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Sample records for maurita nia mauritius

  1. Mauritius-NREL Cooperation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area Biomass Topics Resource assessment, Background analysis Country Mauritius Eastern Africa References NREL International Program Overview1 This article is a stub. You can...

  2. Mauritius: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "","visitedicon":"" Country Profile Name Mauritius Population 1,236,817 GDP 14 Energy Consumption 0.06 Quadrillion Btu 2-letter ISO code MU 3-letter ISO code MUS Numeric ISO...

  3. Eletricidade da Amaz nia S A ELETRAM | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amaz nia S A ELETRAM Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eletricidade da Amaznia SA (ELETRAM) Place: Cuiaba, Mato Grosso, Brazil Zip: 78040-570 Sector: Hydro Product: Small...

  4. Eletricidade de Rond nia S A ELETRON | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rond nia S A ELETRON Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eletricidade de Rondnia S.A. (ELETRON) Place: Alta Floresta D'Oeste, Brazil Sector: Hydro Product: Brazilian small hydro...

  5. Tera-node Network Technology (TASK 4) Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA) final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Postel, John; Bannister, Joe

    2000-03-15

    The TNT project developed software technologies in scalable personal telecommunications (SPT), Reservation Protocol 2 (RSVP2), Scalable Computing Infrastructure (SCOPE), and Network Infrastructure Activities (NIA). SPT = developed many innovative protocols to support the use of videoconferencing applications on the Internet. RSVP2 = developed a new reference model and further standardization of RSVP. SCOPE = developed dynamic resource discovery techniques and distributed directory services in support of resource allocation for large distributed systems and computations. NIA = provided policy, operational, and support to the transitioning Internet.

  6. Photosensitivity of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F with visible light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osuka, Hisao; Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5, Takayama-cho, Ikoma-shi, Nara 630-0192 ; Shomura, Yasuhito; Komori, Hirofumi; Shibata, Naoki; Nagao, Satoshi; Higuchi, Yoshiki; CREST, JST, Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076 ; Hirota, Shun; CREST, JST, Gobancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0076

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase showed light sensitivity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New FT-IR bands were observed with light irradiation of the Ni-A state. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EPR g-values of the Ni-A state shifted upon light irradiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The light-induced state converted back to the Ni-A state under the dark condition. -- Abstract: [NiFe] hydrogenase catalyzes reversible oxidation of molecular hydrogen. Its active site is constructed of a hetero dinuclear Ni-Fe complex, and the oxidation state of the Ni ion changes according to the redox state of the enzyme. We found that the Ni-A state (an inactive unready, oxidized state) of [NiFe] hydrogenase from Desulfovibrio vulgaris Miyazaki F (DvMF) is light sensitive and forms a new state (Ni-AL) with irradiation of visible light. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) bands at 1956, 2084 and 2094 cm{sup -1} of the Ni-A state shifted to 1971, 2086 and 2098 cm{sup -1} in the Ni-AL state. The g-values of g{sub x} = 2.30, g{sub y} = 2.23 and g{sub z} = 2.01 for the signals in the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum of the Ni-A state at room temperature varied for -0.009, +0.012 and +0.010, respectively, upon light irradiation. The light-induced Ni-AL state converted back immediately to the Ni-A state under dark condition at room temperature. These results show that the coordination structure of the Fe site of the Ni-A state of [NiFe] hydrogenase is perturbed significantly by light irradiation with relatively small coordination change at the Ni site.

  7. Biopalma da Amaz nia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    da Amaznia Place: Belem, Para, Brazil Product: Brazilian palm oil plantation for food industry developer company. Coordinates: -1.454426, -48.502537 Show Map Loading...

  8. Mauritius-Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Want, which recognizes the green economy as a vehicle for sustainable development and poverty eradication. PAGE will support 30 countries over the next seven years in building...

  9. Mauritius-Development Policy Operation (DPO) Financing | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Operation (DPO) Financing AgencyCompany Organization France Agency of Development (AFD) Partner EC Sector Climate Focus Area Non-renewable Energy Topics Finance, Low emission...

  10. Materials Data on NiAs (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2015-02-09

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gas Limitations1 Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country studies: Botswana, Tanzania, Zambia...

  12. WorldWide Science.org

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estonia Ethiopia Finland France Germany Ghana Greece Honduras India Indonesia Ireland Italy Japan Kenya Latvia Lesotho Libya Lithuania Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Mauritius Mexico ...

