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Sample records for maureen klein 202-586-8013

  1. Leading the Charge: Christine Klein

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Change doesn’t happen on its own. It’s led by dedicated and passionate people who are committed to empowering Indian Country to energize future generations. Leading the Charge is a regular Office of Indian Energy newsletter feature spotlighting the movers and shakers in energy development on tribal lands. In this issue, we talk to Christine Klein, an adopted Haida who is leading efforts to help Alaska Native villages address their energy challenges in her role as Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of the Calista Corporation.

  2. Rudd Klein Alternative Energy Ventures LLC aka Phoenix Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rudd Klein Alternative Energy Ventures LLC aka Phoenix Energy Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rudd-Klein Alternative Energy Ventures LLC (aka Phoenix Energy Fund) Place: New...

  3. Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Steven Erhart

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of John Woolery Signature of John Woolery 2 Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) Pantex Plant Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC Contract No. DE-AC54-00AL66620 October 1, 2011 to September 30, 2012 A. Pursuant to the terms and conditions of the Contract, this Performance Evaluation Plan (PEP) sets forth the criteria upon which the Contractor's performance of work under the contract will

  4. NREL: Energy Analysis - Maureen Hand

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind technology development risk analysis Wind turbine cost and scaling model development ... Data Analysis and Visualization Group Energy Forecasting and Modeling Group ...

  5. Variational principles for eigenvalues of the Klein-Gordon equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langer, Matthias; Tretter, Christiane

    2006-10-15

    In this paper variational principles for eigenvalues of an abstract model of the Klein-Gordon equation with electromagnetic potential are established. They are used to characterize and estimate eigenvalues in cases where the essential spectrum has a gap around 0, even in the presence of complex eigenvalues. As a consequence, a comparison between eigenvalues of the Klein-Gordon equation in R{sup d} and eigenvalues of certain Schroedinger operators is obtained. The results are illustrated on examples including the Klein-Gordon equation with Coulomb and square-well potential.

  6. Inflation in Kaluza-Klein cosmology. 2; Freidmann models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleyer, U. ); Schmidt, H.J. )

    1990-12-20

    The conformal relation between scale- invariant fourth-order gravity and Kaluza-Klein models as derived is applied to Friedmann cosmological models. Especially, the results that power-law inflation is an attractor solution can be carried over, but the conformal transformation brings power-law inflation to de Sitter-like exponential inflation, or power-law inflation a {approx} t. This paper reports that results depend essentially on the dimension of the internal space.

  7. Cosmic super-strings and Kaluza-Klein modes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufaux, Jean-Franois

    2012-09-01

    Cosmic super-strings interact generically with a tower of relatively light and/or strongly coupled Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes associated with the geometry of the internal space. In this paper, we study the production of spin-2 KK particles by cusps on loops of cosmic F- and D-strings. We consider cosmic super-strings localized either at the bottom of a warped throat or in a flat internal space with large volume. The total energy emitted by cusps in KK modes is comparable in both cases, although the number of produced KK modes may differ significantly. We then show that KK emission is constrained by the photo-dissociation of light elements and by observations of the diffuse gamma ray background. We show that this rules out regions of the parameter space of cosmic super-strings that are complementary to the regions that can be probed by current and upcoming gravitational wave experiments. KK modes are also expected to play an important role in the friction-dominated epoch of cosmic super-string evolution.

  8. The statistical properties of Klein-Gordon oscillator in noncommutative space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassanabadi, H. Hosseini, S. S.; Boumali, A.; Zarrinkamar, S.

    2014-03-15

    We study the relativistic spin-zero bosons influenced by the Klein-Gordon oscillator and an external magnetic field in noncommutative formulation. The problem is considered in two dimensions and is solved in an exact analytical manner. Having found the spectrum of the system, the statistical properties of an N-boson system are reported.

  9. Uniqueness theorem for Kaluza-Klein black holes in five-dimensional minimal supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomizawa, Shinya

    2010-11-15

    We show a uniqueness theorem for Kaluza-Klein black holes in the bosonic sector of five-dimensional minimal supergravity. More precisely, under the assumptions of the existence of two commuting axial isometries and a nondegenerate connected event horizon of the cross-section topology S{sup 3}, or lens space, we prove that a stationary charged rotating Kaluza-Klein black hole in five-dimensional minimal supergravity is uniquely characterized by its mass, two independent angular momenta, electric charge, magnetic flux, and nut charge, provided that there exists neither a nut nor a bolt (a bubble) in the domain of outer communication. We also show that under the assumptions of the same symmetry, same asymptotics, and the horizon cross section of S{sup 1}xS{sup 2}, a black ring within the same theory--if it exists--is uniquely determined by its dipole charge and rod intervals besides the charges and magnetic flux.

  10. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of cloud microphysics can lead to improved simulations. The high-quality observations and broad participation of the modeling community in this study points to the importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds as a key target for climate modeling centers to improve with future cloud parameterization developments. (References: Klein SA, RB McCoy, H Morrison, AS Ackerman, A Avramov, G de Boer, M Chen, JN Cole, AD Del Genio, M Falk, MJ Foster, A Fridlind, JC Golaz, T Hashino, JY Harrington, C Hoose, MF

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - SRNL-L2100-2015-00033-S_Klein

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hydrogen Processing Demonstration System James (Jim) Klein Anita Poore Xin (Steve) Xiao Dave Babineau 35 th Tritium Focus Group (TFG) Meeting Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ May 5-6, 2015 SRNL-L2100-2015-00033 Overview: Compare and Contrast Tritium Process Systems Background * D (Deuterium) - Discovered in 1931 * T (Tritium) - Discovered in 1934 * Various uses for tritium * D-T Fusion Reaction - D + T = He + n + 17.59 MeV 2 Beginning Research US Cold War Defense

  12. Inflation in Kaluza-Klein cosmology. 1; Transformation to fourth-order gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, H.J. )

    1990-12-20

    This paper reports on the higher- dimensional Einstein equation with {Gamma}-term shown to be comformally equivalent to the four-dimensional field equation of scale-invariant fourth-order gravity. This holds for a general warped product between space-time and internal space of arbitrary dimension m which turns out to be an Einstein space. (The limit m {yields} {infinity} makes sense ) Thus, the results concerning the attractor property of the power- law inflationary solution derived for fourth-order gravity hold for the Kaluza-Klein model, too.

  13. Finite temperature Casimir effect for a massless fractional Klein-Gordon field with fractional Neumann conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eab, C. H.; Lim, S. C.; Teo, L. P.

    2007-08-15

    This paper studies the Casimir effect due to fractional massless Klein-Gordon field confined to parallel plates. A new kind of boundary condition called fractional Neumann condition which involves vanishing fractional derivatives of the field is introduced. The fractional Neumann condition allows the interpolation of Dirichlet and Neumann conditions imposed on the two plates. There exists a transition value in the difference between the orders of the fractional Neumann conditions for which the Casimir force changes from attractive to repulsive. Low and high temperature limits of Casimir energy and pressure are obtained. For sufficiently high temperature, these quantities are dominated by terms independent of the boundary conditions. Finally, validity of the temperature inversion symmetry for various boundary conditions is discussed.

  14. Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; al., et

    2009-10-23

    A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) WIMPs in the Sun and converted to limits on the LKP-proton cross-sections for LKP masses in the range 250 - 3000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on LKP annihilation in the Sun.

  15. Kaluza-Klein masses of bulk fields with general boundary conditions in AdS{sub 5} space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Sanghyeon; Park, Seong Chan; Song, Jeonghyeon

    2005-05-15

    Recently bulk Randall-Sundrum theories with the gauge group SU(2){sub L}xSU(2){sub R}xU(1){sub B-L} have drawn a lot of interest as an alternative to the electroweak symmetry breaking mechanism. These models are in better agreement with electroweak precision data since custodial isospin symmetry on the IR-brane is protected by the extended bulk gauge symmetry. We comprehensively study, in the S{sup 1}/Z{sub 2}xZ{sub 2}{sup '} orbifold, the bulk gauge and fermion fields with the general boundary conditions as well as the bulk and localized mass terms. Master equations to determine the Kaluza-Klein (KK) mass spectra are derived without any approximation, which is an important basic step for various phenomenologies at high energy colliders. The correspondence between orbifold boundary conditions and localized mass terms is demonstrated not only in the gauge sector but also in the fermion sector. As the localized mass increases, the first KK fermion mass is shown to decrease while the first KK gauge boson mass is shown to increase. The degree of gauge coupling universality violation is computed to be small in most parameter space, and its correlation with the mass difference between the top quark and light quark KK mode is also studied.

  16. Geothermometry (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  17. Isotopic Analysis (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  18. Tracer Testing (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  19. Portsmouth Site Delivers First Radioactive Waste Shipment to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil ... Melissa Dunsieth, Randy Barr, Rick Williams, Janet Harris, Maureen Fischels, Cecil ...

  20. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maureen Quinn Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass: Comments from Maureen Quinn Application from Northern Pass to construct, operate and maintain ...

  1. Trace Element Analysis (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  2. Fluid Inclusion Analysis (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  4. Surface Gas Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  5. Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    In The Past 20 Years- Geochemistry In Geothermal Exploration Resource Evaluation And Reservoir Management Additional References Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

  6. Snohomish PUD Steve Klein CEO/General Manager

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    very small and slow growing Projects to-date are either highly optimized one-off niche projects, or small learningdemonstration projects Decreasing battery prices alone ...

  7. Nonmaximality of known extremal metrics on torus and Klein bottle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karpukhin, M A

    2013-12-31

    The El Soufi-Ilias theorem establishes a connection between minimal submanifolds of spheres and extremal metrics for eigenvalues of the Laplace-Beltrami operator. Recently, this connection was used to provide several explicit examples of extremal metrics. We investigate the properties of these metrics and prove that none of them is maximal. Bibliography: 24 titles.

