National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for max aromatics volume

  1. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Max Schulze June 9, 2015 Extreme unicycling The unicycle that Los Alamos student intern Max Schulze and his brother had given their dad for Father's Day in 2005 did not get much use until Schulze tried it and got hooked. Today, he is a three-time unicycling world champion, with world wins in New Zealand in 2010, Italy in 2012 and Canada in 2014. "My main competitive unicycling event is 'trials,'" Schulze explains, "which requires riders to navigate technically challenging obstacle

  2. Summary Max Total Units

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary Max Total Units *If All Splits, No Rack Units **If Only FW, AC Splits 1000 52 28 28 2000 87 59 35 3000 61 33 15 4000 61 33 15 Totals 261 153 93 ***Costs $1,957,500.00 $1,147,500.00 $697,500.00 Notes: added several refrigerants removed bins from analysis removed R-22 from list 1000lb, no Glycol, CO2 or ammonia Seawater R-404A only * includes seawater units ** no seawater units included *** Costs = (total units) X (estimate of $7500 per unit) 1000lb, air cooled split systems, fresh water

  3. Unfolding with Maxed and Gravel.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-07-12

    Version: 00 UMG (Unfolding with MAXED and GRAVEL) is a package of seven programs written for the analysis of data measured with spectrometers that require the use of unfolding techniques. See the developers’ website for information on training courses http://www.ptb.de/en/org/6/utc2006/intro.htm. The program MAXED applies the maximum entropy principle to the unfolding problem, and the program GRAVEL uses a modified SAND-II algorithm to do the unfolding. There are two versions of each: MXD_FC33 and GRV_FC33 formore » “few-channel” unfolding (e.g., Bonner sphere spectrometers) and MXD-MC33 and GRV_MC33 for “multi-channel” unfolding (e.g., NE-213). The program IQU can be used to calculate integral quantities for both MAXED and GRAVEL solution spectra and, in the case of MAXED solutions, it can also be used to calculate the uncertainty in these values as well as the uncertainty in the solution spectrum. The uncertainty calculation is handled in the following way: given a solution spectrum generated by MAXED, the program IQU considers variations in the measured data and in the default spectrum and uses standard methods to do sensitivity analysis and uncertainty propagation. There are two versions: IQU_FC33 for “few channel” unfolding and IQU_MC33 for “multi-channel” unfolding. The program UMGPlot can be used to display the results from the unfolding programs MAXED and GRAVEL in graphical form in a quick and easy way.« less

  4. Max Ambiental S A | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ambiental S A Jump to: navigation, search Name: Max Ambiental S.A. Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 01452-938 Sector: Carbon Product: Max Ambiental is a company involved in the...

  5. MaxWest Environmental Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MaxWest Environmental Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name: MaxWest Environmental Systems Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77057 Product: MaxWest Environmental Systems designs,...

  6. Make aromatics from LPG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doolan, P.C. ); Pujado, P.R. )

    1989-09-01

    Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) consists mainly of the propane and butane fraction recovered from gas fields, associated petroleum gas and refinery operations. Apart from its use in steam cracking and stream reforming, LPG has few petrochemical applications. The relative abundance of LPG and the strong demand for aromatics - benzene, toluene and xylenes (BTX) - make it economically attractive to produce aromatics via the aromatization of propane and butanes. This paper describes the Cyclar process, which is based on a catalyst formulation developed by BP and which uses UOP's CCR catalyst regeneration technology, converts propane, butanes or mixtures thereof to petrochemical-quality aromatics in a single step.

  7. Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Max Tech and Beyond Design Competition is an annual competition run by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) that challenges students to design...

  8. SolarMax Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea (Republic) Zip: 445-912 Sector: Solar Product: Manufacturer and engineer of solar heating systems and boilers. References: SolarMax Inc1 This article is a stub. You...

  9. max kwh | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    This is likely due to users not understanding the meaning of "Max kWh"--often I see things like: "300, 700, 1000" (derived from "first 300, next 700, greater than 1000") which...

  10. Selective Conversion of Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Selective Conversion of Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass (15-30 percent by weight; 40 percent by energy). It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few naturally occurring sources of high-volume aromatic compounds. Converting lignin's complex biopolymer structure into simple organic

  11. Rainer Held > Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Rainer Held Guest Researcher - Max-Planck Institute for Solid State Research heldrain@gmail.com Formerly a member of the Schlom Group, he joined the Max-Planck Institute for Solid ...

  12. Aromatic molecules as spintronic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Orellana, P. A.; Laroze, D.

    2014-03-14

    In this paper, we study the spin-dependent electron transport through aromatic molecular chains attached to two semi-infinite leads. We model this system taking into account different geometrical configurations which are all characterized by a tight binding Hamiltonian. Based on the Green's function approach with a Landauer formalism, we find spin-dependent transport in short aromatic molecules by applying external magnetic fields. Additionally, we find that the magnetoresistance of aromatic molecules can reach different values, which are dependent on the variations in the applied magnetic field, length of the molecules, and the interactions between the contacts and the aromatic molecule.

  13. Neutron Damage and MAX Phase Ternary Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barsoum, Michael; Hoffman, Elizabeth; Sindelar, Robert; Garcua-Duaz, Brenda; Kohse, Gordon

    2014-06-17

    The Demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron radiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ C) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the response of a new class of machinable, conductive, layered, ternary transition metal carbides and nitrides - the so-called MAX phases - to low and moderate neutron dose levels.

  14. Extrapolation of systemic bioavailability assessing skin absorption and epidermal and hepatic metabolism of aromatic amine hair dyes in vitro

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manwaring, John; Rothe, Helga; Obringer, Cindy; Foltz, David J.; Baker, Timothy R.; Troutman, John A.; Hewitt, Nicola J.; Goebel, Carsten

    2015-09-01

    Approaches to assess the role of absorption, metabolism and excretion of cosmetic ingredients that are based on the integration of different in vitro data are important for their safety assessment, specifically as it offers an opportunity to refine that safety assessment. In order to estimate systemic exposure (AUC) to aromatic amine hair dyes following typical product application conditions, skin penetration and epidermal and systemic metabolic conversion of the parent compound was assessed in human skin explants and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and hepatocyte cultures. To estimate the amount of the aromatic amine that can reach the general circulation unchanged after passage through the skin the following toxicokinetically relevant parameters were applied: a) Michaelis–Menten kinetics to quantify the epidermal metabolism; b) the estimated keratinocyte cell abundance in the viable epidermis; c) the skin penetration rate; d) the calculated Mean Residence Time in the viable epidermis; e) the viable epidermis thickness and f) the skin permeability coefficient. In a next step, in vitro hepatocyte K{sub m} and V{sub max} values and whole liver mass and cell abundance were used to calculate the scaled intrinsic clearance, which was combined with liver blood flow and fraction of compound unbound in the blood to give hepatic clearance. The systemic exposure in the general circulation (AUC) was extrapolated using internal dose and hepatic clearance, and C{sub max} was extrapolated (conservative overestimation) using internal dose and volume of distribution, indicating that appropriate toxicokinetic information can be generated based solely on in vitro data. For the hair dye, p-phenylenediamine, these data were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those published for human volunteers. - Highlights: • An entirely in silico/in vitro approach to predict in vivo exposure to dermally applied hair dyes • Skin penetration and epidermal conversion assessed in human

  15. SolarMax Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: SolarMax Technology Inc Place: City of Industry, California Zip: 91745 Product: PV module maker and residential and commercial PV...

  16. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix Paradigm. ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  17. Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Incorporating the min-max mesh optimization method within the Target-Matrix ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Word Cloud More Like This Full ...

  18. AVTA: 2013 Ford C-MAX HEV Testing Results

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    VTO's National Laboratories have tested and collected both dynamometer and fleet data for the Ford C-MAX HEV (a hybrid electric vehicle).

  19. The MAX facility for CFD code validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Merzari, E.; Obabko, A.; Pointer, W. D.; Fischer, P.

    2012-07-01

    ANL has recently completed construction of a fluid dynamics test facility devised to provide validation data for CFD simulation tools used to evaluate various aspects of nuclear power plant design and safety. Experiments with the facility involve mixing air jets within a 1x1x1.7m long glass tank at atmospheric pressure. A particle image velocimetry system measures flow velocity and turbulence quantities within the tank while a high-speed infrared camera records temperatures across the tank lid. The tandem of high fidelity thermal and turbulence data is particularly useful for benchmarking transient heat transfer phenomena such as thermal striping. This paper describes the MAX facility, preliminary data obtained during shakedown tests, and the results of companion CFD calculations employing RANS-based Star-CCM+ and large eddy simulations with Nek 5000. (authors)

  20. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, A.A.

    1996-02-06

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

  1. Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekechukwu, Amy A.

    1996-01-01

    A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

  2. University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer | Department of Energy University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer University of Maryland Wins Max Tech and Beyond Competition for Ultra-Efficient Clothes Dryer September 10, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Energy Department announced today that the University of Maryland won the second annual Max Tech and Beyond design competition for ultra-low energy use appliances and equipment for the second year in a row. The

  3. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow ...

  4. Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Energy Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Zhejiang Max Solar Energy Co Ltd Place: Huzhou, Zhejiang Province, China Zip: 313009 Product: A Zhejiang-based PV module...

  5. Subkilovolt response of Kodak T max XUV film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dittmore, C.; Stoering, J.P. ); Gullikson, E. )

    1990-02-08

    A calibration of Kodak T max 100 XUV film at six x-ray energies ranging from 0.27 keV to 1.49 keV has been concluded. The primary purpose was to compare the sensitivity of this film to that of Kodak type 101-07 XUV film in order to appraise the feasibility of replacing the type 101-07 film with the type T max 100 film. In addition to being considerably less expensive, the T max 100 film is less disposed to abrasion from handling. A secondary objective was to provide a base for further response measurements should the T max 100 film prove to be an acceptable substitute for the type 101-07 film. 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1994-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  7. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  8. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1989-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

  9. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1994-06-14

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  10. Nucleophilic fluorination of aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge R

    2014-03-18

    Iodylbenzene derivatives substituted with electron donating as well as electron withdrawing groups on the aromatic ring are used as precursors in aromatic nucleophilic substitution reactions. The iodyl group (IO.sub.2) is regiospecifically substituted by nucleophilic fluoride to provide the corresponding fluoroaryl derivatives. No-carrier-added [F-18]fluoride ion derived from anhydrous [F-18](F/Kryptofix, [F-18]CsF or a quaternary ammonium fluoride (e.g., Me.sub.4NF, Et.sub.4NF, n-Bu.sub.4NF, (PhCH.sub.2).sub.4NF) exclusively substitutes the iodyl moiety in these derivatives and provides high specific activity F-18 labeled fluoroaryl analogs. Iodyl derivatives of a benzothiazole analog and 6-iodyl-L-dopa derivatives have been synthesized as precursors and have been used in the preparation of no-carrier-added [F-18]fluorobenzothiazole as well as 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dopa.

  11. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-09-07

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

  12. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1989-07-18

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

  13. Noncomparative scaling of aromaticity through electron itinerancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, Satadal; Goswami, Tamal; Misra, Anirban

    2015-10-15

    Aromaticity is a multidimensional concept and not a directly observable. These facts have always stood in the way of developing an appropriate theoretical framework for scaling of aromaticity. In the present work, a quantitative account of aromaticity is developed on the basis of cyclic delocalization of π-electrons, which is the phenomenon leading to unique features of aromatic molecules. The stabilization in molecular energy, caused by delocalization of π-electrons is obtained as a second order perturbation energy for archetypal aromatic systems. The final expression parameterizes the aromatic stabilization energy in terms of atom to atom charge transfer integral, onsite repulsion energy and the population of spin orbitals at each site in the delocalized π-electrons. An appropriate computational platform is framed to compute each and individual parameter in the derived equation. The numerical values of aromatic stabilization energies obtained for various aromatic molecules are found to be in close agreement with available theoretical and experimental reports. Thus the reliable estimate of aromaticity through the proposed formalism renders it as a useful tool for the direct assessment of aromaticity, which has been a long standing problem in chemistry.

  14. The interactional foundations of MaxEnt: Open questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harr, Michael S.

    2014-12-05

    One of the simplest and potentially most useful techniques to be developed in the 20{sup th} century, a century noted for an ever more mathematically sophisticated formulation of the sciences, is that of maximising the entropy of a system in order to generate a descriptive, stochastic model of that system in closed form, often abbreviated to MaxEnt. The extension of MaxEnt to systems beyond the physics from which it originated is hampered by the fact that the microscopic physical interactions that are not justified or justifiable within the MaxEnt framework need to be falsifiably evaluated in each new field of application. It is not obvious that such justification exists for many systems in which the interactions are not directly based on physics. For example what is the justification for the use of MaxEnt in biology, climate modelling or economics? Is it simply a useful heuristic or is there some deeper connection with the foundations of some systems? Without further critical examination of the microscopic foundations that give rise to the success of the MaxEnt principle it is difficult to motivate the use of such techniques in other fields except through theoretically an practically unsatisfying analogical arguments. This article briefly presents the basis of MaxEnt principles as originally introduced in statistical mechanics in the Jaynes form, the Tsallis form and the Rnyi form. Several different applications are introduced including that of ecological diversity where maximising the different diversity measures is equivalent to maximising different entropic functionals.

  15. Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Energy Efficient Materials Paul Blom: Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Jan 22, 2014 | 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM Paul Blom Research Director, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research Transport and Recombination in Polymer:fullerene bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells January 22, 2014 | 2:00pm | ESB 2001 Faculty host: Thuc Quyen-Nguyen >>>Video and Slides available after the presentation* Abstract In solar cells, free charge carriers can recombine both via

  16. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. ...

  17. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids. Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M. 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 40 CHEMISTRY; COAL LIQUIDS;...

  18. Quantum transport through aromatic molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Rey-Gonzlez, R. R.; Laroze, D.

    2013-12-07

    In this paper, we study the electronic transport properties through aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. The molecules are in different geometrical configurations including arrays. Using a nearest neighbor tight-binding approach, the transport properties are analyzed into a Green's function technique within a real-space renormalization scheme. We calculate the transmission probability and the Current-Voltage characteristics as a function of a molecule-leads coupling parameter. Our results show different transport regimes for these systems, exhibiting metal-semiconductor-insulator transitions and the possibility to employ them in molecular devices.

  19. Dehydrocyclodimerization, converting LPG to aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.A.; Hilder, G.K.

    1984-03-01

    British Petroleum (BP) recognized the potential need for ways of exploiting feedstocks with low opportunity cost and commenced a research program at its Sunbury Research Center to discover and develop a catalyst for the conversion of LPG to a liquid product. The successful outcome of this research program is the Cyclar /SUP SM/ process, a joint development of UOP Process Division and British Petroleum. The Cyclar process offers a single-step conversion of LPG to an aromatic product which has a highvalue, is easily transported and useful both to fuel and petrochemical applications. The LPG producer can invest in a single unit, avoiding the need to identify and develop markets for multiple C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ products. This catalytic process, which employs UOP Continuous Catalyst Regeneration (CCR) technology, can also be applied to refinery light ends to produce a high-quality gasoline. Aromatic and hydrogen yields from propane and butane feeds surpass those obtained from catalytic reforming of Light Arabian naphtha. This paper describes the principles of the Cyclar process and illustrates yields and economics for several interesting applications.

  20. Predicting Electrochemical Windows of Nitrogen Containing Aromatic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecules - Joint Center for Energy Storage Research October 20, 2014, Research Highlights Predicting Electrochemical Windows of Nitrogen Containing Aromatic Molecules Various nitrogen containing aromatic base molecules and a descriptive relationship derived to predict their reduction potentials is shown. Scientific Achievement A descriptive relationship is derived for computing reduction potentials of quinoxaline derivatives from the orbital energies of the neutral molecules without

  1. High temperature ion irradiation effects in MAX phase ceramics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Clark, D. W.; Zinkle, Steven J.; Patel, Maulik K.; Parish, Chad M.

    2015-12-24

    The family of layered carbides and nitrides known as MAX phase ceramics combine many attractive properties of both ceramics and metals due to their nanolaminate crystal structure and are promising potential candidates for application in future nuclear reactors. This research examines the effects of energetic heavy ion (5.8 MeV Ni) irradiations on polycrystalline samples of Ti3SiC2, Ti3AlC2, and Ti2AlC. The irradiation conditions consisted of midrange ion doses between 10 and 30 displacements per atom at temperatures of 400 and 700⁰C, conditions relevant to application in future nuclear reactors and a relatively un-explored regime for this new class of materials. Followingmore » irradiation, a comprehensive analysis of radiation response properties was compiled using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (XRD), nanoindentation, scanning electron microcopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In all cases, XRD and TEM analyses confirm the materials remain fully crystalline although the intense atomic collisions induce significant damage and disorder into the layered crystalline lattice. X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation show this damage is manifest in anisotropic swelling and hardening at all conditions and in all materials, with the aluminum based MAX phase exhibiting significantly more damage than their silicon counterpart. In all three materials there is little damage dependence on dose, suggesting saturation of radiation damage at levels below 10 displacements per atom, and significantly less retained damage at higher temperatures, suggesting radiation defect annealing. SEM surface analysis showed significant grain boundary cracking and loss of damage tolerance properties in the aluminum-based MAX phase irradiated at 400⁰C, but not in the silicon counterpart. TEM analysis of select samples suggest that interstitials are highly mobile while vacancies are immobile and that all three materials are in the so-called point defect swelling regime

  2. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Arganbright, Robert P.; Hearn, Dennis

    1993-01-01

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  3. Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

    1993-01-05

    Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

  4. max walltime for "low" queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We have increased the...

  5. WPPI GreenMax-Scheller Residence: Near Zero Energy Monitoring Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-11-19

    This report describes results of GreenMax 2 monitoring project referred to as the GreenMax Net Zero Home, a demonstration home that can provide a wealth of information for the building community.

  6. Volume I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOENVl 0630-I 1 Volume I November 1990 . . . . . . ..A- "'asf NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL ... Volume I DOENVl 0630-l 1 Volume I NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT - ...

  7. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  8. Aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a laminar premixed n-butane flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K.; Vincitore, A.M.; Castaldi, M.J.; Senkan, S.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1998-07-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling work has been performed to investigate aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation pathways in a premixed, rich, sooting, n-butane-oxygen-argon burner stabilized flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.6 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer technique. Measurements were made in the main reaction and post-reaction zones for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-fused aromatic rings. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis were used to help identify the important reaction sequences leading to aromatic and PAH growth and destruction in the n-butane flame. Reaction flux analysis showed the propargyl recombination reaction was the dominant pathway to benzene formation. The consumption of propargyl by H atoms was shown to limit propargyl, benzene, and naphthalene formation in flames as exhibited by the large negative sensitivity coefficients. Naphthalene and phenanthrene production was shown to be plausibly formed through reactions involving resonantly stabilized cyclopentadienyl and indenyl radicals. Many of the low molecular weight aliphatics, combustion by-products, aromatics, branched aromatics, and PAHs were fairly well simulated by the model. Additional work is required to understand the formation mechanisms of phenyl acetylene, pyrene, and fluoranthene in the n-butane flame. 73 refs.

  9. Limitations of the planning organ at risk volume (PRV) concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stroom, Joep C. [Netherlands Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Amsterdam (Netherlands)]. E-mail: j.stroom@nki.nl; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC-Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2006-09-01

    Purpose: Previously, we determined a planning target volume (PTV) margin recipe for geometrical errors in radiotherapy equal to M{sub T} = 2{sigma} + 0.7{sigma}, with {sigma} and {sigma} standard deviations describing systematic and random errors, respectively. In this paper, we investigated margins for organs at risk (OAR), yielding the so-called planning organ at risk volume (PRV). Methods and Materials: For critical organs with a maximum dose (D{sub max}) constraint, we calculated margins such that D{sub max} in the PRV is equal to the motion averaged D{sub max} in the (moving) clinical target volume (CTV). We studied margins for the spinal cord in 10 head-and-neck cases and 10 lung cases, each with two different clinical plans. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, we also investigated whether a margin recipe was feasible. Results: For the 20 spinal cords considered, the average margin recipe found was: M{sub R} = 1.6{sigma} + 0.2{sigma} with variations for systematic and random errors of 1.2{sigma} to 1.8{sigma} and -0.2{sigma} to 0.6{sigma}, respectively. The variations were due to differences in shape and position of the dose distributions with respect to the cords. The recipe also depended significantly on the volume definition of D{sub max}. For critical organs with a dose-volume constraint, the PRV concept appears even less useful because a margin around, e.g., the rectum changes the volume in such a manner that dose-volume constraints stop making sense. Conclusion: The concept of PRV for planning of radiotherapy is of limited use. Therefore, alternative ways should be developed to include geometric uncertainties of OARs in radiotherapy planning.

  10. Experimental and modeling investigation of aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in a premixed ethylene flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castaldi, M.J.; Marinov, N.M.; Melius, C.F.

    1996-02-01

    Experimental and detailed chemical kinetic modeling has been performed to investigate aromatic and polyaromatic hydrocarbon formation pathways in a rich, sooting, ethylene-oxygen-argon premixed flame. An atmospheric pressure, laminar flat flame operated at an equivalence ratio of 2.5 was used to acquire experimental data for model validation. Gas composition analysis was conducted by an on-line gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS) technique. Measurements were made in the flame and post-flame zone for a number of low molecular weight species, aliphatics, aromatics and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranging from two to five-aromatic fused rings. The modeling results show the key reaction sequences leading to aromatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon growth involve the combination of resonantly stabilized radicals. In particular, propargyl and 1-methylallenyl combination reactions lead to benzene and methyl substituted benzene formation, while polycyclic aromatics are formed from cyclopentadienyl radicals and fused rings that have a shared C{sub 5} side structure. Naphthalene production through the reaction step of cyclopentadienyl self-combination and phenanthrene formation from indenyl and cyclopentadienyl combination were shown to be important in the flame modeling study. The removal of phenyl by O{sub 2} leading to cyclopentadienyl formation is expected to play a pivotal role in the PAH or soot precursor growth process under fuel-rich oxidation conditions.

  11. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  12. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  13. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  14. RECOVERY OF URANIUM BY AROMATIC DITHIOCARBAMATE COMPLEXING

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neville, O.K.

    1959-08-11

    A selective complexing organic solvent extraction process is presented for the separation of uranium values from an aqueous nitric acid solution of neutron irradiated thorium. The process comprises contacting the solution with an organic aromatic dithiccarbamaie and recovering the resulting urancdithiccarbamate complex with an organic solvent such as ethyl acetate.

  15. Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Mirant: Case 67a: Units 3 & 4 & 5 at Max Load for 12 hours and at Min Load for 12 hours Docket No. ...

  16. Monitoring of vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Hajaligol, Mohammad R.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for monitoring vapor phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a high-temperature environment has an excitation source producing electromagnetic radiation, an optical path having an optical probe optically communicating the electromagnetic radiation received at a proximal end to a distal end, a spectrometer or polychromator, a detector, and a positioner coupled to the first optical path. The positioner can slidably move the distal end of the optical probe to maintain the distal end position with respect to an area of a material undergoing combustion. The emitted wavelength can be directed to a detector in a single optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration, in a dual optical probe 180.degree. backscattered configuration or in a dual optical probe 90.degree. side scattered configuration. The apparatus can be used to monitor an emitted wavelength of energy from a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon as it fluoresces in a high temperature environment.

  17. Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 MAX phases (M: early transition metal; A: elements in group 13 or 14; X: C or N), such as titanium silicon carbide ...

  18. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longanbach, J. R.; Chan, L. K.; Levy, A.

    1982-11-15

    Samples of middle and heavy SRC-II distillates were distilled into 50 C boiling point range fractions. These were characterized by measurements of their molecular weight, elemental analysis and basic nitrogen content and calculation of average molecular structures. The structures typically consisted of 1 to 3 aromatic rings fused to alicyclic rings with short, 1 to 3 carbon aliphatic side chains. The lower boiling fractions contained significant amounts (1 atom/molecule) of oxygen while the heavier fractions contained so few heteroatoms that they were essentially hydrocarbons. Laboratory scale oxidative-pyrolysis experiments were carried out at pyrolysis temperatures of 500 to 1100 C and oxygen concentrations from 0 to 100 percent of stoichiometry. Analysis of liquid products, collected in condensers cooled with liquid nitrogen showed that aromatization is a major reaction in the absence of oxygen. The oxygen-containing materials (phenolics) seem to be more resistant to thermal pyrolysis than unsubstituted aromatics. Nitrogen converts from basic to nonbasic forms at about 500 C. The nonbasic nitrogen is more stable and survives up to 700 C after which it is slowly removed. A recently constructed 50,000 Btu/hr staged combustor was used to study the chemistry of the nitrogen and aromatics. SRC II combustion was studied under fuel-rich, first-stage conditions at air/fuel ratios from 0.6 to 1.0 times stoichiometric. The chemistry of the fuel during combustion calls for further investigation in order to examine the mechanism by which HCN is evolved as a common intermediate for the formation of the nitrogen-containing gaseous combustion products. 25 references, 45 figures, 25 tables.

  19. Characterization and analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breuer, G.M.; Smith, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Sampling and analytical procedures were developed for determining the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in animal-exposure chambers during studies on exposure to diesel exhaust, coal dust, or mixtures of these two pollutants. Fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene, benzo(e)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene were used as representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. High-pressure liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection was used for analysis. Coal-dust only samples revealed a broad, rising background in the chromatogram with small peaks superimposed corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, and benzo(a)anthracene, diesel exhaust only samples showed many peaks on a flat baseline including those corresponding to fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, and benzo(a)pyrene. In general, no polynuclear aromatics were noted in the clean air samples. The authors note that relatively minor changes in air/fuel ratio, lubricant, fuel, and load may have substantial effects on very minor components of the exhaust emission.

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    City 6 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : 2006 MAX-Mex-Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - Mexico City 2006.03.03 - 2006.03.28 Lead Scientist : Jeffrey Gaffney For data sets, see below. Abstract A 4-week field campaign was conducted in and downwind of Mexico City during March 2006. The Megacity Aerosol eXperiment - MEXico City (MAX-MEX)

  1. max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper max walltime for low queue is increased to 24 hrs on Hopper May 31, 2012 by Helen He We have increased the max walltime for the low queue on Hopper from 12 to 24 hrs. Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date February 2013 September 2012 August 2012 May 2012 April 2012 March 2012 February 2012 January 2012 November 2011 October 2011 September 2011 August 2011 July 2011 June 2011 May 2011 April 2011 March 2011 February 2011 January 2011

  2. runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc"

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" runtime error message: "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc" September 12, 2014 Symptom: User jobs with single or multiple apruns in a batch script may get this runtime error. "apsched: request exceeds max nodes, alloc". This problem is intermittent, started in April, then mid July, and again since late August. Status: This problem is identified as a problem when Torque/Moab batch scheduler becomes out of sync with the

  3. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier5Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier5Max&oldid539754...

  4. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier1Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateEnergyRateStructureTier1Max&oldid539766...

  5. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Max | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:OpenEIUtilityRateDemandRateStructureTier4Max&oldid539751...

  6. text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning...

  7. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

    1994-04-26

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

  8. Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reagen, William K.; Schulz, Amber L.; Ingram, Jani C.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Grey, Alan E.

    1994-01-01

    This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for ro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound.

