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1

Max Wei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Max Wei Max Wei Max Wei Sustainable Energy Systems Group Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Road MS 90R2002 Berkeley CA 94720 Office Location: 90-2024L (510) 486-5220 MWei@lbl.gov This publications database is an ongoing project, and not all Division publications are represented here yet. Publications 2013 Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen. "Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors." Environmental Research Letters 8, no. 1 (2013). 2012 Greenblatt, J., Max Wei, and James E. McMahon. California's Energy Future: Buildings and Industrial Efficiency, California Council on Science and

2

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Providing high resolution data for development of computational tools that model fluid flow and heat transfer within complex systems such as the core of a nuclear reactor. 1 2 3 4 5 Hot and cold air jets are mixed within a glass tank while laser-based anemometers and a high-speed infrared camera characterize fluid flow and heat transfer behavior. Click on image to view larger size image.

3

Summary Max Total Units  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Total Units Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water Refrig Voltage Cond Unit IF-CU Combos 2 4 5 28 References Refrig Voltage C-U type Compressor HP R-404A 208/1/60 Hermetic SA 2.5 R-507 230/1/60 Hermetic MA 2.5 208/3/60 SemiHerm SA 1.5 230/3/60 SemiHerm MA 1.5 SemiHerm HA 1.5 1000lb, remote rack systems, fresh water Refrig/system Voltage Combos 12 2 24 References Refrig/system Voltage IF only

4

Evidence for the Direct Two-Photon Transition from $\\psi'$ to $J/\\psi$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-photon transition $\\psi' \\to \\gamma\\gamma J/\\psi$ is studied in a sample of 106 million $\\psi'$ decays collected by the BESIII detector. The branching fraction is measured to be $(3.3\\pm0.6(\\unit{stat})^{+0.8}_{-1.1}(\\unit{syst})) \\times10^{-4}$ using $J/\\psi \\to e^+e^-$ and $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$decays. This work represents the first measurement of a two-photon transition among charmonium states. The orientation of the $\\psi'$ decay plane and the $J/\\psi$ polarization in this decay are also studied. In addition, the product branching fractions of sequential $E1$ transitions $\\psi'\\to\\gamma\\chi_{cJ}$, $\\chi_{cJ}\\to\\gamma J/\\psi (J=0,1,2)$ are reported.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

PSI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 850 Poplar Street Pittsburgh, PA 15220 Contact: Ms. Catherine McNamee Phone: 412-922-4010 x286 Fax: 412-922-4014 E-Mail: cathy.mcnamee ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

On the eta(b) => J/psi J/psi decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been argued long ago that eta(b) could be observed through the eta(b) => J/psi(=> mu+ mu-) J/psi(=> mu+ mu-) decay chain. Recent calculations indicate that the width of eta(b) into two J/psi is almost three order of magnitude smaller than the one into the D D*. We study the effects of final state interactions due to the D D* intermediate state on the J/psi J/psi final state. We find that the inclusion of this contribution may enhance the short distance branching ratio of about two orders of magnitude.

Santorelli, Pietro

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

SCIDAC-PSI.WIRTH.130319.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences and Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) through the SciDAC-3 program. SciDAC-PSI project description...

8

Make aromatics from LPG  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

Doolan, P.C. (BP Exploration Co. Ltd., London (GB)); Pujado, P.R. (UOP, Des Plaines, IL (US))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

SolarMax Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea (Republic) Zip 445-912 Sector Solar Product Manufacturer and engineer of solar heating systems and boilers. References SolarMax Inc1 LinkedIn Connections...

10

Scheduling in multihop WiMAX networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IEEE 802.16, popularly known as WiMAX, is at the forefront of the technology drive because of the growing demand for high-speed wireless broadband networks. Multihop WiMAX networks are particularly useful as they increase the coverage area without the ...

Debalina Ghosh; Ashima Gupta; Prasant Mohapatra

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

max kwh | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

max kwh max kwh Home Ewilson's picture Submitted by Ewilson(53) Contributor 4 January, 2013 - 08:42 Rates with tier problems max kwh tiers I've detected that the following rates all have the improper number of "Max kWh" values (should be one less than the number of charges, since the highest tier is always "all remaining"). This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which should be entered as "300, 1000". This is why we need checks on input that prevent users from entering this incorrectly. Here is the list (my script only checked residential rates): Syndicate content 429 Throttled (bot load)

12

Eutricity Eu-Max ADR LED System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eutricity Eu-Max ADR LED System Speaker(s): Brent Marsh Date: September 13, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Francis Rubinstein Eutricity...

13

Decays of J/psi (3100) to baryon final states  

SciTech Connect

We present results for the decays of psi(3100) into baryon and hyperon final states. The sample studied here consists of 1.3 million produced psi decays. The decays into nonstrange baryons agree well with currently established results, but with better statistics. In addition, significant resonance formation in multibody final states is observed. The decay psi ..-->.. anti pp..gamma.., the first direct photon decay of the psi involving baryons in the final state, is presented and the theoretical implications of the decays are briefly explored. Several new decays of the psi involving strange baryons are explored, including the first observations of three body final states involving hyperons. The I-spin symmetry of the strong decay psi ..-->.. baryons has clearly been observed. The reduced matrix elements for psi ..-->.. B anti B are presented for final states of different SU(3) content. The B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ results are in excellent agreement with the psi being an SU(3) singlet as are the results for psi ..-->.. B/sub 10/ anti B/sub 10/. We present the first evidence for the SU(3) violating decays of the type psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 10/ + c.c.. Angular distributions for psi ..-->.. B/sub 8/ anti B/sub 8/ are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Statistics are limited, but the data tends to prefer other than a 1 + Cos/sup 2/theta distribution.

Eaton, M.W.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Determination of J/{psi} leptonic branching fraction via {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}J/{psi}  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of the rates for {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}}J/{psi}, J/{psi}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}} and J/{psi}{r_arrow} anything is used to determine the J/{psi} leptonic branching fractions. The results are B(J/{psi}{r_arrow}e{sup +}e{sup {minus}})=(5.90{plus_minus}0.05{plus_minus}0.10){percent} and B(J/{psi}{r_arrow}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup {minus}})=(5.84{plus_minus}0.06{plus_minus}0.10){percent}, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. Assuming lepton universality, the leptonic branching fraction of the J/{psi} is B(J/{psi}{r_arrow}l{sup +}l{sup {minus}})=(5.87{plus_minus}0.04{plus_minus}0.09){percent} per species. This result is used to estimate the QCD scale factor {Lambda}{sub {ovr MS}}{sup (4)} and the strong coupling constant {alpha}{sub s}. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Threshold Photo-production of J/psi Mesons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the advent of higher energies at Jefferson Lab, the study of charmonium becomes possible. The threshold production of J/{Psi} meson photo-production on hydrogen is {approx} 8.2 GeV, thus with a 8+ GeV beam, the elementary {gamma}-J/{Psi} cross section can be measured. Threshold charm production on a nucleus can give information on the J/{Psi}-N interaction. The standard method to extract this cross section has been to measure the nuclear dependence of J/{Psi} production. The majority of these A-dependent J/{Psi} production experiments have been measured at high energy, while the only near-threshold experiment was performed using 20 GeV photons. This 20 GeV SLAC experiment measured {sigma}{sub J/{Psi}N} = 3.6 {+-} 0.8 {+-} 0.5 mb[1]; whereas theory predicts this cross section to be higher, about 7 mb [2]. It is unclear whether the SLAC determination of {sigma}{sub J/{Psi}N} corresponds to the physical {sigma}{sub J/{Psi}N}, due to the fact that at these energies the J/{Psi} may still be formed outside the nucleus [3] [4]. A measurement of the nuclear dependence of threshold J/{Psi} photo-production may resolve this issue.

Jim Dunne

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Professional Supply, Inc (PSI) & Ford Motor Company Teaming Profile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Professional Supply, Inc (PSI) & Ford Motor Company Teaming Profile Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing...

17

J/psi Production in Quark-Gluon Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study J/psi production at RHIC and LHC energies with both initial production and regeneration. We solve the coupled set of transport equation for the J/psi distribution in phase space and the hydrodynamic equation for evolution of quark-gluon plasma. At RHIC, continuous regeneration is crucial for the J/psi momentum distribution while the elliptic flow is still dominated by initial production. At LHC energy, almost all the initially created J\\psis are dissociated in the medium and regeneration dominates the J/psi properties.

Li Yan; Pengfei Zhuang; Nu Xu

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

18

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PsyCalc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PsyCalc contains Climatic Design Information, licensed from ASHRAE (1997 Fundamentals Chapter 26) presented in an easy to use interface with additional calculation...

19

Auditing Categorical SUM, MAX and MIN Queries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Auditing consists in logging answered queries and checking, each time that a new query is submitted, that no sensitive information is disclosed by combining responses to answered queries with the response to the current query. Such a method for controlling ... Keywords: Aggregate function, max-query, min-query, null values, sum-query

Francesco M. Malvestuto

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

NIKET TANDON Max Planck Institute for Informatics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 NIKET TANDON Max Planck Institute for Informatics Saarbrücken 66123, Germany Ph.: +49 176 3533 Tandon, Gerard De Melo, Gerhard Weikum Deriving a Web-Scale Commonsense Fact Knowledge Base, AAAI, 2011 Niket Tandon, Gerard De Melo Information Extraction from Web-Scale N-Gram Data, SIGIR workshop ­ Web N

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A unified framework for max-min and min-max fairness with applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Max-min fairness is widely used in various areas of networking. In every case where it is used, there is a proof of existence and one or several algorithms for computing it; in most, but not all cases, they are based on the notion of bottlenecks. In ... Keywords: best-effort traffic, elastic traffic, mathematical programming/optimization, max-min fairness, system design

Bozidar Radunovi?; Jean-Yves Le Boudec

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Strong and Electromagnetic J/psi and psi(2S) Decays into Pion and Kaon Pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined analysis of the electromagnetic pion and kaon form factors in the neighborhood of J/psi and psi(2S) and of the strong decay amplitude of these resonances into kaons is presented. In the presence of a large relative phase between strong and electromagnetic resonance amplitudes the branching ratio, as measured in electron-positron annihilation, receives an additional contribution from the interference between resonance and continuum amplitude neglected in earlier papers. Our study is model independent and does not rely on the SU(3) symmetry assumptions used in earlier papers. We note that the large relative phase between strong and electromagnetic amplitudes observed in earlier analyses is model dependent and relies critically on the specific assumptions on SU(3) symmetry and breaking.

Czyz, Henryk

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Strong and Electromagnetic J/psi and psi(2S) Decays into Pion and Kaon Pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined analysis of the electromagnetic pion and kaon form factors in the neighborhood of J/psi and psi(2S) and of the strong decay amplitude of these resonances into kaons is presented. In the presence of a large relative phase between strong and electromagnetic resonance amplitudes the branching ratio, as measured in electron-positron annihilation, receives an additional contribution from the interference between resonance and continuum amplitude neglected in earlier papers. Our study is model independent and does not rely on the SU(3) symmetry assumptions used in earlier papers. We note that the large relative phase between strong and electromagnetic amplitudes observed in earlier analyses is model dependent and relies critically on the specific assumptions on SU(3) symmetry and breaking.

Henryk Czyz; Johann H. Kuhn

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

24

Study of $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decays $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$ have been investigated with a sample of 225.2 million $J/\\psi$ events collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII $e^+e^-$ collider. The branching fractions are determined to be $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p})=(2.112\\pm0.004\\pm0.031)\\times10^{-3}$ and $\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n})=(2.07\\pm0.01\\pm0.17)\\times10^{-3}$. Distributions of the angle $\\theta$ between the proton or anti-neutron and the beam direction are well described by the form $1+\\alpha\\cos^2\\theta$, and we find $\\alpha=0.595\\pm0.012\\pm0.015$ for $J/\\psi\\to p\\bar{p}$ and $\\alpha=0.50\\pm0.04\\pm0.21$ for $J/\\psi\\to n\\bar{n}$. Our branching-fraction results suggest a large phase angle between the strong and electromagnetic amplitudes describing the $J/\\psi\\to N\\bar{N}$ decay.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ferroli, R B; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Berger, N; Bertani, M B; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Calcaterra, A C; Cao, G F; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Hao, X Q; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, B; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jia, L K; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Leung, J K C; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, N B; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, Kun; Liu, Kai; Liu, K Y; Liu, P L; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Y; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, H; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S P; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Pun, C S J; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, X D; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Thorndike, E H; Tian, H L; Toth, D; Ulrich, M U; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X F; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M W; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Y; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, T; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, W L; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A Z; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J G; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, L; Zhang, S H; Zhang, T R; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zheng, Z P; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H; Zuo, J X

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

An efficient security framework for mobile WiMAX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WiMAX is a technology that provides continuous high data throughput with low delays for various user types and modes of operation. The security protocols proposed for WiMAX impose a heavy performance overhead, especially on mobile subscribers running ... Keywords: PKMv2, WiMAX, handover, hierarcical identity based cryptography, security

Mete Rodoper; Arati Baliga; Edward Jung; Wade Trappe

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Bernstein Center for Computational Neuroscience (BCCN) Gttingen Georg-August-Universitt Gttingen, Max-Planck-Institut fr Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Max-Planck-Institut fr biophysikalische Chemie, Max-Planck-Institut fr experimentelle Medizin,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie, Max-Planck-Institut für experimentelle Medizin, Deutsches Primatenzentrum, Otto Bock Health-Planck-Institut für Dynamik und Selbstorganisation, Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Max Selbstorganisation, Max-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische Chemie, Max-Planck-Institut für experimentelle Medizin

Gollisch, Tim

27

Evidence for the decay X(3872) -> J/\\psi\\omega  

SciTech Connect

We present a study of the decays B{sup 0,+} --> J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup 0,+}, using 467x10{sup 6} B{anti B} pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. We present evidence for the decay mode X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}, with product branching fractions B(B{sup +} --> X(3872)K{sup +}) x B(X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.2(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}, and B(B{sup 0} --> X(3872)K{sup 0}) x B(X(3872) --> J/{psi}{omega}) = [0.6 {+-} 0.3(stat) {+-} 0.1(syst)] x 10{sup -5}. A detailed study of the {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} mass distribution from X(3872) decay favors a negative-parity assignment.

del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Burton Richter, Storage Rings, and the J/psi Particle  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

machine to discover a subatomic particle in 1974 which they called psi particle. A team led by Samuel Ting and using the facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory made the...

29

J/Psi Production by Charm Quark Coalescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production of $c\\bar c$ pairs in elementary hadron-hadron collisions is introduced in a simulation of relativistic heavy ion collisions. Coalescence of charmed quarks and antiquarks into various charmonium states is performed and the results are compared to PHENIX J$/\\psi$ Au+Au data. The $\\chi$ and $\\psi$' bound states must be included as well as the ground state J$/\\psi$, given the appreciable feeding from the excited states down to the J$/\\psi$ via gamma decays. Charmonium coalescence is found to take place at relatively late times: generally after $c$($\\bar c$)-medium interactions have ceased. Direct production of charmonia through hadron-hadron interactions, {\\it ie.} without explicit presence of charm quarks, occurring only at early times, is suppressed by collisions with comoving particles and accounts for some $\\sim 5\\%$ of the total J$/\\psi$ production. Coalescence is especially sensitive to the level of open charm production, scaling naively as $n_{c\\bar c}^2$. The J$/\\psi$ transverse momentum distribution is dependent on the charm quark transverse momentum distribution and early charm quark-medium interaction, thus providing a glimpse of the initial collision history.

D. E. Kahana; S. H. Kahana

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Energy Department announced today that the University of Maryland won the second annual Max Tech and Beyond design competition for ultra-low energy use appliances and equipment for the second year in a row. The team developed a heat pump clothes dryer that is nearly 59% more efficient than a traditional electric dryer. The Max Tech and Beyond competition challenges university teams to go beyond the current "max tech," or maximum technology performance levels, by exploring new design concepts that could become the next generation of

31

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

32

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A universally fastest algorithm for Max 2-Sat, Max 2-CSP, and everything in between  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we introduce "hybrid" Max 2-CSP formulas consisting of "simple clauses", namely conjunctions and disjunctions of pairs of variables, and general 2-variable clauses, which can be any integer-valued functions of pairs of boolean variables. This allows an algorithm to use both efficient reductions specific to AND and OR clauses, and other powerful reductions that require the general CSP setting. We use new reductions introduced here, and recent reductions such as "clause-learning" and "2-reductions" generalized to our setting's mixture of simple and general clauses. Parametrizing an instance by the fraction p of non-simple clauses, we give an exact (exponential-time) algorithm that is the fastest known polynomial-space algorithm for p=0 (which includes the well-studied Max 2-Sat problem but also instances with arbitrary mixtures of AND and OR clauses); the only efficient algorithm for mixtures of AND, OR, and general integer-valued clauses; and tied for fastest for general Max 2-CSP (p=1). Since a ...

Gaspers, Serge

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Phoenix Silicon International Corp Psi | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Phoenix Silicon International Corp Psi Phoenix Silicon International Corp Psi Jump to: navigation, search Name Phoenix Silicon International Corp (Psi) Place Hsinchu, Taiwan Zip 300 Sector Solar Product Taiwan-based silicon recycler and manufacturer of wafers to the semiconductor and solar industries; also makes lithium-ion batteries. Coordinates 24.69389°, 121.148064° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":24.69389,"lon":121.148064,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

35

Utilizing WiMAX mesh mode for efficient IPTV transmission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing high bit-rates, WiMAX enables IPTV multicasting for several simultaneous broadcasting channels. WiMAX base stations can offer higher capacity to users with better signal quality values, and more robust but lower capacity modulations to users ... Keywords: iptv, mesh mode, multicasting, wimax

Murat Ozyurt; Seckin Ulug; Tuna Tugcu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

6 MaxPlanckForschung 3 | 09 PERSPEKTIVEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010. Foto:MPIfürMeteorologie #12;3 | 09 MaxPlanckForschung 7 PERSPEKTIVEN Chemie-Nobelpreis für Ada E Chemie 2009. Wirkstoffsuche im Baum der Strukturen: Das Programm Scaffold Hunter weist den Weg zu neuen- derbehörden. Wie keine andere deutsche Wissen- schaftsorganisation ist die Max-Planck- Gesellschaft

37

Measurement of $\\psi(2S)$ decays to baryon pairs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A sample of 3.95M $\\psi(2S)$ decays registered in the BES detector are used to study final states containing pairs of octet and decuplet baryons. We report branching fractions for $\\psi(2S)\\to p\\bar{p}$, $\\Lambda\\bar{\\Lambda}$, $\\Sigma^0\\bar{\\Sigma}{}^0$, $\\Xi^-\\bar{\\Xi}{}^+$, $\\Delta^{++}\\bar{\\Delta}{}^{--}$, $\\Sigma^+(1385)\\bar{\\Sigma}{}^-(1385 )$, $\\Xi^0(1530)\\bar{\\Xi}{}^0(1530)$, and $\\Omega^-\\bar{\\Omega}{}^+$. These results are compared to expectations based on the SU(3)-flavor symmetry, factorization, and perturbative QCD.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Blum, I K; Chen, A D; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chen, J; Chen Jia Chao; Chen, X D; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Cheng Bao Sen; Choi, J B; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Dunwoodie, W M; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gratton, P; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Guo, Y N; Guo, Z J; Han, S W; Han, Y; Harris, F A; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hitlin, D G; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Huang, G S; Huang, X P; Huang, Y Z; Izen, J M; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Jones, B D; Ju, X; Kang, J S; Ke, Z J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, B K; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, T Y; Kong, D; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Lankford, A J; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li Xiao Nan; Li Xue Qian; Li Zhong Chao; Liu, B; Liu, F; Liu Feng; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, J P; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Liu, Z X; Lou, X C; Lowery, B; Lu, G R; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Malchow, R L; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Mo, X H; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Oyang, J Y T; Paluselli, D; Pan, L J; Panetta, J; Park, H; Porter, F; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Schernau, M; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, H Y; Shen, X Y; Shi, F; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Standifird, J; Suh, J Y; Sun, H S; Sun, L F; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Toki, W; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, F; Wang, L; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, Y Y; Wang, Z Y; Weaver, M; Wei, C L; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, W; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye Shu Wei; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu Yu Hei; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; De Hong Zhang; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang Lei; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Jia Wei Zhao; Zhao Jia Wei; Zhao, M; Zhao Wei Ren; Zhao, Z G; Zheng Jian Ping; Zheng Lin Sheng; Zheng Zhi Peng; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, B A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition The Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition is an annual competition run by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that encourages students to tackle challenges in designing energy efficient appliances and test performance to evaluate reductions in energy consumption. The competition challenges 10 - 20 collegiate teams nationwide to design and test appliance innovations with the potential to significantly reduce energy consumption while providing a level of service comparable to or better than current best-on-market products. The winner of the competition will be the team that best demonstrates energy savings potential for viable future products.

39

MaxWest Environmental Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MaxWest Environmental Systems MaxWest Environmental Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name MaxWest Environmental Systems Place Houston, Texas Zip 77057 Product MaxWest Environmental Systems designs, builds, owns and operates gasification systems on a turnkey basis. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

40

Property:Incentive/MaxInc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MaxInc MaxInc Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/MaxInc Property Type Text Description Maximum Incentive. Pages using the property "Incentive/MaxInc" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2003 Climate Change Fuel Cell Buy-Down Program (Federal) + lesser of 1,000/kW or one-third total project cost 3 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) + No maximum specified. A AEP (Central and North) - Residential Energy Efficiency Programs (Texas) + SOP TCC: $150,000 (Large Projects); $150,000 (Small Projects); $25,000 (Small Projects Monthly Reservation Limit) SOP TNC: $40,000 (Large Projects); $20,000 (Small Projects); $5,000 (Small Projects Monthly Reservation Limit) SOP TCC (Hard to Reach): $75,000/sponsor SOP TNC (Hard to Reach): $50,000/sponsor

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41

Property:Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PVPbiFitMaxKW PVPbiFitMaxKW Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed PV capacity in kW that is eligible for the PBI or FIT. Ex: We Energies' FIT maximum eligible PV system size is 100 kW. Format: 100.0 [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/PVPbiFitMaxKW" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Alliant Energy (Wisconsin Power and Light) - Advanced Renewables Tariff (Wisconsin) + 20 + Ameren Missouri - Solar Renewable Energy Credits + 100 + Anaheim Public Utilities - PV Buydown Program (California) + 1000 + Austin Energy - Commercial PV Incentive Program (Texas) + 20 + Austin Energy - Value of Solar Residential Rate (Texas) + 20 +

42

Property:Incentive/WindResPercMax | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

WindResPercMax WindResPercMax Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/WindResPercMax Property Type String Description The maximum % of the installed cost of a residential wind system that the rebate may offset. Use this for (1.) rebates calculated in terms of % of capital cost as well as (2.) rebates structured in terms of $/kW or $/kWh that also have a maximum % of costs that can be offset by the rebate. Ex: (1.) DE's rebate is 50% of the project cost; (2.) WI's residential wind incentive is based on annual expected performance, up to 25% of installed cost. Format: 25% [1] References ↑ DSIRE Pages using the property "Incentive/WindResPercMax" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Technology Program (Ohio) + 50% +

43

Property:Incentive/WindResMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentiveWindResMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed residential wind capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. Ex: The maximum...

44

Property:Incentive/WindComMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentiveWindComMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed commercial wind capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. This also applies...

45

Property:Incentive/PVComMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentivePVComMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed commercial PV capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. This also applies to...

46

Property:Incentive/PVResMaxKW | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Property Name IncentivePVResMaxKW Property Type String Description The maximum installed residential PV capacity in kW that is eligible for a rebate. CT's maximum...

47

On the Construction of WiMax Mesh Tree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract The IEEE 802.16 protocol, also known as WiMAX, has been designed to support long-range communications with high bitrates, using two operation modes: Point-to-Multi-Point (PMP) and Mesh. In the mesh mode, Subscriber Stations (SSs) can directly communicate with each other, thus forming a tree, and can be used to forward others data packets in a multihop fashion. On the contrary, in the PMP mode only one hop communication toward the Base Station (BS) is allowed. In this paper, we investigate the performance of the mesh mode by proposing an algorithm for constructing the WiMAX mesh tree. Our algorithm increases routes effective throughput by splitting long links into multiple shorter ones. We show through simulations that this approach leads to improving the throughput capacity of WiMAX-based wireless mesh networks. Index Terms WiMAX, wireless mesh networks. I.

Salim Nahle; Luigi Iannone; Benoit Donnet; Naceur Malouch

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

51

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

LINEAR-PROGRAMMING DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF FAST ALGORITHMS FOR MAX 2-CSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LINEAR-PROGRAMMING DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF FAST ALGORITHMS FOR MAX 2-CSP ALEXANDER D. SCOTT AND GREGORY B. SORKIN Abstract. The class Max (r, 2)-CSP (or simply Max 2-CSP) consists of constraint(G) (13/75 + o(1))m, which gives a faster Max 2-CSP algorithm that uses exponential space: running in time

Scott, Alexander Alexander

55

Dehydrocyclodimerization, converting LPG to aromatics  

SciTech Connect

British Petroleum (BP) recognized the potential need for ways of exploiting feedstocks with low opportunity cost and commenced a research program at its Sunbury Research Center to discover and develop a catalyst for the conversion of LPG to a liquid product. The successful outcome of this research program is the Cyclar /SUP SM/ process, a joint development of UOP Process Division and British Petroleum. The Cyclar process offers a single-step conversion of LPG to an aromatic product which has a highvalue, is easily transported and useful both to fuel and petrochemical applications. The LPG producer can invest in a single unit, avoiding the need to identify and develop markets for multiple C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ products. This catalytic process, which employs UOP Continuous Catalyst Regeneration (CCR) technology, can also be applied to refinery light ends to produce a high-quality gasoline. Aromatic and hydrogen yields from propane and butane feeds surpass those obtained from catalytic reforming of Light Arabian naphtha. This paper describes the principles of the Cyclar process and illustrates yields and economics for several interesting applications.

Johnson, J.A.; Hilder, G.K.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Max Tech and Beyond Competition The Max Tech and Beyond Competition The Max Tech and Beyond Competition Addthis 1 of 5 Team Cal Poly Solar is working to significantly reduce the cost and construction time on their solar concentrator for cooking. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 2 of 5 Professor Dale Dolan's students from California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo Electrical Engineering department testing the placement of their Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic Panel for Pool Heating. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 3 of 5 Students from the University of Maryland working hard to make a residential air condition unit more efficient. Image: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 4 of 5 Team Ohio State's vapor compression hybrid air/water conditioning system for residential housing.

57

A CRITICAL COMMENT ON THE CLAIMED RELATION BETWEEN THE SOLAR MAXIMUM AMPLITUDE AND MAX-MAX CYCLE LENGTH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we revisit a correlation between the amplitude of a solar cycle, R{sub m}, and the max-max solar cycle length two solar cycles before, P{sub max-2}, which was proposed by Du to be used as a tool for solar cycle forecasting. We vary the time interval used in the statistical analysis and also use different long-term series of sunspot numbers: International sunspot number and Group sunspot number. We show that the claimed correlation appears unstable as it depends on the time interval and the selected data series. This suggests that the relationship between the two parameters is not stationary and more complex than previously thought and, therefore, this relationship should not be used to predict solar activity.

Carrasco, V. M. S.; Vaquero, J. M.; Gallego, M. C., E-mail: victorm.sanzc@gmail.com, E-mail: jvaquero@unex.es, E-mail: maricruz@unex.es [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Extremadura, E-06071 Badajoz (Spain)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

58

Measuring the phase between strong and EM J/Psi decay amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A c.m. energy scan below the J/Psi peak foreseen in the next future at BESIII can probe the existence in all the exclusive possible final states of an interference pattern between the resonant e+e- => J/Psi => hadrons and non-resonant e+e+ => hadrons amplitudes. The relative phase of the strong J/Psi decay amplitude with respect to the electromagnetic one can hence be accessed for the first time in a model independent way.

M. Maggiora; for the BESIII Collaboration

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

59

Measuring the phase between strong and EM J/Psi decay amplitudes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A c.m. energy scan below the J/Psi peak foreseen in the next future at BESIII can probe the existence in all the exclusive possible final states of an interference pattern between the resonant e+e- => J/Psi => hadrons and non-resonant e+e+ => hadrons amplitudes. The relative phase of the strong J/Psi decay amplitude with respect to the electromagnetic one can hence be accessed for the first time in a model independent way.

Maggiora, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Instruction scheduling using MAX-MIN ant system optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Instruction scheduling is a fundamental step for mapping an application to a computational device. It takes a behavioral application specification and produces a schedule for the instructions onto a collection of processing units. The objective is to ... Keywords: MAX-MIN ant system, force-directed scheduling, instruction scheduling, list scheduling

Gang Wang; Wenrui Gong; Ryan Kastner

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fundamentals of WiMAX: Understanding Broadband Wireless Networking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eBook version of the printed book. Praise for Fundamentals of WiMAX "This book is one of the most comprehensive books I have reviewed ... it is a must-read for engineers and students planning to remain current or who plan to pursue a career ...

Jeffrey Andrews; Arunabha Ghosh; Rias Muhamed

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Molecular motors interacting with their own tracks Max N. Artyomov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular motors interacting with their own tracks Max N. Artyomov Department of Chemistry; published 17 April 2008 Dynamics of molecular motors that move along linear lattices and interact with them exactly solvable discrete-state "burnt- bridge" models. Molecular motors are viewed as diffusing particles

65

Engineering new oil recovery methods. [1800-3,000 psi  

SciTech Connect

In the LPG slug process, propane under normal pressures of a few hundred psi and temperatures in the order of 150/sup 0/F is a liquid. With the methane-LPG slugs, an LPG slug miscible displacement program may be operated at fairly shallow depths. Even if the reservoir depth is only 1,500 ft, it would be possible to carry out an LPG slug miscible displacement program. It is not difficult to maintain miscibility between methane and propane. A crude of very low viscosity should be selected to reduce solvent dispersion and costs of a miscible displacement project. It is necessary that the LPG slug be of sufficient size so that miscibility does not break down prematurely and result in a very low oil recovery. Enriched gas drives are designed to achieve miscible displacement at pressures ranging from about 1,800 to 3,000 psi. Miscibility may also be achieved at pressures outside this range.The cost of establishing a miscible zone in LPG or enriched gas drives can be quite expensive. In the case of an enriched gas drive, size of the zone becomes quite large. Although the size of the zone may be fairly small for the case of LPG slugs, the cost of acquiring the LPG can be prohibitive, in some cases.

Crawford, P.B.

1969-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sugar++: A SAT-Based MAX-CSP/COP Solver Tomoya Tanjo1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sugar++: A SAT-Based MAX-CSP/COP Solver Tomoya Tanjo1 , Naoyuki Tamura2 , and Mutsunori Banbara2 1 describes some features of Sugar++, a SAT-based MAX- CSP/COP solver entering the Third International CSP Solver Competition. In our approach, a MAX-CSP is translated into a Constraint Optimization Problem (COP

Banbara, Mutsunori

67

Use of receding horizon optimal control to solve MaxEP-based biogeochemistry problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

varying energy input attained by periodically cycling feed-gas composition. The MaxEP-based model agrees transient in nature. To apply MaxEP to biogeochemical reaction networks, we propose that living systems max in natural environments. Because the ma- jority of biologically catalyzed reactions that occur on Earth

Vallino, Joseph J.

68

Health and healing in esotericism. The Max Heindel (1865-1919) and the Rosicrucian  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). In this stream, there is also A. Bailey's, Esoteric Healing, (Bailey, 1976). But the case of Max Heindel as a first element of the assessment of esoteric medicine. I shall refer to another book of Max Heindel : Desire Body (Max Heindel, 1993)( in French : Le corps du désir) for this book present the esoteric

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

69

A survey of MAC based QoS implementations for WiMAX networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive survey of proposed Quality of Service (QoS) mechanisms in the Media Access Control (MAC) sublayer of WiMAX based wireless networks. QoS support in WiMAX is a fundamental design requirement, and is considerably more difficult ... Keywords: MAC, Media Access Control, QoS, Quality of Service, WiMAX, Wireless networks

Y. Ahmet ?ekercio?lu; Milosh Ivanovich; Alper Ye?in

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

QoS differentiation for IEEE 802.16 WiMAX mesh networking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently IEEE 802.16 WiMAX has attracted a lot of attention in wireless networking research and applications. To enable a flexible and cost-effective deployment, mesh networking mode is defined in WiMAX standard. In this paper, we introduce a system ... Keywords: IEEE 802.16, QoS, WiMAX mesh, interference-aware design, scheduling

Yan Zhang; Honglin Hu; Hsiao-Hwa Chen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

A joint centralized scheduling and channel assignment scheme in WiMax mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IEEE 802.16 standard, also known as Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMax), which provides a mechanism for deploying high-speed wireless mesh networks in metropolitan areas. Thus, Quality of Service (QoS) is very important for WiMax ... Keywords: MDFS algorithm, WiMax mesh networks, centralized scheduling, channel assignment

Yuliang Tang; Yan Yao; Xinrong Lin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Table 1. Summary of retrap and recovery results for 2003-4 Spp Name Retraps Recovs Max Dist Max Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Andropadus virens 1 0 0 1y 1m 18d 566 Karoo Chat Cercomela schlegelii 2 0 0 0y 0m 4d 568 * Capped Wheatear Karoo Scrub-Robin Cercotrichas coryphaeus 18 0 2 3y 0m 21d 586 Kalahari Scrub-Robin Cercotrichas paena 4 Max Time 650 Black-chested Prinia Prinia flavicans 29 0 11 1y 11m 17d 651 Karoo Prinia Prinia maculosa

de Villiers, Marienne

73

{psi}(2S) Hadronic Decays to Vector-Tensor Final States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decays of the {psi}(2S) into vector plus tensor meson final states have been studied for the first time using the BES detector. We determine upper limits on branching fractions for {psi}(2S) decays into {omega}f{sub 2} , {rho}a{sub 2} , K{sup {asterisk}0}{ovr K}{sup *0}{sub 2}+c.c. , and {phi}f{sup {prime}}{sub 2}(1525) that are, in each case, significantly smaller than the corresponding branching fractions for the J/{psi} meson, scaled according to the expectations of perturbative QCD. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Colorado 80523 (United States)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Measurement of the relative branching ratio of B-s(0) -> J/psi f(0)(980) to B-s(0) -> J/psi phi  

SciTech Connect

We present a measurement of the relative branching fraction, R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}}, of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980), with f{sub 0}(980) {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, to the process B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}, with {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}. The J/{psi}f{sub 0}(980) final state corresponds to a CP-odd eigenstate of B{sub s}{sup 0} that could be of interest in future studies of CP violation. Using 8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we find R{sub f{sub 0}/{phi}} = 0.275 {+-} 0.041(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst).

Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Star-covering properties: generalized $\\Psi$-spaces, countability conditions, reflection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate star-covering properties of $\\Psi$-like spaces. We show star-Lindel\\"ofness is reflected by open perfect mappings. In addition, we offer a new equivalence of CH.

Aiken, L P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Estimation method for the thermochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic molecules, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have attracted considerable attention in the past few decades. They are formed during the incomplete combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and are ...

