect

Optimisation of blade type x-ray beam position monitors (XBPM) was performed for NSLS-II undulator IVU20. Blade material, con and #64257;guration and operation principle was analysed in order to improve XBPM performance. Optimisation is based on calculation of the XBPM signal spatial distribution. Along with standard photoemission type XBPM a Diamond Detector Blades (DDB) were analysed as blades for XBPMs. DDB XBPMs can help to overcome drawbacks of the photoemission blade XBPMs.

ILINSKI P.

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

130

Flying height adjustment technologies for high-density magnetic recording  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flying height adjustment technology becomes important to achieve the stable ultra low flying height for recording density 1 Tb/in in hard disk drive. The possible approaches towards flying height adjustment, advantages and disadvantages of different adjusting methods are discussed. Finally, the flying stability of thermal actuated slider is studied taking into account the short-range interaction forces. It is noticed that the flying height of thermal actuated slider is less sensitive to the short-range interactions than the normal slider and can sustain larger shocks. The thermal actuated flying height adjusting technology is more suitable for ultra-low flying height applications.

Mingsheng Zhang; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Coatings for the protection of turbine blades from erosion  

SciTech Connect

Many types of turbines, including aircraft gas turbines, steam turbines, and power recovery turbines, suffer from solid particle erosion caused by a variety of materials ingested into the machines. Utilization of various laboratory erosion tests tailored to the specific application by using various erodents, temperatures, velocities, and angles of impact, have been shown to be effective in the development and selection of coatings for the erosion protection of turbine blades and other components. Detonation gun coatings have demonstrated their efficacy in providing substantial protection in many situations. It has now been shown that several tungsten carbide and chromium carbide Super D-Gun{trademark} coatings not only have better erosion resistance than their D-Gun analogs, but cause little or no degradation of the fatigue properties of the blade alloys. Nonetheless, caution should be employed in the application of any laboratory data to a specific situation and additional testing done as warranted by the turbine designer.

Walsh, P.N.; Quets, J.M.; Tucker, R.C. Jr. [Praxair Surface Technologies, Inc., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Trailing edge noise theory for rotating blades in uniform flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new formulation for trailing edge noise radiation from rotating blades based on an analytical solution of the convective wave equation. It accounts for distributed loading and the effect of mean flow and spanwise wavenumber. A commonly used theory due to Schlinker and Amiet (1981) predicts trailing edge noise radiation from rotating blades. However, different versions of the theory exist; it is not known which version is the correct one and what the range of validity of the theory is. This paper addresses both questions by deriving Schlinker and Amiet's theory in a simple way and by comparing it to the new formulation, using model blade elements representative of a wind turbine, a cooling fan and an aircraft propeller. The correct form of Schlinker and Amiet's theory (1981) is identified. It is valid at high enough frequency, i.e. for a Helmholtz number relative to chord greater than one and a rotational frequency much smaller than the angular frequency of the noise sources.

Sinayoko, Samuel; Agarwal, Anurag

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy harvesting to power sensing hardware onboard wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbines are becoming a larger source of renewable energy in the United States. However, most of the designs are geared toward the weather conditions seen in Europe. Also, in the United States, manufacturers have been increasing the length of the turbine blades, often made of composite materials, to maximize power output. As a result of the more severe loading conditions in the United States and the material level flaws in composite structures, blade failure has been a more common occurrence in the U.S. than in Europe. Therefore, it is imperative that a structural health monitoring system be incorporated into the design of the wind turbines in order to monitor flaws before they lead to a catastrophic failure. Due to the rotation of the turbine and issues related to lightning strikes, the best way to implement a structural health monitoring system would be to use a network of wireless sensor nodes. In order to provide power to these sensor nodes, piezoelectric, thermoelectric and photovoltaic energy harvesting techniques are examined on a cross section of a CX-100 wind turbine blade in order to determine the feasibility of powering individual nodes that would compose the sensor network.

Carlson, Clinton P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schichting, Alexander D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quellette, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Faringolt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

NREL Wind Turbine Blade Structural Testing of the Modular Wind Energy MW45 Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-354  

SciTech Connect

This CRADA was a purely funds-in CRADA with Modular Wind Energy (MWE). MWE had a need to perform full-scale testing of a 45-m wind turbine blade. NREL/NWTC provided the capabilities, facilities, and equipment to test this large-scale MWE wind turbine blade. Full-scale testing is required to demonstrate the ability of the wind turbine blade to withstand static design load cases and demonstrate the fatigue durability. Structural testing is also necessary to meet international blade testing certification requirements. Through this CRADA, MWE would obtain test results necessary for product development and certification, and NREL would benefit by working with an industrial partner to better understand the unique test requirements for wind turbine blades with advanced structural designs.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact Sheet, May 2014 Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance - Fact...

136

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy Case study that...

137

Comparison of instruments for measuring step heights and surface profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data for step heights and surface profiles obtained using two commercially available instruments are compared. It is shown that step height data obtained with the Dektak IIA are good...

Bennett, Jean M

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Wind Turbine Scaling Enables Projects to Reach New Heights |...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbine Scaling Enables Projects to Reach New Heights Wind Turbine Scaling Enables Projects to Reach New Heights August 18, 2014 - 9:42am Addthis Turbines at the National Wind...

139

Effects of Altitude on Thermal Flying-Height Control Actuation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying-height control (TFC) is now a key technology used in hard-disk drives (HDD) as an effective way ... Precise control of the TFC sliders actuated flying-height (FH) is a major consideration...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy; Shuyu Zhang; Wentao Yan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Sliderbump contact and flying height calibration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultra-low slider flying height accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably the most reliable and ... One of the key issues to determine slider-flying height with the b...

Y. S. Ma; B. Liu; W. J. Wang; K. D. Ye

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optimization of micro-thermal actuator for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders were successfully used in commercial products to compensate the flying height (FH) loss and reduce the risk of head-disk contacts (Gupta et al. 2001; Wang et al. 2001; ...

Jin Liu; Jianhua Li; Junguo Xu; Shinobu Yoshida

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Flying height calibration with bump disk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is a big challenge to determine ultralow slider Flying Height (FH) accurately. The standard bump disk method is probably a reliable and acceptable method. The accuracy of the bump disk method on FH calibration depends on two key factors. One is the detection of the occurrence of slider??bump contact. The other is the understanding of the complicated slider??bump interaction process and the possible disturbance of the bumps on the slider flying performance. In this paper, the research work aiming to resolve these two key issues is reviewed. Key parameters that limit the accuracy of the bump disk method are discussed. Possible strategies to further improve the accuracy of the method are proposed.

Yansheng Ma; Bo Liu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Active flying-height control slider using MEMS thermal actuator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Todays head/disk interface design has a wide flying height distribution due to manufacturing tolerances, environmental...

Masayuki Kurita; Toshiya Shiramatsu; Kouji Miyake; Atsushi Kato

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research PPG and MAG Team Up for Turbine Blade Research May 14, 2010 - 12:39pm Addthis Lindsay Gsell For more than 15 years, PPG Industries has been supplying fiberglass to the wind turbine production industry. Now, with more than $700,000 in Recovery Act funds, PPG and partner MAG Industrial Automation Systems are researching materials and processes that could result in stronger and more reliable wind blades. "Current materials need to be optimized to meet the demanding performance needs of today's largest wind blade designs," said Cheryl Richards, PPG global marketing manager in wind energy. According to Cheryl, wind turbine blades are produced by combining dry fiber glass fabrics with a strong resin to form a composite. This method is widely used in production,

145

Heat Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transfer from Rotating Blade Transfer from Rotating Blade Platforms with and without Film Cooling J.C. Han and M.T. Schobeiri SCIES Project 03-01-SR113 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Texas A&M University Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded 07/01/2003 (36 Month Duration) $461,024 Total Contract Value ($361,024 DOE) Turbine Heat Transfer Laboratory Texas A&M University SR 113 - 10-2005 - JCHan Gas Turbine Needs Need Detailed Heat Transfer Data on Rotating Blade Platforms Improve Current Rotor Blade Cooling Schemes Provide Options for New Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Need Accurate and Efficient CFD Codes to Improve Flow and Heat Transfer Predictions and Guide Rotor Blade Cooling Designs Improved Turbine Power Efficiency by Increasing Turbine

146

A study of radial-flow turbomachinery blade vibration measurements using Eulerian laser Doppler vibrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structural integrity of blades is critical to the health of turbomachinery. Since operational failure of these blades can possibly lead to catastrophic failure of the machine it is important to have knowledge of blade conditions in an online fashion. Due to several practical implications it is desired to measure blade vibration with a non-contact technique. The application of laser Doppler vibrometry towards the vibration based condition monitoring of axial-flow turbomachinery blades has been successfully demonstrated in previous work. In this paper the feasibility of using laser Doppler vibrometry to measure radial-flow turbomachinery blade vibrations is investigated with the aid of digital image correlation and strain gauge telemetry.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Blade root attachment evaluation low-cycle fatigue estimates based on probabilistic approach  

SciTech Connect

When utilities purchase replacement blades from a manufacturer, the machining tolerances in the root attachment and the material fatigue properties are a major quality concern. These factors can have significant impact on the low-cycle fatigue life. For any replacement blades, the primary concern is to minimize the risk of an in-service failure. However, excessively conservative acceptance criteria would unnecessarily drive up the unit price for the replacement blades. Acceptance criteria with estimates of associated risks of in-service failure are therefore needed for each specific blade design based on the expected operating environment, material, and service life. In the work presented herein, a probabilistic model to estimate LCF in the blade root attachment is presented. The approach is demonstrated using stresses and material fatigue properties for a representative LP last stage blade of a steam turbine. The LCF life estimates obtained using the proposed approach show good correlation with field experience.

Sarlashkar, A.V.; Lam, T.C.T. [Stress Technology Inc., Rochester, NY (United States); McCloskey, T.H. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Rotationally Augmented Flow Structures and Time Varying Loads on Turbine Blades: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

To better understand wind turbine flow physics, time dependent blade surface pressure data were acquired from the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.

Schreck, S. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Non-contact gas turbine blade vibration monitoring using internal pressure and casing response measurements.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis addresses the non-contact measurement of rotor blade vibrations in gas turbines. Specifically, use is made of internal casing wall pressure, and external casing (more)

Forbes, Gareth Llewellyn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

SciTech Connect: Development and Validation of a New Blade Element...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technologies Office Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 17 WIND ENERGY BLADE ELEMENT MOMENTUM; SKEWED WAKE; FAST; AERODYN; UNSTEADY AERODYNAMICS...

151

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design, compatibility for the different airfoil family members, etc.) and with the ultimate objective that the airfoils will reduce the blade loads. In this paper the whole airfoil design process and the main characteristics of the airfoil family are described. Some force coefficients for the design Reynolds number are also presented. The new designed airfoils have been studied with computational calculations (panel method code and CFD) and also in a wind tunnel experimental campaign. Some of these results will be also presented in this paper.

B Mndez; X Munduate; U San Miguel

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Wind Turbine Blade Test Definition of the DeWind DW90 Rotor Blade: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-326  

SciTech Connect

This CRADA was developed as a funds-in CRADA with DeWind to assess the suitability of facilities and equipment at the NWTC for performing certification blade testing on wind turbine blades made from advanced materials. DeWind produces a wind turbine blade which includes the use of high-strength and stiffness materials. NREL and DeWind had a mutual interest in defining the necessary facilities, equipment, and test methods for testing large wind turbine blades which incorporate advanced materials and adaptive structures, as the demands on test equipment and infrastructure are greater than current capabilities. Work under this CRADA would enable DeWind to verify domestic capability for certification-class static and fatigue testing, while NREL would be able to identify and develop specialized test capabilities based on the test requirements.

Hughes, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Resonant Vibrations Resulting from the Re-Engineering of a Constant-Speed 2-Bladed Turbine to a Variable-Speed 3-Bladed Turbine  

SciTech Connect

The CART3 (Controls Advanced Research Turbine, 3-bladed) at the National Wind Technology Center has recently been converted from a 2-bladed constant speed machine to a 3-bladed variable speed machine designed specically for controls research. The purpose of this conversion was to develop an advanced controls field-testing platform which has the more typical 3-bladed configuration. A result of this conversion was the emergence of several resonant vibrations, some of which initially prevented operation of the turbine until they could be explained and resolved. In this paper, the investigations into these vibrations are presented as 'lessons-learned'. Additionally, a frequency-domain technique called waterfall plotting is discussed and its usefulness in this research is illustrated.

Fleming, P.; Wright, A. D.; Finersh, L. J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

DEVELOPMENT OF PROTECTIVE COATINGS FOR SINGLE CRYSTAL TURBINE BLADES  

SciTech Connect

Turbine blades in coal derived syngas systems are subject to oxidation and corrosion due to high steam temperature and pressure. Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are developed to address these problems. The emphasis is on prime-reliant design and a better coating architecture, having high temperature and corrosion resistance properties for turbine blades. In Phase I, UES Inc. proposed to develop, characterize and optimize a prime reliant TBC system, having smooth and defect-free NiCoCrAlY bond layer and a defect free oxide sublayer, using a filtered arc technology. Phase I work demonstrated the deposition of highly dense, smooth and defect free NiCoCrAlY bond coat on a single crystal CMSX-4 substrate and the deposition of alpha-alumina and yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) sublayer on top of the bond coat. Isothermal and cyclic oxidation test and pre- and post-characterization of these layers, in Phase I work, (with and without top TBC layer of commercial EB PVD YSZ) revealed significant performance enhancement.

Amarendra K. Rai

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Blade tip clearance effect on the performance and flow field of a three stage axial turbine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rate was also measured using a venturi flow meter in order to discern the effect the blade tip clearance has on the engine efficiency and performance. Results have shown that the blade tip clearance losses appear to play a smaller role when compared...

Abdel-Fattah, Sharef Aly

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Swept Blade Aero-Elastic Model for a Small Wind Turbine (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

A preprocessor for analyzing preswept wind turbines using the in-house aero-elastic tool coupled with a multibody dynamic simulator was developed. A baseline 10-kW small wind turbine with straight blades and various configurations that featured bend-torsion coupling via blade-tip sweep were investigated to study their impact on ultimate loads and fatigue damage equivalent loads.

Damiani, R.; Lee, S.; Larwood, S.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

LQG control of horizontal wind turbines for blades and tower loads alleviation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LQG control of horizontal wind turbines for blades and tower loads alleviation A. Pintea*, N of power produced by two bladed horizontal variable speed wind turbines. The proposed controller ensures oscillations and with the tower bending tendency. Keywords: LQG control, Wind turbines, Multi-objective control

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

159

Ris-R-Report Full Scale Test of SSP 34m blade,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nutidens og fremtidens store vinger under kombineret last" where a 34m wind turbine blade from SSP application and the solution for the load application is described in this report as well. The blade has been have been measured, and also 378 strain gauge measurements have been performed. Furthermore Acoustic

160

Model reduction applied to multi-stage assemblies of bladed disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

consisted in modelling separately each stage of the assembly of bladed disks that compose the rotor of a jetModel reduction applied to multi-stage assemblies of bladed disks A. Sternch¨uss, E. Balm, France e-mail: arnaud.sternchuss@ecp.fr P. Jean, J.-P. Lombard Snecma (Safran Group) Rond-point Ren

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Computational Analysis of a Tip Vortex Structure Shed from a Bioinspired Blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design for this purpose. Different rotor blade designs and relevant insect wings are under study Computational Analysis of a Tip Vortex Structure Shed from a Bioinspired Blade Sebastian was generated with SolidWorks CAD software from measurements performed on a wing sample obtained from

Maccabe, Barney

162

Reduction of teeter angle excursions for a two-bladed downwind rotor using cyclic pitch control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reduction of teeter angle excursions for a two-bladed downwind rotor using cyclic pitch control methods are based on cyclic pitch through the pitch servo system. The first method is based on a PI of the pitch regulated 5MW reference turbine used in the IEA Annex 23 benchmark. KEYWORDS: TWO-BLADED WIND

163

Dynamic stall analysis of horizontal-axis-wind-turbine blades using computational fluid dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic stall has been widely known to significantly affect the performance of the wind turbines. In this paper aerodynamic simulation of the unsteady low-speed flow past two-dimensional wind turbine blade profiles developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will be performed. The aerodynamic simulation will be performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The governing equations used in the simulations are the Unsteady-Reynolds-Averaged-Navier-Stokes (URANS) equations. The unsteady separated turbulent flow around an oscillating airfoil pitching in a sinusoidal pattern in the regime of low Reynolds number is investigated numerically. The investigation employs the URANS approach with the most suitable turbulence model. The development of the light dynamic stall of the blades under consideration is studied. The S809 blade profile is simulated at different mean wind speeds. Moreover the S826 blade profile is also considered for analysis of wind turbine blade which is the most suitable blade profile for the wind conditions in Egypt over the site of Gulf of El-Zayt. In order to find the best oscillating frequency different oscillating frequencies are studied. The best frequency can then be used for the blade pitch controller. The comparisons with the experimental results showed that the used CFD code can accurately predict the blade profile unsteady aerodynamic loads.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S. Cairns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Reference 3, available on the Sandia web site www.sandia.gov/Renewable_Energy/Wind_Energy/. DELAMINATION1 PREDICTION OF DELAM INATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURAL DETAILS John F. Mandell, Douglas S materials structures such as wind turbine blades. Design methodologies to prevent such failures have

165

Resonances of a Forced Mathieu Equation with Reference to Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonances of a Forced Mathieu Equation with Reference to Wind Turbine Blades Venkatanarayanan Engineering Michigan State University East Lansing, Michigan 48824 Abstract A horizontal axis wind turbine blade in steady rotation endures cyclic transverse loading due to wind shear, tower shadowing

Feeny, Brian

166

Approach to the fatigue analysis of vertical-axis wind-turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

A cursory analysis of the stress history of wind turbine blades indicates that a single stress level at each wind speed does not adequately describe the blade stress history. A statistical description is required. Blade stress data collected from the DOE/ALCOA Low Cost experimental turbines indicate that the Rayleigh probability density function adequately describes the distribution of vibratory stresses at each wind speed. The Rayleigh probability density function allows the distribution of vibratory stresses to be described by the RMS of the stress vs. time signal. With the RMS stress level described for all wind speeds, the complete stress history of the turbine blades is known. Miner's linear cumulative damage rule is used as a basis for summing the fatigue damage over all operating conditions. An analytical expression is derived to predict blade fatigue life.

Veers, P.S.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)  

SciTech Connect

Proof-of-Concept Manufacturing and Testing of Composite Wind Generator Blades Made by HCBMP (High Compression Bladder Molded Prepreg)

William C. Leighty; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

168

TECHNICAL PAPER Numerical simulation of thermal flying height control sliders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the flying characteristics at the head-disk interface. In this paper, a finite element model is developed hard disk drives. Thermal flying height control sliders are presently in common use to compensate and the magnetic disk (Schultz 2007). Dietzel et al. (2002) dem- onstrated the feasibility of dynamic flying height

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

169

Effects of collector radius and chimney height on power output of a solar chimney power plant with turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A comprehensive theoretical model is proposed for the performance evaluation of a solar chimney power plant (SCPP), and has been verified by the experimental data of the Spanish prototype. This model takes account of the effects of flow and heat losses, and the temperature lapse rates inside and outside the chimney. There is a maximum power output for a certain SCPP under a given solar radiation condition, due to flow and heat losses and the installation of the turbines. In addition, the design flow rate of the turbine in the SCPP system is found beneficial for power output when it is lower than that at themaximum power point. Furthermore, a limitation on the maximum collector radius exists for the maximum attainable power of the SCPP; whereas, no such limitation exists for chimney height in terms of contemporary construction technology.

Jing-yin Li; Peng-hua Guo; Yuan Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Metallurgical failure analysis for a blade failed in a gas-turbine engine of a power plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The failed gas-turbine blades (first stage blades) (type Siemens V94.2 KWU) were acquired from TNB Research Sdn. Bhd: a subsidiary of Malaysian power-generation industry (TNB, Malaysia). The blades were sectioned for metallographic investigations. The microstructural characterization involved use of both optical as well as electron microscopes including application of EPMA technique. The Microstructures were compared for three spots selection i.e. leading edge of the blade (transverse and longitudinal), trailing edge of the blade (transverse and longitudinal), and centre (near the platform of the blade) (transverse and longitudinal). The material properties and behavior at high temperature were interpreted on the basis of the observed microstructures and the phases present in the alloy. The interpretations were related to the operating conditions of the turbine blade; and main cause of failure was found to be creep damage. Recommendations have been made for improved material performance.

Zainul Huda

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Effect of contact conditions during thermo-mechanical contact between a thermal flying height control slider and a disk asperity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A three-dimensional thermo-mechanical model is developed for the transient contact between a thermal flying height control (TFC) slider and a disk asperity. The effect of contact conditions is investigated, including the friction coefficient and the circumferential disk velocity. The damage of the readwrite shields due to contacts with disk asperities is studied along with the maximum temperature at the location of the read element. The effect of diameter and material properties of the asperity is also investigated. Strong dependence of deformation and maximum temperature is observed as a function of the diameter and material properties of the asperity.

Wenping Song; Andrey Ovcharenko; Bernhard Knigge; Min Yang; Frank E. Talke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Eddy?Current Inspection of Cracking in Land?Based Gas Turbine Blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been a growing need in the electric utility industry to assess the remaining life of blades in gas turbines. It is quite important to nondestructively comprehend the depths of surface?breaking cracks in blades. Flexible eddy current array probes have been developed to overcome the major limitations of existing eddy current inspection systems. The use of an array of sensors allows cracks of all lengths to be detected and will ultimately allow real time data imaging to provide rapid inspection and easy interpretation. For this study using eddy current techniques crack detection equipment has been developed and applied to gas turbine Stage 1 blades for field use.