  9. Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Refrigerant | Department of Energy Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Max Tech Electric Heat Pump Water Heater with Lower GWP Halogenated Refrigerant Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic for an integrated heat pump design model and wrapped tank model. Image credit: Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Information flow schematic

  10. Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Princeton, Max Planck Society launch new research center for plasma physics By John Greenwald March 30, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook (From left to right) Princeton University Professor of Astrophysical Sciences James Stone, Princeton University President Shirley M. Tilghman, Princeton University Dean for Research A. J. Stewart Smith, Max Planck Society President Peter Gruss, and Consul General of the Federal Republic of Germany in New

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Polycyclic ... We report the detection of 6.2 m polycyclic aromatic ... OSTI Identifier: 22357024 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  12. Aromatics oxidation and soot formation in flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard, J.B.; Pope, C.J.; Shandross, R.A.; Yadav, T.

    1993-12-01

    This project is concerned with the kinetics and mechanisms of aromatics oxidation and soot and fullerenes formation in flames. The scope includes detailed measurements of profiles of stable and radical species concentrations in low-pressure one-dimensional premixed flames. Intermediate species identifications and mole fractions, fluxes, and net reaction rates calculated from the measured profiles are used to test postulated reaction mechanisms. Particular objectives are to identify and to determine or confirm rate constants for the main benzene oxidation reactions in flames, and to characterize fullerenes and their formation mechanisms and kinetics.

  13. Band gap estimation from temperature dependent Seebeck measurementDeviations from the 2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max} relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Zachary M.; Kim, Hyun-Sik; Wang, Heng; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2015-01-12

    In characterizing thermoelectric materials, electrical and thermal transport measurements are often used to estimate electronic band structure properties such as the effective mass and band gap. The Goldsmid-Sharp band gap, E{sub g}?=?2e|S|{sub max}T{sub max}, is a tool widely employed to estimate the band gap from temperature dependent Seebeck coefficient measurements. However, significant deviations of more than a factor of two are now known to occur. We find that this is when either the majority-to-minority weighted mobility ratio (A) becomes very different from 1.0 or as the band gap (E{sub g}) becomes significantly smaller than 10 k{sub B}T. For narrow gaps (E{sub g}???6 k{sub B}T), the Maxwell-Boltzmann statistics applied by Goldsmid-Sharp break down and Fermi-Dirac statistics are required. We generate a chart that can be used to quickly estimate the expected correction to the Goldsmid-Sharp band gap depending on A and S{sub max}; however, additional errors can occur for S?

  14. Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization reactions of butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wen-Qing; Suib, S.L. )

    1994-01-01

    Coupling of oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane by using a dual function catalyst has led to a significant enhancement of the yields (from 25 to 40%) and selectivities to aromatics (from 39 to 64%). Butane is converted to aromatics by using either zinc-promoted [Ga]-ZSM-5 or zinc and gallium copromoted [Fe]-ZSM-5 zeolite as a catalyst. However, the formation of aromatics is severely limited by hydrocracking of butane to methane, ethane, and propane due to the hydrogen formed during aromatization reactions. On the other hand, the oxidative dehydrogenation of butane to butene over molybdate catalysts is found to be accompanied by a concurrent undesirable reaction, i.e., total oxidation. When two of these reactions (oxidative dehydrogenation and aromatization of butane) are coupled by using a dual function catalyst they have shown to complement each other. It is believed that the rate-limiting step for aromatization (butane to butene) is increased by adding an oxidative dehydrogenation catalyst (Ga-Zn-Mg-Mo-O). The formation of methane, ethane, and propane was suppressed due to the removal of hydrogen initially formed as water. Studies of ammonia TPD show that the acidities of [Fe]-ZSM-5 are greatly affected by the existence of metal oxides such as Ga[sub 2]O[sub 3], MgO, ZnO, and MoO[sub 3]. 40 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Claire E. Max, 2004 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Claire E. Max, 2004 The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award Lawrence Award Home Nomination & Selection Guidelines Award Laureates 2010's 2000's 1990's 1980's 1970's 1960's Ceremony The Life of Ernest Orlando Lawrence Contact Information The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award U.S. Department of Energy SC-2/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-2411 E: Email Us 2000's Claire E. Max, 2004 Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Physics: For her contributions to

  16. Film Collection Volume One

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  17. Volume One Disc Two

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume One Film Collection Volume Two 75th Anniversary Hydropower in the Northwest Woody Guthrie Videos Strategic Direction Branding & Logos Power of the River History Book...

  18. Nitrogen-doped porous aromatic frameworks for enhanced CO2 adsorption

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fu, Jia; Wu, Jianzhong; Custelcean, Radu; Jiang, De-en

    2014-10-07

    Recently synthesized porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) exhibit extremely high surface areas and exceptional thermal and hydrothermal stabilities. Using computer-aided design, we propose new PAFs, designated as NPAFs, by introducing nitrogen-containing groups to the biphenyl unit and predict their CO2 adsorption capacities with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. Among various NPAFs considered, one with imidazole groups shows the highest adsorption capacity for CO2 (11.5wt % at 1bar and 298K) , in comparison with 5wt % for the parent PAF (PAF- 1) at the same condition. At higher pressures (around 10bar) ,though, another NPAF with pyridinic N groups performs much bettermore » than the rest due to its greater pore volume in addition to the N functionality. This research suggests that adding N functionality to the organic linkers is a promising way to increase CO2 adsorption capacity of PAFs at ambient condition.« less

  19. Nitrogen-doped porous aromatic frameworks for enhanced CO2 adsorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Jia; Wu, Jianzhong; Custelcean, Radu; Jiang, De-en

    2014-10-07

    Recently synthesized porous aromatic frameworks (PAFs) exhibit extremely high surface areas and exceptional thermal and hydrothermal stabilities. Using computer-aided design, we propose new PAFs, designated as NPAFs, by introducing nitrogen-containing groups to the biphenyl unit and predict their CO2 adsorption capacities with grand canonical Monte Carlo (GCMC) simulations. Among various NPAFs considered, one with imidazole groups shows the highest adsorption capacity for CO2 (11.5wt % at 1bar and 298K) , in comparison with 5wt % for the parent PAF (PAF- 1) at the same condition. At higher pressures (around 10bar) ,though, another NPAF with pyridinic N groups performs much better than the rest due to its greater pore volume in addition to the N functionality. This research suggests that adding N functionality to the organic linkers is a promising way to increase CO2 adsorption capacity of PAFs at ambient condition.

  20. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons - IL 30

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    - IL 30 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS (IL.30 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 1925 N. Kenmore Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.30-1 Evaluation Year: 1994 IL.30-2 Site Operations: Sample sized quantities of radioactive materials were shipped through this location; broker arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. IL.30-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination

  1. Max Schulze

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matty Greene About Us Matty Greene - Former Videographer Matty Greene Matty joined the Department of Energy as a videographer in May 2013, producing, filming and editing online video content for Energy. Prior to joining the Department of Energy, her other video pursuits included interning at the White House in the Office of Digital Strategy, where she filmed the President and First Lady, and making short films that played at festivals including South by Southwest. A native Austinite and avid

  2. ~max0006

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... NNSA Headauarters. 1) For cyber security. direct assessment of NNSA contractors by NASA Ifeadquarters organizations consists of the following: a) Annual revieus of Site Office ...

  3. Classification of Malaysia aromatic rice using multivariate statistical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdullah, A. H.; Adom, A. H.; Shakaff, A. Y. Md; Masnan, M. J.; Zakaria, A.; Rahim, N. A.; Omar, O.

    2015-05-15

    Aromatic rice (Oryza sativa L.) is considered as the best quality premium rice. The varieties are preferred by consumers because of its preference criteria such as shape, colour, distinctive aroma and flavour. The price of aromatic rice is higher than ordinary rice due to its special needed growth condition for instance specific climate and soil. Presently, the aromatic rice quality is identified by using its key elements and isotopic variables. The rice can also be classified via Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) or human sensory panels. However, the uses of human sensory panels have significant drawbacks such as lengthy training time, and prone to fatigue as the number of sample increased and inconsistent. The GC–MS analysis techniques on the other hand, require detailed procedures, lengthy analysis and quite costly. This paper presents the application of in-house developed Electronic Nose (e-nose) to classify new aromatic rice varieties. The e-nose is used to classify the variety of aromatic rice based on the samples odour. The samples were taken from the variety of rice. The instrument utilizes multivariate statistical data analysis, including Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and K-Nearest Neighbours (KNN) to classify the unknown rice samples. The Leave-One-Out (LOO) validation approach is applied to evaluate the ability of KNN to perform recognition and classification of the unspecified samples. The visual observation of the PCA and LDA plots of the rice proves that the instrument was able to separate the samples into different clusters accordingly. The results of LDA and KNN with low misclassification error support the above findings and we may conclude that the e-nose is successfully applied to the classification of the aromatic rice varieties.

  4. FY 2007 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Environmental management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-006 Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental management Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2007 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .........................................................................................................3

  5. FY 2008 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-018 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2008 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary.............................................................................................................3

  6. FY 2011 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0050 Volume 4 Science Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Science FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account

  7. FY 2012 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0060 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Science Science February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Science FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 4 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary

  8. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, Joanna S.; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  9. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  10. Development of genetically engineered bacteria for production of selected aromatic compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ward, Thomas E.; Watkins, Carolyn S.; Bulmer, Deborah K.; Johnson, Bruce F.; Amaratunga, Mohan

    2001-01-01

    The cloning and expression of genes in the common aromatic pathway of E. coli are described. A compound for which chorismate, the final product of the common aromatic pathway, is an anabolic intermediate can be produced by cloning and expressing selected genes of the common aromatic pathway and the genes coding for enzymes necessary to convert chorismate to the selected compound. Plasmids carrying selected genes of the common aromatic pathway are also described.

  11. Max Tech and Beyond: Maximizing Appliance and Equipment Efficiency by Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Garbesi, Karina

    2011-07-20

    It is well established that energy efficiency is most often the lowest cost approach to reducing national energy use and minimizing carbon emissions. National investments in energy efficiency to date have been highly cost-effective. The cumulative impacts (out to 2050) of residential energy efficiency standards are expected to have a benefit-to-cost ratio of 2.71:1. This project examined energy end-uses in the residential, commercial, and in some cases the industrial sectors. The scope is limited to appliances and equipment, and does not include building materials, building envelopes, and system designs. This scope is consistent with the scope of DOE's appliance standards program, although many products considered here are not currently subject to energy efficiency standards. How much energy could the United States save if the most efficient design options currently feasible were adopted universally? What design features could produce those savings? How would the savings from various technologies compare? With an eye toward identifying promising candidates and strategies for potential energy efficiency standards, the Max Tech and Beyond project aims to answer these questions. The analysis attempts to consolidate, in one document, the energy savings potential and design characteristics of best-on-market products, best-engineered products (i.e., hypothetical products produced using best-on-market components and technologies), and emerging technologies in research & development. As defined here, emerging technologies are fundamentally new and are as yet unproven in the market, although laboratory studies and/or emerging niche applications offer persuasive evidence of major energy-savings potential. The term 'max tech' is used to describe both best-engineered and emerging technologies (whichever appears to offer larger savings). Few best-on-market products currently qualify as max tech, since few apply all available best practices and components. The three primary

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Max Zuckerman and Sons Inc - MD 04

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Inc - MD 04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MAX ZUCKERMAN & SONS, INC. (MD.04 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Maryland Alloys Corporation MD.04-1 Location: 5245 Fairlawn Avenue , Baltimore , Maryland MD.04-2 Evaluation Year: 1994 MD.04-1 MD.04-3 Site Operations: Scrap metals broker that arranged purchases of materials for third party buyers. MD.04-2 MD.04-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote MD.04-3

  13. FY 2006 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital Fund Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 4 February 2005 DOE/ME-0049 Volume 4

  14. FY 2011 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0051 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request Department of Energy/ Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account

  15. FY 2012 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Volume 7 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Nuclear Energy D f N l W t Di l Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy/ Volume 7 FY 2012 Congressional Budget Volume 7 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary ........................................................................................................... 3 Nuclear Energy

  16. FY 2013 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 DOE/CF-0075 Volume 5 Environmental Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management Page 1 FY 2013 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary

  17. FY 2008 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-019 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink

  18. FY 2009 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-029 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed

  19. FY 2012 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Volume 5 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Environmental Management February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 5 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management FY 2011 Congressional Budget Volume 5 Table of Contents Page Appropriation Account Summary .............................................................................................................3 Appropriation Language

  20. FY 2013 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-0076 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power

  1. Max Phase Materials And Coatings For High Temperature Heat Transfer Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinez-Rodriguez, M.; Garcia-Diaz, B.; Olson, L.; Fuentes, R.; Sindelar, R.

    2015-10-19

    Molten salts have been used as heat transfer fluids in a variety of applications within proposed Gen IV nuclear designs and in advanced power system such as Concentrating Solar Power (CSP). However, operating at elevated temperatures can cause corrosion in many materials. This work developed coating technologies for MAX phase materials on Haynes-230 and characterized the corrosion of the coatings in the presence of commercial MgCl2-KCl molten salt. Cold spraying of Ti2AlC and physical vapor deposition (PVD) of Ti2AlC or Zr2AlC were tested to determine the most effective form of coating MAX phases on structural substrates. Corrosion testing at 850°C for 100 hrs showed that 3.9 μm Ti2AlC by PVD was slightly protective while 117 μm Ti2AlC by cold spray and 3.6 μm Zr2AlC by PVD were completely protective. None of the tests showed decomposition of the coating (Ti or Zr) into the salt

  2. Ambient aromatic hydrocarbon measurements at Welgegund, South Africa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaars, K.; Beukes, J. P.; van Zyl, P. G.; Venter, A. D.; Josipovic, M.; Pienaar, J. J.; Vakkari, Ville; Aaltonen, H.; Laakso, H.; Kulmala, M.; Tiitta, P.; Guenther, Alex B.; Hellen, H.; Laakso, L.; Hakola, H.

    2014-07-11

    Aromatic hydrocarbons are associated with direct adverse human health effects and can have negative impacts on ecosystems due to their toxicity, as well as indirect negative effects through the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol that affect human health, crop production and regional climate. Measurements were conducted at the Welgegund measurement station (South Africa) that is considered to be a regionally representative background site. However, the site is occasionally impacted by plumes from major anthropogenic source regions in the interior of South Africa, which include the western Bushveld Igneous Complex (e.g. platinum, base metal and ferrochrome smelters), the eastern Bushveld Igneous Complex (platinum and ferrochrome smelters), the Johannesburg-Pretoria metropolitan conurbation (>10 million people), the Vaal Triangle (e.g. petrochemical and industries), the Mpumalanga Highveld (e.g. coal-fired power plants and petrochemical industry) and also a region of anti-cyclonic recirculation of air mass over the interior of South Africa. The aromatic hydrocarbon measurements were conducted with an automated sampler on Tenax-TA and Carbopack-B adsorbent tubes with heated inlet for one year. Samples were collected twice a week for two hours during daytime and two hours 1 during night-time. A thermal desorption unit, connected to a gas chromatograph and a mass 2 selective detector was used for sample preparation and analysis. Results indicated that the 3 monthly median total aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations ranged between 0.01 to 3.1 ppb. 4 Benzene levels did not exceed local air quality standards. Toluene was the most abundant 5 species, with an annual median concentration of 0.63 ppb. No statistically significant 6 differences in the concentrations measured during daytime and night-time were found and no distinct seasonal patterns were observed. Air mass back trajectory analysis proved that the lack of seasonal cycles could be

  3. Amination of electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Alexander R.; Pagoria, Philip F.; Schmidt, Robert D.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process to aminate electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen using quaternary hydrazinium salts. The use of trialkylhydrazinium halide, e.g., trimethylhydrazinium iodide, as well as hydroxylamine, alkoxylamines, and 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole to produce aminated aromatic structures, such as 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB), 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 3,5-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (DATNT), is described. DATB and TATB are useful insensitive high explosives. TATB is also used for the preparation of benzenehexamine, a starting material for the synthesis of novel materials (optical imaging devices, liquid crystals, ferromagnetic compounds).

  4. Redox shuttles having an aromatic ring fused to a 1,1,4,4-tetrasubstituted cyclohexane ring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weng, Wei; Zhang, Zhengcheng; Amine, Khalil

    2015-12-01

    An electrolyte includes an alkali metal salt; an aprotic solvent; and a redox shuttle additive including an aromatic compound having at least one aromatic ring fused with at least one non-aromatic ring, the aromatic ring having two or more oxygen or phosphorus-containing substituents.

  5. THE INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF NEUTRAL POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricca, Alessandra; Bauschlicher, Charles W. Jr.; Allamandola, Louis J. E-mail: Charles.W.Bauschlicher@nasa.gov

    2013-10-10

    The mid-infrared spectra of neutral homogeneous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) clusters have been computed using density functional theory including an empirical correction for dispersion. The C-H out-of-plane bending modes are redshifted for all the clusters considered in this work. The magnitude of the redshift and the peak broadening are dependent on PAH size, shape, and on the PAH arrangement in the cluster.

  6. MODELING GALACTIC EXTINCTION WITH DUST AND 'REAL' POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulas, Giacomo; Casu, Silvia; Cecchi-Pestellini, Cesare; Zonca, Alberto E-mail: silvia@oa-cagliari.inaf.it E-mail: azonca@oa-cagliari.inaf.it

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the remarkable apparent variety of galactic extinction curves by modeling extinction profiles with core-mantle grains and a collection of single polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Our aim is to translate a synthetic description of dust into physically well-grounded building blocks through the analysis of a statistically relevant sample of different extinction curves. All different flavors of observed extinction curves, ranging from the average galactic extinction curve to virtually 'bumpless' profiles, can be described by the present model. We prove that a mixture of a relatively small number (54 species in 4 charge states each) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons can reproduce the features of the extinction curve in the ultraviolet, dismissing an old objection to the contribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons to the interstellar extinction curve. Despite the large number of free parameters (at most the 54 Multiplication-Sign 4 column densities of each species in each ionization state included in the molecular ensemble plus the 9 parameters defining the physical properties of classical particles), we can strongly constrain some physically relevant properties such as the total number of C atoms in all species and the mean charge of the mixture. Such properties are found to be largely independent of the adopted dust model whose variation provides effects that are orthogonal to those brought about by the molecular component. Finally, the fitting procedure, together with some physical sense, suggests (but does not require) the presence of an additional component of chemically different very small carbonaceous grains.

  7. FY 2006 Volume 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005 DOE/ME-0046 Volume 1 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 1 February 2005

  8. FY 2006 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense Related Administrative Support Office of Hearings & Appeals Safeguards & Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 2 February 2005 DOE/ME-0047 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Security & Performance Assurance Environment,

  9. FY 2006 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Non-Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non-Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 5 February 2005 DOE/ME-0050 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental

  10. FY 2006 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 6 February 2005 DOE/ME-0051 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville

  11. FY 2006 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Clean Coal Technology Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 7 February 2005 DOE/ME-0052 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy

  12. FY 2007 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear energy Environment, safety and health Legacy management Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-004 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy supply and Conservation Energy efficiency and renewable energy Electricity delivery and energy reliability Nuclear

  13. FY 2007 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-005 Volume 4 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Science Nuclear waste disposal Defense nuclear waste disposal Departmental administration Inspector general Working capital fund Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear

  14. FY 2007 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville power administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 DOE/CF-007 Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Power marketing administrations Southeastern power administration Southwestern power administration Western power administration Bonneville

  15. FY 2007 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil shale reserves Elk hills school lands fund Strategic petroleum reserve Clean coal technology Energy information administration Department of Energy FY 2007 Congressional Budget Request February 2006 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-008 Volume 7 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Fossil energy and other Fossil energy research and development Naval petroleum & oil

  16. FY 2008 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and Security Crosscut Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-015 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Health, Safety and Security Legacy Management Nuclear Energy Defense-Related Administrative Support Hearings and Appeals Safeguards and

  17. FY 2008 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 3 DOE/CF-016 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy

  18. FY 2008 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-017 Volume 4 Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Printed with soy ink on recycled paper

  19. FY 2008 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Strategic Petroleum Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Energy Information Administration Department of Energy FY 2008 Congressional Budget Request February 2007 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 7 DOE/CF-020 Volume 7 Fossil Energy and Other Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum &

  20. FY 2009 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 2 DOE/CF-025 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards

  1. FY 2009 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-026 Volume 3 Energy Supply and Conservation Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Legacy Management Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy

  2. FY 2009 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-028 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 5 DOE/CF-028 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear

  3. FY 2009 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas February 2008 Office of Chief Financial Officer Department of Energy FY 2009 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-030 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil

  4. FY 2010 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 3 DOE/CF-037 Volume 3 Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Energy Transformation Acceleration Fund Nuclear Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity

  5. FY 2010 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 5 DOE/CF-039 Volume 5 Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Environmental Management Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Department of

  6. FY 2010 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 6 DOE/CF-040 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Printed with soy ink on recycled

  7. FY 2010 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas May 2009 Office of Chief Financial Officer FY 2010 Congressional Budget Request Volume 7 DOE/CF-041 Volume 7 Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Clean Coal Technology

  8. FY 2011 Volume 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0047 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2011

  9. FY 2011 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut Domestic Utility Fee Pensions Department of Energy FY 2011 Congressional Budget Request February 2010 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0048 Volume 2 Other Defense Activities Departmental

  10. FY 2005 Volume 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Volume 1 February 2004 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Naval Reactors Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0032 Volume 1 February

  11. FY 2005 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ME-0035 Volume 4 Science Science Nuclear Waste Disposal Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal Departmental Administration Departmental Administration Inspector General Inspector General Working Capital Fund Working Capital Fund February 2004 Volume 4 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005 Congressional Budget Request Request DOE/ME-0035 Volume 4 Science Science

  12. FY 2013 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards and Security Crosscut Pensions February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 2 DOE/CF-0072 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Working Capital F nd Working Capital Fund Safeguards

  13. FY 2013 Volume 4

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 4 DOE/CF-0074 Volume 4 Science Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Science Advanced Research Projects Agency- Energy Department of Energy/Science/ Advanced

  14. FY 2013 Volume I

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request February 2012 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 1 DOE/CF-0071 Volume 1 National Nuclear Security Administration Office of the Administrator Weapons Activities Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation Naval Reactors Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013

  15. Dedicated Max-Planck beamline for the in situ investigation of interfaces and thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stierle, A.; Steinhaeuser, A.; Ruehm, A.; Renner, F.U.; Weigel, R.; Kasper, N.; Dosch, H.

    2004-12-01

    A dedicated beamline for the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung was recently taken into operation at the Angstroemquelle Karlsruhe (ANKA). Here we describe the layout of the beamline optics and the experimental end-station, consisting of a heavy duty multiple circle diffractometer. For both a new design was realized, combining a maximum flexibility in the beam properties [white, pink (focused) monochromatic, energy range 6-20 keV] with a special diffractometer for heavy sample environments up to 500 kg, that can be run in different geometrical modes. In addition the angular-reciprocal space transformations for the diffractometer in use are derived, which allows an operation of the instrument in the convenient six circle mode. As an example, results from surface x-ray diffraction on a Cu{sub 3}Au(111) single crystal are presented.

  16. Boride-based nano-laminates with MAX-phase-like behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telle, Rainer . E-mail: telle@ghi.rwth-aachen.de; Momozawa, Ai; Music, Denis; Schneider, Jochen M.

    2006-09-15

    MAX-phases being usually composed of transition metals, group A elements and carbon/nitrogen are considered interesting materials for many applications because of their tremendous bulk modulus, 'reversible' plasticity, and machinability. This is mainly due to their unique kind of bonding comprising covalent, ionic as well as metallic bonds providing 'easy' planes of rupture and deformability due to the layered crystal structures. In transition metal boride systems, similar types of bonding are available. In particular the W{sub 2}B{sub 5}-structure type and its stacking variations allow the synthesis of strongly layered crystal structures exhibiting unique delamination phenomena. The paper presents ab initio calculations showing the similarities of bonding between the ternary carbides and the corresponding ternary or quaternary borides. Formation of boride-based nano-laminates from auxiliary liquid phases, from the melt as well as during sintering and precipitation from supersaturated solid solutions will be discussed by means of SEM and TEM studies. The role of impurities weakening the interlayer bonding will be addressed in particular. The pronounced cleavage parallel to the basal plane gives rise for crack deflection and pull-out mechanisms if the laminates are dispersed in brittle matrices such as boron carbide, silicon carbide or other transition metal borides. - Graphical abstract: Some transition metal borides crystallise in a layered structure of alternating stacks of metal and boron atoms giving rise for strongly anisotropic properties. Their preferred cleavage parallel and the deformability perpendicular to the basal plan are similar to the peculiar mechanical behaviour recently described for MAX-phases. Ab initio calculations of the crystal structure prove the weak bonds between the layers for a variety of borides which can be used to reinforce ceramic materials on a nano-scale level.

  17. Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons by Zero-Valent Iron and Palladium Catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Hun; Shin, Won Sik; Ko, Seok-Oh; Kim, Myung-Chul

    2004-03-31

    Permeable reactive barrier (PRB) is an alternative technology for soil and groundwater remediation. Zero valent iron, which is the most popular PRB material, is only applicable to halogenated aliphatic organics and some heavy metals. The objective of this study was to investigate reductive dechlorination of halogenated compounds and reduction of non-halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons using zero valent metals (ZVMs) and catalysts as reactive materials for PRBs. A group of small aromatic hydrocarbons such as monochlorophenols, phenol and benzene were readily reduced with palladium catalyst and zero valent iron. Poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also tested with the catalysts and zero valent metal combinations. The aromatic rings were reduced and partly reduced PAHs were found as the daughter compounds. The current study demonstrates reduction of aromatic compounds by ZVMs and modified catalysts and implicates that PRB is applicable not only for halogenated organic compounds but nonhalogenated aromatic compounds such as PAHs.

  18. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Eddie G. (Richland, WA); Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA)

    1993-01-01

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  19. Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

    1993-01-19

    The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

  20. FY 2012 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Volume 6 Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional Budget Request Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2011 Office of Chief Financial Officer Volume 6 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration

  1. FY 2005 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Volume 2 February 2004 Volume 2 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Energy Security and Assurance Energy Security and Assurance Security Security Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Independent Oversight & Performance Assurance Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Legacy Management Nuclear

  2. FY 2005 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Volume 3 February 2004 Volume 3 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Energy Supply Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Nuclear Energy Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Environment, Safety & Health Environment, Safety & Health Future Liabilities Future Liabilities Legacy Management Legacy

  3. FY 2005 Volume 5

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Volume 5 Environmental Management Environmental Management Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Non Non - - Defense Site Acceleration Completion Defense Site Acceleration Completion Non Non - - Defense Environmental Services Defense Environmental Services Uranium Enrichment Decontamination Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund and Decommissioning Fund February 2004 Volume 5

  4. FY 2005 Volume 6

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 Volume 6 Power Marketing Administrations Power Marketing Administrations Southeastern Power Administration Southeastern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Southwestern Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Western Area Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration Bonneville Power Administration February 2004 Volume 6 Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Department of Energy Department of Energy FY 2005 Congressional Budget FY 2005

  5. Process for conversion of light olefins to LPG and aromatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martindale, D.C.; Andermann, R.E.; Mowry, J.R.