Yu, Joanna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Cosmological Constraints from the SDSS maxBCG Cluster Catalog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use the abundance and weak lensing mass measurements of the SDSS maxBCG cluster catalog to simultaneously constrain cosmology and the richness-mass relation of the clusters. Assuming a flat {Lambda}CDM cosmology, we find {sigma}{sub 8}({Omega}{sub m}/0.25){sup 0.41} = 0.832 {+-} 0.033 after marginalization over all systematics. In common with previous studies, our error budget is dominated by systematic uncertainties, the primary two being the absolute mass scale of the weak lensing masses of the maxBCG clusters, and uncertainty in the scatter of the richness-mass relation. Our constraints are fully consistent with the WMAP five-year data, and in a joint analysis we find {sigma}{sub 8} = 0.807 {+-} 0.020 and {Omega}{sub m} = 0.265 {+-} 0.016, an improvement of nearly a factor of two relative to WMAP5 alone. Our results are also in excellent agreement with and comparable in precision to the latest cosmological constraints from X-ray cluster abundances. The remarkable consistency among these results demonstrates that cluster abundance constraints are not only tight but also robust, and highlight the power of optically-selected cluster samples to produce precision constraints on cosmological parameters.

Rozo, Eduardo; /CCAPP; Wechsler, Risa H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Rykoff, Eli S.; /UC, Santa Barbara; Annis, James T.; /Fermilab; Becker, Matthew R.; /Chicago U. /KICP, Chicago; Evrard, August E.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Frieman, Joshua A.; /Fermilab /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; Hansen, Sarah M.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Hao, Jia; /Michigan U.; Johnston, David E.; /Northwestern U.; Koester, Benjamin P.; /KICP, Chicago /Chicago U.; McKay, Timothy A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Sheldon, Erin S.; /Brookhaven; Weinberg, David H.; /CCAPP /Ohio State U.

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Trace elements and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2.2 Anthropogenic emissions 28 2.3 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons 30 2.3.1 Sources of PAHs 30 2.3.2 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 2.3.3 Gas to particle distribution in atmosphere 32 CHAPTER THREE

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

79

text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

text in "Max kWh" fields text in "Max kWh" fields Home > Groups > Utility Rate Ewilson's picture Submitted by Ewilson(51) Contributor 3 January, 2013 - 09:57 I noticed that a warning appears if you enter text only in the "Max kWh" field. However an entry like "text 1234" does not give a warning. I think it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning if the number of "Max kWh" fields with values is not correct--it should be one less than the number of charge fields with values. There should also be a warning if the "Max kWh" fields do not increase from top to bottom. These checks on input would save lots of trouble when using json files for

80

Evidence for $\\eta_{c} \\rightarrow \\gamma\\gamma$ and Measurement of $J/\\psi\\rightarrow 3\\gamma$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decay of $J/\\psi$ to three photons is studied using $\\psi^\\prime\\to\\pi^+\\pi^-J/\\psi$ in a sample of 106 million $\\psi^\\prime$ events collected with the BESIII detector. First evidence of the decay $\\eta_c\\to\\gamma\\gamma$ is reported, and the product branching fraction is determined to be $\\br{J/\\psi\\to\\gamma\\eta_c,\\eta_c\\to \\gamma\\gamma}=(4.5\\pm1.2\\pm0.6)\\times10^{-6}$, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. The branching ratio for the direct decay is $\\br{J/\\psi\\to3\\gamma} = (11.3\\pm1.8\\pm2.0)\\times 10^{-6}$.

Ablikim, M; Ambrose, D J; An, F F; An, Q; An, Z H; Bai, J Z; Ban, Y; Becker, J; Bertani, M; Bian, J M; Boger, E; Bondarenko, O; Boyko, I; Briere, R A; Bytev, V; Cai, X; Cakir, O; Calcaterra, A; Cao, G F; Cetin, S A; Chang, J F; Chelkov, G; Chen, G; Chen, H S; Chen, J C; Chen, M L; Chen, S J; Chen, Y B; Cheng, H P; Chu, Y P; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Dai, H L; Dai, J P; Dedovich, D; Deng, Z Y; Denig, A; Denysenko, I; Destefanis, M; Ding, W M; Ding, Y; Dong, L Y; Dong, M Y; Du, S X; Fang, J; Fang, S S; Fava, L; Feldbauer, F; Feng, C Q; Ferroli, R B; Fu, C D; Fu, J L; Gao, Y; Geng, C; Goetzen, K; Gong, W X; Gradl, W; Greco, M; Gu, M H; Gu, Y T; Guan, Y H; Guo, A Q; Guo, L B; Guo, Y P; Han, Y L; Harris, F A; He, K L; He, M; He, Z Y; Held, T; Heng, Y K; Hou, Z L; Hu, H M; Hu, J F; Hu, T; Huang, G M; Huang, J S; Huang, X T; Huang, Y P; Hussain, T; Ji, C S; Ji, Q; Ji, X B; Ji, X L; Jiang, L L; Jiang, X S; Jiao, J B; Jiao, Z; Jin, D P; Jin, S; Jing, F F; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N; Kavatsyuk, M; Kuehn, W; Lai, W; Lange, J S; Li, C H; Li, Cheng; Li, Cui; Li, D M; Li, F; Li, G; Li, H B; Li, J C; Li, K; Li, Lei; Li, Q J; Li, S L; Li, W D; Li, W G; Li, X L; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, X R; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Liang, Y F; Liang, Y T; Liao, G R; Liao, X T; Liu, B J; Liu, C L; Liu, C X; Liu, C Y; Liu, F H; Liu, Fang; Liu, Feng; Liu, H; Liu, H B; Liu, H H; Liu, H M; Liu, H W; Liu, J P; Liu, K Y; Liu, Kai; Liu, P L; Liu, Q; Liu, S B; Liu, X; Liu, X H; Liu, Y B; Liu, Z A; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Zhiqing; Loehner, H; Lu, G R; Lu, H J; Lu, J G; Lu, Q W; Lu, X R; Lu, Y P; Luo, C L; Luo, M X; Luo, T; Luo, X L; Lv, M; Ma, C L; Ma, F C; Ma, H L; Ma, Q M; Ma, S; Ma, T; Ma, X Y; Ma, Y; Maas, F E; Maggiora, M; Malik, Q A; Mao, Y J; Mao, Z P; Messchendorp, J G; Min, J; Min, T J; Mitchell, R E; Mo, X H; Morales, C Morales; Motzko, C; Muchnoi, N Yu; Muramatsu, H; Nefedov, Y; Nicholson, C; Nikolaev, I B; Ning, Z; Olsen, S L; Ouyang, Q; Pacetti, S; Park, J W; Pelizaeus, M; Peng, H P; Peters, K; Ping, J L; Ping, R G; Poling, R; Prencipe, E; Qi, M; Qian, S; Qiao, C F; Qin, X S; Qin, Y; Qin, Z H; Qiu, J F; Rashid, K H; Rong, G; Ruan, X D; Sarantsev, A; Schaefer, B D; Schulze, J; Shao, M; Shen, C P; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shepherd, M R; Song, X Y; Spataro, S; Spruck, B; Sun, D H; Sun, G X; Sun, J F; Sun, S S; Sun, Y J; Sun, Y Z; Sun, Z J; Sun, Z T; Tang, C J; Tang, X; Tapan, I; Thorndike, E H; Toth, D; Ullrich, M; Varner, G S; Wang, B; Wang, B Q; Wang, K; Wang, L L; Wang, L S; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, Q; Wang, Q J; Wang, S G; Wang, X L; Wang, Y D; Wang, Y F; Wang, Y Q; Wang, Z; Wang, Z G; Wang, Z Y; Wei, D H; Weidenkaff, P; Wen, Q G; Wen, S P; Werner, M; Wiedner, U; Wu, L H; Wu, N; Wu, S X; Wu, W; Wu, Z; Xia, L G; Xiao, Z J; Xie, Y G; Xiu, Q L; Xu, G F; Xu, G M; Xu, H; Xu, Q J; Xu, X P; Xu, Z R; Xue, F; Xue, Z; Yan, L; Yan, W B; Yan, Y H; Yang, H X; Yang, Y; Yang, Y X; Ye, H; Ye, M; Ye, M H; Yu, B X; Yu, C X; Yu, J S; Yu, S P; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zafar, A A; Zallo, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, B X; Zhang, B Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H H; Zhang, H Y; Zhang, J Q; Zhang, J W; Zhang, J Y; Zhang, J Z; Zhang, S H; Zhang, X J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y H; Zhang, Y S; Zhang, Z P; Zhang, Z Y; Zhao, G; Zhao, H S; Zhao, J W; Zhao, K X; Zhao, Lei; Zhao, Ling; Zhao, M G; Zhao, Q; Zhao, S J; Zhao, T C; Zhao, X H; Zhao, Y B; Zhao, Z G; Zhemchugov, A; Zheng, B; Zheng, J P; Zheng, Y H; Zhong, B; Zhong, J; Zhou, L; Zhou, X K; Zhou, X R; Zhu, C; Zhu, K; Zhu, K J; Zhu, S H; Zhu, X L; Zhu, X W; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y M; Zhu, Y S; Zhu, Z A; Zhuang, J; Zou, B S; Zou, J H

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

Literature Review of Background Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) continuously move through the environment, often via atmospheric transport. The subsequent deposition of particulates containing PAHs along with other sources of PAHs, such as natural vegetative decay, result in "background" PAHs in surficial soils. Even in pristine areas, surface and near surface soils can contain detectable levels of PAHs. This study provides data on the concentrations and distributions of background PAHs observed in environmental media. Such inf...

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated weak collision'' formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

MiniMAX: A Compact, Portable X-Ray System For Field Inspection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MiniMAX: A Compact, Portable X-Ray System For Field Inspection MiniMAX: A Compact, Portable X-Ray System For Field Inspection MiniMAX: A Compact, Portable X-Ray System For Field Inspection MiniMAX takes x-ray images that are as detailed or even better than conventional hospital systems. However, unlike such systems, MiniMAX is easy to use, portable, lightweight, and inexpensive. MiniMAX takes advantage of the form factor of x-ray film, the physics of computed radiography (CR), and the compact technology of digital radiography (DR) panels to implement the benefits of each in a very simple, reliable, and compact system. July 11, 2013 Complete , 6.5lb, MiniMAX portable radiography system including Leica M9 camera, Jenoptik lens, JDSU dichroic filter, LED flash, CsBr storage phosphor, and 57-Co source. Complete, 6.5lb, MiniMAX portable radiography system including Leica M9

84

Large scale continuous visual event recognition using max-margin Hough transformation framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we propose a novel method for continuous visual event recognition (CVER) on a large scale video dataset using max-margin Hough transformation framework. Due to high scalability, diverse real environmental state and wide scene variability ... Keywords: Continuous visual event, Event detection, Large scale, Max-margin Hough transform

Bhaskar Chakraborty, Jordi Gonzlez, F. Xavier Roca

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

WiMAX Double Movable Boundary Scheme in the Vehicle to Infrastructure Communication Scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WiMAX is an interesting technology that will be applied in vehicular networks due to the provisioning of high mobility, wide coverage, and different classes of service. In this paper, we investigate the problem of vehicular applications mapping in the ... Keywords: Intelligent Transportation System, Quality of service, Scheduling, WiMAX

Rola Naja; Melhem El Helou; Samir Tohm

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Applications of WiMAX-based wireless mesh network in monitoring wind farms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper has studied the feasibility of applying World Interoperability for Microwave Access (WiMAX) based Wireless Mesh Networks (WMNs) in monitoring wind farms. WMNs provide a dynamic topology which meets the requirements of communications ... Keywords: WMNs, WiMAX, World Interoperability for Microwave Access, communications, renewable energy, simulation, wind energy, wind farm monitoring, wind farms, wind power, wireless mesh networks, wireless networks

Gang Zheng; Hongbing Xu; Xinheng Wang; Jianxiao Zou

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Delay Stability Regions of the Max-Weight Policy under Heavy-Tailed Traffic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delay Stability Regions of the Max-Weight Policy under Heavy-Tailed Traffic Mihalis G. Markakis operated under the Max- Weight scheduling policy, for the case where one of the queues is fed by heavy system exemplifies an intricate phenomenon whereby heavy-tailed traffic at one queue may or may

Tsitsiklis, John

88

Fast-converging scheduling and routing algorithms for WiMAX mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present fast converging algorithms that fit well WiMAX mesh networks. First, a centralized scheduling algorithm is presented. It calculates schedules by transforming the multi-hop tree into a single hop, and then repartitioning the ... Keywords: WiMAX, mesh networks, routing, scheduling

Salim Nahle; Naceur Malouch

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Aromatics Oxidation and Soot Formation in Flames  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and the growth process to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) of increasing size, soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The overall objective of the experimental aromatics oxidation work is to extend the set of available data by measuring concentration profiles for decomposition intermediates such as phenyl, cyclopentadienyl, phenoxy or indenyl radicals which could not be measured with molecular-beam mass spectrometry to permit further refinement and testing of benzene oxidation mechanisms. The focus includes PAH radicals which are thought to play a major role in the soot formation process while their concentrations are in many cases too low to permit measurement with conventional mass spectrometry. The radical species measurements are used in critical testing and improvement of a kinetic model describing benzene oxidation and PAH growth. Thermodynamic property data of selected species are determined computationally, for instance using density functional theory (DFT). Potential energy surfaces are explored in order to identify additional reaction pathways. The ultimate goal is to understand the conversion of high molecular weight compounds to nascent soot particles, to assess the roles of planar and curved PAH and relationships between soot and fullerenes formation. The specific aims are to characterize both the high molecular weight compounds involved in the nucleation of soot particles and the structure of soot including internal nanoscale features indicative of contributions of planar and/or curved PAH to particle inception.

Howard, J. B.; Richter, H.

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

90

Aromaticity and Antiaromaticity in Transition-Metal Systems  

SciTech Connect

Aromaticity is an important concept in chemistry primarily for hydrocarbon compounds, but it has been extended to compounds containing transition-metal atoms. Recent findings of aromaticity and antiaromaticy in all-metal clusters have stimulated further researches in describing the chemical bonding, structures, and stability in transition-metal clusters and compounds on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, which are reviewed here. The presence of d-orbitals endows much more diverse chemistry, structure, and chemical bonding to transition-metal clusters and compounds. One interesting feature is the existence of a new type of ?-aromaticity, in addition to ?- and ?-aromaticity that are only possible for main group compounds. Another striking characteristic in the chemical bonding of transition-metal systems is the multi-fold nature of aromaticity, antiaromaticity, or even conflicting aromaticity. Separate sets of counting rules have been proposed for cyclic transition-metal systems to account for the three types of ?-, ?-, and ?-aromaticity/antiaromaticity. The diverse transition-metal clusters and compounds reviewed here indicate that multiple aromaticity and antiaromaticity may be much more common in chemistry than one would anticipate. It is hoped that the current review will stimulate interest in further understanding the structure and bonding, on the basis of aromaticity and antiaromaticity, of other known or unknown transition-metal systems, such as the active sites of enzymes or other biomolecules, which contain transition-metal atoms and clusters.

Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Averkiev, Boris B.; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

First observation of Bs -> J/psi f0(980) decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using data collected with the LHCb detector in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, the hadronic decay Bs -> J/psi f0(980) is observed. This CP eigenstate mode could be used to measure mixing-induced CP violation in the B_s system. Using a fit to the pi+ pi- mass spectrum with interfering resonances gives R_{f0/phi} = [Gamma(Bs -> J/psi f0, f0 -> pi+ pi-)]/[Gamma(Bs -> J/psi phi, phi -> K+K-)] = 0.252^{+0.046+0.027}_{-0.032-0.033}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

The LHCb Collaboration; R. Aaij; B. Adeva; M. Adinolfi; C. Adrover; A. Affolder; Z. Ajaltouni; J. Albrecht; F. Alessio; M. Alexander; P. Alvarez Cartelle; A. A. Alves Jr; S. Amato; Y. Amhis; J. Amoraal; J. Anderson; R. B. Appleby; O. Aquines Gutierrez; L. Arrabito; M. Artuso; E. Aslanides; G. Auriemma; S. Bachmann; D. S. Bailey; V. Balagura; W. Baldini; R. J. Barlow; C. Barschel; S. Barsuk; A. Bates; C. Bauer; Th. Bauer; A. Bay; I. Bediaga; K. Belous; I. Belyaev; E. Ben-Haim; M. Benayoun; G. Bencivenni; R. Bernet; M. -O. Bettler; M. van Beuzekom; S. Bifani; A. Bizzeti; P. M. Bj\\ornstad; T. Blake; F. Blanc; C. Blanks; J. Blouw; S. Blusk; A. Bobrov; V. Bocci; A. Bondar; N. Bondar; W. Bonivento; S. Borghi; A. Borgia; E. Bos; T. J. V. Bowcock; C. Bozzi; T. Brambach; J. van den Brand; J. Bressieux; S. Brisbane; M. Britsch; T. Britton; N. H. Brook; H. Brown; A. Bchler-Germann; A. Bursche; J. Buytaert; S. Cadeddu; J. M. Caicedo Carvajal; O. Callot; M. Calvi; M. Calvo Gomez; A. Camboni; L. Camilleri; P. Campana; G. Capon; A. Carbone; G. Carboni; R. Cardinale; A. Cardini; L. Carson; K. Carvalho Akiba; G. Casse; M. Cattaneo; M. Charles; Ph. Charpentier; N. Chiapolini; X. Cid Vidal; P. J. Clark; P. E. L. Clarke; M. Clemencic; H. V. Cliff; J. Closier; C. Coca; V. Coco; J. Cogan; P. Collins; F. Constantin; G. Conti; A. Contu; M. Coombes; G. Corti; G. A. Cowan; R. Currie; B. D'Almagne; C. D'Ambrosio; W. Da Silva; P. David; I. De Bonis; S. De Capua; M. De Cian; F. De Lorenzi; J. M. De Miranda; L. De Paula; P. De Simone; D. Decamp; H. Degaudenzi; M. Deissenroth; L. Del Buono; C. Deplano; O. Deschamps; F. Dettori; J. Dickens; H. Dijkstra; M. Dima; P. Diniz Batista; S. Donleavy; D. Dossett; A. Dovbnya; F. Dupertuis; R. Dzhelyadin; C. Eames; S. Easo; U. Egede; V. Egorychev; S. Eidelman; D. van Eijk; F. Eisele; S. Eisenhardt; L. Eklund; D. G. d'Enterria; D. Esperante Pereira; L. Estve; E. Fanchini; C. Frber; G. Fardell; C. Farinelli; S. Farry; V. Fave; V. Fernandez Albor; M. Ferro-Luzzi; S. Filippov; C. Fitzpatrick; F. Fontanelli; R. Forty; M. Frank; C. Frei; M. Frosini; J. L. Fungueirino Pazos; S. Furcas; A. Gallas Torreira; D. Galli; M. Gandelman; P. Gandini; Y. Gao; J-C. Garnier; J. Garofoli; L. Garrido; C. Gaspar; N. Gauvin; M. Gersabeck; T. Gershon; Ph. Ghez; V. Gibson; V. V. Gligorov; C. Gbel; D. Golubkov; A. Golutvin; A. Gomes; H. Gordon; M. Grabalosa Gndara; R. Graciani Diaz; L. A. Granado Cardoso; E. Graugs; G. Graziani; A. Grecu; S. Gregson; B. Gui; E. Gushchin; Yu. Guz; T. Gys; G. Haefeli; S. C. Haines; T. Hampson; S. Hansmann-Menzemer; R. Harji; N. Harnew; P. F. Harrison; J. He; K. Hennessy; P. Henrard; J. A. Hernando Morata; E. van Herwijnen; A. Hicheur; E. Hicks; W. Hofmann; K. Holubyev; P. Hopchev; W. Hulsbergen; P. Hunt; T. Huse; R. S. Huston; D. Hutchcroft; V. Iakovenko; C. Iglesias Escudero; P. Ilten; J. Imong; R. Jacobsson; M. Jahjah Hussein; E. Jans; F. Jansen; P. Jaton; B. Jean-Marie; F. Jing; M. John; D. Johnson; C. R. Jones; B. Jost; F. Kapusta; T. M. Karbach; J. Keaveney; U. Kerzel; T. Ketel; A. Keune; B. Khanji; Y. M. Kim; M. Knecht; S. Koblitz; A. Konoplyannikov; P. Koppenburg; A. Kozlinskiy; L. Kravchuk; G. Krocker; P. Krokovny; F. Kruse; K. Kruzelecki; M. Kucharczyk; S. Kukulak; R. Kumar; T. Kvaratskheliya; V. N. La Thi; D. Lacarrere; G. Lafferty; A. Lai; R. W. Lambert; G. Lanfranchi; C. Langenbruch; T. Latham; R. Le Gac; J. van Leerdam; J. -P. Lees; R. Lefvre; A. Leflat; J. Lefran\\ccois; O. Leroy; T. Lesiak; L. Li; Y. Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; M. Lieng; M. Liles; R. Lindner; C. Linn; B. Liu; G. Liu; J. H. Lopes; E. Lopez Asamar; N. Lopez-March; J. Luisier; B. M'charek; F. Machefert; I. V. Machikhiliyan; F. Maciuc; O. Maev; J. Magnin; A. Maier; S. Malde; R. M. D. Mamunur; G. Manca; G. Mancinelli; N. Mangiafave; U. Marconi; R. Mrki; J. Marks; G. Martellotti; A. Martens; L. Martin; A. Martin Sanchez; D. Martinez Santos; A. Massafferri; Z. Mathe; C. Matteuzzi; M. Matveev; V. Matveev; E. Maurice; B. Maynard; A. Mazurov; G. McGregor; R. McNulty; C. Mclean; M. Meissner; M. Merk; J. Merkel; M. Merkin; R. Messi; S. Miglioranzi; D. A. Milanes; M. -N. Minard; S. Monteil; D. Moran; P. Morawski; J. V. Morris; R. Mountain; I. Mous; F. Muheim; K. Mller; R. Muresan; F. Murtas; B. Muryn; M. Musy; J. Mylroie-Smith; P. Naik; T. Nakada; R. Nandakumar; J. Nardulli; M. Nedos; M. Needham; N. Neufeld; M. Nicol; S. Nies; V. Niess; N. Nikitin; A. Oblakowska-Mucha; V. Obraztsov; S. Oggero; O. Okhrimenko; R. Oldeman; M. Orlandea; A. Ostankov; B. Pal; J. Palacios; M. Palutan; J. Panman; A. Papanestis; M. Pappagallo; C. Parkes; C. J. Parkinson; G. Passaleva; G. D. Patel; M. Patel; S. K. Paterson; G. N. Patrick; C. Patrignani; C. Pavel -Nicorescu; A. Pazos Alvarez; A. Pellegrino; G. Penso; M. Pepe Altarelli; S. Perazzini; D. L. Perego; E. Perez Trigo

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Measurement of the angular distribution in anti-p p ---> psi(2S) ---> e+ e-  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the first measurement of the angular distribution for the exclusive process {bar p}p {yields} {psi}(2S) {yields} e{sup +}e{sup -} based on a sample of 6844 events collected by the Fermilab E835 experiment. They find that the angular distribution is well described by the expected functional form dN/d cos {theta}* {proportional_to} 1 + {lambda} cos{sup 2} {theta}*, where {theta}* is the angle between the antiproton and the electron in the center of mass frame, with {lambda} = 0.67 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(sys.). The measured value for {lambda} implies a small but non zero {psi}(2S) helicity 0 formation amplitude in {bar p}p, comparable to what is observed in J/{psi} decays to baryon pairs.

Ambrogiani, M.; Andreotti, M.; Argiro, S.; Bagnasco, S.; Baldini, W.; Bettoni, D.; Borreani, G.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Cester, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Dalpiaz, P.; Fan, X.; Garzoglio, G.; Gollwitzer, K.E.; Graham, M.; Hahn, A.; Hu, M.; Jin, S.; Joffe, D.; Kasper, J.; /Fermilab /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /Northwestern U. /UC, Irvine /Minnesota U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Exclusive decay of $\\Upsilon$ into $J/\\psi+\\chi_{c0,1,2}$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the $\\Upsilon$ exclusive decay into double charmonium, specifically, the $S$-wave charmonium $ J/\\psi$ plus the $P$-wave charmonium $\\chi_{c0,1,2}$ in the NRQCD factorization framework. Three distinct decay mechanisms, i.e., the strong, electromagnetic and radiative decay channels are included and their interference effects are investigated. The decay processes $\\Upsilon(1S,2S,3S)\\to J/\\psi+\\chi_{c1,0}$ are predicted to have the branching fractions of order $10^{-6}$, which should be observed in the prospective Super $B$ factory.

Xu, Jia; Feng, Feng; Gao, Ying-Jia; Jia, Yu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

MaxEnt-Burg Application to Muon-Spin Resonance  

SciTech Connect

Muon-Spin Rotation ({mu}SR) is an experimental technique similar to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR). {mu}SR data are recorded as a set of time-series histograms of muon-decay events. Both {mu}SR and NMR regularly produce signals that are overlapping, weak and/or broadened in frequency space. These {mu}SR histograms are usually analyzed by curve fitting and Fourier transformations. However, several NMR and {mu}SR groups have developed Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt, ME) applications to improve the sensitivity of the time series analysis. We have focused on the application of the ME-Burg algorithm. The optimal number of autoregression coefficients is between N/3 and N/5 where N is the total number of data points. Selected results for simulated data and real data ME-{mu}SR applications are reported. Most of our {mu}SR work is for cuprate superconductor studies. The strength of the ME-Burg algorithm is fully used, as there is a clear relationship between the muon-spin signal S(i) at any time i and the signals S(i-k) at earlier times. ME-Burg has the major advantage of producing in the frequency transform only structure for which sufficient statistical evidence is present.

Boekema, C.; Browne, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose CA 95192-0106 (United States)

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

95

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

96

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Exposure in German Coke Oven Workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are formed whenever there is incomplete combustion of carbonaceous material. They are ubiquitous in the environment and background levels are found (more)

Thoroman, Jeffrey S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Branching fractions for {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}} and {gamma}{eta}  

SciTech Connect

We report first measurements of the branching fractions B({psi}{sub 2S}{r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}})=(1.54{plus_minus}0.31{plus_minus}0.20){times}10{sup {minus}4} and B({psi}{sub 2S}{r_arrow}{gamma}{eta})=(0.53{plus_minus}0.31{plus_minus}0.08){times}10{sup {minus}4}. The {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}} result is consistent with expectations of a model that considers the possibility of {eta}{sup {prime}}-{eta}{sub c}(2S) mixing. The ratio of the {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta}{sup {prime}} and {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{eta} rates is used to determine the pseudoscalar octet-singlet mixing angle. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, Peoples Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

J/Psi production off nuclei: a detour from SPS to LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a collection of selected phenomena observed in J/Psi production from proton-nucleus and heavy ion collisions at energies, ranging between the SPS and LHC. The emphasis is placed on the related theoretical ideas or techniques, which are either not widely known, or offer an alternative explanation to the observed nuclear effects.

B. Z. Kopeliovich; I. K. Potashnikova; Ivan Schmidt

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

99

Search for fJ(2220) in Radiative J/psi Decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for fJ(2220) production in radiative J/psi-->gammafJ(2220) decays using 460??fb[superscript -1] of data collected with the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II e+e- collider. The fJ(2220) is searched for ...

Fisher, Peter H.

100

ARM - Field Campaign - 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 Lead Scientist : Jeffrey Gaffney For data sets, see below. Description A 4-week field campaign was conducted in and downwind of Mexico City during March 2006. The Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - MEXico City (MAX-MEX) characterized aerosol formation and changes in aerosol composition, size distribution, light scattering coefficient, absorption coefficient, optical depth, soot-specific absorption, and radiative fluxes at selected vertical and horizontal locations in the outflow from a well-characterized urban core. Detailed analyses were made of the meteorological conditions during

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101

Fuel Economy of the 2013 Ford C-MAX Hybrid FWD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ford C-MAX Hybrid FWD Search for Other Vehicles View the Mobile Version of This Page 4 cyl, 2.0 L Automatic (variable gear ratios) Regular Gasoline Compare Side-by-Side Hybrid EPA...

102

Max-Min characterization of the mountain pass energy level for a class of variational problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a max-min characterization of the mountain pass energy level for a family of variational problems. As a consequence we deduce the mountain pass structure of solutions to suitable PDEs, whose existence follows from classical minimization argument.

Jacopo Bellazzini; Nicola Visciglia

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Max-Min characterization of the mountain pass energy level for a class of variational problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a max-min characterization of the mountain pass energy level for a family of variational problems. As a consequence we deduce the mountain pass structure of solutions to suitable PDEs, whose existence follows from classical minimization argument.

Bellazzini, Jacopo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Dominant spin-flip effects for the hadronic-produced J/{psi} polarization at the Tevatron  

SciTech Connect

Dominant spin-flip effects for the direct and prompt J/{psi} polarizations at Tevatron run II with collision energy 1.96 TeV and rapidity cut |y{sup J/{psi}}|<0.6 are systematically studied. The spin-flip effect for the transition of (cc){sub 8}[{sup 3}S{sub 1}] into J/{psi} is especially discussed with care. It is found that the spin-flip effect shall always dilute the J/{psi} polarization, and with a suitable choice of the parameters a{sub 0,1} and c{sub 0,1,2}, the J/{psi} polarization puzzle can be solved to a certain degree. At large transverse momentum p{sub t}, {alpha} for the prompt J/{psi} is reduced by {approx}50% for f{sub 0}=v{sup 2} and by {approx}80% for f{sub 0}=1. We also study the indirect J/{psi} polarization from the b decays, which however is slightly affected by the same spin-flip effect and then shall provide a better platform to determine the color-octet matrix elements.

Wu Xinggang; Fang Zhenyun [Department of Physics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Radiative decays of the psi(3097) to two meson final states  

SciTech Connect

The MARK III detector operating at the SPEAR storage ring has acquired a sample of 2.7 x 10/sup 6/ produced psi(3097)'s. These events are used to investigate the radiative decays of the psi to two meson final states. Such decays are of topical interest because of the unusual QCD laboratory they provide - of particular interest is the possibility of observing glueball states. The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ is studied. The f(1270) tensor meson is observed and the helicity structure of its production is measured. The data indicate that helicity 2 is suppressed, in disagreement with lowest order QCD calculations. Evidence is presented for the first observation of the theta(1700) in the ..pi../sup +/..pi../sup -/ final state. The strong, but not complete, suppression of this state in the ..pi pi.. channel, combined with the absence of a J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ signal in a recent MARK III analysis of psi ..-->.. ..gamma.. rho rho, suggest a very mysterious nature for the theta(1700). The process psi ..-->.. ..gamma..K/sup +/K/sup -/ is also studied. The f'(1515) tensor meson is observed with a branching ratio in agreement with the SU(3) symmetry prediction for the standard two gluon radiative decay diagram with no mixing corrections. The helicity structure of the f'(1515) is measured for the first time, and is found to be similar to that of the f(1270). The theta(1700) is observed with high statistics. Its spin and parity are measured, with the result that J/sup P/ = 2/sup +/ is preferred over J/sup P/ = 0/sup +/ at the 99.9% C.L. In addition, evidence is presented for a remarkable narrow state, designated the xi(2220). Its parameters are measured to be: m = 2.218 +- 0.003 +- 0.010 GeV, GAMMA less than or equal to 0.040 GeV at 95% C.L., and BR(psi ..-->.. ..gamma..xi(2220))BR(xi(2220) ..-->.. K/sup +/K/sup -/) = (5.7 +- 1.9 +- 1.4) x 10/sup -5/.

Einsweiler, K.F.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions of butane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane by using a dual function catalyst has led to a significant enhancement of the yields (from 25 to 40%) and selectivities to aromatics (from 39 to 64%). Butane is converted to aromatics by using either zinc-promoted [Ga]-ZSM-5 or zinc and gallium copromoted [Fe]-ZSM-5 zeolite as a catalyst. However, the formation of aromatics is severely limited by hydrocracking of butane to methane, ethane, and propane due to the hydrogen formed during aromatization reactions. On the other hand, the oxidative dehydrogenation of butane to butene over molybdate catalysts is found to be accompanied by a concurrent undesirable reaction, i.e., total oxidation. When two of these reactions (oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane) are coupled by using a dual function catalyst they have shown to complement each other. It is believed that the rate-limiting step for aromatization (butane to butene) is increased by adding an oxidative dehydrogenation catalyst (Ga-Zn-Mg-Mo-O). The formation of methane, ethane, and propane was suppressed due to the removal of hydrogen initially formed as water. Studies of ammonia TPD show that the acidities of [Fe]-ZSM-5 are greatly affected by the existence of metal oxides such as Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3], MgO, ZnO, and MoO[sub 3]. 40 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Xu, Wen-Qing; Suib, S.L. (Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States))

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

First Measurement of the Branching Fraction of the Decay $\\psi(2S) \\to \\tau\\tau$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The branching fraction of the psi(2S) decay into tau pair has been measured for the first time using the BES detector at the Beijing Electron-Positron Collider. The result is $B_{\\tau\\tau}=(2.71\\pm 0.43 \\pm 0.55) \\times 10^{-3}$, where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic. This value, along with those for the branching fractions into e+e- and mu+mu of this resonance, satisfy well the relation predicted by the sequential lepton hypothesis. Combining all these values with the leptonic width of the resonance the total width of the psi(2S) is determined to be $(252 \\pm 37)$ keV.

Bai, J Z; Bian, J G; Blum, I K; Chen, G P; Chen, H F; Chen, J; Chen Jia Chao; Chen, Y; Chen, Y B; Chen, Y Q; Cheng Bao Sen; Cui, X Z; Ding, H L; Dong, L Y; Du, Z Z; Dunwoodie, W M; Gao, C S; Gao, M L; Gao, S Q; Gratton, P; Gu, J H; Gu, S D; Gu, W X; Gu, Y F; Guo, Z J; Guo, Y N; Han, S W; Han, Y; Harris, F A; He, J; He, J T; He, K L; He, M; Heng, Y K; Hitlin, D G; Hu, G Y; Hu, H M; Hu, J L; Hu, Q H; Hu, T; Hu Xiao Qing; Huang, G S; Huang, Y Z; Izen, J M; Jiang, C H; Jin, Y; Jones, B D; Ju, X; Ke, Z J; Kelsey, M H; Kim, B K; Kong, D; Lai, Y F; Lang, P F; Lankford, A J; Li, C G; Li, D; Li, H B; Li, J; Li, J C; Li, P Q; Li, R B; Li, W; Li, W G; Li, X H; Li Xiao Nan; Liu, H M; Liu, J; Liu, R G; Liu, Y; Lou, X C; Lowery, B; Lu, F; Lu, J G; Luo, X L; Ma, E C; Ma, J M; Malchow, R; Mao, H S; Mao, Z P; Meng, X C; Nie, J; Olsen, S L; Oyang, J Y T; Paluselli, D; Pan, L J; Panetta, J; Porter, F; Qi, N D; Qi, X R; Qian, C D; Qiu, J F; Qu, Y H; Que, Y K; Rong, G; Schernau, M; Shao, Y Y; Shen, B W; Shen, D L; Shen, H; Shen, X Y; Sheng, H Y; Shi, H Z; Song, X F; Standifird, J; Sun, F; Sun, H S; Sun, Y; Sun, Y Z; Tang, S Q; Toki, W; Tong, G L; Varner, G S; Wang, F; Wang, L S; Wang, L Z; Wang, M; Wang, P; Wang, P L; Wang, S M; Wang, T J; Wang, Y Y; Weaver, M; Wei, C L; Wu, J M; Wu, N; Wu, Y G; Xi, D M; Xia, X M; Xie, P P; Xie, Y; Xie, Y H; Xu, G F; Xue, S T; Yan, J; Yan, W G; Yang, C M; Yang, C Y; Yang, H X; Yang, J; Yang, W; Yang, X F; Ye, M H; Ye Shu Wei; Ye, Y X; Yu, C S; Yu, C X; Yu, G W; Yu Yu Hei; Yu, Z Q; Yuan, C Z; Yuan, Y; Zhang Bing Yun; Zhang, C; Zhang, C C; Zhang, D H; Zhang, H L; Zhang, J; Zhang, J W; Zhang, L; Zhang, L S; Zhang, P; Zhang, Q J; Zhang, S Q; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Zhao, D X; Zhao, H W; Zhao Jia Wei; Zhao, M; Zhao Wei Ren; Zhao, Z G; Zheng Jian Ping; Zheng Lin Sheng; Zheng Zhi Peng; Zhou, B Q; Zhou, G P; Zhou, H S; Zhou, L; Zhu, K J; Zhu, Q M; Zhu, Y C; Zhu, Y S; Zhuang, B A

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Measurement of Interference between Electromagnetic and Strong Amplitudes in psi(2S) Decays to Two Pseudoscalar Mesons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a sample of 3.08 million psi(2S) decays collected at sqrt{s} = 3.686 GeV with the CLEO detector at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring, we have measured the branching fractions for psi(2S) decays to pseudoscalar pairs pi+pi-, K+K-, and KsKl. We obtain B(psi(2S) -> pi+pi-) K+K-) = (6.3 +- 0.6(stat) +- 0.3(syst)) x 10^{-5}, and B(psi(2S) -> KsKl) = (5.8 +- 0.8(stat) +- 0.4(syst)) x 10^{-5}. The branching fractions allow extraction of the relative phase Delta = (95 +- 15) degrees and strength ratio R = (2.5 +- 0.4) of the three-gluon and one-photon amplitudes for these modes.