  8. The Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award | Stanford Synchrotro...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results (approximately 300 words). Candidates are encouraged to include their curriculum vitae and information on their plans to present their work at a scientific conference....

  9. Kaluza-Klein dark matter and galactic antiprotons (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Barrau, Aurelien ; Salati, Pierre ; Servant, Geraldine ; Donato, Fiorenza ; Grain, Julien ; Maurin, David ; Taillet, Richard 1 ; Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de ...

  10. High Level Waste Corporate Board Newsletter - 09/11/08

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Federal Review Group (LFRG) in Washington, DC on 16-18 September 2008. Contact Maureen O'Dell for details (MAUREEN.O'DELL@hq.doe.gov) Next High-Level Waste Corporate ...

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - KLEIN_ARM_STM08_POSTER.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sud, David Turner, Dana Veron, Knut von Salzen, Gregory Walker, Zhien Wang, Audrey Wolf, Shaocheng Xie, Kuan-Man Xu, Fanglin Yang, and Gong Zhang This poster presents the ...

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - SRNL-L2100-2015-00033-S_Klein

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Focus Group (TFG) Meeting Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ ... Let's focus funding on plasma science and materials development." * EXIT Signs - Glass ...

  13. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2015-12-14

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and a hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.

  14. Nonlinear instabilities of multi-site breathers in Klein-Gordon lattices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cuevas-Maraver, Jesus; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.; Pelinovsky, Dmitry E.

    2015-12-14

    Here, we explore the possibility of multi-site breather states in a nonlinear Klein–Gordon lattice to become nonlinearly unstable, even if they are found to be spectrally stable. The mechanism for this nonlinear instability is through the resonance with the wave continuum of a multiple of an internal mode eigenfrequency in the linearization of excited breather states. For the nonlinear instability, the internal mode must have its Krein signature opposite to that of the wave continuum. This mechanism is not only theoretically proposed, but also numerically corroborated through two concrete examples of the Klein–Gordon lattice with a soft (Morse) and amore » hard (Φ4) potential. Compared to the case of the nonlinear Schrödinger lattice, the Krein signature of the internal mode relative to that of the wave continuum may change depending on the period of the multi-site breather state. For the periods for which the Krein signatures of the internal mode and the wave continuum coincide, multi-site breather states are observed to be nonlinearly stable.« less

  15. Microsoft PowerPoint - klein.cmwg.summary.pps [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - klein.cmwg.summary.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  17. Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments from Maureen Quinn | Department of Energy Maureen Quinn Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass: Comments from Maureen Quinn Application from Northern Pass to construct, operate and maintain electric transmission facilities at the U.S. - Canada Border. Quinn_NorthernPass_Intervention.pdf (24.36 KB) More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass: Comments from Anne Moschella Application for

  18. A Novel Mechanism for Binding of Galactose-terminated Glycans...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Jgouzo, Sabine A.F. ; Feinberg, Hadar ; Dungarwalla, Tabassum ; Drickamer, Kurt ; Weis, William I. ; Taylor, Maureen E. 1 ; Stanford) 2 + Show Author Affiliations ...

  19. Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bernstein, Hans C. ; Kesaano, Maureen ; Moll, Karen ; Smith, Terence ; Gerlach, Robin ; Carlson, Ross ; Miller, Charles D. ; Peyton, Brent ; Cooksey, Keith ; Gardner, ...

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aerosol Dispersion Effect 2. Droplet Dispersion Effect The First Aerosol Indirect Effect: Beyond Twomey 1. Twomey Effect and Problems Yangang Liu, Peter Daum, and Maureen Dunn...

  1. Potential Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Enabling High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Role of Concentrating Solar Power in Enabling High Renewables Scenarios in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Trieu Mai, Robert Margolis, Greg Brinkman, Easan ...

  2. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for: All records 1 results for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Miller, ... Groer, Maureen W. (1) Luciano, Angel A. (1) Miller, Elizabeth (1) Save Results Excel ...

  3. Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 August 2009 Land-Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States Paul Denholm, Maureen Hand, Maddalena Jackson, and Sean Ong National Renewable Energy...

  4. Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment Eric Lantz, Daniel Steinberg, Michael Mendelsohn, Owen Zinaman, Ted James, Gian Porro, Maureen Hand, Trieu Mai, Jeffrey...

  5. Accelerated Cartesian expansion (ACE) based framework for the rapid evaluation of diffusion, lossy wave, and Klein-Gordon potentials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baczewski, Andrew David; Vikram, Melapudi; Shanker, Balasubramaniam; Kempel, Leo

    2010-08-27

    Diffusion, lossy wave, and Klein–Gordon equations find numerous applications in practical problems across a range of diverse disciplines. The temporal dependence of all three Green’s functions are characterized by an infinite tail. This implies that the cost complexity of the spatio-temporal convolutions, associated with evaluating the potentials, scales as O(Ns2Nt2), where Ns and Nt are the number of spatial and temporal degrees of freedom, respectively. In this paper, we discuss two new methods to rapidly evaluate these spatio-temporal convolutions by exploiting their block-Toeplitz nature within the framework of accelerated Cartesian expansions (ACE). The first scheme identifies a convolution relation inmore » time amongst ACE harmonics and the fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used for efficient evaluation of these convolutions. The second method exploits the rank deficiency of the ACE translation operators with respect to time and develops a recursive numerical compression scheme for the efficient representation and evaluation of temporal convolutions. It is shown that the cost of both methods scales as O(NsNtlog2Nt). Furthermore, several numerical results are presented for the diffusion equation to validate the accuracy and efficacy of the fast algorithms developed here.« less

  6. SREL Reprint #3085

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tsyusko1, Tracey D. Tuberville1, Maureen B. Peters1, Nicholas Crawford1, Cris Hagen1, Stephen G. Weller2, Ann K. Sakai2, and Travis C. Glenn1 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory,...

  7. CopulaPosterARM09forPDF.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using ARM Data to Model Cloud Overlap with Copulas P. Norris 1 , L. Oreopoulos 2 , A. Hou ... For more details see Norris et al., QJRMS, 134: 1843-1864 (2008). Many thanks to Maureen ...

  8. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dien, Bruce S. (1) Kurtzman, Cletus P. (1) Shea-Andersh, Maureen A. (1) Slininger, Patricia J. (1) Thompson, Stephanie R. (1) Uppugundla, Nirmal (1) da Costa Sousa, Leonardo (1) ...

  9. TITLE

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKQROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NfS Cukural Rasowcmr Studks: Background Research for Project Shot11 Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson MAY 1993 DESERT RESEARCH INSTITUTE CULTURAL RESOURCES STUDY BACKGROUND RESEARCH REPORT Off-NTS Cultural Resources Studies: Background Research for Project Shoal Prepared by Maureen King Alvin R. McLane and William Gray Johnson Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Field Office Las Vegas, Nevada

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Prospective Longitudinal Assessment of Quality of Life for Liver Cancer Patients Treated With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Klein, Jonathan, E-mail: jonathan.klein@rmp.uhn.on...

  11. 188795.pdf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    John Woolery Signature of John Woolery Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of Steven Erhart Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of J. Brian Bidwell Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein Signature of Seb Klein

  12. Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of Aerosol Indirect Effects in California Coastal Stratus and Fog Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Kollias, Pavlos Brookhaven National Laboratory Bartholomew, Mary Jane Brookhaven National Laboratory Daum, Peter Brookhaven National Laboratory Dunn, Maureen Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Liu, Yangang Brookhaven National Laboratory Vogelmann, Andrew Brookhaven National Laboratory Andrews, Betsy NOAA/CMDL Ogren, John NOAA/CMDL

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Klein, P (1) Mishra, S (1) Newman, JF (1) Turner, DD (1) Wainwright, CE (1) Wharton, S (1) ... Klein, P ; Bonin, TA ; Newman, JF ; Turner, DD ; Chilson, P ; Blumberg, WG ; Mishra, ...

  14. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Klein, Kate L" Name Name ORCID Search Authors Type: All BookMonograph ConferenceEvent ... Search for: All records CreatorsAuthors contains: "Klein, Kate L" Sort by Relevance ...

  15. Tentative Agreement.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keith A. Klein, Manager Linda Hoffman, Acting Director U. S. Department of Energy, Richland State of Washington, Department...

  16. Re: Ex parte communication | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ex parte communication Re: Ex parte communication On April 20, 2010, Scott Bates, Corporate Vice President and General Counsel, and Karen Meyers, Director of Government Affairs, both of the Rheem Manufacturing Company ("Rheem"), accompanied by their counsel, Bill Anaya of Alston & Bird, LLP, met with Department of Energy ("DOE") officials Scott Harris, General Counsel, Maureen McLaughlin, Special Assistant to the General Counsel, and Stephanie Weiner, Special Assistant,

  17. SREL Reprint #3079

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Microsatellite markers isolated from saltgrass (Distichlis spicata) OLGA V. TSYUSKO1, MAUREEN B. PETERS1, TRACEY D. TUBERVILLE1, CRIS HAGEN1, SARAH M. EPPLEY2, and TRAVIS C. GLENN1,3 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Department of Biology, Portland State University, PO Box 751 Portland, OR 97207, USA 3Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29802, USA Abstract: Twelve polymorphic microsatellite

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - 14_ARM_STM2007_AIE_01.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regimes within the First Regimes within the First Aerosol Indirect Effect Mark A. Miller, Maureen Dunn Mary Jane Bartholomew Pavlos Kollias Mary Jane Bartholomew, Pavlos Kollias Brookhaven National Laboratory Thanks: Pete Daum, Mike Jensen, Andy Vogelmann, Christine Chiu, Dave Turner Dave Turner Theory of the First Aerosol Theory of the First Aerosol Indirect Effect * In an adiabatic ascent, an increase in the droplet number concentration at constant liquid water mixing ratio results in a liquid