H. Fukutomi; T. Ogata

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Property:Building/InteriorHeight | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building/InteriorHeight Building/InteriorHeight Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Interior height, m Pages using the property "Building/InteriorHeight" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2.8 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 3.5 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 3.2 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 3 +

174

City of Seaside Heights, New Jersey (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seaside Heights, New Jersey (Utility Company) Seaside Heights, New Jersey (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Seaside Heights City of Place New Jersey Utility Id 16864 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Floodlights 1000 W Lighting Floodlights 150W Lighting Floodlights 250W Lighting Floodlights 400W Lighting Residential Residential Average Rates Residential: $0.2410/kWh Commercial: $0.2060/kWh References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Seaside_Heights,_New_Jersey_(Utility_Company)&oldid=410221

175

Particle Contamination on a Thermal Flying-Height Control Slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle contamination on a slider in a hard disk drive (HDD) affects the HDDs reliability. With the introduction of the thermal flying-height control (TFC) slider, the temperature in the headdisk interface (HD...

Nan Liu; David B. Bogy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Flying Height Drop Due to Air Entrapment in Lubricant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, it is found experimentally that the flying height of an air bearing slider is influenced by the lubricant on the disk. It is explained as the air molecules ... in air bearing force, and hence, the flying

Wei Hua; Kang Kee Ng; Shengkai Yu; Bo Liu; Vivian Ng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Analogs in the Wintertime 500 mb Height Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A 15-winter sample of daily gridded values of Northern Hemisphere 500 mb heights is examined for the existence of recurrent flow patterns (analogs). The analog search is repeated several times after degrees of freedom are successively removed ...

David S. Gutzler; Jagadish Shukla

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Height premiums for seaside community condominiums : an empirical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis investigates the value that condominium buyers in oceanfront communities place on how high above the ground their home will be. It is assumed that buyers will pay a premium for height, but to date no study has ...

Loker, Randall (Randall David)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Improving the aerodynamic efficiency of blade profile cascade used in a cooled turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Good effect from using rotor blade cascades, the pressure sides profile of which has a bend near the trailing edge at an angle of no larger than 15, is confirmed from the results of experimental studies.

B. I. Mamaev; M. R. Valeev

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Recovery Act-Funded 90-m Blade Test Facility Commissioned May 18, 2011  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Wind Technology Testing Center (WTTC) in Boston, Massachusetts, now offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 m in length as the state-of-the-art facility opened May 18, 2011.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

HIGH REYNOLDS NUMBER FLOW PAST MANY BLADES IN EXTREME GROUND EFFECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

blades have much practical importance, such as helicopter aerodynamics, in fans, propellers, wind turbines, food mixers, hover mowers and so on (1­4). Many body interactions are also important

Purvis, Richard

182

Numerical Investigation of Temperature Distribution on a High Pressure Gas Turbine Blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A numerical code is developed to calculate the temperature distributions on the surface of a gas turbine blade. This code is a tool for quick prediction of the temperatures by knowing the boundary conditions and the flow conditions, and doesn...

Zirakzadeh, Hootan

2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

Estimate of remaining life of blades in aircraft gas turbines from accumulated creep strain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of a multicomponent solution to the problem of calculating the remaining life of blades on the basis of accumulated creep strain with allowance for the effect of vibration loads is ...

A. N. Vetrov; A. G. Kucher

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Blade tonal noise reduction using tail articulation at high Reynolds number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biologically inspired method of tail articulation is investigated as a means of reducing tonal noise due to the stator wake blade interaction in underwater vehicles. This work is experimental in nature and conducted ...

Macumber, Daniel Lee, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Implementation of a Biaxial Resonant Fatigue Test Method on a Large Wind Turbine Blade  

SciTech Connect

A biaxial resonant test method was utilized to simultaneously fatigue test a wind turbine blade in the flap and edge (lead-lag) direction. Biaxial resonant blade fatigue testing is an accelerated life test method utilizing oscillating masses on the blade; each mass is independently oscillated at the respective flap and edge blade resonant frequency. The flap and edge resonant frequency were not controlled, nor were they constant for this demonstrated test method. This biaxial resonant test method presented surmountable challenges in test setup simulation, control and data processing. Biaxial resonant testing has the potential to complete test projects faster than single-axis testing. The load modulation during a biaxial resonant test may necessitate periodic load application above targets or higher applied test cycles.

Snowberg, D.; Dana, S.; Hughes, S.; Berling, P.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Observed acoustic and aeroelastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence excitation  

SciTech Connect

Early results from a recent experiment designed to directly evaluate the aeroacoustic/elastic spectral responses of a MOD-2 turbine blade to turbulence-induced unsteady blade loads are discussed. The experimental procedure consisted of flying a hot-film anemometer from a tethered balloon in the turbine in-flow and simultaneously measuring the fluctuating airload and aeroelastic response at two blade span stations (65% and 87% spans) using surface-mounted, subminiature pressure transducers and standard strain gage instrumentation. The radiated acoustic pressure field was measured with a triad of very-low-frequency microphones placed at ground level, 1.5 rotor diameters upwind of the disk. Initial transfer function estimates for acoustic radiation, blade normal forces, flapwise acceleration/displacement, and chord/flapwise moments are presented.

Kelley, N.D.; McKenna, H.E.; Jacobs, E.W.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Improving the manufacturing yield of investment cast turbine blades through robust design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing of turbine blades is often outsourced to investment casting foundries by aerospace companies that design and build jet engines. Aerospace companies have found that casting defects are an important cost ...

Margetts, David (David Lawrence)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Effect of stress ratio on fatigue life of GFRP composites for WT blade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fatigue life of GFRP (glass-fiber reinforced plastic) composites used in wind turbine rotor blades has been evaluated considering the glass fiber orientations. Three different laminate composites with the resp...

Yong-Hak Huh; Jae-Hyun Lee; Dong-Jin Kim

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

An efficient algorithm for blade loss simulations applied to a high-order rotor dynamics problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a novel approach is presented for blade loss simulation of an aircraft gas turbine rotor mounted on rolling element bearings with squeeze film dampers, seal rub and enclosed in a flexible housing. The modal truncation augmentation...

Parthasarathy, Nikhil Kaushik

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Stress and Fracture Analysis of a Class of Bonded Joints in Wind Turbine Blades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simplified model is proposed to investigate the stress fields and the strain energy release rate (SERR) associated with cracks in bonded joints in wind turbine blades. The proposed two-dimensional model consists of nonparallel upper and lower...

Chen, Chang

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

191

Effects of trailing edge flap dynamic deployment on blade-vortex interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theoretical and experimental investigation is undertaken to determine the effects of an actively deployable trailing edge flap on the disturbances created during blade-vortex interactions (BVI). The theoretical model consists of an unsteady panel...

Nelson, Carter T.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

192

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of Blade Vortex Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An adaptive mesh method for the simulation of parallel ics. Blade Vortex Interaction (BV1) with an active Trailing Edge Flap (TEF) is presented. The two-dimensional 1111-steady problem is solved by a higher order upwind Euler method...

Kim, Kyu-Sup

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

A microwear study of Clovis blades from the Gault site, Bell County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prehistoric quarries in America are poorly understood and thus problematical to take into account when making inferences about past behavior. A microwear analysis of Clovis blades from the 2000 Texas A&M University excavations at the Gault site (41...

Minchak, Scott Alan

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

194

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLUID FLOW MODELING OF RESIN TRANSFER MOLDING FOR COMPOSITE MATERIAL WIND TURBINE BLADE STRUCTURES the guidance and direction provided by my advisors: Dr. Mandell, Dr. Cairns and Dr. Larsen. I would also like

195

Microprocessor-based ultrasonic height controller for sugarcane harvesters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SENSING. Introduction. Accuracy and Response to Height Changes Performance in Ground Detection Soil-Stalk Detection and Discrimination Parameter Adjustments in the System's Software CONCLUSIONS. REFERENCES APPENDIX A.... Ultrasonic Response and Accuracy Test on Wooden Dowels 60 24 Strip-Chart Record'ng of Ultrasonic Height Sensor Output with Various Weights in the Weighted Running Average. 62 25. Single Level Threshold Detection Scheme 64 26. Bilevel Threshold...

Coad, Craig Allan

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Structural Design of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine Composite Blade  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the structural design of a tidal composite blade. The structural design is preceded by two steps: hydrodynamic design and determination of extreme loads. The hydrodynamic design provides the chord and twist distributions along the blade length that result in optimal performance of the tidal turbine over its lifetime. The extreme loads, i.e. the extreme flap and edgewise loads that the blade would likely encounter over its lifetime, are associated with extreme tidal flow conditions and are obtained using a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Given the blade external shape and the extreme loads, we use a laminate-theory-based structural design to determine the optimal layout of composite laminas such that the ultimate-strength and buckling-resistance criteria are satisfied at all points in the blade. The structural design approach allows for arbitrary specification of the chord, twist, and airfoil geometry along the blade and an arbitrary number of shear webs. In addition, certain fabrication criteria are imposed, for example, each composite laminate must be an integral multiple of its constituent ply thickness. In the present effort, the structural design uses only static extreme loads; dynamic-loads-based fatigue design will be addressed in the future. Following the blade design, we compute the distributed structural properties, i.e. flap stiffness, edgewise stiffness, torsion stiffness, mass, moments of inertia, elastic-axis offset, and center-of-mass offset along the blade. Such properties are required by hydro-elastic codes to model the tidal current turbine and to perform modal, stability, loads, and response analyses.

Bir, G. S.; Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Creation of Data Pattern for High Accuracy Flying Height Measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A common technique for measuring flying height is using the ratio of the 1st and the 3rd harmonic of a periodic data pattern. Since the 3rd harmonic is typically smaller than the 1st, and the recording channel usually rolls off at higher harmonics, the magnitude of the 3rd harmonic dominates the signal to noise ratio of the measured flying height. Therefore it is desirable to create a data pattern that has a large 3rd harmonic component for flying height measurement. This paper describes a method to create data patterns with a high frequency component larger than the 1st harmonic. The method multiplies a high frequency signal to a basic periodic signal to create a high frequency component and a low frequency component. The high frequency signal may be the 3rd harmonic and can be larger than the low frequency one. In addition, newly created data pattern was applied to real hard disk drive, and the accuracy of measured flying height was demonstrated in comparison with measured flying height based on conventional data pattern.

Yawshing Tang; Sung-Chang Lee; Mike Suk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Wave height forecasting in Dayyer, the Persian Gulf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forecasting of wave parameters is necessary for many marine and coastal operations. Different forecasting methodologies have been developed using the wind and wave characteristics. In this paper, artificial neural network (ANN) as a robust data learning method is used to forecast the wave height for the next 3, 6, 12 and 24h in the Persian Gulf. To determine the effective parameters, different models with various combinations of input parameters were considered. Parameters such as wind speed, direction and wave height of the previous 3h, were found to be the best inputs. Furthermore, using the difference between wave and wind directions showed better performance. The results also indicated that if only the wind parameters are used as model inputs the accuracy of the forecasting increases as the time horizon increases up to 6h. This can be due to the lower influence of previous wave heights on larger lead time forecasting and the existing lag between the wind and wave growth. It was also found that in short lead times, the forecasted wave heights primarily depend on the previous wave heights, while in larger lead times there is a greater dependence on previous wind speeds.

B. Kamranzad; A. Etemad-Shahidi; M.H. Kazeminezhad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite damage and fracture modes that resemble those reported in the tests. The results show that computational simulation can be relied on to enhance the design of tapered composite structures such as the ones used in turbine wind blades. A computational simulation for durability, damage tolerance (D&DT) and reliability of composite wind turbine blade structures in presence of uncertainties in material properties was performed. A composite turbine blade was first assessed with finite element based multi-scale progressive failure analysis to determine failure modes and locations as well as the fracture load. D&DT analyses were then validated with static test performed at Sandia National Laboratories. The work was followed by detailed weight analysis to identify contribution of various materials to the overall weight of the blade. The methodology ensured that certain types of failure modes, such as delamination progression, are contained to reduce risk to the structure. Probabilistic analysis indicated that composite shear strength has a great influence on the blade ultimate load under static loading. Weight was reduced by 12% with robust design without loss in reliability or D&DT. Structural benefits obtained with the use of enhanced matrix properties through nanoparticles infusion were also assessed. Thin unidirectional fiberglass layers enriched with silica nanoparticles were applied to the outer surfaces of a wind blade to improve its overall structural performance and durability. The wind blade was a 9-meter prototype structure manufactured and tested subject to three saddle static loading at Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The blade manufacturing did not include the use of any nano-material. With silica nanoparticles in glass composite applied to the exterior surfaces of the blade, the durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) results from multi-scale PFA showed an increase in ultimate load of the blade by 9.2% as compared to baseline structural performance (without nano). The use of nanoparticles lead to a delay in the onset of delamination. Load-displacement relati

Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

200

South Miami Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.597606°, -80.3806096° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.597606,"lon":-80.3806096,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

South Chicago Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4808681°, -87.6378211° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4808681,"lon":-87.6378211,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

202

Palos Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Palos Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Palos Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6680885°, -87.7964416° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6680885,"lon":-87.7964416,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) CHIP House Takes Design to Different Heights (Literally) May 12, 2011 - 5:49pm Addthis A model of the SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Deacthlon team's CHIP house. | Photo Courtesy of the Solar Decathlon's Flickr photostream A model of the SCI-Arc/Caltech Solar Deacthlon team's CHIP house. | Photo Courtesy of the Solar Decathlon's Flickr photostream April Saylor April Saylor Former Digital Outreach Strategist, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? The next Solar Decathlon will be held Sept. 23-Oct. 2, 2011, at the National Mall's West Potomac Park in Washington, D.C. In honor of the U.S Department of Energy's Solar Decathlon -- which challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build, and operate solar-powered

204

Rowland Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, California: Energy Resources Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9761238°, -117.9053395° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9761238,"lon":-117.9053395,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

205

Day Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.1739494°, -84.226325° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.1739494,"lon":-84.226325,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

Middleburg Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Middleburg Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Middleburg Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3614401°, -81.812912° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3614401,"lon":-81.812912,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

207

Hacienda Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hacienda Heights, California: Energy Resources Hacienda Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9930677°, -117.9686755° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9930677,"lon":-117.9686755,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

208

Harwood Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harwood Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Harwood Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.9672532°, -87.8075612° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9672532,"lon":-87.8075612,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

209

Barker Heights, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Barker Heights, North Carolina: Energy Resources Barker Heights, North Carolina: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.3112279°, -82.444008° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.3112279,"lon":-82.444008,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

210

Maple Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources Heights-Lake Desire, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.4521975°, -122.0984885° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.4521975,"lon":-122.0984885,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

211

Holden Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holden Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Holden Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.4966702°, -81.3878481° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.4966702,"lon":-81.3878481,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

212

Wofford Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wofford Heights, California: Energy Resources Wofford Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 35.7068961°, -118.4561967° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.7068961,"lon":-118.4561967,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

213

Yorktown Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yorktown Heights, New York: Energy Resources Yorktown Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.2709274°, -73.7776336° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.2709274,"lon":-73.7776336,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Holiday Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9459512°, -74.2540324° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9459512,"lon":-74.2540324,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

Mount Healthy Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2703349°, -84.568001° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2703349,"lon":-84.568001,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

216

Town of Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) Kingsford Heights, Indiana (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation, search Name Town of Kingsford Heights Place Indiana Utility Id 10330 Utility Location Yes Ownership M NERC Location RFC NERC RFC Yes Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Distribution Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1_a[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Churches, Schools, Commercial and Small Power Service Commercial General Power Service Rate C- Demand Metered Commercial General Power Service Rate C- Non Demand Metered Commercial General Service Rate M- Demand Metered Commercial General Service Rate M- Non Demand Metered Commercial

217

Wheatley Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wheatley Heights, New York: Energy Resources Wheatley Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.76371°, -73.3698426° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.76371,"lon":-73.3698426,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

218

Ladera Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ladera Heights, California: Energy Resources Ladera Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9941792°, -118.3753543° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9941792,"lon":-118.3753543,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

219

Shelter Island Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, New York: Energy Resources Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.0839883°, -72.3559166° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.0839883,"lon":-72.3559166,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

220

Newburgh Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newburgh Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Newburgh Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.450052°, -81.6634617° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.450052,"lon":-81.6634617,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Olympia Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.726768°, -80.3553306° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.726768,"lon":-80.3553306,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Glenvar Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glenvar Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Glenvar Heights, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.7076018°, -80.3256076° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.7076018,"lon":-80.3256076,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

223

Wind Industry Soars to New Heights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Industry Soars to New Heights Wind Industry Soars to New Heights Wind Industry Soars to New Heights August 5, 2013 - 8:13am Addthis Watch the video to learn more about the new records reached by the U.S. industry as found in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Matty Greene Matty Greene Videographer Wind capacity additions in the United States reached record levels in 2012, as detailed in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. In a video narrated by Jose Zayas, Director of the Energy Department's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, he highlights the wind energy accomplishments in 2012. This includes adding 13 gigawatts in new installations -- enough to surpass any other country -- as well as employing 80,000 American workers. After watching the video, make sure to checkout the report in its entirety

224

Wind Industry Soars to New Heights | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Soars to New Heights Industry Soars to New Heights Wind Industry Soars to New Heights August 5, 2013 - 8:13am Addthis Watch the video to learn more about the new records reached by the U.S. industry as found in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. | Video by Matty Greene, Energy Department. Matty Greene Matty Greene Videographer Wind capacity additions in the United States reached record levels in 2012, as detailed in the 2012 Wind Technologies Market Report. In a video narrated by Jose Zayas, Director of the Energy Department's Wind and Water Power Technologies Office, he highlights the wind energy accomplishments in 2012. This includes adding 13 gigawatts in new installations -- enough to surpass any other country -- as well as employing 80,000 American workers. After watching the video, make sure to checkout the report in its entirety

225

Preston Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Preston Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Preston Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.343056°, -88.719722° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.343056,"lon":-88.719722,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

226

Arlington Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arlington Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Arlington Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.0883603°, -87.9806265° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0883603,"lon":-87.9806265,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

La Habra Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Habra Heights, California: Energy Resources Habra Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 33.9608461°, -117.9506186° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.9608461,"lon":-117.9506186,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

228

Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Hasbrouck Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8581553°, -74.0806971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8581553,"lon":-74.0806971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

229

Huber Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Huber Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Huber Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.843947°, -84.1246608° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.843947,"lon":-84.1246608,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

230

Warrensville Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warrensville Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Warrensville Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4386°, -81.523419° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4386,"lon":-81.523419,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

231

Vadnais Heights, Minnesota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vadnais Heights, Minnesota: Energy Resources Vadnais Heights, Minnesota: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 45.0574658°, -93.0738305° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.0574658,"lon":-93.0738305,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

232

Madison Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.4858692°, -83.1052028° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.4858692,"lon":-83.1052028,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Airway Heights, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Airway Heights, Washington: Energy Resources Airway Heights, Washington: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 47.644611°, -117.5932728° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.644611,"lon":-117.5932728,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

234

Grandview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grandview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Grandview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9797863°, -83.0407403° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9797863,"lon":-83.0407403,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

235

Billington Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Billington Heights, New York: Energy Resources Billington Heights, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.7842264°, -78.6264151° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.7842264,"lon":-78.6264151,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

San Antonio Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Antonio Heights, California: Energy Resources Antonio Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.1555638°, -117.6564437° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.1555638,"lon":-117.6564437,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

237

Avocado Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avocado Heights, California: Energy Resources Avocado Heights, California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 34.0361217°, -117.9911765° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0361217,"lon":-117.9911765,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

238

Shaker Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shaker Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Shaker Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.4739419°, -81.5370671° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4739419,"lon":-81.5370671,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

239

Parma Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Parma Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Parma Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.3900518°, -81.7595769° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3900518,"lon":-81.7595769,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

240

Colonial Heights County, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heights County, Virginia: Energy Resources Heights County, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.2656873°, -77.3956004° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.2656873,"lon":-77.3956004,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Thermal Cyclic Creep and Long-Term Strength of the Material of Aircraft Gas Turbine Blades after Operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The remaining thermal cyclic creep and long-term strength life of the material of aircraft gas turbine blades after operation has been determined experimentally....

B. S. Karpinos; V. V. Samuleev; B. A. Lyashenko; E. V. Laiske

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

An automatic cutting height control system for a sugarcane harvester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). . . . . 53 22. 23. Effect of the soil-stalk weight factor on the ground average, and the stalk average A comparison of Avg and Avs calculated from laboratory data with both real numbers, and integer numbers. . . . . . . 57 24 . A graph of a portion... factor, W. By calculating the difference between Avg and Avs, as equation (5) shows, the height of the sugarcane stubble remaining after cutting, 0, was to be determined. D = Avg - Avs (5) where: D - the height of the sugarcane stubble remaining...

Hale, Scott Andrew

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Cell development obeys maximum Fisher information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10 micron and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6 micron. The NM contains about 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order delta I = 0 and approximate 2nd-order delta I = 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1-4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the approximate flux value F =10^16 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL approaches IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information approaches non-equilibrium, one condition for life.

B. R. Frieden; R. A. Gatenby

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

Time dependent simulation of active flying height control of TFC sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Flying-height Control (TFC) sliders have been recently used to reduce flying height at the head disk interface and obtain more stable flying heights (Kurita et al. 2005; Song et al. 2007; Liu et al. 2008....

Pablo Antonio Salas; Uwe Boettcher; Frank E. Talke

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Foreign object damage on the leading edge of gas turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The severe damages to the leading edge of aircraft blades occur when millimeter-sized particles such as sands, gravels or even the pieces of the engine components impact those of blades, which is called hard body impact or foreign object damage. This damage produces the geometry discontinuity such as the notch on the blades which becomes the site for fatigue crack initiation. FOD on the leading edge of the turbine blade is done by using the finite element method in this paper. Experimental stress analysis is performed for investigating the stress concentration factor at the crater base and is compared with the data from the finite element and the analytical method. The comparison shows that the finite element method results agree well with the experimental and analytical data at the crater base. Then the residual stress along the largest blade length is obtained for the potential crack initiating regions, and at the end, the analysis focuses on the comparison between the quasi-static indentation and fully dynamic impact for three critical locations where the tensile residual stresses cause crack initiation.