    1989-01-03

    A hydrocarbon conversion process is described which comprises passing a hydrocarbon feed stream comprising at least 30 mole percent olefins having 3 to 4 carbon atoms per molecule and also comprising at least 50 mole percent paraffins having 3 to 4 carbon atoms per molecule and containing less than 10 mole percent C/sub 5/-plus hydrocarbons into a catalytic reaction zone operated at low severity conditions and contacting the feed stream with a solid catalyst gallium. A reaction zone effluent stream is produced comprising C/sub 6/-C/sub 8/ aromatic hydrocarbons and C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ paraffins, with the reaction zone effluent stream containing less than 10 mole percent olefinic hydrocarbons. The low severity conditions include a combination of pressure, feed space velocity and temperature, including a temperature below 425/sup 0/C, which results in a partial conversion of the feed hydrocarbons into aromatic hydrocarbons whereby: (i) when the effluent is separated there are produced a first product stream, which first product stream is rich in C/sub 6/-C/sub 8/ aromatic hydrocarbons and is withdrawn from the process, with the second product stream, which second product stream is rich in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ paraffins and is withdrawn from the process, with the second product stream having a flow rate equal to at least 30 wt. percent of the flow rate of the feed stream; and (ii) the mass flow rate of paraffinic hydrocarbons out of the reaction zone exceeds the mass flow rate of paraffinic hydrocarbons into the reaction zone.

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formation from the pyrolysis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the pyrolysis of different municipal solid waste fractions Citation Details In-Document ... Resource Relation: Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 36; Other ...

  7. LARGE ABUNDANCES OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS IN TITAN'S UPPER ATMOSPHERE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez-Puertas, M.; Funke, B.; Garcia-Comas, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Adriani, A.; D'Aversa, E.; Moriconi, M. L.; Boersma, C.; Allamandola, L. J.

    2013-06-20

    In this paper, we analyze the strong unidentified emission near 3.28 {mu}m in Titan's upper daytime atmosphere recently discovered by Dinelli et al. We have studied it by using the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), after absorbing UV solar radiation, are able to emit strongly near 3.3 {mu}m. By using current models for the redistribution of the absorbed UV energy, we have explained the observed spectral feature and have derived the vertical distribution of PAH abundances in Titan's upper atmosphere. PAHs have been found to be present in large concentrations, about (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} particles cm{sup -3}. The identified PAHs have 9-96 carbons, with a concentration-weighted average of 34 carbons. The mean mass is {approx}430 u; the mean area is about 0.53 nm{sup 2}; they are formed by 10-11 rings on average, and about one-third of them contain nitrogen atoms. Recently, benzene together with light aromatic species as well as small concentrations of heavy positive and negative ions have been detected in Titan's upper atmosphere. We suggest that the large concentrations of PAHs found here are the neutral counterpart of those positive and negative ions, which hence supports the theory that the origin of Titan main haze layer is located in the upper atmosphere.

  8. FY 2006 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/CFO Volume 3 February 2005 DOE/ME-0048 Volume 3 Department of Energy FY 2006 Congressional Budget Request Energy Supply Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electric Transmission and Distribution Nuclear Energy Environment, Safety & Health Legacy Management Office of Management, Budget and

  9. Volume 4 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volume 4 Volume 4 Volume_4.pdf (3.89 MB) More Documents & Publications Before the House Committee on Space, Science, and Technology Office of Science User Facilities DOE Exascale Initiative

  10. UV resonance Raman characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in coal liquid distillates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rumelfanger, R.; Asher, S.A.; Perry, M.B.

    1988-02-01

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterize the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composition of a series of distillates of coal-derived liquids. The UV Raman spectra easily monitor changes in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon composition as a function of distillation temperature. Specific species, such as pyrene, can be determined by judicious choice of excitation wavelength.

  11. Synthesis of condensed phases containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons fullerenes and nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2004-10-19

    The invention relates to methods for producing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, fullerenes, and nanotubes, comprising: a. heating at least one carbon-containing material to form a condensed phase comprising at least one polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon; b. collecting at least some of the condensed phase; c. reacting the condensed phase to form fullerenes and/or nanotubes.

  12. An In-Depth Look at Ground Source Heat Pumps and Other Electric Loads in Two GreenMax Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, Srikanth; Shapiro, Carl

    2012-04-01

    Building America research team Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings (CARB) partnered with WPPI Energy to answer key research questions on in-field performance of ground-source heat pumps and lighting, appliance, and miscellaneous loads (LAMELs) through extensive field monitoring at two WPPI GreenMax demonstration homes in Wisconsin. These two test home evaluations provided valuable data on the true in-field performance of various building mechanical systems and LAMELs.

  13. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) in marsh sediments, Iraq

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Saad, H.T.; Al-Timari, A.A. )

    1989-12-01

    Recently there has been a growing concern in the release of harmful organics into the environment. Carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) are a class of compounds of interset due to their possible harmful effects to man as well as organisms. Anthropogenic PAH's may reach aquatic environment as a result of both industrial and domestic effluents, deposition of airborne particles, surface runoff and oil spillage. Having a relatively low water solubility and high affinity to sorb to the suspended particulate matter, most of the PAH's introduced to the aquatic environment tend to accumulate in bottom sediments. Sedimentary PAH's may thus provide a record of the input and history of these pollutants. Consequently, the distribution of PAH's in aquatic sediments have received considerable attention. The purpose of the present work was to establish the distribution of PAH's in the sediments of the marsh region located in southern Iraq.

  14. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2014-09-16

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of K-dimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. Furthermore, themore » persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  15. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; et al

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistentmore » tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.« less

  16. Extremely strong tubular stacking of aromatic oligoamide macrocycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kline, Mark A.; Wei, Xiaoxi; Horner, Ian J.; Liu, Rui; Chen, Shuang; Chen, Si; Yung, Ka Yi; Yamato, Kazuhiro; Cai, Zhonghou; Bright, Frank V.; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Gong, Bing

    2015-01-01

    As the third-generation rigid macrocycles evolved from progenitor 1, cyclic aromatic oligoamides 3, with a backbone of reduced constraint, exhibit extremely strong stacking with an astoundingly high affinity (estimated lower limit of Kdimer > 1013 M-1 in CHCl3), which leads to dispersed tubular stacks that undergo further assembly in solution. Computational study reveals a very large binding energy (-49.77 kcal mol-1) and indicates highly cooperative local dipole interactions that account for the observed strength and directionality for the stacking of 3. In the solid-state, X-ray diffraction (XRD) confirms that the aggregation of 3 results in well-aligned tubular stacks. The persistent tubular assemblies of 3, with their non-deformable sub-nm pore, are expected to possess many interesting functions. One such function, transmembrane ion transport, is observed for 3.

  17. Viability Assessment Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE,

    1998-12-01

    This volume presents a management summary of the cost estimate to complete the design, and to license, construct, operate, monitor, close, and decommission a Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada. This volume summarizes the scope, estimating methodologies, and assumptions used in development of the Monitored Geologic Repository-VA cost estimate. It identifies the key features necessary to understand the summary costs presented herein. This cost summary derives from a larger body of documented cost analysis. Volume 5 is organized to reflect this structured approach to cost estimation and contains the following sections: Section 1, Cost Elements. This section briefly defines the components of each major repository cost element. Section 2, Project Phases. This section presents the definition, as used in the estimate, of five project phases (Licensing, Pre-emplacement Construction, Emplacement Operations, Monitoring, and Closure and Decommissioning) and the schedule dates for each phase. It also contains major milestone dates and a bar chart schedule. Section 3, Major Assumptions. This section identifies key high-level assumptions for the cost estimate basis. Additional detailed assumptions are included in the appendices. Section 4, Integrated Cost Summary. This section presents a high-level roll-up of the VA costs resulting from the estimating work. The tables and figures contained in this section were compiled from the more detailed cost estimates in the appendices. Section 5, References. This section identifies the references that support this cost volume. Appendices. For each major repository cost element, Appendices B-F [B, C, D, E, F] presents additional information on the scope of cost elements, identifies methodologies used to develop the cost estimates, lists underlying cost assumptions, and tabulates summary results. Appendix A contains a glossary to assist the reader in understanding the terminology in Volume 5. Appendix G presents costs

  18. Viability Assessment Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DOE

    1998-12-01

    Volume 4 provides the DOE plan and cost estimate for the remaining work necessary to proceed from completing this VA to submitting an LA to NRC. This work includes preparing an EIS and evaluating the suitability of the site. Both items are necessary components of the documentation required to support a decision in 2001 by the Secretary of Energy on whether or not to recommend that the President approve the site for development as a repository. If the President recommends the site to Congress and the site designation becomes effective, then DOE will submit the LA to NRC in 2002 for authorization to construct the repository. The work described in Volume 4 constitutes the last step in the characterization of the Yucca Mountain site and the design and evaluation of the performance of a repository system in the geologic setting of this site. The plans in this volume for the next 4 years' work are based on the results of the previous 15 years' work, as reported in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 of this VA. Volume 1 summarizes what DOE has learned to date about the Yucca Mountain site. Volume 2 describes the current, reference repository design, several design options that might enhance the performance of the reference design, and several alternative designs that represent substantial departures from the reference design. Volume 2 also summarizes the results of tests of candidate materials for waste packages and for support of the tunnels into which waste would be emplaced. Volume 3 provides the results of the latest performance assessments undertaken to evaluate the performance of the design in the geologic setting of Yucca Mountain. The results described in Volumes 1, 2, and 3 provide the basis for identifying and prioritizing the work described in this volume. DOE believes that the planned work, together with the results of previous work, will be sufficient to support a site suitability evaluation for site recommendation and, if the site is recommended and designated, a

  19. FY 2012 Volume 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Volume 2 f Department of Energy FY 2012 Congressional B d R Budget Request Other Defense Activities Other Defense Activities Departmental Administration Inspector General Advanced Technology Vehicles Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Technology Loan Guarantee Program Better Building Pilot Loan Guarantee Initiative for Universities Schools and Hospitals Universities, Schools, and Hospitals Working Capital Fund Energy Information Administration Safeguards and Security Crosscut

  20. FY 2005 Volume 7

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    8 Volume 7 Interior & Related Agencies Interior & Related Agencies Fossil Energy Research & Development Fossil Energy Research & Development Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Naval Petroleum & Oil Shale Reserves Elk Hills School Lands Fund Elk Hills School Lands Fund Energy Conservation Energy Conservation Economic Regulation Economic Regulation Strategic Petroleum Reserve Strategic Petroleum Reserve Energy Information Administration Energy Information Administration

  1. Computer Simulations Reveal Multiple Functions for Aromatic Residues in Cellulase Enzymes (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-07-01

    NREL researchers use high-performance computing to demonstrate fundamental roles of aromatic residues in cellulase enzyme tunnels. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) computer simulations of a key industrial enzyme, the Trichoderma reesei Family 6 cellulase (Cel6A), predict that aromatic residues near the enzyme's active site and at the entrance and exit tunnel perform different functions in substrate binding and catalysis, depending on their location in the enzyme. These results suggest that nature employs aromatic-carbohydrate interactions with a wide variety of binding affinities for diverse functions. Outcomes also suggest that protein engineering strategies in which mutations are made around the binding sites may require tailoring specific to the enzyme family. Cellulase enzymes ubiquitously exhibit tunnels or clefts lined with aromatic residues for processing carbohydrate polymers to monomers, but the molecular-level role of these aromatic residues remains unknown. In silico mutation of the aromatic residues near the catalytic site of Cel6A has little impact on the binding affinity, but simulation suggests that these residues play a major role in the glucopyranose ring distortion necessary for cleaving glycosidic bonds to produce fermentable sugars. Removal of aromatic residues at the entrance and exit of the cellulase tunnel, however, dramatically impacts the binding affinity. This suggests that these residues play a role in acquiring cellulose chains from the cellulose crystal and stabilizing the reaction product, respectively. These results illustrate that the role of aromatic-carbohydrate interactions varies dramatically depending on the position in the enzyme tunnel. As aromatic-carbohydrate interactions are present in all carbohydrate-active enzymes, the results have implications for understanding protein structure-function relationships in carbohydrate metabolism and recognition, carbon turnover in nature, and protein engineering strategies for

  2. FY 2013 Volume 3

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 DOE/CF-0073 Volume 3 Printed with soy ink on recycled paper Department of Energy FY 2013 Congressional Budget Request Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Nuclear Energy Fossil Energy Research and Development Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northeast Home Heating Oil Reserve Ultra-Deepwater Unconventional Natural Gas Elk Hills Lands Fund Advanced Tech. Vehicle Manufacturing Loan Program Title 17 Innovative Tech.

  3. Estimating the aqueous solubility of aromatic hydrocarbons by high performance liquid chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitehouse, B.G.; Cooke, R.C.

    1982-01-01

    Empirical equations which correlate high performance liquid chromatography capacity factor (k') to aromatic hydrocarbon aqueous solubility are developed. The correlations of k' to octanol-water partition coefficients, and k' to hydrocarbon surface area are also shown.

  4. Refractometric determination of content of aromatic hydrocarbons in AI-93 gasolines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuznetsova, L.M.; Ioffe, B.V.; Mikheeva, E.G.

    1982-11-01

    Investigates the possibility of extending the use of the dispersometric method to the control of aromatic hydrocarbon content in AI-93 gasolines. Uses 4 model blends with aromatics content of 20-40% by weight. Finds that the dispersometric method can be used in analyzing both unleaded and leaded AI-93 gasolines, since the addition of ethyl fluid and dye in formulating the leaded gasolines does not affect the accuracy in determining the aromatic hydrocarbon content. Concludes that the dispersometric method can be used to determine the aromatic hydrocarbon content in AI-93 gasolines to within + or - 1.0% by weight, both in the laboratory (IRF-23M refractometer) and under commercial conditions (in ''Nafta-74'' unit).

  5. DUSTY WINDS: EXTRAPLANAR POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON FEATURES OF NEARBY GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormick, Alexander; Veilleux, Sylvain; Rupke, David S. N. E-mail: veilleux@astro.umd.edu

    2013-09-10

    Recent observations have shown the presence of dust and molecular material in galactic winds, but relatively little is known about the distribution of these outflow components. To shed some light on this issue, we have used IRAC images from the Spitzer Space Telescope archive to investigate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission from a sample of 16 local galaxies with known winds. Our focus on nearby sources (median distance 8.6 Mpc) has revealed detailed PAH structure in the winds and allowed us to measure extraplanar PAH emission. We have identified extraplanar PAH features on scales of {approx}0.8-6.0 kpc. We find a nearly linear correlation between the amount of extraplanar PAH emission and the total infrared flux, a proxy for star formation activity in the disk. Our results also indicate a correlation between the height of extraplanar PAH emission and star formation rate surface density, which supports the idea of a surface density threshold on the energy or momentum injection rate for producing detectable extraplanar wind material.

  6. Atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Lang; Shu Tao; Wenxin Liu; Yanxu Zhang; Staci Simonich

    2008-07-15

    A potential receptor influence function (PRIF) model, based on air mass forward trajectory calculations, was applied to simulate the atmospheric transport and outflow of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from China. With a 10 day atmospheric transport time, most neighboring countries and regions, as well as remote regions, were influenced by PAH emissions from China. Of the total annual PAH emission of 114 Gg, 92.7% remained within the boundary of mainland China. The geographic distribution of PRIFs within China was similar to the geographic distribution of the source regions, with high values in the North China Plain, Sichuan Basin, Shanxi, and Guizhou province. The Tarim basin and Sichuan basin had unfavorable meteorological conditions for PAH outflow. Of the PAH outflow from China (8092 tons or 7.1% of the total annual PAH emission), approximately 69.9% (5655 tons) reached no further than the offshore environment of mainland China and the South China Sea. Approximate 227, 71, 746, and 131 tons PAHs reached North Korea, South Korea, Russia-Mongolia region, and Japan, respectively, 2-4 days after the emission. Only 1.4 tons PAHs reached North America after more than 9 days. Interannual variation in the eastward PAH outflow was positively correlated to cold episodes of El Nino/Southern Oscillation. However, trans-Pacific atmospheric transport of PAHs from China was correlated to Pacific North America index (PNA) which is associated with the strength and position of westerly winds. 38 refs., 4 figs.

  7. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lime spray dryer ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Panuwat Taerakul; Linda K. Weavers; Harold W. Walker

    2005-10-01

    Four lime spray dryer (LSD) ash samples were collected from a spreader stoker boiler and measured for their concentrations of 16 U.S. EPA specified polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Results showed that the total measured PAH concentration correlated with the organic carbon content of the LSD ash. Each LSD ash sample was then separated using a 140 mesh sieve into two fractions: a carbon-enriched fraction ({gt}140 mesh) and a lime-enriched fraction ({lt}140 mesh). Unburned carbon was further separated from the carbon-enriched fraction with a lithiumheteropolytungstate (LST) solution. PAH measurements on these different fractions showed that unburned carbon had the highest PAH concentrations followed by the carbon-enriched fraction, indicating that PAHs were primarily associated with the carbonaceous material in LSD ash. However, detectable levels of PAHs were also found in the lime-enriched fraction, suggesting that the fine spray of slaked lime may sorb PAH compounds from the flue gas in the LSD process. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Selective aromatization of C[sub 3]- and C[sub 4]-paraffins over modified encilite catalysts: 2. Kinetics of n-butane aromatization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, A.K.; Rao, M.S. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-11-01

    The kinetics of the aromatization of n-butane over Zn-encilite catalyst was studied in a fixed bed reactor under steady-state conditions at atmospheric pressure and in the temperature range of 480--540 C. The experimental data were analyzed, and a dual-site mechanism was proposed. Six rate equations of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type were tested. The unknown parameters in the rate equations were estimated by a nonlinear regression method. A kinetic equation for n-butane aromatization is proposed.

  9. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting; Huber, George W.

    2011-06-03

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysismass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450600 C). At low temperatures (450 C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include DielsAlder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e

  10. Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Two-Step Process Converts Lignin into Simple Aromatic Compounds Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center Contact GLBRC About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary Lignin is a major component of non-edible biomass. It is a cheap byproduct of pulp and biofuel production and is one of the few naturally occurring sources of valuable aromatic compounds. Converting lignin's complex biopolymer structure into simple organic chemicals has attracted major interest. For example,

  11. Environmental diagnostic analysis of ground water bacteria and their involvement in utilization of aromatic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wear, J.E. Jr.

    1993-05-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that select functional groups of bacteria from pristine sites have an innate ability to degrade synthetic aromatics that often contaminate groundwater environments,due to exposure to naturally occurring recalcitrant aromatics in their environment. This study demonstrates that subsurface microbial communities are capable of utilizing lignin and humic acid breakdown products. Utilizers of these compounds were found to be present in most all the wells tested. Even the deepest aquifer tested had utilizers present for all six of the aromatics tested. Highest counts for the aromatics tested were observed with the naturally occurring breakdown products of either lignin or humic acid. Carboxylic acids were found to be an important sole carbon source for groundwater bacteria possibly explained by the fact that they are produced by the oxidative cleavage of aromatic ring structures. The carbohydrate sole carbon sources that demonstrated the greatest densities were ones commonly associated with humics. This study indicates that utilization of naturally occurring aromatic compounds in the subsurface is an important nutritional source for groundwater bacteria. In addition, it suggests that adaptation to naturally occurring recalcitrant substrates is the origin of degradative pathways for xenobiotic compounds with analogous structure. This work has important implications for in situ bioremediation as a method of environmental cleanup.

  12. THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN {nu}{sub max} AND AGE t FROM ZAMS TO RGB-TIP FOR LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Y. K.; Gai, N. E-mail: ning.gai@hotmail.com

    2013-07-10

    Stellar age is an important quantity in astrophysics, which is useful for many fields both in the universe and galaxies. It cannot be determined by direct measurements, but can only be estimated or inferred. We attempt to find a useful indicator of stellar age, which is accurate from the zero-age main sequence to the tip of red giant branch for low-mass stars. Using the Yale Rotation and Evolution Code (YREC), a grid of stellar models has been constructed. Meanwhile, the frequency of maximum oscillations' power {nu}{sub max} and the large frequency separation {Delta}{nu} are calculated using the scaling relations. For the stars, the masses of which are from 0.8 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }, we can obtain the {nu}{sub max} and stellar age by combing the scaling relations with the four sets of grid models (YREC, Dotter et al., Marigo et al., and YY isochrones). We find that {nu}{sub max} is tightly correlated and decreases monotonically with the age of the star from the main sequence to the red giant evolutionary stages. Moreover, we find that the line shapes of the curves in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram, which is plotted by the four sets of grid models, are consistent for red giants with masses from 1.1 M{sub Sun} to 2.8 M{sub Sun }. For red giants, the differences of correlation coefficients between Age and {nu}{sub max} for different grid models are minor and can be ignored. Interestingly, we find two peaks that correspond to the subgiants and bump of red giants in the Age versus {nu}{sub max} diagram. By general linear least-squares, we make the polynomial fitting and deduce the relationship between log(Age) and log({nu}{sub max}) in red giants' evolutionary state.

  13. THE AROMATIC FEATURES IN VERY FAINT DWARF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Ronin; Hogg, David W.; Moustakas, John

    2011-04-01

    We present optical and mid-infrared photometry of a statistically complete sample of 29 dwarf galaxies (M{sub r} > - 15 mag) selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectroscopic sample and observed in the mid-infrared with Spitzer IRAC. This sample contains nearby (redshift {approx}<0.005) galaxies 3 mag fainter than previously studied samples. We compare our sample with other star-forming galaxies that have been observed with both IRAC and SDSS. We examine the relationship of the infrared color, [3.6]-[7.8], sensitive to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) abundance and also hot dust and stellar continuum, with star formation rates (SFRs), oxygen abundances, and radiation hardness, all estimated by optical emission lines. Consistent with studies of more luminous dwarfs, we find that these dwarf galaxies show much redder [3.6]-[7.8] color than luminous galaxies with similar specific SFRs. Unlike luminous galaxies, we find that these dwarf galaxies show no significant dependence at all of the [3.6]-[7.8] color on SFR, oxygen abundance, or radiation hardness, despite the fact that the sample spans a significant range in all of these quantities. When the dwarfs in our sample are compared with more luminous dwarfs, we find that the [3.6]-[7.8] color, potentially tracing the PAH emission, depends on oxygen abundance and radiation hardness. However, these two parameters are correlated with one another as well; we break this degeneracy by looking at the PAH-oxygen abundance relation at a fixed radiation hardness and the PAH-hardness relation at a fixed oxygen abundance. This test shows that the [3.6]-[7.8] color in dwarf galaxies appears to depend more directly on oxygen abundance based on the data currently available.

  14. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C.

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  15. Simulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons transport in multimedia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, L.; Chu, C.J.

    1999-07-01

    Many studies have indicated that the threat from toxic air pollutants such as VOCs comes not through inhalation by humans while the pollutants are in a gaseous state but through absorption when the pollutants are in a solid state such as in an aerosol or particulate form. Pollutants such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) usually exist in a semi-volatile state. To assess the risk of the PAHs, one needs to estimate the dose of the pollutants to which a human would be exposed through various pathways. In this study, the authors modified a Spatial Multimedia Compartmental Model (SMCM) originally developed by UCLA Professor Cohen to predict the PAHs distribution among multimedia such as air, water, soil and sediment in the Taipei metropolitan area. Three PAHs were considered in this study. They are Benzo(a)pyrene, Pyrene and Chrysene. When PAHs are emitted into atmosphere, physical and chemical mechanisms may redistribute the PAHs among multimedia. Five cases of PAHs distribution in multimedia were simulated: (1) PAHs distribution in a dry condition, (2) PAHs distribution when there are different dry deposition velocities, (3) PAHs distribution under a single rainfall event, (4) PAHs distribution when there are different soil properties, (5) PAHs distribution under a random rainfall case. The simulation results are concluded: (1) In the dry case, the PAHs accumulate mostly in soil and air compartments, (2) Different dry depositing velocities will affect the PAHs distribution among compartments. (3) Different soil properties affect the PAHs concentration in the soil and sediment compartments, (4) The soil PAHs concentrations usually increase for those PAHs with a high solid/gas ratio. (5) The random rainfall only affects the PAHs concentration in the soil.

  16. Diffusion of Ag, Au and Cs implants in MAX phase Ti3SiC2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 462; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-3115 Publisher: Elsevier Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and ...

  17. Fluid mechanics experiments in oscillatory flow. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seume, J.; Friedman, G.; Simon, T.W.

    1992-03-01

    Results of a fluid mechanics measurement program is oscillating flow within a circular duct are present. The program began with a survey of transition behavior over a range of oscillation frequency and magnitude and continued with a detailed study at a single operating point. Such measurements were made in support of Stirling engine development. Values of three dimensionless parameters, Re{sub max}, Re{sub W}, and A{sub R}, embody the velocity amplitude, frequency of oscillation and mean fluid displacement of the cycle, respectively. Measurements were first made over a range of these parameters which included operating points of all Stirling engines. Next, a case was studied with values of these parameters that are representative of the heat exchanger tubes in the heater section of NASA`s Stirling cycle Space Power Research Engine (SPRE). Measurements were taken of the axial and radical components of ensemble-averaged velocity and rms-velocity fluctuation and the dominant Reynolds shear stress, at various radial positions for each of four axial stations. In each run, transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and in reverse, were identified and sufficient data was gathered to propose the transition mechanism. Models of laminar and turbulent boundary layers were used to process the data into wall coordinates and to evaluate skin friction coefficients. Such data aids in validating computational models and is useful in comparing oscillatory flow characteristics to those of fully-developed steady flow. Data were taken with a contoured entry to each end of the test section and with flush square inlets so that the effects of test section inlet geometry on transition and turbulence are documented. The following is presented in two-volumes. Volume I contains the text of the report including figures and supporting appendices. Volume II contains data reduction program listings and tabulated data (including its graphical presentation).

  18. Synergistic effect of mixing dimethyl ether with methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and soot formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, S.S.; Anh, D.H.; Chung, S.H.

    2008-08-15

    Characteristics of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and soot formation in counterflow diffusion flames of methane, ethane, propane, and ethylene fuels mixed with dimethyl ether (DME) have been investigated. Planar laser-induced incandescence and fluorescence techniques were employed to measure relative soot volume fractions and PAH concentrations, respectively. Results showed that even though DME is known to be a clean fuel in terms of soot formation, DME mixture with ethylene fuel increases PAH and soot formation significantly as compared to the pure ethylene case, while the mixture of DME with methane, ethane, and propane decreases PAH and soot formation. Numerical calculations adopting a detailed kinetics showed that DME can be decomposed to produce a relatively large number of methyl radicals in the low-temperature region where PAH forms and grows; thus the mixture of DME with ethylene increases CH{sub 3} radicals significantly in the PAH formation region. Considering that the increase in the concentration of O radicals is minimal in the PAH formation region with DME mixture, the enhancement of PAH and soot formation in the mixture flames of DME and ethylene can be explained based on the role of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation. Methyl radicals can increase the concentration of propargyls, which could enhance incipient benzene ring formation through the propargyl recombination reaction and subsequent PAH growth. Thus, the result substantiates the importance of methyl radicals in PAH and soot formation, especially in the PAH formation region of diffusion flames. (author)

  19. Multi-photon UV photolysis of gaseous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Extinction spectra and dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, A. J.; Gash, E. W.; Mansfield, M. W. D.; Ruth, A. A.