  13. UNEP-Risoe-Economics of GHG Limitations: Country Study Series...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Econo References Economics of Greenhouse Gas Limitations1 Country study series: Argentina, Ecuador, Estonia, Hungary, Indonesia, Mauritius, Senegal, Vietnam Parallel country...

  14. Green Solar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Solar Place: Paris, France Zip: 45003 Product: Develops and builds PV systems in Guadeloupe and Mauritius. Coordinates: 48.85693,...

  15. --No Title--

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Action (NIA) Code to Track Procurement Actions Made in Support of the Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami SUMMARY: The purpose of this Policy Flash is to advise Contracting...

  16. FLASH2011-52 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Action (NIA) Code to Track Procurement Actions Made in Support of the Pacific Earthquake and Tsunami FLASH2011-52 More Documents & Publications Policy Flash 2011-77...

  17. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    analysis includes an expectation that the current weak La Nia conditions will transition to neutral or perhaps weak El Nio conditions by this years hurricane season. The...

  18. Quarterly Business Review FY 2009 3rd Quarter Financial Results...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1:55 15 Meteorologist Briefing (La Nia) 27-30 Chris Karafotias 2:10 20 Secondary Revenue Outlook 31-33 Eric Federovitch, Alex Spain 2:30 10 Break 2:40 5 FY 2010 IT Update...

  19. ARM07Chang_poster.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Retrievals and Comparisons of Various MODIS-Spectrum Inferred Water Cloud Droplet Effective Radii Fu-Lung Chang @ , Patrick Minnis # , Bing Lin # , Sunny Sun-Mack & , Mandana Khaiyer & @National Institute of Aerospace #NASA Langley Research Center &Science System Applications Inc The 17th ARM Science Team Meeting, Monterey, California, March 26-30, 2007 Contact: Dr. Fu-Lung Chang, National Institute of Aerospace (NIA) Email: f.chang@larc.nasa.gov  How different are the retrievals

  20. HTGR Economic / Business Analysis and Trade Studies Market Analysis for HTGR Technologies and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Matt; Hamilton, Chris

    2013-11-01

    This report provides supplemental information to the assessment of target markets provided in Appendix A of the 2012 Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Industry Alliance (NIA) business plan [NIA 2012] for deployment of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) in the 2025 – 2050 time frame. This report largely reiterates the [NIA 2012] assessment for potential deployment of 400 to 800 HTGR modules (100 to 200 HTGR plants with 4 reactor modules) in the 600-MWt class in North America by 2050 for electricity generation, co-generation of steam and electricity, oil sands operations, hydrogen production, and synthetic fuels production (e.g., coal to liquids). As the result of increased natural gas supply from hydraulic fracturing, the current and historically low prices of natural gas remain a significant barrier to deployment of HTGRs and other nuclear reactor concepts in the U.S. However, based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Agency (EIA) data, U.S. natural gas prices are expected to increase by the 2030 – 2040 timeframe when a significant number of HTGR modules could be deployed. An evaluation of more recent EIA 2013 data confirms the assumptions in [NIA 2012] of future natural gas prices in the range of approximately $7/MMBtu to $10/MMBtu during the 2030 – 2040 timeframe. Natural gas prices in this range will make HTGR energy prices competitive with natural gas, even in the absence of carbon-emissions penalties. Exhibit ES-1 presents the North American projections in each market segment including a characterization of the market penetration logic. Adjustments made to the 2012 data (and reflected in Exhibit ES-1) include normalization to the slightly larger 625MWt reactor module, segregation between steam cycle and more advanced (higher outlet temperature) modules, and characterization of U.S. synthetic fuel process applications as a separate market segment.

  1. Scaling nitrogen and carbon interactions: What are the consequences of biological buffering?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weston, David J.; Rogers, Alistair; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara A.; Engle, Nancy L.; Heady, Lindsey E.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-25

    Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2 (eCO2; 800 ppm) on terrestrial ecosystems is a central theme in global change biology, but relatively little is known about how altered plant C and N metabolism influences higher levels of biological organization. Here, we investigate the consequences of C and N interactions by genetically modifying the N-assimilation pathway in Arabidopsis and initiating growth chamber and mesocosm competition studies at current CO2 (cCO2; 400 ppm) and eCO2 over multiple generations. Using a suite of ecological, physiological, and molecular genomic tools, we show that a single-gene mutant of a key enzyme (nia2) elicited a highly orchestrated buffering response starting with a fivefold increase in the expression of a gene paralog (nia1) and a 63% increase in the expression of gene network module enriched for N-assimilation genes. The genetic perturbation reduced amino acids, protein, and TCA-cycle intermediate concentrations in the nia2 mutant compared to the wild-type, while eCO2 mainly increased carbohydrate concentrations. The mutant had reduced net photosynthetic rates due to a 27% decrease in carboxylation capacity and an 18% decrease in electron transport rates. The expression of these buffering mechanisms resulted in a penalty that negatively correlated with fitness and population dynamics yet showed only minor alterations in our estimates of population function, including total per unit area biomass, ground cover, and leaf area index. As a result, this study provides insight into the consequences of buffering mechanisms that occur post-genetic perturbations in the N pathway and the associated outcomes these buffering systems have on plant populations relative to eCO2.

  2. Scaling carbon and nitrogen interactions. What are the consequences of biological buffering?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weston, David; Rogers, Alistair; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Gunter, Lee E; Jawdy, Sara; Engle, Nancy L.; Heady, Lindsey E.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-25

    Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2 (eCO2; 800 ppm) on terrestrial ecosystems is a central theme in global change biology, but relatively little is known about how altered plant C and N metabolism influences higher levels of biological organization. Here, we investigate the consequences of C and N interactions by genetically modifying the N-assimilation pathway in Arabidopsis and initiating growth chamber and mesocosm competition studies at current CO2 (cCO2; 400 ppm) and eCO2 over multiple generations. Using a suite of ecological, physiological, and molecular genomic tools, we show that a single-gene mutant of a key enzyme (nia2) elicited a highlymore » orchestrated buffering response starting with a fivefold increase in the expression of a gene paralog (nia1) and a 63% increase in the expression of gene network module enriched for N-assimilation genes. The genetic perturbation reduced amino acids, protein, and TCA-cycle intermediate concentrations in the nia2 mutant compared to the wild-type, while eCO2 mainly increased carbohydrate concentrations. The mutant had reduced net photosynthetic rates due to a 27% decrease in carboxylation capacity and an 18% decrease in electron transport rates. The expression of these buffering mechanisms resulted in a penalty that negatively correlated with fitness and population dynamics yet showed only minor alterations in our estimates of population function, including total per unit area biomass, ground cover, and leaf area index. This study provides insight into the consequences of buffering mechanisms that occur post-genetic perturbations in the N pathway and the associated outcomes these buffering systems have on plant populations relative to eCO2.« less

  3. Scaling nitrogen and carbon interactions: What are the consequences of biological buffering?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Weston, David J.; Rogers, Alistair; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Gunter, Lee E.; Jawdy, Sara A.; Engle, Nancy L.; Heady, Lindsey E.; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Wullschleger, Stan D.

    2015-06-25

    Understanding the consequences of elevated CO2 (eCO2; 800 ppm) on terrestrial ecosystems is a central theme in global change biology, but relatively little is known about how altered plant C and N metabolism influences higher levels of biological organization. Here, we investigate the consequences of C and N interactions by genetically modifying the N-assimilation pathway in Arabidopsis and initiating growth chamber and mesocosm competition studies at current CO2 (cCO2; 400 ppm) and eCO2 over multiple generations. Using a suite of ecological, physiological, and molecular genomic tools, we show that a single-gene mutant of a key enzyme (nia2) elicited a highlymore » orchestrated buffering response starting with a fivefold increase in the expression of a gene paralog (nia1) and a 63% increase in the expression of gene network module enriched for N-assimilation genes. The genetic perturbation reduced amino acids, protein, and TCA-cycle intermediate concentrations in the nia2 mutant compared to the wild-type, while eCO2 mainly increased carbohydrate concentrations. The mutant had reduced net photosynthetic rates due to a 27% decrease in carboxylation capacity and an 18% decrease in electron transport rates. The expression of these buffering mechanisms resulted in a penalty that negatively correlated with fitness and population dynamics yet showed only minor alterations in our estimates of population function, including total per unit area biomass, ground cover, and leaf area index. As a result, this study provides insight into the consequences of buffering mechanisms that occur post-genetic perturbations in the N pathway and the associated outcomes these buffering systems have on plant populations relative to eCO2.« less