Seyed Masoud Marandi; Kh. Rahmani; Mehdi Tajdari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Comparison of strength and load-based methods for testing wind turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to compare two methods of blade test loading and show how they are applied in an actual blade test. Strength and load-based methods were examined to determine the test load for an Atlantic Orient Corporation (AOC) 15/50 wind turbine blade for fatigue and static testing. Fatigue load-based analysis was performed using measured field test loads extrapolated for extreme rare events and scaled to thirty-year spectra. An accelerated constant amplitude fatigue test that gives equivalent damage at critical locations was developed using Miner`s Rule and the material S-N curves. Test load factors were applied to adjust the test loads for uncertainties, and differences between the test and operating environment. Similar analyses were carried, out for the strength-based fatigue test using the strength of the blade and the material properties to determine the load level and number of constant amplitude cycles to failure. Static tests were also developed using load and strength criteria. The resulting test loads were compared and contrasted. The analysis shows that, for the AOC 15/50 blade, the strength-based test loads are higher than any of the static load-based cases considered but were exceeded in the fatigue analysis for a severe hot/wet environment.

Musial, W.D.; Clark, M.E.; Egging, N. [and others

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Wind turbine blade fatigue tests: lessons learned and application to SHM system development  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental results of several structural health monitoring (SHM) methods applied to a 9-meter CX-100 wind turbine blade that underwent fatigue loading. The blade was instrumented with piezoelectric transducers, accelerometers, acoustic emission sensors, and foil strain gauges. It underwent harmonic excitation at its first natural frequency using a hydraulically actuated resonant excitation system. The blade was initially excited at 25% of its design load, and then with steadily increasing loads until it failed. Various data were collected between and during fatigue loading sessions. The data were measured over multiple frequency ranges using a variety of acquisition equipment, including off-the-shelf systems and specially designed hardware developed by the authors. Modal response, diffuse wave-field transfer functions, and ultrasonic guided wave methods were applied to assess the condition of the wind turbine blade. The piezoelectric sensors themselves were also monitored using a sensor diagnostics procedure. This paper summarizes experimental procedures and results, focusing particularly on fatigue crack detection, and concludes with considerations for implementing such damage identification systems, which will be used as a guideline for future SHM system development for operating wind turbine blades.

Taylor, Stuart G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jeong, Hyomi [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Jang, JaeKyung [Chonbuk National University, Korea; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Todd, Michael D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

248

Improved methodology for design of low wind speed specific wind turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The majority of wind power is currently produced on high wind speed sites, and the standard design of wind turbine blades has evolved to be structurally efficient under these conditions. Recently, sites with lower quality wind resources have begun to be considered for new wind farms. This study confirms the expectation that the standard high wind speed design process results in less efficient structures when used for low wind speed conditions, and that a low wind speed specific design process is able to yield structural improvements. A comparative structural analysis of generic blades from high and low wind speed turbines quantifies the differences in structural performance between high and low wind speed blades, and indicates the ways in which the standard design process should be modified to suit a low wind speed specific design. An improved design method specifically for low wind speed blades is proposed, with more emphasis on stiffness than in the standard high wind speed design. The improved design process results in a lighter and cheaper blade than the conventionally designed one, whilst still fulfilling the design requirements.

R.H. Barnes; E.V. Morozov; K. Shankar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

LEVY PROCESS CONDITIONED BY ITS HEIGHT PROCESS June 11, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-called exploration process defined in [10], T0 is the hitting time of 0 for X. When the process X is a compensatedL´EVY PROCESS CONDITIONED BY ITS HEIGHT PROCESS June 11, 2011 MATHIEU RICHARD Abstract. In the present work, we consider spectrally positive L´evy processes (Xt, t 0) not drifting to + and we

250

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonant Instability in Mountain Waves: Breaking at Subcritical Mountain Heights Kevin Viner1 and breaks subcritical critical Nh/U = 0.5 Nh/U = 0.8 #12;Subcritical Instability: An Example three peaks · Nh/U = 0.6 · U/NL = 0.1 · nonrotating · Time-dependent model initialized with subcritical steady wave

251

Exploiting the Height of Vehicles in Vehicular Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploiting the Height of Vehicles in Vehicular Communication Mate Boban1,3, Rui Meireles2,3, Jo@ece.cmu.edu, prs@cs.cmu.edu} 1 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, USA 2 networks (VANETs) is how to efficiently relay messages between vehicles. We propose a heuristic that uses

Garlan, David

252

Injection Solvent Effect on Peak Height in Ion Exchange HPLC  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......2. To further evaluate the effect of the injection volume only...injection volume were varied. Effect of weak injection solvent There...same eluent ion strength. The effect of eluent ion strength. Figure...nitrate in the mobile phase. 418 ship of the peak height of phenylacetate......

Hyunjoo Kim Lee; Norman E. Hoffman

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Offshore Series Wind Turbine Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.6MW Offshore Series Wind Turbine GE Energy #12;Feature Variable Hub heights & rotor diameters-savings feature, considering the rigors of offshore power generation. The 3.6 MW offshore wind turbine also, for both on and offshore use. Special features include... As the world's first commercially available wind

Firestone, Jeremy

254

Adult Height, Insulin, and 17?-Estradiol in Young Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...17beta-estradiol vary in response to adult height...puberty and fat storage, and may influence...the Norwegian Energy Balance and...in means and frequencies of selected...of childhood energy intake; it...insulin (dose response and no threshold...Predictive Adaptive Response hypothesis...Lukanova A. Energy balance and...

Sissi Espetvedt Finstad; Aina Emaus; Steinar Tretli; Grazyna Jasienska; Peter T. Ellison; Anne-Sofie Furberg; Erik A. Wist; and Inger Thune

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Forecasting wave height probabilities with numerical weather prediction models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting wave height probabilities with numerical weather prediction models Mark S. Roulstona; Numerical weather prediction 1. Introduction Wave forecasting is now an integral part of operational weather methods for generating such forecasts from numerical model output from the European Centre for Medium

Stevenson, Paul

256

Adult Height, Insulin, and 17?-Estradiol in Young Women  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the Norwegian Energy Balance and Breast...locally in Northern Norway during 2000 to...daily intake of energy and nutrients was...University of Oslo, Norway (15). Height...World War II in Norway (18) support that energy restriction, as...

Sissi Espetvedt Finstad; Aina Emaus; Steinar Tretli; Grazyna Jasienska; Peter T. Ellison; Anne-Sofie Furberg; Erik A. Wist; and Inger Thune

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Notes on Frequentist, Maximum Likelihood & Bayesian Statistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, theory, "gut feeling," etc. · Changes the probability distribution #12;Bayesian Statistics · ProbabilityNotes on Frequentist, Maximum Likelihood & Bayesian Statistics #12;Statistical Methods · Probability is a long-term frequency statement about the data ­ if repeated, what proportion of the time would

Ernest, Holly

258

PublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 maximum depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a video camera to complete installation of the world's first regional cabled ocean observatory. NEPTUNE- tion systems that--using power and the internet--provide continuous, long-term monitoring of oceanPublicationsmailagreementNo.40014024 THE 2.7km maximum depth beneath the ocean surface of neptune

Pedersen, Tom

259

Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions, Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions, and Eco-Driving Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions, and Eco-Driving July 23, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Elizabeth Meckes Elizabeth Meckes Director of User Experience & Digital Technologies, Office of Public Affairs On Thursday, Secretary Chu announced six projects that aim to find ways of convert captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products. The innovative projects - funded with $106 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and matched with $156 million in private cost-share - will seek to use CO2 emissions from industrial sources to create useful products such as fuel, plastics, cement, and fertilizers. Find out more here.

260

Department of Energy to Invest up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade Testing Facilities Department of Energy to Invest up to $4 Million for Wind Turbine Blade Testing Facilities June 25, 2007 - 2:07pm Addthis New facilities in Massachusetts and Texas will bring cutting-edge technology to wind research WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Samuel W. Bodman today announced that DOE has selected the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Partnership in Massachusetts, and the Lone Star Wind Alliance in Texas, to each receive up to $2 million in test equipment to develop large-scale wind blade test facilities, accelerating the commercial availability of wind energy. These consortia have been selected to negotiate cooperative research and development agreements (CRADAs) to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A simple method of estimating wind turbine blade fatigue at potential wind turbine sites  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a technique of estimating blade fatigue damage at potential wind turbine sites. The cornerstone of this technique is a simple model for the blade`s root flap bending moment. The model requires as input a simple set of wind measurements which may be obtained as part of a routine site characterization study. By using the model to simulate a time series of the root flap bending moment, fatigue damage rates may be estimated. The technique is evaluated by comparing these estimates with damage estimates derived from actual bending moment data; the agreement between the two is quite good. The simple connection between wind measurements and fatigue provided by the model now allows one to readily discriminate between damaging and more benign wind environments.

Barnard, J.C.; Wendell, L.L.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Source level model for propeller blade rate radiation for the worlds merchant fleet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model is developed for the acoustic source strength of blade rate line energy produced by single?screw merchant vessels. These source strengths are based on observed cavitation time histories on merchant vessels and on limitations imposed by considerations of propeller design procedures and ship vibration criteria. Relationships are presented for the expected value of the blade rate source strength for ships of different lengths expressed both as a monopole source strength located at a known depth below a free surface and as a dipole source strength that describes the pressure radiated to the farfield. These relationships are based on a small sample of merchant shipcharacteristics and are exercised for the estimated population of ships at sea. This calculation yields a statistical description of the distribution of source level and frequency of propeller blade rate acoustic energy for the fleet of single?screw merchant vessels.

Leslie M. Gray; David S. Greeley

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The determination of stochastic loads on horizontal axis wind turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

The FAST Code which is capable of determining structural loads of a flexible, teetering, horizontal axis wind turbine is described and comparisons of calculated loads with test data are given at two wind speeds for the ESI-80. The FAST Code models a two-bladed HAWT with degrees-of-freedom for blade bending, teeter, drive train flexibility, yaw, and windwise and crosswind tower motion. The code allows blade dimensions, stiffnesses, and weights to differ and the code models tower shadow, wind shear, and turbulence. Additionally, dynamic stall is included as are delta-3 and an underslung rotor. Load comparisons are made with ESI-80 test data in the form of power spectral density, rainflow counting occurrence histograms, and azimuth averaged bin plots. It is concluded that agreement between the FAST Code and test results is good.

Freeman, L.N.; Wilson, R.E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Deflection Shape Reconstructions of a Rotating Five-blade Helicopter Rotor from TLDV Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Helicopters are aircraft machines which are subjected to high level of vibrations, mainly due to spinning rotors. These are made of two or more blades attached by hinges to a central hub, which can make the dynamic behaviour difficult to study. However, they share some common dynamic properties with the ones expected in bladed discs, thereby the analytical modelling of rotors can be performed using some assumptions as the ones adopted for the bladed discs. This paper presents results of a vibrations study performed on a scaled helicopter rotor model which was rotating at a fix rotational speed and excited by an air jet. A simplified analytical model of that rotor was also produced to help the identifications of the vibration patterns measured using a single point tracking-SLDV measurement method.

Fioretti, A.; Castellini, P.; Tomasini, E. P. [Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Dipartimento di Meccanica, Ancona (Italy); Di Maio, D.; Ewins, D. J. [University of Bristol, Aerospace Department, Bristol (United Kingdom)

2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Comparative Investigation of Blade Lean Effect in Hydrogen?Fueled Combustion Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently environmental problems have been actively researched all over the world. To overcome air pollution and fossil fuel exhaustion we have been investigating a hydrogen?fueled propulsion system. In the system hydrogen is injected from the turbine blade and/or vane surface. The system can realize higher power lighter weight and lower emission than conventional systems. However there exist many problems for the realization. One of them is the extremely high temperature region appearing on the wall. In the present study we clarify the effect of blade lean on the generation of high temperature region. The combusting turbulent flowfield around a normal a compound lean and a reverse compound lean blades are simulated using RANS and 5?step reduced combustion model. Comparing the numerical results it is confirmed that compound lean is promising to suppress the high temperature region.

R. Nakamura; M. Suzuki; M. Yamamoto

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Supply Chain and Blade Manufacturing Considerations in the Global Wind Industry (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This briefing provides an overview of supply chain developments in the global wind industry and a detailed assessment of blade manufacturing considerations for U.S. end-markets. The report discusses the international trade flows of wind power equipment, blade manufacturing and logistical costs, and qualitative issues that often influence factory location decisions. To help guide policy and research and development strategy decisions, this report offers a comprehensive perspective of both quantitative and qualitative factors that affect selected supply chain developments in the growing wind power industry.

James, T.; Goodrich, A.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Analysis of SNL/MSU/DOE fatigue database trends for wind turbine blade materials.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of trends in fatigue results from the Montana State University program on the fatigue of composite materials for wind turbine blades for the period 2005-2009. Test data can be found in the SNL/MSU/DOE Fatigue of Composite Materials Database which is updated annually. This is the fifth report in this series, which summarizes progress of the overall program since its inception in 1989. The primary thrust of this program has been research and testing of a broad range of structural laminate materials of interest to blade structures. The report is focused on current types of infused and prepreg blade materials, either processed in-house or by industry partners. Trends in static and fatigue performance are analyzed for a range of materials, geometries and loading conditions. Materials include: sixteen resins of three general types, five epoxy based paste adhesives, fifteen reinforcing fabrics including three fiber types, three prepregs, many laminate lay-ups and process variations. Significant differences in static and fatigue performance and delamination resistance are quantified for particular materials and process conditions. When blades do fail, the likely cause is fatigue in the structural detail areas or at major flaws. The program is focused strongly on these issues in addition to standard laminates. Structural detail tests allow evaluation of various blade materials options in the context of more realistic representations of blade structure than do the standard test methods. Types of structural details addressed in this report include ply drops used in thickness tapering, and adhesive joints, each tested over a range of fatigue loading conditions. Ply drop studies were in two areas: (1) a combined experimental and finite element study of basic ply drop delamination parameters for glass and carbon prepreg laminates, and (2) the development of a complex structured resin-infused coupon including ply drops, for comparison studies of various resins, fabrics and pry drop thicknesses. Adhesive joint tests using typical blade adhesives included both generic testing of materials parameters using a notched-lap-shear test geometry developed in this study, and also a series of simulated blade web joint geometries fabricated by an industry partner.

Mandell, John F. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Ashwill, Thomas D.; Wilson, Timothy J. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Sears, Aaron T. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Agastra, Pancasatya (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT); Laird, Daniel L.; Samborsky, Daniel D. (Montana State University, Bozeman, MT)

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

7,511,624 Wind Energy Overview: Device for monitoring the balance and integrity of wind turbine blades either in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oscillations (including imbalances and tracking variations) in wind turbine blades. This technology was tested covering the RPM rate of any wind turbine blade. This invention directly targets the operational monitoring://tto.montana.edu/technologies Technology Available for License In-Field LIDAR Monitoring and Manufacturing Control of Wind Turbine Montana

Maxwell, Bruce D.

269

A Predictive Maintenance Policy Based on the Blade of Offshore Wind Wenjin Zhu, Troyes University of Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Predictive Maintenance Policy Based on the Blade of Offshore Wind Turbine Wenjin Zhu, Troyes, Paris-Erdogan law, rotor blade, wind turbine SUMMARY & CONCLUSIONS Based on the modeling and the better quality of the wind resource in the sea, the installation of wind turbines is shifting from

McCalley, James D.

270

Wind turbine rotor blade with in-plane sweep and devices using the same, and methods for making the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wind turbine includes a rotor having a hub and at least one blade having a torsionally rigid root, an inboard section, and an outboard section. The inboard section has a forward sweep relative to an elastic axis of the blade and the outboard section has an aft sweep.

Wetzel, Kyle Kristopher

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

Simultaneous observations of Schumann resonances in California and Australia: Evidence for intensity modulation by the local height of the D region  

SciTech Connect

Observations are presented of the horizontal magnetic component of Schumann resonance intensities as simultaneously measured at locations in California and Western Australia during two separate intervals September 2-17, 1989, and April 14-21, 1990. For both intervals, diurnal variations of the average magnetic power over the lowest three modes of the Schumann resonances showed substantially different temporal profiles at the California and Western Australia stations, with interstation correlations of 0.51 and 0.39, respectively. A method is demonstrated for determining from these observations the average local time variation of the height of the D region. A height variation is obtained that is nearly identical for the respective analysis intervals, with a minimum height occurring at approximately 1300-1400 LT and a maximum-to-minimum height difference of roughly 50% of the mean. When corrected for the local D region height, the detailed diurnal intensity profiles over the analysis intervals display a greatly improved similarity, with interstation correlation coefficients increasing from 0.51 to 0.70 and from 0.39 to 0.82, respectively. Substantial agreement between the two stations after correction for D region height suggest that such observations could be used to monitor the global totality and variability of lightning, quantitatively and at time resolutions of the order of 10 min or less, in studies of global change.

Sentman, D.D. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)); Fraser, B.J. (Univ. of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

1 1 Zoning for Small Wind: The Importance of Tower Height An ASES Small Wind Webinar Mick Sagrillo-Wisconsin's Focus on Energy © 2008 by Mick Sagrillo 2 Definitions: rotor L&S Tech. Assoc., Inc. Rotor = "collector" for a wind system 3 Definitions: wind * Wind = the 'fuel' * Wind has two 'components' - Quantity = wind speed (velocity or V) - Quality = 'clean' flowing wind 4 Quantity * = average annual wind speed * Climate, not weather * Akin to annual average sun hours for PV or head and flow for hydro * Wind speed increases with height above ground... * ...Due to diminished ground drag (friction) 5 Power in the wind V³ * Wind speed = V * Power available is proportional to wind speed x wind speed x wind speed - or P ~ V x V x V - or P ~ V ³ * Therefore, 10% V = 33% P * Lesson !

273

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Limiting Factors for Convective Cloud Top Height in the Tropics M. P. Jensen and A. D. Del Genio National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies Columbia University New York, New York Introduction Populations of tropical convective clouds are mainly comprised of three types: shallow trade cumulus, mid-level cumulus congestus and deep convective clouds (Johnson et al. 1999). Each of these cloud types has different impacts on the local radiation and water budgets. For climate model applications it is therefore important to understand the factors which determine the type of convective cloud that will occur. In this study, we concentrate on describing the factors that limit the cloud-top heights of mid-

274

Design of maximum density aggregate grading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An aggregate grading that yields maximum solid density and maximum particle interlock is highly desirable for both bound mixtures, such as asphalt concrete and plain and reinforced concrete, and for unbound mixtures such as those used in base courses. Maximum particle interlock leads to high strength. Whereas minimum voids in a certain material composition is conducive to high strength and low compression. Aggregate grading may be obtained, for instance, from the ASTM, which is based on experience or may be designed according to Lees method. In the present work five different types of aggregates were used, each with a variety of chosen grading. It was found that Lees method produced the lowest porosity of all types of aggregates as well as for the various employed gradings. Lees rational method of aggregate grading, however, is a very lengthy and time-consuming procedure. Therefore, programming of Lees method is an essential step to make such an excellent method available to practicing engineers. A program named ratmix was developed and has incorporated 58 design graphs of the Lees method. ratmix is a comprehensive program for Lees rational method; it conducts interpolation for intermediate points within the design graphs as well as between graphs of different properties.

Yahia A Abdel-Jawad; Waddah Salman Abdullah

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Experimental study of blade thickness effects on the overall and local performances of a Controlled Vortex Designed axial-flow fan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thick blades could lead to a good compromise between aerodynamic and acoustic performances, on a wider af- fect both their overall and acoustical performances. An example of one parameter for actuators then implies thicker blades. The rotomoulding process -- previously tested for wind turbine blades

Boyer, Edmond

276

To cite this document: Barbiero, Franck and Vincent, Franois and Deloues, Thierry and Letestu, Franck Effects of rotor blade modulation on GNSS anti-jamming algorithms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Franck Effects of rotor blade modulation on GNSS anti-jamming algorithms. (2014) In: ION International be sent to the repository administrator: staff-oatao@inp-toulouse.fr #12;Effects of rotor blade modulation rotating bodies, the signal undergo complex and non-stationary effects called Rotor Blade Modulation (RBM

Mailhes, Corinne

277

Structural and Damage Assessment of Multi-Section Modular Hybrid Composite Wind Turbine Blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the size of wind turbines to generate higher power output. Typically, the larger/longer blade designs rely on hybrid material systems such as carbon and/or glass fiber (CF/GF) reinforced polymers to improve specific stiffness/strength and damage tolerance...

Nanami, Norimichi

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

278

Multi-piece wind turbine rotor blades and wind turbines incorporating same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multisection blade for a wind turbine includes a hub extender having a pitch bearing at one end, a skirt or fairing having a hole therethrough and configured to mount over the hub extender, and an outboard section configured to couple to the pitch bearing.

Moroz; Emilian Mieczyslaw (San Diego, CA) [San Diego, CA

2008-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

279

Concurrent Aerodynamic Optimization of Rotor Blades Using a Nash Game Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concurrent Aerodynamic Optimization of Rotor Blades Using a Nash Game Method Enric Roca Le´on Ph Aerodynamics Leader, Airbus Helicopter, Marignane, France Michel Costes Research Engineer, ONERA, Meudon OF THE AMERICAN HELICOPTER SOCIETY Abstract A multi-objective strategy adapted to the aerodynamic concurrent

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

280

Simulation of winds as seen by a rotating vertical axis wind turbine blade  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to provide turbulent wind analyses relevant to the design and testing of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). A technique was developed for utilizing high-speed turbulence wind data from a line of seven anemometers at a single level to simulate the wind seen by a rotating VAWT blade. Twelve data cases, representing a range of wind speeds and stability classes, were selected from the large volume of data available from the Clayton, New Mexico, Vertical Plane Array (VPA) project. Simulations were run of the rotationally sampled wind speed relative to the earth, as well as the tangential and radial wind speeds, which are relative to the rotating wind turbine blade. Spectral analysis is used to compare and assess wind simulations from the different wind regimes, as well as from alternate wind measurement techniques. The variance in the wind speed at frequencies at or above the blade rotation rate is computed for all cases, and is used to quantitatively compare the VAWT simulations with Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) simulations. Qualitative comparisons are also made with direct wind measurements from a VAWT blade.

George, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Latest advances in steam turbine design, blading, repairs, condition assessment, and condenser interaction  

SciTech Connect

This book contains papers presented at a conference on power generation. Topics covered include: a life extension approach for steam turbine blading in Electricite de France fossil plants, and on site 430 MW high pressure reheat turbine shell cracking and distortion repairs.

Rasmussen, D.M. (Turbine Consultants, Inc., Milwaukee, WI (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

DAMAGE DETECTION IN A WIND TURBINE BLADE BASED ON TIME SERIES Simon Hoell, Piotr Omenzetter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DAMAGE DETECTION IN A WIND TURBINE BLADE BASED ON TIME SERIES METHODS Simon Hoell, Piotr Omenzetter, the consequences are growing sizes of wind turbines (WTs) and erections in remote places, such as off in the past years, thus efficient energy harvesting becomes more important. For the sector of wind energy

Boyer, Edmond

283

OPERATIONAL MODAL ANALYSIS AND WAVELET TRANSFORMATION FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL MODAL ANALYSIS AND WAVELET TRANSFORMATION FOR DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION IN WIND TURBINE-frequency modes. KEYWORDS : Wind Turbine Blades, Debonding, Wavelet Transformation, Operational Modal Analysis. INTRODUCTION While failure can happen in any structural component of the wind turbine, one of the most common

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

284

Geek-Up[09.17.2010]-- Water Blades, Biomass Conversion and Antineutrino Detection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Scientists have engineered a blade of water thats strong enough and fast enough to penetrate through steel, which will help soldiers in Afghanistan disable deadly IEDs, plus researchers are currently testing an aboveground water-based antineutrino detector that will improve monitoring capabilities at nuclear facilities.

285

CAN-bus based distributed control system for hydraulic turbine blade repairing robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A CAN-bus (Controller Area Network) based distributed control system was designed for a mobile on-site hydraulic turbine blade repairing robot (HTBRR). The system is composed of one supervisory station, seven joint servo nodes, and four accessory nodes. ... Keywords: distributed control system, mobile robot, virtual reality

Kangtai Xiang; Zhenguo Sun; Hongjun Dai; Qiang Chen; Jiajun Liu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter estimation for stochastic biochemical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Daigle et al. : Accelerated maximum likelihood parame-Gillespie DT: Approximate accelerated stochastic simulationARTICLE Open Access Accelerated maximum likelihood parameter

Daigle, Bernie J; Roh, Min K; Petzold, Linda R; Niemi, Jarad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The Hybrid Maximum Principle is a consequence of Pontryagin ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a simple proof of the Maximum Principle for smooth hybrid control sys- ... result in the study of such problems is Hybrid Maximum Principle proved in [4]...

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Garfield Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.6059581° 1.6059581° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4169974,"lon":-81.6059581,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

289

Cleveland Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.556235° 1.556235° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5200518,"lon":-81.556235,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

290

Maple Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.565956° 1.565956° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4153313,"lon":-81.565956,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

291

Highland Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.4784522° 1.4784522° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5519954,"lon":-81.4784522,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

292

University Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

°, -81.5373456° °, -81.5373456° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4978306,"lon":-81.5373456,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

293

Brooklyn Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1.665391° 1.665391° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.415601,"lon":-81.665391,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

294

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

295

Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1  

SciTech Connect

This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

296

Studies of the 3D surface roughness height  

SciTech Connect

Nowadays nano-coatings occupy more and more significant place in technology. Innovative, functional coatings acquire new aspects from the point of view of modern technologies, considering the aggregate of physical properties that can be achieved manipulating in the production process with the properties of coatings surfaces on micro- and nano-level. Nano-coatings are applied on machine parts, friction surfaces, contacting parts, corrosion surfaces, transparent conducting films (TCF), etc. The equipment available at present for the production of transparent conducting oxide (TCO) coatings with highest quality is based on expensive indium tin oxide (ITO) material; therefore cheaper alternatives are being searched for. One such offered alternative is zink oxide (ZnO) nano-coatings. Evaluating the TCF physical and mechanical properties and in view of the new ISO standard (EN ISO 25178) on the introduction of surface texture (3D surface roughness) in the engineering calculations, it is necessary to examine the height of 3D surface roughness, which is one of the most significant roughness parameters. The given paper studies the average values of 3D surface roughness height and the most often applied distribution laws are as follows: the normal distribution and Rayleigh distribution. The 3D surface is simulated by a normal random field.

Avisane, Anita; Rudzitis, Janis; Kumermanis, Maris [Institute of Mechanical Engineering, Riga Technical University, Ezermalas str. 6k, Riga (Latvia)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

297

Maximum mass of magnetic white dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit in this work the problem of the maximum masses of magnetized White Dwarfs (WD). The impact of a strong magnetic field onto the structure equations is addressed. The pressures become anisotropic due to the presence of the magnetic field and split into a parallel and perpendicular components. We first construct stable solutions of TOV equations for the parallel pressures, and found that physical solutions vanish for the perpendicular pressure when $B \\gtrsim 10^{13}$ G. This fact establishes an upper bound for a magnetic field and the stability of the configurations in the (quasi) spherical approximation. Our findings also indicate that it is not possible to obtain stable magnetized WD with super Chandrasekhar masses because the values of the magnetic field needed for them are higher than this bound. To proceed into the anisotropic regime, we derived structure equations appropriated for a cylindrical metric with anisotropic pressures. From the solutions of the structure equations in cylindrical symme...

Paret, D Manreza; Horvath, J E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Critical insulation thickness for maximum entropy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical insulation thickness is known to refer to the insulation thickness that maximises the rate of heat transfer in cylindrical and spherical systems. The same analogy is extended to the rate of entropy generation in the present study. The possible critical insulation thickness that yields a maximum rate of entropy generation is investigated. Entropy generation is related to heat transfer through and temperature distribution within the insulation material. It is found that there exists a critical insulation thickness for maximising the rate of entropy generation that is a function of the Bi number and the surface to ambient temperature ratio. The solution of such critical thickness is formulated analytically for both cylindrical and spherical geometries. It is also found that the critical insulation thickness for the rate of entropy generation does not coincide with that for the rate of heat transfer.

Ahmet Z. Sahin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Control of residual stresses in tests of technological processes of producing compressor blades for gas turbine engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article describes experience with inducing and controlling residual surface stresses in compressor blades made of titanium alloys. It was established that these stresses have a substantial effect on the fa...

V. A. Boguslaev

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Certain peculiarities of Zr?Cr?N coatings on steel blades of a gas-turbine engine compressor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The properties of compressor blades of a helicopter gas-turbine engine with an experimental ionplasma coating Zr? ... -resistant, and mitigate the dependence of their residual properties on the amplitude and the ...

V. A. Styazhkin; A. A. Kopylov; S. Ya. Paleeva; Yu. G. Veksler

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Assessment of crack growth in a space shuttle main engine first-stage high-pressure fuel turbopump blade  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A two-dimensional finite element fracture mechanics analysis of a space shuttle main engine (SSME) turbine blade firtree was performed using the MARC finite element code. The analysis was conducted under combined effects of thermal and mechanical loads ...

Ali Abdul-Aziz

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Study of the Causes of the Service Fracture of Turbine Rotor Blade of Compressor Station Gas-Turbine Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of structural and fractographic the analysis of the fractured surface of working turbine blade of GTK-10-2 gas-turbine unit of compressor station it is established...

A. Ya. Krasovskyi; O. E. Gopkalo; I. O. Makovetska; O. O. Yanko

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Investigation of Dynamic Aerodynamics and Control of Wind Turbine Sections Under Relevant Inflow/Blade Attitude Conditions  

SciTech Connect

The growth of wind turbines has led to highly variable loading on the blades. Coupled with the relative reduced stiffness of longer blades, the need to control loading on the blades has become important. One method of controlling loads and maximizing energy extraction is local control of the flow on the wind turbine blades. The goal of the present work was to better understand the sources of the unsteady loading and then to control them. This is accomplished through an experimental effort to characterize the unsteadiness and the effect of a Gurney flap on the flow, as well as an analytical effort to develop control approaches. It was planned to combine these two efforts to demonstrate control of a wind tunnel test model, but that final piece still remains to be accomplished.

Naughton, Jonathan W. [University of Wyoming

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

304

Development of Simplified Models for Wind Turbine Blades with Application to NREL 5 MW Offshore Research Wind Turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration of complex models of wind turbine blades in aeroelastic simulations places an untenable demand on computational resources and, hence, means of speed-up become necessary. This paper considers the pr...

Majid Khorsand Vakilzadeh; Anders T. Johansson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and Lower Cost of Energy U.S. Wind Manufacturing: Taller Hub Heights to Access Higher Wind Resources and...

306

DOE/SC-ARM/TR-132 Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) Height Value  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

determination of the PBL height in models can significantly impact the formation and maintenance of low-level clouds (Zeng et al. 2004). Routine estimates of PBL height are useful...

307

Parametric simulation of piezoelectric flying height control slider using shear-mode deformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The piezoelectric flying height control slider has recently been implemented in magnetic recording disk drives to reduce the flying height. This paper performs the electromechanical simulation ... of the shear-mo...

Shengnan Shen; Hui Li; Bo Liu; Hejun Du; Nobutoshi Sagawa

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Experimental study of sliderdisk interaction process with thermal-flying-height controlled slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height (TFC) controlled slider has been introduced in hard disk drive recently. Flying height at the read/write elements of ... protrusion. Interactions between the TFC slider and disk can be very ...

Yansheng Ma; Bo Liu

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Drive level measurement of flying height modulation and control of slider disk contact  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A drive level measurement of flying height modulation and a demonstration of slider-disk contact control was conducted. The results of the flying height modulation strongly agree with those obtained ... modulatio...

J. Xu; Y. Shimizu; L. Su

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

An efficient thermal actuator design for the thermal flying height control slider  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal flying height control (TFC) has recently been implemented in magnetic recording disk drives to reduce the flying height at the read/write element for...2000; Suk et al. 2005; Kurita et al. 2005; Song et a...

Hui Li; Shengnan Shen

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Contact between a thermal flying height control slider and a disk asperity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contact between a thermal flying height control slider and an asperity on a disk is investigated using finite element analysis. The ... write element are determined as a function of flying height of the slider, l...

Wenping Song; Andrey Ovcharenko; Min Yang; Hao Zheng

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Characterization of light contact in head disk interface with dynamic flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an investigation of the light contact in a head disk interface with dynamic flying height control. The touchdown test is conducted for a dynamic flying height control slider and the response i...

Jianfeng Xu; Gang Sheng

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Servo signal processing for flying height control in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, thermal actuated flying height control has been implemented in hard disk drives (HDD) to reduce the effect of flying height variations due to manufacturing tolerances or...2005). A stable low flying

Uwe Boettcher; Christopher A. Lacey; Hui Li; Kensuke Amemiya

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Improvement of measurement sensitivity near contact in intensity-interferometry flying height testers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the hard disk drive, the spacing between the read/write head and the magnetic disk or flying height has been greatly reduced to a ... to achieve ultrahigh-density magnetic storage. At flying heights below 10n...

Korakoch Phetdee; Alongkorn Pimpin; Werayut Srituravanich

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Taft Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5.1346895°, -119.4726196° 5.1346895°, -119.4726196° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.1346895,"lon":-119.4726196,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

316

Federal Heights, Colorado: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colorado: Energy Resources Colorado: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.8513747°, -104.9985922° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.8513747,"lon":-104.9985922,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

317

Paradise Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 28.6236102°, -81.5439618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":28.6236102,"lon":-81.5439618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

318

Broadview Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6°, -81.6851271° 6°, -81.6851271° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3139426,"lon":-81.6851271,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

319

East Richmond Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California: Energy Resources California: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.944924°, -122.3135811° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.944924,"lon":-122.3135811,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

Arlington Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

150583°, -84.4554978° 150583°, -84.4554978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2150583,"lon":-84.4554978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Bedford Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4169982°, -81.5273428° 4169982°, -81.5273428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4169982,"lon":-81.5273428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

322

Citrus Heights, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8.7071247°, -121.2810611° 8.7071247°, -121.2810611° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.7071247,"lon":-121.2810611,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

323

Muskegon Heights, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan: Energy Resources Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.2011264°, -86.2389464° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.2011264,"lon":-86.2389464,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

Monfort Heights South, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

73251°, -84.606362° 73251°, -84.606362° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.173251,"lon":-84.606362,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

325

Richmond Heights, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida: Energy Resources Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 25.6314936°, -80.3689426° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":25.6314936,"lon":-80.3689426,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

326

Ford Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

506424°, -87.5917092° 506424°, -87.5917092° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.506424,"lon":-87.5917092,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

327

Boston Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

778°, -81.5131709° 778°, -81.5131709° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.264778,"lon":-81.5131709,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

328

Berlin Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3253277°, -82.4932261° 3253277°, -82.4932261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.3253277,"lon":-82.4932261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

329

Seaside Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey: Energy Resources Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.944285°, -74.0729139° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.944285,"lon":-74.0729139,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

330

Lincoln Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

389469°, -84.4554979° 389469°, -84.4554979° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2389469,"lon":-84.4554979,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

331

Sewickley Heights, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

343°, -80.1631139° 343°, -80.1631139° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5567343,"lon":-80.1631139,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

332

Chicago Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46°, -87.6355995° 46°, -87.6355995° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.506146,"lon":-87.6355995,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

333

Richmond Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

288°, -81.5101208° 288°, -81.5101208° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5528288,"lon":-81.5101208,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

334

Island Heights, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey: Energy Resources Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.9420626°, -74.1498616° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9420626,"lon":-74.1498616,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

335

Champion Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

288128°, -80.848759° 288128°, -80.848759° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.288128,"lon":-80.848759,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

336

Ben Avon Heights, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.5136795°, -80.0731112° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5136795,"lon":-80.0731112,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

337

Alamo Heights, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29.4849531°, -98.4658502° 29.4849531°, -98.4658502° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.4849531,"lon":-98.4658502,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

338

Prospect Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2.0953049°, -87.9375694° 2.0953049°, -87.9375694° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.0953049,"lon":-87.9375694,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

339

Gordon Heights, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

York: Energy Resources York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.8587097°, -72.9706607° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.8587097,"lon":-72.9706607,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Windsor Heights, Iowa: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Iowa: Energy Resources Iowa: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 41.6048°, -93.711899° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.6048,"lon":-93.711899,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Glendale Heights, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9202°, -88.078849° 9202°, -88.078849° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.9202,"lon":-88.078849,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

342

Mayfield Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

189°, -81.457896° 189°, -81.457896° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.5192189,"lon":-81.457896,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

343

Dilution calculations for determining laboratory exhaust stack heights  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory exhaust stacks should be designed with sufficient height and exit momentum to avoid re-entry of exhaust and possible air quality problems, and the design should be evaluated before construction. One evaluation method is presented in this paper that combines dilution prediction equations from the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (1997) and a dilution criteria of Halitsky (1988). This method is less conservative than a geometric method in the ASHRAE Handbook and is less costly than wind-tunnel modeling. The method should only be applied to relatively simple building geometries with no larger buildings adjacent to them. A planned change to the ASHRAE equations, which would result in larger stacks being necessary, is discussed. Further investigation of this change is recommended using comparisons to wind tunnel data.

Ratcliff, M.A.; Sandru, E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Porter Heights, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30.151883°, -95.3218803° 30.151883°, -95.3218803° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.151883,"lon":-95.3218803,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Braddock Heights, Maryland: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maryland: Energy Resources Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.4187127°, -77.503598° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.4187127,"lon":-77.503598,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

346

Perry Heights, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0.7953357°, -81.4734515° 0.7953357°, -81.4734515° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.7953357,"lon":-81.4734515,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

347

Monfort Heights East, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ohio: Energy Resources Ohio: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.182151°, -84.583915° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.182151,"lon":-84.583915,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Deposition of Alternative (Syngas) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACERC ACERC Dr. Jeffrey Bons and Dr. Thomas Fletcher BRIGHAM YOUNG UNIVERSITY SCIES Project 05-01-SR-120 with support from General Electric, Siemens-Westinghouse, Solar Turbines, Praxair UTSR Peer Workshop III, Clemson University, SC Oct. 18-20, 2005 Deposition of Alternative ( Deposition of Alternative ( Syngas Syngas ) Fuels on ) Fuels on Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Turbine Blades with Film Cooling Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons Alternate fuels (e.g. coal, petcoke, and biomass) are being cons idered to idered to produce produce syngas syngas fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines fuels to replace natural gas in power turbines Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. Despite gas cleanup, small levels of airborne particulate (e.g. 0.1 0.1 ppmw

349

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with 3-D Endwall Contouring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Aerodynamic Losses and Heat Transfer in a Blade Cascade with 3 Blade Cascade with 3 - - D D Endwall Endwall Contouring Contouring Principal Investigator Principal Investigator Sumanta Acharya, Professor Sumanta Acharya, Professor Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana Collaborators Collaborators Gazi Mahmood, Ph.D., Research Asqociate Gazi Mahmood, Ph.D., Research Asqociate Arun Saha, Ph.D., Research Associate Arun Saha, Ph.D., Research Associate Ross Gustafson, M.S. student Ross Gustafson, M.S. student SCIES Project 02 SCIES Project 02 - - 01 01 - - SR098 SR098 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE - - FC26 FC26 - - 02NT41431 02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL

350

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.2: UV Degradation Prevention on Fiber-Reinforced Composite Blades  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMARRY Use of wind energy has expanded very quickly because of the energy prices, environmental concerns and improved efficiency of wind generators. Rather than using metal and alloy based wind turbine blades, larger size fiber (glass and carbon) reinforced composite blades have been recently utilized to increase the efficiency of the wind energy in both high and low wind potential areas. In the current composite manufacturing, pre-preg and vacuum-assisted/heat sensitive resin transfer molding and resin infusion methods are employed. However, these lighter, stiffer and stronger composite blades experience ultraviolet (UV) light degradation where polymers (epoxies and hardeners) used for the blades manufacturing absorb solar UV lights, and cause photolytic, thermo-oxidative and photo-oxidative reactions resulting in breaking of carbon-hydrogen bonds, polymer degradation and internal and external stresses. One of the main reasons is the weak protective coatings/paints on the composite blades. This process accelerates the aging and fatigue cracks, and reduces the overall mechanical properties of the blades. Thus, the lack of technology on coatings for blade manufacturing is forcing many government agencies and private companies (local and national windmill companies) to find a better solution for the composite wind blades. Kansas has a great wind potential for the future energy demand, so efficient wind generators can be an option for continuous energy production. The research goal of the present project was to develop nanocomposite coatings using various inclusions against UV degradation and corrosion, and advance the fundamental understanding of degradation (i.e., physical, chemical and physiochemical property changes) on those coatings. In pursuit of the research goal, the research objective of the present program was to investigate the effects of UV light and duration on various nanocomposites made mainly of carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoflakes, contribute the valuable information to this emerging field of advanced materials and manufacturing and advance the Kansas economy through creation of engineering knowledge and products in the wind energy. The proposed work was involved in a multidisciplinary research program that incorporates nanocomposite fabrication, advanced coating, characterization, surface and colloidal chemistry, physicochemistry, corrosion science, and analysis with a simple and effective testing methodology. The findings were closely related to our hypothesis and approaches that we proposed in this proposal. The data produced in the study offered to advance the physical understanding of the behavior of nanostructured materials for the prevention of UV light at different exposure time and salt fogging. Founding of this proposal enabled the first UV resistive nanocomposite corrosion coating effort in Kansas to impact the local and national wind mill industry. Results of this program provided valuable opportunities for the multidisciplinary training of undergraduate and graduate students at Wichita State University (WSU), as well as a number of aircraft companies (e.g., Cessna, Hawker Beechcraft, Spirit, Boeing and Bombardier/Learjet) and other local and regional industries.

Janet M. Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

All-small-molecule efficient white organic light-emitting diodes by multi-layer blade coating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letter All-small-molecule efficient white organic light-emitting diodes by multi-layer blade-molecule organic light-emitting diodes are fabricated by multi-layer blade coating on hot plate at 80 °C with hot.3 lm/W). Orange emitter iridium(III)bis (4-(4-t-butylphenyl) thie- no[3,2-c]pyridinato-N,C20

Meng, Hsin-Fei

352

Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Blade Designs - Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Materials Issues in Innovative Turbine Blade Designs-Oak Ridge National Laboratory Background Gas turbine efficiency and service life are strongly affected by the turbine expansion process, where the working fluid's high thermal energy gas is converted into mechanical energy to drive the compressor and the electric generator. The most effective way to increase the efficiency of the expansion process is to raise the temperature of the turbine's working fluid.

353

Design, prototyping and experimental testing of a chiral blade system for hydroelectric microgeneration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the aim of investigating the applicative possibilities of chiral blade turbines in obtaining energy from water conduits with low velocity of flow, the present study traces a design procedure, defining analytical tools and identifying various expedients which can guide the effective choice of the functional parameters of the device and allow a preliminary estimation of the quantities in play, confirming their suitability by the construction of a prototype and its functional characterisation as a real device.

F. Giudice; G. La Rosa

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Computer subroutine for estimating aerodynamic blade loads on Darrieus vertical axis wind turbines. [FORCE code  

SciTech Connect

An important aspect of structural design of the Darrieus rotor is the determination of aerodynamic blade loads. This report describes a load generator which has been used at Sandia for quasi-static and dynamic rotor analyses. The generator is based on the single streamtube aerodynamic flow model and is constructed as a FORTRAN IV subroutine to facilitate its use in finite element structural models. Input and output characteristics of the subroutine are described and a complete listing is attached as an appendix.