    2013-08-07

    The extinction spectra of static naphthalene and static biphenylene vapor, each buffered with a noble gas at room temperature, were measured as a function of time in the region between 390 and 850 nm after UV multi-photon laser photolysis at 308 nm. Employing incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS), the spectra were found to be unstructured with a general lack of isolated features suggesting that the extinction was not solely based on absorption but was in fact dominated by scattering from particles formed in the photolysis of the respective polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. Following UV multi-photon photolysis, the extinction dynamics of the static (unstirred) closed gas-phase system exhibits extraordinary quasi-periodic and complex oscillations with periods ranging from seconds to many minutes, persisting for up to several hours. Depending on buffer gas type and pressure, several types of dynamical responses could be generated (classified as types I, II, and III). They were studied as a function of temperature and chamber volume for different experimental conditions and possible explanations for the oscillations are discussed. A conclusive model for the observed phenomena has not been established. However, a number of key hypotheses have made based on the measurements in this publication: (a) Following the multi-photon UV photolysis of naphthalene (or biphenylene), particles are formed on a timescale not observable using IBBCEAS. (b) The observed temporal behavior cannot be described on basis of a chemical reaction scheme alone. (c) The pressure dependence of the system's responses is due to transport phenomena of particles in the chamber. (d) The size distribution and the refractive indices of particles are time dependent and evolve on a timescale of minutes to hours. The rate of particle coagulation, involving coalescent growth and particle agglomeration, affects the observed oscillations. (e) The walls of the chamber act as a sink

  20. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1983-09-20

    A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

  1. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, John M.; Napier, John M.; Travaglini, Michael A.

    1983-01-01

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

  2. Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum & Other Liquids Reports Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1 With Data for 2014 | Release Date: September 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: September 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Volume 1 - Final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 1 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and

  3. Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Annual, Volume 2 With Data for 2014 | Release Date: September 25, 2015 | Next Release Date: September 2016 Previous Issues Year: 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 Go Volume 2 - Final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. Volume 2 Tables All Tables All Tables Detailed Statistics Tables National Statistics 1 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum

  4. Twisted mass finite volume effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Wenger, Urs; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2010-08-01

    We calculate finite-volume effects on the pion masses and decay constant in twisted mass lattice QCD at finite lattice spacing. We show that the lighter neutral pion in twisted mass lattice QCD gives rise to finite-volume effects that are exponentially enhanced when compared to those arising from the heavier charged pions. We demonstrate that the recent two flavor twisted mass lattice data can be better fitted when twisted mass effects in finite-volume corrections are taken into account.

  5. Fusing porphyrins with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocycles for optoelectronic applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Mark E.; Diev, Viacheslav; Hanson, Kenneth; Forrest, Stephen R.

    2015-08-18

    A compound that can be used as a donor material in organic photovoltaic devices comprising a non-activated porphyrin fused with one or more non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or one or more non-activated heterocyclic rings can be obtained by a thermal fusion process. The compounds can include structures of Formula I: ##STR00001## By heating the reaction mixture of non-activated porphyrins with non-activated polycyclic aromatic rings or heterocyclic rings to a fusion temperature and holding for a predetermined time, fusion of one or more polycyclic rings or heterocyclic rings to the non-activated porphyrin core in meso,.beta. fashion is achieved resulting in hybrid structures containing a distorted porphyrin ring with annulated aromatic rings. The porphyrin core can be olygoporphyrins.

  6. Rehab guide: Roofs. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    Nine volumes will eventually make up The Rehab Guide in its entirety, and they are listed on the back cover of this volume. Each one is devoted to distinct elements of the house, and within each volume is a range of issues that are common to that element of home rehabilitation work. This volume, Roofs, for example, covers the major roofing systems including framing and sheathing; protective strategies such as underlayments and flashing; energy and air infiltration issues; roofing materials; and gutters and down-spouts. Each volume addresses a wide range techniques, materials, and tools, and recommendations based on regional differences around the country. Throughout The Rehab Guide, special attention is given to issues related to energy efficiency, sustainability, and accessibility.

  7. Alternative descriptions of catalyst deactivation in aromatization of propane and butane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koshelev, Yu.N.; Vorob`ev, B.L.; Khvorova, E.P.

    1995-08-20

    Deactivation of a zeolite-containing catalyst has been studied in aromatization of propane and butane. Various descriptions of the dependence of the alkane conversion on the coke concentration on the catalyst have been considered, and using a statistical method of estimating the model validity, the most preferable form of the deactivation function has been proposed.

  8. Influence of temperature and process duration on composition of products of butane aromatization on zeolitic catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vorob`ev, B.L.; Trishin, P.Yu.; Koshelev, Yu.N.

    1995-06-10

    A study has been made of the influence of catalyst deactivation in the course of its service. The composition of products of butane aromatization on zeolitic catalyst and on selectivity of formation of target products and by-products is reported.

  9. Borehole SASW testing to evaluate log(G{sub max}) - log({sigma}{prime}) relationships in situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Stokoe, K.H. II; Young, Y.L.; Roesset, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    A new method is being developed for the in-situ measurement of shear wave velocity, V{sub s}, in the soil surrounding a borehole. The method involves the measurement of axially propagating surface waves inside an uncased borehole using the Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves (SASW) approach. Testing if performed with instrumentation housed inside an inflatable tool. Inflation pressures applied by the tool are used to vary radial stresses in the soil surrounding the borehole. Surface wave velocities over a range of frequencies are measured at each inflation pressure. These measurements are then theoretically modeled so that the variation in V{sub s} (an hence small-strain shear module, G{sub max}) with distance behind the borehole wall is determined at each pressure. The results of field tests with the borehole SASW tool at two sites composed of unsaturated clayey soil are presented. These results are compared with independent field seismic measurements and with laboratory tests on intact specimens using the torsional resonant column to assess the validity of the new field method.

  10. Bent Diamond Crystals and Multilayer Based Optics at the new 5-Station Protein Crystallography Beamline 'Cassiopeia' at MAX-lab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mammen, Christian B.; Als-Nielsen, Jens; Ursby, Thomas; Thunnissen, Marjolein

    2004-05-12

    A new 5-station beamline for protein crystallography is being commissioned at the Swedish synchrotron light source MAX-II at Lund University. Of the 2K/{gamma} = 14 mrad horizontal wiggler fan, the central 2 mrad are used and split in three parts. The central 1 mrad will be used for a station optimized for MAD experiments and on each side of the central fan, from 0.5 mrad to 1 mrad, there are two fixed energy stations using different energies of the same part of the beam. These, in total five stations, can be used simultaneously and independently for diffraction data collection. The two upstream monochromators for the side stations are meridionally bent asymmetric diamond(111) crystals in Laue transmission geometry. The monochromators for the downstream side stations are bent Ge(111) crystals in asymmetric Bragg reflection geometry. Curved multilayer mirrors inserted in the monochromatic beams provide focusing in the vertical plane. The first side station is under commissioning, and a preliminary test protein data set has been collected.

  11. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume ...

  12. Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2004 Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume 1, 2004 Building America Program Evaluation, Volume I: Main Report, prepared by Energy Technology Innovation ...

  13. Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2, 2004 Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume 2, 2004 Building America Program Evaluation, Volume II: Appendices, prepared by: Energy Technology ...

  14. Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Nuclear power reactor instrumentation systems handbook. Volume 1 You ...

  15. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Citation Details In-Document Search Title: International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics You are accessing a ...

  16. Aromatic-Hydroxyl Interaction of a Lignin Model Compound on SBA-15, Present at Pyrolysis Temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kandziolka, III, Michael V.; Kidder, Michelle; Gill, Lance W.; Wu, Zili; Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2014-07-14

    An aromatic alpha-aryl ether compound (a benzyl phenyl ether analogue) was covalently grafted to mesoporous silica SBA-15, to create BPEa-SBA-15. The BPEa-SBA-15 was subjected to successive heating cycles up to 600 °C, with in situ monitoring by DRIFTS. It was found that the toluene moiety coordinates to SBA-15 surface silanol hydroxyl groups via an aromatic–hydroxyl interaction. This interaction is evidenced by a red-shift of the aromatic C–H stretches, as well as a red-shift and broadening of the surface hydroxyl O–H stretches, which are features characteristic of a hydrogen bond. These features remain present during heating until ~400 °C whereupon themore » ether linkage of BPEa-SBA-15 is cleaved, accompanied by loss of the toluene moiety.« less

  17. Synthetic fuel aromaticity and staged combustion. First quarterly technical progress report, September 23-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Arthur; Longanbach, James R.; Chan, Lisa K.

    1981-01-28

    Synthetic liquid fuels, otherwise referred to as synfuels or coal-derived liquids, are probably best characterized from a combustion-environmental point of view as low in hydrogen, low in sulfur, high in nitrogen, and high in aromatics. As a consequence two of the more critical problems in synfuel combustion are NO/sub x/ formation and soot formation (and polycyclic organic matter). This program is directed to these two issues. At first hand the solutions to burning synfuels high in aromatics and fuel-bound nitrogen are diametrically opposed, i.e., high temperature and excess air keep soot levels down, low temperatures and vitiated air keep nitrogen oxide levels down. Staged combustion however offers a logical solution to the above. This program separates and analyzes the synfuel combustion problem via its component parts and then puts them together again phenomenologically via the stage combustion process.

  18. High air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masquelier, Donald A.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Willeke, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    A high air volume to low liquid volume aerosol collector. A high volume flow of aerosol particles is drawn into an annular, centripetal slot in a collector which directs the aerosol flow into a small volume of liquid pool contained is a lower center section of the collector. The annular jet of air impinges into the liquid, imbedding initially airborne particles in the liquid. The liquid in the pool continuously circulates in the lower section of the collector by moving to the center line, then upwardly, and through assistance by a rotating deflector plate passes back into the liquid at the outer area adjacent the impinging air jet which passes upwardly through the liquid pool and through a hollow center of the collector, and is discharged via a side outlet opening. Any liquid droplets escaping with the effluent air are captured by a rotating mist eliminator and moved back toward the liquid pool. The collector includes a sensor assembly for determining, controlling, and maintaining the level of the liquid pool, and includes a lower centrally located valve assembly connected to a liquid reservoir and to an analyzer for analyzing the particles which are impinged into the liquid pool.

  19. Asymmetric Intramolecular Alkylation of Chiral Aromatic Imines via Catalytic C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watzke, Anja; Wilson, Rebecca; O'Malley, Steven; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2007-04-16

    The asymmetric intramolecular alkylation of chiral aromatic aldimines, in which differentially substituted alkenes are tethered meta to the imine, was investigated. High enantioselectivities were obtained for imines prepared from aminoindane derivatives, which function as directing groups for the rhodium-catalyzed C-H bond activation. Initial demonstration of catalytic asymmetric intramolecular alkylation also was achieved by employing a sterically hindered achiral imine substrate and catalytic amounts of a chiral amine.

  20. Addition of CFCl3 to Aromatic Aldehydes via in Situ Grignard Reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barkakaty, Balaka; Talukdar, Bandana; Lokitz, Bradley

    2015-08-18

    In the case of synthetic modification of trichlorofluoromethane (CFCl3) to non-volatile and useful fluorinated precursors, we realized that it is a cost-effective and an environmentally benign strategy for the safe consumption/destruction of the ozone depleting potential of the reagent. In our report, we present a novel method for in situ Grignard reaction using magnesium powder and CFCl3 for synthesis of dichlorofluoromethyl aromatic alcohols.

  1. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 2 contains papers from the following sessions: Safeguards-Related Problems; Neutronics and Criticality; Operations and Systems Experience II; Plutonium Systems; Intermediate Storage in Casks; Operations and Systems Planning; Institutional Issues; Structural and Thermal Evaluation I; Poster Session B; Extended Testing I; Structural and Thermal Evaluation II; Extended Testing II; and Emergency Preparedness and Response. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  2. PATRAM '80. Proceedings. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huebner, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 1 contains papers from the following sessions: Plenary Session; Regulations, Licensing and Standards; LMFBR Systems Concepts; Risk/Safety Assessment I; Systems and Package Design; US Institutional Issues; Risk/Safety Assessment II; Leakage, Leak Rate and Seals; Poster Session A; Operations and Systems Experience I; Manufacturing Processes and Materials; and Quality Assurance and Maintenance. Individual papers were processed. (LM)

  3. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W W 843.8 W W 2,188.3 W W 193.2 133.6 - 326.8 November ... W W 818.4 1,151.9 NA 1,984.1 W W 189.5 127.0 - 316.5 December ... W W W...

  4. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    W 2,734.4 W W W W - 243.3 May ... W W 898.3 W W 2,818.3 W W W W - 255.4 June ... W W 919.7 W W 2,841.1 W W...

  5. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    13,752.8 14,204.9 16,837.5 52,025.3 9,480.0 78,342.8 2,675.9 2,738.6 2,823.0 4,995.6 - 7,818.6 August ... 13,908.8 14,400.4 17,863.9 53,248.7 8,114.1...

  6. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, NUMBER 18 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 6 MAY 2002 Measurement of the Current-Density Profile and Plasma Dynamics in the Reversed-Field Pinch D. L. Brower, W. X. Ding, and S. D. Terry Electrical Engineering Department, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 J. K. Anderson, T. M. Biewer, B. E. Chapman, D. Craig, C. B. Forest, S. C. Prager, and J. S. Sarff Physics Department, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (Received 29

  7. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reduced Edge Instability and Improved Confinement in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch B. E. Chapman, 1, * J. K. Anderson, 1 T. M. Biewer, 1 D. L. Brower, 2 S. Castillo, 1 P. K. Chattopadhyay, 1 C.-S. Chiang, 1 D. Craig, 1 D. J. Den Hartog, 1 G. Fiksel, 1 P. W. Fontana, 1 C. B. Forest, 1 S. Gerhardt, 1 A. K. Hansen, 1 D. Holly, 1 Y. Jiang, 2 N. E. Lanier, 1 S. C. Prager, 1 J. C. Reardon, 1 and J. S. Sarff 1 1 University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 2 University of California, Los Angeles,

  8. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 17 JULY 2000 Spectroscopic Observation of Fluctuation-Induced Dynamo in the Edge of the Reversed-Field Pinch P. W. Fontana, D. J. Den Hartog, G. Fiksel, and S. C. Prager Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (Received 29 October 1999) The fluctuation-induced dynamo ͗ ~ v 3 ~ b͘ has been investigated by direct measurement of ~ v and ~ b in the edge of a reversed-field pinch and is found to be significant in

  9. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 4 SEPTEMBER 2000 Control of Density Fluctuations and Electron Transport in the Reversed-Field Pinch N. E. Lanier, D. Craig, J. K. Anderson, T. M. Biewer, B. E. Chapman, D. J. Den Hartog, C. B. Forest, and S. C. Prager Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 D. L. Brower and Y. Jiang Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1594 (Received 24

  10. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evidence of Stabilization in the Z-Pinch U. Shumlak, R. P. Golingo, and B. A. Nelson University of Washington, Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, Seattle, Washington 98195-2250 D. J. Den Hartog* Sterling Scientific, Inc., Madison, Wisconsin (Received 11 June 2001; published 29 October 2001) Theoretical studies have predicted that the Z-pinch can be stabilized with a sufficiently sheared axial flow [U. Shumlak and C. W. Hartman, Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 3285 (1995)]. A Z-pinch experiment is

  11. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9, NUMBER 10 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 8 SEPTEMBER 1997 Enhanced ... Particle content increases and H a radiation decreases upon application of bias and global ...

  12. Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    39,569.3 40,215.9 122,708.5 26,876.5 189,800.8 10,466.7 10,604.8 10,129.5 14,302.8 - 24,432.4 February ... 40,637.5 41,953.1 43,328.9 133,687.6...

  13. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    point in the profiles presented below is an en- semble average of time-averaged data from 10-30 similar discharges. The time windows are of varying length, cho- sen to avoid...

  14. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PPCD. The transition of the fluctuation to its low value coincides with a small saw- tooth in this and many improved PPCD plasmas. This is probably related to an abrupt but...

  15. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a typical MST discharge. the cause of the sudden changes in rotation during saw- tooth crashes. First, we measure correlated triple products of three modes, and observe that...

  16. VOLUME

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    role in the fluctuation structure. These experiments also report that the sign of the flux can actually reverse in the region of the shear flow, an effect not predicted by the...

  17. Site Environmental Report for 2005 Volume I and Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, Michael

    2006-07-07

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting''. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2005'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2005. (Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab'', ''the Laboratory'', ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory'', and ''LBNL''.) The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains an overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. This year's Volume I text body is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters. The report's structure has been reorganized this year, and it now includes a chapter devoted to environmental management system topics. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The ''Site Environmental Report'' is distributed by releasing it on the Web from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements, because the non-SI system is referenced by several current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. Two tables are provided at the end of the Glossary to help readers: the first defines the prefixes

  18. Managing natural gas volume analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, J. ); Treat, R. ); Bergen, H. )

    1994-07-01

    In late 1992, Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America and BMP Energy Systems began the joint development of a system for the automated verification and statistical correction of gas volume data captured at meter locations by flow computers. NGPL required a single system that would provide functionality for both chart processing and automated EFM data validation and correction. The pipeline company was looking for a vendor that would help develop a system to handle EFM data. The NGAS 4[trademark] system implemented at NGPL made the bridge from monthly to daily gas volume processing. The automated and rapid validation of flow data within the NGAS 4 system minimizes human intervention for validation and correction. NGPL has moved from reliance on paper chart processing to the EFM capability required in the evolving US gas market.

  19. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report (Volumes 1 through 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison M.

    2013-03-27

    The design report consists of four volumes: Volume 1, Executive Summary; Volume 2, Physics; Volume 3, Accelerator (Part I, R and D in the Technical Design Phase, and Part II, Baseline Design); and Volume 4, Detectors.

  20. Combined application of normal and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography to determining the group composition of aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belous, E.F.; Lanin, S.N.; Nikitin, Yu.S.

    1995-01-01

    The quality and working characteristics of motor fuels essentially depend on the concentration of aromatic hydrocarbons (AHs). Therefore, the development of procedures for the group determination of aromatic hydrocarbons is an important and topical problem in the processing and quality control of petroleum products. The aim of this work was to improve the group separation and quantitative determination of monocyclic and bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (MAH and BAH) in light-end products.

  1. Steam stripping of polycyclic aromatics from simulated high-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.P.; Shah, H.B.; Young, S.R.; Edwards, R.E.; Carter, J.T.

    1992-12-31

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) will be the United States` first facility to process High Level radioactive Waste (HLW) into a borosilicate glass matrix. The removal of aromatic precipitates by hydrolysis, evaporation, liquid-liquid extraction and decantation will be a key step in the processing of the HLW. This step, titled the Precipitate Hydrolysis Process, has been demonstrated by the Savannah River Technology Center with the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF). The mission of the PHEF is to demonstrate processing of simulated high level radioactive waste which contains tetraphenylborate precipitates and nitrite. Aqueous washing or nitrite destruction is used to reduce nitrite. Formic acid with a copper catalyst is used to hydrolyze tetraphenylborate (TPB). The primary offgases are benzene, carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and nitric oxide. Hydrolysis of TPB in the presence of nitrite results in the production of polycyclic aromatics and aromatic amines (referred as high boiling organics) such as biphenyl, diphenylamine, terphenyls etc. The decanter separates the organic (benzene) and aqueous phase, but the high boiling organic separation is difficult. This paper focuses on the evaluation of the operating strategies, including steam stripping, to maximize the removal of the high boiling organics from the aqueous stream. Two areas were investigated, (1) a stream stripping comparison of the late wash flowsheet to the HAN flowsheet and (2) the extraction performance of the original decanter to the new decanter. The focus of both studies was to minimize the high boiling organic content of the Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) product in order to minimize downstream impacts caused by organic deposition.

  2. Flash Vacuum Pyrolysis of Lignin Model Compounds: Reaction Pathways of Aromatic Methoxy Groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C., III; Martineau, D.R.

    1999-03-21

    Currently, there is interest in utilizing lignin, a major constituent of biomass, as a renewable source of chemicals and fuels. High yields of liquid products can be obtained from the flash or fast pyrolysis of biomass, but the reaction pathways that lead to product formation are not understood. To provide insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds at 500 C. This presentation will focus on the FVP of {beta}-ether linkages containing aromatic methoxy groups and the reaction pathways of methoxy-substituted phenoxy radicals.

  3. Volume International: Order (2014-CE-32014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Volume International Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Volume International had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products. [Polychlorinated biphenyls; methylene chloride; perchloroethylene; trichlorofluoroethane; trichloroethylene; chlorobenzene

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

    1982-03-31

    A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contracting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible polyhydroxy compound, such as, water, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds in the low polar or nonpolar solvent by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered for recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 2 tables.

  5. OMAE 1993: Proceedings. Volume 5: Pipeline technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, M.; Murray, A.; Thygesen, J.

    1993-01-01

    This volume of conference proceedings is volume five of a five volume series dealing with offshore and arctic pipeline, marine riser, platforms, and ship design and engineering. This volume is a result of increased use of pipeline transportation for oil, gas, and liquid products and the resultant need for lower design and operating costs. Papers in this conference cover topics on environmental considerations, pipeline automation, computer simulation techniques, materials testing, corrosion protection, permafrost problems, pipeline integrity, geotechnical concerns, and offshore engineering problems.

  6. Renewable Electricity Futures Study - Volume One

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hand, Maureen; Mai, Treui; Baldwin, Sam; Brinkman, Greg; Sandor, Debbie; Denholm, Paul; Heath, Garvin; Wiser, Ryan

    2016-06-01

    Renewable Electricity Futures Study - Volume One. This is part of a series of four volumes describing exploring a high-penetration renewable electricity future for the United States of America. This data set is provides data for the entire volume one document and includes all data for the charts and graphs included in the document.

  7. Environmental Report 1995. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Failor, R.A.; Gallegos, G.M.

    1996-09-01

    This report contains the results of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL) environmental monitoring and compliance effort and an assessment of the impact of LLNL operations on the environment and the public. This first volume describes LLNL`s environmental impact and compliance activities and features descriptive and explanatory text, summary data tables, and plots showing data trends. The summary data include measures of the center of data, their spread or variability, and their extreme values. Chapters on monitoring air, sewage, surface water, ground water, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuff, and environmental radiation are present.

  8. Solar Fundamentals Volume 1: Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is one component of a multi-part series publication to assist in educating th'se seeking to become more familiar with the solar industry. This volume introduces solar technologies, explaining each technology’s applications, the components that make up a photovoltaic system, and how they can be used to optimize energy generation. This report explains solar insolation and how it impacts energy generation in illustrating where solar energy is a viable option. A final section highlights important considerations in solar project siting to maximize system production and avoid unexpected project development challenges.

  9. Product Guide Category Prices Volumes

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Product Guide Category Prices Volumes Crude oil Refiner acqusistion cost 1,1A - Domestic first purchases 1 - from selected states 18 - by API gravity 20 - for selected crude streams 19 - Imports F.O.B. cost 1 - from selected states 21 - by API gravity 23 - for selected crude streams 26 - Landed costs 1 - from selected states 22 - by API gravity 24 - for selected crude streams 27 - Percentage by gravity band 25 - - Motor gasoline all sellers 28 - refiners 2,4,6,31 3,5,7,39,40 prime suppliers - 45

  10. A study on the coagulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon clusters to determine their collision efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raj, Abhijeet; Sander, Markus; Janardhanan, Vinod; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2010-03-15

    This paper presents a theoretical study on the physical interaction between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their clusters of different sizes in laminar premixed flames. Two models are employed for this study: a detailed PAH growth model, referred to as the kinetic Monte Carlo - aromatic site (KMC-ARS) model [Raj et al., Combust. Flame 156 (2009) 896-913]; and a multivariate PAH population balance model, referred to as the PAH - primary particle (PAH-PP) model. Both the models are solved by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. PAH mass spectra are generated using the PAH-PP model, and compared to the experimentally observed spectra for a laminar premixed ethylene flame. The position of the maxima of PAH dimers in the spectra and their concentrations are found to depend strongly on the collision efficiency of PAH coagulation. The variation in the collision efficiency with various flame and PAH parameters is studied to determine the factors on which it may depend. A correlation for the collision efficiency is proposed by comparing the computed and the observed spectra for an ethylene flame. With this correlation, a good agreement between the computed and the observed spectra for a number of laminar premixed ethylene flames is found. (author)

  11. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) formation from the pyrolysis of different municipal solid waste fractions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hui; Wu, Chunfei; Onwudili, Jude A.; Meng, Aihong; Zhang, Yanguo; Williams, Paul T.

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • PAH from pyrolysis of 9 MSW fractions was investigated. • Pyrolysis of plastics released more PAH than that of biomass. • Naphthalene was the most abundant PAH in the tar. • The mechanism of PAH release from biomass and plastics was proposed. - Abstract: The formation of 2–4 ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from the pyrolysis of nine different municipal solid waste fractions (xylan, cellulose, lignin, pectin, starch, polyethylene (PE), polystyrene (PS), polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and polyethylene terephthalate (PET)) were investigated in a fixed bed furnace at 800 °C. The mass distribution of pyrolysis was also reported. The results showed that PS generated the most total PAH, followed by PVC, PET, and lignin. More PAH were detected from the pyrolysis of plastics than the pyrolysis of biomass. In the biomass group, lignin generated more PAH than others. Naphthalene was the most abundant PAH, and the amount of 1-methynaphthalene and 2-methynaphthalene was also notable. Phenanthrene and fluorene were the most abundant 3-ring PAH, while benzo[a]anthracene and chrysene were notable in the tar of PS, PVC, and PET. 2-ring PAH dominated all tar samples, and varied from 40 wt.% to 70 wt.%. For PS, PET and lignin, PAH may be generated directly from the aromatic structure of the feedstock.

  12. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts and the CYP1A1 restriction fragment length polymorphism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shields, P.G.; Bowman, E.D.; Weston, A.; Harris, C.C.; Sugimura, H.; Caporaso, N.E.; Petruzzelli, S.F. ); Trump, B.F. )

    1992-11-01

    Human cancer risk assessment at a genetic level involves the investigation of carcinogen metabolism and DNA adduct formation. Wide interindividual differences in metabolism result in different DNA adduct levels. For this and other reasons, many laboratories have considered DNA adducts to be a measure of the biologically effective dose of a carcinogen. Techniques for studying DNA adducts using chemically specific assays are becoming available. A modification of the [sup 32]P-postlabeling assay for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon DNA adducts described here provides potential improvements in quantification. DNA adducts, however, reflect only recent exposure to carcinogens; in contrast, genetic testing for metabolic capacity indicates the extent to which carcinogens can be activated and exert genotoxic effects. Such studies may reflect both separate and integrated risk factors together with DNA adduct levels. A recently described restriction fragment length polymorphism for the CYP1A1, which codes for the cytochrome P450 enzyme primarily responsible for the metabolic activation of carcinogenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, has been found to be associated with lung cancer risk in a Japanese population. In a subset of individuals enrolled in a US lung cancer case-control study, no association with lung cancer was found. 17 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Volume efficient sodium sulfur battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mikkor, Mati

    1980-01-01

    In accordance with the teachings of this specification, a sodium sulfur battery is formed as follows. A plurality of box shaped sulfur electrodes are provided, the outer surfaces of which are defined by an electrolyte material. Each of the electrodes have length and width dimensions substantially greater than the thicknesses thereof as well as upwardly facing surface and a downwardly facing surface. An electrode structure is contained in each of the sulfur electrodes. A holding structure is provided for holding the plurality of sulfur electrodes in a stacked condition with the upwardly facing surface of one sulfur electrode in facing relationship to the downwardly facing surface of another sulfur electrode thereabove. A small thickness dimension separates each of the stacked electrodes thereby defining between each pair of sulfur electrodes a volume which receives the sodium reactant. A reservoir is provided for containing sodium. A manifold structure interconnects the volumes between the sulfur electrodes and the reservoir. A metering structure controls the flow of sodium between the reservoir and the manifold structure.