S. Dobbs; CLEO Collaboration

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

109

J/psi Photo-production at Large z in Soft Collinear Effective Theory  

SciTech Connect

One of the outstanding problems in J/{psi} physics is a systematic understanding of the differential photo-production cross section d{sigma}/dz({gamma} + p {yields} J/{psi} + X), where z = E{sub {psi}}/E{sub {gamma}} in the proton rest frame. The theoretical prediction based on the non-relativistic QCD (NRQCD) factorization formalism has a color-octet contribution which grows rapidly in the endpoint region, z {yields} 1, spoiling perturbation theory. In addition there are subleading operators which are enhanced by powers of 1/(1-z) and they must be resumed to all orders. Here an update of a systematic analysis is presented. The approach used to organize the endpoint behavior of the photo-production cross section is based on a combination of NRQCD and soft collinear effective theory. While a final result is not yet available, an intermediate result indicates that better agreement between theory and data will be achieved in this framework.

Sean Fleming; Adam K. Leibovich; Thomas Mehen

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

110

Kieffer Paper Mill's Recycled Fiber Mill and PSI Energy's High Efficiency Motors Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The needs of electricity consumers along with the utility industry are rapidly changing. Consumers want electricity to perform more functions, improve efficiencies and help lower the cost of production, all in an environmentally responsible manner. In 1991, PSI Energy developed a comprehensive Demand-Side Management program, called Energy Matters, aimed at improving the overall end-use efficiency of its customers. Its goal is to reduce summer peak demand 120 megawatts by the summer of 1995. Kieffer Paper Mills in Brownstown, IN had a need to address the efficiency of its new, state-of-the-art pulp processing mill that it was building. With over 4,000 horsepower of process motors going into the new plant, even a modest improvement in motor efficiency would yield significant energy savings. PSI Energy was able to help Kieffer examine the economics of high efficiency motors, and through the PSI Energy High Efficiency Motors Plan encouraged Kieffer Paper Mills to purchase energy efficient motors by helping pay part of the cost differential between high efficiency and standard efficiency models.

Myers, J. A.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Improved analysis of J/{psi} decays into a vector meson and two pseudoscalars  

SciTech Connect

Recently, the BES collaboration has published an extensive partial-wave analysis of experimental data on J/{psi}{yields}{phi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, J/{psi}{yields}{omega}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, J/{psi}{yields}{phi}K{sup +}K{sup -} and J/{psi}{yields}{omega}K{sup +}K{sup -}. These new results are analyzed here, with full account of detection efficiencies, in the framework of a chiral unitary description with coupled-channel final state interactions between {pi}{pi} and KK pairs. The emission of a dimeson pair is described in terms of the strange and nonstrange scalar form factors of the pion and the kaon, which include the final state interaction and are constrained by unitarity and by matching to the next-to-leading-order chiral expressions. This procedure allows for a calculation of the S-wave component of the dimeson spectrum including the f{sub 0}(980) resonance, and for an estimation of the low-energy constants of Chiral Perturbation Theory, in particular, the large N{sub c} suppressed constants L{sub 4}{sup r} and L{sub 6}{sup r}. The decays in question are also sensitive to physics associated with OZI violation in the 0{sup ++} channel. It is found that the S-wave contributions to {phi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {phi}K{sup +}K{sup -} and {omega}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} given by the BES partial-wave analysis may be very well fitted up to a dimeson center-of-mass energy of {approx}1.2 GeV, for a large and positive value of L{sub 4}{sup r} and a value of L{sub 6}{sup r} compatible with zero. An accurate determination of the amount of OZI violation in the J/{psi}{yields}{phi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay is achieved, and the S-wave contribution to {omega}K{sup +}K{sup -} near threshold is predicted.

Laehde, Timo A. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (HISKP), Bonn University, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Meissner, Ulf-G. [Helmholtz-Institut fuer Strahlen- und Kernphysik (HISKP), Bonn University, Nussallee 14-16, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik (Thailand), D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Heavy Atom Substitution Effects in Non-Aromatic Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atom Substitution Effects in Non-Aromatic Ionic Liquids: Ultrafast Dynamics and Physical Properties H. Shirota, H. Fukazawa, T. Fujisawa, and J. F. Wishart J. Phys. Chem. B 114,...

113

EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of laccase and ...  

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2010) 37:10911096 DOI 10.1007/s10295-010-0757-y 123 ORIGINAL PAPER EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of ...

114

Affinity labelling enzymes with esters of aromatic sulfonic acids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel esters of aromatic sulfonic acids are disclosed. The specific esters are nitrophenyl p- and m-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate. Also disclosed is a method for specific inactivation of the enzyme, thrombin, employing nitrophenyl p-amidinophenylmethanesulfonate.

Wong, Show-Chu (Riverhead, NY); Shaw, Elliott (Shoreham, NY)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Biodegradation and phytoremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using mushroom compost.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Soils contaminated with Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are commonly found in petroleum, gas-work and wood-impregnation sites. Interest in the biodegradation and environmental fate of PAHs (more)

Kodjo-Wayo, Lina Korkor

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? Onshore wind max capacity 50.4% - what wind farm, what year? Home How can I find more specific information about wind capacity? I can get the max/min/media stuff from the bar graphs. Is there any way to see individual wind farm capacity per year or get examples of performance? I'm helping run a tech site and some specific information would be helpful in dealing with skeptical individuals. Is there any more detailed information on capacity other than the graph summary statistics? (I do not know my way around this site, but I'm willing to learn.) Submitted by Bob Wallace on 15 June, 2013 - 00:23 1 answer Points: 0 Hi Bob- Thank you for posting your question. It seems that your question developed after viewing/using the Transparent Cost Database, however, I

117

Using a MaxEnt Classifier for the Automatic Content Scoring of Free-Text Responses  

SciTech Connect

Criticisms against multiple-choice item assessments in the USA have prompted researchers and organizations to move towards constructed-response (free-text) items. Constructed-response (CR) items pose many challenges to the education community - one of which is that they are expensive to score by humans. At the same time, there has been widespread movement towards computer-based assessment and hence, assessment organizations are competing to develop automatic content scoring engines for such items types - which we view as a textual entailment task. This paper describes how MaxEnt Modeling is used to help solve the task. MaxEnt has been used in many natural language tasks but this is the first application of the MaxEnt approach to textual entailment and automatic content scoring.

Sukkarieh, Jana Z. [Educational Testing Service, Rosedale Road, Princeton NJ 08541 (United States)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

Di-J/psi Studies, Level 3 Tracking and the D0 Run IIb Upgrade  

SciTech Connect

The D0 detector underwent an upgrade to its silicon vertex detector and triggering systems during the transition from Run IIa to Run IIb to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. This thesis describes improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms used by the high level trigger in both Run IIa and Run IIb, as well as a search for resonant di-J/{psi} states using both Run IIa and Run IIb data. Improvements made to the tracking and vertexing algorithms during Run IIa included the optimization of the existing tracking software to reduce overall processing time and the certification and testing of a new software release. Upgrades made to the high level trigger for Run IIb included the development of a new tracking algorithm and the inclusion of the new Layer 0 silicon detector into the existing software. The integration of Layer 0 into the high level trigger has led to an improvement in the overall impact parameter resolution for tracks of {approx}50%. The development of a new parameterization method for finding the error associated to the impact parameter of tracks returned by the high level tracking algorithm, in association with the inclusion of Layer 0, has led to improvements in vertex resolution of {approx}4.5 {micro}m. A previous search in the di-J/{psi} channel revealed a unpredicted resonance at {approx}13.7 GeV/c{sup 2}. A confirmation analysis is presented using 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data and two different approaches to cuts. No significant excess is seen in the di-J/{psi} mass spectrum.

Vint, Philip John; /Imperial Coll., London

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Search for a vector glueball by a scan of the {ital J}/{psi} resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cross section for {ital e}{sup +}{ital e}{sup {minus}}{r_arrow}{rho}{pi} has been measured by the BES detector at BEPC at center-of-mass energies covering a 40 MeV interval spanning the {ital J}/{psi} resonance. The data are used to search for the vector gluonium state hypothesized by Brodsky, Lepage, and Tuan as an explanation of the {rho}{pi} puzzle in charmonium physics. The shape of the {rho}{pi} cross section is compatible with that of the total hadronic cross section. No distortions indicating the presence of a vector glueball are seen. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

Bai, J.Z.; Bardon, O.; Blum, I.; Breakstone, A.; Burnett, T.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, J.; Chen, S.M.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cowan, R.F.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Du, Z.Z.; Dunwoodie, W.; Fan, X.L.; Fang, J.; Fero, M.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gratton, P.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; Harris, F.A.; Hatanaka, M.; He, J.; He, M.; Hitlin, D.G.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, D.Q.; Huang, Y.Z.; Izen, J.M.; Jia, Q.P.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, S.; Jin, Y.; Jones, L.; Kang, S.H.; Ke, Z.J.; Kelsey, M.H.; Kim, B.K.; Kong, D.; Lai, Y.F.; Lan, H.B.; Lang, P.F.; Lankford, A.; Li, F.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Lin, S.Z.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Liu, Z.A.; Lou, X.C.; Lowery, B.; Lu, J.G.; Luo, S.Q.; Luo, Y.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Malchow, R.; Mandelkern, M.; Meng, X.C.; Ni, H.L.; Nie, J.; Olsen, S.L.; Oyang, J.; Paluselli, D.; Pan, L.J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Prabhakar, E.; Qi, N.D.; Que, Y.K.; Quigley, J.; Rong, G.; Schernau, M.; Schmid, B.; Schultz, J.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Shi, X.R.; Smith, A.; Soderstrom, E.; Song, X.F.; Standifird, J.; Stoker, D.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Sun, S.J.; Synodinos, J.; Tan, Y.P.; Tang, S.Q.; Toki, W.; Tong, G.L.; Torrence, E.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Whittaker, S.; Wilson, R.; Wisniewski, W.J.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, D.Z.; Xu, R.S.; Xu, Z.Q.; Xue, S.T.; Yamamoto, R.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, W.; Ye, M.H.; Ye, S.W.; Ye, S.Z.; Young, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yuan, C.Z.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Measurements of Trace Gas Fluxes by MAX-DOAS In Texas City, Texas spring 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of Trace Gas Fluxes by MAX- DOAS In Texas City, Texas ­ spring 2009 Elaina Shawver and NO2 from oil refineries in Texas City, TX by utilizing the spatial inhomogeneity of trace gas/hr, respectively. Determine facility averaged fluxes of NO2, HCHO, and SO2 in Texas City Determine source specific

Collins, Gary S.

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121

DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY AS EFFECTS OF QUANTUM GRAVITY Max I. Fomitchev1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DARK MATTER AND DARK ENERGY AS EFFECTS OF QUANTUM GRAVITY Max I. Fomitchev1 Submitted March 12th , 2004 ABSTRACT I present a theory of quantum gravity based on the principle of gravitational energy fluctuations. Gravitational energy fluctuations ­ gravitons ­ are responsible for elastic scattering

Giles, C. Lee

122

A min-max optimization framework for designing ?? learners: theory and hardware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a framework for constructing ?? learning algorithms and hardware that can identify and track low-dimensional manifolds embedded in a high-dimensional analog signal space. At the core of the proposed approach is a min-max ... Keywords: ?? conversion, analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), high-dimensional signal processing, manifold learning, multichannel ADC, signal decorrelation

Amit Gore; Shantanu Chakrabartty

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Improvement security for RuBee radio-WiMAX mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Next generation communication standard integrate various access networks technology to become mesh networks. One of air interface standard is metropolitan area wireless broadband service. IEEE 802.16 is the basis for Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave ... Keywords: AAA, RuBee (IEEE 1902.1), WiMAX, gateway access point, group identity key

Tin-Yu Wu; Jhong-Ci Wu; Wei-Fang Weng

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Max-Weight Scheduling in Queueing Networks with Heavy-Tailed Traffic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Max-Weight Scheduling in Queueing Networks with Heavy-Tailed Traffic Mihalis G. Markakis, Eytan network with a mix of heavy-tailed and light- tailed traffic, and analyze the impact of heavy unstable otherwise. First, we show that a heavy-tailed traffic flow is delay unstable under any scheduling

Tsitsiklis, John

125

Perspectives on quality of experience for video streaming over WiMAX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The advent of broadband wireless networks, such as WiMAX, is paving the way for the widespread deployment of high-bandwidth video streaming services for mobile users. To provide acceptable end-to-end performance in such a network, it is important to ...

Arun Vishwanath; Partha Dutta; Malolan Chetlu; Parul Gupta; Shivkumar Kalyanaraman; Amitabha Ghosh

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

MaxSolver: An efficient exact algorithm for (weighted) maximum satisfiability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximum Boolean satisfiability (max-SAT) is the optimization counterpart of Boolean satisfiability (SAT), in which a variable assignment is sought to satisfy the maximum number of clauses in a Boolean formula. A branch and bound algorithm based on the ... Keywords: DPLL, Linear programming, Nonlinear programming, Unit propagation, Variable ordering, Weighted maximum satisfiability

Zhao Xing; Weixiong Zhang

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

In neuem Gewand und mit einer komplett neu angelegten Nutzerfhrung prsentiert sich die Internetseite der Max-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 Millionen Menschen leben in Mumbai, der Finanzmetropole Indiens. #12;PERSPEKTIVEN Foto:MPIfürChemie Max-Planck-Institut für Chemie hat zusammen mit seinem Kollegen Flori- an Wittmann und Maria Teresa, die über presse@gv.mpg.de auf Deutsch oder Englisch bestellt werden kann, wurden die Langtexte von

128

WiMAX-RBDS-Sim: an OPNET simulation framework for IEEE 802.16 mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a simulation model for IEEE 802.16 (WiMAX) wireless mesh networks with distributed scheduling is developed. It provides a framework for the evaluation of reservation-based distributed scheduling (RBDS) policies at the medium access control ... Keywords: IEEE 802.16, OPNET, distributed scheduling, simulation, wireless mesh networks

Gustavo Vejarano; Janise McNair

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Silence Duration Based Uplink Scheduling Algorithm for Multiple VoIP Users in M-WiMAX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes an efficient uplink scheduling algorithm that can perfectly support various VoIP CODECs with VAD/DTX/CNG in M-WiMAX considering the variants of silence duration between different voice users, solving the problems of uplink resources ... Keywords: G.729B, VAD/DTX/CNG, VoIP CODECs, WiMAX, ertPS, scheduling algorithm

Farouk Y. M. Alkadhi; Zheng Liu; Min Yang; Qiuhong Wang; Jufeng Dai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A cross-layer framework for video-on-demand service in multi-hop WiMax mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we introduce a cross-layer framework to favor the video-on-demand service in multi-hop WiMax mesh networks. We first propose a joint solution of admission control and channel scheduling for video streams. The proposed approach guarantees ... Keywords: Cross-layer design, Simulation, Video-on-demand, WiMax, Wireless mesh network

Fei Xie; Kien A. Hua; Ning Jiang

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Measurement of the CP-violating phase phi sJ/psi phi using the flavor-tagged decay Bs(0) -> J/psi phi in 8 fb(-1) of p(p)over-bar collisions  

SciTech Connect

We report an updated measurement of the CP-violating phase, {phi}{sub s}{sup J/{psi}{phi}} and the decay-width difference for the two mass eigenstates, {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s}, from the flavor-tagged decay B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{phi}. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 8.0 fb{sup -1} accumulated with the D0 detector using p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV produced at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The 68% Bayesian credibility intervals, including systematic uncertainties, are {Delta}{Gamma}{sub s} = 0.163{sub -0.064}{sup +0.065} ps{sup -1} and {phi}{sub s}{sup J}/{psi}{phi} = -0.55{sub -0.36}{sup +0.38}. The p-value for the Standard Model point is 29.8%.

Abazov, V.M.; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Aoki, M.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Asman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; BackusMayes, J.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Begel, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besancon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Buszello, C. P.; Calpas, B.; Camacho-Perez, E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga, M. A.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thery, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; De, K.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Deliot, F.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garcia-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Gruenendahl, S.; Gruenewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffre, M.; Jamin, D.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurca, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Kvita, J.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lietti, S. M.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; de Sa, R. Lopes; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Mackin, D.; Madar, R.; Magana-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martinez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; et al.

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

132

Toxicity Analysis of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are widely distributed in the environment and are generated by many sources. Though the potential of PAH-rich mixtures to cause health effects has been known for almost a century, there are still unanswered questions about the levels of PAHs in the environment, the potential for human exposure to PAHs, the health effects associated with exposure, and how genetic susceptibility influences the extent of health effects in individuals. The first objective of this research was to quantify concentrations of PAHs in samples of settled house dust collected from homes in Azerbaijan, China, and Texas. The trends of PAH surface loadings and percentage of carcinogenic PAHs were China > Azerbaijan > Texas, indicating that the risk of health effects from exposure to PAHs in house dust is highest in the Chinese population and lowest in the Texas population. PAHs in China and Azerbaijan were derived mainly from combustion sources; Texas PAHs were derived from unburned fossil fuels such as petroleum. The second objective of this research was to investigate the effect of pregnane X receptor (PXR) on the genotoxicity of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). BaP treatment resulted in significantly lower DNA adduct levels in PXR-transfected HepG2 cells than in parental HepG2 cells. Total GST enzymatic activity and mRNA levels of several metabolizing enyzmes were significantly higher in cells overexpressing PXR. These results suggest that PXR protects cells against DNA damage by PAHs such as BaP, possibly through a coordinated regulation of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism. The third objective of this research was to investigate biomarkers of exposure in house mice (Mus musculus) exposed to PAH mixtures in situ. Mice and soil were collected near homes in Sumgayit and Khizi, Azerbaijan. Mean liver adduct levels were significantly higher in Khizi than in Sumgayit. Mean lung and kidney adduct levels were similar in the two regions. The DNA lesions detected may be a combination of environmentally-induced DNA adducts and naturally-occurring I-compounds. PAHs were present at background levels in soils from both Khizi and Sumgayit. It appears that health risks posed to rodents by soil-borne PAHs are low in these two areas.

Naspinski, Christine S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Global analysis of J/psi suppression in cold nuclear matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpreting the J/psi suppression reported in nucleus--nucleus collisions at SPS and RHIC requires the quantitative understanding of cold nuclear matter effects, such as the inelastic rescattering of J/psi states in nuclei or the nuclear modification of parton densities. With respect to our former Glauber analysis, we include in the present work the new PHENIX d--Au measurements, and analyze as well all existing data using the EPS08 nuclear parton densities recently released. The largest suppression reported in the new PHENIX analysis leads in turn to an increase of sigma from 3.5 +/- 0.3 mb to 5.4 +/- 2.5 mb using proton PDF. The stronger x-dependence of the G^{A}/G^p ratio in EPS08 as compared to e.g. EKS98 shifts the cross section towards larger values at fixed target energies (x_2 ~ 0.1) while decreasing somehow the value extracted at RHIC (x_2 ~10^{-2}).

Tram, Vi-Nham; 10.1140/epjc/s10052-009-0864-y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Samuel C.C. Ting, the J/psi Particle (Charm), and the Alpha Magnetic  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Samuel C.C. Ting, the J/psi Particle (Charm), and Samuel C.C. Ting, the J/psi Particle (Charm), and the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) Resources with Additional Information Samuel C.C. Ting Credit: Courtesy of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology 'Samuel C.C. Ting was born ... in Ann Arbor, Michigan, ... [and] received his elementary and secondary education in China ... . He excelled in mathematics, science and history. In 1956, Ting returned to the United States to attend the University of Michigan as an engineering student, but he soon transferred his major to physics.'1 In 1959, he was awarded a BSE (in physics) and BSE (in mathematics), both from the University of Michigan and in 1962, he was awarded a Ph.D. (in physics), also from the University of Michigan. 'After receiving his Ph.D., Ting went to CERN as a Ford Foundation postdoctoral scholar, then joined the faculty at Columbia University where he became interested in the physics of electron-positron pair production. ...

135

$\\rho-\\omega-$Interference in $J/\\psi-$Decays and $\\rho\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$ Decay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study $\\rho-\\omega-$interference by analyzing $J/\\psi\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0\\pi^0$. PDG-2002 data on $J/\\psi$ decays into $PP$ and $PV$ ($P$ denotes pseudoscalar mesons; $V$, vector mesons) are used to fit a generic model which describes the $J/\\psi$ decays. From the fits, we obtain anomalously large branching ratio $Br(\\rho^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0)\\sim 10^{-3}-10^{-2}$. A theoretical analysis for it is also provided, and the prediction is in good agreement with the anomalously large $Br(\\rho^0\\to \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0)$. By the fit, we also get the $\\eta-\\eta'-$mixing angle $\\theta=-19.68^o\\pm 1.49^o$ and the constituent quark mass ratio $m_u/m_s\\sim 0.6$ which are all reasonable.

Fang, L; Huang, Y B; Yan, M L; Fang, Liu; Jin, Li; Huang, Yi-Bin; Yan, Mu-Lin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Evidence for. rho. sub 1 (1600) from the decay J/. psi. yields. pi. sup minus. pi. sup +. pi. sup 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from MARK 3 on the decay J/{psi} {yields} {pi}{sup {minus}}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} are described in terms of amplitudes representing the sequential two-body decay processes J/{psi} {yields} {rho}{pi}, {rho}{yields}{pi}{pi}. It is found that a complete description requires contributions from excited J{sup PC} = 1{sup --} states in addition to the dominant contribution form the {rho}(770). The characteristics of these additional states are discussed. 11 refs., 6 figs.

Chen, Liang-Ping (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)); Dunwoodie, W. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evidence for nuclear gluon shadowing from the ALICE measurements of PbPb ultraperipheral exclusive J/{\\psi} production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the recent ALICE measurements of exclusive J/{\\psi} production in ultraperipheral PbPb collisions at 2.76 TeV provide the first direct experimental evidence for the strong nuclear gluon shadowing in lead at $x \\sim 10^{-3}$. The evidence is based on the comparison of the nuclear suppression factor S(x\\approx 0.001)=0.61^{+0.05}_{-0.04} found in the analysis of the coherent J/{\\psi} photoproduction cross sections measured by ALICE with the nuclear gluon shadowing predicted by the global fits of nuclear parton distributions and by the leading twist theory of nuclear shadowing.

Guzey, V; Strikman, M; Zhalov, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

About the creation of proton-anti-proton pair at electron-positron collider in the energy range of the mass $\\Psi(3770)$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of electron--positron annihilation into proton--antiproton pair is considered within the vicinity of $\\psi(3770)$ resonance. The interference between the pure electromagnetic intermediate state and the $\\psi(3770)$ state is evaluated. It is shown that this interference is destructive and the relative phase between these two contributions is large ($\\phi_0 \\approx 250^o$).

Ahmadov, A I; Kuraev, E A; Wang, P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

Ding, Yu-Shin (Central Islip, NY); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

142

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Inc - MD 04 Inc - MD 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC. (MD.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Maryland Alloys Corporation MD.04-1 Location: 5245 Fairlawn Avenue , Baltimore , Maryland MD.04-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 MD.04-1 MD.04-3 Site Operations: Scrap metals broker that arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. MD.04-2 MD.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote MD.04-3 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium (Q-11) Oxide/Residue MD.04-2 MD.04-4 Radiological Survey(s): Yes MD.04-1 Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP MD.04-3 Also see Documents Related to MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC.

143

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Max | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Max" Max" Showing 13 pages using this property. 4 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 6 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 7 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 3 +, 4 +, 5 +, ... 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 9 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 3 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 30 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 4 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 36 + E E40880ac-c27b-4cbf-a011-b0d7d6e10fe9 + 200 + E40880ac-c27b-4cbf-a011-b0d7d6e10fe9 + 200 + E40880ac-c27b-4cbf-a011-b0d7d6e10fe9 + 200 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Max&oldid=539747

144

Characteristics of the Neutron Irradiation Facilities of the PSI Calibration Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The neutron radiation fields of the Calibration Laboratory at Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) are traceable to the national standards of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in Germany. A Berthold LB6411 neutron dose rate meter for neutron radiation is used as a secondary standard. Recently, a thorough characterization of the neutron irradiation fields of the {sup 241}Am-Be and {sup 252}Cf sources by means of reference measurements and a detailed MCNPX simulation of the irradiation facility has been initiated. In this work, the characteristics of the neutron radiation fields are summarized and presented together with model equations and an uncertainty analysis. MCNPX results are shown for the {sup 241}Am-Be source. A comparison of measured and simulated data shows an excellent agreement. From the simulation, valuable information about the neutron fields like the contribution of scattered neutrons in the fields and the energy spectra could be obtained.

Hoedlmoser, H.; Schuler, Ch.; Butterweck, G.; Mayer, S. [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

145

Max Sherman  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventilation Strategies on Residential Ozone Levels." Building and Environment 59 (2012): 456-465. Download: PDF (2.28 MB) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 ... next last This Speaker's...

146

~max0006  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

10-1 7-08 NNSA Line Oversight and Contractor Assurance System Supplemental Directive U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY National Nuclear Security Administration AVAILABLE ONLINE AT:...

147

Queue length asymptotics for generalized max-weight scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the asymptotic behavior of the steady-state queue length distribution under generalized max-weight scheduling in the presence of heavy-tailed traffic. We consider a system consisting of two parallel queues, ...

Jagannathan

148

Multi-channel transmission with efficient delivery of routing information in maritime WiMAX mesh networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a lack of broadband wireless network in sea to meet the increasing needs of modern maritime users and we have envisaged WiMAX mesh networks for high-speed and low-cost ship-to-ship/shore communications. In such a maritime WiMAX mesh network, ... Keywords: IEEE Std 802.16-2004, broadband wireless access, maritime communications, mesh network, multi-channel transmission

Ming-Tuo Zhou; Hiroshi Harada; Peng-Yong Kong; Chee-Wei Ang; Yu Ge; J. S. Pathmasuntharam

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Determining Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) Background in Sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sediment remediation challenges at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites include defining sediment remedial zones, establishing risk-based remedial goals for specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and determining background conditions in what are often highly industrialized waterways. This technical update describes the various tools and approaches developed over approximately the past decade to determine site-specific background PAH concentrations in sediments attributable to ...

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Glucan synthesis in membranes from Zea mays and Glycine max: Interaction of ER and Golgi membranes  

SciTech Connect

Membranes of the Golgi apparatus from maize (Zea mays L.) were used to synthesize in vitro the (1[yields]3),(1[yields]4)-[beta]-D-glucan that is unique to the cell wall of the Poaceae. Activated charcoal added during homogenization reduced the synthesis of callose and enhanced synthesis of (1[yields]3),(1[yields]4)-[beta]-D-glucan. Charcoal was also effective on stimulating the synthesis of xyloglucan using Golgi apparatus from soybean (Glycine max) hypocotyls. In both cases, a crude membrane fraction containing both endoplasmic synthesis than a purified fraction of Golgi apparatus. The interaction of endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus is being investigated.

Gibeaut, D.M.; Carpita, N.C. (Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary analyses presented in this report are: Nevertheless, it is important to analyze best-on-market products, since data on truly max tech technologies are limited. (1) an analysis of the cross-cutting strategies most promising for reducing appliance and equipment energy use in the U.S.; (2) a macro-analysis of the U.S. energy-saving potential inherent in promising ultra-efficient appliance technologies; and (3) a product-level analysis of the energy-saving potential.

Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Docket No. EO-05-01. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours. Arial photograph showing plant and location of predicted SO2 violations, predicted in 2000. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours More Documents & Publications Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 3, 1, 2 SO2 Case Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by AERMOD-PRIME, Units 4, 1, 2 SO2 Case Mirant Potomac, Alexandria, Virginia: Maximum Impacts Predicted by

153

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

Development of coker feeds from aromatic oil and bituminous coal digests.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Kingwood coal has been digested with two coal derived (anthracene oil and carbon black base) and two petroleum derived (slurry oil and Maraflex oil) aromatic (more)

Clendenin, L. Mitchell.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHS) in Surface Soil in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred sixty soil samples were collected and analyzed from sites in the State of Illinois as part of EPRI's nationwide study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface soil. The samples were collected from 10 pseudo-randomly selected locations in 16 pseudo-randomly selected populated areas throughout the State, excluding the City of Chicago. At each location, the soils were logged and samples were collected from 0 to 15 cm below ground surface. At the laboratory, the soil samples were ana...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

157

www.wapa.gov/sn/environment/Docs/FINAL MAX OBN CX 10-11-2011.pdf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maxwell - Maxwell - O'Banion opaw Requested By: David Young Date Submitted: 9/1112011 Descl'iption of the Projcct: Purpose and Need Mail Code: N1410 Phone: 916-353-4542 Date Required: 9/20/2011 The Western Area Power Administration (Western), Sierra Nevada Region (SNR), is responsible for the operation and maintenance (O&M) of federally owned and operated transmission lines, Switchyards, and facilities throughout California. Western and Reclamation must comply with the National Electric Safety Code, Western States Coordinating Council (WECC), and internal directives for protecting human safety, the physical environment, and maintaining the reliable operation of the transmission system. Western is proposing to put Optical Oround Wire (OPOW) on its existing Maxwell O'Banion (MAX-OBN) transmission line. The need for

158

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - Dynamic Energy and Environmental Dispatch - Max Zhang  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispatch: Dispatch: Achieving co-benefits of power systems reliability and air quality K. Max Zhang, Richard Schuler, Monica Nguyen, Crystal Chen, Santiago Palacio, and Keenan Valentine Acknowledgement: Collaborations with Mike Swider and Wesley Hall at NYISO; Valuable discussions with Tim Mount, Bill Schulze, Bob Thomas, Dan Shawhan and Ray Zimmerman. High Electric Demand Days (HEDD): A "peak" problem * Heat Waves * Power Systems - Reliability is compromised - Cost of electricity is high: expensive peaking generators * Environment - High ozone air pollution - Double threats to public health: heat and air pollution New York City Temperature 81 89 84 94 94 88 93 93 94 89 96 100 Washington DC Metropolitan Area June 2012 July 2012 Get Creative!

159

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier2Max | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Max" Max" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2ed23a51-907f-47a4-aa12-930fdab46ff6 + 100 + 2ed23a51-907f-47a4-aa12-930fdab46ff6 + 100 + 2ed23a51-907f-47a4-aa12-930fdab46ff6 + 100 + 3 33829b61-e8a8-4227-9d74-c6d82b9a7439 + 5,000 + 33829b61-e8a8-4227-9d74-c6d82b9a7439 + 5,000 + 33829b61-e8a8-4227-9d74-c6d82b9a7439 + 5,000 + 4 41b62cce-5d88-4f82-9cec-9def23ca54f0 + 5,000 + 41b62cce-5d88-4f82-9cec-9def23ca54f0 + 5,000 + 41b62cce-5d88-4f82-9cec-9def23ca54f0 + 5,000 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 20 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 3 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 24 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 3 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 4 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 4 + 4b524791-bef2-49b1-850b-458730755203 + 5 +

160

In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CARB partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and LAMELs through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and lighting, appliances, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs).

Puttagunta, S.; Shapiro, C.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Search for {psi}(2S) production in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilations at 4.03GeV  

SciTech Connect

A search is performed for the production of the {psi}(2S) in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilation at a center-of-mass energy of 4.03 GeV using the BES detector operated at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC). The kinematic features of the reconstructed {psi}(2S) signal are consistent with its being produced only in association with an energetic photon resulting from initial state radiation (ISR). Limits are placed on {psi}(2S) production from the decay of unknown charmonia or metastable hybrids that might be produced in e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} annihilations at 4.03GeV. Under the assumption that the observed cross section for {psi}(2S) production is due entirely to ISR, the partial width {Gamma}{sub ee} of the {psi}(2S) is measured to be 2.07{plus_minus}0.32keV. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing100039, Peoples Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing100039, Peoples Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado80523 (United States); Yu, Y.H. [ (China)] [(China)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier1Max | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Max" Max" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 0 05af5998-fbb0-4fd1-a2e2-34b0219e532d + 500 + 05af5998-fbb0-4fd1-a2e2-34b0219e532d + 500 + 05af5998-fbb0-4fd1-a2e2-34b0219e532d + 500 + 06df2629-673d-4fbf-a827-95d5e97d56a3 + 1,000 + 06df2629-673d-4fbf-a827-95d5e97d56a3 + 1,000 + 06df2629-673d-4fbf-a827-95d5e97d56a3 + 1,000 + 06df2629-673d-4fbf-a827-95d5e97d56a3 + 1,000 + 07beaafd-8549-421f-a202-1e7395bd34f5 + 50 + 07beaafd-8549-421f-a202-1e7395bd34f5 + 50 + 07beaafd-8549-421f-a202-1e7395bd34f5 + 50 + 07beaafd-8549-421f-a202-1e7395bd34f5 + 50 + 08fb31c8-8850-49b0-9174-3b194f1083af + 15 + 08fb31c8-8850-49b0-9174-3b194f1083af + 15 + 1 16c48ab1-a941-4888-8946-55b5bad56660 + 15 + 16c48ab1-a941-4888-8946-55b5bad56660 + 15 + 178900e3-861b-4a8d-b2bd-b74894d0b1c4 + 100 +

163

Thermal stabilities of aromatic acids as geothermal tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports that thirty-nine aromatic acids were tested for their suitability as geothermal tracers. The parameters of the experiments included temperatures up to 300[degrees]C for periods of up to one month in fluids of various salinities, the presence of absence of rocks, and atmospheric levels of molecular oxygen. Of the compounds tested, at least 24 are suitable as tracers in a moderate-temperature geothermal environment while 5 may be used at temperatures as high as 300[degrees]C. The compounds displayed no adsorption on the rocks used in the tests. Some of the compounds were used successfully in a major tracer test at the Dixie Valley, Nevada geothermal system.

Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N.; Fabry, L.G.; Ahn, J.H. (Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for biofuels production.

Not Available

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on extrinsic J/psi production at sqrt{s_{NN}}=2.76 TeV at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We evaluate the Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production in pPb and PbPb collisions at the current LHC energy, taking into account the gluon shadowing and the nuclear absorption. We use the complete kinematics in the underlying 2 to 2 partonic process, namely $g+g \\to \\jpsi + g$ as expected from LO pQCD. The resulting shadowing is responsible for a large J/psi suppression in pPb and PbPb, and shows a strong rapidity dependence.