Sullivan, W. N.; Leonard, T. M.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Simulating Blade-Strike on Fish passing through Marine Hydrokinetic Turbines  

SciTech Connect

The study reported here evaluated the occurrence, frequency, and intensity of blade strike of fish on an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine by using two modeling approaches: a conventional kinematic formulation and a proposed Lagrangian particle- based scheme. The kinematic model included simplifying assumptions of fish trajectories such as distribution and velocity. The proposed method overcame the need for such simplifications by integrating the following components into a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model: (i) advanced eddy-resolving flow simulation, (ii) generation of ambient turbulence based on field data, (iii) moving turbine blades in highly transient flows, and (iv) Lagrangian particles to mimic the potential fish pathways. The test conditions to evaluate the blade-strike probability and fish survival rate were: (i) the turbulent environment, (ii) the fish size, and (iii) the approaching flow velocity. The proposed method offered the ability to produce potential fish trajectories and their interaction with the rotating turbine. Depending upon the scenario, the percentile of particles that registered a collision event ranged from 6% to 19% of the released sample size. Next, by using a set of experimental correlations of the exposure-response of living fish colliding with moving blades, the simulated collision data were used as input variables to estimate the survival rate of fish passing through the operating turbine. The resulting survival rates were greater than 96% in all scenarios, which is comparable to or better than known survival rates for conventional hydropower turbines. The figures of strike probability and mortality rate were amplified by the kinematic model. The proposed method offered the advantage of expanding the evaluation of other mechanisms of stress and injury on fish derived from hydrokinetic turbines and related devices.

Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

High Temperature Capabililty and Innovative Cooling with a Spar and Shell Turbine Blade - Florida Turbine Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Temperature Capability and Temperature Capability and Innovative Cooling with a Spar and Shell Turbine Blade-Florida Turbine Technologies Background Florida Turbine Technologies, Inc. (FTT) is currently developing advanced aerothermal technologies centered on spar and shell airfoil concepts meant to provide highly durable turbine components that require the lowest cooling flow possible. The spar-shell system represents a unique opportunity for the use of advanced, high-temperature materials

357

Maximum likelihood continuity mapping for fraud detection  

SciTech Connect

The author describes a novel time-series analysis technique called maximum likelihood continuity mapping (MALCOM), and focuses on one application of MALCOM: detecting fraud in medical insurance claims. Given a training data set composed of typical sequences, MALCOM creates a stochastic model of sequence generation, called a continuity map (CM). A CM maximizes the probability of sequences in the training set given the model constraints, CMs can be used to estimate the likelihood of sequences not found in the training set, enabling anomaly detection and sequence prediction--important aspects of data mining. Since MALCOM can be used on sequences of categorical data (e.g., sequences of words) as well as real valued data, MALCOM is also a potential replacement for database search tools such as N-gram analysis. In a recent experiment, MALCOM was used to evaluate the likelihood of patient medical histories, where ``medical history`` is used to mean the sequence of medical procedures performed on a patient. Physicians whose patients had anomalous medical histories (according to MALCOM) were evaluated for fraud by an independent agency. Of the small sample (12 physicians) that has been evaluated, 92% have been determined fraudulent or abusive. Despite the small sample, these results are encouraging.

Hogden, J.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Using Height Sensors for Biometric Identification in Multi-resident Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Height Sensors for Biometric Identification in Multi-resident Homes Vijay Srinivasan, John the doorways in a home. Height sensors are cheap, are convenient for the residents, are simple to install in an existing home, and are perceived to be less invasive than cameras or microphones. Height is typically only

Stankovic, John A.

359

Results of the DF-4 BWR (boiling water reactor) control blade-channel box test  

SciTech Connect

The DF-4 in-pile fuel damage experiment investigated the behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel canisters and control blades in the high temperature environment of an unrecovered reactor accident. This experiment, which was carried out in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories, was performed under the USNRC's internationally sponsored severe fuel damage (SFD) program. The DF-4 test is described herein and results from the experiment are presented. Important findings from the DF-4 test include the low temperature melting of the stainless steel control blade caused by reaction with the B{sub 4}C, and the subsequent low temperature attack of the Zr-4 channel box by the relocating molten blade components. Hydrogen generation was found to continue throughout the experiment, diminishing slightly following the relocation of molten oxidizing zircaloy to the lower extreme of the test bundle. A large blockage which was formed from this material continued to oxidize while steam was being fed into the the test bundle. The results of this test have provided information on the initial stages of core melt progression in BWR geometry involving the heatup and cladding oxidation stages of a severe accident and terminating at the point of melting and relocation of the metallic core components. The information is useful in modeling melt progression in BWR core geometry, and provides engineering insight into the key phenomena controlling these processes. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Enhancement of soft X-ray lasing action with thin blade radiators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An enhancement of approximately 100 of stimulated emission over spontaneous emission of the CVI 182 Angstrom line was obtained in a recombining magnetically confined plasma column. The plasma was formed by focusing a CO.sub.2 laser beam on a carbon disc. A magnetic solenoid produced a strong magnetic field which confined the plasma to the shape of a column. A single thin carbon blade extended parallel to the plasma column and served to make the column axially more uniform and also acted as a heat sink. Axial and transverse measurements of the soft X-ray lasing action were made from locations off-set from the central axis of the plasma column. Multiple carbon blades located at equal intervals around the plasma column were also found to produce acceptable results. According to another embodiment 10 a thin coating of aluminum or magnesium was placed on the carbon disc and blade. The Z of the coating should preferably be at least 5 greater than the Z of the target. Measurements of the soft X-rays generated at 182 Angstroms showed a significant increase in intensity enhancement.

Suckewer, Szymon (Princeton Junction, NJ); Skinner, Charles H. (Kingston, NJ); Voorhees, David R. (Hopewell, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comment on "Efficiency of Isothermal Molecular Machines at Maximum Power"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comment on "Efficiency of Isothermal Molecular Machines at Maximum Power" (PRL 108, 210602 (2012), arXiv:1201.6396)

Yunxin Zhang

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

362

Observational analysis on the run-up height and inundation along the Andhra coast during December 26, 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 26 December 2004 earthquake with magnitude of 9.3 triggered one of the most destructive tsunamis in the Indian Ocean and caused widespread inundation and extensive damage in terms of life and property along the coasts of several Asian countries. In India, the Andaman and Nicobar group of Islands, the coastal states of Tamil Nadu, Andhra Pradesh and Kerala were severely affected. Post tsunami field surveys were conducted along the Andhra coast (central part of east coast of India) to assess the tsunami run-up heights and inundation. Estimation of tsunami run-up heights and inundation relative to the mean sea level were made based on the water marks on permanent structures and marks of debris on trees. Observations revealed that the Andhra coast was largely affected by the tsunami and in general the intensity of the tsunami along the Andhra coast decreased from south to north. Maximum run-up heights of 4.5m were observed in the southern parts and minimum run-up heights of 2m were observed in the northern parts of the Andhra coast. While, the distance of inundation varied from 60 to 900m along the coast. The interdependency between the tsunami run-up height and inundation with the physical setup of the shoreline has been identified. Also local features such as dunes, vegetation and steepness of beaches played vital role in reducing the impact of tsunami. Dependency of tsunami parameters on Coastal Characteristic Index (CCI) was attempted for the first time for the Indian coast. Good correlation has been observed between run-up heights, inundation and CCI. The width of the continental shelf also played a crucial role in causing damage to the coast.

K.V.K.R.K. Patnaik; S.V.V. Arun Kumar; Ch. Venkata Ramu; K.V.S.R. Prasad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Multidelay Model Relating Tide Height to Underwater Acoustic Phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observed relationships between environmental parameters and underwater acoustic phase were earlier reported and a multi?input nonrealizable model was analyzed showing that among several parameters tide height has the strongest coherence with measured phase fluctuations. This work is concerned with a special case of the above model where the system is single input with a realizable impulse response consisting of few delays. Several cases are considered such as a single delay two or more delays. Among these a special case is found where one of the delays is fixed at zero time (in phase no delay component). Two kinds of results are reportedone where optimization is carried out on all energy bands another where optimization is carried out on selected bands that are least corrupted by noise and the effect of other parameters. The resulting transfer function is calculated and errors from measured values are given individually for each band and also collectively as a figure of merit for that solution. [Work supported by Office of Naval Research Code 468.

Kamal Yacoub; Jose Almeida

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Computational fluid dynamics study of wind turbine blade profiles at low Reynolds numbers for various angles of attack  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Airfoil data are rarely available for Angles Of Attack (AOA) over the entire range of 180. This is unfortunate for the wind turbine designers because wind turbine airfoils do operate over this entire range. In this paper an attempt is made to study the lift and drag forces on a wind turbine blade at various sections and the effect of angle of attack on these forces. Aerodynamic simulations of the steady flow past two-dimensional wind-turbine blade-profiles developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) at low Reynolds number will be performed. The aerodynamic simulation will be performed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) techniques. The governing equations used in the simulations are the Reynolds-Average-Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. The simulations at different wind speeds will be performed on the S809 and the S826 blade profiles. The S826 blade profile is considered in this study because it is the most suitable blade profile for the wind conditions in Egypt in the site of Gulf El-Zayt on the red sea. Lift and drag forces along with the angle of attack are the important parameters in a wind turbine system. These parameters determine the efficiency of the wind turbine. The lift and drag forces are computed over the entire range of AOA of 180 at low Reynolds numbers. The results of the analysis showed that the AOA between 3 and 8 have high Lift/Drag ratio regardless of the wind speed and the blade profile. The numerical results are compared with wind tunnel measurements at the available limited range of the angle of attack. In addition the numerical results are compared with the results obtained from the equations developed by Viterna and Janetzke for deep stall. The comparisons showed that the used CFD code can accurately predict the aerodynamic loads on the wind-turbine blades.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pattern formation, logistics, and maximum path probability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The concept of pattern formation, which to current researchers is a synonym for self-organization, carries the connotation of deductive logic together with the process of spontaneous inference. Defining a pattern as an equivalence relation on a set of thermodynamic objects, we establish that a large class of irreversible pattern-forming systems, evolving along idealized quasisteady paths, approaches the stable steady state as a mapping upon the formal deductive imperatives of a propositional function calculus. In the preamble the classical reversible thermodynamics of composite systems is analyzed as an externally manipulated system of space partitioning and classification based on ideal enclosures and diaphragms. The diaphragms have discrete classificationcapabilities which are designated in relation to conserved quantities by descriptors such as impervious, diathermal, and adiabatic. Differentiability in the continuum thermodynamic calculus is invoked as equivalent to analyticity and consistency in the underlying class or sentential calculus. The seat of inference, however, rests with the thermodynamicist. In the transition to an irreversible pattern-forming system the defined nature of the composite reservoirs remains, but a given diaphragm is replaced by a pattern-forming system which by its nature is a spontaneously evolving volume partitioner and classifier of invariants. The seat of volition or inference for the classification system is thus transferred from the experimenter or theoretician to the diaphragm, and with it the full deductive facility. The equivalence relations or partitions associated with the emerging patterns may thus be associated with theorems of the natural pattern-forming calculus. The entropyfunction, together with its derivatives, is the vehicle which relates the logistics of reservoirs and diaphragms to the analog logistics of the continuum. Maximum path probability or second-order differentiability of the entropy in isolation are sufficiently strong interpretations of the second law of thermodynamics to define the approach to and the nature of patterned stable steady states. For many pattern-forming systems these principles define quantifiable stable states as maxima or minima (or both) in the dissipation. An elementary statistical-mechanical proof is offered. To turn the argument full circle, the transformations of the partitions and classes which are predicated upon such minimax entropic paths can through digital modeling be directly identified with the syntactic and inferential elements of deductive logic. It follows therefore that all self-organizing or pattern-forming systems which possess stable steady states approach these states according to the imperatives of formal logic, the optimum pattern with its rich endowment ofequivalence relations representing the central theorem of the associated calculus. Logic is thus the stuff of the universe, and biological evolution with its culmination in the human brain is the most significant example of all the irreversible pattern-forming processes. We thus conclude with a few remarks on the relevance of the contribution to the theory of evolution and to research on artificial intelligence.

J. S. Kirkaldy

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Genetic Determinants of Height Growth Assessed Longitudinally from Infancy to Adulthood in the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified dozens of common variants associated with adult height. However, it is unknown how these variants influence height growth during childhood. We derived peak height ...

Peltonen, Leena

367

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: February 6, 0: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #410: February 6, 2006 Maximum Speed Limits by State, 2005 on AddThis.com...

368

Evaluation of WRF predicted near hub-height winds and ramp events over a Pacific Northwest site with complex terrain  

SciTech Connect

The WRF model version 3.3 is used to simulate near hub-height winds and power ramps utilizing three commonly used planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes: Mellor-Yamada-Janji? (MYJ), University of Washington (UW), and Yonsei University (YSU). The predicted winds have small mean biases compared with observations. Power ramps and step changes (changes within an hour) consistently show that the UW scheme performed better in predicting up ramps under stable conditions with higher prediction accuracy and capture rates. Both YSU and UW scheme show good performance predicting up- and down- ramps under unstable conditions with YSU being slightly better for ramp durations longer than an hour. MYJ is the most successful simulating down-ramps under stable conditions. The high wind speed and large shear associated with low-level jets are frequently associated with power ramps, and the biases in predicted low-level jet explain some of the shown differences in ramp predictions among different PBL schemes. Low-level jets were observed as low as ~200 m in altitude over the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES) site, located in an area of complex terrain. The shear, low-level peak wind speeds, as well as the height of maximum wind speed are not well predicted. Model simulations with 3 PBL schemes show the largest variability among them under stable conditions.

Yang, Qing; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Stoelinga, Mark; Finley, Cathy

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Science on Stage: Science in Action competition hits the heights in Madrid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Science on Stage: Science in Action competition hits the heights in Madrid Conference: New year brings ASE conference Exhibition: BETT 2007 sells hard and plays hard

371

EIS-0505: Vantage to Pomona Heights 230 kV Transmission Line...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

of the following ways: Online at: http:www.blm.govordistrictsspokaneplansvph230.php. By email to: blmorvantagepomona@blm.gov (please specify Vantage to Pomona Heights...

372

Engineer End Uses for Maximum Efficiency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Maximum Efficiency (August 2004) More Documents & Publications Maintaining System Air Quality Compressed Air Storage Strategies Alternative Strategies for Low Pressure End Uses...

373

Rapid Extraction of Dust Impact Tracks from Silica Aerogel by Ultrasonic Micro-blades  

SciTech Connect

In January 2006, NASA's Stardust Mission will return with its valuable cargo of cometary dust particles, the first brought back to Earth, captured at hypervelocity speeds in silica aerogel collectors. Aerogel, a proven capture medium, is also a candidate for future sample return missions and low-earth orbit (LEO) deployments. Critical to the science return of Stardust and future missions using aerogel is the ability to efficiently extract impacted particles from collector tiles. Researchers will be eager to obtain Stardust samples as quickly as possible, and tools for the rapid extraction of particle impact tracks that require little construction, training, or investment would be an attractive asset. To this end, we have experimented with diamond and steel micro-blades. Applying ultrasonic frequency oscillations to these micro-blades via a piezo-driven holder produces rapid, clean cuts in the aerogel with minimal damage to the surrounding collector tile. With this approach, impact tracks in aerogel fragments with low-roughness cut surfaces have been extracted from aerogel tiles flown on NASA's Orbital Debris Collector Experiment. The smooth surfaces produced during cutting reduce imaging artifacts during analysis by SEM. Some tracks have been dissected to expose the main cavity for eventual isolation of individual impact debris particles and further analysis by techniques such as TEM and nanoSIMS.

Ishii, H; Graham, G; Kearsley, A T; Grant, P G; Snead, C J; Bradley, J P

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

374

BeamDyn: A High-Fidelity Wind Turbine Blade Solver in the FAST Modular Framework: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

BeamDyn, a Legendre-spectral-finite-element implementation of geometrically exact beam theory (GEBT), was developed to meet the design challenges associated with highly flexible composite wind turbine blades. In this paper, the governing equations of GEBT are reformulated into a nonlinear state-space form to support its coupling within the modular framework of the FAST wind turbine computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool. Different time integration schemes (implicit and explicit) were implemented and examined for wind turbine analysis. Numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the capability of this new beam solver. An example analysis of a realistic wind turbine blade, the CX-100, is also presented as validation.

Wang, Q.; Sprague, M.; Jonkman, J.; Johnson, N.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

DC's Marble ceiling : urban height and its regulation in Washington, DC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC has a unique urban form that is the result of a century-old law. Through the narrow lens of DC's height limit, I survey a range of topics related to urban height, starting with a review of its history of ...

Trueblood, Andrew Tyson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Slider design for sub-3-nm flying height headdisk systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is important to further push slider's gap flying height from the current value of 78nm in mass production to 2.53nm, in order to increase the areal density of magnetic data storage technology from the current 6080Gb/in2 in mass production to 1Tb/in2. Furthermore, perpendicular magnetic recording will be the only choice for area densities beyond 300Gb/in2, though it might be more sensitive to the fluctuation of the flying height and needs higher flying height stability. This paper reports the authors efforts in both reducing slider's gap flying height and increasing the stability of the flying height. Analysis suggests that heat energy generation in both reading and writing operations affects the stability of the flying height, in addition to the intermolecular forces and the flying height modulations caused by disk waviness. An important design strategy is to have high air pressure and pressure gradient around the read/write element. Results suggest that introducing a sub-shallow step in slider's trailing part is an effective approach of achieving high air pressure and pressure gradient. A new type of slider is designed accordingly. Aerodynamic performance analysis indicates that the proposed slider can fly stably at a flying height below 3nm.

Bo Liu; Jin Liu; Tow-Chong Chong

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

TECHNICAL PAPER Contact and temperature rise of thermal flying height control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TECHNICAL PAPER Contact and temperature rise of thermal flying height control sliders in hard disk the flying height in hard disk drives (HDDs) has decreased to only a few nanometers, intermittent contacts Abstract Contact and interfacial temperature rise upon slider-disk contact in hard disk drives

Fainman, Yeshaiahu

378

Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum Constant Boost Control of the Z-Source Inverter Miaosen Shen1 , Jin Wang1 , Alan Joseph1 Laboratory Abstract: This paper proposes two maximum constant boost control methods for the Z-source inverter to modulation index is analyzed in detail and verified by simulation and experiment. Keywords- Z-source inverter

Tolbert, Leon M.

379

Acceleration of Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Tomosynthesis Mammography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the amount of x-ray radiation exposure to the patients, tomosynthesis uses a lower dose of x-ray than convenAcceleration of Maximum Likelihood Estimation for Tomosynthesis Mammography Juemin Zhang, Waleed twu2@partners.org Abstract Maximum likelihood (ML) estimation is used dur- ing tomosynthesis

Meleis, Waleed

380

Maximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

node consumes energy, but the receiving node does not. This assumption is not true if acknowledgementsMaximum Residual Energy Routing with Reverse Energy Cost Qiling Xie, Chin-Tau Lea, Mordecai J-The Maximum Residual Energy Path (MREP) routing has been shown an effective routing scheme for energy

Fleischer, Rudolf

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Summary of research and development effort on air and water cooling of gas turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

The review on air- and water-cooled gas turbines from the 1904 Lemale-Armengaud water-cooled gas turbine, the 1948 to 1952 NACA work, and the program at GE indicates that the potential of air cooling has been largely exploited in reaching temperatures of 1100/sup 0/C (approx. 2000/sup 0/F) in utility service and that further increases in turbine inlet temperature may be obtained with water cooling. The local heat flux in the first-stage turbine rotor with water cooling is very high, yielding high-temperature gradients and severe thermal stresses. Analyses and tests indicate that by employing a blade with an outer cladding of an approx. 1-mm-thick oxidation-resistant high-nickel alloy, a sublayer of a high-thermal-conductivity, high-strength, copper alloy containing closely spaced cooling passages approx. 2 mm in ID to minimize thermal gradients, and a central high-strength alloy structural spar, it appears possible to operate a water-cooled gas turbine with an inlet gas temperature of 1370/sup 0/C. The cooling-water passages must be lined with an iron-chrome-nickel alloy must be bent 90/sup 0/ to extend in a neatly spaced array through the platform at the base of the blade. The complex geometry of the blade design presents truly formidable fabrication problems. The water flow rate to each of many thousands of coolant passages must be metered and held to within rather close limits because the heat flux is so high that a local flow interruption of only a few seconds would lead to a serious failure.Heat losses to the cooling water will run approx. 10% of the heat from the fuel. By recoverying this waste heat for feedwater heating in a command cycle, these heat losses will give a degradation in the power plant output of approx. 5% relative to what might be obtained if no cooling were required. However, the associated power loss is less than half that to be expected with an elegant air cooling system.