  14. Petroleum supply annual 1994. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-22

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  15. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Below is a description of each section in Volume 1 of the PSA.

  16. Enhancing muconic acid production from glucose and lignin-derived aromatic compounds via increased protocatechuate decarboxylase activity

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Christopher W.; Salvachua, Davinia; Khanna, Payal; Smith, Holly; Peterson, Darren J.; Beckham, Gregg T.

    2016-04-22

    The conversion of biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules to cis,cis-muconic acid (referred to hereafter as muconic acid or muconate) has been of recent interest owing to its facile conversion to adipic acid, an important commodity chemical. Metabolic routes to produce muconate from both sugars and many lignin-derived aromatic compounds require the use of a decarboxylase to convert protocatechuate (PCA, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) to catechol (1,2-dihydroxybenzene), two central aromatic intermediates in this pathway. Several studies have identified the PCA decarboxylase as a metabolic bottleneck, causing an accumulation of PCA that subsequently reduces muconate production. A recent study showed that activity of the PCAmore » decarboxylase is enhanced by co-expression of two genetically associated proteins, one of which likely produces a flavin-derived cofactor utilized by the decarboxylase. Using entirely genome-integrated gene expression, we have engineered Pseudomonas putida KT2440-derived strains to produce muconate from either aromatic molecules or sugars and demonstrate in both cases that co-expression of these decarboxylase associated proteins reduces PCA accumulation and enhances muconate production relative to strains expressing the PCA decarboxylase alone. In bioreactor experiments, co-expression increased the specific productivity (mg/g cells/h) of muconate from the aromatic lignin monomer p-coumarate by 50% and resulted in a titer of >15 g/L. In strains engineered to produce muconate from glucose, co-expression more than tripled the titer, yield, productivity, and specific productivity, with the best strain producing 4.92+/-0.48 g/L muconate. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that overcoming the PCA decarboxylase bottleneck can increase muconate yields from biomass-derived sugars and aromatic molecules in industrially relevant strains and cultivation conditions.« less

  17. Determination of the Average Aromatic Cluster Size of Fossil Fuels by Solid-State NMR at High Magnetic Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Kanmi; Kennedy, Gordon J.; Althaus, Stacey M.; Pruski, Marek

    2013-01-07

    We show that the average aromatic cluster size in complex carbonaceous materials can be accurately determined using fast magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR at a high magnetic field. To accurately quantify the nonprotonated aromatic carbon, we edited the 13C spectra using the recently reported MAS-synchronized spinecho, which alleviated the problem of rotational recoupling of 1H-13C dipolar interactions associated with traditional dipolar dephasing experiments. The dependability of this approach was demonstrated on selected Argonne Premium coal standards, for which full sets of basic structural parameters were determined with high accuracy.

  18. Proposed Southline Transmission Line Project - Volume 3 of 4...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Right-of-Way ... G-1 11 12 13 VOLUME SUMMARY 14 15 Volume 1 - Executive Summary, Chapters 1, 2, and 3 16 Volume 2 -...

  19. X{sub max}{sup μ} vs. N{sup μ} from extensive air showers as estimator for the mass of primary UHECR's. Application for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arsene, Nicusor; Sima, Octavian

    2015-02-24

    We study the possibility of primary mass estimation for Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR's) using the X{sub max}{sup μ} (the height where the number of muons produced on the core of Extensive Air Showers (EAS) is maximum) and the number N{sup μ} of muons detected on ground. We use the 2D distribution - X{sub max}{sup μ} against N{sup μ} in order to find its sensitivity to the mass of the primary particle. For that, we construct a 2D Probability Function Prob(p,Fe | X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) which estimates the probability that a certain point from the plane (X{sub max}{sup μ}, N{sup μ}) corresponds to a shower induced by a proton, respectively an iron nucleus. To test the procedure, we analyze a set of simulated EAS induced by protons and iron nuclei at energies of 10{sup 19}eV and 20° zenith angle with CORSIKA. Using the Bayesian approach and taking into account the geometry of the infill detectors from the Pierre Auger Observatory, we observe an improvement in the accuracy of the primary mass reconstruction in comparison with the results obtained using only the X{sub max}{sup μ} distributions.

  20. Compounds having aromatic rings and side-chain amide-functionality and a method for transporting monovalent anions across biological membranes using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jeffery T.; Sidorov, Vladimir; Kotch, Frank W.

    2008-04-08

    A compound containing at least two aromatic rings covalently bonded together, with each aromatic ring containing at least one oxyacetamide-based side chain, the compound being capable of forming a chloride ion channel across a lipid bilayer, and transporting chloride ion across the lipid bilayer.

  1. Information architecture. Volume 3: Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this document, as presented in Volume 1, The Foundations, is to assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in developing and promulgating information architecture guidance. This guidance is aimed at increasing the development of information architecture as a Departmentwide management best practice. This document describes departmental information architecture principles and minimum design characteristics for systems and infrastructures within the DOE Information Architecture Conceptual Model, and establishes a Departmentwide standards-based architecture program. The publication of this document fulfills the commitment to address guiding principles, promote standard architectural practices, and provide technical guidance. This document guides the transition from the baseline or defacto Departmental architecture through approved information management program plans and budgets to the future vision architecture. This document also represents another major step toward establishing a well-organized, logical foundation for the DOE information architecture.

  2. Ironmaking conference proceedings. Volume 54

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The technical presentations at this conference displayed a renewed sense of viability of the coke and ironmaking community. In addition, many of the papers show that the environmental aspects of ironmaking are being integrated into day-to-day operations rather than being thought of as separate responsibilities. This volume contains 68 papers divided into the following sections: Blast furnace injection; Blast furnace fundamental studies; Blast furnace general; Blast furnace repairs/rebuilds/modernization; Process control techniques for blast furnaces; Cokemaking general; Cokemaking environmental; Coke--by-products--plant operations; Coal and coke research; Battery operations; Pelletizing; Direct reduction and smelting; and Sintering. Most of the papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  3. Measurement of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the air along the niagara river

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoff, R.M.; Chan, K.W.

    1987-06-01

    Two week-long studies in 1982-1983 have measure ambient concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and phthalate esters in air in both the particulate and gas phase along the US-Canadian border and the Niagara River. Concentrations of the PAH species monitored varied from 3 pg m/sup -3/ to 40 ng m/sup -3/. PAH's with three rings or less were found in significant proportions in the gas phase while larger molecules are almost solely in the particulate phase. Particulate components of the PAH loadings appear to originate locally with Buffalo, NY, Niagara Falls, NY, and Niagara Falls, Ontario, as probably sources. Gas-phase PAH components have a more regional character indicating regional or long-range transport. Levels of benzo(a)pyrene are consistent with previous particulate measurements made along the river since 1981.

  4. Air pollution from a large steel factory: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emissions from coke-oven batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenzo Liberti; Michele Notarnicola; Roberto Primerano; Paolo Zannetti

    2006-03-15

    A systematic investigation of solid and gaseous atmospheric emissions from some coke-oven batteries of one of Europe's largest integrated steel factory (Taranto, Italy) has been carried out. These emissions, predominantly diffuse, originate from oven leakages, as well as from cyclic operations of coal loading and coke unloading. In air monitoring samples, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were consistently detected at concentrations largely exceeding threshold limit values. By means of PAHs speciation profile and benzo-(a)pyrene (BaP) equivalent dispersion modeling from diffuse sources, the study indicated that serious health risks exist not only in working areas, but also in a densely populated residential district near the factory. 30 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pantelic, Radosav S., E-mail: pantelic@imbb.forth.gr [National Cancer Institute, 50 South Drive, Building 50, Room 4306, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (United States); Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian [Department of Physics, University of Basel, Klingelbergstrasse 82, Basel CH-4056 (Switzerland); Stahlberg, Henning [Center for Cellular Imaging and NanoAnalytics, Biozentrum, University of Basel, Mattenstrasse 26, WRO-1058, Basel CH-4058 (Switzerland)

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilica convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  6. Catalytic cracking of aromatic hydrocarbons. Final report, October 1984-March 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simons, G.A.; Ham, D.O.; Moniz, G.A.

    1986-04-01

    Iron containing minerals and chars were screened as cracking catalysts for aromatic hydrocarbons (AHC) in simulated gasifier effluents. Catalytic activities of six minerals and two chars were measured and used to infer fundamental hetereogeneous rate constants using measured properties of the pore structure of the solids. Measurements were made for 200 ppM and 2000 ppM benzene cracking over the temperature range 400 to 1000/sup 0/C. The active catalyst under gasifier conditions was found to be FeO. The minerals have a higher reactivity per unit mass in chars than in a pure form. H/sub 2/S was found to reduce the catalytic activity to one third of the unpoisoned value, but the catalysts maintained this reduced activity. These minerals have the potential to be economically feasible, disposable catalysts in a fixed bed or fluidized bed process if they can survive for ten hours. 8 refs., 33 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Constant Volume During Combustion | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Constant Volume During Combustion Constant Volume During Combustion This presentation covers constant volume during combustion and discusses how it can alter the kinematics of piston to crankshaft travel. deer08_joniec.pdf (88.76 KB) More Documents & Publications Utilizing the Rapid Ignition Region of HCCI to Attain > 60% BTE 50% thermo-mechanical efficiency utilizing a free-piston engine in Hybrid vehicles DOE-HDBK-1018/1-93

  8. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The {ital Petroleum Supply Annual} contains information on supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. It reflects data collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys, and it is divided into 2 volumes. This volume contains three sections: summary statistics, detailed statistics, and selected refinery statistics, each with final annual data. (The other volume contains final statistics for each month and replaces data previously published in the {ital Petroleum Supply Monthly}).

  9. Surface and Volume Contamination | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Surface and Volume Contamination Surface and Volume Contamination (Questions Posted to ERAD in May 2012) Will there be volume contamination/activation guides as well as updated contamination guides? The only guidance being developed for volumetric contamination is a Technical Standard for accelerator facilities. However, a revised version of ANSI N13.12-1999 is expected in the future and it will be assessed to determine its acceptability for use as a pre-approved authorized limit. It is noted

  10. PARC Periodical | Volume 6, Issue 5 | Photosynthetic Antenna Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center Volume 6, Issue 5 June 3, 2015 PARC Periodical | Volume 6, Issue 5 VIEW ARTICLE HERE

  11. ,"Alabama Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  12. ,"Minnesota Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  13. ,"Missouri Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mo2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  14. ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ok2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  15. ,"Utah Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  16. ,"Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030va2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  17. ,"Indiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  18. ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  19. ,"Maryland Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030md2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  20. ,"Iowa Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ia2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  1. ,"Louisiana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  2. ,"Colorado Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  3. ,"Washington Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030wa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  4. ,"Montana Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mt2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  5. ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  6. ,"Kansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  7. ,"Illinois Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030il2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  8. ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ky2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  9. ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  10. ,"Michigan Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  11. ,"Mississippi Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  12. ,"Ohio Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030oh2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  13. ,"Texas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  14. ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030wy2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  15. ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  16. Petroleum supply annual 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-26

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them.

  17. International Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Linear Collider Technical Design Report - Volume 2: Physics Baer, Howard; Barklow, Tim; Fujii, Keisuke; Gao, Yuanning; Hoang, Andre; Kanemura, Shinya; List, Jenny; Logan, Heather...

  18. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 48 tabs.

  19. Solar Progammatic Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 1 |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Progammatic Environmental Impact Statement, Volume 1 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Solar Progammatic Environmental...

  20. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The ``Petroleum Supply Annual`` (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the PSA. The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  1. Aromatic carboxylate effect on dimensionality of three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers: Syntheses, structures and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Ju-Wen; Gong, Chun-Hua; Hou, Li-Li; Tian, Ai-Xiang; Wang, Xiu-Li

    2013-09-15

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers [Co(4-bbc){sub 2}(bbbm)] (1), [Co(3,5-pdc)(bbbm)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) and [Co(1,4-ndc)(bbbm)] (3) (4-Hbbc=4-bromobenzoic acid, 3,5-H{sub 2}pdc=3,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid, 1,4-H{sub 2}ndc=1,4-naphthalenedicarboxylic acid and bbbm=1,1-(1,4-butanediyl)bis-1H-benzimidazole) were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Polymer 1 is a 1D chain formed by the bbbm ligands and Co{sup II} ions. Polymer 2 exhibits a 2D network with a (3·4·5)(3{sup 2}·4·5·6{sup 2}·7{sup 4}) topology. Polymer 3 possesses a 3D three-fold interpenetrating framework. The versatile structures of title polymers indicate that the aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of 1–3. Moreover, the thermal stability, electrochemical and luminescent properties of 1–3 were investigated. - graphical abstract: Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. The aromatic carboxylates play a key role in the dimensionality of three polymers. The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Three bis(benzimidazole)-based cobalt(II) coordination polymers tuned by aromatic carboxylates were obtained. • The aromatic carboxylates have an important influence on the dimensionality of three polymers. • The electrochemical and luminescent properties of three polymers were investigated.

  2. Information architecture. Volume 4: Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The Vision document marks the transition from definition to implementation of the Department of Energy (DOE) Information Architecture Program. A description of the possibilities for the future, supported by actual experience with a process model and tool set, points toward implementation options. The directions for future information technology investments are discussed. Practical examples of how technology answers the business and information needs of the organization through coordinated and meshed data, applications, and technology architectures are related. This document is the fourth and final volume in the planned series for defining and exhibiting the DOE information architecture. The targeted scope of this document includes DOE Program Offices, field sites, contractor-operated facilities, and laboratories. This document paints a picture of how, over the next 7 years, technology may be implemented, dramatically improving the ways business is conducted at DOE. While technology is mentioned throughout this document, the vision is not about technology. The vision concerns the transition afforded by technology and the process steps to be completed to ensure alignment with business needs. This goal can be met if those directing the changing business and mission-support processes understand the capabilities afforded by architectural processes.

  3. Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

    1975-11-18

    An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

  4. Grating light reflection spectroelectrochemistry for detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY,MICHAEL J.; SWEATT,WILLIAM C.; KEMME,SHANALYN A.; KASUNIC,K.J.; BLAIR,DIANNA S.; ZAIDI,S.H.; MCNEIL,J.R.; BURGESS,L.W.; BRODSKY,A.M.; SMITH,S.A.

    2000-04-01

    Grating light reflection spectroscopy (GLRS) is an emerging technique for spectroscopic analysis and sensing. A transmission diffraction grating is placed in contact with the sample to be analyzed, and an incident light beam is directed onto the grating. At certain angles of incidence, some of the diffracted orders are transformed from traveling waves to evanescent waves. This occurs at a specific wavelength that is a function of the grating period and the complex index of refraction of the sample. The intensities of diffracted orders are also dependent on the sample's complex index of refraction. The authors describe the use of GLRS, in combination with electrochemical modulation of the grating, for the detection of trace amounts of aromatic hydrocarbons. The diffraction grating consisted of chromium lines on a fused silica substrate. The depth of the grating lines was 1 {micro}m, the grating period was 1 {micro}m, and the duty cycle was 50%. Since chromium was not suitable for electrochemical modulation of the analyte concentration, a 200 nm gold layer was deposited over the entire grating. This gold layer slightly degraded the transmission of the grating, but provided satisfactory optical transparency for the spectroelectrochemical experiments. The grating was configured as the working electrode in an electrochemical cell containing water plus trace amounts of the aromatic hydrocarbon analytes. The grating was then electrochemically modulated via cyclic voltammetry waveforms, and the normalized intensity of the zero order reflection was simultaneously measured. The authors discuss the lower limits of detection (LLD) for two analytes, 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine (Meldola's Blue dye) and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), probed with an incident HeNe laser beam ({lambda} = 543.5 nm) at an incident angle of 52.5{degree}. The LLD for 7-dimethylamino-1,2-benzophenoxazine is approximately 50 parts per billion (ppb), while the LLD for TNT is approximately 50 parts

  5. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  6. Variations in the structure of aromatic solvents under the influence of microadditives of the C{sub 60} fullerene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginzburg, B. M. Tuichiev, Sh.

    2007-02-15

    The structural ordering of aromatic solvents is investigated using wide-angle X-ray diffraction. It is shown that the degree of structural ordering of aromatic solvents at room temperature decreases in the following sequence: benzene, toluene, and n-xylene. The introduction of the C{sub 60} fullerene ({approx}0.001%) into these solvents leads to an increase in the degree of their ordering. Upon introduction of the fullerene, the degree of structural ordering increases significantly in n-xylene and only slightly in toluene and remains virtually unchanged in benzene. An analysis of the small-angle X-ray diffraction patterns of C{sub 60} fullerene solutions in benzene likewise demonstrates that the introduction of the fullerene into benzene leads to an insignificant change in the degree of structural ordering of this solvent. The specific features of the structure and behavior of benzene upon interaction with C{sub 60} fullerene additives are discussed.

  7. Applications of organo-calcium chemistry to control contaminant aromatic hydrocarbons in advanced coal gasification processes: Final technical progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Longwall, J.P.; Chang, C.C.S.; Lai, C.K.S.; Chen, P.; Hajaligol, M.R.; Peters, W.A.

    1988-09-01

    The broad goal of this contract was to provide quantitative understanding of the thermal reactions of aromatics contaminants with calcium oxide under conditions pertinent to their in situ or out-board reduction or elimination from advanced coal gasification process and waste streams. Specific objectives were formalized into the following four tasks: cracking of fresh coal pyrolysis tar, benzene cracking, CaO deactivation behavior, and preliminary economic implications. The approach primarily involved laboratory scale measurements of rates and extents of feed conversion, and of quality indices or compositions of the resulting products, when pure aromatic compounds or newly formed coal pyrolysis tars undergo controlled extents of thermal treatment with CaO of known preparation history. 70 refs., 54 figs., 7 tabs.

  8. Aromatics and phenols from catalytic pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets in microwave with ZSM-5 as a catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lu; Lei, Hanwu; Ren, Shoujie; Bu, Quan; Liang, Jing; Wei, Yi; Liu, Yupeng; Lee, Guo-Shuh J.; Chen, Shulin; Tang, Juming; Zhang, Qin; Ruan, Roger

    2012-11-04

    Microwave assisted catalytic pyrolysis was investigated to convert Douglas fir pellets to bio-oils by a ZSM-5 Zeolite catalyst. A central composite experimental design (CCD) was used to optimize the catalytic pyrolysis process. The effects of reaction time, temperature and catalyst to biomass ratio on the bio-oil, syngas, and biochar yields were determined. GC/MS analysis results showed that the bio-oil contained a series of important and useful chemical compounds. Phenols, guaiacols, and aromatic hydrocarbons were the most abundant compounds which were about 50-82 % in bio-oil depending on the pyrolysis conditions. Comparison between the bio-oils from microwave pyrolysis with and without catalyst showed that the catalyst increased the content of aromatic hydrocarbons and phenols. A reaction pathway was proposed for microwave assisted catalyst pyrolysis of Douglas fir pellets.

  9. Gas-phase reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demarais, Nicholas J.; Yang, Zhibo; Bierbaum, Veronica M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, 215 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0215 (United States); Snow, Theodore P., E-mail: Nicholas.Demarais@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Zhibo.Yang@ou.edu, E-mail: Veronica.Bierbaum@Colorado.edu, E-mail: Theodore.Snow@Colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309-0389 (United States)

    2014-03-20

    We have studied the reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations and their nitrogen-containing analogs with H atoms. Reaction rate constants are measured at 300 K using a flowing afterglow-selected ion flow tube. We have implemented the laser induced acoustic desorption technique to allow the study of large, non-volatile species in the gas phase. The extension of this work from previous studies shows that the reactivity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon cations with H atoms reaches a constant value for large cations. There is a small difference in reactivity when comparing molecules of different size and geometry; however, no difference in reactivity was found when nitrogen was incorporated into the ring.

  10. Catalytic Upgrading of Thermochemical Intermediates to Hydrocarbons: Conversion of Lignocellulosic Feedstocks to Aromatic Fuels and High Value Chemicals

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 May, 2013 Technology Area Review: Thermochemical Conversion Randy Cortright PhD Virent, Inc WBS: 3.3.1.10 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Goal Statement Project Goal -Develop and demonstrate integration of Virent's lignocellulosic biomass solvolysis technology with Virent's BioForming® process to generate aromatic-rich hydrocarbon products for use in either fuels or chemicals applications.  Liquefaction of Biomass and

  11. Linkages and aromatic clusters in a bituminous coal: Final report, September 1, 1985--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, K.E.

    1988-10-01

    The distribution and arrangement of aromatic clusters, oxygen functional groups, and linkages in an Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal were determined by controlled solubilization of the coal, followed by solvent fractionation of the soluble product and detailed analyses of the product fractions. The solubilization was carried out in reactions with NaOH/ethanol/H/sub 2/O at temperatures of 260/degree/, 300/degree/ and 320/degree/C. Elemental balance and spectroscopic data revealed that the oxygen functional groups of the coal were attacked selectively in the solubilization process, resulting in an orderly definable diminution of the complex coal structure. Also aliphatic linkages present in selected solubilized product fractions were subjected to a transalkylation reaction. A molecular structural model specific to the Illinois coal was constructed, and the hydroliquefaction behavior of the coal was evaluated in terms of potential product distribution and hydrogen consumption. The structural characteristics are compared with those of a Wyoming subbituminous coal in our previous study. 9 refs., 16 figs., 11 tabs.

  12. Separation, characterization and instrumental analysis of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon ring classes in petroleum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chmielowiec, J.; Beshai, J.E.; George, A.E.

    1980-08-01

    To develop effective utilization technology for heavy streams from conventional fuels and unconventional resources such as heavy oils and oilsand bitumens, detailed information on the chemical composition of the feedstocks is needed. Attempts were made during the seventies to modify the API Project 60 scheme of analysis or to develop chemically more efficient, and less time-consuming, separation and characterization methods. These attempts aimed to improve characterization by separating the samples into concentrates of different structural types. Samples throughput was increased by using pressure and higher performance chromatographic systems. Other valuable contributions, such as coal-liquid characterization in terms of different chemical functionalities have also been made. The separation of aromatic ring classes and characterization or identification of their major components was our primary objective in this study. A silica-R(NH/sub 2/)/sub 2/-based HPLC system was used in our laboratory to study the analytical potential of this approach; the work was described in a previous publication. In the present study, the applicability of HPLC separation by this system and instrumental spectrometric characterization of 3- and 4-ring PAHs isolated from two Canadian oils were investigated. The oils used, Medicine River and Lloydminster, are examples of hydrocarbon-dominated materials representing light and heavy processing feedstocks, respectively.

  13. The anharmonic quartic force field infrared spectra of three polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackie, Cameron J. Candian, Alessandra; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Huang, Xinchuan; Maltseva, Elena; Buma, Wybren Jan; Petrignani, Annemieke; Oomens, Jos; Lee, Timothy J.

    2015-12-14

    Current efforts to characterize and study interstellar polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) rely heavily on theoretically predicted infrared (IR) spectra. Generally, such studies use the scaled harmonic frequencies for band positions and double harmonic approximation for intensities of species, and then compare these calculated spectra with experimental spectra obtained under matrix isolation conditions. High-resolution gas-phase experimental spectroscopic studies have recently revealed that the double harmonic approximation is not sufficient for reliable spectra prediction. In this paper, we present the anharmonic theoretical spectra of three PAHs: naphthalene, anthracene, and tetracene, computed with a locally modified version of the SPECTRO program using Cartesian derivatives transformed from Gaussian 09 normal coordinate force constants. Proper treatments of Fermi resonances lead to an impressive improvement on the agreement between the observed and theoretical spectra, especially in the C–H stretching region. All major IR absorption features in the full-scale matrix-isolated spectra, the high-temperature gas-phase spectra, and the most recent high-resolution gas-phase spectra obtained under supersonically cooled molecular beam conditions in the CH-stretching region are assigned.

  14. In situ toxicity evaluations of turbidity and photoinduction of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ireland, D.S.; Burton, G.A. Jr; Hess, G.G.

    1996-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are prevalent pollutants in the aquatic environment that can cause a wide range of toxic effects. Earlier studies have shown that toxicity of PAHs can be enhanced by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. In situ and laboratory exposures with Ceriodaphnia dubia were used to evaluate photoinduced toxicity of PAHs in wet-weather runoff and in turbid conditions. Exposure to UV increased the toxicity of PAH-contaminated sediment to C. dubia. Toxicity was removed when UV wavelengths did not penetrate the water column to the exposed organisms. A significant correlation was observed between in situ C. dubia survival and turbidity when organisms were exposed to sunlight. Stormwater runoff samples exhibited an increase in chronic toxicity (reproduction) to C. dubia when exposed to UV wavelengths as compared to C. dubia not exposed to UV wavelengths. Toxicity was reduced significantly in the presence of UV radiation when the organic fraction of stormwater runoff was removed. The PAHs are bound to the sediment and resuspended into the water column once the sediment is disturbed (e.g., during a storm). The in situ and laboratory results showed that photoinduced toxicity occurred frequently during low flow conditions and wet weather runoff and was reduced in turbid conditions.

  15. Use of SPMDs to determine average water concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in urban stormwater runoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeVita, W.; Crunkilton, R.

    1995-12-31

    Semipermeable polymeric membrane devices (SPMDS) were deployed for 30 day periods to monitor polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in an urban stream which receives much of its flow from urban runoff. SPMDs are capable of effectively sampling several liters of water per day for some PAHs. Unlike conventional methods, SPMDs sample only those non-polar organic contaminants which are truly dissolved and available for bioconcentration. Also, SPMDs may concentrate contaminants from episodic events such as stormwater discharge. The State of Wisconsin has established surface water quality criteria based upon human lifetime cancer risk of 23 ppt for benzo(a)pyrene and 23 ppt as the sum of nine other potentially carcinogenic PAHs. Bulk water samples analyzed by conventional methodology were routinely well above this criteria, but contained particulate bound PAHs as well as PAHs bound by dissolved organic carbon (DOC) which are not available for bioconcentration. Average water concentrations of dissolved PAHs determined using SPMDs were also above this criteria. Variables used for determining water concentration included sampling rate at the exposure temperature, length of exposure and estimation of biofouling of SPMD surface.

  16. Anaerobic cometabolic transformation of polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: evidence from laboratory and field studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Safinowski; Christian Griebler; Rainer U. Meckenstock

    2006-07-01

    The sulfate-reducing enrichment culture N47 can grow on naphthalene or 2-methylnaphthalene as the sole carbon and energy source. The study reported shows that the culture can furthermore cometabolically transform a variety of polycyclic and heteroaromatic compounds with naphthalene or methylnaphthalene as the auxiliary substrate. Most of the cosubstrates were converted to the corresponding carboxylic acids, frequently to several isomers. The mass spectra of specific metabolites that were extracted from supernatants of cultures containing the cosubstrates benzothiophene, benzofuran, and 1-methylnaphthalene resembled known intermediates of the anaerobic naphthalene and 2-methylnaphthalene degradation pathways. This indicates that some of the tested compounds were first methylated and then transformed to the corresponding methylsuccinic acids by a fumarate addition to the methyl group. For some of the cosubstrates, a partial or total inhibition of growth on the auxiliary substrate was observed. This was caused by a specific combination of auxiliary substrate and cosubstrate. None of the cosubstrates tested could be utilized as the sole carbon source and electron donor by the enrichment culture N47. Field investigations at the tar-oil-contaminated aquifer (at a former gasworks in southwest Germany), where strain N47 originated, revealed the presence of metabolites similar to the ones identified in batch culture supernatants. The findings suggest that aromatic hydrocarbons and heterocyclic compounds can be converted by aquifer organisms and produce a variety of polar compounds that become mobile in groundwater. 51 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Field application of a genetically engineered microorganism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioremediation process monitoring and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayler, G.S.; Cox, C.D.; Ripp, S.; Nivens, D.E.; Werner, C.; Ahn, Y.; Matrubutham, U.; Burlage, R.