E. G. Ferreiro; F. Fleuret; J. P. Lansberg; N. Matagne; A. Rakotozafindrabe

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

166

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

Koester, B P; Annis, J; Wechsler, R H; Evrard, A; Bleem, L; Becker, M; Johnston, D; Sheldon, E; Nichol, R; Miller, C; Scranton, R; Bahcall, N; Barentine, J; Brewington, H; Brinkmann, J; Harvanek, M; Kleinman, S; Krzesnski, J; Long, D; Nitta, A; Schneider, D; Sneddin, S; Voges, W; York, D; 10.1086/509599

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A MaxBCG Catalog of 13,823 Galaxy Clusters from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a catalog of galaxy clusters selected using the maxBCG redsequence method from Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric data. This catalog includes 13,823 clusters with velocity dispersions greater than 400 km/s, and is the largest galaxy cluster catalog assembled to date. They are selected in an approximately volume-limited way from a 0.5 Gpc^3 region covering 7500 square degrees of sky between redshifts 0.1 and 0.3. (ABRIGDED)

B. P. Koester; T. A. McKay; J. Annis; R. H. Wechsler; A. Evrard; L. Bleem; M. Becker; D. Johnston; E. Sheldon; R. Nichol; C. Miller; R. Scranton; N. Bahcall; J. Barentine; H. Brewington; J. Brinkmann; M. Harvanek; S. Kleinman; J. Krzesinski; D. Long; A. Nitta; D. Schneider; S. Sneddin; W. Voges; D. York; SDSS collaboration

2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Comparative physiology and transcriptional networks underlying the heat shock response in Populus trichocarpa, Arabidopsis thaliana and Glycine max  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The heat shock response continues to be layered with additional complexity as interactions and crosstalk among heat shock proteins (HSPs), the reactive oxygen network and hormonal signalling are discovered. However, comparative analyses exploring variation in each of these processes among species remain relatively unexplored. In controlled environment experiments, photosynthetic response curves were conducted from 22 to 42 C and indicated that temperature optimum of light-saturated photosynthesis was greater for Glycine max relative to Arabidopsis thaliana or Populus trichocarpa. Transcript profiles were taken at defined states along the temperature response curves, and inferred pathway analysis revealed species-specific variation in the abiotic stress and the minor carbohydrate raffinose/galactinol pathways. A weighted gene co-expression network approach was used to group individual genes into network modules linking biochemical measures of the antioxidant system to leaf-level photosynthesis among P. trichocarpa, G. max and A. thaliana. Network-enabled results revealed an expansion in the G. max HSP17 protein family and divergence in the regulation of the antioxidant and heat shock modules relative to P. trichocarpa and A. thaliana. These results indicate that although the heat shock response is highly conserved, there is considerable species-specific variation in its regulation.

Weston, David [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Karve, Abhijit A [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; Jawdy, Sara [ORNL; Allen, Sara M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Modeling the biodegradability and physicochemical properties of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The biodegradability and physicochemical properties of unsubstituted and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were investigated. The focus was on the development of models expressing the influence of molecular structure and properties on observed behavior. Linear free energy relationships (LFERs) were developed for the estimation of aqueous solubilities, octanol/water partition coefficients, and vapor pressures as functions of chromatographic retention time. LFERs were tested in the estimation of physicochemical properties for twenty methylated naphthalenes containing up to four methyl substituents. It was determined that LFERs can accurately estimate physicochemical properties for methylated naphthalenes. Twenty unsubstituted and methylated PAHs containing up to four aromatic rings were biodegraded individually by Sphingomonas paucimobilis strain EPA505, and Monod-type kinetic coefficients were estimated for each PAH using the integral method. Estimated extant kinetic parameters included the maximal specific biodegradation rate, the affinity coefficient, and the inhibition coefficient. The generic Andrews model adequately simulated kinetic data. The ability of PAHs to serve as sole energy and carbon sources was also evaluated. Quantitative structure-biodegradability relationships (QSBRs) were developed based on the estimates of the kinetic and growth parameters. A genetic algorithm was used for QSBR development. Statistical analysis and validation demonstrated the predictive value of the QSBRs. Spatial and topological molecular descriptors were essential in explaining biodegradability. Mechanistic interpretation of the kinetic data and the QSBRs provided evidence that simple or facilitated diffusion through the cell membranes is the rate-determining step in PAH biodegradation by strain EPA505. A kinetic experiment was conducted to investigate biodegradation of PAH mixtures by strain EPA505. The investigation focused on 2-methylphenanthrene, fluoranthene, and pyrene, and their mixtures. Integrated material balance equations describing different interaction types were fitted to the depletion data and evaluated on a statistical and probabilistic basis. Mixture degradation was most adequately described by a pure competitive interaction model with mutual substrate exclusivity, a fully predictive model utilizing parameters estimated in the sole-PAH experiments only. The models developed in this research provide insight into how molecular structure and properties influence physicochemical properties and biodegradability of PAHs. The models have considerable predictive value and could reduce the need for laboratory testing.

Dimitriou-Christidis, Petros

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Understanding the Adsorption of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons from Aqueous Phase onto Activated Carbon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-competitive adsorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from water onto activated carbon was studied alongside the performance of CO2-activated petroleum coke as a low-cost adsorbent. (more)

Awoyemi, Ayodeji

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Black carbon in marine sediments : quantification and implications for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption is a key factor in determining the fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment. Here, PAH sorption is proposed as the sum of two mechanisms: absorption into a biogenic, organic carbon (OC) ...

Accardi-Dey, AmyMarie, 1976-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Package of Homojunction of Fully Conjugated Heterocyclic Aromatic Rigid-rod Polymer Light Emitting Diodes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this study is mono-layer polymer light emitting diode (PLED). The emitting layer is poly-p-phenylenebenzobisoxazole (PBO). PBO is a fully conjugated heterocyclic aromatic (more)

Liao, Hung-chi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Year/PAD District Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alkylates Alkylates Aromatics Road Oil and Lubricants Petroleum Coke (MMcfd) Hydrogen Sulfur (short tons/day) Production Capacity Asphalt Isomers Marketable Table 7. Operable Production Capacity of Petroleum Refineries, January 1, 1981 to January 1, 2013 (Thousand Barrels per Stream Day, Except Where Noted) a JAN 1, 1981 974 299 765 131 234 276 2,054 NA JAN 1, 1982 984 290 740 162 242 267 1,944 NA JAN 1, 1983 960 237 722 212 241 296 2,298 NA JAN 1, 1984 945 218 800 208 241 407 2,444 NA JAN 1, 1985 917 215 767 219 243 424 2,572 NA JAN 1, 1986 941 276 804 258 246 356 2,357 NA JAN 1, 1987 974 287 788 326 250 364 2,569 23,806 JAN 1, 1988 993 289 788 465 232 368 2,418 27,639 JAN 1, 1989 1,015 290 823 469 230 333 2,501 28,369 JAN 1, 1990 1,030 290 844 456 232 341 2,607 24,202

175

Cold Nuclear Matter Effects on J/Psi as Constrained by Deuteron-Gold Measurements at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new analysis of J/psi production yields in deuteron-gold collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV using data taken by the PHENIX experiment in 2003 and previously published in [S.S. Adler et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 96, 012304 (2006)]. The high statistics proton-proton J/psi data taken in 2005 is used to improve the baseline measurement and thus construct updated cold nuclear matter modification factors R_dAu. A suppression of J/psi in cold nuclear matter is observed as one goes forward in rapidity (in the deuteron-going direction), corresponding to a region more sensitive to initial state low-x gluons in the gold nucleus. The measured nuclear modification factors are compared to theoretical calculations of nuclear shadowing to which a J/psi (or precursor) break-up cross-section is added. Breakup cross sections of sigma_breakup = 2.8^[+1.7_-1.4] (2.2^[+1.6_-1.5]) mb are obtained by fitting these calculations to the data using two different models of nuclear shadowing. These breakup cross section values are consistent within large uncertainties with the 4.2 +/- 0.5 mb determined at lower collision energies. Projecting this range of cold nuclear matter effects to copper-copper and gold-gold collisions reveals that the current constraints are not sufficient to firmly quantify the additional hot nuclear matter effect.

PHENIX Collaboration; A. Adare

2007-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effect of deposition temperature on the crystalline structure and surface morphology of ZnO films deposited on p-Si  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zinc oxide (ZnO) films were deposited on p-Si substrates by sol-gel spin coating method. Zinc acetate dihydrate (ZnAc), 2-methoxyethanol and monoethanolamine (MEA) were used as a starting material, solvent and stabilizer, respectively. The films were ... Keywords: FESEM, ZnO, crystalline structure, deposition temperature, reflectance, sol-gel

Seval Aksoy; Yasemin Caglar; Saliha Ilican; Mujdat Caglar

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards Title Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4608E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Garbesi, Karina, Louis-Benoit Desroches, Christopher A. Bolduc, Gabriel Burch, Griffin Hosseinzadeh, and Seth Saltiel Document Number LBNL-4608E Pagination 13 Date Published July 11 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports-simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save ~200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

178

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

180

Biodegradability of select polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (pah) mixtures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are environmentally significant because of their ubiquity and the toxicity of some. Their recalcitrance and persistence makes them problematic environmental contaminants. Microbial degradation is considered to be the primary mechanism of PAH removal from the environment. Biodegradation kinetics of individual PAHs by pure and mixed cultures have been reported by several researchers. However, contaminated sites commonly have complex mixtures of PAHs whose individual biodegradability may be altered in mixtures. Biodegradation kinetics for fluorene, naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnaphthalene and 1- methylfluorene were evaluated in sole substrate systems, binary and ternary systems using Sphingomonas paucimobilis EPA505. The Monod model was fitted to the data from the sole substrate experiments to yield biokinetic parameters, (qmax and Ks). The first order rate constants (qmax/Ks) for fluorene, naphthalene and 1,5- dimethylnaphthalene were comparable, although statistically different. However, affinity constants for the three compounds were not comparable. Binary and ternary experiments indicated that the presence of another PAH retards the biodegradation of the co-occurring PAH. Antagonistic interactions between substrates were evident in the form of competitive inhibition, demonstrated mathematically by the Monod multisubstrate model. This model appropriately predicted the biodegradation kinetics in mixtures using the sole substrate parameters, validating the hypothesis of common enzyme systems. Competitive inhibition became pronounced under conditions of: Ks1 > Ks1 and S1 >> S. Experiments with equitable concentrations of substrates demonstrated the effect of concentration on competitive inhibition. Ternary experiments with naphthalene, 1,5-dimethylnapthalene and 1-methylfluorene revealed preferential degradation, where depletion of naphthalene and 1,5-dimethylnapthalene proceeded only after the complete removal of 1-methylfluorene. The substrate interactions observed in binary and ternary mixtures require a multisubstrate model to account for simultaneous degradation of substrates. However, developing models that account for sequential degradation may be useful in scenarios where PAHs may not be competitive substrates. These mixture results prove that substrate interactions must be considered in designing effective bioremediation strategies and that sole substrate performance is limited in predicting biodegradation kinetics of complex mixtures.

Desai, Anuradha M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Measurement of the B_d0 lifetime using B_d0 to J/psi K0_S decays at Dzero  

SciTech Connect

This thesis describes a measurement of the B{sub d}{sup 0} lifetime in the decay to (J/{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}), using 114 pb{sup -1} of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Tevatron from October 15, 2002, to June 10, 2003. The measurement is motivated by the tests of the Standard Model that it makes possible. These include tests of Heavy Quark Effective Theory predicting B-meson lifetimes, and of the complex phase in the CKM-matrix as the source of CP-violation in B{sub d}{sup 0} decays to (J/{psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}).

Balm, Paul W.; /Amsterdam U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Unitized Design for Home Refueling Appliance for Hydrogen Generation to 5,000 psi - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Timothy Norman (Primary Contact), Monjid Hamdan Giner, Inc. (formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC) 89 Rumford Avenue Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0556 Email: tnorman@ginerinc.com DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0001486 Project Start Date: August 15, 2010 Project End Date: August 14, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Detail design and demonstrate subsystems for a unitized * electrolyzer system for residential refueling at 5,000 psi to meet DOE targets for a home refueling appliance (HRA) Fabricate and demonstrate unitized 5,000 psi system * Identify and team with commercialization partner(s) * Technical Barriers

183

Process for removal of polynuclear aromatics from a hydrocarbon in an endothermic reformer reaction system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process is described for reforming a hydrocarbon in a multi-stage endothermic reforming series of catalytic reforming reactors where the hydrocarbon is passed through the series of catalytic reforming reactors to form a reformate. The hydrocarbon is heated prior to entry to the next catalytic reforming reactor in the series, which process comprises contact of the hydrocarbon intermediate from the series of catalytic reforming reactors containing reforming catalyst with a polynuclear aromatic adsorbent to adsorb at least a portion of the polynuclear aromatic content from the hydrocarbon prior to entry to each of the next catalytic reforming reactor in the series and recovering a reformate from the last catalytic reforming reactor in the series, the recovered reformate having a reduced content of polynuclear aromatics.

Ngan, D.Y.

1989-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

184

Branching Ratio Measurements of B ---> J/psi eta K and B+- ---> D0 K+- with D0 ---> pi+ pi- pi0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented for the decays of B {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K and B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}}, respectively, with experimental data collected with BABAR detector at PEP-II, located at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). With 90 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, we obtained branching fractions of {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}) = [10.8 {+-} 2.3(stat) {+-} 2.4(syst)] x 10{sup -5} and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sub S}{sup 0}) = [8.4 {+-} 2.6(stat) {+-} 2.7(syst)] x 10{sup -5}; and we set an upper limit of {Beta}[B{sup {+-}} {yields} X(3872)K{sup {+-}} {yields} J/{psi}{eta}K{sup {+-}}] < 7.7 x 10{sup -6} at 90% confidence level. The branching fraction of decay chain {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} DK{sup {+-}} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}K{sup {+-}}) = [5.5 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 0.7(syst)] x 10{sup -6} with 229 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} events at {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, here D represents the neutral D meson. The decay rate asymmetry is A = 0.02 {+-} 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) for this full decay chain. This decay can be used to extract the unitarity angle {gamma}, a weak CP violation phase, through the interference of decay production of D{sup 0} and {bar D}{sup 0} to {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0}.

Zeng, Qinglin; /Colorado State U.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

185

Biodegradation of volatile aromatic hydrocarbons by native soil and groundwater microorganisms: Microcosm studies  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was twofold: to develop and test strategies for enhancing the microbial degradation of hydrocarbon contaminants in subsurface soil and groundwater, and to understand why and under what conditions these strategies can be successful. The work deals primarily with what are generally considered the highest priority contaminants, from a toxicological point of view, in a typical hydrocarbon remediation site -- the aromatic fraction, including benzene and related compounds. The work involved the determination of the relative degradation rates of aromatic, as well as several nonaromatic constituents, in conjunction with an analysis of the effect of oxygen concentration and with an extensive microbiological characterization.

Rai, D.N.; Dasch, J.M.; Gibson, T.L.; Ang, C.C.; Abdul, A.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F]fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substituent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is carried out by nucleophilic aromatic substitution with a no-carrier-added (NCA) [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion. The method can be used to synthesize various no-carrier-added aryl [{sup 18}F]fluoride compositions, including 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA, 2-[{sup 18}F]fluorotyrosine, 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, and 6-[{sup 18}F]fluorodopamine. In those instances when a racemic mixture of enantiomers is produced by the present invention, such as in the synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, a preferred method also includes resolution of the racemic mixture on a chiral HPLC column. This procedure results in a high yield of enantiomerically pure [{sup 18}F] labeled isomers, for example [-]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine and [+]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine.

Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

2012 CERTS R&M Peer Review - Summary: Dynamic Energy and Environmental Dispatch of Power Systems - Max Zhang  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dispatch of Power Systems Dispatch of Power Systems Project Lead: Max Zhang, Dick Schuler 1. Project objective This project will develop a framework that allows power system operators to co-optimize power flows and environmental flows (air pollution transport). This framework has the potential to provide a cost-effective way for the power sector to meet the increasingly stringent environmental regulations and systems reliability. 2. Major technical accomplishments that will be completed this year We have developed a new mechanism to analyzer Continuous Emission Measurement (CEM) data of electric generation units (EGUs). We have came up with a methodology evaluating the effects of dynamic pricing on load profiles. We will soon finish evaluating the effects of dynamic pricing on reducing EGU emissions during high energy demand

188

Manual of BlackMax, a black-hole event generator with rotation, recoil, split branes, and brane tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is the users manual of the black-hole event generator BlackMax, which simulates the experimental signatures of microscopic and Planckian black-hole production and evolution at proton-proton, proton-antiproton and electron-positron colliders in the context of brane world models with low-scale quantum gravity. The generator is based on phenomenologically realistic models free of serious problems that plague low-scale gravity. It includes all of the black-hole gray-body factors known to date and incorporates the effects of black-hole rotation, splitting between the fermions, non-zero brane tension and black-hole recoil due to Hawking radiation (although not all simultaneously).

De-Chang Dai; Cigdem Issever; Eram Rizvi; Glenn Starkman; Dejan Stojkovic; Jeff Tseng

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

189

Photocatabolism of aromatic compounds by the phototrophic purple bacterium Rhodomicrobium vannielii  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phototrophic purple non-sulfur bacterium Thodomicrobium vannielii grew phototrophically (illuminated anaerobic conditions) on a variety of aromatic compounds (in the presence of CO{sub 2}). Benzoate was universally photocatabolized by all five strains of R. vannielii examined, and benzyl alcohol was photocatabolized by four of the five strains. Catabolism of benzyl alcohol by phototrophic bacteria has not been previously reported. Other aromatic substrates supporting reasonably good growth of R. vannielii strains were the methozylated benzoate derivatives vanillate (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzoate) and syringate (4-hydroxy-3,5-dimethoxybenzoate). However, catabolism of vanillate and syringate led to significant inhibition of bacteriochlorophyll synthesis in R. vannielii cells, eventually causing cultures to cease growing. No such effect on photopigment synthesis in cells grown on benzoate or benzyl alcohol was observed. Along with a handful of other species of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria, the ability of the species R. vannielii to photocatabolize aromatic compounds indicates that this organism may also be ecologically significant as a consumer of aromatic derivatives in illuminated anaerobic habitats in nature.

Wright, G.E.; Madigan, M.T. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce volume, remove pathogens, and to gain energy. Anaerobic digestion is by far the most commonRemoval of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sewage sludge by anaerobic degradation N treatment in a wastewater treatment plant. They therefore proceed directly to the anaerobic post treatment

191

Examination of the Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) in Urban Background Soil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between 2000 and 2005, EPRI collected several hundred soil samples from urban background locations in three States and analyzed them for 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs). This report presents the initial results of efforts to extract additional chemical data from the urban background PAH database and to explore those data using chemical forensic methods for statistical properties and trends.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

DOI: 10.1002/chem.200((......)) Deprotonative Metalation of Functionalized Aromatics using Mixed Lithium-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using Mixed Lithium- Cadmium, Lithium-Indium, and Lithium-Zinc Species Katia Snégaroff,[a] Jean similarly dideprotonated at room temperature. The aromatic lithium cadmates thus obtained were involved · cadmium · lithium · cross-coupling · ab initio calculations Introduction Lithium bases

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

193

Aromatic hydrocarbon metabolism by Rhodococcus sp. I24 : computational, biochemical and transcriptional analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rhodococcus sp. 124 is a Gram-positive soil bacterium being developed for the manufacture of (-)cis-(1S,2R)-1-aminoindan-2-ol, a key precursor in the production of the HIV-1 protease inhibitor CrixivanTM, from the aromatic ...

Parker, Jefferson A. (Jefferson Alexander), 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Numerical Simulation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Formation in n-Heptane HCCI Combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By modifying the SENKIN code of CHEMKIN chemical kinetics package, the combustion processes and the characteristics of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide(CO) emissions of a HCCI engine were simulated. Furthermore, the formation of benzene (A1) and ... Keywords: n-neptane, HCCI, multi-zone model, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

Zeng Wen; Ma Hong-an

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Brief Min-max predictive control techniques for a linear state-space system with a bounded set of input matrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Min-max predictive control of a linear state-space system with a bounded set of input matrices is studied based on a quadratic performance criterion. Systems with stable and integrating dynamics as well as time-varying and time-invariant uncertainties ... Keywords: Constraint satisfaction, Minimax techniques, Predictive control, Robust control

Jay H. Lee; Brian L. Cooley

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Measurement of the J/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s(NN)**(1/2) = 1960-GeV  

SciTech Connect

We present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. We find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 4.08 {+-} 0.02(stat){sub -0.33}{sup +0.36}(syst) {mu}b. We separate the fraction of J/{psi} events from the decay of the long-lived b-hadrons using the lifetime distribution in all events with p{sub T} (J/{psi}) > 1.25 GeV/c. We find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, we extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. We find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U. /Duke U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Helsinki U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /SungKyunKwan U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Measurement of the bottom quark cross section in [bar p]-p collisions using the exclusive decay B[sup 0] [yields] J/[psi]K[sup 0]*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A measurement of the b quark cross section in pp collisions is presented for b quarks with PT above 11.5 GeV/c and rapidity [parallel]y[parallel] < 1.0. The measurement is based on reconstruction of the exclusive decay B[sup o] [yields] J/[psi] K[sup o] in data taken with the CDF detector in the 1988-1989 Collider run. The measurement is compared to other CDF preliminary results and to theoretical predictions.

Vejcik, S. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

An Analysis of Simultaneous Online GC Measurements of BTEX Aromatics at Three Selected Sites in the Greater Munich Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During two field campaigns in 1993 and 1994, measurements of aromatic compounds [benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-/p-/o-xylenes (BTEX)] were carried out at urban and rural sites in the greater Munich area. These field campaigns represent a ...

B. Rappenglck; P. Fabian

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames. Progress report for year beginning 15 August 1988  

SciTech Connect

Work during this contract period has been concerned with the mechanisms through which aromatics are formed and destroyed in flames, and the processes responsible for soot formation. Recent progress has been primarily in two areas: experiments and modeling of the soot nucleation process in low pressure benzene flames and preparation for experiments on the destruction mechanisms of benzene. In addition, we have incorporated ``weak collision`` formalisms into a fall-off computer code.

Howard, J.B.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

200

Study of the {ital P }-Wave Charmonium State {ital {chi}}{sub {ital cJ}} in {ital {psi}}(2{ital S}) Decays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The processes {psi}(2S){r_arrow}{gamma}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} , {gamma}K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} , and {gamma}p{ovr p} have been studied using a sample of 3.79{times}10{sup 6} {psi}(2S) decays. We determine the total width of the {chi}{sub c0} to be {Gamma}{sup tot}{sub {chi}{sub c0}} =14.3{plus_minus}2.0{plus_minus}3.0 MeV . We present the first measurement of the branching fraction B({chi}{sub c0}{r_arrow}p{ovr p})=( 15.9{plus_minus}4.3{plus_minus}5.3){times}10{sup {minus}5} , where the first error is statistical and the second one is systematic. Branching fractions of {chi}{sub c0,2}{r_arrow}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} and K{sup +}K{sup {minus}} are also reported. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society }

Bai, J.Z.; Bian, J.G.; Chai, Z.W.; Chen, G.P.; Chen, J.C.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Y.B.; Chen, Y.Q.; Cheng, B.S.; Cui, X.Z.; Ding, H.L.; Ding, L.Y.; Dong, L.Y.; Du, Z.Z.; Feng, S.; Gao, C.S.; Gao, M.L.; Gao, S.Q.; Gu, J.H.; Gu, S.D.; Gu, W.X.; Gu, Y.F.; Guo, Y.N.; Han, S.W.; Han, Y.; He, J.; He, J.T.; Hu, G.Y.; Hu, H.M.; Hu, J.L.; Hu, Q.H.; Hu, T.; Hu, X.Q.; Huang, J.D.; Huang, Y.Z.; Jiang, C.H.; Jin, Y.; Ke, Z.J.; Lai, Y.F.; Lang, P.F.; Li, C.G.; Li, D.; Li, H.B.; Li, J.; Li, P.Q.; Li, R.B.; Li, W.; Li, W.D.; Li, W.G.; Li, X.H.; Li, X.N.; Liu, H.M.; Liu, J.; Liu, J.H.; Liu, R.G.; Liu, Y.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.G.; Lu, J.Y.; Lu, L.C.; Luo, C.H.; Ma, A.M.; Ma, E.C.; Ma, J.M.; Mao, H.S.; Mao, Z.P.; Meng, X.C.; Nie, J.; Qi, N.D.; Qi, X.R.; Qiu, J.F.; Qu, Y.H.; Que, Y.K.; Rong, G.; Shao, Y.Y.; Shen, B.W.; Shen, D.L.; Shen, H.; Shen, X.Y.; Sheng, H.Y.; Shi, H.Z.; Song, X.F.; Sun, F.; Sun, H.S.; Tang, S.Q.; Tong, G.L.; Wang, F.; Wang, L.S.; Wang, L.Z.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.; Wang, P.; Wang, P.L.; Wang, S.M.; Wang, T.J.; Wang, Y.Y.; Wei, C.L.; Wu, Y.G.; Xi, D.M.; Xia, X.M.; Xie, P.P.; Xie, Y.; Xie, Y.H.; Xiong, W.J.; Xu, C.C.; Xu, G.F.; Xue, S.T.; Yan, J.; Yan, W.G.; Yang, C.M.; Yang, C.Y.; Yang, J.; Yang, X.F.; Ye, M.H.; Yi, K.; Yu, C.S.; Yu, C.X.; Yu, Z.Q.; Yu, Z.T.; Yuan, C.Z.; Yuan, Y.; Zhang, B.Y.; Zhang, C.C.; Zhang, D.H.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, H.L.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.L.; Zhang, J.W.; Zhang, L.S.; Zhang, Q.J.; Zhang, S.Q.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Y.Y.; Zhao, D.X.; Zhao, H.W.; Zhao, J.W.; Zhao, M.; Zhao, W.R.; Zhao, Z.G.; Zheng, J.P.; Zheng, L.S.; Zheng, Z.P.; Zhou, G.P.; Zhou, H.S.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, Q.M.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zhu, Y.S.; Zhuang, B.A. [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing 100039, People`s Republic of (China); Hitlin, D.G.; Kelsey, M.H.; Oyang, J.; Panetta, J.; Porter, F.; Weaver, M. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)] [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Chen, J.; Malchow, R.; Toki, W.; Yang, W. [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)] [Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States)

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The golden modes B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} in the era of precision flavor physics  

SciTech Connect

CP violation is a major challenge of contemporary particle physics. It has been discovered in kaon decays and appears also in B decays, where the B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub S,L} channels are considered to be clean probes of this phenomenon. Recent B-factory data challenge the description of CP violation in the standard model of particle physics, showing some 'tension' with theoretical predictions. We take a detailed look at certain standard-model contributions, which are usually neglected, and point out that they can be included unambiguously through measurements of the B{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{pi}{sup 0} observables. Using the most recent data, we show that the tension with the standard model is softened, and we constrain a possible new-physics phase in B{sup 0}-B{sup 0} mixing. Our strategy is crucial to fully exploit the accuracy of the search for this kind of new physics at the LHC and future super-flavor factories.

Faller, Sven; Mannel, Thomas [Theory Division, Department of Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Theoretische Physik 1, Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Jung, Martin [Theoretische Physik 1, Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen, D-57068 Siegen (Germany); Fleischer, Robert [Theory Division, Department of Physics, CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Ambiguity-Free Measurement of cos2beta: Time-Intergrated and Time-Dependent Angular Analyses of B to J/psi K pi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present results on B {yields} J/{psi} K{pi} decays using e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation data collected with the BABAR detector at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. The detector is located at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage ring facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Using approximately 88 million B{bar B} pairs, we measure the decay amplitudes for the flavor eigenmodes and observe strong-phase differences indicative of final-state interactions with a significance of 7.6 standard deviations. We use the interference between the K{pi} S-wave and P-wave amplitudes in the region of the K*(892) to resolve the ambiguity in the determination of these strong phases. We then perform an ambiguity-free measurement of cos 2{beta} using the angular and time-dependent asymmetry in B {yields} J/{psi} K*{sup 0} (K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) decays. With sin2{beta} fixed at its measured value and cos2{beta} treated as an independent parameter, we find cos 2{beta} = 2.72{sub -0.79}{sup +0.50}(stat) {+-} 0.27(syst), determining the sign of cos 2{beta} to be positive at 86% CL.

Aubert, B.

2004-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cross-layer modeling of capacity in wireless networks: Application to UMTS/HSDPA, IEEE802.11 WLAN and IEEE802.16 WiMAX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate in this work the cross-layer modeling of the capacity of wireless systems in the presence of two types of flows: streaming and elastic, under a dynamic configuration wherein users join the system and leave it after a finite duration. For ... Keywords: Capacity, Cross-layer design, Flow level, IEEE802.11 WLAN, IEEE802.16 WiMAX, Integrated services, MAC scheduling, UMTS/HSDPA

Mariana Dirani; Chadi Tarhini; Tijani Chahed

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

The effect of urinary cadmium on cardiovascular fitness as measured by VO{sub 2} max in white, black and Mexican Americans  

SciTech Connect

Objectives: We explored potential effects of cadmium exposure on cardiovascular fitness measures, including gender and racial/ethnic differences. Methods: Data were from the 1999 to 2000 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES); 1963 participating subjects were included in our analysis. Volume of oxygen consumed at sub-maximum activity (VO{sub 2} max) were recorded in a series of graded exercises; the goal was to elicit 75% of predetermined age-specific heart rates. Cadmium from urine samples was measured in the laboratory using standard methods. Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed to determine potential relationships. Results: Increased urinary cadmium concentrations were generally associated with decreased estimated VO{sub 2} max values. Gender and racial/ethnic differences were also observed. Specifically, associations were statistically significant for white males and Mexican American females. Conclusion: Inverse associations between urinary cadmium concentrations and estimated VO{sub 2} max values were observed, including racial and gender differences. The implications of such gender and racial/ethnic differences on long-term cardiovascular health and health disparities of present public health concern warrant further investigation.

Egwuogu, Heartley [Institute of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Shendell, Derek G. [Institute of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)-School of Public Health (and EOHSI), 683 Hoes Lane West, 3rd Floor, P.O. Box 9, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)], E-mail: shendedg@umdnj.edu; Okosun, Ike S. [Institute of Public Health, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Goodfellow, Lynda [School of Health Professions, College of Health and Human Sciences, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

MAX Phase Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 26, 2009... 50 W/m K with the phonon contribution of Ti3Al(C0.5,N0.5)2 particularly large ... forming a herring-bone like structure, and others in which they were all in ... Andrew R. McGhie2; Chaoying Ni3; Magnus Odn4; Sven Vogel5;...

206

Allocating the Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) in Surficial Sediments from the Washington, DC Region with Particular Emphasis on Coal Tar Sealcoat .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed that potentially influenced contamination levels in sediments from the Anacostia River in Washington, DC and surrounding (more)

Nadrchal, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1982-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

1999-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Measurement of the J/psi meson and b-hadron production cross sections in p anti-p collisions at s(NN)**(1/2) = 1960-GeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new measurement of the inclusive and differential production cross sections of J/{psi} mesons and b-hadrons in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 39.7 pb{sup -1} collected by the CDF Run II detector. We find the integrated cross section for inclusive J/{psi} production for all transverse momenta from 0 to 20 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y| 1.25 GeV/c. We find the total cross section for b-hadrons, including both hadrons and anti-hadrons, decaying to J/{psi} with transverse momenta greater than 1.25 GeV/c in the rapidity range |y(J/{psi})| < 0.6, is 0.330 {+-} 0.005(stat){sub -0.033}{sup +0.036}(syst) {mu}b. Using a Monte Carlo simulation of the decay kinematics of b-hadrons to all final states containing a J/{psi}, we extract the first measurement of the total single b-hadron cross section down to zero transverse momentum at {radical}s = 1960 GeV. We find the total single b-hadron cross section integrated over all transverse momenta for b-hadrons in the rapidity range |y| < 0.6 to be 17.6 {+-} 0.4(stat){sub -2.3}{sup +2.5}(syst) {mu}b.

Acosta, D.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, T.; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, M.G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, K.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Aoki, M.; Apollinari, G.; Arisawa, T.; Arguin, J.-F.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Azfar, F.; Azzi-Bacchetta, P.; /Barcelona, Autonoma U. /Bologna U. /Brandeis U. /UC, Davis /UCLA /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /Cantabria U., Santander /Carnegie Mellon U. /Chicago U. /Duke U. /Florida U. /Geneva U. /Glasgow U. /Harvard U. /Helsinki U. /Hiroshima U. /Illinois U., Urbana /Johns Hopkins U. /Karlsruhe U. /SungKyunKwan U.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Application of p-toluidine in chromogenic detection of catechol and protocatechuate, diphenolic intermediates in catabolism of aromatic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the presence of p-toluidine and iron, protocatechuate and catechols yield color. Inclusion of p-toluidine in media facilities the screening of microbial strains for alterations affecting aromatic catabolism. Such strains include mutants affected in the expression of oxygenases and Escherichia coli colonies carrying cloned or subcloned aromatic catabolic genes which encode enzymes giving rise to protocatechuate or catechol. The diphenolic detection system can also be applied to the creation of vectors relying on insertion of cloned DNA into one of the latter marker genes.

Parke, D. (Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, October 1984-March 1986  

SciTech Connect

Iron containing minerals and chars were screened as cracking catalysts for aromatic hydrocarbons (AHC) in simulated gasifier effluents. Catalytic activities of six minerals and two chars were measured and used to infer fundamental hetereogeneous rate constants using measured properties of the pore structure of the solids. Measurements were made for 200 ppM and 2000 ppM benzene cracking over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The active catalyst under gasifier conditions was found to be FeO. The minerals have a higher reactivity per unit mass in chars than in a pure form. H/sub 2/S was found to reduce the catalytic activity to one third of the unpoisoned value, but the catalysts maintained this reduced activity. These minerals have the potential to be economically feasible, disposable catalysts in a fixed bed or fluidized bed process if they can survive for ten hours. 8 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.O.; Moniz, G.A.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries  

SciTech Connect

A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti [Technical University of Bari, Bari (Italy). Department of Environmental Engineering and Sustainable Development

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Assessment of dosimetry requirements and techniques for measuring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. [13 refs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A prediction by ERDA is that, within a decade, 10/sup 6/ barrels/day of synthetic fuel will come from liquefaction of coal. The coproduction of highly carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) will necessitate much better dosimetry and means of personnel protection than exist today. Traditional techniques for measuring PAH are gas chromatography with mass spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Several newly developed, or developing techniques, may also lend themselves to PAH dosimetry. These include low-temperature Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, time-resolved fluorescence, room-temperature phosphorescence, portable mass spectrometry, and second derivative spectrometry. Special emphasis is given to potential use of the second derivative spectrometer for dosimetry purposes. Some of the advantages and limitations of these techniques for characterizing and measuring PAH under various conditions (vapor, liquid, solid, or aerosol) are discussed.

Hawthorne, A R; Gammage, R B; Simpkin, D J

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Aromatic hydrocarbons associated with brines from geopressured wells. Annual report, fiscal 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Samples of cryocondensates - materials condensed at - 78.5/sup 0/C were taken on a regular basis from the gas stream for the USDOE geopressured wells. Most of the data has been taken from the Gladys McCall well as it has flowed on a regular and almost continous basis. The cryocondensates, not the ''condensate'' from gas wells, are almost exclusively aromatic hydrocarbons, primarily benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes, but contain over 95 compounds, characterized using gas chromatographic-mass spectroscopy. The solubility in water and brine of benezene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene, some of the components of the cryocondensate, as well as distribution coefficients between water or brine and a standard oil have been measured. 25 refs.