Fraas, A.P.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

DISCRETE ELEMENT MODELING OF BLADESTRIKE FREQUENCY AND SURVIVAL OF FISH PASSING THROUGH HYDROKINETIC TURBINES  

SciTech Connect

Evaluating the consequences from blade-strike of fish on marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbine blades is essential for incorporating environmental objectives into the integral optimization of machine performance. For instance, experience with conventional hydroelectric turbines has shown that innovative shaping of the blade and other machine components can lead to improved designs that generate more power without increased impacts to fish and other aquatic life. In this work, we used unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of turbine flow and discrete element modeling (DEM) of particle motion to estimate the frequency and severity of collisions between a horizontal axis MHK tidal energy device and drifting aquatic organisms or debris. Two metrics are determined with the method: the strike frequency and survival rate estimate. To illustrate the procedure step-by-step, an exemplary case of a simple runner model was run and compared against a probabilistic model widely used for strike frequency evaluation. The results for the exemplary case showed a strong correlation between the two approaches. In the application case of the MHK turbine flow, turbulent flow was modeled using detached eddy simulation (DES) in conjunction with a full moving rotor at full scale. The CFD simulated power and thrust were satisfactorily comparable to experimental results conducted in a water tunnel on a reduced scaled (1:8.7) version of the turbine design. A cloud of DEM particles was injected into the domain to simulate fish or debris that were entrained into the turbine flow. The strike frequency was the ratio of the count of colliding particles to the crossing sample size. The fish length and approaching velocity were test conditions in the simulations of the MHK turbine. Comparisons showed that DEM-based frequencies tend to be greater than previous results from Lagrangian particles and probabilistic models, mostly because the DEM scheme accounts for both the geometric aspects of the passage event ---which the probabilistic method does--- as well as the fluid-particle interactions ---which the Lagrangian particle method does. The DEM-based survival rates were comparable to laboratory results for small fish but not for mid-size fish because of the considerably different turbine diameters. The modeling framework can be used for applications that aim at evaluating the biological performance of MHK turbine units during the design phase and to provide information to regulatory agencies needed for the environmental permitting process.

Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ; Richmond, Marshall C.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

383

Eliciting a human understandable model of ice adhesion strength for rotor blade leading edge materials from uncertain experimental data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the thermal conductivity of isotropic materials that protect the leading edge of the blade from erosion. For this reason, electro-thermal de-icing is not ideal for new high erosion resistant polymer based leading edge protec- tion materials because they have lower thermal conductivity than isotropic materials. Due

Granada, Universidad de

384

DEVELOPMENT OF TIP CLEARANCE FLOW DOWNSTREAM OF A ROTOR BLADE WITH COOLANT INJECTION FROM A TIP TRENCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dimensional picture. The small leakage flow through the tip gap has an effect on the loss and heat transfer it imperative to understand the flow field and heat transfer distribution in the blade tip region. Most studies on the secondary flow. The ultimate objective is to re- duce losses by the introduction of high momentum air

Camci, Cengiz

385

Enhanced Prediction Techniques Based on Time-Accurate Simulations for Turbine Blade Internal Cooling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab utsr.dkt.oct05 Enhanced Prediction Techniques Based on Time-Accurate Simulations for Turbine Blade Internal Cooling Danesh Tafti SCIES Project 02- 01- SR100 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (5/1/02, 36 Month Duration) $ 331,430 Total Contract Value ($331,430 DOE) High Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab utsr.dkt.oct05 Gas Turbine Need * Need for higher thermal efficiencies result in higher gas temperatures * Cooling technologies critical for increased durability * Reliable prediction tools for design - reduce costs High Performance Computational Fluid-Thermal Science & Engineering Lab

386

Electron backscattering diffraction analysis of an ancient wootz steel blade from central India  

SciTech Connect

The electron backscattering diffraction technique was used to analyse the nature of carbides present in an ancient wootz steel blade. Bulky carbides, pro-eutectoid carbide along the prior austenite grain boundaries and fine spheroidized carbides were detected. Electron backscattering diffraction was employed to understand the texture of these carbides. The orientations of the cementite frequently occur in clusters, which points to a common origin of the members of the cluster. For the bands of coarse cementite, the origin is probably large coarse particles formed during the original cooling of the wootz cake. Pearlite formed earlier in the forging process has led to groups of similarly oriented fine cementite particles. The crystallographic texture of the cementite is sharp whereas that of the ferrite is weak. The sharp cementite textures point to the longevity of the coarse cementite throughout the repeated forging steps and to the influence of existing textured cementite on the nucleation of new cementite during cooling.

Barnett, M.R. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong (Australia)], E-mail: barnettm@deakin.edu.au; Sullivan, A. [Centre for Material and Fibre Innovation, Deakin University, Geelong (Australia); Balasubramaniam, R. [Depertment of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, Kanpur 208 016 (India)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

An Innovative Technique for Evaluating the Integrity and Durability of Wind Turbine Blade Composites - Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

To build increasingly larger, lightweight, and robust wind turbine blades for improved power output and cost efficiency, durability of the blade, largely resulting from its structural composites selection and aerodynamic shape design, is of paramount concern. The safe/reliable operation of structural components depends critically on the selection of materials that are resistant to damage and failure in the expected service environment. An effective surveillance program is also necessary to monitor the degradation of the materials in the course of service. Composite materials having high specific strength/stiffness are desirable for the construction of wind turbines. However, most high-strength materials tend to exhibit low fracture toughness. That is why the fracture toughness of the composite materials under consideration for the manufacture of the next generation of wind turbines deserves special attention. In order to achieve the above we have proposed to develop an innovative technology, based on spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) methodology, to effectively investigate the material performance of turbine blade composites. SNTT approach was successfully demonstrated and extended to both epoxy and glass fiber composite materials for wind turbine blades during the performance period. In addition to typical Mode I failure mechanism, the mixed-mode failure mechanism induced by the wind turbine service environments and/or the material mismatch of the composite materials was also effectively investigated using SNTT approach. The SNTT results indicate that the proposed protocol not only provides significant advance in understanding the composite failure mechanism, but also can be readily utilized to assist the development of new turbine blade composites.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Tan, Ting [ORNL; Mandell, John [Montana State University; Agastra, Pancasatya [Montana State University

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Multi-Sensor Estimation of Mixing Heights Over a Coastal City  

SciTech Connect

An airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was deployed during the An airborne Microwave Temperature Profiler (MTP) was deployed during the Texas 2000 Air Quality Study (TexAQS-2000) to make measurements of boundary layer thermal structure. An objective technique is developed and tested for estimating the mixed layer (ML) height from the MTP vertical temperature profiles. The technique identifies the ML height as a threshold increase of potential temperature from its minimum value within the boundary layer. In order to calibrate the technique and evaluate the usefulness of this approach, coincident estimates from radiosondes, radar wind profilers, an aerosol backscatter lidar, and in situ aircraft measurements were compared with each other and with the MTP. Relative biases among all instruments were generally less than 50 m, and the agreement between MTP ML height estimates and other estimates was at least as good as the agreement among the other estimates. The ML height estimates from the MTP and other instruments are utilized to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of ML height in the Houston area on 1 Sept. 2000. An elevated temperature inversion was present, so ML growth was inhibited until early afternoon. In the afternoon, large spatial variations in ML height developed across the Houston area. The highest ML heights, well over 2 km, were observed to the north of Houston, while downwind of Galveston Bay and within the late afternoon sea breeze ML heights were much lower. The spatial variations that were found away from the immediate influence of coastal circulations were unexpected, and multiple independent ML height estimates were essential for documenting this feature.

Nielsen-Gammon, John W.; Powell, Christina L.; Mahoney, Michael J.; Angevine, Wayne M.; Senff, Christoph; White, Allen B.; Berkowitz, Carl M.; Doran, J. C.; Knupp, Kevin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Maximum Photovoltaic Penetration Levels on Typical Distribution Feeders: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents simulation results for a taxonomy of typical distribution feeders with various levels of photovoltaic (PV) penetration. For each of the 16 feeders simulated, the maximum PV penetration that did not result in steady-state voltage or current violation is presented for several PV location scenarios: clustered near the feeder source, clustered near the midpoint of the feeder, clustered near the end of the feeder, randomly located, and evenly distributed. In addition, the maximum level of PV is presented for single, large PV systems at each location. Maximum PV penetration was determined by requiring that feeder voltages stay within ANSI Range A and that feeder currents stay within the ranges determined by overcurrent protection devices. Simulations were run in GridLAB-D using hourly time steps over a year with randomized load profiles based on utility data and typical meteorological year weather data. For 86% of the cases simulated, maximum PV penetration was at least 30% of peak load.

Hoke, A.; Butler, R.; Hambrick, J.; Kroposki, B.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

On the maximum pressure rise rate in boosted HCCI operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper explores the combined effects of boosting, intake air temperature, trapped residual gas fraction, and dilution on the Maximum Pressure Rise Rate (MPRR) in a boosted single cylinder gasoline HCCI engine with ...

Wildman, Craig B.

391

Nonstationary analysis of annual maximum streamflow of Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Both natural climate change and anthropogenic impacts may cause nonstationarities in hydrological extremes. In this study, long-term annual maximum streamflow (AMS) records from 145 stations over Canada were used to investigate the nonstationary ...

Xuezhi Tan; Thian Yew Gan

392

Propane spectral resolution enhancement by the maximum entropy method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Burg algorithm for maximum entropy power spectral density estimation is applied to a time series of data obtained from a Michelson interferometer and compared with a standard fast...

Bonavito, N L; Yeh, K C; Stewart, K P; Inguva, R; Hurley, E J

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Is there a maximum observable redshift in an open universe?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An estimate of the maximum observable redshift is obtained using only t_{0} approximately equal to (14+- 3)10^{9}years, H_{0} approximately equal to 65 +- 10Km\\sec^{-1}Mpc^{-1}(t_{0}H_{0} approximately equal to 0.91 +- 0.08/0.18) assuming \\Lambda approximately equal to 0. The resulting maximum redshift z_{+} approximately equal to 10 appears to give a reasonable upper limit to the highest actually observed redshifts. Some implications are discussed.

J. A. Gonzalo

2000-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Efficiency at maximum power of interacting molecular machines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the efficiency of systems of molecular motors operating at maximum power. We consider two models of kinesin motors on a microtubule: for both the simplified and the detailed model, we find that the many-body exclusion effect enhances the efficiency at maximum power of the many-motor system, with respect to the single motor case. Remarkably, we find that this effect occurs in a limited region of the system parameters, compatible with the biologically relevant range.

N. Golubeva; A. Imparato

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

395

Numerical simulation of flow and heat transfer of internal cooling passage in gas turbine blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-to-hydraulic diameter ratio (e/Dh) is 0.078 and the rib pitch-to-height ratio (P/e) is 10. The rotation number and inlet coolant-to-wall density ratio were varied from 0.0 to 0.28 and from 0.122 to 0.40, respectively, while the Reynolds number was varied from 10...

Su, Guoguang

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Real-time variable rate Pix application system using a plant height sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a chemical application system that could measure plant size, determine the optimum chemical rate to apply and control that application. A plant height sensor, the MEPRT growth relationship software...

Beck, Andy Dwayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Leading Ideal of a Complete Intersection of Height Two in a 2 ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goto, W. Heinzer, and M.-K. Kim, The leading ideal of a complete intersection of height two, J. Algebra, 298 (206), 238-247. [GHK2]GHK2S. Goto, W. Heinzer...

398

Height change detection in Antarcita using satellite altimetry data and Kriging / Kalman filtering techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of the response of ice sheets to climate change require data sets with high accuracy and uniform ice-sheet coverage. The most common technique used in analyzing satellite altimetry data to study height change in ...

Nguyen, An Thanh-Thuy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Adaptive flying height modulation control of hybrid active slider with thermal and piezoelectric actuators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hybrid active slider is an effective means to increase the storage density of hard disk, but its effectiveness is compromised by the flying height modulation (FHM), the bounding vibrations ... proposes an adaptiv...

L. Huang; G. Sheng; J. -Y. Chang

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Contact and temperature rise of thermal flying height control sliders in hard disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Contact and interfacial temperature rise upon slider-disk contact in hard disk drives is investigated using thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders. To achieve ... increasing bias. The temperature rise during...

Liane Matthes; Uwe Boettcher; Bernhard Knigge

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Active-head sliders using piezoelectric thin films for flying height control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes design and fabrication of a MEMS-based active-head slider using a PZT thin film for flying height control in hard disk drives. A piezoelectric cantilever integrated in the ... air bearing sli...

Kenji Suzuki; Takayuki Akimatsu; Kenji Sasaki; Masayuki Kurita

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Effects of environmental temperature and humidity on thermal flying height adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal actuated sliders are being widely used in todays hard disk drive industry for its advantages of easier control of flying height (FH) and less risk of contacts with the disk. This article uses a coupled-f...

Weidong Zhou; Bo Liu; Shengkai Yu; Wei Hua; Chee How Wong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A parameter identification method for thermal flying-height control sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The MEMS thermal actuated flying-height control (TFC) sliders have been ... industry as an effective design to reduce head-disk spacing in disk drives to achieve Terabit per square inch...2006; Li et al. 2009; Zh...

Gang Sheng; Jianfeng Xu

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Dynamic instability of thermal-flying-height-control sliders at touchdown  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the wide application of thermal flying-height control (TFC) technology in the hard disk drive industry, the head-disk clearance can be controlled to as low ... experiences more complicated dynamics, compared...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Polarization interferometer for measuring the flying height of magnetic readwrite heads  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditional optical flying-height testers use only the normal-incidence reflectivity of the interface between the readwrite slider and a glass disk surrogate. We propose a tester that...

de Groot, Peter; Deck, Leslie; Soobitsky, James; Biegen, James

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A numerical investigation of different touchdown patterns of thermal-flying-height-control sliders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study we employ a numerical approach to explore the touchdown patterns of a thermal-flying-height-control (TFC) slider. Depending on the roughness of the head disk interface and thickness of the lubricant...

Jinglin Zheng; David B. Bogy

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Ocean Currents and Sea Surface Heights Estimated across the West Florida Shelf  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The across-shelf structures of the ocean circulation and the associated sea surface height (SSH) variability are examined on the west Florida shelf (WFS) for the 3-yr interval from September 1998 to December 2001. Five sets of characteristic ...

Yonggang Liu; Robert H. Weisberg

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wind Speeds at Heights Crucial for Wind Energy: Measurements and Verification of Forecasts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wind speed measurements from one year from meteorological towers and wind turbines at heights between 20 and 250 m for various European sites are analyzed and are compared with operational short-term forecasts of the global ECMWF model. The ...

Susanne Drechsel; Georg J. Mayr; Jakob W. Messner; Reto Stauffer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Tornadoes in Environments with Small Helicity and/or High LCL Heights  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent studies have suggested that supercell tornado environments are usually associated with large 01-km storm-relative helicity (SRH) and relatively low lifting condensation levels (LCL heights). However, occasional tornadoes of significance ...

Jonathan M. Davies

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Annual Variability of Sea Surface Height and Upper Layer Thickness in the Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The annual variabilities of the sea surface height in the Pacific Ocean were investigated by analyzing the TOPEX/POSEIDON ... the model results suggests that the eastern equatorial Pacific Ocean is relatively cal...

Yoshinobu Wakata; Shouko Kitaya

411

The Relationship between Height and Precipitation Characteristics of Summertime Convective Cells in South Florida  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radar volume scan studies employed two radars simultaneously to measure heights and other echo characteristics of convective cells. Maps produced from the date were used to identify and track cells, whose properties were then related to one ...

A. Gagin; D. Rosenfeld; R. E. Lpez

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Wind Speed Dependence of Single-Site Wave-Height Retrievals from High-Frequency Radars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wave-height observations derived from single-site high-frequency (HF) radar backscattered Doppler spectra are generally recognized to be less accurate than overlapping radar techniques but can provide significantly larger sampling regions. The ...

Brian K. Haus; Lynn K. Shay; Paul A. Work; George Voulgaris; Rafael J. Ramos; Jorge Martinez-Pedraja

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) with 10-km horizontal grid spacing was used to explore improvements in wind speed forecasts at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m). An ensemble consisting of WRF model simulations with ...

Adam J. Deppe; William A. Gallus Jr.; Eugene S. Takle

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

BLOCKS WITH EQUAL HEIGHT ZERO DEGREES GUNTER MALLE AND GABRIEL NAVARRO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BLOCKS WITH EQUAL HEIGHT ZERO DEGREES GUNTER MALLE AND GABRIEL NAVARRO Abstract. We investigate of this work. 1 #12;2 Gunter Malle and Gabriel Navarro unipotent blocks of general linear groups GLn

Malle, Gunter

415

Engineering issue study of triple harmonic method for in situ flying height analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ flying height testing technology is becoming more and more important in sliderdisk interaction analysis and manufacturing quality control of disk drives and head-related components. Triple harmonic method is a quite promising choice for in situ flying height analysis, compared with other in situ methods reported up to now. This paper reports results of investigations on engineering issues of applying triple harmonic method for in situ flying height analysis. The paper reports results of analysis on the effects of various testing conditions on flying height testing repeatability and accuracy. Results suggest that working at reasonable high channel density and working on the ratio between third and first harmonics will be an advantage in terms of both flying height testing sensitivity and testing repeatability. Comparing with media thickness effect, the gap-length variation among different heads will be important if it is to study flying height difference among different heads and the testing is at high channel density. Also, it is suggested to work at AC erased track, in order to reduce the non-linearity caused by hard transition.

Yipin Zhou; Bo Liu; Lewei Li

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Simulation of Piezoelectric Flying Height Control Slider Using Shear-Mode Deformation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The piezoelectric flying height control slider has recently been implemented in magnetic recording disk drives to reduce the flying height. This paper has examined the piezoelectric flying height control slider using shear-model deformation of piezoelectric transducer (PZT). A finite element model of the PZT slider using shear-model deformation has been built, and the electromechanical simulation and air-bearing simulation have been performed to investigate the effects of the shear-model deformation on the static flying attitude of the PZT slider. The results show that the flying height and pitch angle of the PZT slider can be significantly reduced with an increase in the drive voltage on the PZT sheet. However, beyond the drive voltage of 80V for the proposed PZT slider, the reduction in the flying height of PZT slider is limited owing to the high air bearing stiffness at low flying height region. Furthermore, the PZT slider can be rotated and balanced at a negative pitch angle.

Hui Li; Shengnan Shen; Kensuke Amemiya; Bo Liu; Hejun Du

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

CRITICAL HEIGHT FOR THE DESTABILIZATION OF SOLAR PROMINENCES: STATISTICAL RESULTS FROM STEREO OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

At which height is a prominence inclined to be unstable, or where is the most probable critical height for the prominence destabilization? This question was statistically studied based on 362 solar limb prominences well recognized by Solar Limb Prominence Catcher and Tracker from 2007 April to the end of 2009. We found that there are about 71% disrupted prominences (DPs), among which about 42% of them did not erupt successfully and about 89% of them experienced a sudden destabilization process. After a comprehensive analysis of the DPs, we discovered the following: (1) Most DPs become unstable at a height of 0.06-0.14 R{sub Sun} from the solar surface, and there are two most probable critical heights at which a prominence is very likely to become unstable, the first one is 0.13 R{sub Sun} and the second one is 0.19 R{sub Sun }. (2) An upper limit for the erupting velocity of eruptive prominences (EPs) exists, which decreases following a power law with increasing height and mass; accordingly, the kinetic energy of EPs has an upper limit too, which decreases as the critical height increases. (3) Stable prominences are generally longer and heavier than DPs, and not higher than 0.4 R{sub Sun }. (4) About 62% of the EPs were associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs); but there is no difference in apparent properties between EPs associated with CMEs and those that are not.

Liu Kai; Wang Yuming; Wang Shui; Shen Chenglong, E-mail: ymwang@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, Department of Geophysics and Planetary Sciences, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

418

Investigation of wear resistance and lifetime of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated glass disk in flying height measurement process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Flying height has been greatly reduced to less ... -density magnetic storage. This leads to significant disk wear especially, glass disks used in flying height measurement process. This paper reports the ... the ...

Korakoch Phetdee; Alongkorn Pimpin; Werayut Srituravanich

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Simulation of Static Flying Attitudes with Different Heat Transfer Models for a Flying-Height Control Slider with Thermal Protrusion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal flying height control (TFC), aka dynamic fly height (DFH), technique has been recently used in the head disk interface of hard disk drives to obtain a lower head-media ... effects are included in the ...

Du Chen; David B. Bogy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Method for estimation of the average local working temperatures and the residual resource of metal coatings of gas-turbine blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new method is proposed for estimation of the average local operating temperatures and the residual service life (resource) of protective MCrAlY metal coatings of gas-turbine blades after a certain time of opera...

P. G. Krukovskii; K. A. Tadlya

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SAFT imaging of flaws in the rail base blade with consideration of multiple reflections of an ultrasonic pulse from the boundaries of a test object  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of obtaining images of type-69 flaws in blades of the railroad rail base is considered. For this purpose, a modification of the SAFT algorithm is proposed, in which, during...

E. G. Bazulin

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1ŒComposite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 * NREL/SR-500-29492 1 * NREL/SR-500-29492 Dayton A. Griffin Global Energy Concepts Kirkland, Washington WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor March 21, 2000 - March 15, 2001 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 NREL is a U.S. Department of Energy Laboratory Operated by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 April 2001 * NREL/SR-500-29492 WindPACT Turbine Design Scaling Studies Technical Area 1-Composite Blades for 80- to 120-Meter Rotor March 21, 2000 - March 15, 2001 Dayton A. Griffin Global Energy Concepts Kirkland, Washington NREL Technical Monitor: Alan Laxson Prepared under Subcontract No. YAM-0-30203-01 National Renewable Energy Laboratory

423

Efficiency of autonomous soft nano-machines at maximum power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider nano-sized artificial or biological machines working in steady state enforced by imposing non-equilibrium concentrations of solutes or by applying external forces, torques or electric fields. For unicyclic and strongly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power is not bounded by the linear response value 1/2. For strong driving, it can even approach the thermodynamic limit 1. Quite generally, such machines fall in three different classes characterized, respectively, as "strong and efficient", "strong and inefficient", and "balanced". For weakly coupled multicyclic machines, efficiency at maximum power has lost any universality even in the linear response regime.