    1998-11-01

    On October 30, 1996, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) commenced the first test release of genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) for use in bioremediation. The specific objectives of the investigation were multifaceted and include (1) testing the hypothesis that a GEM can be successfully introduced and maintained in a bioremediation process, (2) testing the concept of using, at the field scale, reporter organisms for direct bioremediation process monitoring and control, and (3) acquiring data that can be used in risk assessment decision making and protocol development for future field release applications of GEMs. The genetically engineered strain under investigation is Pseudomonas fluorescens strain HK44 (King et al., 1990). The original P. fluorescens parent strain was isolated from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated manufactured gas plant soil. Thus, this bacterium is able to biodegrade naphthalene (as well as other substituted naphthalenes and other PAHs) and is able to function as a living bioluminescent reporter for the presence of naphthalene contamination, its bioavailability, and the functional process of biodegradation. A unique component of this field investigation was the availability of an array of large subsurface soil lysimeters. This article describes the experience associated with the release of a genetically modified microorganism, the lysimeter facility and its associated instrumentation, as well as representative data collected during the first eighteen months of operation.

  18. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface waters of Alessandria District, South Eastern Piedmont (Italy)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trova, C.; Cossa, G.; Gandolfo, G.

    1992-10-01

    Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous environmental pollutants. Because of the high toxicity of some polycyclic compounds, such as benzopyrenes, the determination of their levels in air, water, soil and aquatic organisms was the object of several papers. Anthropogenic pyrolitic and combustion processes, related to industrial plants, domestic heating, automobile traffic, are the major sources of these compounds; from these sources they enter atmospheric environment where their concentration is reduced by scavenging during precipitation events: rain, snow and fog in urban areas usually show high contents of PAHs. Dry and wet atmospheric polluted depositions effluents transport appreciable amounts of PAHs to aquatic environment, where they are rapidly taken up and accumulated by both fish and shellfish. Alessandria District, in South-Eastern Piedmont (Italy), lies in the middle of Torino-Milano-Genova industrial area: in addition to local sources, a relatively long range transport of polluted air masses may conduct to this region atmospheric contaminants, such as polynuclear compounds, that can enter fluvial environments through meteoric precipitation. The object of this work was to evaluate PAH content in surface waters flowing across the described territory. Samplings were carried on during winter season, when the concentration of these pollutants usually reaches the highest levels. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. PAMAM dendrimers and graphene: Materials for removing aromatic contaminants from water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeFever, Ryan S.; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Ding, Feng; Ke, Pu Chun; Sarupria, Sapna

    2015-04-07

    We present results from experiments and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations on the association of naphthalene with polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers and graphene oxide (GrO). Specifically, we investigate 3rd-6th generation (G3-G6) PAMAM dendrimers and GrO with different levels of oxidation. The work is motivated by the potential applications of these materials in removing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants from water. Our experimental results indicate that graphene oxide outperforms dendrimers in removing naphthalene from water. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the prominent factors driving naphthalene association to these seemingly disparate materials are similar. Interestingly, we find that cooperative interactions between the naphthalene molecules play a significant role in enhancing their association to the dendrimers and graphene oxide. Our findings highlight that while selection of appropriate materials is important, the interactions between the contaminants themselves can also be important in governing the effectiveness of a given material. The combined use of experiments and molecular dynamics simulations allows us to comment on the possible factors resulting in better performance of graphene oxide in removing naphthalene from water.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons at selected burning grounds at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, B.W.; Minor, L.K.M.; Flucas, B.J.

    1998-02-01

    A commercial immunoassay field test (IFT) was used to rapidly assess the total concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the soil at selected burning grounds within the explosives corridor at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Results were compared with analyses obtained from LANL Analytical Laboratory and from a commercial laboratory. Both used the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Methods 8270 and 8310. EPA`s Method 8270 employs gas chromatography and mass spectral analyses, whereas EPA`s Method 8310 uses an ultraviolet detector in a high-performance liquid chromatography procedure. One crude oil sample and one diesel fuel sample, analyzed by EPA Method 8270, were included for references. On an average the IFT results were lower for standard samples and lower than the analytical laboratory results for the unknown samples. Sites were selected to determine whether the PAHs came from the material burned or the fuel used to ignite the burn, or whether they are produced by a high-temperature chemical reaction during the burn. Even though the crude oil and diesel fuel samples did contain measurable quantities of PAHs, there were no significant concentrations of PAHs detected in the ashes and soil at the burning grounds. Tests were made on fresh soil and ashes collected after a large burn and on aged soil and ashes known to have been at the site more than three years. Also analyzed were twelve-year-old samples from an inactive open burn cage.

  1. Petroleum supply annual 1992. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-27

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  2. Petroleum supply annual, 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1997 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1997, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  3. Petroleum supply annual 1995: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1995 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and selected Refinery Statistics each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1995, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  4. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1996, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  5. Volume International: Proposed Penalty (2014-CE-32014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE alleged in a Notice of Proposed Civil Penalty that Volume International Corporation failed to certify a variety of ceiling fans as compliant with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  6. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, M.

    2000-08-12

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  7. Site Environmental Report for 1999 - Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggieri, M.

    2000-08-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The Site Environmental Report for 1999 is intended to summarize Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterize environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlight significant programs and efforts for calendar year 1999. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summary results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Each chapter in Volume I begins with an outline of the sections that follow, including any tables or figures found in the chapter. Readers should use section numbers (e.g., {section}1.5) as navigational tools to find topics of interest in either the printed or the electronic version of the report. Volume II contains the individual data results from monitoring programs.

  8. Petroleum supply annual 1994, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1994 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1994, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary.

  9. Petroleum supply annual 1998: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1998 through monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Statistics; each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1998, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary. 35 tabs.

  10. Mechanisms of photoinduced C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage in protonated aromatic amino acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, B.; Barat, M.; Fayeton, J. A.; Perot, M.; Jouvet, C.; Gregoire, G.; Broendsted Nielsen, S.

    2008-04-28

    Photoexcitation of protonated aromatic amino acids leads to C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage among other channels. There are two pathways for the C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond breakage, one is a slow process (microseconds) that occurs after hydrogen loss from the electronically excited ion, whereas the other is a fast process (nanoseconds). In this paper, a comparative study of the fragmentation of four molecules shows that the presence of the carboxylic acid group is necessary for this fast fragmentation channel to occur. We suggest a mechanism based on light-induced electron transfer from the aromatic ring to the carboxylic acid, followed by a fast internal proton transfer from the ammonium group to the negatively charged carboxylic acid group. The ion formed is a biradical since the aromatic ring is ionized and the carbon of the COOH group has an unpaired electron. Breakage of the weak C{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}} bond gives two even-electron fragments and is expected to quickly occur. The present experimental results together with the ab initio calculations support the interpretation previously proposed.

  11. Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from wastewater by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a coagulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wada, Shinji; Ichikawa, Hiroyasu; Tatsumi, Kenji )

    1995-02-20

    Removal of phenols and aromatic amines from industrial wastewater by tyrosinase was investigated. A color change from colorless to dark brown was observed, but no precipitate was formed. Colored products were found to be easily removed by a combination treatment with tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant containing amino group, such as hexamethylenediamine-epichlorohidrin polycondensate, polyethleneimine, or chitosan. The first two coagulants, synthetic polymers, were more effective than chitosan, a polymer produced in crustacean shells. Phenols and aromatic amines are not precipitated by any kind of coagulants, but their enzymatic reaction products are easily precipitated by a cationic polymer coagulant. These results indicate that the combination of tyrosinase and a cationic polymer coagulant is effective in removing carcinogenic phenols and aromatic amines from an aqueous solution. Immobilization of tyrosinase on magnetite gave a good retention of activity (80%) and storage stability i.e., only 5% loss after 15 days of storage at ambient temperature. In the treatment of immobilized tyrosinase, colored enzymatic reaction products were removed by less coagulant compared with soluble tyrosinase.

  12. Density and viscosity for mixtures of propanoic acid with aromatic hydrocarbons at 298.15 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, M.; Gupta, P.C.; Kesharwani, R.N.

    1995-03-01

    The density and viscosity of binary mixtures of propanic acid + benzene, + toluene, and + o-, + m-, and + p-xylenes have been measured at 298.15 K. Excess volumes have been calculated. The interactions existing between the components have been discussed. The results are used to theoretically justify the validity of the viscosity models.

  13. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print Wednesday, 31 August 2005 00:00 For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to solids. In atoms and small molecules, the behavior of electrons is accounted individually; in bulk materials, a sea of innumerable electrons can behave en masse, yielding a very different description of electronic structure. Buckyballs perch

  14. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Gabe V.; Carlson, Nancy M.; Donaldson, Alan D.

    1991-01-01

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  15. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume

  16. Data collection system. Volume 1, Overview and operators manual; Volume 2, Maintenance manual; Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, R.B.; Bauder, M.E.; Boyer, W.B.; French, R.E.; Isidoro, R.J.; Kaestner, P.C.; Perkins, W.G.

    1993-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Instrumentation Development Department was tasked by the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) to record data on Tektronix RTD720 Digitizers on the HUNTERS TROPHY field test conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) on September 18, 1992. This report contains a overview and description of the computer hardware and software that was used to acquire, reduce, and display the data. The document is divided into two volumes: an overview and operators manual (Volume 1) and a maintenance manual (Volume 2).

  17. Technical Options for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Technical Options for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes within the United ... for Processing Additional Light Tight Oil Volumes within the United States i This ...

  18. Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings Ablation Casting Evaluation for High Volume Structural Castings 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  19. Produced water volumes and management practices in the United...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Produced water volumes and management practices in the United ...

  20. Path Integral for Stochastic Inflation: Non-Perturbative Volume...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Path Integral for Stochastic Inflation: Non-Perturbative Volume Weighting, Complex ... Title: Path Integral for Stochastic Inflation: Non-Perturbative Volume Weighting, Complex ...

  1. Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems Finite Volume Based Computer Program for Ground Source Heat Pump Systems Project objective: Create a new ...

  2. Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 13 - Energy Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Series, Volume 13 - Energy Performance Techniques and Technologies: Perserving Historic Homes Building America Best Practices Series, Volume 13 - Energy Performance Techniques and ...

  3. Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. EnergyRenovations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: A Guide for Contractors to Share With Homeowners Building America Best Practices Series: Volume 12. Energy Renovations-Insulation: ...

  4. Promising Technology: Variable-Air-Volume Ventilation System

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Variable-air-volume (VAV) ventilation saves energy compared to a constant-air-volume (CAV) ventilation system, mainly by reducing energy consumption associated with fans.

  5. Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export Liquefied Natural Gas Energy Department Authorizes Additional Volume at Proposed Freeport LNG Facility to Export ...

  6. Characterization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in motor vehicle fuels and exhaust emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, L.C.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Harley, R.A.; Hammond, S.K.; Miguel, A.H.; Hering, S.V.

    1999-09-15

    Motor vehicles are a significant source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emissions. Improved understanding of the relationship between fuel composition and PAH emissions is needed to determine whether fuel reformulation is a viable approach for reducing PAH emissions. PAH concentrations were quantified in gasoline and diesel fuel samples collected in summer 1997 in northern California. Naphthalene was the predominant PAH in both fuels, with concentrations of up to 2,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in gasoline and 1,600 mg L{sup {minus}1} in diesel fuel. Particle-phase PAH size distributions and exhaust emission factors were measured in two bores of a roadway tunnel. Emission factors were determined separately for light-duty vehicles and for heavy-duty diesel trucks, based on measurements of PAHs, CO, and CO{sub 2}. Particle-phase emission factors, expressed per unit mass of fuel burned, ranged up to 21 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for benzo[ghi]perylene for light-duty vehicles and up to {approximately} 1,000 {micro}g kg{sup {minus}1} for pyrene for heavy-duty diesel vehicles. Light-duty vehicles were found to be a significant source of heavier (four- and five-ring) PAHs, whereas heavy-duty diesel engines were the dominant source of three-ring PAHs, such as fluoranthene and pyrene. While no correlation between heavy-duty diesel truck PAH emission factors and PAH concentrations in diesel fuel was found, light-duty vehicle PAH emission factors were found to be correlated with PAH concentrations in gasoline, suggesting that gasoline reformulation may be effective in reducing PAH emissions from motor vehicles.

  7. Trends in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in the Great Lakes atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ping Sun; Pierrette Blanchard; Kenneth A. Brice; Ronald A. Hites

    2006-10-15

    Atmospheric polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) concentrations were measured in both the vapor and particle phases at seven sites near the Great Lakes as a part of the Integrated Atmospheric Deposition Network. Lower molecular weight PAHs, including fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthrene, and pyrene, were dominant in the vapor phase, and higher molecular weight PAHs, including chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, and coronene, were dominant in the particle phase. The highest PAH concentrations in both the vapor and particle phases were observed in Chicago followed by the semiurban site at Sturgeon Point, NY. The major sources of PAHs in and around Chicago are vehicle emissions, coal and natural gas combustion, and coke production. The spatial difference of PAH concentrations can be explained by the local population density. Long-term decreasing trends of most PAH concentrations were observed in both the vapor and particle phases at Chicago, with half-lives ranging from 3-10 years in the vapor phase and 5-15 years in the particle phase. At Eagle Harbor, Sleeping Bear Dunes, and Sturgeon Point, total PAH concentrations in the vapor phase showed significant, but slow, long-term decreasing trends. At the Sturgeon Point site, which was impacted by a nearby city, particle-phase PAH concentrations also declined. However, most particle-phase PAH concentrations did not show significant long-term decreasing trends at the remote sites. Seasonal trends were also observed for particle-phase PAH concentrations, which were higher in the winter and lower in the summer. 36 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon and mid-infrared continuum emission in a z > 4 submillimeter galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riechers, Dominik A.; Pope, Alexandra; Daddi, Emanuele; Elbaz, David; Carilli, Christopher L.; Walter, Fabian; Hodge, Jacqueline; Morrison, Glenn E.; Dickinson, Mark; Dannerbauer, Helmut

    2014-05-01

    We report the detection of 6.2 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and rest-frame 4-7 μm continuum emission in the z = 4.055 submillimeter galaxy GN20, using the Infrared Spectrograph on board the Spitzer Space Telescope. This represents the first detection of PAH emission at z > 4. The strength of the PAH emission feature is consistent with a very high star formation rate of ∼1600 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. We find that this intense starburst powers at least ∼1/3 of the faint underlying 6 μm continuum emission, with an additional, significant (and perhaps dominant) contribution due to a power-law-like hot dust source, which we interpret to likely be a faint, dust-obscured active galactic nucleus (AGN). The inferred 6 μm AGN continuum luminosity is consistent with a sensitive upper limit on the hard X-ray emission as measured by the Chandra X-Ray Observatory if the previously undetected AGN is Compton-thick. This is in agreement with the finding at optical/infrared wavelengths that the galaxy and its nucleus are heavily dust-obscured. Despite the strong power-law component enhancing the mid-infrared continuum emission, the intense starburst associated with the photon-dominated regions that give rise to the PAH emission appears to dominate the total energy output in the infrared. GN20 is one of the most luminous starburst galaxies known at any redshift, embedded in a rich protocluster of star-forming galaxies. This investigation provides an improved understanding of the energy sources that power such exceptional systems, which represent the extreme end of massive galaxy formation at early cosmic times.

  9. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fresh and smoked fish samples from three Nigerian cities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akpan, V.; Lodovici, M.; Dolara, P. )

    1994-08-01

    Nigeria is a major producer of crude oil in sub-Saharan Africa. In-shore and off-shore wells are located in richly watered creeks in the southern part of the country. Although published data on environmental impact assessment of the petroleum industry in Nigeria are lacking, there is a growing concern about the possible contamination of estuarine and coastal waters and of marine species by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs). PAHs are ubiquitous priority pollutants that occur naturally in crude oil, automobile exhaust emissions and smoke condensates from incomplete combustion of carbonaceous materials. PAHs with high molecular weight are less readily biodegraded by indigenous microorganisms in some regions, and given their marked hydrophobic characteristics, may persist in the aqueous environment, thus contaminating the food chain by bioaccumulating in aquatic species like fish and mussels. Major Nigerian oil wells are located in the vicinity of breeding and harvesting sites serving the fresh-water fishing industry. Large hauls of fresh fish are normally consumed cooked in soups or smoke cured in handcrafted traditional ovens using freshly cut red mangrove (Rhizophora racemosa) wood as fuel. Though smoke curing is economical and may ensure longer conservation of fish, it undoubtedly increases the burden of PAHs in finished products as a result of partial charring and from smoke condensates or mangroves that also contain PAHs in measurable quantities as reported by Asita et al. (1991). Apart from PAHs analyzed by Emerole (1980) in smoked food samples from Ibadan using simple analytical methods, those from industrial and other anthropogenic sources have rarely been analyzed in Nigeria. We tried therefore to update the data and address this discrepancy. 14 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Suppression of autophagy enhances the cytotoxicity of the DNA-damaging aromatic amine p-anilinoaniline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Althea; Reiners, John J.

    2008-10-15

    p-Anilinoaniline (pAA) is an aromatic amine that is widely used in hair dying applications. It is also a metabolite of metanil yellow, an azo dye that is commonly used as a food coloring agent. Concentrations of pAA between 10 and 25 {mu}M were cytostatic to cultures of the normal human mammary epithelia cell line MCF10A. Concentrations {>=} 50 {mu}M were cytotoxic. Cytostatic concentrations induced transient G{sub 1} and S cell cycle phase arrests; whereas cytotoxic concentrations induced protracted arrests. Cytotoxic concentrations of pAA caused DNA damage, as monitored by the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay, and morphological changes consistent with cells undergoing apoptosis and/or autophagy. Enzymatic and western blot analyses, and binding analyses of fluorescent labeled VAD-FMK, suggested that caspase family members were activated by pAA. Western blot analyses documented the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, a post-translational modification involved in the development of the autophagosome. Suppression of autophagosome formation, via knockdown of ATG7 with shRNA, prevented pAA-induced vacuolization, enhanced the activation of pro-caspase-3, and increased susceptibility of ATG7-deficient cells to the cytostatic and cytotoxic activities of markedly lower concentrations of pAA. Cells stably transfected with a nonsense shRNA behaved like parental MCF10A cells. Collectively, these data suggest that MCF10A cultures undergo autophagy as a pro-survival response to concentrations of pAA sufficient to induce DNA damage.

  11. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  12. Site Environmental Report for 2002, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauer, Ron

    2003-07-01

    Each year, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory prepares an integrated report on its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy Order 231.1. The ''Site Environmental Report for 2002'' summarizes Berkeley Lab's compliance with environmental standards and requirements, characterizes environmental management efforts through surveillance and monitoring activities, and highlights significant programs and efforts for calendar year 2002. Throughout this report, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is referred to as ''Berkeley Lab,'' ''the Laboratory,'' ''Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,'' and ''LBNL.'' The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I contains a general overview of the Laboratory, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities. Volume II contains individual data results from the monitoring programs. This year, the ''Site Environmental Report'' was distributed on a CD in PDF format that includes Volume I, Volume II, and related documents. The report is also available on the Web at http://www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. The report follows the Laboratory's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are additionally reported using the more conventional (non-SI) system of measurements because this system is referenced by some current regulatory standards and is more familiar to some readers. The tables included at the end of the Glossary are intended to help readers understand the various prefixes used with SI units of measurement and convert these units from one system to the other.

  13. Local volume fraction fluctuations in random media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintanilla, J.; Torquato, S.

    1997-02-01

    Although the volume fraction is a constant for a statistically homogeneous random medium, on a spatially local level it fluctuates. We study the full distribution of volume fraction within an observation window of finite size for models of random media. A formula due to Lu and Torquato for the standard deviation or {open_quotes}coarseness{close_quotes} associated with the {ital local} volume fraction {xi} is extended for the nth moment of {xi} for any n. The distribution function F{sub L} of the local volume fraction of five different model microstructures is evaluated using analytical and computer-simulation methods for a wide range of window sizes and overall volume fractions. On the line, we examine a system of fully penetrable rods and a system of totally impenetrable rods formed by random sequential addition (RSA). In the plane, we study RSA totally impenetrable disks and fully penetrable aligned squares. In three dimensions, we study fully penetrable aligned cubes. In the case of fully penetrable rods, we will also simplify and numerically invert a prior analytical result for the Laplace transform of F{sub L}. In all of these models, we show that, for sufficiently large window sizes, F{sub L} can be reasonably approximated by the normal distribution. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  14. Time varying, multivariate volume data reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, James P; Fout, Nathaniel; Ma, Kwan - Liu

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale supercomputing is revolutionizing the way science is conducted. A growing challenge, however, is understanding the massive quantities of data produced by large-scale simulations. The data, typically time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, can occupy from hundreds of gigabytes to several terabytes of storage space. Transferring and processing volume data of such sizes is prohibitively expensive and resource intensive. Although it may not be possible to entirely alleviate these problems, data compression should be considered as part of a viable solution, especially when the primary means of data analysis is volume rendering. In this paper we present our study of multivariate compression, which exploits correlations among related variables, for volume rendering. Two configurations for multidimensional compression based on vector quantization are examined. We emphasize quality reconstruction and interactive rendering, which leads us to a solution using graphics hardware to perform on-the-fly decompression during rendering. In this paper we present a solution which addresses the need for data reduction in large supercomputing environments where data resulting from simulations occupies tremendous amounts of storage. Our solution employs a lossy encoding scheme to acrueve data reduction with several options in terms of rate-distortion behavior. We focus on encoding of multiple variables together, with optional compression in space and time. The compressed volumes can be rendered directly with commodity graphics cards at interactive frame rates and rendering quality similar to that of static volume renderers. Compression results using a multivariate time-varying data set indicate that encoding multiple variables results in acceptable performance in the case of spatial and temporal encoding as compared to independent compression of variables. The relative performance of spatial vs. temporal compression is data dependent, although temporal compression has the

  15. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  16. CRC handbook of radiology. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, K.N.

    1984-01-01

    The care and testing of measurement and diagnostic instruments are described in detail. Difficulties encountered with therapeutic and diagnostic calibrations are explored and solutions are suggested. Volume I: Measurement of exposure and calibration of ion chambers. Radiation detectors in radiotherapy. The assay of beta and gamma sources in medicine and biology. Statistical and error analysis in medical physics. Calibration of low energy x-ray units (10 to 100 KV). Calibration of medium energy x-ray and Co-60 units used in radiotherapy. Calibration of megavoltage electron radiotherapy beams. Routine clinical dosimetry. Brachytherapy dosimetry. Neutrons and heavy charged particles used in radiation therapy. Time, dose fractionation and volume relationships in radiotherapy. Index.

  17. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  18. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  19. PARC Periodical | Volume 6, Issue 6 | Photosynthetic Antenna Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center 6, Issue 6 August 20, 2015 PARC Periodical | Volume 6, Issue 6

  20. PARC Periodical | Volume 7, Issue 1 | Photosynthetic Antenna Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center 7, Issue 1 October 12, 2015 PARC Periodical | Volume 7, Issue 1

  1. PARC Periodical | Volume 7, Issue 2 | Photosynthetic Antenna Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center 2 December 7, 2015 PARC Periodical | Volume 7, Issue 2 VIEW ARTICLE HERE

  2. PARC Periodical | Volume 7, Issue 3 | Photosynthetic Antenna Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center 3 February 16, 2016 PARC Periodical | Volume 7, Issue 3 VIEW ARTICLE HERE

  3. Product Guide Product Guide Volumes Category Prices Table Crude...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- 49 Product Guide Volumes Category Prices Table Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing...

  4. Product Guide Product Guide Volumes Category Prices Table Crude...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    suppliers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- 49 Product Guide Volumes Category Prices Table Energy Information Administration Petroleum...

  5. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs): a possible cause of lung cancer mortality among nickel/copper smelter and refinery workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, D.K.; Julian, J.A.; Roberts, R.S.; Muir, D.C.; Jadon, N.; Shaw, D.S. )

    1992-05-01

    A retrospective industrial hygiene investigation was undertaken to explain the cause of a statistically significant excess lung cancer mortality observed in a subset of a large cohort of nickel workers involved in mining, smelting, and refining of nickel and copper in Ontario. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate how an industrial hygiene follow-up assessment of an epidemiologic finding can help to identify a likely cause. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) alone or in association with particulate and gaseous contaminants (e.g., SO2) were likely the causative agents of the excess lung cancer observed among the lead welders, cranemen, and arc furnace workers of the copper refinery.

  6. Structurally distinct polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons induce differential transcriptional responses in developing zebrafish

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodale, Britton C.; Tilton, Susan C.; Corvi, Margaret M.; Wilson, Glenn R.; Janszen, Derek B.; Anderson, Kim A.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tanguay, Robert L.

    2013-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous in the environment as components of fossil fuels and by-products of combustion. These multi-ring chemicals differentially activate the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) in a structurally dependent manner, and induce toxicity via both AHR-dependent and -independent mechanisms. PAH exposure is known to induce developmental malformations in zebrafish embryos, and recent studies have shown cardiac toxicity induced by compounds with low AHR affinity. Unraveling the potentially diverse molecular mechanisms of PAH toxicity is essential for understanding the hazard posed by complex PAH mixtures present in the environment. We analyzed transcriptional responses to PAH exposure in zebrafish embryos exposed to benz(a)anthracene (BAA), dibenzothiophene (DBT) and pyrene (PYR) at concentrations that induced developmental malformations by 120 h post-fertilization (hpf). Whole genome microarray analysis of mRNA expression at 24 and 48 hpf identified genes that were differentially regulated over time and in response to the three PAH structures. PAH body burdens were analyzed at both time points using GCMS, and demonstrated differences in PAH uptake into the embryos. This was important for discerning dose-related differences from those that represented unique molecular mechanisms. While BAA misregulated the least number of transcripts, it caused strong induction of cyp1a and other genes known to be downstream of the AHR, which were not induced by the other two PAHs. Analysis of functional roles of misregulated genes and their predicted regulatory transcription factors also distinguished the BAA response from regulatory networks disrupted by DBT and PYR exposure. These results indicate that systems approaches can be used to classify the toxicity of PAHs based on the networks perturbed following exposure, and may provide a path for unraveling the toxicity of complex PAH mixtures. - Highlights: Defined global mRNA expression

  7. Natural gas annual 1992. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. This report, Volume 2, presents historical data for the Nation from 1930 to 1992, and by State from 1967 to 1992. The Supplement of this report presents profiles of selected companies.

  8. Blanket comparison and selection study. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-10-01

    This volume contains extensive data for the following chapters: (1) solid breeder tritium recovery, (2) solid breeder blanket designs, (3) alternate blanket concept screening, and (4) safety analysis. The following appendices are also included: (1) blanket design guidelines, (2) power conversion systems, (3) helium-cooled, vanadium alloy structure blanket design, (4) high wall loading study, and (5) molten salt safety studies. (MOW)

  9. 2013 BNL Site Environmental Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel, K.; Remien, J.; Pohlot, P.; Williams, J.; Green, T.; Paquette, P.; Dorsch, W.; Welty, T.; Burke, J.