Keeley, D.F.; Meriwether, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The aromatic infrared bands as seen by ISO-SWS: probing the PAH model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the Aromatic Infrared Band (AIB) profiles observed by ISO-SWS towards a number of bright interstellar regions where dense molecular gas is illuminated by stellar radiation. Our sample spans a broad range of excitation conditions (exciting radiation fields with effective temperature, Teff, ranging from 23,000 to 45,000 K). The SWS spectra are decomposed coherently in our sample into Lorentz profiles and a broadband continuum. We find that the individual profiles of the main AIBs at 3.3, 6.2, 8.6 and 11.3 microns are well represented with at most two lorentzians. Furthermore, we show that the positions and widths of these AIBs are remarkably stable (within a few cm-1). We then extract the profiles of individual AIBs from the data and compare them to a model of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon (PAH) cation emission which includes the temperature dependence of the AIB profiles. The present similarity of the AIB profiles requires that the PAH temperature distribution remains roughly the same whatever the radiation field hardness. Deriving the temperature distribution of interstellar PAHs, we show that its hot tail, which controls the AIB spectrum, sensitively depends on Nmin (the number of C-atoms in the smallest PAH) and Teff. Comparing the observed profiles of the individual AIBs to our model results, we can match most of the AIB profiles if Nmin is increased with Teff. We then discuss our results in the broader context of ISO observations of fainter interstellar regions where PAHs are expected to be in neutral form.

L. Verstraete; C. Pech; Claire Moutou; K. Sellgren; C. M. Wright; M. Giard; A. Leger; R. Timmermann; S. Drapatz

2001-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

216

Measurement of the $\\Lambda_b^0$ lifetime in the exclusive decay $\\Lambda_b^0 \\to J/\\psi \\Lambda^0$ in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We measure the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} lifetime in the fully reconstructed decay {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda}{sup 0} using 10.4 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions collected with the D0 detector at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The lifetime of the topologically similar decay channel B{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} K{sub S}{sup 0} is also measured. We obtain {tau} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) = 1.303 {+-} 0.075 (stat.) {+-} 0.035 (syst.) ps and {tau} (B{sup 0}) = 1.508 {+-} 0.025 (stat.) {+-} 0.043 (syst.) ps. Using these measurements, we determine the lifetime ratio of {tau} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})/{tau} (B{sup 0}) = 0.864 {+-} 0.052 (stat.) {+-} 0.033 (syst.).

Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /ABC Federal U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Characterization of GaN nanowires grown on PSi, PZnO and PGaN on Si (111) substrates by thermal evaporation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this research, we used an easy and inexpensive method to synthesize highly crystalline GaN nanowires (NWs); on different substrates such as porous silicon (PSi), porous zinc oxide (PZnO) and porous gallium nitride (PGaN) on Si (111) wafer by thermal evaporation using commercial GaN powder without any catalyst. Micro structural studies by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope measurements reveal the role of different substrates in the morphology, nucleation and alignment of the GaN nanowires. The degree of alignment of the synthesized nanowires does not depend on the lattice mismatch between wires and their substrates. Further structural and optical characterizations were performed using high resolution X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results indicate that the nanowires are of single-crystal hexagonal GaN. The quality and density of grown GaN nanowires for different substrates are highly dependent on the lattice mismatch between the nanowires and their substrates and also on the size of the porosity of the substrates. Nanowires grown on PGaN have the best quality and highest density as compared to nanowires on other substrates. By using three kinds of porous substrates, we are able to study the increase in the alignment and density of the nanowires.

Shekari, Leila; Hassan, Haslan Abu; Thahab, Sabah M.; Hassan, Zainuriah [Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia); Materials Engineering Department, College of Engineering, University of Kufa, Najaf (Iraq); Nano-Optoelectronics Research and Technology Laboratory School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 USM, Penang (Malaysia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

218

Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water  

SciTech Connect

Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts per million (ppm). The possible factors contributing to the differences in LLD for these analytes are discussed. This is the final report for a Sandia National Laboratories Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project conducted during fiscal years 1998 and 1999 (case number 3518.190).

KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Attenuation of dilute aromatic hydrocarbon transport by a block copolymer in a compacted vertisol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Municipal solid waste landfills in the United States are built with a composite bottom liner consisting of a flexible membrane liner of high-density polyethylene overlying a compacted soil liner. Hydrocarbons have been shown to pass through the flexible membrane liner by diffusion. Flexible membrane liners often have flaws allowing direct contact between the leachate and the compacted soil liner. The transmission of hydrocarbons to the compacted soil liner presents a threat to groundwater supplies. The study was performed to determine if the modification of a compacted soil liner with a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer could successfully sequester benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes and meet the United States Environmental Protection Agency's saturated hydraulic conductivity requirement of 1x10?? cm sec?. Compacted Ships clay modified with 0, 1, 3, 5, and 10% weight of a thermoplastic elastomer block copolymer was tested for saturated hydraulic conductivity using 10.2 cm fixed wall permeameters. The compacted Ships clay met the United States Environmental Protection Agency's mandated saturated hydraulic conductivity of 10?? cm sec? at polymer contents of 3% (wt) polymer or less. The presence of dissolved aromatic hydrocarbons had no effect on the saturated hydraulic conductivity. The ability of the polymer to attenuate the transport of dilute aromatic hydrocarbons was tested by permeating the compacted soil/polymer treatments with a 0.01N CaSO4 solution contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes. Leachate from permeameters packed with soil containing more than 1% (wt) polymer had BTEX concentrations below the drinking water standard for 3 or more pore volumes. The findings of this research were applied to a hypothetical compacted soil liner constructed with Ships clay modified to include 3% (wt) polymer and having a saturated hydraulic conductivity of 4.23 x 10?? cm sec?. It was assumed that the soil liner was in direct contact with landfill leachate. The hypothetical liner would protect the groundwater from contamination above the maximum contamination limit for drinking water by benzene for 350 years, toluene for 140 years, and ethylbenzene for 260 years.

Akin, James Browning

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements made by PTR-MS, DOAS and GC-FID during the MCMA 2003 Field Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison of aromatic hydrocarbon measurements is reported for the CENICA supersite in the district of Iztapalapa during the Mexico City Metropolitan Area field experiment in April 2003 (MCMA 2003). Data from three ...

Jobson, B. T.

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221

Chemisorption of Aromatic Compounds on Well-Defined Palladium Surfaces: Studies by Electron Spectroscopy and Electrochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemisorption of aromatic compounds, derivatized with different functional groups, on well-defined Pd(111) surfaces was studied by a combination of Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), low energy electron diffraction (LEED), high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS), and electrochemistry (EC). The results of this work led to the following trends and conclusions: (a) At low concentrations, 2,5-dihydroxythiophenol (DHT) chemisorbs on a Pd surface through both diphenolic ring and thiol group. At high concentrations, it chemisorbs only through the thiol group. (b) There is extensive intermolecular attraction between the co-adsorbed thiolated quinone and thiolated hydroquinone molecules. The interaction occurs through the Pd substrate and not through space. (c) The chemisorption properties of Nheteroaromatic compounds are pH-dependent. When the nitrogen heteroatom is protonated, it becomes very weakly surface-active. When the nitrogen heteroatom is deprotonated, surface activity stronger than the diphenolic ring is exhibited. (d) On a palladium surface, the binding strengths of ligands increase in the order: phenyl ring < quinonoid ring, < N-heteroatom < I < -SH.

Li, Ding

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Synergy between Secondary Organic Aerosols and Long Range Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) known for their harmful health effects undergo long-range transport (LRT) when adsorbed on and/or absorbed in atmospheric particles. The association between atmospheric particles, PAHs, and their LRT has been the subject of many studies, yet remains poorly understood. Current models assume PAHs instantaneously attain reversible gas-particle equilibrium. In this paradigm, during LRT, as gas-phase PAHs concentrations are depleted due to oxidation and dilution, particle-bound PAHs rapidly evaporate to re-establish equilibrium, leading to severe underpredictions of LRT potential of particle-bound PAHs. Here we present a new, experimentally based picture, in which the PAHs become trapped inside highly viscous quasi-solid secondary organic aerosol (SOA) particles during particle formation, and thus prevented from evaporation, and shielded from oxidation. In contrast, surface-adsorbed PAHs rapidly evaporate, leaving no trace behind. We find synergetic effects between PAHs and SOA, in that the presence of PAHs inside SOA particles drastically slows SOA evaporation to the point that it can be ignored, and the highly viscous SOA prevents PAHs evaporation assuring efficient LRT. The data show that the assumptions of instantaneous reversible gas-particle equilibrium for PAHs and for SOA are fundamentally flawed, providing explanation for the persistent discrepancy between observed and predicted particle-bound PAHs.

Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Beranek, Josef; Abramson, Evan H.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

223

LABORATORY INVESTIGATIONS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FORMATION AND DESTRUCTION IN THE CIRCUMSTELLAR OUTFLOWS OF CARBON STARS  

SciTech Connect

The formation and destruction mechanisms of interstellar dust analogs formed from a variety of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and hydrocarbon molecular precursors are studied in the laboratory. We used the newly developed facility COSmIC, which simulates interstellar and circumstellar environments, to investigate both PAHs and species that include the cosmically abundant atoms O, N, and S. The species generated in a discharge plasma are detected, monitored, and characterized in situ using highly sensitive techniques that provide both spectral and ion mass information. We report here the first series of measurements obtained in these experiments which focus on the characterization of the most efficient molecular precursors in the chemical pathways that eventually lead to the formation of carbonaceous grains in the stellar envelopes of carbon stars. We compare and discuss the relative efficiencies of the various molecular precursors that lead to the formation of the building blocks of carbon grains. We discuss the most probable molecular precursors in terms of size and structure and the implications for the expected growth and destruction processes of interstellar carbonaceous dust.

Contreras, Cesar S.; Salama, Farid, E-mail: cesar.contreras@nasa.gov, E-mail: Farid.Salama@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division, NASA-Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

A survey on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in soil in Chiang-Mai, Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 30 sampling sites along roadsides in the city of Chiang-Mai, Thailand, in February 1996, and concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. The distribution of PAH concentration in the soil samples was almost log-normal for all PAHs. Concentrations of pyrene (Py) and fluoranthene (Fluor) were the highest, followed by those of benzo[ghi]perylene and coronene (Cor). Since PAH concentrations were highest on the roadside where the traffic density was high, vehicles were the main determinants of PAH concentration in soil in Chiang-Mai. Significant correlations among PAH concentrations were found for almost all PAHs. PAH profiles in the air were different from those in the soil. For example, relative benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentration in the soil was significantly lower than that in the air. Relative concentrations of Fluor, Py, chrysene, and Cor in the soil were considerably higher than those in the air, due presumably to their difference in photochemical reactivities and in sources. The sampling of soil has advantages relative to that of air: (1) collection of soil is easy; (2) it needs no special equipment and electricity; (3) it takes little time; and (4) it can be collected anywhere. Therefore PAH analysis in soil was useful as a proxy-screening tool for air pollution levels with consideration of compositional differences between soil and air samples.

Amagai, Takashi; Takahashi, Yukari; Matsushita, Hidetsuru [Univ. of Shizuoka (Japan); Morknoy, D.; Sukasem, P.; Taucanon, M. [Technopolis, Pathumthani (Thailand). Environmental Research and Training Center

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Partition behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons between aged coal tar and water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal tar aged in a large-scale, artificial aquifer experiment for five years was subsequently investigated for leaching behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). After five years, the initially liquid coal tar had solidified and formed segregated particles with a grain size similar to that of the sandy aquifer material. The composition of the aged coal tar (ACT) with regard to PAHs was remarkably different from that of the original bulk coal tar (BCT), because most of the low-molecular-weight compounds had been depleted. Equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of 17 PAHs leaching from the aquifer material containing the ACT were measured from consecutive equilibration steps at increasing temperatures of between 25 and 100 {sup o}C using accelerated solvent extraction. The results showed 2-to 5,000-fold lower concentrations than those from BCT, indicating dramatic changes of dissolution behavior of PAHs from coal tar after the five-year aging period. Predictions based on Raoult's law with the subcooled liquid solubilities substantially overestimated the equilibrium aqueous-phase concentrations of the PAHs from ACT, whereas the estimations were reasonable if the solid solubilities were employed instead. The enthalpies of phase transfer from ACT to water were determined based on the van't Hoff equation. The resulting values agreed with the dissolution enthalpies of pure solid rather than subcooled liquid PAHs.

Liu, L.H.; Endo, S.; Eberhardt, C.; Grathwohl, P.; Schmidt, T.C. [University of Tubingen, Tubingen (Germany)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

SURFACE LAYER ACCRETION IN TRANSITIONAL AND CONVENTIONAL DISKS: FROM POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS TO PLANETS  

SciTech Connect

'Transitional' T Tauri disks have optically thin holes with radii {approx}>10 AU, yet accrete up to the median T Tauri rate. Multiple planets inside the hole can torque the gas to high radial speeds over large distances, reducing the local surface density while maintaining accretion. Thus multi-planet systems, together with reductions in disk opacity due to grain growth, can explain how holes can be simultaneously transparent and accreting. There remains the problem of how outer disk gas diffuses into the hole. Here it has been proposed that the magnetorotational instability (MRI) erodes disk surface layers ionized by stellar X-rays. In contrast to previous work, we find that the extent to which surface layers are MRI-active is limited not by ohmic dissipation but by ambipolar diffusion, the latter measured by Am: the number of times a neutral hydrogen molecule collides with ions in a dynamical time. Simulations by Hawley and Stone showed that Am {approx} 100 is necessary for ions to drive MRI turbulence in neutral gas. We calculate that in X-ray-irradiated surface layers, Am typically varies from {approx}10{sup -3} to 1, depending on the abundance of charge-adsorbing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, whose properties we infer from Spitzer observations. We conclude that ionization of H{sub 2} by X-rays and cosmic rays can sustain, at most, only weak MRI turbulence in surface layers 1-10 g cm{sup -2} thick, and that accretion rates in such layers are too small compared to observed accretion rates for the majority of disks.

Perez-Becker, Daniel [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chiang, Eugene, E-mail: perez-becker@berkeley.edu [Departments of Astronomy and Earth and Planetary Science, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

227

Molecular shape and the prediction of high-performance liquid chromatographic retention indexes of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

The effects of molecular shape on the retention behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) have been studied. It has been found that the retention on polymeric phases is highly shape dependent in contrast to the monomeric phases where retention is more dependent on the electronic properties of the solute. In addition, retention on the polymeric phases has been studied with respect to substitution and shape. The retention of substituted PAHs shows a strong dependence on shape, whereas the retention of unsubstituted PAHs is more dependent on electronic properties.

Rohrbaugh, R.H.; Jurs, P.C.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Bacterial mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reconstituted mixtures and crude coal tar extracts and fractions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) are one of the most ubiquitous carcinogens in the environment, little is known regarding their potential mutagenic interactions. Risk assessment of complex PAH mixtures utilizes toxic equivalency factors which assume additive interactions between individual PAHS. The mutagenic interactions of PAH mixtures were investigated using the Salmonellalmicrosome assay. Two groups of samples included PAH mixtures modeling a coal tar and an environmental crude coal tar extract and its fractions. The PAH mixtures were prepared in 2-, 3-, 4-ring and total reconstituted groups in the same percentages as a model coal tar. The environmental coal tar was extracted and separated into PAH fractions. Each sample was tested at 5 consecutive dose levels with and without metabolic activation in the Salmonella/microsome assay using tester strains TA98 and TAIOO. The reconstituted mixture elicited the maximum mutagenic response of 1,089 revertants at a dose of 1.8mg/mL. At the four lower dose levels (0.09mg/mL to 1.8mg/mL), the reconstituted induced a higher response than the 4-ring mixture. At the highest dose level (18mg/mL), the reconstituted showed a lower response that the 4-ring. These results suggest enhanced mutagenic responses at lower dose levels, with inhibition at higher doses. The mutagenicity of the PAH mixtures was evaluated in combinations as 2-:3-, 3-:4-, and 2-:4-ring mixtures. The 2-:4-ring, and 3-:4-ring combinations induced lower mutagenic responses than the 4-ring alone, suggesting inhibition by the 2-and 3-ring PAHS. Inhibition was also observed when benzo[a]pyrene was tested 935 net revertants, while the benzo[a]pyrene:reconstituted mixture induced 349 net revertants. The methylene chloride extract of a coal tar induced 385 net TA98 and 589 net TAIOO revertants with high metabolic activation (30%). Fractions from the coal tar extract and binary mixtures of individual chemicals with a reconstituted coal tar extract induced additive responses. These data indicate that mixtures of PAHs exhibit a variety of mutagenic interactions. The interactive responses appear controlled by concentration and metabolism of the PAHS. Research of this nature may aid in establishing a clearer understanding of risks and interactions which occur from exposure to PAHS.

Onufrock, Amy Mildred

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Spectroscopic investigation of fluorescence quenching agents. Part IV: Selectivity of nitromethane for discriminating between alternant versus nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in solvents of differing polarities  

SciTech Connect

To further assess the applicability of nitromethane as a selective quenching agent for alternant vs. nonalternant polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in HPLC analysis, the authors measured the effect that it has non the fluorescence emission behavior of 96 different polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons dissolved in a binary ethyl acetate/acetonitrile solvent mixture. Nitromethane quenching results are compared with previously reported acetonitrile, aqueous/acetonitrile, and toluene/acetonitrile solvent mixtures. Results of these measurements revealed that the {open_quotes}selective quenching{close_quotes} rule is obeyed for the vast majority of PAHs in all solvents considered thus far, with the coronene derivatives being the only major exceptions. 31 refs., 1 tab.

Tucker, S.A.; Bates, H.C.; Acree, W.E. Jr. [Univ. of North Texas, Denton, TX (United States); Fetzer, J.C. [Chevron Research and Technology Center, Richmond, CA (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Sunday, November 17, 2002.max  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Typical surge magnitude and duration as well as frequency of occurrence are ... in the paper also show how a unidirectional stimulation (8120 ps ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

232

Monday, November 25, 2002.max  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Thyrite Arrester Field Tests Aircraft Compasses Coal Handling Xodernization Rectifier Auxiliaries High-speed Oscillograph Timing ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Saturday, March 09, 2002.max  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the IEEE Power Engineering Society for ... at the time of substation capacitor bank ... in Bonneville Power Administration Substations," IEEE Trans. ...

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

234

MAX PLANCK SOCIETY Press Release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a large sample of galaxies can one explore the huge diversity of galaxy types, sizes and shapes, as well distant galaxies are moving away from us faster than nearby galaxies. Astronomers use the Doppler shift of the galaxies' light to measure this movement and compute the distance. And because the light from distant

235

Wednesday, March 06, 2002.max  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... There is good :-L..--. A,.-:I.-.C,l.-. n- I-.-.. rr rrrrnrrm-l;rrC, +C,;- -rn+rr.-.+;n- Dm-;- I;rrh+m;-m -rrr+nrr+;n- -rrr.-.+:rr- A".-. ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

236

MaxPlanckForschungMaxPlanckForschungDas Wissenschaftsmagazin der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft Einstein und  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solarthermische Kraftwerke dabei sogar doppelt soviel Energie bereitstellen. 5 Die Investition in Spanien 3 Die Investition in Spanien Auszeichnung der Andasol-Kraftwerke mit dem Energy Globe Award im. Solarfeldverrohrung Die Investition in Spanien #12;16 Die ersten Parabolrinnen-Kraftwerke Europas ­ die grössten

237

Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills  

SciTech Connect

The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Molecular and Thermal Diffusion Coefficients of Alkane-Alkane and Alkane-Aromatic Binary Mixtures: Effect of Shape and Size of Molecules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular and Thermal Diffusion Coefficients of Alkane-Alkane and Alkane-Aromatic Binary Mixtures Form: October 27, 2006 New molecular and thermal diffusion coefficients of binary mixtures of normal measured in a thermogravitational column. Molecular diffusion coefficients were measured using an open

Firoozabadi, Abbas

239

Influence of co-attached aromatics on the thermolysis of surface-immobilized 1,3-diphenylpropane  

SciTech Connect

The technique of model compound immobilization by covalent surface attachment is being employed to investigate the potential impact of restricted diffusional mobility on the thermal reactivity of coal. This restricted mobility may be imposed in coal as a consequence of its cross-linked, macromolecular structure. Thermolysis studies at 345--400{degree}C of model coal structures covalently attached to a silica surface have shown that significant perturbations in free-radical reaction mechanisms can occur, and result in altered reaction rates and product distributions compared with corresponding fluid phase behavior. In the current study, we are beginning to probe the influence of the structure of co-attached aromatic molecules such as biphenyl and diphenylmethane on the reaction rate and regioselectivity in the thermolysis of surface-attached 1,3-diphenylpropane. 6 refs., 1 tab.

Buchanan, A.C. III; Britt, P.F.; Biggs, C.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

High-pressure binary phase equilibria of aromatic hydrocarbons with CO/sub 2/ and C/sub 2/H/sub 6/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe high-pressure vapor-liquid equilibria of several binary systems containing aromatic hydrocarbons as one component and supercritical carbon dioxide or ethane as the other component measured by using a dynamic system in which both vapor and liquid phases were circulated. The aromatic hydrocarbons that were used in this study are anisole, benzaldehyde, tetralin, and 1-methylnaphthalene. The phase equilibria of binary systems containing carbon dioxide were measured at two different temperatures, 343 and 373 K, and pressures up to 22 MPa. For ethane binary systems, equilibrium measurements were made at 373 K and pressures up to 12 MPa. In addition to measuring temperature, pressure, and phase compositions, the vapor- and liquid-phase densities also were determined for both carbon dioxide and ethane binary systems.

Kim, C.H.; Clark, A.B.; Vimalchand, P.; Donohue, M.D. (The Johns Hopkins Univ., Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Baltimore, MD (US))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Atmospheric deposition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in an urban and a suburban area of Korea from 2002 to 2004  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric bulk samples (wet and dry) were collected monthly during 2002 to 2004 from an urban and a suburban area in Korea for assessment of depositional flux and seasonal variations in the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). PAH depositional flux ranged from 64.1 to 610 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the urban area and from 65 to 460 {mu} g/m{sup 2}/y for the suburban area. The fluxes of PAHs measured in this study were comparable with those reported for urban and suburban areas in other countries. The fluxes of particulates and PAHs were higher in winter than in summer, consistent with the greater per capita consumption of fossil fuel in winter than in summer. Ambient temperature played a major role in the seasonal variability in PAH fluxes. Photochemical degradation of PAHs appears to occur during the summer months. The relationship of PAH depositional fluxes with major air pollutants, such as ozone, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, nitrogen dioxide, and presence of particulate matter up to 10 {mu} m in size (PM10), was also investigated. Dominant PAH compounds in both the urban and the suburban locations were benzo(g,h,i)perylene, pyrene, and indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene. Based on the PAH diagnostic ratios and a factor analysis, the major sources of PAHs in the urban and the suburban regions were found to be similar. Diesel exhaust, coal combustion, and gasoline emissions contributed predominantly to atmospheric PAH contamination.

Moon, H.B.; Kannan, K.; Lee, S.J.; Ok, G. [National Fisheries Research & Development Institute, Pusan (Republic of Korea)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

Probabilistic ecological risk assessment and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Yellow Sea  

SciTech Connect

Based on the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 12 surface sediment samples from Yellow Sea, the relative risk of 9 PAHs was investigated using joint risk probability distribution curves and overlapping area, which were generated based on the distributions of exposure and acute toxicity data (LC50), and the sources of PAHs were apportioned using principal component analysis. It was found that joint probability curve and overlapping area indicated the acceptable ecological risk of individual PAHs, only a small fraction of the benthic organisms was affected. Among the nine PAHs studied, the overall risk of pyrene was the highest, with that of naphthalene the lowest. For lower exposure levels at which the percentage of species affected was less than 10%, the risk associated with phenanthrene and fluorene were clearly higher than that of the other seven PAHs. It was indicated that PAHs in surface sediments mainly originated from vehicular emissions, coal combustion sources, coke oven emission and wood combustion, petroleum origin made little influence on sources of PAHs by PCA.

Liu, A.X.; Lang, Y.H.; Xue, L.D.; Liao, S.L.; Zhou, H. [Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China). College for Environmental Science & Engineering

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

Effectiveness of in site biodegradation for the remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at a contaminated oil refinery, Port Arthur, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effectiveness of bioremediation for the removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from sediments contaminated with highly weathered petroleum was evaluated at a contaminated oil refinery. The sediments were chronically contaminated with crude oil and Bunker C fuel oil for the past 20 years. Two treatments, Inipol EAP-22 (INIPOL) and basic nutrients with indigenous organisms (BNIO), were compared to a control (CONTROL) plot over an 11 week period. In site PAH biodegradation was quantified by plotting the time dependence of PAH to 17?,21?-hopane concentration ratios. 17?,21?-hopane, a nondegradable, C30 triterpane, was used as a natural internal standard. Sediment characterization was performed to determine the effect of geologic conditions on PAH biodegradation rates. Total Ion Chromatograms (TICs) of extracted oil showed high concentrations of an unresolved complex mixture that did not change over the 11 week period. The particle size of the sediments from the plots averaged 51% and 34% for clay and silt content, respectively. Sediment mineralogy was dominated by kaolinite and smectite. [PAH]/[Hopane] ratios indicate no significant PAH degradation in either the INIPOL, BNIO, or CONTROL plots over the 11 week period. This data indicates that bioremediation was unsuccessful at this site due to the extreme weathered state of the oil, the limited bioavailability of the PAH compounds, and the potential toxicity of the petroleum. The use of hopane as a natural internal standard was important in quantifying the effectiveness of bioremediation due to the high spatial variability in initial oil concentrations.

Moffit, Alfred Edward

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Biotransformations of carboxylated aromatic compounds by the acetogen Clostridium thermoaceticum: Generation of growth-supportive CO sub 2 equivalents under CO sub 2 -limited conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clostridium thermoaceticum ATCC 39073 converted vanillate to catechol. Although carboxylated aromatic compounds which did not contain methoxyl groups were not by themselves growth supportive, protocatechuate and p-hydroxybenzoate (nonmethoxylated aromatic compounds) were converted to catechol and phenol, respectively, during carbon monoxide-dependent growth. Syringate is not subject to decarboxylation by C. thermoaceticum, and sustained growth at the expense of syringate-derived methoxyl groups was dependent on supplemental CO{sub 2}. In contrast, vanillate was growth supportive in the absence of supplemental CO{sub 2}, and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} was the major {sup 14}C-labeled product during (carboxyl-{sup 14}C)vanillate-dependent growth. Furthermore, the decarboxylation of protocatechuate and p-hydroxybenzoate supported methanol- and 1,2,3-trimethoxybenzene-dependent growth (CO{sub 2} is required for growth at the expense of these substrates) when supplemental CO{sub 2} was depleted from the growth medium, and the decarboxylation of protocatechuate was concomitant with improved cell yields of methanol cultures. These findings demonstrate that (i) C. thermoaceticum is competent in the decarboxylation of certain aromatic compounds and (ii) under certain conditions, decarboxylation may be integrated to the flow of carbon and energy during acetogenesis.

Hus, T.; Daniel, S.L.; Lux, M.F.; Drake, H.L. (Univ. of Mississippi, University (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

The efficacy of oxidative coupling for promoting in-situ immobilization of hydroxylated aromatics in contaminated soil and sediment systems. 1998 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

'Hydroxylated aromatic compounds (HAC''s) and their precursors are common contaminants of surface and subsurface systems at DOE facilities. The environmental fate and transport of such compounds, particularly in subsurface systems, is generally dominated by their sorption and desorption by soils and sediments. Certain secondary chemical reactions, most specifically abiotic and/or enzymatic oxidative coupling, may be significant in controlling the sorption and subsequent desorption of such hydroxylated aromatics by soils and sediments. The principal objectives of this study are to investigate: (1) the role of abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions on the immobilization of HAC''s; (2) the effects of environmental factors on such immobilization; and (3) preliminary engineering approaches utilizing enhanced abiotic/enzymatic coupling reactions to immobilize hydroxylated aromatics in-situ. Information gathered from the study will be useful in quantifying the behavior of this class of organic compounds in various subsurface contamination scenarios relevant to DOE facilities, and in specifying strategies for the selection and design of remediation technologies. Over the first two years of this three-year project, the authors have developed a significantly improved understanding of the mechanisms of hydroxylated aromatic compound sorption and immobilization by natural soils and sediments. Immobilization in this context is attributed to oxidative coupling of the hydroxylated aromatics subsequent to their sorption to a soil or sediment, and is quantified in terms of the amount of a sorbed target compound retained by a sorbent after a series of sequential water and solvent extractions. The presence of oxygen, metal oxides, and organic matter, all of which can potentially catalyze/facilitate the abiotic oxidative coupling of HAC''s, were investigated during these first two years. Three different HAC''s: phenol, trichlorophenol and o-cresol were included in the experimental program. Inorganic soil matrices were represented by a glacial wash sand (Wurtsmith sand) having very low organic content. Because the chemical nature of soil organic matter may potentially affect the extent of coupling or immobilization, sorbents having different organic matter compositions are being investigated. Two of the three studied to date are near-surface soils, characterized by geologically younger organic material (Fox Forest soil and Fox Grassland soil). The third sorbent is an older and diagenetically altered soil (Lachine Shale). Sorbent preparation, characterization and experimental protocol development were completed in the first year of the study while the second year of the project has focused primarily on experiments with natural systems, as planned. Preliminary work with engineered systems has been initiated earlier than scheduled in order to integrate and relate all aspects of the study.'

Weber, W.J. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (US); Bhandari, A. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (US)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Aromatics - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

-No Data Reported; --= Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Notes: Hydrogen production ...

247

Advanced research in coal gasification process modification technology: catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Topical report, 1 October 1984-31 June 1985  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to screen inexpensive materials for potential use as disposable aromatic hydrocarbon (AHC) cracking catalysts in the reaction zone of the coal gasifier or in a fixed bed downstream from the gasifier. The approach is based on the conclusions reported in the literature that iron in a reduced state is an effective catalyst for AHC destruction. It therefore follows that chars or minerals with high iron content, high porosity, and high internal surface area will provide the most effective catalysts. We have screened all six of the following iron containing minerals: Siderite, Ankerite, Hematite, Magnetite, Pyrite, and Jarosite. The experimental tests measure the catalytic activity of these minerals for cracking benzene over the parameter range relevant to coal gasifier operation. Simulated coal gas containing 200 to 2000 ppM of model aromatic molecules will be used in all experiments and destruction of benzene will be measured over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The porosity and surface area of these minerals (partially decomposed in coal gas) will be determined and utilized in a computer model describing pore structure, species transport and surface chemistry to interpret the reactivity data in terms of the intrinsic reactivity of the reduced state of each mineral. These results will provide a basis for catalyst selection, coal selection and economic comparison. 3 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.A.; Moniz, G.A.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effect of B20 and Low Aromatic Diesel on Transit Bus NOx Emissions Over Driving Cycles with a Range of Kinetic Intensity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) emissions for transit buses for up to five different fuels and three standard transit duty cycles were compared to establish whether there is a real-world biodiesel NOx increase for transit bus duty cycles and engine calibrations. Six buses representing the majority of the current national transit fleet and including hybrid and selective catalyst reduction systems were tested on a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with certification diesel, certification B20 blend, low aromatic (California Air Resources Board) diesel, low aromatic B20 blend, and B100 fuels over the Manhattan, Orange County and UDDS test cycles. Engine emissions certification level had the dominant effect on NOx; kinetic intensity was the secondary driving factor. The biodiesel effect on NOx emissions was not statistically significant for most buses and duty cycles for blends with certification diesel, except for a 2008 model year bus. CARB fuel had many more instances of a statistically significant effect of reducing NOx. SCR systems proved effective at reducing NOx to near the detection limit on all duty cycles and fuels, including B100. While offering a fuel economy benefit, a hybrid system significantly increased NOx emissions over a same year bus with a conventional drivetrain and the same engine.

Lammert, M. P.; McCormick, R. L.; Sindler, P.; Williams, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Polymer Surface/Interface (PSI) Consortium Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2006), to be published in 2008; C. Clerici, X. Gu, L. Sung, P. Stutzman, AM Forster, T. Nguyen and JW Martin, Effect of Pigment Dispersion on ...

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

MaxPlanckResearchMaxPlanckResearchScience Magazine of the Max Planck Society Big Bang in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Plasma Research - Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India received 18 March 2011; accepted in final form 29 June

251

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Max-Planck-Institut fur Mathematik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and then another hour to Pamukale. But this splits the trip in half and I will go into Izmir in the morning in Istanbul; but her luggage didn't. She first 2 #12;deplaned at the international terminal in Izmir. Of course we had to sit in the small airport in Izmir for 2 ours. Then, I was unable to find the address

253

Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigated, except for the case where p = 2. More precisely, for p = 2, there are obtained rather esoteric

254

Max-Planck-Haus Spemannstr.36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gartenstadt Engelfriedshalde Wennfelder Garten Engelfriedshalde Omnibusbahnhof Winkelwiese Omnibusbahnhof

255

Max-Planck-Institut f ur Mathematik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the English literature (Fortescue, 1980), integrates studies of element abundance, element migration

256

MaxPower Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

research, development and production of lithium ion batteries. Coordinates 40.281201, -75.393534 Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP"...

257

Wir schaffen Wissen heute fr morgen May 4, 2011PSI, May 4, 2011PSI,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was deposited on the leak detector (which partly fell off when the target was moved). The sides of the LLMC wereA Power: 0.9 MW MEGAPIE target #12;MEGAPIE target features target head electro- magnetic pumps beam window with leak detector heat exchanger safety shroud lower target assembly central flow guide tube #12;MEGAPIE

McDonald, Kirk

258

Metabolic analysis of the soil microbe Dechloromonas aromatica str. RCB: indications of a surprisingly complex life-style and cryptic anaerobic pathways for aromatic degradation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Initial interest in Dechloromonas aromatica strain RCB arose from its ability to anaerobically degrade benzene. It is also able to reduce perchlorate and oxidize chlorobenzoate, toluene, and xylene, creating interest in using this organism for bioremediation. Little physiological data has been published for this microbe. It is considered to be a free-living organism. The a priori prediction that the D. aromatica genome would contain previously characterized 'central' enzymes involved in anaerobic aromatic degradation proved to be false, suggesting the presence of novel anaerobic aromatic degradation pathways in this species. These missing pathways include the benzyl succinyl synthase (bssABC) genes (responsible for formate addition to toluene) and the central benzoylCoA pathway for monoaromatics. In depth analyses using existing TIGRfam, COG, and InterPro models, and the creation of de novo HMM models, indicate a highly complex lifestyle with a large number of environmental sensors and signaling pathways, including a relatively large number of GGDEF domain signal receptors and multiple quorum sensors. A number of proteins indicate interactions with an as yet unknown host, as indicated by the presence of predicted cell host remodeling enzymes, effector enzymes, hemolysin-like proteins, adhesins, NO reductase, and both type III and type VI secretory complexes. Evidence of biofilm formation including a proposed exopolysaccharide complex with the somewhat rare exosortase (epsH), is also present. Annotation described in this paper also reveals evidence for several metabolic pathways that have yet to be observed experimentally, including a sulphur oxidation (soxFCDYZAXB) gene cluster, Calvin cycle enzymes, and nitrogen fixation (including RubisCo, ribulose-phosphate 3-epimerase, and nif gene families, respectively). Analysis of the D. aromatica genome indicates there is much to be learned regarding the metabolic capabilities, and life-style, for this microbial species. Examples of recent gene duplication events in signaling as well as dioxygenase clusters are present, indicating selective gene family expansion as a relatively recent event in D. aromatica's evolutionary history. Gene families that constitute metabolic cycles presumed to create D. aromatica's environmental 'foot-print' indicate a high level of diversification between its predicted capabilities and those of its close relatives, A. aromaticum str EbN1 and Azoarcus BH72.