Udo Seifert

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

424

Advanced turbine design for coal-fueled engines. Phase 1, Erosion of turbine hot gas path blading: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The investigators conclude that: (1) Turbine erosion resistance was shown to be improved by a factor of 5 by varying the turbine design. Increasing the number of stages and increasing the mean radius reduces the peak predicted erosion rates for 2-D flows on the blade airfoil from values which are 6 times those of the vane to values of erosion which are comparable to those of the vane airfoils. (2) Turbine erosion was a strong function of airfoil shape depending on particle diameter. Different airfoil shapes for the same turbine operating condition resulted in a factor of 7 change in airfoil erosion for the smallest particles studied (5 micron). (3) Predicted erosion for the various turbines analyzed was a strong function of particle diameter and weaker function of particle density. (4) Three dimensional secondary flows were shown to cause increases in peak and average erosion on the vane and blade airfoils. Additionally, the interblade secondary flows and stationary outer case caused unique erosion patterns which were not obtainable with 2-D analyses. (5) Analysis of the results indicate that hot gas cleanup systems are necessary to achieve acceptable turbine life in direct-fired, coal-fueled systems. In addition, serious consequences arise when hot gas filter systems fail for even short time periods. For a complete failure of the filter system, a 0.030 in. thick corrosion-resistant protective coating on a turbine blade would be eroded at some locations within eight minutes.

Wagner, J.H.; Johnson, B.V.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Exit blade geometry and part-load performance of small axial flow propeller turbines: An experimental investigation  

SciTech Connect

A detailed experimental investigation of the effects of exit blade geometry on the part-load performance of low-head, axial flow propeller turbines is presented. Even as these turbines find important applications in small-scale energy generation using micro-hydro, the relationship between the layout of blade profile, geometry and turbine performance continues to be poorly characterized. The experimental results presented here help understand the relationship between exit tip angle, discharge through the turbine, shaft power, and efficiency. The modification was implemented on two different propeller runners and it was found that the power and efficiency gains from decreasing the exit tip angle could be explained by a theoretical model presented here based on classical theory of turbomachines. In particular, the focus is on the behaviour of internal parameters like the runner loss coefficient, relative flow angle at exit, mean axial flow velocity and net tangential flow velocity. The study concluded that the effects of exit tip modification were significant. The introspective discussion on the theoretical model's limitation and test facility suggests wider and continued experimentation pertaining to the internal parameters like inlet vortex profile and exit swirl profile. It also recommends thorough validation of the model and its improvement so that it can be made capable for accurate characterization of blade geometric effects. (author)

Singh, Punit; Nestmann, Franz [Institute for Water and River Basin Management (IWG), University of Karlsruhe, Kaiser Str. 12, D 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena, Hugo Eduardo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Maximum power tracking control scheme for wind generator systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to develop a maximum power tracking control strategy for variable speed wind turbine systems. Modern wind turbine control systems are slow, and they depend on the design parameters of the turbine and use wind and/or rotor...

Mena Lopez, Hugo Eduardo

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

428

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance of Civil Aviation Receivers during Maximum Solar Activity Events Lina DEAMBROGIO on the fields of ionosphere scintillations, solar energetic particles and on the implementation of operational the upcoming period of high solar activity. Emilien ROBERT got his PhD in 2005 and started to work on behalf

Boyer, Edmond

429

Rapidly Solving an Online Sequence of Maximum Flow Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... an interdictor allocates a finite amount of resources to remove arcs from a net- ... is, the next maximum flow problem in the sequence differs from the previous one by ..... the appropriate reoptimization case and then taking the appropriate action to ..... Our first set of computational experiments tested the performance of our...

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

THE MAXIMUM CAPACITY OF A LINE PLAN IS INAPPROXIMABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MAXIMUM CAPACITY OF A LINE PLAN IS INAPPROXIMABLE CHRISTINA PUHL AND SEBASTIAN STILLER Abstract a network, upper arc-capacities and a line pool. E-mail: puhl@math.tu-berlin.de, stiller of the European Commission under contract no. FP6-021235-2. 1 #12;2 CHRISTINA PUHL AND SEBASTIAN STILLER We

Nabben, Reinhard

431

Maximum-principle-satisfying and positivity-preserving high order ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conservation laws: Survey and new developments ..... Notice that in (2.10) we need to evaluate the maximum/minimum of a ..... total energy, p is the pressure, e is the internal energy, and ? > 1 is a constant ... under a standard CFL condition.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article High-Energy Flare Observations from the Solar Maximum Mission W...Vestrand We review high-energy observations of solar flares with emphasis...expectation, high-energy emission is a common property of solar flares. Direct interpretation...

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Maximum Entropy in Support of Semantically Annotated Datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximum Entropy in Support of Semantically Annotated Datasets Paulo Pinheiro da Silva, Vladik whether two datasets describe the same quantity. The existing solution to this problem is to use these datasets' ontologies to deduce that these datasets indeed represent the same quantity. However, even when

Kreinovich, Vladik

434

O(1)-Approximations for Maximum Movement Piotr Berman1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

movement of the pebbles, motivated by minimizing either execution time or energy usage. Spe- cific problems the maximum movement made by pebbles on a graph to reach a configuration in which the pebbles form a connected. For example, in the connectivity goal, the proximity of the robots should form a connected graph. Two

Demaine, Erik

435

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximization of Recursive Utilities: A Dynamic Maximum Principle Approach Wahid FAIDI LAMSIN, ENIT for a class of robust utility function introduced in Bordigoni, Matoussi et Schweizer (2005). Our method-investment strategy which is characterized as the unique solution of a forward-backward system. Key words : Utility

Di Girolami, Cristina

436

Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Scheduling for Fading Channels with Maximum Power Constraint Zhe Wang Electrical--In this paper, we develop efficient algorithm to obtain the optimal energy schedule for fading channel with energy harvesting. We assume that the side information of both the channel states and energy harvesting

Greenberg, Albert

438

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction. 11 refs.

Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Experimental research on tidal current vertical axis turbine with variable-pitch blades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to the limited storage and ever-increasing dependence on fossil fuel, the world is in the phase of shifting toward renewable energy. Tidal current energy is one of the most predictable forms of renewable energy, which is harnessed by utilizing a tidal current turbine. To study the performance of the tidal current turbine relating to the ability of energy absorption and exchanging, experimental tests play an important role which can not only validate the numerical results but also provide a reference for the prototype design. In this study, a series of experiments related to vertical-axis turbines (VAT) were carried out at Harbin Engineering University and a large quantity of experimental data to study the hydrodynamic performance of turbines was presented. Based on the different techniques used to control the pitch mechanism, the experiments can be classified as the cycloid type controllable-pitch, spring-control pitch and passive variable-pitch VAT experiment. The influences of the different parameters on the hydrodynamic performance of turbines were discussed. Finally, some control strategies for the blade for different turbines were given.

Fengmei Jing; Qihu Sheng; Liang Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Technical progress report: Peripheral mower blade. Sixth quarter report ending 12/31/99  

SciTech Connect

Machine Tech Inc. has been assisting the author with the development of the peripheral mower blade decks. Machine Tech Inc. is still developing the batwing mower deck, which was started last fall after the completion of the mounted deck. The completion date of this program is slated for February. The wing covers and the center section of the batwing have been completed, the frame and drive-lines are now under development. Information from the nineteen-foot bat-wing deck prototype that they have been testing is now being used in the development of a more acceptable bat-wing mower. This unit will be able to maintain the same peripheral mower benefits, but will be much lighter and easier to pull requiring less fuel and damage to highway right of ways in soft areas. The mounted deck has been completed and is in the pilot stage with reports yet to be compiled. Machine Tech Inc. has also worked in an agricultural deck which is closely related to the mounted peripheral mower deck developed for the highway right of way. This will be one more outlet for the peripheral mower machines into the hands of the public.

Darden, John A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL GIS Data: U.S. Great Lakes Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Great Lakes Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Great Lakes Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. The data provide an estimate of annual average wind speed at 90 meter height above surface for specific offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy, and have been validated by NREL. To download state wind resource maps, visit Wind Powering America. In order to ensure the downloadable shapefile is current, please compare the date updated on this page to the last updated date on the NREL GIS Wind Data webpage.

442

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels February 22, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program A recent flight to a conference inspired me to think about the impact of airports on our environment and society. Although modern planes have made it safe and fun to travel around the world, they use a vast amount of fuel. The petroleum used by the array of behind-the-scenes equipment, from shuttle buses to luggage carriers, adds up as well. Although Clean Cities doesn't address planes, our 87 local coalitions have helped airports limit their petroleum use in other ways, reducing their smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced

443

NREL GIS Data: U.S. Hawaii Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawaii Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Hawaii Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. The data provide an estimate of annual average wind speed at 90 meter height above surface for specific offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy, and have been validated by NREL. To download state wind resource maps, visit Wind Powering America. In order to ensure the downloadable shapefile is current, please compare the date updated on this page to the last updated date on the NREL GIS Wind Data webpage.

444

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, Comparison of Cloud Top Height and Optical Depth Histograms from ISCCP, MISR, and MODIS Marchand, Roger Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, Thomas Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Cloud Properties Joint histograms of Cloud Top Height (CTH) and Optical Depth (OD) derived by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) are being widely used by the climate modeling community in evaluating global climate models. Similar joint histograms of CTH-OD are now being produced by the NASA Multi-angle Imaging Spectro-Radiometer (MISR) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instruments. There are notable differences in the histograms being produced by these three projects. In this poster we analyze some of the differences and discuss how the

445

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels Airports Soar to New Heights with Alternative Fuels February 22, 2011 - 2:27pm Addthis Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program A recent flight to a conference inspired me to think about the impact of airports on our environment and society. Although modern planes have made it safe and fun to travel around the world, they use a vast amount of fuel. The petroleum used by the array of behind-the-scenes equipment, from shuttle buses to luggage carriers, adds up as well. Although Clean Cities doesn't address planes, our 87 local coalitions have helped airports limit their petroleum use in other ways, reducing their smog-forming and greenhouse gas emissions. A number of airports have adopted the use of alternative fuels and advanced

446

NREL GIS Data: U.S. Gulf of Mexico Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gulf of Mexico Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Gulf of Mexico Coast Offshore Windspeed 90m Height High Resolution Dataset Summary Description This dataset is a geographic shapefile generated from the original raster data. The original raster data resolution is a 200-meter cell size. The data provide an estimate of annual average wind speed at 90 meter height above surface for specific offshore regions of the United States. To learn more, please see the Assessment of Offshore Wind Energy Resources for the United States. These data were produced in cooperation with U.S. Department of Energy, and have been validated by NREL. To download state wind resource maps, visit Wind Powering America. In order to ensure the downloadable shapefile is current, please compare the date updated on this page to the last updated date on the NREL GIS Wind Data webpage.

447

About EffectiveŽ Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in "Effective" Height of the Aerosol Atmosphere in Visible and IR Wavelength Range V. N. Uzhegov, D. M. Kabanov, M. V. Panchenko, Yu. A. Pkhalagov, and S. M. Sakerin Institute of Atmospheric Optics Tomsk, Russia Introduction Aerosol component of the atmosphere is one of the important factors affecting the radiation budget of the space - atmosphere - underlying surface system in visible and infrared (IR) wavelength ranges. It is extremely important to take into account the contribution of this component into the extinction of solar radiation under cloudless sky conditions. Sometimes it is important to know not only the total value of the aerosol component of extinction, but also to have the possibility to estimate the "effective" height of

448

A gap capacitance method for slider flying height measurement in near-field optical disk drives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In order to overcome the diffraction limit of conventional optical disk drives, and substantially increase data storage capacity and density, near-field optical disk drives remain to be realized. The slider of a flying pickup head in a near-field optical disk drive has to fly at a stable spacing above the disk surface. To sense the slider flying height, a gap capacitance method is developed in this study to measure capacitance variation between the pickup head and disk surface. The capacitance varying with the flying height is modulated by a Colpitts oscillator. Subsequent demodulation accounts for height variation of the flying pickup head. Measurement results of this method are verified by using a laser Doppler interferometer.

J.W. Chen; T.S. Liu

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Large-eddy simulation of flows over two-dimensional idealised street canyons with height variation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of large-eddy simulation (LES) models consisting of two-dimensional (2D) idealised street canyons with building height variability (BHV) are examined. Building blocks with two different heights are placed alternately in the computational domains, constructing repeated street canyons of building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratio (AR) = 1, 0.5, 0.25 and 0.125 together with BHV = 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6. LES results show that the air exchange rate (ACH) increases with increasing aerodynamic resistance. Apart from AR, BHV is another factor affecting the aerodynamic resistance and thus the ACH. The (vertical) dispersion coefficient ?z of plume transport is also closely related to the aerodynamic resistance, suggesting that introducing BHV in urban areas could help improve the air quality.

Colman C.C. Wong; Chun-Ho Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Property:Maximum Velocity(m/s) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Velocity(m/s) Velocity(m/s) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Velocity(m/s) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Velocity(m/s)" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alden Large Flume + 0.9 + B Bucknell Hydraulic Flume + 2.7 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 7.2 + Carderock Rotating Arm Tow Tank + 25.8 + Carderock Tow Tank 1 + 9.3 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 10.3 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 25.8 + Chase Tow Tank + 2.5 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 18.3 + H Haynes Tow Tank + 1.8 + I Ice Towing Tank + 0.5 + L Lakefront Tow Tank + 2.7 + M MHL Free Surface Channel + 2 + MHL High Speed Cavitation + 25.9 + MHL Tow Tank + 6.7 + MIT Tow Tank + 1.5 + MMA Tugboat/ Barge/ Vessel + 5.1 + Maine Tow Tank + 3 +

451

Radiative muon capture rates and the maximum photon energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential photon spectrum for radiative muon capture is expanded about the average maximum photon energy km and the correction terms evaluated using for one a modified Thomas-Reiche-Kuhn sum rule, thus extending previous work for ordinary capture. The resulting rate is much less dependent on km than the usual closure result. The ratio km? appropriate for closure calculations, with ? the average neutrino energy, is determined and found to be approximately constant and, when correction terms are included, somewhat higher than values previously used. By similar techniques a consistency relation is derived which can be solved to explicitly estimate "physical" values of km and ?.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Radiative muon capture. Differential photon spectrum, relative rate for Ca40. Dipole sum rules used to correct closure approximation, obtain estimates of mean excitation energy, average maximum photon energy.

R. S. Sloboda and Harold W. Fearing

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and fire. The inputs are chosen from distributions that are either gaussian, uniform, skewed, or bimodal. For each circuit, we compute the distribution on output spiking states either analytically or by sampling, approximate by a maximum entropy fit... generation is characterized by a simple static nonlinearity, or by integrate-and-fire (LIF) threshold-crossing dynamics. However, this circuit does generate substantial higher-order correlations if the common input to the three cells is bimodal. This approach...

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

453

Maximum entanglement in squeezed boson and fermion states  

SciTech Connect

A class of squeezed boson and fermion states is studied with particular emphasis on the nature of entanglement. We first investigate the case of bosons, considering two-mode squeezed states. Then we construct the fermion version to show that such states are maximum entangled, for both bosons and fermions. To achieve these results, we demonstrate some relations involving squeezed boson states. The generalization to the case of fermions is made by using Grassmann variables.

Khanna, F. C. [Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 2A3 (Canada); Malbouisson, J. M. C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40210-340, Salvador, BA (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santana, A. E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Brasilia, 70910-900, Brasilia, DF (Brazil); Theoretical Physics Institute, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2J1 (Canada); Santos, E. S. [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica da Bahia, 40030-010, Salvador, BA (Brazil)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Maximum Entry and Mandatory Separation Ages for Certain Security Employees  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The policy establishes the DOE policy on maximum entry and mandatory separation ages for primary or secondary positions covered under special statutory retirement provisions and for those employees whose primary duties are the protection of officials of the United States against threats to personal safety or the investigation, apprehension, and detention of individuals suspected or convicted of offenses against the criminal laws of the United States. Admin Chg 1, dated 12-1-11, cancels DOE P 310.1.

2001-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

455

The Maximum Patch Method for Directional Dark Matter Detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

Shawn Henderson; Jocelyn Monroe; Peter Fisher

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

456

Maximum patch method for directional dark matter detection  

SciTech Connect

Present and planned dark matter detection experiments search for WIMP-induced nuclear recoils in poorly known background conditions. In this environment, the maximum gap statistical method provides a way of setting more sensitive cross section upper limits by incorporating known signal information. We give a recipe for the numerical calculation of upper limits for planned directional dark matter detection experiments, that will measure both recoil energy and angle, based on the gaps between events in two-dimensional phase space.

Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Laboratory for Nuclear Science, MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Maximum entropy method for reconstruction of the CMB images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new approach for the accurate reconstruction of cosmic microwave background distributions from observations containing in addition to the primary fluctuations the radiation from unresolved extragalactic point sources and pixel noise. The approach uses some effective realizations of the well-known maximum entropy method and principally takes into account {\\it a priori} information about finiteness and spherical symmetry of the power spectrum of the CMB satisfying the Gaussian statistics.

A. T. Bajkova

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

458

Property:Maximum Wave Length(m) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Length(m) Wave Length(m) Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Maximum Wave Length(m) Property Type String Pages using the property "Maximum Wave Length(m)" Showing 18 pages using this property. A Alden Small Flume + Variable + Alden Wave Basin + 1.8 + C Carderock Maneuvering & Seakeeping Basin + 12.2 + Carderock Tow Tank 2 + 12.2 + Carderock Tow Tank 3 + 12.2 + D Davidson Laboratory Tow Tank + 15.2 + DeFrees Large Wave Basin + 64 + DeFrees Small Wave Basin + 30 + H Haynes Wave Basin + 10.7 + L Lakefront Tow Tank + 22 + M MIT Tow Tank + 4.6 + O OTRC Wave Basin + 25 + Ohmsett Tow Tank + 18 + R Richmond Field Station Tow Tank + 2 + S SAFL Channel + 6.6 + Sandia Lake Facility + 4.57 + Sheets Wave Basin + 10 + Ship Towing Tank + 6 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Maximum_Wave_Length(m)&oldid=597351

459

IEP - Water-Energy Interface: Total Maximum Daily Load Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) The overall goal of the Clean Water Act is to "restore and maintain the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Nation’s waters." In 1999, EPA proposed changes to Section 303(d), to establish Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs) for watersheds that do not meet this goal. The TMDL is the highest amount of a given pollutant that is permissible in that body of water over a given period of time. TMDLs include both waste load allocation (WLA) for point sources and load allocations for non-point sources. In Appalachia, acid mine drainage (AMD) is the single most damaging non-point source. There is also particular concern of the atmospheric deposition of airborne sulfur, nitrogen, and mercury compounds. States are currently in the process of developing comprehensive lists of impaired waters and establishing TMDLs for those waters. EPA has recently proposed a final rule that will require states to develop TMDLs and implement plans for improving water quality within the next 10 years. Under the new rule, TMDL credits could be traded within a watershed.

460

The effect of bulge height and length on the lateral crash behaviour of front platform of a compressed natural gas vehicle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the crash analysis of a mild steel front platform of a natural gas vehicle. The objective is to determine the effect of bulge height, H, and bulge length, L, on the crashworthiness properties. Catia V5, Hypermesh and LSDYNA3D softwares were used in the analysis. The crashworthiness parameters are energy adsorption and crash distance. For the effect of bulge height on energy absorbed and crash distance, a platform with L = 750.0 mm was used with H varied from 0 to 140 mm. For the effect of L, a platform with H = 140.0 mm was used with L varied from 200.0 to 1350.0 mm. For all cases, the bulge diameter, D, was 200.0 mm. The crash was due to lateral impact of a rigid wall with velocity of 50 km/h (13.9 m/s). The results showed that the maximum energy absorption of 7914.0 J was obtained for L = 750.0 mm and H = 120.0 mm.

B.B. Sahari; A.R. Norwazan; A.M. Hamouda; Y.A. Khalid; S.V. Wong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Distribution of scaled height in one-dimensional competitive growth profiles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This work investigates the scaled height distribution, ?(q), of irregular profiles that are grown based on two sets of local rules: those of the restricted solid on solid (RSOS) and ballistic deposition (BD) models. At each time step, these rules are respectively chosen with probability p and r=1?p. Large-scale Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the system behaves differently in three succeeding intervals of values of p: IB?[0,0.75),IT?(0.75,0.9), and IR?(0.9,1.0]. In IB, the ballistic character prevails: the growth velocity ?? decreases with p in a linear way, and similar behavior is found for ??(p), the amplitude of the t1/3-fluctuations, which is measured from the second-order height cumulant. The distribution of scaled height fluctuations follows the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble (GOE) Tracy-Widom (TW) distribution with resolution roughly close to 10?4. The skewness and kurtosis of the computed distribution coincide with those for TW distribution. Similar results are observed in the interval IR, with prevalent RSOS features. In this case, the skewness become negative. In the transition interval IT, the system goes smoothly from one regime to the other: the height distribution becomes apparently Gaussian, which motivates us to identify this phenomenon as a transition from Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) behavior to Edwards-Wilkinson (EW) behavior back to KPZ behavior.

T. A. de Assis; C. P. de Castro; F. de Brito Mota; C. M. C. de Castilho; R. F. S. Andrade

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Laser altimeter canopy height profiles Methods and validation for closed-canopy, broadleaf forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laser altimeter canopy height profiles Methods and validation for closed-canopy, broadleaf forests November 2000 Abstract Waveform-recording laser altimeter observations of vegetated landscapes provide a time-resolved measure of laser pulse backscatter energy from canopy surfaces and the underlying ground

Lefsky, Michael

463

PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL AND HIGHLY DEVIATED WELLS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Louisiana State University Abstract In oil well drilling, the efficient transport of drilled cuttings from pipe and excessive frictional pressure losses while drilling directional and horizontal oil wellsPREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL

Ullmer, Brygg

464

Master thesis Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height for solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Master thesis ­ Solar Energy Meteorology Comparison of different methods to estimate cloud height: · Interest in meteorology and solar energy · Experiences with data handling and analysis · Good programming for solar irradiance calculations In order to derive incoming solar irradiance at the earths surface

Peinke, Joachim

465

THE NILPOTENCE HEIGHT OF Sq 2 n G. WALKER AND R. M. W. WOOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE NILPOTENCE HEIGHT OF Sq 2 n G. WALKER AND R. M. W. WOOD Abstract. A 20 year old conjecture 55S10. 1 #12; 2 G. WALKER AND R. M. W. WOOD Sq u d Sq v = X SqhRi : jRj = u + v; jRj + X r i #23; 2u

Wood, Reginald M W

466

On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the study of wind energy at great heights using remote sensing techniques Alfredo Pe~na1 by the wind energy industry due to the high sensitivity that the wind characteristics have on the performance Dong energy, Dong Energy, Kraftværksvej 53, DK-7000, Fredericia, Denmark e-mail: alfredo

467

Computational Strategies for Evaluating Barrier Heights for Gas-Phase Reactions of Lithium Enolates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an enolate to an aldehyde, a proton transfer from an alcohol to a lithium enolate, and an SN2 reactionComputational Strategies for Evaluating Barrier Heights for Gas-Phase Reactions of Lithium Enolates reactions by using several different ab initio and density functional theory (DFT) methods to determine

Ramachandran, Bala (Ramu)

468

On the joint distribution of wave heights and periods: The role of the spectral bandwidth  

SciTech Connect

The influence of spectral bandwidth on the probabilistic structure of the joint distribution of wave heights and periods is analyzed by means of simulated wave records. The authors put the emphasis on its effect upon the asymmetric and bimodal structure of the distributions. Moreover, the adequacy of some theoretical models to describe such features is considered.