  19. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IEA Wind Task 26 WP2 The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy Leading Authors Eric Lantz: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Ryan Wiser: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Maureen Hand: National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 *

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud Coupling Between Oceanic Upwelling and Cloud - - Aerosol Properties Aerosol Properties at the AMF Point Reyes Site at the AMF Point Reyes Site Maureen Dunn , Mike Jensen , Pavlos Kollias , Mark Miller , Peter Daum Mary Jane Bartholomew , David Turner , Elisabeth Andrews and Anne Jefferson Introduction Ground based observations from the MASRAD, Pt. Reyes AMF July 1-Sept 15, 2005 indicate a relationship between coastal marine stratus cloud properties,

  1. Attendee List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendee List Attendee List ERSUG - Attendees John Allen - NERSC Bas Braams - NYU Jack Byers - LLNL Bruce Curtis - NERSC David Feller - PNL Judith Giarrusso - PPPL Brent Gorda - NERSC Bruce Griffing - NERSC Bill Herrmannsfeldt - SLAC Brian Hingerty - ORNL Barry Howard - NERSC Stephen Jardin - PPPL Morris Jette - NERSC Bruce Kelly - NERSC Rick Kendall - PNL Tom Kitchens - DOE Dale Koelling - DOE Jean-Noel Leboeuf - ORNL Steve Louis - NERSC Maureen McCarthy - PNL Michel McCoy - NERSC William

  2. Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons and the Stopping Power in Cryogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Gary P. 1 ; Klein, Andreas 1 ; Rundberg, Robert S. 1 ; Wilhelmy, Jerry B. 1 ; Wilson, Douglas Carl 1 ; Cerjan, Charles 2 ; Schneider, Dieter 2 ; Tonchev, Anton 2 ; ...

  3. AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMIE (ACRF MJO Investigation Experiment) Planning Meeting AMIE Science Steering Committee Chuck Long, Tony DelGenio, Bill Gustafson, Bob Houze, Mike Jensen, Steve Klein, Ruby...

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: ARM SCM Intercompa...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM SCM Intercomparison Helps Find Cloud Parameterization Bug Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory The ARM Cloud Parameterization and Modeling working group has...

  5. Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing Statistical Cloud Scheme Ideas in the GFDL Climate Model Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Pincus, Robert NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center...

  6. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Evaluation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the Ground-based Remote Sensing at SGP Kim, Byung-Gon Princeton University Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mace, Gerald University of Utah Benson, Sally...

  7. Effective Radius of Cloud Droplets Derived from Ground-based...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    which could eventually facilitate aerosol-cloud interactions. (Kim, Klein, Norris, JGR, 2005) SD z (m) SD LWP (g m -2 ) Efficacy of Aerosol-Cloud Interactions - ...

  8. NEAC Facilities Subcommittee Report, Meeting on 2-25-2014 NEAC...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Physics University of Wisconsin-Madison Dr. David J. Hill Deputy Director, INL (retired) Dr. Andrew Klein Professor of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Health Physics at Oregon ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Filter by Author Khandaker, Mahbubul (18) Stepanyan, Samuel (14) Kim, Wooyoung (13) Klein, ... or vertically, is use with quasi-4pi detector systems in open geometries with ...

  10. Designs for a Linac-Ring LHeC (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accel. Sci. Tech. ; Dainton, John ; Liverpool U. ; Klein, Max ; Liverpool U. ; Eide, Anders ; Paris U., VI-VII less Publication Date: 2012-06-21 OSTI Identifier: 1043845 ...

  11. Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Facility Subcommittee visit...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Klein (Oregon State University). Tansel Selekler (Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy) accompanied the Subcommittee. The visit was well-coordinated by Sherrell...

  12. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... in the Setting of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Klein, Emily A. ; Guiou, Michael ; ... head-and-neck cancer among a cohort of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ...

  13. Aeromagnetic Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Gardner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The magnetic low zone was interpreted as hydrothermally altered rocks. References Murray C. Gardner, James R. McNitt, Christopher W. Klein, James B. Koenig, Dean Nakano (1995)...

  14. History and Results of Surface Exploration in the Kilauea East...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (SP) surveys, possibly resistivity soundings, and soil gas surveys. Authors Murray C. Gardner, James R. McNitt, Christopher W. Klein, James B. Koenig and Dean Nakano...

  15. Antibodies to a conformational epitope on gp41 neutralize HIV...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Klein, Florian ; Burton, Dennis R. ; Nussenzweig, Michel C. ; Poignard, Pascal ; Moore, John P. ; Klasse, Per Johan ; Sanders, Rogier W. ; Zwick, Michael B. ; Wilson, Ian A. ...

  16. DOE/NNSA's Nonproliferation Experts Lead First Workshop on the...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... During his welcoming remarks, DCM Kleine congratulated Lao PDR on signing the AP in November 2014 as a clear demonstration of its commitment to nuclear nonproliferation. He also ...

  17. Ground Electromagnetic Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the data rather than computed from a theoretical formula. This survey was good for learning about the deep resistivity structures. References James Kauahikaua, Douglas Klein...

  18. The Effect of Precipitation on Variability of Low Stratiform...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can lead to substantial underestimates of microphysical process rates (see Pincus and Klein 2000, for example). The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates a...

  19. ARM - Facility News Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Matthew takes over the reigns from Eugene Clothiaux, and Ann takes over for Steve Klein. DOE program directors announced the leadership changes on November 14, during the...

  20. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the findings from the other resistivity surveys conducted in the area. References James Kauahikaua, Douglas Klein (1978) Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii...

  1. Schlumberger Resistivity Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hydrothermal structure from seepage of heated ground water from the rift. References James Kauahikaua, Douglas Klein (1978) Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii...

  2. Toward Understanding of Differences in Current Cloud Retrievals...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Zhao, Chuanfeng ; Xie, Shaocheng ; Klein, Stephen A. ; Protat, Alain ; Shupe, Matthew D. ; McFarlane, Sally A. ; Comstock, Jennifer M. ; Delanoe, Julien ; Deng, Min ; ...

  3. Nuclear Facilities Subcommittee of NEAC; 5 June 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Subcommittee of NEAC; 5 June 2014 John Sackett, Chair John Ahearne, Denis Beller Dana Christensen, Thomas Cochran Michael Corradini, David Hill Andrew Klein, Paul Murray ...

  4. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the Oskar Klein Centre in Sweden, the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, the TANGO Program of the University System of Taiwan and the Kavli Institute for the ...

  5. Uncovering the mysteries of cosmic explosions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... the Oskar Klein Centre in Sweden, the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, the TANGO Program of the University System of Taiwan and the Kavli Institute for the ...

  6. 1

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of ColoradoNOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Mattioli ...

  7. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution I: What's...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems - affecting energy use , water consumption, and resident convenience and comfort. In this initial session Gary Klein covers ...

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAM5 Shows Reasonable Aerosol First Indirect Effects on Non-Precipitating Low Liquid Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhao, C., Beijing Normal University Klein, S., ...

  9. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (3) quantum information (3) qubits (3) field theories (2) higgs model (2) kaluza-klein theory (2) mass (2) mathematical models (2) quantum computers (2) quantum field ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Theories with large extra dimensions predict the production of photons in association with Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton. In supersymmetric theories with superlight ...

  11. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) ...

  12. ON THE ENERGY SPECTRA OF GeV/TeV COSMIC RAY LEPTONS (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The models rely on either dark matter annihilationdecay or specific nearby astrophysical ... is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. ...

  13. On the Energy Spectra of GeV/TeV Cosmic Ray Leptons (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The models rely on either dark matter annihilationdecay or specific nearby astrophysical ... is the Klein-Nishina suppression of the electron cooling rate around TeV energies. ...

  14. Buildings.Energy.gov DOE Challenge Home Tech Training Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Challenge Home - Efficient Hot Water Distribution 5 | INNOVATION & INTEGRATION: ... Eastern Gary Klein Affiliated International Management, LLC. P.O. Box 11752 Newport Beach, ...

  15. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Update on...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Update on Activities of the CAPT* Project Potter, Gerald Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Boyle, Jim Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore ...

  16. Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) |

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers EFRC External Websites Research Science Highlights News & Events Publications History Contact BES Home Centers Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page C3Bio Header Director Maureen McCann Lead Institution Purdue University Year Established 2009 Mission To

  17. SREL Reprint #3074

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Development and characterization of microsatellite loci in the eastern chipmunk (Tamias striatus) MAUREEN B. PETERS1, JULIE L. GLENN1, PAM SVETE1, CRIS HAGEN1, OLGA V. TSYUSKO1, PATRICIA DECOURSEY2, MÉLISSA LIEUTENANT-GOSSELIN3, DANY GARANT3, and TRAVIS C. GLENN1,2 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Institute of Ecology, The University of Georgia, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29802, USA 3Département de

  18. SREL Reprint #3078

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Microsatellite markers isolated from barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) OLGA V. TSYUSKO1, MAUREEN B. PETERS1, CRIS HAGEN1, TRACEY D. TUBERVILLE1, TIMOTHY A. MOUSSEAU2, ANDERS P. MØLLER3, and TRAVIS C. GLENN1,2 1The University of Georgia, Institute of Ecology, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, PO Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Department of Biological Sciences, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29802, USA 3Laboratoire de Parasitologie Evolutive, Université Pierre et Marie Curie,

  19. SREL Reprint #3116

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Development and characterization of microsatellite loci in the American white pelican (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos) Caleb R. Hickman1, Maureen B. Peters1, Nicholas G. Crawford1, Cris Hagen1, Travis C. Glenn1,2, and Christopher M. Somers3 1Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA 2Department of Environmental Health Science, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA 3Department of Biology, University of Regina, Regina, SK, Canada S4S 0A2 Abstract:

  20. SREL Reprint #3139

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Five hundred microsatellite loci for Peromyscus Jesse N. Weber1, Maureen B. Peters2, Olga V. Tsyusko2,3, Catherine R. Linnen1, Cris Hagen2, Nancy A. Schable2, Tracey D. Tuberville2, Anna M. McKee2, Stacey L. Lance2,4, Kenneth L. Jones4, Heidi S. Fisher1, Michael J. Dewey5, Hopi E. Hoekstra1, and Travis C. Glenn2,4 1Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and The Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA 2Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, Drawer E,

  1. Contact Us - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) State Energy Experts Electricity detailed data Jonathan DeVilbiss 202-586-2992 jonathan.devilbiss@eia.gov Energy consumption by state Yvonne L. Taylor 202-586-1455 yvonne.taylor@eia.gov Energy expenditures by dtate Yvonne L. Taylor 202-586-1455 yvonne.taylor@eia.gov Energy production by state Yvonne L. Taylor 202-586-1455 yvonne.taylor@eia.gov Fuel oil and kerosene sales Dan Walzer 202-586-3511 daniel.walzer@eia.gov Petroleum prime supplier sales Maureen

  2. Microsoft Word - 10 0726 Letter re DOE NBP RFI on Data Access w resolution.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    July 26, 2010 Maureen C. McLaughlin VIA E-Mail: broadband@hq.doe.gov Senior Legal Advisor to the General Counsel Office of the General Counsel 1000 Independence Avenue, SW., Room 6A245 Washington, DC 20585. RE: NBP RFI: Data Access In the Matter of Implementing the National Broadband Plan by Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid; Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy, 75 Federal Register 33611 (June 14, 2010). Dear Ms. McLaughlin: On May 11, 2010, the Department of Energy (DOE) published a

  3. United_CoolAir_Ex Parte Meeting Memo.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Rod Beever [mailto:rbeever@unitedcoolair.com] Sent: Friday, October 05, 2012 10:02 AM To: Cymbalsky, John; Adin, Lucas; Barhydt, Laura; Tong, Clarence Cc: Athar Khan; Neil Tucker; Jack Bardol; maureen_o'dea@casey.senate.gov; brett_doyle@toomey.senate.gov; kevin_stanton@casey.senate.gov Subject: Meeting 10-2-12 at DOE Thank you for providing the opportunity to meet with your group to discuss the regulations for commercial air conditioning as it relates to small business. Our conversation included

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 2000 to the Prototype ARM Microbase Value Added Products (VAPs) Kim, B.-G.(a), Klein, S.A.(b), Miller, M.A.(c), and Johnson, K.L.(c), Princeton University (a), GFDLNOAA (b),...

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-02-20

    The ARM CMBE-CLDRAD [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected cloud and radiation relevant quantities from ACRF observations

  6. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Harry Boston, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River ...

  7. LABLE: A multi-institutional, student-led, atmospheric boundary...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Klein, P. ; Bonin, T. A. ; Newman, J. F. ; Turner, D. D. ; Chilson, P. B. ; Wainwright, C. E. ; Blumberg, W. G. ; Mishra, S. ; Carney, M. ; Jacobsen, E. P. ; Wharton, ...

  8. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Energy U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550...

  9. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (response to Board advice 129, dated June 6, 2002, signed by Keith Klein and Harry Boston). The Board expects to see these three points incorporated in the August 1...

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Links Between Mesoscale Dynamics and Cloud Water in High-Resolution March 2000 RAMS Simulations Weaver, C.P.(a), Gordon, N.D.(b), Norris, J.R.(b), and Klein, S.A.(d), Rutgers ...

  11. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Variability of Continental Liquid-Water Cloud and Its Parameterization Using ARM Data Kim, B.-G.(a), Klein, S.A.(b), and Norris, J.R.(c), Princeton University (a), GFDL (b), ...

  12. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) Simulations of March 2000 IOP Frontal Clouds Weaver, C.P.(a), Gordon, N.D.(b), Norris, J.R.(c), and Klein, S.A.(d), Rutgers University ...

  13. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Towards Parameterization of Frontal Mesoscale Circulations and Cloudiness in GCMs Based on ARM Observations Norris, J.R.(a), Weaver, C.P.(b), Gordon, N.D.(c), and Klein, S.A.(d), ...

  14. Change Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Date: M-16-04-04 Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Change Control Form Do not use blue ink. Type or print using black ink. May 27, 2004 Originator: K. A. Klein Phone:...

  15. ARM_200703_poster.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is good in the Northern Hemisphere, but less so in the descending regions of the Hadley cell in the Southern Hemisphere. References Klein, S. A. and D. L. Hartmann, 1993: The...

  16. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling Springtime Shallow Frontal Clouds with Cloud-Resolving and Single-Column Models Xu, Kuan-Man ; Zhang, Minghua ; Eitzen, Zachary A. ; Ghan, Steven J. ; Klein, Stephen A. ; ...

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TWPC3) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several ...

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    TWPC2) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several ...

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate ...

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file ...

  1. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Zhang, Minghua (5) Del Genio, Anthony D. (4) Klein, Stephen A. (4) Lin, Wuyin (4) Walker, Gregory K. (4) Wolf, Audrey (4) Ackerman, Thomas P. (3) Golaz, Jean-Christophe (3) ...

  2. Microsoft Word - HAB Adv #145 Groundwater.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Subject: Groundwater Strategy and Groundwater Protection Adopted: April 4, 2003 Page 1 Apr. 4, 2003 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box...

  3. January 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Renewable Energy Sources...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Musial, W. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation Bruce, Allan J The Solar Energy Consortium of New York Photovoltaic Research and Development Center Klein, Petra M. ...

  4. Electronic structures of reconstructed zigzag silicene nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Yi E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn; Wang, Yanli E-mail: wangyanli-04@tsinghua.org.cn

    2014-02-24

    Edge states and magnetism are crucial for spintronic applications of nanoribbons. Here, using first-principles calculations, we explore structural stabilities and electronic properties of zigzag silicene nanoribbons (ZSiNRs) with Klein and pentagon-heptagon reconstructions. Comparing to unreconstructed zigzag edges, deformed bare pentagon-heptagon ones are favored under H-poor conditions, while H-rich surroundings stabilize di-hydrogenated Klein edges. These Klein edges have analogous magnetism to zigzag ones, which also possess the electric-field-induced half-metallicity of nanoribbons. Moreover, diverse magnetic states can be achieved by asymmetric Klein and zigzag edges into ZSiNRs, which could be transformed from antiferromagnetic-semiconductors to bipolar spin-gapless-semiconductors and ferromagnetic-metals depending on edge hydrogenations.

  5. ARM - 2012 AGU Presentations Featuring ARM Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... of Clouds ER Lewis, WJ Wiscombe, BA Albrecht, G Bland, CN Flagg, SA Klein, P Kollias, ... Doppler Cloud Radar Observations BA Albrecht, M Fang 4:12 pm, M-West 3006 A54H. Where ...

  6. DOE/SC-ARM-12-020 MAGIC: Marine ARM GPCI Investigation of Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ER Lewis WJ Wiscombe Co-Investigators BA Albrecht GL Bland CN Flagg SA Klein P Kollias G ... Space Flight Center Co-Investigators BA Albrecht, University of Miami GL Bland - NASA ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Spintronic properties of Li1.5Mn0.5Z (ZAs, Sb) compounds in the Cu2Sb structure Damewood, L. ; Fong, C. Y. ; Klein, B. M. ; Yang, L. H. ; Felser, C. March 2015 , Elsevier ...

  8. DOE/SC-ARM-TR-099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    99 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED) C Zhao MP Jensen S Xie GG Mace SA Klein ... DOESC-ARM-TR-099 ARM Cloud Retrieval Ensemble Data Set (ACRED) C Zhao, Lawrence Livermore ...

  9. Fuel 21 GmbH Co KG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GmbH Co KG Jump to: navigation, search Name: fuel 21 GmbH & Co. KG Place: Klein Wanzleben, Germany Zip: 39164 Product: fuel 21 GmbH & Co. KG started in 2006 as a member of...

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data. Authors: ...

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data. Authors: ...

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data. Authors: ...

  20. Micro-Earthquake At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Gardner...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of faults as well as produce an accurate velocity model of the region. References Murray C. Gardner, James R. McNitt, Christopher W. Klein, James B. Koenig, Dean Nakano (1995)...

  1. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Kilauea Southwest Rift And...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of high b-value anomalies withmagma reservoirs is confirmed. References M. Wyss, F. Klein, K. Nagamine, S. Wiemer (2001) Anomalously High B-Values In The South Flank Of Kilauea...

  2. Dipole-Dipole Resistivity At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of about 6000 ohm-m and the layer below has a resistivity of 5-10 ohm-m. References James Kauahikaua, Douglas Klein (1978) Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii...

  3. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-CLDRAD [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected cloud and radiation relevant quantities from ACRF observations

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. Self Potential At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (KELLER,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the University of Hawaii's geothermal program. References G. V. KELLER, C. K. SKOKAN, J. J. SKOKAN, J. DANIELS, J. P. KAUAHIKAUA, D. P. KLEIN, C. J. ZABLOCKI (1977) Geoelectric...

  18. Geoelectric Studies on the East Rift, Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    these areas was chosen as the site of a test hole. Authors G. V. KELLER, C. K. SKOKAN, J. J. SKOKAN, J. DANIELS, J. P. KAUAHIKAUA, D. P. KLEIN and C. J. ZABLOCKI Published...

  19. Electromagnetic Soundings At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    as heated groundwater reaching around 150C. References G. V. KELLER, C. K. SKOKAN, J. J. SKOKAN, J. DANIELS, J. P. KAUAHIKAUA, D. P. KLEIN, C. J. ZABLOCKI (1977) Geoelectric...