Salinero, Kennan Kellaris; Keller, Keith; Feil, William S.; Feil, Helene; Trong, Stephan; Di Bartolo, Genevieve; Lapidus, Alla

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

259

Adequacy of benzo(a)pyrene and benzene soluble materials as indicators of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a Sderberg aluminum smelter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Occupational and environmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) occurs as a complex mixture that is evaluated using specific components, such as benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and benzene soluble materials (BSM). Factors that influence the relationship between BaP, BSM, and other PAHs within an aluminum smelter were investigated. Personal samples collected from 1978 to 2001 were used. Differences in the log-transformed ratios (PAH/BaP, BaP/BSM) due to anode paste composition, pot group, season, and job were examined using linear regression. In linear regression, 27% of the variability in the log-transformed BaP/BSM ratio was explained by coal tar pitch, work area, and job; no seasonal or pot group differences were observed. Within the potrooms, BaP was very strongly correlated with other PAHs (majority 0.9). Depending on the PAH, between 23% and 89% of the variability in the log-transformed PAH/BSM was explained by season, coal tar pitch, pot group, and job. The BaP toxic equivalency factors of the mixture varied more across job (2.1-3.5) than across coal tar pitch source (1.8-2.8) or pot group (2.3-2.5). Seasonal and work area differences in the relationship between BaP and other PAHs have not been reported previously.

Friesen, M.C.; Demers, P.A.; Spinelli, J.J.; Le, N.D. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). School of Occupational & Environmental Hygiene

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Biomarkers of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure in northwest Gulf of Mexico marine fish and invertebrates: indicators of offshore petroleum contamination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Higher molecular weight Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHS) associated with crude oil induce CYPIAI gene expression, and this response has been utilized as a biomarker of exposure to PAHs in aquatic and marine environments. Several benthic marine fish and invertebrates were collected in the vicinity of offshore petroleum platforms in the northwest Gulf of Mexico and subdivided with respect to distance from the platforms (i.e. "near", 3000 m). Hepatic tissues were analyzed for CYPIAI MRNA levels using a CDNA probe derived from rainbow trout, and ethoxyresorufin-0-deethylase (EROD) activity (a CYPIAI response) was also determined in the fish species. Invertebrate exposure to PAHs was estimated by determining the dose-dependent induction of EROD activity by invertebrate extracts in rat hepatoma H-4-IIE cells. CYPIAI MRNA levels and EROD activity were detected in all species, though the relative response intensities were low, indicating minimal PAH contamination at these sites. Intensities of the MRNA bands did not correlate with EROD activity in the same fish species. The results indicated that there were no consistent differences between the near and far stations as expected for a contaminant gradient. Interestingly, the CYPIAI MRNA data exhibited some inter-and intraspecies differences, suggesting genetic differences in this gene in various fish species. Bioanalysis of invertebrate extracts in rat hepatoma H-4-IIE cells also indicated low PAH contamination at the study sites. All three assays were sensitive indicators of PAH contamination.

Erickson, Cynthia Marie

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

A 700 year sediment record of black carbon and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons near the EMEP air monitoring station in Aspvreten, Sweden  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In view of poor constraints on historical combustion emissions, past environmental loadings of black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) were reconstructed from dated lake sediment cores collected 70 km south of Stockholm, Sweden. Compared to several dramatic variations over the recent 150 years, the preindustrial loadings were steady within {+-}50% through the entire medieval with BC fluxes of 0.071 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} and PAH fluxes of 6 g m{sup -2} yr{sup -1}. In the wood-burning dominated century leading up to the industrial revolution around 1850, increasing BC fluxes were leading PAH fluxes. BC fluxes reached their millennial-scale maximum around 1920, whereas PAH fluxes increased exponentially to its record maximum around 1960, 50-fold above preindustrial values. For 1920-1950, BC fluxes consistently decreased as PAH fluxes kept increasing. Coal and coke represented >50% of the Swedish energy market in the 1930s. Combined with sharply decreasing (1,7-)/(1,7{+-}2,6-dimethylphenanthrene), indicative of diminishing wood combustion, and decreasing methylphenanthrenes/phenanthrene, indicative of higher-temperature combustion (coal instead of wood), the sediment archive suggests that the relative BC/PAH emission factors thus are lower for coal than for wood combustion. For the first time, both BC and PAH fluxes decreased after 1960. This trend break is a testament to the positive effects of decreasing reliance on petroleum fuels and a number of legislative actions aimed at curbing emissions and by 1990, the loading of BC was back at preindustrial levels, whereas that of PAH were the lowest since the 1910s. However, for the most recent period (1990-2004) the BC and PAH fluxes are no longer decreasing. 55 refs., 3 figs.

Marie Elmquist; Zdenek Zencak; Oerjan Gustafsson [Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden). Department of Applied Environmental Science

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Developmental toxicity of clarified slurry oil, syntower bottoms, and distillate aromatic extract administered as a single oral dose to pregnant rats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clarified slurry oil (CSO), syntower bottoms (STB), and distillate aromatic extract (DAE) are refinery streams produced by processing crude oil. Available data indicate that some refinery streams are developmentally toxic by the dermal route of exposure. However, there is no conclusive evidence for their being teratogenic. The present studies were designed to further explore the suspected teratogenic potency of refinery streams while at the same time limiting embryolethality. In general, evidence of maternal toxicity (i.e., decreased body weight gain, decreased thymus weight) was observed at doses greater than or equal to 500 mg/kg. For each refinery stream tested, the incidence of resorption was greatest on GD 11. A common pattern of fetal malformations was observed for all of the refinery streams tested and included cleft palate, diaphragmatic hernia, and paw and tail defects. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidence and type of malformation observed were influenced by the gestation day of exposure. The incidences of external and skeletal malformations were greatest on GD 11 and 12 for fetuses exposed to CSO; on GD 13 and 14, the incidence of malformation was comparable for CSO- and STB-exposed fetuses. The incidence of visceral anomalies was greatest on GD 11-13 for fetuses exposed to CSO and STB; on Gestation D 14, the incidence was comparable for each of the refinery streams tested. In general, the ability to produce adverse effects on development was greatest for CSO and least for DAE. Effects produced by STB were comparable to or less severe than those observed for CSO. 24 refs., 11 tabs.

Feuston, M.H.; Mackerer, C.R. [Stonybrook Labs., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emissions data are often lacking or uncertain for many airborne contaminants. Chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), emitted from combustion sources, fall into this category. Currently available ambient-air emission inventories of PAHs either fail to account for population-based activities (such as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle activity) and/or report ''total PAH'' or particulate organic matter emissions instead of individual compounds. We measure the degree of overlap between predicted concentrations from estimated emissions with measured concentrations. Our analysis is, based on probabilistic analysis of measured outdoor air concentrations with those predicted from mass-balance models. Based on available information, we estimate the relative magnitude of emissions from four major sources of PAHs to outdoor air- (1) on-road motor vehicles, including light-duty gasoline vehicles and diesel-powered buses and medium and heavy duty trucks; (2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation from external combustion boilers. We use the CalTOX regional multimedia mass-balance model to evaluate our emissions estimates in rural and urban regions of the state of Minnesota, USA. We compare model estimates of outdoor PAH airborne concentrations with those reported by the Minnesota Children's Pesticide Exposure Study (MNCPES). With these measured concentrations we probabilistically evaluate our emissions and interpret the reliability of our emissions estimates for specific PAHs. The median estimates of our predicted outdoor air concentrations agree within an order of magnitude of measured concentrations. For four representative PAHs, we were able to obtain a reasonable degree of overlap between empirical and predicted distributions of outdoor air concentrations. Our combination of models, emissions estimates, and empirical concentration data estimate exposure in a manner that is more reliable than any of these tools alone. Thereby, we increase our confidence about our plausible ranges of emissions and predicted concentrations.

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

A Kinetic Modeling study on the Oxidation of Primary Reference Fuel?Toluene Mixtures Including Cross Reactions between Aromatics and Aliphatics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model for the mixtures of Primary Reference Fuel (PRF: n-heptane and iso-octane) and toluene has been proposed. This model is divided into three parts; a PRF mechanism [T. Ogura et al., Energy & Fuels 21 (2007) 3233-3239], toluene sub-mechanism and cross reactions between PRF and toluene. Toluene sub-mechanism includes the low temperature kinetics relevant to engine conditions. A chemical kinetic mechanism proposed by Pitz et al. [Proc. the 2nd Joint Meeting of the U.S. Combust. Institute (2001)] was used as a starting model and modified by updating rate coefficients. Theoretical estimations of rate coefficients were performed for toluene and benzyl radical reactions important at low temperatures. Cross-reactions between alkane, alkene, and aromatics were also included in order to account for the acceleration by the addition of toluene into iso-octane recently found in the shock tube study of the ignition delay [Y. Sakai et al, SAE 2007-01-4014 (2007)]. Validations of the model were performed with existing shock tube and flow tube data. The model well predicts the ignition characteristics of toluene and PRF/Toluene mixtures under the wide range of temperatures (500-1700 K) and pressures (2-50 atm). It is found that reactions of benzyl radical with oxygen molecule determine the reactivity of toluene at low temperature. Although the effect of toluene addition to iso-octane is not fully resolved, the reactions of alkene with benzyl radical have the possibility to account for the kinetic interactions between PRF and toluene.

Sakai, Y; Miyoshi, A; Koshi, M; Pitz, W J

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

265

Monitored natural attenuation of manufactured gas plant tar mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in ground water: a 14-year field study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Site 24 was the subject of a 14-year (5110-day) study of a ground water plume created by the disposal of manufactured gas plant (MGP) tar into a shallow sandy aquifer approximately 25 years prior to the study. The ground water plume in 1988 extended from a well-defined source area to a distance of approximately 400 m down gradient. A system of monitoring wells was installed along six transects that ran perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the plume centerline. The MGP tar source was removed from the site in 1991 and a 14-year ground water monitored natural attenuation (MNA) study commenced. The program measured the dissolved mono- and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAHs and PAHs) periodically over time, which decreased significantly over the 14-year period. Naphthalene decreased to less than 99% of the original dissolved mass, with mass degradation rates of 0.30 per year (half-life 2.3 years). Bulk attenuation rate constants for plume centerline concentrations over time ranged from 0.33 {+-} 0.09 per year (half-life 2.3 {+-} 0.8 years) for toluene and 0.45 {+-} 0.06 per year (half-life 1.6 {+-} 0.2 years) for naphthalene. The hydrogeologic setting at Site 24, having a sandy aquifer, shallow water table, clay confining layer, and aerobic conditions, was ideal for demonstrating MNA. However, these results demonstrate that MNA is a viable remedial strategy for ground water at sites impacted by MAHs and PAHs after the original source is removed, stabilized, or contained.

Neuhauser, E.F.; Ripp, J.A.; Azzolina, N.A.; Madsen, E.L.; Mauro, D.M.; Taylor, T. [Foth Infrastructure & Environment LLC, Green Bay, WI (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

2/2007 B56133 MaxPlanckResearchSCIENCE MAGAZINE OF THE MAX PLANCK SOCIETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

under construc- tion at CERN in Geneva,will attempt to find the Higgs boson, a particle associated to produce a Higgs boson). The shot-to-shot stability and efficiency of these schemes also need

267

Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

Sun Meng [School of Resources and Environment, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Li Danzhen, E-mail: dzli@fzu.edu.cn [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi [Research Institute of Photocatalysis, State Key Laboratory Breeding Base of Photocatalysis, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

268

Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole and different aromatic carboxylates: Assembly, structures, electrochemical and magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes constructed from 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole (atrz) and three types of aromatic carboxylates, [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(DNBA){sub 6}] (1), [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(1,3-BDC){sub 3}]{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Cu{sub 4}({mu}{sub 3}-OH){sub 2}(atrz){sub 2}(SIP){sub 2}]{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O (3) (HDNBA=3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid, 1,3-H{sub 2}BDC=1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid and NaH{sub 2}SIP=sodium 5-sulfoisophthalate), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Complex 1 displays a single-molecular Cu{sup II}{sub 4} cluster structure, which is further connected by the intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions to form a 2D supramolecular layer. In 2, there also exist tetranuclear Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters, which are linked by the 1,3-BDC anions to give a 3D NaCl-type framework. In 3, the Cu{sup II}{sub 4} clusters are connected by the carboxyl and sulfo groups of SIP anions to generate 3D (4,8)-connected framework with a (4{sup 10}{center_dot}6{sup 14}{center_dot}8{sup 4})(4{sup 5}{center_dot}6){sub 2} topology. The atrz ligand conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters and the carboxylates with different non-carboxyl substituent show important effects on the final structures of the title complexes. The electrochemical and magnetic properties of 1-3 have been investigated. - Graphical abstract: Three tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes based on different carboxylates have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The carboxylate anions play a key role in the formation of three different structures. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three new tetranuclear copper(II) cluster-based complexes have been obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The atrz conduces to the construction of tetranuclear copper(II) clusters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carboxylates show important effect on the structures of title complexes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties and electrochemical behaviors have been reported.

Wang, Xiu-Li, E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Ju-Wen; Lu, Qi-Lin [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)] [Department of Chemistry, Bohai University, Liaoning Province Silicon Materials Engineering Technology Research Centre, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

Stable carbon isotope ratio of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment: validation of isolation and stable carbon isotope analysis methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous, toxic contaminants that are released to the environment from various petrogenic and pyrogenic sources. In an effort to more clearly identify and trace sources of PAHs in the environment, purification and compound specific isotope analysis methods were developed to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratio of individual PAHs. Development of the method included improving accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurement by producing highly pure extracts using various chromatographic techniques. The method was refined by improving compound separations using purification techniques and high resolution chromatographic columns. The purification method consists of alumina/silica gel column chromatography, gel permeation chromatography and thin layer chromatography. The mean recovery of PAHs after the purification procedure was approximately 80 %. Sample purities after purification were verified by GC/FID and full scan mass spectrometry. To better resolve peaks and provide more accurate stable carbon isotope measurements, various gas chromatographic conditions were evaluated. The precision of the method ranged between 0.08 and 0.43 . The analytical protocols were evaluated to confirm compositional and stable isotopic integrity during purification and stable isotopic analysis. To confirm the utility of the purification and isotope analysis methods, various environmental samples from marine, land and lacustrine environments were analyzed. The isolates were analyzed for the composition and the stable carbon isotope ratios of PAHs. The stable carbon isotope ratio was measured by GC/IRMS and the results, along with quantitative compound compositions, were used to characterize and identify the contaminant sources. The sources of the PAHs in the study areas were differentiated by PAH molecular ratios and confirmed by stable carbon isotope ratios. This study confirms that compound specific isotope analysis of pollutants by GC/IRMS can be used to identify PAH sources in environmental samples. The study also confirms that the purification and stable carbon isotope analysis methods that were developed can be used to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratios of PAHs in environmental samples for the purpose of source identification. GC/IRMS measurement of stable isotopic compositions can be an effective fingerprinting method when used in conjunction with traditional molecular composition methods.

Kim, Moon Koo

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Structure Index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Naphthalene 4 1,2-(1,8-Naphthalenediyl)benzene 18 Naphthalin 4 ... Structure Name Formula MW L/B CAS# 1 Benzene 78 1.099 1 2 3 4 5 6 CH6 6 ...

271

Design, Commissioning and Performance of the PIBETA Detector at PSI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the design, construction and performance of the PIBETA detector built for the precise measurement of the branching ratio of pion beta decay, pi+ -> pi0 e+ nu, at the Paul Scherrer Institute. The central part of the detector is a 240-module spherical pure CsI calorimeter covering 3*pi sr solid angle. The calorimeter is supplemented with an active collimator/beam degrader system, an active segmented plastic target, a pair of low-mass cylindrical wire chambers and a 20-element cylindrical plastic scintillator hodoscope. The whole detector system is housed inside a temperature-controlled lead brick enclosure which in turn is lined with cosmic muon plastic veto counters. Commissioning and calibration data were taken during two three-month beam periods in 1999/2000 with pi+ stopping rates between 1.3*E3 pi+/s and 1.3*E6 pi+/s. We examine the timing, energy and angular detector resolution for photons, positrons and protons in the energy range of 5-150 MeV, as well as the response of the detector to cosmic muons. We illustrate the detector signatures for the assorted rare pion and muon decays and their associated backgrounds.

E. Frlez; D. Pocanic; K. A. Assamagan; Yu. Bagaturia; V. A. Baranov; W. Bertl; Ch. Broennimann; M. A. Bychkov; J. F. Crawford; M. Daum; Th. Fluegel; R. Frosch; R. Horisberger; V. A. Kalinnikov; V. V. Karpukhin; N. V. Khomutov; J. E. Koglin; A. S. Korenchenko; S. M. Korenchenko; T. Kozlowski; B. Krause; N. P. Kravchuk; N. A. Kuchinsky; W. Li; D. W. Lawrence; R. C. Minehart; D. Mzhavia; H. Obermeier; D. Renker; B. G. Ritchie; S. Ritt; T. Sakhelashvili; R. Schnyder; V. V. Sidorkin; P. L. Slocum; L. C. Smith; N. Soic; W. A. Stephens; I. Supek; Z. Tsamalaidze; B. A. VanDevender; Y. Wang; H. -P. Wirtz; K. O. H. Ziock

2003-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

WEB RESOURCE: Nagra/PSI Chemical Thermodynamic Data ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 7, 2007 ... This data base focuses on elements commonly found as major solutes in natural waters, and on actinides and fission products relevant for...

273

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PsyChart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

state calculations. It has a graphical interface with a component pallet of all common air-conditioning processes. You can add and link any processes on a graphic chart to form...

274

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PsyCalc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

275

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: PsyChart  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools by Country Australia Austria Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand...

276

Plasma-Neutrals Simulation of Linear Configurations for PSI  

SciTech Connect

Coupled fluid plasma and kinetic Monte Carlo neutrals simulations in a linear configuration are reported. The configuration mimics the tokamak divertor plasma channel contacting a target surface with nearby wall. We calculate the parameters of the source plasmas, 3-5m from the target, required to produce high recycling target plasmas recently simulated for ITER. It is shown that the source plasma needs to deliver heat fluxes of 10-20MW/m2, ion fluxes of 1023/m2/s, densities of 2-6x1019/m3, and electron and ion temperatures of 15-30eV over a plasma radius of 5-6cm. The neutral H and H2 fluxes to the vessel wall are calculated to be comparable to those measured in the divertor regions of today s tokamaks. These results identify some design features for a prospective plasma material test station and the research required for this plasma source.

Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL; Owen, Larry W [ORNL; Rapp, Juergen [ORNL; Bonnin, X. [CNRS-LIMHP, Universite, Paris; Canik, John [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Property:Incentive/PVResMaxDol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Type String Description The maximum rebate amount for a residential PV installation. Ex: DE's maximum incentive for residential PV is 31,500. Format: 31,500...

278

Property:Incentive/PVComMaxDol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Type String Description The maximum rebate amount for a commercial PV installation. Ex: DE's maximum incentive for commercial PV is 250,000. Format:...

279

Max-min separability: incremental approach and application to ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?f(x) = coC, ?f(x) = coD. We denote by F the class of all semismooth, quasidifferentiable functions whose subdif- ferential and superdifferential are polytopes at...

280

University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The winning prototype will be on display at this year's U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon in Irvine, California. Led by Dr. Mark Walter, Ohio State University's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-intensity discharge (HID) lamps are most often found in industrial and commercial applications, and are the light source of choice in street and area lighting, and sports stadium illumination. HID lamps are produced in three types - mercury vapor (MV), high pressure sodium (HPS) and metal halide (MH). Of these, MV and MH are considered white-light sources (although the MV exhibits poor color rendering) and HPS produces a yellow-orange color light. A fourth lamp, low-pressure sodium (LPS), is not a HID lamp by definition, but it is used in similar applications and thus is often grouped with HID lamps. With the notable exception of MV which is comparatively inefficient and in decline in the US from both a sales and installed stock point of view; HPS, LPS and MH all have efficacies over 100 lumens per watt. The figure below presents the efficacy trends over time for commercially available HID lamps and LPS, starting with MV and LPS in 1930's followed by the development of HPS and MH in the 1960's. In HID lamps, light is generated by creating an electric arc between two electrodes in an arc tube. The particles in the arc are partially ionized, making them electrically conductive, and a light-emitting 'plasma' is created. This arc occurs within the arc tube, which for most HID lamps is enclosed within an evacuated outer bulb that thermally isolates and protects the hot arc tube from the surroundings. Unlike a fluorescent lamp that produces visible light through down-converting UV light with phosphors, the arc itself is the light source in an HID lamp, emitting visible radiation that is characteristic of the elements present in the plasma. Thus, the mixture of elements included in the arc tube is one critical factor determining the quality of the light emitted from the lamp, including its correlated color temperature (CCT) and color rendering index (CRI). Similar to fluorescent lamps, HID lamps require a ballast to start and maintain stable operating conditions, and this necessitates additional power beyond that used by the lamp itself. HID lamps offer important advantages compared to other lighting technologies, making them well suited for certain applications. HID lamps can be very efficient, have long operating lives, are relatively temperature-insensitive and produce a large quantity of light from a small package. For these reasons, HID lamps are often used when high levels of illumination are required over large areas and where operating and maintenance costs must be kept to a minimum. Furthermore, if the installation has a significant mounting height, high-power HID lamps can offer superior optical performance luminaires, reducing the number of lamps required to illuminate a given area. The indoor environments best suited to HID lamps are those with high ceilings, such as those commonly found in industrial spaces, warehouses, large retail spaces, sports halls and large public areas. Research into efficacy improvements for HID lighting technologies has generally followed market demand for these lamps, which is in decline for MV and LPS, has reached a plateau for HPS and is growing for MH. Several manufacturers interviewed for this study indicated that although solid-state lighting was now receiving the bulk of their company's R&D investment, there are still strong HID lamp research programs, which concentrate on MH technologies, with some limited amount of investment in HPS for specific niche applications (e.g., agricultural greenhouses). LPS and MV lamps are no longer being researched or improved in terms of efficacy or other performance attributes, although some consider MH HID lamps to be the next-generation MV lamp. Thus, the efficacy values of commercially available MV, LPS and HPS lamps are not expected to increase in the next 5 to 10 years. MH lamps, and more specifically, ceramic MH lamps are continuing to improve in efficacy as well as light quality, manufacturability and lamp life. Within an HID lamp, the light-producing plasma must be heated to sufficiently high temperatures to achieve high efficiencie

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Min-Max Theorems Related to Geometric Representationsof Graphs ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 27, 2010 ... A related concept is that of an energy function (see, e.g., ... A nice interpretation of this energy is given as follows. ..... Washington, DC, 1997. 6.

283

Magma Max Power Generating Plant: Feasibility Study and Preliminary Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rogers Engineering affirms that the isobutane power recovery cycle is a sound one from the standpoint of thermodynamic and engineering considerations.

None

1970-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

D4: MAX Phase Response to Neutron Irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

B7: Synthesis and Electrical Properties of K2NiF4-Type (Ca2-xLnx)MnO4 (Ln=Nd and Sm) B8: Monitoring Oxygen Diffusion in Gd-Doped Ceria by Null...

285

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: C-MAX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Properties. Keywords pumps, fans, chillers, compressors, energy conservation, facility design ValidationTesting NA Expertise Required : General knowledge of fluid flow...

286

A New Insight into Plasticity of MAX-Phase Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Definite: A CD-only volume ... Solid Solutions (TiC1-xNx)nTiAl1-ySny (n = 1, 2, 3) Synthesis, Crystal Growth and Characterization Synthesis and...

287

ORTE DER FORSCHUNG 1 | 13 MaxPlanckForschung 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in der Via Gregoriana in Rom ­ zu Zeiten Federico Zuccaris führte es direkt in den Garten des Palazzos Augen. Ein wahrhaft paradiesischer Garten der Wissenschaften. Tor zur Hölle oder Pforte ins Paradies

288

MicroMaxTM Series 670 Single Axis Board Level  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ERS1 as marker genes for the ethylene response, PIN1 and IAA19 for the auxin response, MFC19 expressed in the guard cells and affects the stomatal response to ABA: guard cells of the dor mutant SCFDOR activity could result in increased ABA sensitivity in the guard cells, which would in turn explain

Kleinfeld, David

289

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demonstration (like street lights) and commercialization andthe dominant light source for street and roadway lighting,has been a popular light source for street lighting because

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

presents the national energy consumption profile for HIDVolume I: National Lighting Inventory and Energy Consumption

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Max Tech and Beyond: High-Intensity Discharge Lamps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the reason industry started by developing ceramic MH lampsceramic metal halide lamps, which are the focus of industryindustry had invested in the development of very low wattage ceramic

Scholand, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supercomputers' Pictorial Superpowers How the Smart Grid Helps Homeowners Reduce Their Energy Use EcoCAR Challenge Finish Line Event 1 of 8 Students Earn Street Cred With the...

293

The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Keynote: Dr. Arun Majumdar Sec. Chu Online Town Hall Science Lecture: Talking the Higgs Boson with Dr. Joseph Incandela What We Do For You Month by month the clean energy...

294

Building Technologies Office: Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings News Building Technologies Office Announces 3 Million to Advance Building Automation Software Solutions in Small to Medium-Sized Commercial Buildings March 29,...

295

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: C-MAX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Belarus Belgium Brazil Canada Chile China Czech Republic Denmark Finland France Germany India Ireland Israel Italy Japan Netherlands New Zealand Portugal Russia South Africa...

296

Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

initiated the Hubble Space Telescope and founded PPPL." Smith delivered a statement from William Brinkman, director of the DOE's Office of Science, who was unable to attend....

297

A dynamic approach to MPE and weighted MAX-SAT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of Most Probable Explanation (MPE) arises in the scenario of probabilistic inference: finding an assignment to all variables that has the maximum likelihood given some evidence. We consider the more general CNF-based MPE problem, where each ...

Tian Sang; Paul Beame; Henry Kautz

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Relating max-cut problems and binary linear feasibility problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use the standard notation, i.e. Sn is the set of symmetric nn-matrices, and the symbol. X ? 0 is used to .... (7) is always applicable. Indeed, any component.

299

PARTLY CLOUDY WITH NUMEROUS SHOWERS AND THUNDERSTORMS. MAX TEMPERATURE...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ABOVE 8000 FT....69-74. BELOW 8000 FT....80-85. 24 HR TREND......LITTLE CHANGE. MIN HUMIDITY... ABOVE 8000 FT....32-42 PCT. BELOW 8000 FT....28-38 PCT. 24 HR TREND......DOWN...

300

6 MaxPlanckForschung 2 | 09 PERSPEKTIVEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amerikanisch-deutsches Gemein- schaftsprojekt für den Betrieb eines Flugzeug-Observatoriums in 13 bis 14 für Phy- sik, Chemie oder Biologie so anzuspre- chen, dass sie sich später ein Studium dieser Fächer. In der Physik, der Chemie, besonders aber in der Biologie kann man heute äu?erst spannende Entwicklungen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

Research Report 2012 Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Berlin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.C. and Pouchard M., Solid State Comm., 91 (1994) 501-505. [4] WattiauvA., GrenierJ.C., Pouchard M. and Hagenmuller:~,A. Wattiaux, A. Demourgues,P. Bezdicka, J.C. Grenier, M. Pouchard and J. Etourneau Institut de Chimie de la measured at H = 2 T. References [I] Wattiaux A,, Fournks L., DemourguesA., Bernaben N., Grenier J

Spang, Rainer

302

The Max Tech and Beyond Competition | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saving Energy and Resources Revolutionizing Manufacturing INFOGRAPHIC: Wind Energy in America National Wind Technology Center - Colorado America's Wind Testing Facilities Beyond...

303

FUSING PORPHYRINS WITH POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND ...  

... fusion of one or more polycyclic rings or heterocyclic rings to the non-activated porphyrin core in meso,.beta. fashion is achieved, resulting in ...

304

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in urban soils ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

yards, coking plants, power plants, chemical plants, urban parks, university ...... Barrie LA, Gregor DJ, Hargrave B, Lake R, Muir D, Shearer R, Tracy. B, Bidleman ...

305

Extraction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons with Triethylene Glycol ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

introduced in LG 35-8/300B benzene reforming unit. (Kirishinefteorgsintez Production Association). The sulfolane content in the extractant was gradually brought...

306

Chlorinated Aromatic Hydrocarbons Dr. K. Squibb  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cement kilns - iron ore sintering, steel production and scrap metal recovery #12;Polychlorinated banned in 1977 For use in: electrical capacitors and transformers (977 kg/transformer) heat exchangers: Very stable, chemically and thermally Resistant to acids and alkalis Excellent conductor of heat Low

Kane, Andrew S.

307

Photophysical Properties of Protonated Aromatic Hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a cloud at 10­15 km and HT intermediate size range. Hayashi et al. (1998) showed induced by Kelvin waves. Comstock et al. (2002) analyzed the same data over 7 months, includ- ing instrument. Particles in the ambient air are guided by a pump through the beams of laser diodes transmitting

Blake, Geoffrey

308

Wir schaffen Wissen heute fr morgen High Power Targetry WS Malm, May 2-6, 2011May 4, 2011PSI, May 4, 2011PSI,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-target ­ STIP: the SINQ Target Irradiation Program ­ .... targeting at the MEGAPIE liquid metal target, addressing ­ cladding tubes for the solid Pb-target ­ STIP: the SINQ Target Irradiation Program, addressing ­ STIP: the SINQ Target Irradiation Program ­ .... targeting at the MEGAPIE liquid metal target

McDonald, Kirk

309

The Latitudinal Dependence of Shear and Mixing in the Pacific Transiting the Critical Latitude for PSI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent mixing rates are inferred from measurements spanning 2537N in the Pacific Ocean. The observations were made as part of the Internal Waves Across the Pacific experiment, designed to investigate the long-range fate of the low-mode ...

J. A. MacKinnon; M. H. Alford; Rob Pinkel; Jody Klymak; Zhongxiang Zhao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Samuel C.C. Ting, the J/psi Particle (Charm), and the Alpha Magnetic...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

University where he became interested in the physics of electron-positron pair production. ... In the spring of 1972, Ting, then on the faculty at the Massachusetts Institute...

311

Simulation in University Education: The Artificial Agent PSI as a Teaching Tool  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One weakness of undergraduate psychology education in Germany is that students do not have many opportunities to practice their theoretical knowledge. To fill this gap, a new teaching approach has been introduced to the curriculum at the University of ... Keywords: Agents, cognitive modeling, education, training

Johanna Knzel; Viola Hmmer

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analysis of device parameters of Al/In2O3/p-Si Schottky diode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin film of indium oxide (In"2O"3) is deposited on p-silicon substrate using sol-gel spin technique. The sol-gel spin deposited film is very smooth with grain size and root mean square surface roughness of ~40nm and ~7.9nm, respectively. The device ... Keywords: Capacitance-voltage, Current-voltage, Indium oxide, Schottky diode, Sol-gel

R. K. Gupta; F. Yakuphanoglu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

CP violation in flavor-tagged Bs? --> J/[psi][phi] decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this dissertation, we present the results of a time-dependent angular analysis of Bs -+ J/,0 decays performed with the use of initial-state flavor tagging. CP violation is observed in this mode through the interference ...

Makhoul, Khaldoun

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Quantization in classical mechanics and its relation to the Bohmian {Psi}-field  

SciTech Connect

Research highlights: > The Schroedinger equation is derived from the classical Hamiltonian mechanics. > This derivation is based on the Chetaev theorem on stable dynamical trajectories. > The conditions for correctness of trajectory quantum mechanics are discussed. - Abstract: Based on the Chetaev theorem on stable dynamical trajectories in the presence of dissipative forces, we obtain the generalized condition for stability of Hamilton systems in the form of the Schroedinger equation. It is shown that the energy of dissipative forces, which generate the Chetaev generalized condition of stability, coincides exactly with the Bohm 'quantum' potential. Within the frame-work of Bohmian quantum mechanics supplemented by the generalized Chetaev theorem and on the basis of the principle of least action for dissipative forces, we show that the squared amplitude of a wave function in the Schroedinger equation is equivalent semantically and syntactically to the probability density function for the number of particle trajectories, relative to which the velocity and the position of the particle are not hidden parameters. The conditions for the correctness of trajectory interpretation of quantum mechanics are discussed.

Rusov, V.D., E-mail: siiis@te.net.ua [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Nuclear Physics, Odessa National Polytechnic University, 65044 Odessa (Ukraine); Faculty of Mathematics, Bielefeld University, P.O.X: 100131, Bielefeld (Germany); Vlasenko, D.S. [Department of Theoretical and Experimental Nuclear Physics, Odessa National Polytechnic University, 65044 Odessa (Ukraine); Mavrodiev, S.Cht. [The Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, BAS, 1874 Sofia (Bulgaria); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

PSI-1402/ TR-1979 Extended Performance Handheld and Mobile Sensors for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02/ 02/ TR-1979 Extended Performance Handheld and Mobile Sensors for Remote Detection of Natural Gas Leaks Phase II Final Report Reporting Period Start Date: 10/01/02 Reporting Period End Date: 12/31/04 Prepared by Michael B. Frish, B. David Green, Richard T. Wainner, Francesca Scire-Scappuzzo, Paul Cataldi, and Matthew C. Laderer May 2005 Under Cooperative Research Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41603 Between Physical Sciences Inc. and DoE NETL Physical Sciences Inc. 20 New England Business Center Andover, MA 01810-1077 Graham Midgley Heath Consultants, Inc. 9030 Monroe Road Houston, TX ACKNOWLEDGMENT STATEMENT: This Final Report was prepared with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, under Award No. DE-FC26- 02NT41603. However, any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed herein are those of the

316

Dynamic Parameter Spring Model for Automatic Graph Layout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3....(..............................),max()( )8.3....(..............................),max()( ),( ),( ),( ),( ),( ),( ),( ),( rifd Cifsp

Tanaka, Jiro

317

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Max | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subproperties: subproperties: 0 Data:03c19c6d-b1be-4f3d-9e94-f307f2b612a5 Data:03c19c6d-b1be-4f3d-9e94-f307f2b612a5 Data:03c19c6d-b1be-4f3d-9e94-f307f2b612a5 Data:09c31977-ce1b-4395-b596-525653829612 Data:09c31977-ce1b-4395-b596-525653829612 Data:0be46cfc-d88d-4445-8557-2cded97020e0 Data:0be46cfc-d88d-4445-8557-2cded97020e0 Data:0d5ae5c4-b8c0-4a1e-8578-9f8b45778b4a Data:0d5ae5c4-b8c0-4a1e-8578-9f8b45778b4a 1 Data:14234af0-0c16-40c2-9cdb-bdbb029940fb Data:14234af0-0c16-40c2-9cdb-bdbb029940fb Data:14234af0-0c16-40c2-9cdb-bdbb029940fb Data:14ab105c-a14b-4a62-bf7b-64350a7ad19b Data:14ab105c-a14b-4a62-bf7b-64350a7ad19b Data:14ab105c-a14b-4a62-bf7b-64350a7ad19b Data:1d062854-a777-4883-b87b-1ac5db1e7e5b Data:1d062854-a777-4883-b87b-1ac5db1e7e5b 2 Data:224fe722-cada-4069-b0b0-8bca5853d1f0

318

DOE FY10_Svc_Cont_Inv 122910 v2 MAX.xlsx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fixed Fixed Price Cost T&M/LH Other Competed Not Competed Blank Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 B505 Cost Benefit Analyses $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R406 Policy Review/Development Services $0 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% R407 Program Evaluation Services $6,598,775 0% 1% 0% 99% 0% 30% 5% 65% 5% 33% 32% 31% R408 Program Management/Support Services $311,028,791 1% 2% 67% 32% 0% 90% 4% 6% 26% 25% 13% 35% R409 Program Review/Development Services $49,991 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 100% R413 Specifications Development Service $106,958 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% 0% 100% 0% 0% R707 Management Services/Contract & Procurement Support $35,519,976 0% 3% 93% 4% 0% 0% 100% 0% 17% 1% 49% 32% R423 Intelligence Services $10,385,300 0% 2% 0% 98% 0% 57% 0% 43% 7% 39% 26% 29% R425 Engineering and Technical Services $315,519,561 1% 2% 58% 33% 7% 93% 6% 1% 10% 25% 23% 42% R414 Systems Engineering Services

319

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pump water heaters. Solar thermal water heaters are gainingsolar water heating system can reduce energy consumption by 50% or more [2]. Like electric water heaters,

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

On the min-cut max- ow ratio for multicommodity ows 1 Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 5, 2001 ... where k is the cardinality of the minimal vertex cover of the demand graph. ... We also show a similar bound for the maximum multicommodity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting, motors, and various heat pump applications for which we are able to break down and compare energy usage

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

H8: Processing and Characterization of NiTi-MAX Phase ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

C19: Dissolution Behavior of Cu Under Bump Metallization in Ball Grid Array Structure ... E11: Evolution of the Grain Boundary Character Distribution During Grain ... for High Volume and Fast Turnaround Automated Inline TEM Sample Preparation .... H2: Triboluminescent Smart Sensors for Structural Health Monitoring.