    2014-10-01

    A summary of Brookhaven National Laboratory’s (BNL) Site Environmental Report, meant to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory’s environmental performance in the lab’s surrounding area during the calendar year. The review is comprised of multiple volumes relevant to environmental data/environmental management performance and groundwater status report.

  10. Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

    2009-09-21

    The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

  11. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doelling, H.H. comp.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  12. Petroleum supply annual 1993. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This publication contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1993 through annual and monthly surveys. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1993.

  13. Bibliography of Utah radioactive occurrences. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doelling, H.H.

    1983-07-01

    The references in this bibliography were assembled by reviewing published bibliographies of Utah geology, unpublished reports of the US Geological Survey and the Department of Energy, and various university theses. Each of the listings is cross-referenced by location and subject matter. This report is published in two volumes.

  14. Coal slurry combustion and technology. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains papers presented at the following sessions of the Coal Slurry Combustion and Technology Symposium: (1) bench-scale testing; (2) pilot testing; (3) combustion; and (4) rheology and characterization. Thirty-three papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (ATT)

  15. State authorization manual. Volume 2. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugler-Jones, S.

    1990-10-01

    The document provides the supportive appendices for Volume 1 of the State Authorization Manual (SAM), which provides guidance for States applying for program revisions to their authorized RCRA State program. Among the appendices are: various program checklists, lists of revision checklists by cluster, model Federal Register Notices, guidance for State Authorization Files, and guidance for using Wordperfect files and for CFR files.

  16. The effect of the nature of a modifying additive (Pt, Zn, Ga) on the activity of oxide and zeolite catalysts in ethane dehydrogenation and aromatization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasina, T.V.; Masloboyshchikova, O.V.; Chetina, O.V.

    1994-10-01

    The catalytic properties of Pt, Zn, and Ga deposited on supports of various natures (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, NaZSM, and HZSM) in the dehydrogenation and aromatization of ethane were investigated. Pt-containing catalysts are the most active in the conversion of ethane: the selectivity with respect to ethylene is 25-87% depending on the nature of the support. In the presence of Zn- and Ga-containing catalysts the yield of ethylene is 2-3 times lower than with Pt-catalysts. With HZSM modified by Pt, Zn, or Ga aromatic hydrocarbons (ArH) and methane are the main products of ethane transformation. Ga/HZSM is the most efficient catalyst of the aromatization of ethane under the conditions studied (550 {degrees}C, 120 h{sup -1}).

  17. Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

    2012-03-01

    Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

  18. Catalytic hydroprocessing of simulated heavy coal liquids; 1: Reactivities of aromatic hydrocarbons and sulfur and oxygen heterocyclic compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girgis, M.J. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ . Central Research Lab.); Gates, B.C. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1994-05-01

    The hydroprocessing of mixtures simulating a coal liquid without organonitrogen compounds was investigated with a once-through flow reactor operated with liquid-phase reactants at 350 C and 171 atm. The catalyst was sulfided Ni-Mo/[gamma]-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3]. The reactants included pyrene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, dibenzothiophene, dibenzofuran, and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1-naphthol. The products formed from each reactant were determined, and each reaction was modeled as first order in the organic reactant. The reactivity of fused six-ring aromatics increases with the number of rings, but the change from one member of the family to another is less than the order-of-magnitude increase in reactivity from benzene to naphthalene. Fluoranthene must be considered in a separate compound class from fused six-membered-ring aromatics because it is hydrogenated more rapidly. Dibenzothiophene gives biphenyl selectively. Dibenzofuran reacts very slowly, whereas 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-1-naphthol reacts very rapidly. The results reported here, in combination with the reaction networks developed in the sequel, are the first quantitative evaluation of reactivities of components in a mixture simulating a hydroprocessing feedstock that takes account of competitive reactions and the formation of intermediate products.

  19. On-line instrumentation for the real-time monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the effluents from a fluidized bed combustor - a feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Silva, A.P.; Iles, M.; Rice, G.; Fassel, V.A.

    1984-04-01

    When polynuclear aromatic hydrocargons in the vapor phase are diluted preferably in a rare gas and undergo supersonic jet expansion, rotationally cooled molecules with absorption bandwidths of the order of 0.01 nm (FWHM) are obtained. Selective excitation with a tunable dye laser into such narrow absorption bands leads to the observation of highly specific luminescence spectra. Such an approach has been utilized for the on-line, real-time monitoring of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the effluents from a fluidized bed combustor.

  20. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 1 are Environmental Data Management, Site characterization technology, Wastewater treatment, Waste management in foreign countries, Transuranic waste management, and Groundwater characterization and treatment.

  1. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3 - 7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics included in Volume 3 include treatment of soils, waste characterization and certification, waste minimization site remediation management plans and programs, and training programs.

  2. 1996 Site environmental report. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory presents Volume II, data appendix as a reference document to supplement the 1996 Site Environmental Report. Volume II contains the raw environmental monitoring and sampling data used to generate many of the summary results included in the main report for both routine and nonroutine activities. This appendix includes a legend that cross-references the enclosed data tables with summary tables in the main report. The legend also provides a listing of more detailed descriptions for the station location codes used in the appendices` tables. Data presented in the tables are given in Systeme International (SI) units. The glossary found in the main report contains a listing of the SI units.

  3. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1 -- with a focus on US electric utilities -- contains final 1997 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1997 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold (based on a monthly sample: Form EIA-826, ``Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions``). Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA.

  4. Potential for cogeneration in Maryland. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01

    Cogeneration is a name given to energy systems that produce both electric power and useful thermal energy such as steam. While cogeneration markets have flourished in California, Texas, and some states, those in Maryland have not. A primary reason is that the industries that have been targeted in other states--e.g., oil refining, pulp and paper, chemicals, food processing--are not major elements of Maryland's industrial base. The study estimates the potential for future cogeneration in Maryland, both large units and small packaged systems, and assesses the potential impact of cogeneration systems on Maryland's energy needs between now and 2005. The study is presented in three volumes. Because of significant differences between large- and small-scale cogeneration, the analysis of these two systems was performed separately. This volume is a summary document presenting the findings from both studies.

  5. Microscopic origin of volume modulus inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cicoli, Michele; Muia, Francesco; Pedro, Francisco Gil

    2015-12-21

    High-scale string inflationary models are in well-known tension with low-energy supersymmetry. A promising solution involves models where the inflaton is the volume of the extra dimensions so that the gravitino mass relaxes from large values during inflation to smaller values today. We describe a possible microscopic origin of the scalar potential of volume modulus inflation by exploiting non-perturbative effects, string loop and higher derivative perturbative corrections to the supergravity effective action together with contributions from anti-branes and charged hidden matter fields. We also analyse the relation between the size of the flux superpotential and the position of the late-time minimum and the inflection point around which inflation takes place. We perform a detailed study of the inflationary dynamics for a single modulus and a two moduli case where we also analyse the sensitivity of the cosmological observables on the choice of initial conditions.

  6. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3--7, 1988 DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 5 include environmental assessments and program strategies, waste treatment technologies, and regulations and compliance studies.

  7. Zero dead volume tube to surface seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benett, William J.; Folta, James A.

    2000-01-01

    A method and apparatus for connecting a tube to a surface that creates a dead volume seal. The apparatus is composed of three components, a body, a ferrule, and a threaded fitting. The ferrule is compressed onto a tube and a seal is formed between the tube and a device retained in the body by threading the fitting into the body which provides pressure that seals the face of the ferrule to a mating surface on the device. This seal can be used at elevated temperatures depending on the materials used. While the invention has been developed for use with micro-machined silicon wafers used in Capillary Gas Chromatograph (GC), it can be utilized anywhere for making a gas or fluid face seal to the surface of a device that has near zero dead volume.

  8. 1988 DOE model conference proceedings: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    These Proceedings of the October 3-7, 1988, DOE Model Conference are a compilation of the papers that were presented in the technical or poster sessions at the conference. Papers and posters not submitted for publication are not included in the Proceedings. The Table of Contents lists the titles of papers as well as the names of the presenters. These individuals are not, in all cases, the primary authors of the papers published. The actual title pages, appearing later with the papers, show the primary author(s) and all co-authors. The papers in all three volumes of the Proceedings appear as they were originally submitted for publication and have not been edited or changed in any way. Topics discussed in Volume 4 include site characterization and remediation projects, environmental monitoring and modeling; disposal site selection and facility design, risk assessment, safety and health issues, and site remediation technology.

  9. Environmental report 1994. Volume No. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, K.S.; Harrach, R.J.; Gallegos, G.M.; Failor, R.A.; Christofferson, E.

    1995-09-01

    This volume 2 of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) annual Environmental Report 1994 is a detailed data report that provides individual data points, where applicable, along with some summary data and more detailed accounts of sample collection and analytical methods. Six chapters have information on monitoring of air, surface water, groundwater, soil and sediment, vegetation and foodstuffs, and environmental radiation; two other chapters cover compliance sel-monitoring and quality assurance.

  10. Volume, Number of Shipments Surpass Goals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volume Comparison Data for June 2016 | Release Date: August 31, 2016 | Complete XLS File Beginning with data for August 2010, natural gas consumption for the residential and commercial sectors was derived from the total system sendout reported by local distribution companies on Form EIA-857, "Monthly Report of Natural Gas Purchases and Deliveries." The new methodology was designed to yield estimates that more closely reflect calendar month consumption patterns. Total system sendout is

  11. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to solids. In atoms and small molecules, the behavior of electrons is accounted individually; in bulk materials, a sea of innumerable electrons can behave en masse, yielding a very different description of electronic structure. Buckyballs perch on the cusp between these states, as evidenced by the discovery in the early 1990s

  12. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to solids. In atoms and small molecules, the behavior of electrons is accounted individually; in bulk materials, a sea of innumerable electrons can behave en masse, yielding a very different description of electronic structure. Buckyballs perch on the cusp between these states, as evidenced by the discovery in the early 1990s

  13. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the two modules: structure of metals (bonding, common lattic types, grain structure/boundary, polymorphis, alloys, imperfections in metals) and properties of metals (stress, strain, Young modulus, stress-strain relation, physical properties, working of metals, corrosion, hydrogen embrittlement, tritium/material compatibility).

  14. Automatic detection of sweep-meshable volumes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tautges; Timothy J. , White; David R.

    2006-05-23

    A method of and software for automatically determining whether a mesh can be generated by sweeping for a representation of a geometric solid comprising: classifying surface mesh schemes for surfaces of the representation locally using surface vertex types; grouping mappable and submappable surfaces of the representation into chains; computing volume edge types for the representation; recursively traversing surfaces of the representation and grouping the surfaces into source, target, and linking surface lists; and checking traversal direction when traversing onto linking surfaces.

  15. 1994 Solid waste forecast container volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Templeton, K.J.; Clary, J.L.

    1994-09-01

    This report describes a 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes by container type. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste. These volumes and their associated container types will be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site for storage, treatment, and disposal at Westinghouse Hanford Company`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during a 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The forecast data for the 30-year period indicates that approximately 307,150 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed by the SWOC. The main container type for this waste is 55-gallon drums, which will be used to ship 36% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of 55-gallon drums is Past Practice Remediation. This waste will be generated by the Environmental Restoration Program during remediation of Hanford`s past practice sites. Although Past Practice Remediation is the primary generator of 55-gallon drums, most waste generators are planning to ship some percentage of their waste in 55-gallon drums. Long-length equipment containers (LECs) are forecasted to contain 32% of the LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste. The main waste generator forecasting the use of LECs is the Long-Length Equipment waste generator, which is responsible for retrieving contaminated long-length equipment from the tank farms. Boxes are forecasted to contain 21% of the waste. These containers are primarily forecasted for use by the Environmental Restoration Operations--D&D of Surplus Facilities waste generator. This waste generator is responsible for the solid waste generated during decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the facilities currently on the Surplus Facilities Program Plan. The remaining LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste volume is planned to be shipped in casks and other miscellaneous containers.

  16. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to solids. In atoms and small molecules, the behavior of electrons is accounted individually; in bulk materials, a sea of innumerable electrons can behave en masse, yielding a very different description of electronic structure. Buckyballs perch on the cusp between these states, as evidenced by the discovery in the early 1990s

  17. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to solids. In atoms and small molecules, the behavior of electrons is accounted individually; in bulk materials, a sea of innumerable electrons can behave en masse, yielding a very different description of electronic structure. Buckyballs perch on the cusp between these states, as evidenced by the discovery in the early 1990s

  18. Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photoexcitation of a Volume Plasmon in Buckyballs Print For molecules made from a single element, buckyballs (carbon-60) are very large. They mark the transition from atoms to solids. In atoms and small molecules, the behavior of electrons is accounted individually; in bulk materials, a sea of innumerable electrons can behave en masse, yielding a very different description of electronic structure. Buckyballs perch on the cusp between these states, as evidenced by the discovery in the early 1990s

  19. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication

  20. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in

  1. Coal: America's energy future. Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-03-15

    Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman requested the National Coal Council in April 2005 a report identifying the challenges and opportunities of more fully exploring the USA's domestic coal resources to meet the nations' future energy needs. This resultant report addresses the Secretary's request in the context of the President's focus, with eight findings and recommendations that would use technology to leverage the USA's extensive coal assets and reduce dependence on imported energy. Volume I outlines these findings and recommendations. Volume II provides technical data and case histories to support the findings and recommendations. Chapter headings of Volume I are: Coal-to-Liquids to Produce 2.6 MMbbl/d; Coal-to-Natural Gas to Produce 4.0 Tcf Per Year; Coal-to-Clean Electricity; Coal to Produce Ethanol; Coal-to-Hydrogen; Enhanced Oil and Gas (Coalbed Methane); Recovery as Carbon Management Strategies; Delineate U.S. Coal Reserves and Transportation Constraints as Part of an Effort to Maximize U.S. Coal Production; and Penn State Study, 'Economic Benefits of Coal Conversion Investments'.

  2. Electric power annual 1996. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-08-01

    The Electric Power Annual presents a summary of electric power industry statistics at national, regional, and State levels. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policy-makers, analysts, and the general public with data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. The Electric Power Annual is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Volume 1--with a focus on US electric utilities--contains final 1996 data on net generation and fossil fuel consumption, stocks, receipts, and cost; preliminary 1996 data on generating unit capability, and retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Additionally, information on net generation from renewable energy sources and on the associated generating capability is included in Volume 1 of the EPA. Data published in the Electric Power Annual Volume 1 are compiled from three statistical forms filed monthly and two forms filed annually by electric utilities. These forms are described in detail in the Technical Notes. 5 figs., 30 tabs.

  3. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to

  4. ,"U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes",2,"Monthly","5... "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Residual Fuel Oil Refiner Sales Volumes" ...

  5. Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys Optimization of High-Volume Warm Forming for Lightweight Sheet Alloys 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle ...

  6. Large-Volume Resonant Microwave Discharge for Plasma Cleaning...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large-Volume Resonant Microwave Discharge for Plasma Cleaning of a CEBAF 5-Cell SRF Cavity Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large-Volume Resonant Microwave Discharge for...

  7. Building America Best Practices Series Volume 11. Guide to 40...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volume 11. Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Marine Climate Building America Best Practices Series Volume 11. Guide to 40% Whole-House Energy Savings in the Marine ...

  8. ,"New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume ... 8:27:57 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume ...

  9. Volume II NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    630-l 1 DOENVl 0630-l 1 Volume II NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT - ... DOENVl 0830-l 1 Volume II NEVADA TEST SITE ANNUAL SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT - ...

  10. East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug...

  11. Low current plasmatron fuel converter having enlarged volume discharges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai; Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Samokhin, Andrei

    2005-04-19

    A novel apparatus and method is disclosed for a plasmatron fuel converter (""plasmatron"") that efficiently uses electrical energy to produce hydrogen rich gas. The volume and shape of the plasma discharge is controlled by a fluid flow established in a plasma discharge volume. A plasmatron according to this invention produces a substantially large effective plasma discharge volume allowing for substantially greater volumetric efficiency in the initiation of chemical reactions within a volume of bulk fluid reactant flowing through the plasmatron.

  12. Low current plasmatron fuel converter having enlarged volume discharges

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai; Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Samokhin, Andrei

    2009-10-06

    A novel apparatus and method is disclosed for a plasmatron fuel converter ("plasmatron") that efficiently uses electrical energy to produce hydrogen rich gas. The volume and shape of the plasma discharge is controlled by a fluid flow established in a plasma discharge volume. A plasmatron according to this invention produces a substantially large effective plasma discharge volume allowing for substantially greater volumetric efficiency in the initiation of chemical reactions within a volume of bulk fluid reactant flowing through the plasmatron.

  13. QUALITY ASSURANCE EXCHANGE July 2005 Volume 1 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    QUALITY ASSURANCE EXCHANGE July 2005 Volume 1 Issue 1 US Department of Energy, Office of Quality Assurance Programs (EH-31)

  14. Quality Assurance Exchange January 2007, Volume 3 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange January 2007, Volume 3 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Corporate Safety Analysis

  15. Quality Assurance Exchange August 2007, Volume 3 Issue 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange August 2007, Volume 3 Issue 2 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Corporate Safety Analysis

  16. Quality Assurance Exchange Setpebmer 2007, Volume 3 Issue 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange Setpebmer 2007, Volume 3 Issue 3 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Corporate Safety Analysis

  17. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Michael J.; Shepherd, Jason F.

    2007-02-20

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet extraction. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of determining a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, generating nodes for merging, and merging the nodes to delete the sheet of hexahedral mesh elements and modify the volume mesh.

  18. Amped Up! Volume 1, No.1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 Amped Up! Volume 1, No.1 January/February 2015 EERE's internal newsletter, Amped Up!, is a bimonthly publication that highlights news within EERE, as well as some of our external successes, lessons learned, and best practices. Amped Up! Volume 1, No.1, January/February 2015 (3.9 MB) More Documents & Publications Amped Up! Volume 1, No.2 Amped Up! Volume 1, No. 3

  19. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.; Coates, Don M.

    2011-05-31

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  20. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.; Coates, Don M.

    2011-06-21

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  1. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2011-01-18

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  2. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2010-06-29

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  3. Controlling the pressure within an annular volume of a wellbore

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E.; Gonzalez, Manuel E.; Llewellyn, Brian C.; Bloys, James B.

    2008-10-28

    A process is described for replacing at least a portion of the liquid within the annular volume of a casing system within a wellbore with a second liquid. The second liquid is preselected to provide a measure of control of the pressure within the annular volume as the fluid within the volume is being heated.

  4. Selective aromatization of C[sub 3] and C[sub 4] paraffins over modified encilite catalysts. 1. Qualitative study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jana, A.K.; Rao, M.S. . Department of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-06-01

    The catalytic activity of Zn-encilite in the aromatization of propane and n-butane has been studied by a comparative study of the yields of benzene, toluene, and xylenes (BTX) using propane and n-butane as feeds. The results showed that n-butane had better activity and selectivity to BTX than propane. The effects of reaction temperature, contact time, inlet concentration, poisoning with ammonia on H-encilite, and different degrees of ion exchange with Zn[sup 2+] ion were studied in detail in order to obtain information on the reaction mechanism. The results indicated that the activity and the selectivity were dictated by the acidity and Zn loading on the catalyst.

  5. Solid waste 30-year volume summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valero, O.J.; Armacost, L.L.; DeForest, T.J.; Templeton, K.J.; Williams, N.C.

    1994-06-01

    A 30-year forecast of the solid waste volumes to be generated or received at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site is described in this report. The volumes described are low-level mixed waste (LLMW) and transuranic/transuranic mixed (TRU/TRUM) waste that will require treatment, storage, and disposal at Hanford`s Solid Waste Operations Complex (SWOC) during the 30-year period from FY 1994 through FY 2023. The data used to complete this document were collected from onsite and offsite waste generators who currently, or are planning to, ship solid wastes to the Hanford Site. An analysis of the data suggests that over 300,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste will be managed at Hanford`s SWOC over the next 30 years. An extensive effort was made this year to collect this information. The 1993 solid waste forecast was used as a starting point, which identified approximately 100,000 m{sup 3} of LLMW and TRU/TRUM waste to be sent to the SWOC. After analyzing the forecast waste volume, it was determined that additional waste was expected from the tank waste remediation system (TWRS), onsite decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities, and onsite remedial action (RA) activities. Data presented in this report establish a starting point for solid waste management planning. It is recognized that forecast estimates will vary (typically increasing) as facility planning and missions continue to change and become better defined, but the information presented still provides useful insight into Hanford`s future solid waste management requirements.

  6. Journal of Undergraduate Research, Volume I, 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faletra, P.; Beavis, W.; Franz, K.; Musick, C.; Walbridge, S.E.; Myron, H.

    2001-01-01

    This is our first volume of the Undergraduate Journal. It is an approbation of the impressive research performed by summer interns under the guidance of their dedicated mentors. The full-length publications were chosen from a pool of submissions that were reviewed by many of the excellent scientists at our National Laboratories. Most of these students will pursue careers in science, engineering and technology and, hopefully, some of this talent will remain with our labs. We have also included about 125 abstracts that survived the review process. These were submitted from all of our participating National Laboratories.

  7. High volume production of nanostructured materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ripley, Edward B.; Morrell, Jonathan S.; Seals, Roland D.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2009-10-13

    A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

  8. Metals handbook: Ninth edition. Volume 13; Corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    Beginning with the fundamentals of corrosion, the Volume then discusses the general of the forms of corrosion, testing and evaluation, designing to minimize corrosion, and various protection methods. Following are 27 articles on specific metals and alloys, with details on the effects of alloying additions and heat treatments on corrosion resistance, protective coatings, anodic and cathodic protection, and design considerations. The final section of the Handbook presents information on the corrosion problems encountered in over 20 major industries, as well as prevention and protection methods used.

  9. DOE fundamentals handbook: Material science. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of the structure and properties of metals. This volume contains the following modules: thermal shock (thermal stress, pressurized thermal shock), brittle fracture (mechanism, minimum pressurization-temperature curves, heatup/cooldown rate limits), and plant materials (properties considered when selecting materials, fuel materials, cladding and reflectors, control materials, nuclear reactor core problems, plant material problems, atomic displacement due to irradiation, thermal and displacement spikes due to irradiation, neutron capture effect, radiation effects in organic compounds, reactor use of aluminum).

  10. DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

  11. Large volume flow-through scintillating detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gritzo, Russ E.; Fowler, Malcolm M.

    1995-01-01

    A large volume flow through radiation detector for use in large air flow situations such as incinerator stacks or building air systems comprises a plurality of flat plates made of a scintillating material arranged parallel to the air flow. Each scintillating plate has a light guide attached which transfers light generated inside the scintillating plate to an associated photomultiplier tube. The output of the photomultiplier tubes are connected to electronics which can record any radiation and provide an alarm if appropriate for the application.

  12. Petroleum Supply Annual 1998, Volume 2

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, Volume 2 Entire . The entire report as a single file. PDF 3.8MB . . Front Matter . Cover Page, Contacts, Preface, and Table of Contents Page PDF . . Monthly Statistics Tables . National Statistics 1 U.S. Petroleum Balance PDF TXT 2 U.S. Supply, Disposition, and Ending Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products PDF TXT 3 U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Stocks PDF TXT . Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products 4 PAD District I PDF TXT 5

  13. Volume higher; spot price ranges widen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-11-01

    This article is the October 1994 uranium market summary. During this reporting period, volume on the spot concentrates market doubled. Twelve deals took place: three in the spot concentrates market, one in the medium and long-term market, four in the conversion market, and four in the enrichment market. The restricted price range widened due to higher prices at the top end of the range, while the unrestricted price range widened because of lower prices at the bottom end. Spot conversion prices were higher, and enrichment prices were unchanged.

  14. Spot market volume sluggish in October

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    This article is the October 1995 uranium market summary. Spot market volume reached a meager 116,000 lbs of U3O8 and equivalent. The restricted price range increased from September`s high end of $11.75 to $12.00. The unrestricted range also increased with September`s high end of $9.65 as October`s low end and a high of $9.80. Conversion prices have held steady the past few months. However, the SWU price range increased this month to a high of $97.00.

  15. Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Regina E.; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea

    2008-09-15

    The Site Environmental Report is an integrated report on Berkeley Lab's environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. It summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2007. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory's environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

  16. Natural gas annual 1992: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-22

    This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. The 1992 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production top its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1988 to 1992 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. Volume 2 of this report presents State-level historical data.

  17. High volume, multiple use, portable precipitator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Duane C.

    2011-10-25

    A portable high air volume electrostatic collection precipitator for analyzing air is provided which is a relatively small, self-contained device. The device has a collection electrode adapted to carry a variety of collecting media. An air intake is provided such that air to be analyzed flows through an ionization section with a transversely positioned ionization wire to ionize analytes in the air, and then flows over the collection electrode where ionized analytes are collected. Air flow is maintained at but below turbulent flow, Ionizable constituents in the air are ionized, attracted to the collection electrode, and precipitated in the selected medium which can be removed for analysis.

  18. Petroleum supply annual 1996: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1996 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains three sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, and Refinery Capacity; each with final annual data. The summary statistics section show 16 years of data depicting the balance between supply, disposition and ending stocks for various commodities including crude oil, motor gasoline, distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, jet fuel propane/propylene, and liquefied petroleum gases. The detailed statistics section provide 1996 detailed statistics on supply and disposition, refinery operations, imports and exports, stocks, and transportation of crude oil and petroleum products. The refinery capacity contain listings of refineries and associated crude oil distillation and downstream capacities by State, as of January 1, 1997, as well as summaries of corporate refinery capacities and refinery storage capacities. In addition, refinery receipts of crude oil by method of transportation for 1996 are provided. Also included are fuels consumed at refineries, and lists of shutdowns, sales, reactivations, and mergers during 1995 and 1996. 16 figs., 59 tabs.

  19. Multivariate volume visualization through dynamic projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Shusen; Wang, Bei; Thiagarajan, Jayaraman J.; Bremer, Peer -Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2014-11-01

    We propose a multivariate volume visualization framework that tightly couples dynamic projections with a high-dimensional transfer function design for interactive volume visualization. We assume that the complex, high-dimensional data in the attribute space can be well-represented through a collection of low-dimensional linear subspaces, and embed the data points in a variety of 2D views created as projections onto these subspaces. Through dynamic projections, we present animated transitions between different views to help the user navigate and explore the attribute space for effective transfer function design. Our framework not only provides a more intuitive understanding of the attribute space but also allows the design of the transfer function under multiple dynamic views, which is more flexible than being restricted to a single static view of the data. For large volumetric datasets, we maintain interactivity during the transfer function design via intelligent sampling and scalable clustering. As a result, using examples in combustion and climate simulations, we demonstrate how our framework can be used to visualize interesting structures in the volumetric space.

  20. Southwest conference on optics. SPIE Volume 540

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    In 1985 the Los Alamos Conference on Optics, which has been held previously in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, expanded its coverage and moved to Albuquerque as the Southwest Conference on Optics. This was made possible by a broad increase in the Conference sponsorship, which this year included research and educational institutions throughout New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Texas, and old Mexico, as well as SPIE, OSA, and LIA. In that portion of the Conference represented by the present volume, about 115 papers were presented, of which the majority were contributed papers given in poster sessions. The texts of most of these papers, both invited and contributed, are included here. The organization of this volume generally follows that of the Conference, with the papers arranged by the various sessions: General Invited Papers; Optical Components, Materials, and Design; Lasers and Laser Systems; Spectroscopy and Spectroscopic Applications; Applications of Optics; and the Symposium on Optics Along the Rio Grande Research Corridor. There was some rearrangement to provide for a more logical sequence, and the postdeadline papers have been placed in their proper sessions.