  20. Assessing the Rye Patch Geothermal Field, a Classic Basin-and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Rye Patch Geothermal Field, a Classic Basin-and-Range Resource Authors S.K Sanyal, J.R McNitt, S. J. Butler, C. W. Klein and and R.E. Elliss Published Journal GRC...

  1. Electrical Resistivity At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and extending down to about 2 km below sea level. References G. V. KELLER, C. K. SKOKAN, J. J. SKOKAN, J. DANIELS, J. P. KAUAHIKAUA, D. P. KLEIN, C. J. ZABLOCKI (1977) Geoelectric...

  2. Assessing the Rye Patch geothermal field, a classic Basin-and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    if one or two additional wells are drilled for injection. Authors Sanyal, S.K., McNitt, J.R., Butler, S.J., Klein, C.W., and Ellis and R.K. Conference GRC Annual Meeting;...

  3. PNNL-Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-Chem Modeling in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    San Francisco, CA, A41F-01. Fast JD, JC Doran, JC Barnard, S Springs ton, L Klein man, L Emmons, C Wiedinmyer. 2007. "Predictions of aerosols downwind of Mexico City using a...

  4. TeamWorks.cdr

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Carter, Sandy Jowers (SWB receptionist) and John Haschets. Front row (L to R) Bob Weeks, Julie Desai and Tom Klein. Team ... Johnna was born at 5:10 a.m. on November 17. She weighed 8 ...

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-27

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2013-12-26

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Carney, M (1) Chilson, P (1) Jacobsen, EP (1) Klein, P (1) Mishra, S (1) Newman, JF (1) Turner, DD (1) Wainwright, CE (1) Wharton, S (1) Save Results Save this search to My Library ...

  14. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Darwin, AU (ARMBE-ATM TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  16. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  17. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-ATM SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-12-13

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  18. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-08-11

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  19. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-08-10

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  20. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  1. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  2. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-ATM TWPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  3. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-08-11

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  4. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC2 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  5. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Darwin, AU with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  6. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Nauru (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC3)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  7. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  8. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate from Manus Island, PNG (ARMBE-CLDRAD TWPC1 V2.1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  9. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Lamont, OK (ARMBE-CLDRAD SGPC1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2012-05-14

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  10. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate From Nauru (ARMBE-ATM TWPC2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2010-10-05

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  11. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK with additional satellite product (ARMBE-CLDRAD NSAC1 V2.1a)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    McCoy, Renata; Xie, Shaocheng

    2011-02-07

    The ARM CMBE-ATM [Xie, McCoy, Klein et al.] data file contains a best estimate of several selected atmospheric quantities from ACRF observations and NWP analysis data.

  12. Microsoft Word - cimini_d.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    di Metodologie per l'Analisi Ambientale - National Research Council Tito Scalo (PZ), Italy E.R. Westwater, A.J. Gasiewski, M. Klein, and V. Leuski National Oceanic and ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Structure of a Dengue Virus Envelope Protein Late-Stage Fusion Intermediate Klein, Daryl E. ; Choi, Jason L. ; Harrison, Stephen C. ; CH-Boston) February 2013 Shape change in the ...

  14. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Evaluate the Diurnal Cycle in the Multiscale Modeling Framework Using Satellite and ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Zhang, Y, SA Klein, C Liu, B Tian, RT Marchand, JM Haynes, RB McCoy, Y Zhang, and TP Ackerman. 2008. "On the diurnal cycle of deep

  15. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Impact of Horizontal Resolution on Climate Model Simulations of Tropical Moist Processes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Boyle, J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Boyle JS and SA Klein. 2010. "Impact of horizontal resolution on climate model forecasts of tropical precipitation and diabatic heating

  16. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observational Analysis of Land-Atmosphere Coupling for Climate Model Evaluation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Phillips, T. J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Phillips TJ and SA Klein. 2014. "Land-atmosphere coupling manifested in warm-season observations on the U.S. southern great plains." Journal of Geophysical Research -

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weather Forecasts Help to Understand Climate Model Biases Submitter: Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Klein, Stephen A., X. Jiang, J. Boyle, S. Malyshev, and S. Xie, 2006: Diagnosis of the summertime warm and dry bias over the U. S. Southern Great Plains in the GFDL climate model using a weather forecasting approach. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33,

  18. HABadv-118.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Subject: HAMMER Adopted: June 8, 2001 Page 1 June 8, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager Department of Energy P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Re: Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training and Education Center (HAMMER) Dear Mr. Klein Worker, public, and environmental health and safety are a fundamental concern at the Hanford Site. Protection requires prevention of accidents and disease, and prevention requires a work force that is well- trained and drilled in safe work

  19. file://L:\DOE-hanford.gov\public\boards\hab\advice\advice111.ht

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Harry Boston, Manager Office of River Protection 2440 Stevens Center Richland, WA 99352 Chuck Findley, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Tom Fitzsimmons, Director Washington Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Subject: FY2001 Performance Measures Dear Messrs. Klein, Boston, Findley, and

  20. file://L:\DOE-hanford.gov\public\boards\hab\advice\advice97.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mr. Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Subject: FY2000 Performance Agreements Dear Mr. Klein: The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB) urges the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to use performance agreements to accomplish cleanup in the most technically sound, environmentally safe, and cost efficient manner possible. In 1998, the Hanford Advisory Board provided specific advice on Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC)

  1. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ground-Based Scanning Radiometer Measurements During the Water Vapor Intensive Operational Period 2004: A Valuable New Dataset for the Study of the Arctic Atmosphere D. Cimini, M. Klein, and E.R. Westwater, and V. Leuski CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado A.J. Gasiewski, M. Klein, E.R. Westwater, and S. Dowlatshahi NOAA - Enivonrmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado S. Dowlatshahi Science and Technology Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction The importance of accurate

  2. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Klein Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2009 ARM Science Team Meeting Cloud Properties Working Group Breakout Monday, March 30, 2009 Cloud Data Product Priorities of the ARM Cloud Modeling Working Group Stephen A. Klein, 30 March 2009.p 2 What do cloud modelers want? * I discussed the use of cloud property retrievals by the cloud modeling working group at the November 2007 joint meeting of the Cloud Properties and Cloud Modeling Working Groups * The answers to this question haven't changed

  3. Genomic Sequence or Signature Tags (GSTs) from the Genome Group at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K.

    Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs) are the products of a method we have developed for identifying and quantitatively analyzing genomic DNAs. The DNA is initially fragmented with a type II restriction enzyme. An oligonucleotide adaptor containing a recognition site for MmeI, a type IIS restriction enzyme, is then used to release 21-bp tags from fixed positions in the DNA relative to the sites recognized by the fragmenting enzyme. These tags are PCR-amplified, purified, concatenated and then cloned and sequenced. The tag sequences and abundances are used to create a high resolution GST sequence profile of the genomic DNA. [Quoted from Genomic Signature Tags (GSTs): A System for Profiling Genomic DNA, Dunn, John J.; McCorkle, Sean R.; Praissman, Laura A.; Hind, Geoffrey; Van der Lelie, Daniel; Bahou, Wadie F.; Gnatenko, Dmitri V.; Krause, Maureen K., Revised 9/13/2002

  4. HABAdv#1671.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Subject: U Plant Closure Plan Adopted: September 10, 2004 Page 1 September 10, 2004 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Linda Hoffman, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Ron Kreizeneeck, Acting Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Subject: U Plant Closure Plan Dear Mssrs. Klein, Kreizeneeck, and Ms.

  5. HABadv-117.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Subject: Low-Level Waste Burial Ground Expansion Adopted: June 8, 2001 Page 1 June 8, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Re: Low-Level Waste Burial Ground Expansion Dear Mr. Klein Hanford continues to face pressure to accept offsite waste while also facing severe challenges in dealing with its own waste. Now the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct up to four new waste disposal trenches in Hanford's low-

  6. Inert scalar dark matter in an extra dimension inspired model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lineros, R.A.; Santos, F.A. Pereira dos E-mail: fabio.alex@fis.puc-rio.br

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we analyze a dark matter model inspired by theories with extra dimensions. The dark matter candidate corresponds to the first Kaluza–Klein mode of an real scalar added to the Standard Model. The tower of new particles enriches the calculation of the relic abundance. For large mass splitting, the model converges to the predictions of the inert singlet dark matter model. For nearly degenerate mass spectrum, coannihilations increase the cross-sections used for direct and indirect dark matter searches. Moreover, the Kaluza–Klein zero mode can mix with the SM higgs and further constraints can be applied.

  7. file://L:\DOE-hanford.gov\public\boards\hab\advice\advice106.ht

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2000 Chuck Clarke, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Tom Fitzsimmons, Director Washington Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Subject: 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds Dear Messrs. Clarke, Fitzsimmons, and Klein: The Hanford Advisory Board (HAB) has an acute concern with regard to the

  8. file://L:\DOE-hanford.gov\public\boards\hab\advice\advice96.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mr. Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Subject: HRA-EIS/CLUP Dear Mr. Klein: A draft Hanford Remedial Action Environmental Impact Statement (HRA-EIS) and Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP) was issued in September 1996. Extensive and generally critical public comments were made during the review period. The Hanford Advisory Board did not submit formal advice, but agreed that this initial draft needed extensive revisions.

  9. Aether compactification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Sean M.; Tam, Heywood

    2008-08-15

    We propose a new way to hide large extra dimensions without invoking branes, based on Lorentz-violating tensor fields with expectation values along the extra directions. We investigate the case of a single vector aether field on a compact circle. In such a background, interactions of other fields with the aether can lead to modified dispersion relations, increasing the mass of the Kaluza-Klein excitations. The mass scale characterizing each Kaluza-Klein tower can be chosen independently for each species of scalar, fermion, or gauge boson. No small-scale deviations from the inverse square law for gravity are predicted, although light graviton modes may exist.