323

A Power-Law Formulation of Laminar Flow in Short Pipes Max Sherman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the same approaches that Jeppson 1 uses for turbulent ones. Other similarities are suggested, but have;10 REFERENCES 1. J.W. Jeppson, "Analysis of Flow in Pipe Networks," Ann Arbor Science, pp. 53-69, (1977). 2. H

324

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial process, absorption chillers have the potentialvapor-compression chillers. Absorption chillers currentlycycle. Traditional absorption chillers use water as a

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Annually the US DOE presents US energy use forecasts in its50 products, in terms of US energy savings potential overand Liu X. Impacts of US federal energy efficiency standards

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a traditional vapor-compression cycle, outside air can goefficiency of the vapor-compression system (by reducing theof a traditional vapor- compression air conditioner (i.e. ,

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

initial costs. Absorption heat pump water heaters (which usereliable absorption heat pump water heaters. Solar thermal

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

On the equivalence of the max-min transportation lower bound and ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the author was a post-doc in the Dept. of ISyE at University of Wisconsin-Madison . L. Shi: Dept. of ISyE, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706,...

329

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems are technically nott yet possible due to the VRF capability to simultaneously

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Probabilistic and Max-margin structured learning in Human Action Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are `space-time interest point' (STIP) from Laptev [2005] and `space-time cuboid' from Dollar et al. [2005a]. While STIP is devel- oped as an space-time extension of Harris corner detector Harris and Stephens [1988 been reported that produce compelling results using STIP and cuboids in the bag-of-feature frame- work

New South Wales, University of

331

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

refrigeration cycle (hot water in the case of adsorption chillers), and thus are most ideal for industrial

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lighting, improved fan blade design with proper balance, andDesign Options .. 21 Ceiling Fans and10W [2]. A design option for ceiling fans in large, open

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Science Magazine of the Max Planck Society 3.2012 RESEARCH POLICY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy need new power lines as well. In the future, a larger number of small, distributed wind and solar instruments, including spectrographs and cameras, GREGOR is one of the world's three most powerful solar Knowledge TECHNOLOGY The Power Grid's Got Rhythm ASTRONOMY The Search for a Second Earth ART HISTORY

334

Ventilation Requirements in Hot Humid Iain S. Walker and Max H. Sherman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as it provides cooling (i.e. sensible load removal). Conventional systems have well known limits because it brings in moisture which can cause mold problems and/or increase loads on the cooling system for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Building Technologies Program, U.S. Department

335

Combustion Formation of Ti2AlC MAX Phase by Electro-Plasma ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical density of the powder compact was found to play an important role for the initiation of the combustion reaction. For the compacts with a higher...

336

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

motors, permanent magnet motors, and, as is already evident,efficient permanent magnet (PM) motors have been cost-approaches: a motor (from permanent magnet consumer rotors,

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

34 MaxPlanckForschung Spezial | 09 m die knappen Ressourcen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Dennoch unterstützt solch ein Speicher schon den Verbrennungsmo- tor des Hybrid-Autos Toyota Prius. Mit

338

18 MaxPlanckForschung Spezial | 10 m die knappen Ressourcen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Dennoch unterstützt solch ein Speicher schon den Verbrennungsmo- tor des Hybrid-Autos Toyota Prius. Mit

339

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy use information is generally readily available for most best-on-market products, design information

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

66 MaxPlanckForschung 2 | 11 BIOLOGIE & MEDIZIN_Zur Person  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zweistöckigen Haus im Kolonialstil, inklusive Garagenein- fahrt und Garten nach hinten. Als er noch klein war

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although bulbs, primarily in LED and CFL efficaciescompact fluorescent bulbs, with LEDs being a likely futurelights. LED street lights offer increased bulb lifetime (and

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

AmbiMax: Autonomous Energy Harvesting Platform for Multi-Supply Wireless Sensor Nodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Coeurjolly and Drouilhet (2008) for asymptotic results). Once you have estimated the parameter vector and Drouilhet (2008) for more details and asymptotic results (con- sistency and asymptotic normality). Finally of the Institute of Statistical Mathematics, 60(7), 627­649 [3] E. Bertin, J.-M. Billiot and R. Drouilhet (1999) k

Chou, Pai H.

343

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Heaters (gas) Street Lights Low-end Servers Res. GasWater Heaters Street Lights Low-end Servers Cumulative 30-

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heaters Low-end Servers Street Lights Comm. Storage WaterWater Heaters (gas) Street Lights Low-end Servers Res. Gaseffectiveness of LED street lights. LED street lights offer

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for a discussion on variable refrigerant flow systems. SuchMulti-split variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems are

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of energy efficient appliance databases on the CEC [5] andAppliance Efficiency http://www.appliances.energy.ca.gov/QuickSearch.aspx Database.

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Autonomous sub-image matching for two-dimensional electrophoresis gels using MaxRST algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matching two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) gel images typically generates a bottleneck in the automated protein analysis, and image distortion and experimental variation, which reduce the matching accuracy. However, conventional matching schemes ... Keywords: Features extraction, Gabriel graph, Gaussian similarity measure, Maximum relation spanning tree, Relative neighborhood graph, Sub-image matching, Two-dimensional electrophoresis

Daw-Tung Lin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

More data means less inference: A pseudo-max approach to structured learning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The problem of learning to predict structured labels is of key importance in many applications. However, for general graph structure both learning and inference in this setting are intractable. Here we show that it is ...

Sontag, David

349

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fans Desktop Monitors Dishwashers Clothes Washers ClothesCompressors, pumps, blowers, dishwashers, refrigerators, and

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports - simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save {approx}200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

Garbesi, Karina; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Bolduc, Christopher; Burch, Gabriel; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Saltiel, Seth

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

351

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

external/technical_reports/PNNL-13232.pdf [2] DOE.National Laboratory for DOE. Report PNNL- 13232. April.National Laboratory (PNNL). (2010). Evaluation of a

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

WENDELSTEIN 7-X Max-Planck-Institut fr Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

move independently, large spacing Cold Warm Hot Hotter T 100 C T > 100000 C, EURATOM Association Astrophysical plasmas fusion process is main energy source in stars ED- DINGTON to gain fusion energy in laboratories high-temperature plasma physics started classi ed around 1950 since

Coster, David

353

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electric ignition, heat pipe or induction griddles, reducedCommercial Ground-Source Heat PumpsOne-Pipe Loops. August.possibly benefit from drain-pipe heat recovery (see above).

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

buildings/ appliance_standards/pdfs/fy05_priority_setting_standards for residential appliances. Energy 28: 2003, pp.Department of Energy, Appliances and Commercial Equipment

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product...

356

Max-Planck-Institut fur Plasmaphysik Heiz-und Stromprofile bei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vergleichsweise hoch. Um ein Kraftwerk mit einer elektrischen Leistung von Pel = 1 GW ein Jahr lang zu betreiben

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

357

Max-Planck-Institut fr neuropsychologische Forschung, Leipzig herrmann / bosch@cns.mpg.de  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Müsseler/Wolfgang Prinz (Hrsg.), ALLGEMEINE PSYCHOLOGIE, 970 Seiten mit zahlreichen Abbildungen, Spektrum

Herrmann, Christoph

358

6 MaxPlanckForschung 4 | 11 ,,Intelligenz", so Chaim Weizmann, ,,ist der  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- chen Chemie, Wirtschaft und Weltraumfor- schunghervorgebracht­dasbelegtdiehohe wissenschaftliche. Während am Anfang der deutsch-israeli- schen Beziehungen nach dem Holocaust auf deutscher Seite vor allem deutsch-israe- lischen Beziehungen kam der Wissenschaft nach 1945 die Rolle eines Brückenbauers zu

359

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ground source) dryers of CO2 as refrigerant, absorption replace standard cycle use for gas-heat pump

Garbesi, Karina

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report: Commercial Ground-Source Heat PumpsOne-Pipe Loops.6]. Commercial ground-source heat pumps are an establishedcost- effectiveness of ground-source heat pumps is generally

Desroches, Louis-Benoit

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Claire E. Max, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Physics: For her contributions to the theory of laser guide star adaptive optics and its application in ground-based astronomy to correct...

362

42 MaxPlanckForschung 4 | 11 Ein Tauziehen zwischen zwei Rubidiumatomen endete krz-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

erneuerbarer Energie, und Ingenieure arbeiten auch bereits daran, sie anzuzapfen. Doch die hohen erneuerbare Energie als bislang angenommen Schneller Wind mit wenig Kraft Wie Drachen mit Rotoren sollen sprangen dann von einem Gitterplatz zum nächsten, obwohl ihre restliche thermische Energie hierzu nicht

363

Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier2Max | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subproperties: subproperties: 0 Data:09c31977-ce1b-4395-b596-525653829612 Data:09c31977-ce1b-4395-b596-525653829612 Data:0be46cfc-d88d-4445-8557-2cded97020e0 Data:0be46cfc-d88d-4445-8557-2cded97020e0 Data:0c895657-5e1f-48a0-934a-63b41fb86a1e Data:0c895657-5e1f-48a0-934a-63b41fb86a1e Data:0d5ae5c4-b8c0-4a1e-8578-9f8b45778b4a Data:0d5ae5c4-b8c0-4a1e-8578-9f8b45778b4a 1 Data:14234af0-0c16-40c2-9cdb-bdbb029940fb Data:14234af0-0c16-40c2-9cdb-bdbb029940fb Data:14234af0-0c16-40c2-9cdb-bdbb029940fb Data:1d062854-a777-4883-b87b-1ac5db1e7e5b Data:1d062854-a777-4883-b87b-1ac5db1e7e5b 2 Data:224fe722-cada-4069-b0b0-8bca5853d1f0 Data:224fe722-cada-4069-b0b0-8bca5853d1f0 Data:2983f37c-ba70-4311-aafc-820afc45c7d2 Data:2983f37c-ba70-4311-aafc-820afc45c7d2 Data:2e707b81-23d2-44e3-ab94-5895e3fb34d5

364

Achieving True Video-on-Demand Service in Multi-Hop WiMax Mesh Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mesh Network Configuration (MSH-NCFG) messages. Each MSH-NCFG message contains a Network Descriptor by listening to MSH-NCFG messages. From all the possible neighboring nodes that advertise MSH-NCFG messages

Hua, Kien A.

365

UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abundant and widespread class of carbon-car- rying gaseous species is believed to be PAHs (3­5). In dense divided between the hydro

366

Cyclodehydrogenation Reactions to Cyclopentafused Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Angela Violi*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to simulate the adsorption process. The adsorption mechanism of metal ammine complexes over silica.D. Gonzalzez, Catal. Today 5 (1989) 395. [56] H.-Y. Lin, Y.-W. Chen, Thermochim. Acta 419 (2004) 283. [57] J

Violi, Angel

367

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 [mu]M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 [mu]M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K[sub i] for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

368

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from fossil fuel conversion processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Benzo(a)pyrene continues to be the most widely accepted indicator of PAH content and biological significance. The concentrations of BaP in synfuels related materials are summarized. Petroleum crude is estimated to contain approximately 1 ppM of BaP. Both shale- and coal-derived crudes contain approximately three times as much BaP. Depending on the source (coal, process, process conditions), coal-derived crude oils contain BaP ranging from the same amount as petroleum crudes to ten times as much. High boiling distillates and distillate residues are generally enriched in BaP content as should be expected. While enriched in BaP relative to petroleum crudes, coal-derived crude oils contain two to three times less BaP than do coal tar, coal tar pitch, and petroleum pitch. Mutagenic activity is observed in the PAH fractions containing three-ring PAHs to those containing PAHs greater than five rings in size. The specific activity tends to ''peak'' for the 4-ring and 5-ring fractions, i.e., those containing the most common (benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(c)phenanthrene, 3-methylcholanthrene, etc.) known carcinogens. Of particular interest is the observation that fractions corresponding to PAHs of 4-rings and larger contain constituents which do not require metabolic activation to express histidine reversion. It is also important to note that mutagenicity of the fraction is produced by at most 4-12 wt % (depending on whether enzyme activation is employed) of its constituents.

Guerin, M R; Epler, J L; Griest, W H; Clark, B R; Rao, T K

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Formation mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in methane flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exhausts,7­17 coal-fired, electricity generating power plants,18,19 tobacco smoke,20 residential wood applications including heating systems and gas turbines for electric power generation.62­64 The combustion propane,57,58 butane,59 ethane,31,53,60 and other aliphatic61 flames. Methane is used as fuel in many

Sattler, Klaus

370

Humic acid complexation of basic and neutral polycyclic aromatic compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, metallurgical processes, and some coal, oil shale, and tar sand conversion systems. These com- pounds exhibit

Chorover, Jon

371

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

372

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

RESPIRATORY DISEASES Prenatal ambient air exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Charlie Matulka, who lost to Senator Chuck Hagel of Nebraska the same year, does not trust the results- counting machines, which happen to have been manufactured by a company Mr. Hagel used to run. Mr. Matulka, against Mr. Matulka, he won more than 80 percent of the vote. What gets conspiracy theorists excited

374

Cobalt-Base Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 4   Nominal compositions of various cobalt-base alloys...Si Mn Others Cobalt-base wear-resistant alloys Stellite 1 bal 31 12.5 1 (max) 2.4 3 (max) 3 (max) 2 (max) 1 (max) ? Stellite 6 bal 28 4.5 1 (max) 1.2 3 (max) 3 (max) 2 (max) 1 (max) ? Stellite 12 bal 30 8.3 1 (max) 1.4 3 (max) 3 (max) 2 (max) 1 (max) ? Stellite 21 bal 28 ? 5.5 0.25 2 (max) 2.5 2 (max) 1...

375

Role of Subsurface Oxygen in Oxide Formation at Transition Metal Surfaces M. Todorova,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:69 AA, Ewf max ¼ 17 Ry, Epot max ¼ 169 Ry, lwf max ¼ 12, lpot max ¼ 4, 19 k- points in the irreducible

Li, Weixue

376

System-level max power (SYMPO): a systematic approach for escalating system-level power consumption using synthetic benchmarks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To effectively design a computer system for the worst case power consumption scenario, system architects often use hand-crafted maximum power consuming benchmarks at the assembly language level. These stressmarks, also called power viruses, are very ... Keywords: synthetic benchmark, system-level power virus, thermal design point

Karthik Ganesan; Jungho Jo; W. Lloyd Bircher; Dimitris Kaseridis; Zhibin Yu; Lizy K. John

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Using an implicit min/max KD-tree for doing efficient terrain line of sight calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of accurate Line of Sight (LOS) visibility information consumes significant resources in large scale synthetic environments such as many-on-many serious games and battlefield simulators. Due to the importance of optimum utilisation of ... Keywords: implicit kd-tree, line of sight, spherical earth

Bernardt Duvenhage

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Foto:MPIfrKognitions-undNeurowissenschaften;Grafiken:MPIfrChemieDomenicoTaraborrelli 42 MaxPlanckForschung 1 | 12  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Institut für Physik. (Astronomy & Astrophysics, 30. März 2012) Das Kraftwerk im Krebsnebel Kosmischer

379

Direct Characterization of Kerogen by X-ray and Solid-State [superscript 13]C Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of solid-state {sup 13}C NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and sulfur X-ray absorption near edge structure (S-XANES) techniques are used to characterize organic oxygen, nitrogen, and sulfur species and carbon chemical/structural features in kerogens. The kerogens studied represent a wide range of organic matter types and maturities. A van Krevelen plot based on elemental H/C data and XPS derived O/C data shows the well established pattern for type I, type II, and type III kerogens. The anticipated relationship between the Rock-Eval hydrogen index and H/C is independent of organic matter type. Carbon structural and lattice parameters are derived from solid-state {sup 13}C NMR analysis. As expected, the amount of aromatic carbon, measured by both {sup 13}C NMR and XPS, increases with decreasing H/C. The correlation between aromatic carbon and Rock-Eval T{sub max}, an indicator of maturity, is linear for types II and IIIC kerogens, but each organic matter type follows a different relationship. The average aliphatic carbon chain length (Cn) decreases with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon in a similar manner across all organic matter types. The fraction of aromatic carbons with attachments (FAA) decreases, while the average number of aromatic carbons per cluster (C) increases with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon. FAA values range from 0.2 to 0.4, and C values range from 12 to 20 indicating that kerogens possess on average 2- to 5-ring aromatic carbon units that are highly substituted. There is basic agreement between XPS and {sup 13}C NMR results for the amount and speciation of organic oxygen. XPS results show that the amount of carbon oxygen single bonded species increases and carbonyl-carboxyl species decrease with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon. Patterns for the relative abundances of nitrogen and sulfur species exist regardless of the large differences in the total amount of organic nitrogen and sulfur seen in the kerogens. XPS and S-XANES results indicate that the relative level of aromatic sulfur increases with an increasing amount of aromatic carbon for all kerogens. XPS show that the majority of nitrogen exists as pyrrolic forms in comparable relative abundances in all kerogens studied. The direct characterization results using X-ray and NMR methods for nitrogen, sulfur, oxygen, and carbon chemical structures provide a basis for developing both specific and general average chemical structural models for different organic matter type kerogens.

Kelemen, S. R.; Afeworki, M.; Gorbaty, M.L.; Sansone, M.; Kwiatek, P.J.; Walters, C.C.; Freund, H.; Siskin, M.; Bence, A.E.; Curry, D.J.; Solum, M.; Pugmire, R.J.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Leblond, M.; Behar, F. (ExxonMobil); (ExxonMobil); (IFP); (Utah)

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

380

Pretreatment of solid carbonaceous material with dicarboxylic aromatic acids to prevent scale formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scale formation during the liquefaction of lower ranking coals and similar carbonaceous materials is significantly reduced and/or prevented by pretreatment with a pretreating agent selected from the group consisting of phthalic acid, phthalic anhydride, pyromellitic acid and pyromellitic anhydride. The pretreatment is believed to convert the scale-forming components to the corresponding phthalate and/or pyromellitate prior to liquefaction. The pretreatment is accomplished at a total pressure within the range from about 1 to about 2 atmospheres. Temperature during pretreatment will generally be within the range from about 5.degree. to about 80.degree. C.

Brunson, Roy J. (Buffalo Grove, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Analysis for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from the Thermaikos Gulf, Greece  

SciTech Connect

The Thermaikos Gulf area is suspected of being contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons. A total of 57 samples were analyzed as follows: 29 from the western area (industrial) and 28 from the eastern area (agricultural) of the Gulf. All samples examined were found to be contaminated. The levels detected ranged from trace to 13 ng/g (wet weight, drained). Seven of the samples examined contained benzo(a)pyrene at an average level of 1 ng/g. Dibenzo(a,i)pyrene was found at trace levels in a small proportion of samples. Another compound, benzo(a)anthracene, was found in 19 samples at concentrations ranging from 2 ng/g to 42 ng/g. Dibenzo(a,h)pyrene was not found in any of the samples analyzed. On the basis of the above data, the concentration of total PAH in mussels of the Thermaikos Gulf amounted to 91 ng/g (wet weight) and those of the carcinogenic PAH counted to 19 ng/g. (JMT)

Iosifidou, H.G.; Kilikidis, S.D.; Kamarianos, A.P.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A facile route to aromatic ring-annelated bis(ethylenedithio) tretrathiafluvalene derivatives  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis of bis(benzo)- and bis(naphtho)-fused derivatives of bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene (BEDT-TTF or ET) is easily achieved by employing the (4+2) cycloaddition reaction of oligo(1,3-dithiole-2,4,5-trithione) with appropriate olefins as the key step.

Parakka, J.P.; Kini, A.M.; Williams, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

383

Environmental Microbiology (2001) 3(4), 281287 Anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds coupled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of about 50 meters below the Baltic seabed outside the harbor. The sea depth over the site is approximately

Lovley, Derek

384

Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands  

SciTech Connect

The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

2008-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Interstrand pairing patterns in -barrel membrane proteins: the positive-outside rule, aromatic rescue,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dmm, 1d2u, 1eg9, 1ei5, 1epa, 1em2, 1ewf, 1fsk, 1fx3, 1h91, 1jkg, 1lkf, 1m6p, 1qfv, 1std, 1stp, 1t27, 1

Liang, Jie

386

Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals With Aromatic Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pandis S.N. , Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Firstand Pitts J.N.Jr. , 2000. Chemistry of the upper and lowerPandis S.N. , 1998. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, First

Strollo Gordon, Christen Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

The effect of sorption on the degradation of aromatic acids and bases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability and degradation of selected ionizable organic compounds sorbed to pure mineral phases are discussed. Substrates sorbed to mineral surfaces may or may not be protected from microbial attack; the degree of protection appears to be dependent on the type and cell density of the microorganism involved. The currently available data, however, demonstrate that there is little, if any, consensus on the types of reactions or interactions that facilitate sorbed substrate utilization. Rates of degradation of organic bases and cations that sorb to clay minerals via an exchange reaction are suggested to be directly related to substrate binding intensity and conformation on the clay surface. Similarly, rates of degradation of organic acids sorbed to the surface of oxides are suggested to be related to their interaction with the surface and the type of oxide sorbent. Although the rate-limiting step in microbial utilization of sorbed acids and bases is apparently a desorption process, the rate of desorption is itself linked to the compound's binding intensities on a given sorbent. Thus, as the binding intensities of compounds increase, chemical kinetic reactions, rather than mass-transfer processes, appear to limit the rate of desorption.

Ainsworth, C.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Smith, S.C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The effect of sorption on the degradation of aromatic acids and bases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The availability and degradation of selected ionizable organic compounds sorbed to pure mineral phases are discussed. Substrates sorbed to mineral surfaces may or may not be protected from microbial attack; the degree of protection appears to be dependent on the type and cell density of the microorganism involved. The currently available data, however, demonstrate that there is little, if any, consensus on the types of reactions or interactions that facilitate sorbed substrate utilization. Rates of degradation of organic bases and cations that sorb to clay minerals via an exchange reaction are suggested to be directly related to substrate binding intensity and conformation on the clay surface. Similarly, rates of degradation of organic acids sorbed to the surface of oxides are suggested to be related to their interaction with the surface and the type of oxide sorbent. Although the rate-limiting step in microbial utilization of sorbed acids and bases is apparently a desorption process, the rate of desorption is itself linked to the compound`s binding intensities on a given sorbent. Thus, as the binding intensities of compounds increase, chemical kinetic reactions, rather than mass-transfer processes, appear to limit the rate of desorption.

Ainsworth, C.C.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Smith, S.C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Tom, a new aromatic degradative plasmid from Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia G4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burkholderia (Pseudomonas) cepacia PR1{sub 23} has been shown to constitutively express a toluene catabolic pathway distinguished by a unique toluene ortho-monooxygenase (Tom). This strain has also been shown to contain two extrachromosomal elements of 100 kb. A derivative strain cured of the largest plasmid, PR1{sub 23} Cure, was unable to grow on phenol or toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy, which requires expression of the Tom pathway. Transfer of the larger plasmid from strain G4 J(the parent strain inducible for Tom) enabled PR1{sub 23} Cure to grow on toluene or phenol via inducible Tom pathway expression. Conjugal transfer of TOM{sub 23c} from PR1{sub 23} to an antibiotic-resistant derivative of PR1{sub 23} Cure enabled the transconjugant to grow with either phenol or toluene as the sole source of carbon and energy through constitutive expression of the Tom pathway. A cloned 11.2-kb EcoRI restriction fragment of Tom{sub 23c} resulted in the expression of both Tom and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase in Escherichia coli, as evidenced by its ability to oxidize trichloroethylene, toluene, m-cresol, o-cresol, phenol, and catechol. The largest resident plasmid of PR1 was identified as the source of these genes by DNA hybridization. These results indicate that the genes which encode Tom and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase are located on TOM, an approximately 108-kb degradative plasmid of B. cepacia G4. 35 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Shields, M.S.; Reagin, J.J.; Campbell, R. [Univ. of West Florida, Pensacola, FL (United States)] [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energetics and kinetics of anaerobic aromatic and fatty acid degradation. Progress report, June 1991--November 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The kinetics of benzoate degradation by the anaerobic syntrophic bacterium, Syntrophus buswellii, was studied in coculture with Desulfovibrio strain G11. The threshold value for benzoate degradation was dependent on the acetate concentration with benzoate threshold values ranging from 2.4 {mu}M at 20 mM acetate to 30.0 {mu}M at 65 mM acetate. Increasing acetate concentrations also inhibited the rate of benzoate degradation with a apparent K{sub i} for acetate inhibition of 7.0 mM. Lower threshold values were obtained when nitrate rather than sulfate was the terminal electron acceptor. These data are consistent with a thermodynamic explanation for the threshold, and suggest that there is a minimum Gibbs free energy value required for the degradation of benzoate. An acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase has been isolated from Syntrophomonas wolfei; it is apparently a key enzyme controlling the synthesis of poly-B-hydroxyalkanoate from acetyl-CoA in this organism. Kinetic characterization of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase from S. wolfei showed that it is similar in its structural, kinetic, and apparent regulatory properties to other biosynthetic acetoacetyl-CoA thiolases from phylogenetically distinct bacteria that synthesize PHA. Intracellular concentrations of CoA and acetyl-CoA are believed to be critical factors regulating the activity of the acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase in S. wolfei. We have also isolated and characterized several new halophilic anaerobic fermentative anaerobes. Phylogenetic analysis indicates that one of these bacteria is a new species in the genus, Haloanaerobium. Two other species appear to be members of the genus, Halobacteroides. Several halophilic acetoclastic methanogenic bacteria have also been isolated and their physiological properties are currently under investigation. We have also isolated an acetate-using dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium.

McInerney, M.J.

1992-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nutritional Status of some Aromatic Plants Grown to Produce Volatile Oils under Treated Municipal Wastewater irrigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

any reduction in quantity and quality of volatile oils.on the quantity and quality of the essential oil for fiveon the quantity and quality of the essential oil of five

Khalifa, Ramadan Khalifa Mohamed

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Partitioning and Bioavailability of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons in an Intertidal Marsh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by combustion of organic matter including petroleum and woodcombustion of petroleum-based fuels but also from organic matter including wood.

Maruya, Keith A; Horne, Alex J

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams  

SciTech Connect

Our efforts quarter were directed at preparing PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis. The same operating conditions used in the past were implemented this quarter to prepare PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis from a Pit. [number sign]8 hvA bituminous coal. The new data are in excellent agreement with the old. Both ultimate yield values and soot percentages at particular furnace temperatures from these data sets am within experimental uncertainties. PAH samples have now been prepared to cover extents of conversion of coal tar into soot from 35--80 %. Additional runs during primary devolatilization have yielded PAH samples that cover nearly the full range of this process as well. Hence, all PAH samples from the Pit. [number sign]8 coal sample are in hand. We also began to collect the analogous PAH samples from a subituminous coal. Efforts at sample analysis focused on testing and modification of the gravity-flow column chromatography procedure using actual tar samples. Extra samples collected during combustion experiments using the Pit. [number sign]8 bituminous coal were used to refine the preparation technique. Solvent volumes were adjusted to optimize sample separation, and additional tests were conducted to determine the reproducibility of the fractionation and recovery. Further refinement in the experimental methodology allowed 80% recovery of the coal tar samples to be reproducibly achieved.

Yu, L.; Dadamio, J.; Hildemann, L.; Niska, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Micellar solubilization of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal tar-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Solubilization of PAHs from a coal tar-contaminated soil obtained from a manufactured gas plant (MGP) site was evaluated using nonionic polyoxyethylene surfactants at dosages greater than cmc. Up to 25% of Soxhlet-extractable PAHs could be solubilized at surfactant loadings of 0.3 g/g of oil in 16 days in completely stirred batch reactors. Longer periods were required to reach equilibrium at higher surfactant dosages. Raoult`s law satisfactorily described the partitioning of constituent PAHs between the weathered coal tar and the micellar solution. An equilibrium model was developed to predict the solubilization of PAHs from coal tar-contaminated soils for given properties of the soil, surfactant, and component PAHs. The model predicted solubilization of constituent PAHs reasonably well at low surfactant dosages. At extremely high surfactant dosages, the model failed to reliably predict solubilization. Presumably, mass transfer mass transfer limitations prevented the attainment of equilibrium during the duration (380h) of solubilization experiments. 25 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

Yeom, I.T.; Ghosh, M.M.; Cox, C.D.; Robinson, K.G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

1 Solvent-Extractable Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Biochar: 2 Influence of Pyrolysis Temperature and Feedstock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable gasification­biochar systems? A case-study of rice-husk gasification in Cambodia, Part Biochar Research Centre, University of Edinburgh, Crew Building, King's Buildings, West Mains Road November 2011 Available online 26 November 2011 Keywords: Biochar Rice husk Sustainability a b s t r a c

396

Final Report for Grant "Direct Writing via Novel Aromatic Ladder Polymer Precursors"  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities and findings under the above entitled grant. These pertain to the development of new synthetic routes to novel precursor polymers and oligomers that are applicable for conversion from electrical insulators to electrical conductors under the application of light (e.g. direct photolithographic writing)

C. B. Gorman

2010-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 5308 7/1/2013 0:41 Indian Fort Medical Emergency Hiker bit by snake on trail Report Filed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

due to unknown cause BFD Responded 5311 7/2/2013 13:15 Old Broom Craft Building Theft By Unlawful Taking Copper piping stolen from new construction BPD responded 5312 7/4/2013 13:45 James Hall Fire Alarm/6/2013 12:45 Visitor Center Theft By Unlawful Taking Older Huffy bicycle stolen from parking lot Report

Baltisberger, Jay H.

398

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4280 7/1/2011 12:02 Kentucky Hall Fire Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theatre Theft Copper Wiring Sheriff responded 4293 7/14/2011 16:59 Campus Vehicle Immobilized Unpaid Alarm Activation Activation due to burnt food BFD responded 4281 7/2/2011 9:30 James Hall Theft Glade Property Damage Hand rail FM notified 4285 7/6/2011 10:10 Draper Building Theft Sony DVD

Baltisberger, Jay H.

399

Evidence for X(3872)--> psi (2S) gamma in B-->X(3872)K Decays and a Study of B-->cc-bar gamma K  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a search for B?cc? ?K decays with the BABAR detector, where cc? includes J/? and ?(2S), and K includes K, K[supscript S] [superscript 0], and K*(892), we find evidence for X(3872)?J/?? and X(3872)??(2S)? with 3.6? and ...

Fisher, Peter H.

400

Searches for Cosmic-String Gravitational-Wave Bursts in Mock LISA Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A network of observable, macroscopic cosmic (super-)strings may have formed in the early universe. If so, the cusps that generically develop on cosmic-string loops emit bursts of gravitational radiation that could be detectable by both ground- and space-based gravitational-wave interferometers. Here we report on two versions of a LISA-oriented string-burst search pipeline that we have developed and tested within the context of the Mock LISA Data Challenges. The two versions rely on the publicly available MultiNest and PyMC software packages, respectively. To reduce the effective dimensionality of the search space, our implementations use the F-statistic to analytically maximize over the signal's amplitude and polarization, A and psi, and use the FFT to search quickly over burst arrival times t_C. The standard F-statistic is essentially a frequentist statistic that maximizes the likelihood; we also demonstrate an approximate, Bayesian version of the F-statistic that incorporates realistic priors on A and psi. We calculate how accurately LISA can expect to measure the physical parameters of string-burst sources. To understand LISA's angular resolution for string-burst sources, we draw maps of the waveform fitting factor [maximized over (A psi, t_C)] as a function of sky position; these maps dramatically illustrate why (for LISA) inferring the correct sky location of the emitting string loop will often be practically impossible. We also identify and elucidate several symmetries that are imbedded in this search problem, and we derive the distribution of cut-off frequencies f_max for observable bursts.

Michael I. Cohen; Curt Cutler; Michele Vallisneri

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

QoS Routing under Adversarial Binary Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... rif cw rif cw cw L r )} (,0 max{ ) ( ,0 max min min max ? ? ? where { } Rrc c r ? = min min , and { } Rrc c r ? = min min (29) ...

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

402

The hydrological cycle tirelessly distributes water between land, ocean, atmosphere and cryosphere. Stefan Hagemann and his colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

irrigation, permafrost and climate. The Perpetual Pump TEXT UTE KEHSE Photo:Okapia #12;Always on the move sooner or later. W ater molecules are al- ways on the move. They migrate from the ocean into the atmo of those parts of the water cycle that take place on land ­ and to investigate how they feed back

403

A l u m n i C a m p u sh a n n o v e r Zu Gast bei max und moritz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gastfreundschaft des WilhelmBuschMuseums und genossen im Garten die eigens gegrillten Würstchen und knüpften noch nachempfunden wurde. · Bild: Behrens Der gro?zügig angelegte Garten des Georgenpalais dient auch als Café

Nejdl, Wolfgang

404

OCCURRENCE OF DISEASES AND INSECT PESTS IN SELECT SOYBEAN (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) AND SORGHUM(Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) ROTATIONS IN MISSISSIPPI.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Field and greenhouse studies were conducted during 2004 through 2006 at the Rodney R. Foil Plant Science Research Center, Starkville, MS. Six sorghum and soybean (more)

Pichardo, Sergio T.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Der Klimawandel trifft die Menschen global ebenso wie regional. So erforscht Pankaj Kumar, Mitarbeiter am Climate-Service-Center und am Max-Planck-Institut fr Meteorologie in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strahlenausbrüche Das Kraftwerk der kurzen Gammablitze Seit Jahren geben sie Rätsel auf: Jene kurzen Blitze im

Spang, Rainer

406

MAX PLANCK aktuell 86 M A X P L A N C K F O R S C H U N G 2 / 2 0 0 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mitteln des Stifter- verbandes für die Deutsche Wissenschaft ­ liefert vor allem ergänzendes Material zur zu Chemie und Phy- sik. Zwischen 5 und 10 Prozent der 3100 bundesweit ange- schriebenen Gymnasien, Chemie und Physik. Eintauchen in die Geschichte der Wissenschaft ­ die Funktionen der Zeitmaschine wollen

407

Further tests of new method for zone isolation in horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research is the continuation of Phase II of a joint industry project, whose main objective is to investigate the feasibility of sealing off water and gas producing zones in a horizontal well. During Phase I of the project laboratory experiments were conducted using PVC pipes up to 2-in. diameter and 3-ft. long in order to investigate the viability of using three commercial gels for use as wellborn plugs. The encouraging results from these earlier experiments led to testing the method in a full-scale 60-ft. long by 6-in. diameter wellborn model. The results obtained were again encouraging, but we needed to confirm them by repeating the experiment with some modifications. The two main objectives of this research are: (i) to investigate the effectiveness of K-MAX as a chemical wellborn plug and PERMSEAL as a formation gel in a horizontal well, and (ii) to measure the holding pressure of K-MAX. For the first research objective, the existing 60-ft. long apparatus was modified to include heater pipes inside the 12-in. PVC oboes to allow hot water circulation to achieve a temperature of about 120 F? during curing of PERMSEAL. The results showed that K-MAX performed satisfactorily as a chemical wellborn plug, being displaced with no slumping. The PERMSEAL was displaced radially around the wellborn, penetrating and consolidating the sand and making it apparently impermeable. The holding pressure apparatus consisted of two lengths of 5 []-in. casing (5-ft. long and 10-ft. long), open at one end and closed at the other. K-MAX gel was introduced into the pipe at the open end. Upon curing, the closed end was connected to a HPLC pump to inject water against the K-MAX plug. The holding pressures obtained were low (less than 1 psi). Somewhat higher holding pressures may be expected in the field because of the actual wellborn roughness; and with surface rams being closed during injection in the field, the formation would preferentially be injected into the problem zone. Given the encouraging results to date, it is recommended to field test the new zone isolation method.