  1. Draft Strategic Laboratory Missions Plan. Volume II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This volume described in detail the Department`s research and technology development activities and their funding at the Department`s laboratories. It includes 166 Mission Activity Profiles, organized by major mission area, with each representing a discrete budget function called a Budget and Reporting (B & R) Code. The activities profiled here encompass the total research and technology development funding of the laboratories from the Department. Each profile includes a description of the activity and shows how the funding for that activity is distributed among the DOE laboratories as well as universities and industry. The profiles also indicate the principal laboratories for each activity, as well as which other laboratories are involved. The information in this volume is at the core of the Strategic Laboratory Mission Plan. It enables a reader to follow funds from the Department`s appropriation to a specific activity description and to specific R & D performing institutions. This information will enable the Department, along with the Laboratory Operations Board and Congress, to review the distribution of R & D performers chosen to execute the Department`s missions.

  2. Linear dimensions and volumes of human lungs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hickman, David P.

    2012-03-30

    TOTAL LUNG Capacity is defined as “the inspiratory capacity plus the functional residual capacity; the volume of air contained in the lungs at the end of a maximal inspiration; also equals vital capacity plus residual volume” (from MediLexicon.com). Within the Results and Discussion section of their April 2012 Health Physics paper, Kramer et al. briefly noted that the lungs of their experimental subjects were “not fully inflated.” By definition and failure to obtain maximal inspiration, Kramer et. al. did not measure Total Lung Capacity (TLC). The TLC equation generated from this work will tend to underestimate TLC and does notmore » improve or update total lung capacity data provided by ICRP and others. Likewise, the five linear measurements performed by Kramer et. al. are only representative of the conditions of the measurement (i.e., not at-rest volume, but not fully inflated either). While there was significant work performed and the data are interesting, the data does not represent a maximal situation, a minimal situation, or an at-rest situation. Moreover, while interesting, the linear data generated by this study is limited by the conditions of the experiment and may not be fully comparative with other lung or inspiratory parameters, measures, or physical dimensions.« less

  3. Method of modifying a volume mesh using sheet insertion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borden, Michael J.; Shepherd, Jason F.

    2006-08-29

    A method and machine-readable medium provide a technique to modify a hexahedral finite element volume mesh using dual generation and sheet insertion. After generating a dual of a volume stack (mesh), a predetermined algorithm may be followed to modify (refine) the volume mesh of hexahedral elements. The predetermined algorithm may include the steps of locating a sheet of hexahedral mesh elements, determining a plurality of hexahedral elements within the sheet to refine, shrinking the plurality of elements, and inserting a new sheet of hexahedral elements adjacently to modify the volume mesh. Additionally, another predetermined algorithm using mesh cutting may be followed to modify a volume mesh.

  4. The bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties of four MAX phases Cr{sub 2}AX (A = Al or Ge, X = C or N): From density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Neng; Mo, Yuxiang; Ching, Wai-Yim

    2013-11-14

    In this work, we assess a full spectrum of properties (chemical bonding, charge distribution, spin ordering, optical, and elastic properties) of Cr{sub 2}AC (A = Al, Ge) and their hypothetical nitride counterparts Cr{sub 2}AN (A = Al, Ge) based on density functional theory calculations. The calculated total energy values indicate that a variety of spin ordering of these four compounds depending on interlayer-interactions between M-A and M-X within the sublattice, which is supported by bonding analysis. MAX phase materials are discovered to possess exotic magnetic properties which indicates that these materials could serve as promising candidates for novel layered magnetic materials for various electronic and spintronic applications. Further analysis of optical properties for two polarization vectors of Cr{sub 2}AX shows that the reflectivity is high in the visible-ultraviolet region up to ∼15 eV suggesting Cr{sub 2}AX as a promising candidate for use as a coating material. The elastic coefficients (C{sub ij}) and bulk mechanical properties [bulk modulus (K), shear modulus (G), Young's modulus (E), Poisson's ratio (η), and Pugh ratio (G/K)] of these four Cr{sub 2}AX compounds are also calculated and analyzed, which pave the way to predict or design new MAX phases that are less brittle or tougher by having a lower G/K value or higher η.

  5. The CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS instrument – Part 2: Raman scattering probability measurements and retrieval of aerosol optical properties

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ortega, Ivan; Coburn, Sean; Berg, Larry K.; Lantz, Kathy; Michalsky, Joseph; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, Johnathan W.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-08-23

    The multiannual global mean of aerosol optical depth at 550 nm (AOD550) over land is ∼ 0.19, and that over oceans is ∼ 0.13. About 45 % of the Earth surface shows AOD550 smaller than 0.1. There is a need for measurement techniques that are optimized to measure aerosol optical properties under low AOD conditions. We present an inherently calibrated retrieval (i.e., no need for radiance calibration) to simultaneously measure AOD and the aerosol phase function parameter, g, based on measurements of azimuth distributions of the Raman scattering probability (RSP), the near-absolute rotational Raman scattering (RRS) intensity. We employ radiative transfer model simulations tomore » show that for solar azimuth RSP measurements at solar elevation and solar zenith angle (SZA) smaller than 80°, RSP is insensitive to the vertical distribution of aerosols and maximally sensitive to changes in AOD and g under near-molecular scattering conditions. The University of Colorado two-dimensional Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU 2-D-MAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed as part of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) at Cape Cod, MA, during the summer of 2012 to measure direct sun spectra and RSP from scattered light spectra at solar relative azimuth angles (SRAAs) between 5 and 170°. During two case study days with (1) high aerosol load (17 July, 0.3  <  AOD430 < 0.6) and (2) near-molecular scattering conditions (22 July, AOD430 < 0.13) we compare RSP-based retrievals of AOD430 and g with data from a co-located CIMEL sun photometer, Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR), and an airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). The average difference (relative to DOAS) for AOD430 is +0.012 ± 0.023 (CIMEL), −0.012 ± 0.024 (MFRSR), −0.011 ± 0.014 (HSRL-2), and +0.023 ± 0.013 (CIMELAOD − MFRSRAOD) and yields the following expressions for correlations between different instruments

  6. Electric power annual 1997. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The Electric Power Annual 1997, Volume 2 contains annual summary statistics at national, regional, and state levels for the electric power industry, including information on both electric utilities and nonutility power producers. Included are data for electric utility retail sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold; financial statistics; environmental statistics; power transactions; and demand-side management. Also included are data for US nonutility power producers on installed capacity; gross generation; emissions; and supply and disposition of energy. The objective of the publication is to provide industry decisionmakers, government policymakers, analysts, and the general public with historical data that may be used in understanding US electricity markets. 15 figs., 62 tabs.

  7. Low head, high volume pump apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Avery, Don E.; Young, Bryan F.

    1989-01-01

    An inner cylinder and a substantially larger outer cylinder are joined as two verticle concentric cylinders. Verticle partitions between the cylinders divide the space between the cylinders into an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber which is substantially larger in volume than the inner chamber. The inner cylinder has a central pumping section positioned between upper and lower valve sections. In the valve section ports extend through the inner cylinder wall to the inlet and outlet chambers. Spring loaded valves close the ports. Tension springs extend across the inlet chamber and compression springs extend across the inner cylinder to close the inlet valves. Tension springs extend across the inner cylinder the close the outlet valves. The elastomeric valve flaps have rigid curved backing members. A piston rod extends through one end cover to move a piston in the central section. An inlet is connected to the inlet chamber and an outlet is connected to the outlet chamber.

  8. Site Environmental Report for 2009, Volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, Regina

    2010-08-17

    Each year, the University of California (UC), as the managing and operating contractor of the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, prepares an integrated report regarding its environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting.1 The Site Environmental Report for 2009 summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year (CY) 2009. Throughout this report, 'Berkeley Lab' or 'LBNL' refers both to (1) the multiprogram scientific facility the UC manages and operates on the 202-acre university-owned site located in the hills above the UC Berkeley campus, and the site itself, and (2) the UC as managing and operating contractor for Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The report is separated into two volumes. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of LBNL, a discussion of its environmental management system (EMS), the status of environmental programs, summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities, and quality assurance (QA) measures. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities. The Site Environmental Report is distributed by releasing it on the World Wide Web (Web) from the Berkeley Lab Environmental Services Group (ESG) home page, which is located at www.lbl.gov/ehs/esg/. Many of the documents cited in this report also are accessible from the ESG Web page. Links to documents available on the Web are given with the citations in the References section. CD and printed copies of this Site Environmental Report are available upon request. The report follows Berkeley Lab's policy of using the International System of Units (SI), also known as the metric system of measurements. Whenever possible, results are also reported using

  9. Economic evaluation of volume reduction for Defense transuranic waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.M.

    1981-07-01

    This study evaluates the economics of volume reduction of retrievably stored and newly generated DOE transuranic waste by comparing the costs of reduction of the waste with the savings possible in transportation and disposal of the waste. The report develops a general approach to the comparison of TRU waste volume reduction costs and cost savings, establishes an initial set of cost data, and develops conclusions to support selecting technologies and facilities for the disposal of DOE transuranic waste. Section I outlines the analysis which considers seven types of volume reduction from incineration and compaction of combustibles to compaction, size reduction, shredding, melting, and decontamination of metals. The study considers the volume reduction of contact-handled newly generated, and retrievably stored DOE transuranic waste. Section II of this report describes the analytical approach, assumptions, and flow of waste material through sites. Section III presents the waste inventories, disposal, and transportation savings with volume reduction and the volume reduction techniques and savings.

  10. Pion polarizabilities and volume effects in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Jie; Jiang Fujiun; Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2008-01-01

    We use chiral perturbation theory to study the extraction of pion electromagnetic polarizabilities from lattice QCD. Chiral extrapolation formulae are derived for partially quenched QCD, and quenched QCD simulations. On a torus, volume dependence of electromagnetic current correlators is complicated by SO(4) breaking, as well as photon zero-mode interactions. We determine finite volume corrections to the Compton scattering tensor of pions. We argue, however, that such results cannot be used to ascertain volume corrections to polarizabilities determined in lattice QCD with background field methods. Connection is lacking because small momentum expansions are not permitted in finite volume. Our argument also applies to form factors. Volume effects for background field calculations of electromagnetic moments cannot be deduced from finite volume form factors.

  11. Scalable Ray-Casted Volume Rendering | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scalable Ray-Casted Volume Rendering September 9, 2016 10:30AM to 11:30AM Presenter Roba Binyahib, University of Oregon Location Building 240, Room 4301 Type Seminar Series MCS Seminar Abstract: Computational power has been increasing tremendously in recent years, resulting in an increase in data size and complexity. Volume rendering is an important method for visualizing such data, as it provides insight over the entire data set. However, traditional volume rendering techniques are not

  12. Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume 1, 2004 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 1, 2004 Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume 1, 2004 Building America Program Evaluation, Volume I: Main Report, prepared by Energy Technology Innovation Project (ETIP), Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Vicki Norberg-Bohm, Principal Investigator, Chad White, Lead Author, September 2004. Building America Program Evaluation (2.07 MB) More Documents & Publications Building America Program Evaluation, Harvard University, Volume

  13. ,"U.S. Conventional Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","22016","1151994" ,"Release Date:","522016" ,"Next Release Date:","612016" ,"Excel File Name:","petconsrefmgcnusepm0umgalpdm.xls" ...

  14. ,"U.S. Reformulated Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Sales Volumes",6,"Monthly","22016","1151994" ,"Release Date:","522016" ,"Next Release Date:","612016" ,"Excel File Name:","petconsrefmgcnusepm0rmgalpdm.xls" ...

  15. Oak Ridge Reservation environmental report for 1992. Volume 1: Narrative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koncinski, W.S.

    1993-09-01

    The two volumes of this report present data and supporting narratives regarding the impact of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) on its environs and the public during 1992. This Volume (Volume 1) includes all narrative descriptions, summaries, and conclusions and is intended to be a ``stand-alone`` report for the reader who does not want to review in detail all of the 1992 data for the ORR. Volume 2 includes the detailed data in formats that ensure all the environmental data are represented. Narratives are not included in Vol. 2.

  16. ,"Midwest Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at ...dnavnghistn5030852m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  17. ,"U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","22016" ...dnavnghistn5030us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  18. ,"East Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at ...dnavnghistn5030832m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  19. ,"Pacific Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pacific Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or ...dnavnghistn5030912m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  20. ,"West Virginia Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ...dnavnghistn5030wv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  1. ,"Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mountain Region Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or ...dnavnghistn5030862m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, ...

  2. ,"U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales ... AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Motor Gasoline Refiner Sales Volumes" ...

  3. State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 - Program Design Lessons Learned State Energy-Efficient Appliance Rebate Program: Volume 1 - Program Design Lessons Learned View the report State Energy-Efficient Appliance ...

  4. Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale ...

  5. Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 1 -...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1 - Introduction Jump to: navigation, search Name Community Energy Planning A Guide for Communities Volume 1 - Introduction AgencyCompany Organization Natural Resources Canada...

  6. Petroleum supply annual 1992: Volume 1. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-26

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. This first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. The second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them.

  7. MHK ISDB/Instruments/TRDI Doppler Volume Sampler | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Doppler Volume Sampler < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help...

  8. Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    See footnotes at end of table. 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State 386 Energy Information...

  9. Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Marketing Annual 1998 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

  10. Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Marketing Annual 1995 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

  11. Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Marketing Annual 1999 Table 49. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Aviation Fuels, Propane, and Residual Fuel Oil by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

  12. Requirements for status for volume fuel cell manufacturing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements & Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing DOE Hydrogen Program, Washington, DC July 13-14, 2005 Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Customer Requirements: ...

  13. Vermont Stormwater Management Manual Volume I | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: Vermont Stormwater Management Manual Volume IPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook Abstract The Vermont...

  14. Volume II - Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    208-2012 July 2012 DOE HANDBOOK Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Volume II: ... This Department of Energy (DOE) Accident and Operational Safety Analysis Handbook ...

  15. QUALITY ASSURANCE EXCHANGE December 2005 Volume 1 Issue 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    QUALITY ASSURANCE EXCHANGE December 2005 Volume 1 Issue 3 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Corporate Performance Assessment Office of Quality Assurance Programs (EH-31)

  16. Quality Assurance Exchange June 2006, Volume 2 Issue 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange June 2006, Volume 2 Issue 2 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Corporate Performance Assessment Office of Quality Assurance Programs (EH-31)

  17. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Marketing Annual 1997 401 Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  18. Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Marketing Annual 1999 359 Table 50. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Distillate Fuel Oils and Kerosene by PAD District and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued...

  19. Membranes with artificial free-volume for biofuel production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Petzetakis, Nikos; Doherty, Cara M.; Thornton, Aaron W.; Chen, X. Chelsea; Cotanda, Pepa; Hill, Anita J.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2015-06-24

    Free-volume of polymers governs transport of penetrants through polymeric films. Control over free-volume is thus important for the development of better membranes for a wide variety of applications such as gas separations, pharmaceutical purifications and energy storage. To date, methodologies used to create materials with different amounts of free-volume are based primarily on chemical synthesis of new polymers. Here we report a simple methodology for generating free-volume based on the self-assembly of polyethylene-b-polydimethylsiloxane-b-polyethylene triblock copolymers. Here, we have used this method to fabricate a series of membranes with identical compositions but with different amounts of free-volume. We use the termmore » artificial free-volume to refer to the additional free-volume created by self-assembly. The effect of artificial free-volume on selective transport through the membranes was tested using butanol/water and ethanol/water mixtures due to their importance in biofuel production. Moreover, we found that the introduction of artificial free-volume improves both alcohol permeability and selectivity.« less

  20. Membranes with artificial free-volume for biofuel production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petzetakis, Nikos; Doherty, Cara M.; Thornton, Aaron W.; Chen, X. Chelsea; Cotanda, Pepa; Hill, Anita J.; Balsara, Nitash P.

    2015-06-24

    Free-volume of polymers governs transport of penetrants through polymeric films. Control over free-volume is thus important for the development of better membranes for a wide variety of applications such as gas separations, pharmaceutical purifications and energy storage. To date, methodologies used to create materials with different amounts of free-volume are based primarily on chemical synthesis of new polymers. Here we report a simple methodology for generating free-volume based on the self-assembly of polyethylene-b-polydimethylsiloxane-b-polyethylene triblock copolymers. Here, we have used this method to fabricate a series of membranes with identical compositions but with different amounts of free-volume. We use the term artificial free-volume to refer to the additional free-volume created by self-assembly. The effect of artificial free-volume on selective transport through the membranes was tested using butanol/water and ethanol/water mixtures due to their importance in biofuel production. Moreover, we found that the introduction of artificial free-volume improves both alcohol permeability and selectivity.

  1. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fit by the Kondo volume collapse model plus a quasiharmonic representation of the phonons. ... CERIUM; FLUCTUATIONS; FREE ENERGY; PHONONS; SPIN; THERMODYNAMICS; X-RAY DIFFRACTION ...

  2. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems High-Temperature Motor Windings for Downhole Pumps Used in Geothermal Energy ...

  3. Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Final Report, Volume 1, Metallurgical Evaluation of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels and their Weldments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Final Report, ...

  4. Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Graham B.; Mapes, Terry S.; Zalis, WJ

    2013-02-01

    This report summarizes the Highly Insulating Windows Volume Purchase Program, conduced by PNNL for DOE-BTP, including a summary of outcomes and lessons learned.

  5. Quality Assurance Exchange Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange Winter 2010 Volume 6 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance

  6. Quality Assurance Exchange October 2008 Volume 4 Issue 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange October 2008 Volume 4 Issue 2 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance

  7. New York Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New York Natural Gas Underground Storage ... Underground Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New York Underground Natural Gas ...

  8. New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Underground Storage Volume (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Underground Storage ... Underground Natural Gas in Storage - All Operators New Mexico Underground Natural Gas ...

  9. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High ...

  10. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications (ACC932) Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume ... More Documents & Publications Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High ...

  11. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1997 Table 43....

  12. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued Geographic Area Month Premium All Grades Sales...

  13. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2000 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) - Continued Geographic Area Month Premium All Grades Sales...

  14. Petroleum Products Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of table. 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 262 Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1996 Table 43....

  15. Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data Citation Details ... Sponsoring Org: USDOE Director, Office of Science. Office of Advanced Scientific Computing ...

  16. Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Remote interactive direct volume rendering of AMR data Citation Details ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  17. Quality Assurance Exchange August 2009, Volume 5 Issue 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange August 2009, Volume 5 Issue 2 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Quality Assurance Policy and Assistance

  18. Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) to Liquid Fuels Synthesis, Volume 1: Availability of Feedstock and Technology Municipal solid waste (MSW) is a domestic energy resource with the ...

  19. High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High-Temperature-High-Volume Lifting for Enhanced Geothermal Systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  20. EA-1645: Sage Electrochromics SageGlass High Volume Manufacturing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sage Electrochromics Sageglass High Volume Manufacturing (Hvm) Facility in Faribault, Minnesota July 1, 2009 EA-1645: Finding of No Significant Impact Loan Guarantee for Sage ...

  1. Scattering from Star Polymers including Excluded Volume Effects...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GrantContract Number: AC05-00OR22725 Type: Accepted Manuscript Journal Name: Journal of Applied Crystallography Additional Journal Information: Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: ...

  2. Quality Assurance Exchange March 2006, Volume 2 Issue 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quality Assurance Exchange March 2006, Volume 2 Issue 1 U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Corporate Performance Assessment Office of Quality Assurance Programs (EH-31)

  3. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  4. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  5. Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

  6. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  7. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - - - - W W - - - - - - See footnotes at end of table. 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State 292 Energy...

  8. Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

  9. Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 48. Prime Supplier Sales Volumes of Motor Gasoline by Grade, Formulation, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per Day) -...

  10. Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    250 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1998 Table 44. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Formulation, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons...

  11. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    220 Energy Information AdministrationPetroleum Marketing Annual 1999 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  12. Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Information Administration Petroleum Marketing Annual 1995 Table 43. Refiner Motor Gasoline Volumes by Grade, Sales Type, PAD District, and State (Thousand Gallons per...

  13. Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Predictive Technology Development and Crash Energy Management Advanced Materials and Processing of Composites for High Volume Applications FY 2009 ...

  14. Occurrence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons below coal-tar-sealed parking lots and effects on stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scoggins, M.; McClintock, N.L.; Gosselink, L.; Bryer, P.

    2007-12-15

    Parking-lot pavement sealants recently have been recognized as a major source of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in urban stream sediments in Austin, Texas. Laboratory and field studies have shown that PAHs in sediments can be toxic to aquatic organisms and can degrade aquatic communities. After identifying increases in concentrations of PAHs in sediments below seal-coated parking lots, we investigated whether the increases had significant effects on stream biota in 5 Austin streams. We sampled sediment chemistry and biological communities above and below the point at which stormwater runoff from the parking lots discharged into the streams, thus providing 5 upstream reference sites and 5 downstream treatment sites. Differences between upstream and downstream concentrations of total PAH ranged from 3.9 to 32 mg/kg. Analysis of the species occurrence data from pool and riffle habitats indicated a significant decrease in community health at the downstream sites, including decreases in richness, intolerant taxa, Diptera taxa, and density. In pool sediments, Chironomidae density was negatively correlated with PAH concentrations, whereas Oligochaeta density responded positively to PAH concentrations. In general, pool taxa responded more strongly than riffle taxa to PAHs, but riffle taxa responded more broadly than pool taxa. Increases in PAH sediment-toxicity units between upstream and downstream sites explained decreases in taxon richness and density in pools between upstream and downstream sites.

  15. THE CONNECTION BETWEEN 3.3 {mu}m POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON EMISSION AND ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Jong-Hak; Park, Dawoo; Kim, Ji Hoon; Imanishi, Masatoshi

    2012-02-15

    We investigate the connection between starburst and active galactic nucleus (AGN) activity by comparing 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission with AGN properties. Utilizing the slitless spectroscopic capability of the AKARI space telescope, we observe a moderate-luminosity Type I AGN at z {approx} 0.4 to measure global starburst activity. The 3.3 {mu}m PAH emissions are detected for 7 out of 26 target galaxies. We find no strong correlation between the 3.3 {mu}m PAH emission and AGN luminosity in the limited range of the observed AGN luminosity, suggesting that global star formation may not be closely related to AGN activity. Combining our measurements with previous 3.3 {mu}m measurements of low-redshift Type I AGNs in the literature, we investigate the connection between nuclear starburst and AGN activity. In contrast to global star formation, the 3.3 {mu}m PAH luminosity measured from the central part of galaxies correlates with AGN luminosity, implying that starburst activity and AGN activity are directly connected in the nuclear region.

  16. Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fly ash during coal and residual char combustion in a pressurized fluidized bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongcang Zhou; Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhaoping Zhong; Yaji Huang

    2009-04-15

    To investigate the distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in fly ash, the combustion of coal and residual char was performed in a pressurized spouted fluidized bed. After Soxhlet extraction and Kuderna-Danish (K-D) concentration, the contents of 16 PAHs recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA) in coal, residual char, and fly ash were analyzed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with fluorescence and diode array detection. The experimental results show that the combustion efficiency is lower and the carbon content in fly ash is higher during coal pressurized combustion, compared to the residual char pressurized combustion at the pressure of 0.3 MPa. Under the same pressure, the PAH amounts in fly ash produced from residual char combustion are lower than that in fly ash produced from coal combustion. The total PAHs in fly ash produced from coal and residual char combustion are dominated by three- and four-ring PAHs. The amounts of PAHs in fly ash produced from residual char combustion increase and then decrease with the increase of pressure in a fluidized bed. 21 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  17. Dispersion modeling of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and production of coke in Tianjin, China

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shu Tao; Xinrong Li; Yu Yang; Raymond M. Coveney, Jr.; Xiaoxia Lu; Haitao Chen; Weiran Shen

    2006-08-01

    A USEPA procedure, ISCLT3 (Industrial Source Complex Long-Term), was applied to model the spatial distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) emitted from various sources including coal, petroleum, natural gas, and biomass into the atmosphere of Tianjin, China. Benzo(a)pyrene equivalent concentrations (BaPeq) were calculated for risk assessment. Model results were provisionally validated for concentrations and profiles based on the observed data at two monitoring stations. The dominant emission sources in the area were domestic coal combustion, coke production, and biomass burning. Mainly because of the difference in the emission heights, the contributions of various sources to the average concentrations at receptors differ from proportions emitted. The shares of domestic coal increased from {approximately} 43% at the sources to 56% at the receptors, while the contributions of coking industry decreased from {approximately} 23% at the sources to 7% at the receptors. The spatial distributions of gaseous and particulate PAHs were similar, with higher concentrations occurring within urban districts because of domestic coal combustion. With relatively smaller contributions, the other minor sources had limited influences on the overall spatial distribution. The calculated average BaPeq value in air was 2.54 {+-} 2.87 ng/m{sup 3} on an annual basis. Although only 2.3% of the area in Tianjin exceeded the national standard of 10 ng/m{sup 3}, 41% of the entire population lives within this area. 37 refs., 9 figs.

  18. Probabilistic ecological risk assessment and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Yellow Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, A.X.; Lang, Y.H.; Xue, L.D.; Liao, S.L.; Zhou, H.

    2009-11-15

    Based on the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 12 surface sediment samples from Yellow Sea, the relative risk of 9 PAHs was investigated using joint risk probability distribution curves and overlapping area, which were generated based on the distributions of exposure and acute toxicity data (LC50), and the sources of PAHs were apportioned using principal component analysis. It was found that joint probability curve and overlapping area indicated the acceptable ecological risk of individual PAHs, only a small fraction of the benthic organisms was affected. Among the nine PAHs studied, the overall risk of pyrene was the highest, with that of naphthalene the lowest. For lower exposure levels at which the percentage of species affected was less than 10%, the risk associated with phenanthrene and fluorene were clearly higher than that of the other seven PAHs. It was indicated that PAHs in surface sediments mainly originated from vehicular emissions, coal combustion sources, coke oven emission and wood combustion, petroleum origin made little influence on sources of PAHs by PCA.

  19. Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

  20. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-induced CYP1B1 activity is suppressed by perillyl alcohol in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Nelson L.S.; Wang Huan; Wang Yun; Leung, H.Y.; Leung, Lai K. . E-mail: laikleung@yahoo.com

    2006-06-01

    Perillyl alcohol (POH) is a dietary monoterpene with potential applications in chemoprevention and chemotherapy. Although clinical trials are under way, POH's physiological and pharmacological properties are still unclear. In the present study, the effect of POH on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-induced genotoxicity, and the related expression were examined in MCF-7 cells. Exposure to environmental toxicant increases the risk of cancer. Many of these compounds are pro-carcinogens and are biotransformed into their ultimate genotoxic structures by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. CYP1A1 and 1B1 are enzymes that catalyze the biotransformation of dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA). Our data revealed that 0.5 {mu}M of POH was effective in blocking DMBA-DNA binding. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) assay indicated that the administration of POH inhibited the DMBA-induced enzyme activity in MCF-7 cells. Enzyme kinetic analysis revealed that POH inhibited CYP1B1 but not CYP1A1 activity. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay also demonstrated that the monoterpene reduced CYP1B1 mRNA abundance induced by DMBA. The present study illustrated that POH might inhibit and downregulate CYP1B1, which could protect against PAH-induced carcinogenesis.