  10. Microsoft Word - HABAdv #169 Budgets Workshop.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    69 Subject: Budget Workshops Adopted: March 4, 2005 Page 1 March 4, 2005 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Roy Schepens, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 (H6-60) Richland, WA 99352 Re: Budget Workshops Dear Messrs. Klein and Schepens, Background The Tri Party Agreement (TPA) requires that the budget be shared with the regulatory agencies and the public with the intent that there be

  11. Habadv-115.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    115 Subject: Proposed River Corridor and Performance Measures Adopted: April 6, 2001 Page 1 April 6, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 999352 Subject: Proposed River Corridor Contract and Performance Measures Dear Mr. Klein, Clean- up of the River Corridor is important. The proposed River Corridor contract should authorize and direct the contractor to perform the full scope of work of the Hanford Clean-Up Agreement more

  12. Habadv-120.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20 Subject: Fiscal Year 2002 and 2003 Budgets Adopted: June 8, 2001 Page 1 June 8, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Harry Boston, Manager Department of Energy, Office of River Protection 2440 Stevens Richland, WA 99352 Re: Fiscal Year 2002 and 2003 Budgets Dear Messrs Klein and Boston, The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposed fiscal year (FY) 2002 and preliminary FY 2003 budgets signal an intent to slow Hanford cleanup

  13. Habadv114.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Subject: Fluor Hanford Worker Layoffs Adopted: February 2, 2001 Page 1 February 2, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Subject: Fluor Hanford Worker Layoffs Dear Mr. Klein, The Hanford Advisory Board believes that worker morale is an integral part of the clean-up effort. Pursuant to that value, at the HAB's February 1 and 2 meeting, the Board discussed the recent announcement from Fluor Hanford regarding worker

  14. ARM2007_STM_poster_v1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Kim, B.-G, M. Miller, S. Schwartz, Y. Liu, Q. Min, (2008), JGR, doi:10.1029 2007JD008961. Kim, B.-G, S. Klein, J. Norris (2005), JGR, doi:10.10292004JD005122. Lu, M.-L, W.C. ...

  15. ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4) Title: ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate Barrow, AK (ARMBE-ATM NSAC1 V4) The ARM CMBE-ATM Xie, McCoy, Klein et al. data file contains a best ...

  16. Non-commutative relativistic equation with a Coulomb potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaim, Slimane; Khodja, Lamine; Delenda, Yazid

    2012-06-27

    We improve the previous study of the Klein-Gordon equation in a non-commutative space-time as applied to the Hydrogen atom to extract the energy levels, by considering the secondorder corrections in the non-commutativity parameter. Phenomenologically we show that noncommutativity plays the role of spin.

  17. SSRL HEADLINES Jun 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 June, 2006 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Chemists Discover how Nature Makes Medicine Science Highlight - Protecting against DNA Invasion SPEAR3 Fast Orbit Feedback Milestone Achieved in June Register for SSRL Summer Workshops in the Structural Biology Sciences Call for Nominations for Klein, Spicer and Lytle Awards Stanford Board of Trustees Committee Visits SLAC Secretary of Energy Bodman Speaks to DOE

  18. racette-99.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Millimeter Wave Radiometric Arctic Winter Experiment P. E. Racette and E. Kim National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland E. R. Westwater, Y. Han, and M. Klein CIRES, University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado A. Gasiewski National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. B. Widener Pacific Northwest National

  19. Cummins Indy Racing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Indy Racing Cummins Indy Racing This presentation covers the history of Cummins' participation in competitive auto racing, particularly the Indy 500 deer09_kleine.pdf (1.51 MB) More Documents & Publications Clean and Efficient Diesel Engines - Designing for the Customer Coming On Strong Green Racing: Accelerating the Use of Advanced Technologies & Renewable Fuels, Developing Market Acceptance

  20. Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCann, Maureen (Director, Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels); C3Bio Staff

    2011-11-03

    'Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World' was submitted by the Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. C3Bio, an EFRC directed by Maureen McCann at Purdue University is a partnership between five institutions: Purdue (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Northeastern University, and the University of Tennessee. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  1. Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCann, Maureen; C3Bio Staff

    2011-05-01

    'Moving from Petroleum to Plants to Energize our World' was submitted by the Center for Direct Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Biofuels (C3Bio) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. C3Bio, an EFRC directed by Maureen McCann at Purdue University is a partnership between five institutions: Purdue (lead), Argonne National Laboratory, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Northeastern University, and the University of Tennessee. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges.

  2. Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ri-Party Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 135 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ADVICE #158 -300 AREA EXPLANATION OF SIGNIFICANT DIFFERENCE (ESD) HAB ietter from T. Martin to K. Klein, RL; R. Schepens, ORP; J. lani, EP A; and L. Hoffman, Ecology, "300 Area Explanation of Significant Difference," dated April 2, 2004. Reference: This letter is in response to HAB advice #158 in the reference. This advice

  3. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To Be or Not to Be Liquid? the Challenge of Arctic Mixed-Phase Cloud Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Klein, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Morrison, H. C., NCAR McCoy, R. B., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Luo, Y., Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences Ackerman, A., NASA - Goddard Institute for Space Studies Avramov, A., Columbia University de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Chen, M., Colorado

  4. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mechanisms Affecting the Transition from Shallow to Deep Convection over Land Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhang Y and SA Klein. 2010. "Mechanisms affecting the transition from shallow to deep convection over land: Inferences from observations of the diurnal cycle collected at the ARM Southern Great

  5. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Many Forecast Errors Are Climate Errors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Xie S, H Ma, JS Boyle, SA Klein, and Y Zhang. 2012. "On the correspondence between short- and long-timescale systematic errors in CAM4/CAM5 for the years of tropical convection." Journal of Climate, 25(22),

  6. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Metrics and Diagnostics for Climate Model Short-Range Hindcasts Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ma, H., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ma H, S Xie, JS Boyle, SA Klein, and Y Zhang. 2012. "Metrics and diagnostics for precipitation-related processes in climate model short-range hindcasts." Journal of Climate, , . ACCEPTED. Pattern statistics

  7. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    What Controls the Vertical Extent of Continental Shallow Cumulus? Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zhang, Y., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zhang Y and SA Klein. 2013. "Factors controlling the vertical extent of fair-weather shallow cumulus clouds over land: investigation of diurnal-cycle observations collected at the ARM Southern Great Plains site." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences,

  8. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Most Systematic Errors in Climate Models Appear in Only a Few Days of Model Integration Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ma, H., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Ma H, S Xie, SA Klein, KD Williams, JS Boyle, S Bony, H Douville, S Fermepin, B Medeiros, S Tyteca, M Watanabe, and DL Williamson. 2014. "On the correspondence between mean forecast errors and climate errors in

  9. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Regime Analysis to Identify the Contribution of Clouds to Surface Temperature Errors in GCMs Submitter: Van Weverberg, K., Met Office Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Van Weverberg K, CJ Morcrette, H Ma, SA Klein, and JC Petch. 2015. "Using regime analysis to identify the contribution of clouds to surface temperature errors in weather and climate models." Quarterly Journal Royal

  10. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How Well Are Shallow Convective Clouds Simulated in the CAM5 Model? Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chandra, A. S., University of Miami Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chandra AS, C Zhang, SA Klein, and H Ma. 2015. "Low-cloud characteristics over the tropical western Pacific from ARM observations and CAM5 simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 120, 52402, doi:10.1002/2015JD02.

  11. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Out with the Old, in with the New: McICA to Replace Traditional Cloud Overlap Assumptions Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pincus, R., R. Hemler, and S.A. Klein, 2006: Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model. Mon. Wea. Rev., 134, 3644-3656. As shown by the difference between the two panels, the

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Improved Hindcast Approach for Evaluation and Diagnosis of Physical Processes in GCMs Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ma, H., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Ma H, C Chuang, SA Klein, M Lo, Y Zhang, S Xie, X Zheng, P Ma, Y Zhang, and TJ Phillips. 2015. "An improved hindcast approach for evaluation and

  13. Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime with Maxwell and dilaton fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, Alikram N.; Cebeci, Hakan; Dereli, Tekin

    2008-06-15

    We present an exact solution describing a stationary and axisymmetric object with electromagnetic and dilaton fields. The solution generalizes the usual Kerr-Taub-NUT (Newman-Unti-Tamburino) spacetime in general relativity and is obtained by boosting this spacetime in the fifth dimension and performing a Kaluza-Klein reduction to four dimensions. We also discuss the physical parameters of this solution and calculate its gyromagnetic ratio.

  14. Validation of Global Weather Forecast and Climate Models Over the North

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slope of Alaska Validation of Global Weather Forecast and Climate Models Over the North Slope of Alaska Xie, Shaocheng Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Klein, Stephen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Boyle, Jim Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Fiorino, Michael DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Hnilo, Justin DOE/Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Phillips, Thomas PCMDI/LLNL Potter, Gerald Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Beljaars, Anton ECMWF Category:

  15. Vertical Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Velocities in Continental Boundary Layer Stratocumulus Clouds Virendra Ghate Bruce Albrecht and Pavlos Kollias Why BL Stratocumulus?? * Extensive Coverage - Cover ~24% of earth's surface - Persist of long time-scales * Impact on radiation budget - High SW albedo compared to land or ocean Klein and Hartmann 1993 But Why Continental Clouds? * They do exist - Monthly cloud fraction can vary from 10% to 23% * Impact on pollution & Diurnal Cycle - Affect pollutant venting out of BL & Aerosol

  16. NEAC Facilities Subcommittee Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Subcommittee Report Presentation to the NEAC Committee 12/11/2015 John I. Sackett Facilities Subcommittee Members * John Ahearne * Dana Christensen * Tom Cochran * Mike Corradini * Dave Hill * Hussein Khalil * Andy Klein * Paul Murray * John Sackett, chair Subcommittee Objectives * The objective of our deliberations has been to help DOE-NE develop a means to identify, prioritize and make available those facilities important to Nuclear Energy Research and Development. - All facilities

  17. file://L:\DOE-hanford.gov\public\boards\hab\advice\advice100.ht

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chuck Clarke, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Tom Fitzsimmons, Director Washington Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Dick French, Manager Office of River Protection 2440 Stevens Center Richland, WA 99352 Subject: TPA Agency Processes for Responding to HAB Consensus Advice Dear Messrs.