  4. Caltech Campus Map and Directory 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O I INT'L. S C HOLAR S E R VIC E S LIG O LIG O LIG O S AN PAS QUAL S T. HOLLIS TON AVE . HILL AVE . C ALIFOR NIA B LVD. DE L MAR B LVD. WILS ON AVE . C ATALINA AVE . S AN PAS QUAL S T. C HE S TE R AVE . MIC HIG AN AVE . A R D E N R D . S AN PAS QUAL S HOLLIS TON AVE . S S C a m p u s D i r e c to r y M a p A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 MOOR E AVE R Y FINANC IAL PAS ADE NA FIR E S TATION # 34 IMS S B E C KMAN AUD B AXTE R KE C K S E R VIC E S WATSON C E S H R STEELE LAB

  5. Transforming on-grid renewable energy markets. A review of UNDP-GEF support for feed-in tariffs and related price and market-access instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glemarec, Yannick; Rickerson, Wilson; Waissbein, Oliver

    2012-11-15

    As a Global Environment Facility (GEF) founding implementing agency, UNDP has worked on over 230 GEF-supported clean energy projects in close to 100 developing countries since 1992. About 100 of these projects in 80 countries have focused on renewable energy, supported by approximately US $ 293 million in GEF funds and leveraging US $1.48 billion in associated co-financing from national governments, international organizations, the private sector and non-governmental organizations. As part of UNDP efforts to codify and share lessons learnt from these initiatives, this report addresses how scarce public resources can be used to catalyze larger private financial flows for renewable energy. It provides an overview of UNDP-GEF’s extensive work supporting development of national renewable energy policies such as feed-in tariffs. In these activities UNDP-GEF assists developing countries to assess key risks and barriers to technology diffusion and then to identify a mix of policy and financial de-risking measures to remove these barriers and drive investment. This approach is illustrated through three case studies in Uruguay, Mauritius and Kazakhstan. This report is complemented by a companion publication presenting an innovative UNDP financial modeling tool to assist policymakers in appraising different public instruments to promote clean energy.

  6. Spin correlations and electron transport in MnBi:Au films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kharel, P.; Skomski, R.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    The structural, magnetic, and electron transport properties of Mn{sub 55-x}Au{sub x}Bi{sub 45} (x = 0, 4.5) thin films prepared by magnetron sputtering have been investigated. The magnetization of the MnBi films decreases and the coercivity increases due to Au doping. The temperature dependence of resistivity between 2 to 300 K shows that the films are metallic but the 4.5% Au-doped film shows a Kondo behavior with resistance minimum at 10.2 K. The magnetoresistance is anisotropic and the positive transverse magnetoresistance is significantly enhanced (16.3% at 70 kOe) by Au doping. We interpret these data in terms of a model in which Au atoms preferentially substitute for Mn atoms on the Mn lattice, and some Mn atoms are displaced to interstitial sites in the NiAs structure. These interstitial Mn atoms are coupled antiferromagnetically to the Mn atoms on the original Mn lattice leading to the large decrease in magnetization, Kondo effect, and the positive magnetoresistance.

  7. A comparative DFT study of the catalytic activity of the 3d transition metal sulphides surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez-Balderas, R.; Oviedo-Roa, R; Martinez-Magadan, J M.; Amador, C.; Dixon, David A. )

    2002-10-10

    The catalytic activity of the first transition metal series sulphides for hydrodesulfurization (HDS) reactions exhibits a particular behaviour when analysed as a function of the metal position in the Periodic Table. This work reports a comparative study of the electronic structure of the bulk and of the (0 0 1) metal surface (assumed to be the reactive surface) for the Sc-Zn monosulphides. The systems were modeled using the NiAs prototype crystal structure for the bulk and by applying the supercell model with seven atomic layers for (0 0 1) surfaces. The electronic structure of closed-packed solids code based on the density-functional theory and adopting the muffin-tin approximation to the potential was employed in the calculations of the electronic properties. For the Co and Ni sulphides, the density of states (DOS) variations between the metal atom present in the bulk and the ones exposed at the surface show that at the surface, there exists a higher DOS in the occupied states region just below the Fermi level. This feature might indicate a good performance of these two metal sulphides substrates in the HDS reactions favouring a donation, back-donation mechanism. In contrast, the DOS at the surface of Mn is increased in the unoccupied states region, just above the Fermi level. This suggests the possibility of a strong interaction with charge dontating sulphur adsorbate atoms poisoning the active substrate surface.