Gomez Gomez, Julian Alberto

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Converged properties of clean metal surfaces by all-electron first-principles calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

region between the muffin tin spheres was Ewf max ) 17 Ry for the wave functions and Epot max ) 169 Ry

409

March 14, 2008 1 Abstract--In this paper, we continue to analyze optimal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacity of generator g Pkc min , Pkc max : max and min transmission element k emergency rating cng: cost

410

Nobel Prize in Physics 1961  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hochschule Mnchen (Technische Universitt Mnchen) & Max Planck Institute for Medical Research, Heidelberg, Germany Button WA - Technische Hochschule Mnchen & Max...

411

Local Constraints in Combinatorial Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lasserre relaxation for MAX k-CSP q . . . . . . .for MAX k-CSP q . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Expanding CSP Instances . . . . . .

Tulsiani, Madhur

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

NETL F 451.1-1/1 Categorical Exclusion (CX) Designation Form  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOD 2011 Benjamin May 5162011 - 12312011 Morgantown, WV 100700 PSI Compressor Facility Air Improvements Project Install a filtration system for the 700 psi...

413

Solution for Coal Seam Deaasi ication Wel s =ducing Under Two-Phase Flow Conditkms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the cod seam in Exampk #Z Initial pressure(psi) 600.0 WellborePressure(psi) 120.0 Well Radius(ft) 0

Mohaghegh, Shahab

414

Effect of community structure on the kinetics of anaerobic degradation of aromatic compounds. Progress report, March 1989--June 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The physiology of fatty acid metabolism and the kinetics of benzoate degradation by anaerobic syntrophic bacteria were studied. We have shown that: a threshold for benzoate degradation by a syntrophic coculture of Syntrophus buswellii and Desulfovibrio strain G11 exists and the value of the threshold depends on the amount of benzoate and acetate suggesting a thermodynamic limitation. Syntrophomonas wolfei has the enzymatic ability to produce formate and that low levels of formate are made during growth in pure culture with crotonate or in coculture with butyrate. However, the high specific activities of hydrogenase compared to formate dehydrogenase indicate that hydrogen rather than formate is the intermediate involved in the interspecies transfer of reducing equivalents. We have isolated Syntrophus buswellii and a novel anaerobic bacteria that catalyzes an aryl-ether cleavage reaction using crotonate as the energy source. Several novel obligately halophilic anaerobes from hypersaline oil reservoir brines were isolated and characterized. Two of these degraded pyrogallate with the production of acetate. We have shown that S. wolfei synthesizes poly-{beta}hydroxyalkanoate (PHA) by two routes, directly from a {beta}-oxidation intermediate without cleaving a C-C bond and by the condensation of two acetyl-CoA molecules. The formation of D-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA needed for PHA synthesis occurs by the activity of a acetoacetyl-CoA reductase rather than a enoyl-CoA hydratase. The genes for PHA synthesis in S. wolfei have been cloned into Escherichia coli.

McInerney, M.J.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Direct determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquids and shale oil by laser excited Shpol'skii spectrometry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This article reports that tunable, dye laser excitation of Shpol'skii effect spectra provides a potentially useful means of determining PAH compounds directly in coal liquids and shale oil without prior isolation of the PAH fraction by chromatographic or other techniques. The data reported were obtained by selecting excitation wavelengths within the response curve of a single dye, 2-(4-biphenylyl)-5-phenyl-1,3,4 oxadiazole (PBD). The characteristic low temperature excitation spectra of PAH compounds in appropriate Shpol'skii matrices are known to be sharp (FWHM approx. 10cm/sup -1/). The luminescence of four individual PAHs is included. The analytical results obtained for a typical solvent refined coal and shale oil sample are summarized. 2 figures, 1 table. (DP)

Yen, Y.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.; Iles, M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

THE CHEMISTRY OF COAL MODEL COMPOUNDS -CLEAVAGE OF ALIPHATIC BRIDGES BETWEEN AROMATIC NUCLEI CATALYSED BY LEWIS ACIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Background I. II. III. IV. II. Coal Liquefaction . Coal Structure . Lewis Acid Catalysts. Scope andOrganic Structure of Bituminous Coal", Proceedings, Stanford

Taylor, Newell D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Nitration of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in coal combustors and exhaust streams. Quarterly report, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Our efforts quarter were directed at preparing PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis. The same operating conditions used in the past were implemented this quarter to prepare PAH samples at well-controlled extents of secondary pyrolysis from a Pit. {number_sign}8 hvA bituminous coal. The new data are in excellent agreement with the old. Both ultimate yield values and soot percentages at particular furnace temperatures from these data sets am within experimental uncertainties. PAH samples have now been prepared to cover extents of conversion of coal tar into soot from 35--80 %. Additional runs during primary devolatilization have yielded PAH samples that cover nearly the full range of this process as well. Hence, all PAH samples from the Pit. {number_sign}8 coal sample are in hand. We also began to collect the analogous PAH samples from a subituminous coal. Efforts at sample analysis focused on testing and modification of the gravity-flow column chromatography procedure using actual tar samples. Extra samples collected during combustion experiments using the Pit. {number_sign}8 bituminous coal were used to refine the preparation technique. Solvent volumes were adjusted to optimize sample separation, and additional tests were conducted to determine the reproducibility of the fractionation and recovery. Further refinement in the experimental methodology allowed 80% recovery of the coal tar samples to be reproducibly achieved.

Yu, L.; Dadamio, J.; Hildemann, L.; Niska, S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development and evaluation of aromatic polyamide-imide membranes for H?S and CO? separations from natural gas .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Over the past decade, membrane based gas separations have gained traction in industry as an attractive alternative to traditional thermally based separations due to their (more)

Vaughn, Justin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Nucleation mechanisms of aromatic polyesters, PET, PBT, and PEN, on single-wall carbon nanotubes: early nucleation stages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nucleation mechanisms of poly (ethylene terephthalate) (PET), poly (butylene terephthalate) (PBT), and poly (ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) on single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are proposed, based on experimental evidence, theoretical epitaxy analysis, ...

Adriana Espinoza-Martnez, Carlos Avila-Orta, Vctor Cruz-Delgado, Oscar Olvera-Neria, Julio Gonzlez-Torres, Francisco Medelln-Rodrguez

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Production of Green Aromatics and Olefins from Lignocellulosic Biomass by Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: Chemistry, Catalysis, and Process Development.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diminishing petroleum resources combined with concerns about global warming and dependence on fossil fuels are leading our society to search for renewable sources of energy. (more)

Jae, Jungho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Phenotype fingerprinting suggests the involvement of single-genotype consortia in degradation of aromatic compounds by Rhodopseudomonas palustris  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding of cellular processes involved in the anaerobic degradation of complex organic compounds by microorganisms is crucial for development of innovative biotechnologies for bioethanol production and for efficient degradation of toxic organic compounds. In natural environment the degradation is usually accomplished by syntrophic consortia comprised of different bacterial species. Here we show that the metabolically versatile phototrophic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris may form its own syntrophic consortia, when it grows anaerobically on p-coumarate or benzoate as a sole carbon source. In the study we reveal the consortia from a comparison of large-scale measurements of mRNA and protein expressions under p-coumarate and benzoate degrading conditions using a novel computational approach referred as phenotype fingerprinting. In this approach marker genes for known R. palustris phenotypes are employed to calculate their expression from the gene and protein expressions in each studied condition. Subpopulations of the consortia are inferred from the expression of phenotypes and known metabolic modes of the R. palustris growth. We find that p-coumarate degrading condition leads to at least three R. palustris subpopulations utilizing p-coumarate, benzoate, and CO2 and H2. Benzoate degrading condition also produces at least three subpopulations utilizing benzoate, CO2 and H2, and N2 and formate. Communication among syntrophs and inter-syntrophic dynamics in each consortium are indicated by up-regulation of transporters and genes involved in the curli formation and chemotaxis. The photoautotrphic subpopulation found in both consortia is characterized by activation of two cbb operons and the uptake hydrogenase system. A specificity of N2-fixing subpopulation in the benzoate degrading consortium is the preferential activation of the vanadium nitrogenase over the molybdenum nitrogenase. The N2-fixing subpopulation in the consortium is confirmed by consumption of dissolved nitrogen gas under the benzoate degrading conditions.

Karpinets, Tatiana V [ORNL; Pelletier, Dale A [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL; Uberbacher, Edward C [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Samatova, Nagiza F [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission profiles and removal efficiency by electrostatic precipitator and wetfine scrubber in an iron ore sintering plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A monitoring campaign of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyl was carried out in an Italian iron ore sintering plant by sampling the combustion gases at the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) outlet, at the Wetfine scrubber (WS) outlet, and by collecting the ESP dust. Few data are available on these micropollutants produced in iron ore sintering plants, particularly from Italian plants. This study investigates the PAH emission profiles and the removal efficiency of ESPs and WS. PAHs were determined at the stack, ESP outlet flue gases, and in ESP dust to characterize the emission profiles and the performance of the ESP and the WS for reducing PAH emission. The 11 PAHs monitored are listed in the Italian legislative decree 152/2006. The mean total PAH sum concentration in the stack flue gases is 3.96 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, in ESP outlet flue gases is 9.73 {mu}g/N m{sup 3}, and in ESP dust is 0.53 {mu}g/g. Regarding the emission profiles, the most abundant compound is benzo(b)fluoranthene, which has a relative low BaP toxic equivalency factors (TEF) value, followed by dibenzo(a,l)pyrene, which has a very high BaP(TEF) value. The emission profiles in ESP dust and in the flue gases after the ESP show some changes, whereas the fingerprint in ESP and stack flue gases is very similar. The removal efficiency of the ESP and of WS on the total PAH concentration is 5.2 and 59.5%, respectively. 2 figs., 5 tabs.

Ettore Guerriero; Antonina Lutri; Rosanna Mabilia; Maria Concetta Tomasi Sciano; Mauro Rotatori [Istituto sull'Inquinamento Atmosferico, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy). Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

STEAM EXTRACTION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND LEAD FROM CONTAMINATED SEDIMENT USING SURFACTANT, SALT AND AKALINE CONDITIONS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Indiana Harbor Canal sediments, containing a number of environmental contaminants, are a source of pollution to Lake Michigan, and will need to be dredged (more)

WEINKAM, GRANT

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Direct aromatization of methane. Quarterly technical progress report Number 5, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study into the pyrolysis of methane in the absence of a quench has been completed. The unquenched reaction was studied at temperatures between 900 and 1,200 C and methane flows of 80--800 Scc/min. At 1,100 C and a methane flow rate ranging between 267 and 800 Scc/minute, methane conversions ranged between 31--48% with the major detectable product being benzene. At the low flow rates a significant amount of a black heavy product, primarily coke, was also formed. The reaction was also studied in a quenched mode. At 1,100 C, methane flow rate of 500 Scc/min, and a water flow rate of 216 mL/hr, a conversion of 33% was achieved with over 60% of the products being C{sub 4}+ hydrocarbons. Although a significant amount of heavy products were still formed, these were of a lighter color than those formed in the unquenched model suggesting a lower average molecular weight.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Automatica 36 (2000) 69}82 Brief Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure PTS psi (MPa) 4 Attemperator valve area AAT * Electrical power JGN MW components is implicitly

Ray, Asok

426

202 IEEE TRANS.4CTIONS Oh'AUTOMATIC CONTROL, VOL. AC-18,NO. 3, J U K E 1973 Design and Analysis of Boiler-Turbine-Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pressure PTS psi (MPa) 4 Attemperator valve area AAT * Electrical power JGN MW components is implicitly

Kwatny, Harry G.

427

Phosphine-Mediated Multi-Component ?-Umpolung/Aldol/Wittig Cascade Reaction for the Synthesis of Functionalized Naphthalenes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

84% yield) as a pale yellow oil; IR (film) ? max 3252, 2927,99% yield) as a pale yellow oil; IR (film) ? max 3277, 3031,87% yield) as a colorless oil; IR (film) ? max 3300, 3058,

Zhang, Kui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

External Mass Injection to Reduce Energetic Ion Production in the Discharge Plume of High Current Hollow Cathodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow Voltage Spread (V) Volt at Max Ion Energy (V) Externalfor 10 sccm cathode flow. Volt at Max Ion Energy (V) 16 sccm10 sccm cathode 10 sccm injected Volt at Max Ion Energy (V)

Chu, Emily

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Hyper-resistivity and electron thermal conductivity due to destroyed magnetic surfaces in axisymmetric plasma equilibria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to model the effects of small-scale current-driven magnetic fluctuations in a mean-field theoretical description of a large-scale plasma magnetic field B(x,t), a space and time dependent hyper-resistivity {Lambda}(x,t) can be incorporated into the Ohm's law for the parallel electric field E Dot-Operator B. Using Boozer coordinates, a theoretical method is presented that allows for a determination of the hyper-resistivity {Lambda}({psi}) functional dependence on the toroidal magnetic flux {psi} for arbitrary experimental steady-state Grad-Shafranov axisymmetric plasma equilibria, if values are given for the parallel plasma resistivity {eta}({psi}) and the local distribution of any auxiliary plasma current. Heat transport in regions of plasma magnetic surfaces destroyed by resistive tearing modes can then be modeled by an electron thermal conductivity k{sub e}({psi})=({epsilon}{sub 0}{sup 2}m{sub e}/e{sup 2}){Lambda}({psi}), where e and m{sub e} are the electron charge and mass, respectively, while {epsilon}{sub 0} is the permittivity of free space. An important result obtained for axisymmetric plasma equilibria is that the {psi}{psi}-component of the metric tensor of Boozer coordinates is given by the relation g{sup {psi}{psi}}({psi}){identical_to}{nabla}{psi} Dot-Operator {nabla}{psi}=[{mu}{sub 0}G({psi})][{mu}{sub 0}I({psi})]/{iota}({psi}), with {mu}{sub 0} the permeability of free space, G({psi}) the poloidal current outside a magnetic surface, I({psi}) the toroidal current inside a magnetic surface, and {iota}({psi}) the rotational transform.

Weening, R. H. [Department of Radiologic Sciences, Thomas Jefferson University, 901 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107-5233 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Haskel/BuTech/PPI  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation Presentation For Argonne National Laboratory Haskel/BuTech/PPI Products * 100,000psi Liquid Pumps * 37,000psi Gas Boosters * 15,000psi Diaphragm Comp * 4,500psi Air Amplifiers * 150,000psi Valves, Fittings, and Tubing * 15,000psi Sub-Sea Valves (1" orifice) * Air Pilot Switches & Relief Valves Valves, Fittings & Tubing Pumps, Boosters, & Diaphragm Compressors & Systems Hydraulic Gas Booster Challenges * Global Material Regulations - KHK Japan recommends A286 & 316 SS with high nickel content - Europe recommends 316SS - North America does not appear to regulate * Global Certifications - CE & ATEX * Low Inlet vs. High Outlet (Suction vs Discharge) - Multiple compression stages - Elevated temperatures

431

IOP PUBLISHING JOURNAL OF PHYSICS: CONDENSED MATTER J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 (2009) 134009 (9pp) doi:10.1088/0953-8984/21/13/134009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the muffin tin spheres was Ewf max =20 Ry for the wave functions and Epot max =169 Ry for the potential

432

Oxygen Overlayers on Pd(111) Studied by Density Functional Theory Mira Todorova, Karsten Reuter, and Matthias Scheffler*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the wavefunction in the interstitial is Ewf max = 20 Ryd and for the potential E pot max = 196 Ryd. For the (2 ? 2

433

Composition and structure of the RuO2,,110... surface in an O2 and CO environment: Implications for the catalytic formation of CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the interstitial is Ewf max 19 Ry for the wave functions and Epot max 196 Ry for the potential. With these cutoff

434

Nobel Prize in Physics 1918  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Physics by his discovery of energy quanta" Max Karl Ernst Ludwig Planck Button Germany Button born 1858, died 1947 Button CA - Kaiser Wilhelm Society (Max Planck Society),...

435

Property:Available Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensors Sensors Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Available Sensors Property Type Text Pages using the property "Available Sensors" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... A Alden Large Flume + Pressure Range(psi), Velocity, Displacement, ...

436

International Energy Agency (IEA) PVPS Task 12: Environment, Health and Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Issues Workshop, Sacramento, CA, June 28, 2007 Coal Oil NG LPG Nuclear (Chernobyl) Nuclear (except Chernobyl) PV, PSI Fatalities 434 3000 100 600 125 PV, BNL 2 9000-33000 100 105 104 103 102 101 100 PSI #12

437

Further insights into the "$??$ puzzle"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a systematic investigation of $J/\\psi(\\psi^\\prime)\\to VP$, where $V$ and $P$ stand for light vector and pseudoscalar mesons, we identify the role played by the electromagnetic (EM) transitions and intermediate meson loop transitions, which are essential ingredients for understanding the $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi^\\prime$ couplings to $VP$. We show that on the one hand, the EM transitions have relatively larger interferences in $\\psi^\\prime\\to \\rho\\pi$ and $K^*\\bar{K}+c.c.$ as explicitly shown by vector meson dominance (VMD). On the other hand, the strong decay of $\\psi^\\prime$ receives relatively larger destructive interferences from the intermediate meson loop transitions. By identifying these mechanisms in an overall study of $J/\\psi(\\psi^\\prime)\\to VP$, we provide a coherent understanding of the so-called "$\\rho\\pi$ puzzle".

Qiang Zhao; Gang Li; Chao-Hsi Chang

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

Further insights into the "$\\rho\\pi$ puzzle"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on a systematic investigation of $J/\\psi(\\psi^\\prime)\\to VP$, where $V$ and $P$ stand for light vector and pseudoscalar mesons, we identify the role played by the electromagnetic (EM) transitions and intermediate meson loop transitions, which are essential ingredients for understanding the $J/\\psi$ and $\\psi^\\prime$ couplings to $VP$. We show that on the one hand, the EM transitions have relatively larger interferences in $\\psi^\\prime\\to \\rho\\pi$ and $K^*\\bar{K}+c.c.$ as explicitly shown by vector meson dominance (VMD). On the other hand, the strong decay of $\\psi^\\prime$ receives relatively larger destructive interferences from the intermediate meson loop transitions. By identifying these mechanisms in an overall study of $J/\\psi(\\psi^\\prime)\\to VP$, we provide a coherent understanding of the so-called "$\\rho\\pi$ puzzle".

Zhao, Qiang; Chang, Chao-Hsi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Engineering Tables: Reinforcement Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Properties of key reinforcement materials...3 GPa 10 6 psi GPa 10 6 psi GPa 10 6 psi Carbon fiber (pitch) E = 55 ? 10 6 psi 2.0 0.072 380 55 ? ? 190 28 E = 75 ? 10 6 psi 2.0 0.072 520 75 ? ? 260 38 E = 100 ? 10 6 psi 2.2 0.078 690 100 5 0.7 314 46 E = 120 ? 10 6 psi 2.2 0.078 830 120 5 0.7 377 55 E = 130 ? 10 6 psi 2.2 0.078 895 130 5 0.7 407...

440

Nucleate boiling bubble growth and departure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vapor bubble formation on the heating surface during pool boiling has been studied experimentally. Experiments were made at the atmospheric pressure 28 psi and 40 psi, using degassed distilled water and ethanol. The ...

Staniszewski, Bogumil E.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design and evaluation of an internet-based personalized instructional system for social psychology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two iterations of an Internet-based Personalized System of Instruction (PSI) course are described. The course was designed to capitalize on the unique advantages of the PSI system while using the Internet to overcome some of its noted administrative ...

Erica Davis Blann; Donald A. Hantula

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Derivation of Maxwell-like equations from the quaternionic Dirac's equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expanding the ordinary Dirac's equation, $\\frac{1}{c}\\frac{\\partial\\psi}{\\partial t}+\\vec{\\alpha}\\cdot\\vec{\

A. I. Arbab

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

443

EFFECTS OF LEWIS ACID CATALYSTS ON THE HYDROGENATION AND CRACKING OF TWO-RING AROMATIC AND HYDROAROMATIC STRUCTURES RELATED TO COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Zinc Chloride Catalysts in an Extracting Medium", LBL-EFFECTS OF LEWIS ACID CATALYSTS ON THE HYDROGENATION ANDEffects of Lewis Acid Catalysts on the Hydrogenation and

Salim, Sadie S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Semi-supervised Machine Learning Algorithm in Near Infrared Spectral Calibration: A Case Study to Determine Cetane Number and Total Aromatics of Diesel Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new spectral calibration algorithm, Laplacian regularized least squares (LapRLS), was proposed. Commonly least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) and partial least squares (PLS) are used for the spectral quantitative model establishment. However, ... Keywords: semi-supervised learning, supervised learning, laplacian regularized least squares, near infrared spectroscopy

Songjing Wang; Di Wu; Kangsheng Liu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Use of a Heated Transfer Line-Membrane Interface Probe to Characterize Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons at a Manufactured Gas Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes bench-scale and field pilot tests of a system integrating a heated transfer line (HTL) and a membrane interface probe (MIP) with commercially available analytical instruments and software. Driven into the subsurface by a cone penetrometer, the HTL-MIP thermally extracts organic compounds from saturated and unsaturated soils at former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The integrated system detects compounds using a screening photo-ionization detector (PID) and analyzes them in situ...

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Epidemiology 10, 145-58. Xcel Energy, 2003a. Black Dog PlantAccessed December 2003. Xcel Energy, 2003b. Sherburne CountyAccessed December 2003. Xcel Energy, 2003c. Allen S King

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from residential wood combustion. Environmental Science andsuch as residential wood combustion and motor vehicle2) residential wood combustion; and (3) power generation

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

EFFECTS OF LEWIS ACID CATALYSTS ON THE HYDROGENATION AND CRACKING OF TWO-RING AROMATIC AND HYDROAROMATIC STRUCTURES RELATED TO COAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asphaltenes in Processed Coal", EPRI Report AF-480, preparedS. A. and Bell, A. T. , "Coal Liquefaction Using ZincJ. H. , and Vermeulen, T. , "Coal Conversion Using Zinc

Salim, Sadie S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Contributions of aromatic pairs of human Gamma-D-Crystallin to its folding, stability, aggregation, and interaction with human Alpha B-Crystallin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two distinct groups of proteins, a-crystallins and [Beta][gamma]-crystallins, constitute 90% of the vertebrate eye lens soluble proteins. Long-term solubility and stability against unfolding and aggregation are essential ...

Kong, Fanrong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Heating: including gas, oil, coal and woodto MVs, domestic heating, in general, and residential woodpopulation using wood as their primary heating fuel (i.e. ,

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood Combustion (RWC) We estimated PAH emissions from RWC from both fireplaces and woodstoves. Emissions from pellet

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Use of aromatic salts for simultaneously removing SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x pollutants from exhaust of a combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for removing pollutants from the exhaust of combustion systems burning fuels containing substantial amounts of sulfur and nitrogen. An exemplary method of the invention involves the formation and reaction of a sorbent comprising calcium benzoate. The calcium benzoate is either dry-sprayed (in the form of a fine powder) or wet-sprayed in an aqueous solution in a high temperature environment such as a combustion chamber. The latter technique is feasible since calcium benzoate is a water-soluble form of calcium. When the dispersed particles of calcium benzoate are heated to a high temperature, the organic benzoate burns off and fine calcium oxide particles are formed. These particles are cenospheric (hollow) and have thin and highly porous walls, thus, affording optimum external and internal accessibility for reacting with toxic gaseous emissions such as SO.sub.2. Further, the combustion of the organic benzoate portion of the sorbent results in the conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2.

Levendis, Yiannis A. (Boston, MA); Wise, Donald L. (Belmont, MA)

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

Developing indicators for the assessment and proper management of the different levels of exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)s generally associated with coke-oven workers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Coke ovens may occur in the aluminium, steel, graphite, electrical, and construction industries. In the work area coke-oven workers may be exposed to various chemical (more)

Wang, Tianyuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Constraining uncertainties about the sources and magnitude of ambient air exposures to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): The state of Minnesota as a case study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial sources, such as coke-oven emissions, asphaltindustrial processes such as coke manufacturing and aluminumwood, wood waste, petroleum coke, or wastewater, sludge (

Lobscheid, Agnes B.; McKone, Thomas E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ITER fast ion collective Thomson scattering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007 Department: Optics and Plasma Research Department. Abstract (max. 2000 char.): ISSN 0106-2840 ISBN

456

Michigan Tech Career Services Partners If you see any of our Career Services Partners at this year's fair, stop by and say "Thanks!'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND LOCAL AREA Boehringer Ingelheim IBM BASF Max Planck Graduate Center Schott MPI for Chemistry MPI

457

Ocean Carbon Cycle Models from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

\tPacific data-model intercomparison from Patrick Wetzel (Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Germany)

458

Evolution of a transcriptional repression domain in an insect Hox  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Francis, Steve Glover, Jon Grenier, Max Hewitt, Leslie Hodder, Frank Hodge, Pat Hopkins, Steve Kaplan

Doebley, John

459

Cold matter effects and quarkonium production at RHIC and LHC  

SciTech Connect

In this work we investigate two cold matter effects in J/{Psi} and {Upsilon} production in nuclear collisions at RHIC and LHC, namely the shadowing effect and nuclear absorption. We characterize these effects by estimating the rapidity dependence of some nuclear ratios in pA and AA collisions at RHIC and LHC, R{sub pA} = d{sigma}{sub pA}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon})/Ad{sigma}{sub pp}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon}) and R{sub AA} = d{sigma}{sub AA}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon})/A{sup 2}d{sigma}{sub pp}(J/{Psi},{Upsilon}).

Dos Santos, G. S.; Mariotto, C. B. [Instituto de Matematica, Estatistica e Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande, Caixa Postal 474, CEP 96203-900, Rio Grande, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, V. P. [Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, CEP 96010-090, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

460

Fusion rules and vortices in $p_x+ip_y$ superconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "half-quantum" vortices ($\\sigma$) and quasiparticles ($\\psi$) in a two-dimensional $p_x+ip_y$ superconductor obey the Ising-like fusion rules $\\psi\\times \\psi=1$, $\\sigma\\times \\psi=\\sigma$, and $\\sigma\\times \\sigma= 1+\\psi$. We explain how the physical fusion of vortex-antivortex pairs allows us to use these rules to read out the information encoded in the topologically protected space of degenerate ground states. We comment on the potential applicability of this fact to quantum computation. Modified 11/30/05 to reflect manuscript as accepted for publication. Includes corrected last section.

Michael Stone; Suk Bum Chung

2005-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "max psi aromatics" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

P-Glycoprotein Structure and Chemotherapy Resistance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

them, including ones containing aromatic compounds (i.e., compounds with one or more benzene rings). The presence of so many hydrophobic and aromatic residues explains how,...

462

A Combined Crossed Molecular Beams and Electronic Structure Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combined Crossed Molecular Beams and Electronic Structure Study on the Gas Phase Formation of Prototype Aromatic and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) Ralf I. Kaiser Dept....

463

LIGHTING RESEARCH PROGRAM Project 5.2 Evaluation of Electronic Ballasts and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribution of ballast for evaluation in this project: Advance Transformer, Aromat, Aurswald, Delta Power

464

QUANTIFICATION OF PARENT AND ALKYL POLYCYCLIC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

QUANTIFICATION OF PARENT AND ALKYL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN CRUDE OIL SAMPLES USING COMPREHENSIVE ...

465

Arylene-fluorinated-sulfonimide ionomers and membranes for fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The preparation of aromatic sulfonimide polymers useful as membranes in electrochemical cells is described.

Teasley, Mark F. (Landenberg, PA)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA Twin Cities Campus Environmental Health and Safety W-140 Boynton Health Service  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-FID California: aromatics; EPA Method 9071: TCLP. Soluble reactive phosphate concentrations were measured

Netoff, Theoden

467

O:\EA-161.ORD  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PSI Energy, Inc. PSI Energy, Inc. Order No. EA-161 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electric energy from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under Section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C.§824a(e)). On October 9, 1997, PSI Energy, Inc. (PSI) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada. The application was amended by letter on October 14, 1997. PSI is a regulated public utility engaged in the generation, transmission, distribution, and sale of electricity. PSI proposes to transmit electricity to Canada that is surplus to its system or purchased from other sources and exported to Canada on its own behalf. The energy to be exported would

468

Perfect NOT transformation and conjugate transformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The perfect NOT transformation, probabilistic perfect NOT transformation and conjugate transformation are studied. Perfect NOT transformation criteria on a quantum state set $S$ of a qubit are obtained. Two necessary and sufficient conditions for realizing a perfect NOT transformation on $S$ are derived. When these conditions are not satisfied we discuss a probabilistic perfect NOT transformation (gate). We construct a probabilistic perfect NOT machine (gate) by a general unitary-reduction operation. With a postselection of the measurement outcomes, the probabilistic NOT gate yields perfectly complements of the input states. We prove that one can realize probabilistically the NOT gate of the input states secretly chosen from a certain set $S=\\{|\\Psi_1>, |\\Psi_2>,..., |\\Psi_n>\\}$ if and only if $|\\Psi_1>, |\\Psi_2>,...,$ and $|\\Psi_n>$ are linearly independent. We also generalize the probabilistic NOT transformation to the conjugate transformation in the multi-level quantum system. The lower bound of the best p...

Yan, Fengli; Yan, Zhichao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

$J/?$ polarization in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV in STAR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a polarization measurement of inclusive $J/\\psi$ mesons in the di-electron decay channel at mid-rapidity at 2 $< p_T <$ 6 GeV/c in p+p collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 200 GeV. Data were taken with the STAR detector at RHIC. The $J/\\psi$ polarization measurement should help to distinguish between the different models of the $J/\\psi$ production mechanism since they predict different $p_T$ dependences of the $J/\\psi$ polarization. In this analysis, $J/\\psi$ polarization is studied in the helicity frame. The polarization parameter $\\lambda_{\\theta}$ measured at RHIC becomes smaller towards high $p_T$, indicating more longitudinal $J/\\psi$ polarization as $p_T$ increases. The result is compared with predictions of presently available models.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bltmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Caldern de la Barca Snchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

470

EXPGUI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... theta max (or E-max/TOF-min) for each bank. ... pressing a button causes all selected banks to be ... the scaling panel.) The 2-theta/energy/TOF range to ...

471

MAR M 247 Derivations - CM 247 LC DS Alloy and CMSX Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

lbs/cu. in. gains in gas turbine operating .... combined with very tight control ... Tightly. Si. > control. S. MAR M 247 .03%. 1.0% .lO% max. 150 ppm max. Lower C.

472

A distribution-free risk-reward newsvendor model: Extending Scarf's ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scarf's min-max order formula for the distribution-free risk-neutral newsvendor problem is a classical result in the field of inventory management. The min-max...

473

Xe adsorption on metal surfaces: First-principles investigations Juarez L. F. Da Silva,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a kinetic-energy cutoff for the plane wave basis of Ewf max 18 Ry. This is a rather high value and makes value for Ewf max was manda- tory to ensure good numerical accuracy. Details of the calculations

474

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4-Cylinder Displacement: 1.4 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 9.3 gal Fuel Type: Premium gasoline Motor Type: 12-pole permanent magnet AC synchronous Max. PowerTorque: 111 kW370 Nm Max....

475

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Displacement: 1.5 L Fuel Tank Capacity: 13.2 US gal Fuel Type: Regular Unleaded Motor Type: Permanent magnet Max. PowerTorque: 17 kW144 Nm Max. Motor Speed: 9500 rpm...

476

Configurations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

difference between a loop in a structural template and its aligned (loop) region in the query sequence. e.g., MaxLoopSize 20 MaxSkipSeqSize (default 30): the maximum allowed...

477

The energy-savings potential of electrochromic windows in the US commercial buildings sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed windows: Minneapolis Chicago Washington DC Los AngelesWashington DC and California climate zone 9 Large windows (Window-to-wall ratio (WWR): Assembly maximum SHGC: Minneapolis SHGC max SHGC north Chicago SHGC max SHGC north Washington DC

Lee, Eleanor; Yazdanian, Mehry; Selkowitz, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

VEHICLE SPECIFICATIONS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy: 0.5 kWh Weight of Pack: 65 lb Pack Location: TrunkRear Seat Cooling: Active - Fan cooled MotorGenerator Max. PowerTorque: 15 kW107 Nm Max. Generator Speed: 6000 rpm...

479

An Utopia-Tracking Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2012 ... s? = max{|s1|, ..., |sns |}. Definition 3 (Lyapunov Function [10]) A continu- ous function V () : nx ? is called a Lyapunov func- tion if there exist...

480

Hardness of Maximum Constraint Satisfaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.4 Non-boolean Max-k-CSP . . . . . .Techniques 3 Preliminaries 4 Max-CSP given by a predicate 5Results for Every CSP?. In Symposium on Theory of

Chan, Siu On

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Power Conversion Apparatus and Method (Current Source Inverter)  

r s i ds v ds C Z e C v q s L md q-axis equivalent circuit i dst d-axis equivalent circuit I. Max. torque II. Extended max. torque; using the voltage boost capability

482

Photovoltaic properties of n-type SnS contact on the unpolished p-type Si surfaces with and without sulfide treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fabrication and detailed electrical properties of heterojunction diodes based on n-type SnS (n-SnS) and p-type Si (p-Si) were reported. The effect of sulfide treatment of p-Si on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the n-SnS/unpolished p-Si ... Keywords: Si, SnS, Solar cells, Surface treatment

Chung-Cheng Huang, Yow-Jon Lin, Chia-Jyi Liu, Yao-Wei Yang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Materials Solutions for Hydrogen Delivery in Pipelines  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of the study is as follows: Identify steel compositions/microstructures suitable for construction of new pipeline infrastructure and evaluate the potential use of the existing steel pipeline infrastructure in high pressure gaseous hydrogen applications. The microstructures of four pipeline steels were characterized and tensile testing was conducted in gaseous hydrogen and helium at pressures of 5.5 MPa (800 psi), 11 MPa (1600 psi) and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi). Based on reduction of area, two of the four steels that performed the best across the pressure range were selected for evaluation of fracture and fatigue performance in gaseous hydrogen at 5.5 MPa (800 psi) and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi). The basic format for this phase of the study is as follows: Microstructural characterization of volume fraction of phases in each alloy; Tensile testing of all four alloys in He and H{sub 2} at 5.5 MPa (800 psi), 11 MPa (1600 psi), and 20.7 MPa (3000 psi). RA performance was used to choose the two best performers for further mechanical property evaluation; Fracture testing (ASTM E1820) of two best t