  18. Memorandum: Direction and Guidance for Implementing Direct DOE Relationship & Funding for the EMSSAB

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Designated Federal Officer, Sandra L. Waisley (EM-11) To: SSAB Members (G. Stegner, J. Reising, G. Bowman, T. Taylor, C. Gertz, B. Murphie, S. McCracken, M. Marvin, J. Rampe, A. Doswell, C. Anderson, B. Wethington, S. Brennan, K. Kozeliski, D. Dollins, P. Halsey, Y. Sherman, L. Bratcher, R. Warther, K. Klein, R. Schepens, F. Lockhart, J. Allison, R. Erickson, E. Sellers, K. Carlson, G. Boyd, R. Butler)

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiometric Observations of Water Vapor During the 1999 Arctic Winter Experiment Y. Han, E. R. Westwater, and M. Klein Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Racette National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland W. Manning University of Maryland Baltimore County JCET Baltimore, Maryland A. Gasiewski National Oceanic and

  20. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Comparison of Clear-Sky Emission Models with Data Taken During the 1999 Millimeter-Wave Radiometric Arctic Winter Water Vapor Experiment E. R. Westwater, Y. Han, A. Gasiewski, and M. Klein Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado P. E. Racette National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland W. Manning University of Maryland

  1. One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' One in five online scholarly articles affected by 'reference rot' Los Alamos authors focus on reference rot, the combination of link rot and content drift to which references to web resources included in STM articles are subject. January 26, 2015 From left, Los Alamos National Laboratory authors Lyudmila Balakireva, Herbert Van De Sompel and Harihar Shankar, and Martin Klein and Robert Sanderson (on computer screens). Their work was published in the

  2. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM Azores Observations Help Identify Deficiencies in Climate Model Simulations of Low Clouds PI Contact: Zheng, X., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Zheng X, SA Klein, H Ma, P Bogenschutz, A Gettelman, and VE Larson. 2016. "Assessment of Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Simulations in the CAM with CLUBB and Updated Microphysics Scheme Based on ARM Observations

  3. NEAC charge letter - test reactor.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facilities Subcommittee Report Presentation to the NEAC Committee 12/11/2015 John I. Sackett Facilities Subcommittee Members * John Ahearne * Dana Christensen * Tom Cochran * Mike Corradini * Dave Hill * Hussein Khalil * Andy Klein * Paul Murray * John Sackett, chair Subcommittee Objectives * The objective of our deliberations has been to help DOE-NE develop a means to identify, prioritize and make available those facilities important to Nuclear Energy Research and Development. - All facilities

  4. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Top-to-Bottom Review Dear Mssrs. Klein, Boston, Iani, and Fitzsimmons, The Hanford Advisory Board (Board) has always endorsed the risk-based approach to prioritizing activities and milestones. This approach is reflected in the Hanford Federal Facilities Compliance Agreement (Tri-Party Agreement or TPA) and the Single Shell Tank Retrieval Consent Decree. The Board has a long tradition of supporting the concept of a more economical and expeditious cleanup, provided that applicable environmental

  5. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Iani, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Re: Principles for M-91 Negotiations Dear Mssrs. Klein, Fitzsimmons and Iani, The following are principles adopted by the Hanford Advisory Board (Board) for application during and beyond the current M-91 Tri Party Agreement (TPA) negotiations. Principle #1: Waste must be characterized for both radionuclide and hazardous waste content before shipment to Hanford. Principle #2: The

  6. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Iani, Regional Administrator U. S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Linda Hoffman, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Re: M-91 Change Package Dear Mssrs. Klein, Schepens, Iani and Ms. Hoffman, While the M-91-03-01 change package does not provide a comprehensive solution to Hanford's buried waste challenges, the Hanford Advisory Board (Board) believes the following items in the change package

  7. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Re: Public and Regulator Review and Input to Baselines Dear Mssrs. Klein and Schepens, Hanford's cleanup success has been, in part, a result of public and regulator input into the development of cleanup priorities. In the past, public and regulator involvement in priority setting created a groundswell of public support for Hanford's budgetary requests. The Department of Energy (DOE) no longer manages cleanup by "priority lists" on an annual basis. Rather, cleanup activities are

  8. DRAFT ADVICE - UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Iani, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Linda Hoffman, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Re: 300 Area Explanation of Significant Difference Dear Mssrs. Klein, Schepens, Iani and Ms. Hoffman, The Hanford Advisory Board (Board) is reviewing the Tri-Party Agreement (TPA) Agencies' proposed Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) on the 300 Area cleanup. The cleanup

  9. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resolving Models as Scaffolding for Cloud Parameterizations in Large-Scale Models Pincus, R.(a), Klein, S.A.(b), Hannay, C.(a), and Xu, K.-M.(c), NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center (a), NOAA Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b), NASA Langley Research Center (c) Twelfth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The treatment of clouds in large scale models has evolved from fixed to diagnostics to predictive as the importance of cloud feedbacks has become clear. In

  10. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Implementing Flexible Cloud Vertical Structure in GFDL's AM-2 Large-Scale Model Using Stochastic Clouds Pincus, R.(a), Klein, S.A.(b), and Hemmler, R.(b), NOAA-CIRES Climate DiagnosticsCenter (a), Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (b) Fourteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting Cloud vertical structure has a significant impact on radiation and precipitation fluxes, which can then feed back to the general circulation. In large-scale models with partial cloudiness

  11. On the correspondence between quantum and classical variational principles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ruiz, D. E.; Dodin, I. Y.

    2015-06-10

    Here, classical variational principles can be deduced from quantum variational principles via formal reparameterization of the latter. It is shown that such reparameterization is possible without invoking any assumptions other than classicality and without appealing to dynamical equations. As examples, first principle variational formulations of classical point-particle and cold-fluid motion are derived from their quantum counterparts for Schrodinger, Pauli, and Klein-Gordon particles.

  12. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution I: What's at Stake |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy I: What's at Stake DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution I: What's at Stake Watch the video or view the presentation below Zero Energy Ready Homes include critical systems to ensure both energy efficiency and performance. Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems - affecting energy use , water consumption, and resident convenience and comfort. In this initial session Gary Klein covers the basics of residential hot water plumbing systems

  13. DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy II: How to Get it Right DOE ZERH Webinar: Efficient Hot Water Distribution II: How to Get it Right Watch the video or view the presentation slides below Zero Energy Ready Homes include critical systems to ensure both energy efficiency and performance. Hot water distribution is one of these critical systems - affecting energy use , water consumption, and resident convenience and comfort. In this second session on hot water distribution, Gary Klein will explain design

  14. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microwave and Millimeter Wave Forward Modeling Results from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment E.R. Westwater, D. Cimini, M. Klein, and V. Leuski Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado/NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Mattioli Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettronica e dell'Informazione Universitά di Perugia Perugia, Italy A.J. Gasiewski NOAA-Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder,

  15. SSRL HEADLINES August 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 August, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - The Chemical Form of Mercury in the Fish We Eat Science Highlight - How Stents Take the Strain 2007 Spicer Young Investigator Award to be Presented to Hugh Harris Jessica Vey to Receive 2007 Klein Award Register for 2007 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops, September 28-October 3 Learn About SR Techniques or Brush Up Your Skills at September 30 Workshop Several

  16. SSRL HEADLINES August 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 August, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Lensless Nanoscale Imaging: Combining MAD Crystallography with X-Ray Holography Small, Fast, and Holographic Ajay Virkar to Receive 2008 Klein Professional Development Award How Plants Do It: Light, Oxygen, Action! Call for User Science Poster Abstracts for Joint SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops, October 15-18, 2008 Users Needed to Serve on the SSRL Users'

  17. SSRL HEADLINES June 2007

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 June, 2007 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - A T-cell's Guide to Knowing Who's Who Register for SSRL STXM and X-ray Nanoprobe Workshop, July 9-10 SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Summer School, September 9-14 First Ultrafast X-ray Summer School a Success! Call for Abstracts for 2007 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting and Workshops Call for Nominations for Klein, Spicer and Lytle Awards SSRL Users' Organization Update

  18. SSRL HEADLINES June 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 June, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - Keeping Electronics in Line with the Law Science Highlight - Electronics go Organic Safety Reminder Beam Line Updates Register for 2008 SSRL/LCLS Users' Meeting & Workshops, October 15-18, 2008 Call for Nominations for Spicer, Klein and Lytle Awards Sign Up for the Synchrotron Summer School, August 17-22, 2008 SSRL User Receives First Polymer International-IUPAC

  19. SSRL HEADLINES May 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 May, 2008 __________________________________________________________________________ Contents of this Issue: Science Highlight - A Case of Molecular Cooperation Science Highlight - A New Eye on Sulfur in Living Tissues Brains in the Beam Line Save the Date October 15-18 for the 2008 LCLS/SSRL Users' Meeting and Workshops Plans for Soft X-ray Materials Science (SXR) Call for Nominations for Spicer, Klein and Lytle Awards New LCLS Website Launched SSRL Hosts School for Future X-ray Researchers