Rodriguez, R.G.; Rubio, R.F.; Pacheco, M.M.; Martinez, M.A. [Univ. de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria (Spain). Dept. de Fisica

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Sustainable Energy Solutions Task 4.1 Intelligent Manufacturing of Hybrid Carbon-Glass Fiber-Reinforced Composite Wind Turbine Blades  

SciTech Connect

EXECUTIVE SUMARY In this subtask, the manufacturability of hybrid carbon-glass fiber-reinforced composite wind turbine blades using Vacuum-Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) was investigated. The objective of this investigation was to study the VARTM process and its parameters to manufacture cost-effective wind turbine blades with no defects (mainly eliminate dry spots and reduce manufacturing time). A 2.5-dimensional model and a 3-dimensional model were developed to simulate mold filling and part curing under different conditions. These conditions included isothermal and non-isothermal filling, curing of the part during and after filling, and placement of injection gates at different locations. Results from this investigation reveal that the process can be simulated and also that manufacturing parameters can be optimized to eliminate dry spot formation and reduce the manufacturing time. Using computer-based models is a cost-effective way to simulate manufacturing of wind turbine blades. The approach taken herein allows the design of the wind blade manufacturing processes without physically running trial-and-error experiments that are expensive and time-consuming; especially for larger blades needed for more demanding environmental conditions. This will benefit the wind energy industry by reducing initial design and manufacturing costs which can later be passed down to consumers and consequently make the wind energy industry more competitive.

Janet M Twomey, PhD

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Maximum likelihood reconstruction for the Daya Bay Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Daya Bay Reactor Neutrino experiment is designed to precisely determine the neutrino mixing angle theta13. In this paper, we report a maximum likelihood (ML) method to reconstruct the vertex and energy of events in the anti-neutrino detector, based on a simplified optical model that describes light propagation. We calibrate the key paramters of the optical model with Co60 source, by comparing the predicted charges of the PMTs with the observed charges. With the optimized parameters, the resolution of the vertex reconstruction is about 25cm for Co60 gamma.

Xia Dongmei

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

Location of Maximum Credible Beam Losses in LCLS Injector  

SciTech Connect

The memo describes the maximum credible beam the LCLS injector can produce and lose at various locations along the beamline. The estimation procedure is based upon three previous reports [1, 2, 3]. While specific numbers have been updated to accurately reflect the present design parameters, the conclusions are very similar to those given in Ref 1. The source of the maximum credible beam results from the explosive electron emission from the photocathode if the drive laser intensity exceeds the threshold for plasma production. In this event, the gun's RF field can extract a large number of electrons from this plasma which are accelerated out of the gun and into the beamline. This electron emission persists until it has depleted the gun of all its energy. Hence the number of electrons emitted per pulse is limited by the amount of stored RF energy in the gun. It needs to be emphasized that this type of emission is highly undesirable, as it causes permanent damage to the cathode.

Mao, Stan

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

Ionization and maximum energy of nuclei in shock acceleration theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the acceleration of heavy nuclei at SNR shocks when the process of ionization is taken into account. Heavy atoms ($Z_N >$ few) in the interstellar medium which start the diffusive shock acceleration (DSA) are never fully ionized at the moment of injection. The ionization occurs during the acceleration process, when atoms already move relativistically. For typical environment around SNRs the photo-ionization due to the background galactic radiation dominates over Coulomb collisions. The main consequence of ionization is the reduction of the maximum energy which ions can achieve with respect to the standard result of the DSA. In fact the photo-ionization has a timescale comparable to the beginning of the Sedov-Taylor phase, hence the maximum energy is no more proportional to the nuclear charge, as predicted by standard DSA, but rather to the effective ions' charge during the acceleration process, which is smaller than the total nuclear charge $Z_N$. This result can have a direct consequence in the pred...

Morlino, Giovanni

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Microsoft Word - 41344_Texas A&M_Mech of Single Crystal Blades_Factsheet_Rev01_10-03.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation into the Mechanics of Single Crystal Turbine Blades Investigation into the Mechanics of Single Crystal Turbine Blades with a View Toward Enhancing Turbine Efficiency October 8, 2003 DE-FC26-01NT41344 1 FACT SHEET I. PROJECT PARTICIPANTS PI: K.R.Rajagopal, Texas A & M University Co-PI: I.J.Rao, New Jersey Institute of Technology II. PROJECT DESCRIPTION A. Objective(s) To model the behavior of single crystal turbine blades within a full thermodynamic framework, accounting for the evolving anisotropy of the material as it deforms and the creep behavior at different temperatures. B. Background/Relevancy The preferred solution to the generation of electric power is by means of gas turbines as they are cheaper and produce considerably less carbon monoxide than conventional methods of power

474

Wind Turbine Towers Establish New Height Standards and Reduce Cost of Wind Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Tower Systems to develop the Wind Tower Systems to develop the Space Frame tower, a new concept for wind turbine towers. Instead of a solid steel tube, the Space Frame tower consists of a highly optimized design of five custom-shaped legs and interlaced steel struts. With this design, Space Frame towers can support turbines at greater heights, yet weigh and cost less than traditional steel tube towers. Wind Tower Systems LLC (now

475

Evaluating stereoscopic CCD still video imagery for determining object height in forestry applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements Aerial Photography in Forestry The History of Video Technology Charge-Coupled Devices Videography for Remote Sensing in Forestry Still Video Development . Resolution Quantitative Forest Measurements 8 11 13 17 25 26 29 31 MATERIALS... height estimates after method of least squares 85 INTRODUCTION Forest resource managers and procurement specialists have long used aerial reconnaissance as a means of gathering pertinent data about timber and timbered properties. The process began...

Jacobs, Dennis Murray

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Disk clamping distortion and slider crown sensitivity induced flying height variation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The disk clamping distortion and slider crown sensitivity induced flying height (FH) variation is investigated. The experimental results which were measured with in situ method were compared with simulated numerical results. Both results indicate that the disk clamping distortion has significant influence on the FH variation. Crown sensitivity of the sliders is one of the factors that determine the amplitude of the FH variation. Higher crown sensitivity sliders exhibit greater FH variation.

Ng Ka Wei; Yuan Zhimin; Liu Bo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Chamberlain Heights Redevelopment: A Large Scale, Cold Climate Study of Affordable Housing Retrofits  

SciTech Connect

The City of Meriden Housing Authority (MHA) collaborated with affordable housing developer Jonathon Rose Companies (JRC) to complete a gut renovation of 124 residential units in the Chamberlain Heights retrofit project. The affordable housing community is made up of 36 buildings in duplex and quad configurations located on 22 acres within two miles of downtown Meriden, CT. The final post-retrofit analysis showed 40-45% source energy savings over the existing pre-retrofit conditions.

Donnelly, K.; Mahle, M.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance- Fact Sheet, May 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet about the Boiler Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Technical Assistance Program

479

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 slicing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of cloud top heights computed from airborne lidar and MAS radiance data using CO2 in assessing the accuracy of the CO2-slicing cloud height algorithm. Infrared measurements of upwelling which included various single- layer and multilayer cloud conditions. Overall, the CO2-slicing method

Sheridan, Jennifer

480

Analysis of the classical pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth across stress barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the classical pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth in revised form 13 February 2010 Accepted 10 March 2010 Keywords: Hydraulic fracture P3D Symmetric stress-called ``pseudo three-dimensional'' (P3D) model for a hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth across two

Peirce, Anthony

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "maximum blade height" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Analysis of the classical pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth across stress barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis of the classical pseudo-3D model for hydraulic fracture with equilibrium height growth t This paper deals with the so-called ``pseudo three-dimensional'' (P3D) model for a hydraulic fracture of the length, height, and aperture of the hydraulic fracture, in contrast to the numerical formulations adopted

Peirce, Anthony

482

Effect of contact conditions during thermo-mechanical contact between a thermal flying height control slider and a disk asperity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is developed for the transient contact between a thermal flying height control (TFC) slider and a disk asperityEffect of contact conditions during thermo-mechanical contact between a thermal flying height control slider and a disk asperity Wenping Song a,c,n , Andrey Ovcharenko b , Bernhard Knigge b , Min Yang

Wang, Deli

483

The effect of write current on thermal flying height control sliders with dual heater/insulator elements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of write induced pole tip protrusion on the magnetic spacing of the head/disk interface has to be taken into consideration as flying heights approach the spacing regime of a few nano-meters. Thermal flying height control (TFC) sliders are ...

Hao Zheng; Hui Li; Kensuke Amemiya; Frank E. Talke

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height ADAM J. DEPPE AND WILLIAM A. GALLUS JR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A WRF Ensemble for Improved Wind Speed Forecasts at Turbine Height ADAM J. DEPPE AND WILLIAM A in wind speed forecasts at a typical wind turbine hub height (80 m). An ensemble consisting of WRF model ensemble members for forecasting wind speed. A second configuration using three random perturbations

McCalley, James D.

485

100-Year Return Value Estimates for Ocean Wind Speed and Significant Wave Height from the ERA-40 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and time variability of significant wave height and wind speed on the prediction of their extreme values of this dataset makes it ideal for the study of extreme wind and wave phenomena over the whole globe. Initial100-Year Return Value Estimates for Ocean Wind Speed and Significant Wave Height from the ERA-40

Haak, Hein

486

Asymptotic Behavior of the Height in a Digital Search Tree and the Longest Phrase of the LempelZiv Scheme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the height of a digital search tree (DST in short) built from n random strings generated by an unbiased sequence into n phrases. We also analyze the longest phrase in the Lempel­Ziv scheme in which a string of the height exhibits an exponen­ tial of a Gaussian distribution (with an oscillating term) around the most

Szpankowski, Wojciech

487

Diffusion maximum as a function of size in dense liquids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study the diffusion of small guest particles of different sizes in a host fluid at liquid densities using molecular dynamics simulations. We observe an enhancement of the diffusivity of guest particles for a size related to the structure of the void space of the host fluid, analogous to the levitation effect observed for guest diffusion in porous solids. Friction and activation energy are found to be minimum for the guest size with maximum self-diffusivity. Wavelength dependent self-diffusivity indicates a monotonic and oscillatory dependence on wave number k for anomalous and linear regimes, respectively. These are associated with single and bi-exponential decay of the incoherent intermediate scattering function.

Pradip Kr. Ghorai; A. V. Anil Kumar; Srikanth Sastry; S. Yashonath

2005-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

488

Maximum-Likelihood Continuity Mapping (MALCOM): An Alternative to HMMs  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe Maximum-Likelihood Continuity Mapping (MALCOM) as an alternative to hidden Markov models (HMMs) for processing sequence data such as speech. While HMMs have a discrete ''hidden'' space constrained by a fixed finite-automata architecture, MALCOM has a continuous hidden space (a continuity map) that is constrained only by a smoothness requirement on paths through the space. MALCOM fits into the same probabilistic framework for speech recognition as HMMs, but it represents a far more realistic model of the speech production process. The authors support this claim by generating continuity maps for three speakers and using the resulting MALCOM paths to predict measured speech articulator data. The correlations between the MALCOM paths (obtained from only the speech acoustics) and the actual articulator movements average 0.77 on an independent test set not used to train MALCOM nor the predictor. On average, this unsupervised model achieves 92% of performance obtained using the corresponding supervised method.

Nix, D.A.; Hogden, J.E.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Maximum Entropy Principle and the Higgs boson mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A successful connection between Higgs boson decays and the Maximum Entropy Principle is presented. Based on the information theory inference approach we determine the Higgs boson mass as M H = 125.04 0.25 GeV , a value fully compatible to the LHC measurement. This is straightforwardly obtained by taking the Higgs boson branching ratios as the target probability distributions of the inference, without any extra assumptions beyond the Standard Model. Yet, the principle can be a powerful tool in the construction of any model affecting the Higgs sector. We give, as an example, the case where the Higgs boson has an extra invisible decay channel within a Higgs portal model.

Alexandre Alves; Alex G. Dias; Roberto da Silva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Reduction in maximum time uncertainty of paired time signals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reduction in the maximum time uncertainty (t/sub max/ - t/sub min/) of a series of paired time signals t/sub 1/ and t/sub 2/ varying between two input terminals and representative of a series of single events where t/sub 1/ less than or equal to t/sub 2/ and t/sub 1/ + t/sub 2/ equals a constant, is carried out with a circuit utilizing a combination of OR and AND gates as signal selecting means and one or more time delays to increase the minimum value (t/sub min/) of the first signal t/sub 1/ closer to t/sub max/ and thereby reduce the difference. The circuit may utilize a plurality of stages to reduce the uncertainty by factors of 20 to 800.

Theodosiou, G.E.; Dawson, J.W.

1981-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

491

Maximum Likelihood Analysis of Low Energy CDMS II Germanium Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the results of a search for a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP) signal in low-energy data of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS~II) experiment using a maximum likelihood analysis. A background model is constructed using GEANT4 to simulate the surface-event background from $^{210}$Pb decay-chain events, while using independent calibration data to model the gamma background. Fitting this background model to the data results in no statistically significant WIMP component. In addition, we perform fits using an analytic ad hoc background model proposed by Collar and Fields, who claimed to find a large excess of signal-like events in our data. We confirm the strong preference for a signal hypothesis in their analysis under these assumptions, but excesses are observed in both single- and multiple-scatter events, which implies the signal is not caused by WIMPs, but rather reflects the inadequacy of their background model.

Agnese, R; Balakishiyeva, D; Thakur, R Basu; Bauer, D A; Billard, J; Borgland, A; Bowles, M A; Brandt, D; Brink, P L; Bunker, R; Cabrera, B; Caldwell, D O; Cerdeno, D G; Chagani, H; Chen, Y; Cooley, J; Cornell, B; Crewdson, C H; Cushman, P; Daal, M; Di Stefano, P C F; Doughty, T; Esteban, L; Fallows, S; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fritts, M; Godfrey, G L; Golwala, S R; Graham, M; Hall, J; Harris, H R; Hertel, S A; Hofer, T; Holmgren, D; Hsu, L; Huber, M E; Jastram, A; Kamaev, O; Kara, B; Kelsey, M H; Kennedy, A; Kiveni, M; Koch, K; Leder, A; Loer, B; Asamar, E Lopez; Mahapatra, R; Mandic, V; Martinez, C; McCarthy, K A; Mirabolfathi, N; Moffatt, R A; Moore, D C; Nelson, R H; Oser, S M; Page, K; Page, W A; Partridge, R; Pepin, M; Phipps, A; Prasad, K; Pyle, M; Qiu, H; Rau, W; Redl, P; Reisetter, A; Ricci, Y; Rogers, H E; Saab, T; Sadoulet, B; Sander, J; Schneck, K; Schnee, R W; Scorza, S; Serfass, B; Shank, B; Speller, D; Upadhyayula, S; Villano, A N; Welliver, B; Wright, D H; Yellin, S; Yen, J J; Young, B A; Zhang, J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Fracture Toughness and Maximum Stress in a Disordered Lattice System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fracture in a disordered lattice system is studied. In our system, particles are initially arranged on the triangular lattice and each nearest-neighbor pair is connected with a randomly chosen soft or hard Hookean spring. Every spring has the common threshold of stress at which it is cut. We make an initial crack and expand the system perpendicularly to the crack. We find that the maximum stress in the stress-strain curve is larger than those in the systems with soft or hard springs only (uniform systems). Energy required to advance fracture is also larger in some disordered systems, which indicates that the fracture toughness improves. The increase of the energy is caused by the following two factors. One is that the soft spring is able to hold larger energy than the hard one. The other is that the number of cut springs increases as the fracture surface becomes tortuous in disordered systems.

Chiyori Urabe; Shinji Takesue

2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

494

A new scanning photoemission microscope for ELETTRA: SuperMAXIMUM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High brightness third?generation synchrotrons allow diffraction?limited performance and large flux for scanning photoemission microscopes. A new microscope SuperMAXIMUM is being developed at the University of Wisconsin Center for X ray Lithography in collaboration with the Sincrotrone Trieste. The beamline being built in Trieste uses a variable angle spherical gratingmonochromator (VASGM). A combination of rotation of a plane mirror and rotation of the spherical grating keeps the slit positions and beam directions fixed. The microscope objectives are normal?incidence multilayer?coated Schwarzschild objectives. The project which is nearing completion utilizes novel designs for optics alignment sample rastering mechanics and software control. We will discuss the project status new designs and techniques.

John T. Welnak; H. Solak; J. Wallace; F. Cerrina; F. Barbo; M. Bertolo; A. Bianco; S. Di Fonzo; S. Fontana; W. Jark; F. Mazzolini; R. Rosei; A. Savoia; J.H. Underwood; G. Margaritondo

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

A new scanning photoemission microscope for ELETTRA: SuperMAXIMUM  

SciTech Connect

High brightness, third-generation synchrotrons allow diffraction-limited performance and large flux for scanning photoemission microscopes. A new microscope, SuperMAXIMUM, is being developed at the University of Wisconsin Center for X ray Lithography in collaboration with the Sincrotrone Trieste. The beamline, being built in Trieste, uses a variable angle spherical grating monochromator (VASGM). A combination of rotation of a plane mirror and rotation of the spherical grating keeps the slit positions and beam directions fixed. The microscope objectives are normal-incidence, multilayer-coated Schwarzschild objectives. The project, which is nearing completion, utilizes novel designs for optics alignment, sample rastering mechanics, and software control. We will discuss the project status, new designs, and techniques. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Welnak, J.T.; Solak, H.; Wallace, J.; Cerrina, F.; Barbo, F.; Bertolo, M.; Bianco, A.; Di Fonzo, S.; Fontana, S.; Jark, W.; Mazzolini, F.; Rosei, R.; Savoia, A.; Underwood, J.; Margaritondo, G. [University of WI--Center for X ray Lithography, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States)] [University of WI--Center for X ray Lithography, 3731 Schneider Drive, Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States); [Sincrotrone Trieste, Padriciano 99, 34012, Trieste (Italy); [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Center for X ray Optics, 1 Cyclotron Road, 80-101, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); [Institut de Physique Appliqee, Ecole Polytechnique Federale, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia River Gorge. Photo: C. Bruce Forster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wind turbine blade is ready to be lifted into place at the Windy Point Wind Farm in the Columbia and wildlife recovery. At a conceptual level, the Act aimed for a power system that would meet energy demands pressure off Columbia River fish and wildlife. For the power system, moving ahead would require modified

497

Installation of the MAXIMUM microscope at the ALS  

SciTech Connect

The MAXIMUM scanning x-ray microscope, developed at the Synchrotron Radiation Center (SRC) at the University of Wisconsin, Madison was implemented on the Advanced Light Source in August of 1995. The microscope`s initial operation at SRC successfully demonstrated the use of multilayer coated Schwarzschild objective for focusing 130 eV x-rays to a spot size of better than 0.1 micron with an electron energy resolution of 250meV. The performance of the microscope was severely limited, because of the relatively low brightness of SRC, which limits the available flux at the focus of the microscope. The high brightness of the ALS is expected to increase the usable flux at the sample by a factor of 1,000. The authors will report on the installation of the microscope on bending magnet beamline 6.3.2 at the ALS and the initial measurement of optical performance on the new source, and preliminary experiments with surface chemistry of HF etched Si will be described.

Ng, W.; Perera, R.C.C.; Underwood, J.H. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Singh, S.; Solak, H.; Cerrina, F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Stoughton, WI (United States). Center for X-ray Lithography

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

An investigation of the effects of luminaire mounting height on roadside sign placement and visibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

320 340 280 320 400 400 280 390 340 310 TABLE V-2 SUMMARY OF DATA OBSERVER 2 Legibility Distance in Ft. 30 M. -H 40 M-H Bright-No Opposing Dim-Dim Opposing Brgght-No Opposing Dim-Dim Opposing 12. 5 0 -12. 5 12. 5 0 -12. 5 12. 5 0 -12. 5...AN INVESTiGATION OF THE EFFE( TS OF LUMINAIRE MOJNIING HEIGHT ON ROADSIDE SIGN PLACEMENT AND VISiBILITY A Thesis By NED E. WALTON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfrllment of the requirements...

Walton, Ned Ephram

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Improvement of the energy resolution of CdTe detectors by pulse height correction from waveform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiconductor detectors made of CdTe crystal have high gamma-ray detection efficiency and are usable at room temperature. However, the energy resolution of CdTe detectors for MeV gamma-rays is rather poor because of the significant hole trapping effect. We have developed a method to improve the energy resolution by correcting the pulse height using the waveform of the signal and achieved 2.0% (FWHM) energy resolution for 662keV gamma-rays. Best energy resolution was achieved at temperatures between -10 degrees C and 0 degrees C.

Kikawa, T; Hiraki, T; Nakaya, T

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z