  20. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/092a.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    99352 99-OEA-105 Advice # 92 From: Lloyd Piper for Keith Klein Ms. Merilyn Reeves, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 723 The Parkway, Suite 200: B1 -41 Richland, Washington 99352 May 21, 1999 Dear Ms. Reeves: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD CONSENSUS ADVICE #92 TRI-PARTIES RESPONSE TO PUBLIC COMMENTS Thank you for your recent advice regarding responses to public comments, concerns, and suggestions. They are good suggestions, and provide us with an improved framework for responding to comments and concerns

  1. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/097.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PRO-759 Advice # 97 From: Keith A. Klein Ms. Merilyn Reeves, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 723 The Parkway, Suite 200: B1 -41 Richland, Washington 99352 September 9, 1999 Dear Ms. Reeves: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) CONSENSUS ADVICE #97 TO THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, RICHLAND OPERATIONS OFFICE (RL) - PROJECT HANFORD MANAGEMENT CONTRACT (PHMC) PERFORMANCE MEASURES Thank you for the input contained in HAB Consensus Advice #97 dated July 16, 1999. The advice has been useful and I believe you

  2. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/104.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IPI-143 Advice # 104 From: Marla K. Marvin Ms. Merilyn Reeves, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 723 The Parkway, Suite 200: B1 -41 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Ms. Reeves: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) CONSENSUS ADVICE #104 This letter is in response to the HAB's advice regarding openness at Hanford to Carolyn Huntoon, DOE Headquarters, Keith Klein, RL Manager, and Dick French, ORP Manager, dated February 4, 2000 (Advice Letter #104). The advice letter was a follow up to the discussion at the

  3. Foundation of Hydrodynamics of Strongly Interacting Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2014-01-01

    Hydrodynamics and quantum mechanics have many elements in common, as the density field and velocity fields are common variables that can be constructed in both descriptions. Starting with the Schroedinger equation and the Klein-Gordon for a single particle in hydrodynamical form, we examine the basic assumptions under which a quantum system of particles interacting through their mean fields can be described by hydrodynamics.

  4. R. Boers KNMI

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Boers KNMI April 2004 Recent results from the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research ARM-science meeting NM April 2004 Collaboration between institutions ARM-science meeting NM April 2004 KNMI: Arnout Feijt, Henk Klein Baltink, Wouter Knap, Erik v Meijgaard, Fred Bosveld, Piet Stammes, Pier Siebesma, Rob Roebeling, Gert-Jan Zadelhoff University Delft: Herman Russchenberg, Hans v Marel Environmental Protection Agency Netherlands(RIVM): Arnoud Apituley, Daan Swart Netherlands Technical

  5. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robin Hogan Anthony Illingworth, Anthony Illingworth, Ewan Ewan O O ' ' Connor, Jon Connor, Jon Shonk Shonk , , Julien Delanoe Julien Delanoe , Andrew Barratt , Andrew Barratt University of Reading, UK University of Reading, UK And the Cloudnet team: And the Cloudnet team: D. D. Bouniol Bouniol , M. E. Brooks, D. P. Donovan, J. D. , M. E. Brooks, D. P. Donovan, J. D. Eastment Eastment , , N. N. Gaussiat Gaussiat , J. W. F. Goddard, M. , J. W. F. Goddard, M. Haeffelin Haeffelin , H. Klein , H.

  6. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Illinois, Champaign, IL October 14-16, 2008 ARM AVP Workshop The Profiling Radiometer for Atmospheric and Cloud Observation PRACO Marian Klein, Vladimir Irisov, Vladimir Leuski University of Illinois, Champaign, IL October 14-16, 2008 ARM AVP Workshop BEST * Established in 2006 * Passive microwave remote sensing * Long experience with airborne, ship-borne, ground based microwave radiometers University of Illinois, Champaign, IL October 14-16, 2008 ARM AVP Workshop 60 GHz Boundary Layer

  7. Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics of Mid-Latitude Synoptic Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics of Mid-Latitude Synoptic Systems N. D. Gordon and J. R. Norris Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California C. P. Weaver Center for Environmental Prediction Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey S. A. Klein Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey Introduction This study uses a clustering algorithm to group meteorological regimes by cloud

  8. Quantum singularities in (2+1) dimensional matter coupled black hole spacetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unver, O.; Gurtug, O.

    2010-10-15

    Quantum singularities considered in the 3D Banados-Teitelboim-Zanelli (BTZ) spacetime by Pitelli and Letelier [Phys. Rev. D 77, 124030 (2008)] is extended to charged BTZ and 3D Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity spacetimes. The occurrence of naked singularities in the Einstein-Maxwell extension of the BTZ spacetime both in linear and nonlinear electrodynamics as well as in the Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton gravity spacetimes are analyzed with the quantum test fields obeying the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. We show that with the inclusion of the matter fields, the conical geometry near r=0 is removed and restricted classes of solutions are admitted for the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. Hence, the classical central singularity at r=0 turns out to be quantum mechanically singular for quantum particles obeying the Klein-Gordon equation but nonsingular for fermions obeying the Dirac equation. Explicit calculations reveal that the occurrence of the timelike naked singularities in the considered spacetimes does not violate the cosmic censorship hypothesis as far as the Dirac fields are concerned. The role of horizons that clothes the singularity in the black hole cases is replaced by repulsive potential barrier against the propagation of Dirac fields.

  9. Greybody factors for Myers–Perry black holes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Chatrabhuti, Auttakit Ngampitipan, Tritos; Visser, Matt

    2014-11-15

    The Myers–Perry black holes are higher-dimensional generalizations of the usual (3+1)-dimensional rotating Kerr black hole. They are of considerable interest in Kaluza–Klein models, specifically within the context of brane-world versions thereof. In the present article, we shall consider the greybody factors associated with scalar field excitations of the Myers–Perry spacetimes, and develop some rigorous bounds on these greybody factors. These bounds are of relevance for characterizing both the higher-dimensional Hawking radiation, and the super-radiance, that is expected for these spacetimes.

  10. Search for Randall-Sundrum gravitons in the dielectron and diphoton final states with 5.4fb$^{-1}$ of data from $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Abolins, Maris A.; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Aguilo, Ernest; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.

    2010-04-01

    Using 5.4 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we search for decays of the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model to ee and {gamma}{gamma}. We set 95% C.L. lower limits on the mass of the lightest graviton between 560 GeV and 1050 GeV for values of the coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} between 0.01 and 0.1.

  11. Dirac solutions for quaternionic potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Leo, Stefano Giardino, Sergio

    2014-02-15

    The Dirac equation is solved for quaternionic potentials, i?V{sub 0} + j?W{sub 0} (V{sub 0}?R , W{sub 0}?C). The study shows two different solutions. The first one contains particle and anti-particle solutions and leads to the diffusion, tunneling, and Klein energy zones. The standard solution is recovered taking the complex limit of this solution. The second solution, which does not have a complex counterpart, can be seen as a V{sub 0}-antiparticle or |W{sub 0}|-particle solution.

  12. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    An Assessment of the ECMWF Model over the Arctic Land Using Observations from the Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S., S. A. Klein, J. J. Yio, A. C. M. Beljaars, C. N. Long, and M. Zhang, (2006): An Assessment of the ECMWF Model over the Arctic Land Using Observations from the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic

  13. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weather Forecasting in the Tropics with Climate Models Is Feasible Submitter: Boyle, J., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Climate Model Forecast Experiments for TOGA-COARE. J. Boyle,S. Klein,G. Zhang,S. Xie,X. Wei. Accepted by Monthly Weather Review Figure 1. Profiles of the apparent heat source (Q1) at the TOGA-COARE central site for the observations and

  14. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARM M-PACE Data Used to Evaluate and Improve Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds Simulated in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie, S, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Liu, and S Ghan. 2008. "Simulations of Arctic mixed-phase clouds in forecasts with CAM3 and AM2 for M-PACE." Journal of Geophysical Research 113,

  15. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMBE - a New ACRF Data Product for Climate Studies Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie S, RB McCoy, SA Klein, RT Cederwall, WJ Wiscombe, EE Clothiaux, KL Gaustad, J Golaz, S Hall, MP Jensen, KL Johnson, Y Lin, CN Long, JH Mather, RA McCord, SA McFarlane, G Palanisamy, Y Shi, and DD Turner. 2010. "ARM Climate Modeling Best Estimate

  16. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large-Scale Structures and Diabatic Heating and Drying Profiles Revealed by TWP-ICE Download a printable PDF Submitter: Xie, S., Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Xie S, T Hume, C Jakob, SA Klein, RB McCoy, and M Zhang. 2009. "Observed large-scale structures and diabatic heating and drying profiles during TWP-ICE." Journal of Climate, 23(1), . Analyzed vertical

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Long-Term Observations of Convective Boundary Layer Using Insect Returns at SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Chandra, A. S., McGill University Area of Research: Vertical Velocity Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Chandra AS, P Kollias, SE Giangrande, and SA Klein. 2010. "Long-term observations of the convective boundary layer using insect radar returns at the SGP ARM Climate Research Facility." Journal of Climate, 23, 5699-5714. Example of time-height mapping

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Critical Evaluation of the ICARUS Portion of the ISCCP Simulator Using ARM Data Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mace, G., University of Utah Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mace GG, S Houser, S Benson, SA Klein, and QL Min. 2011. "Critical evaluation of the ISCCP simulator using ground-based remote sensing data." Journal of Climate, 24(6), doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3517.1. Figure 1.

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Predicting Arctic Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Liu, X., University of Wyoming Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Liu X, S Xie, J Boyle, SA Klein, X Shi, Z Wang, W Lin, SJ Ghan, M Earle, PS Liu, and A Zelenyuk. 2011. "Testing cloud microphysics parameterizations in NCAR CAM5 with ISDAC and M-PACE observations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 116, D00T11,

  20. Gammasphere Past, Present and Future: M.P. Carpenter Argonne National Laboratory ICW2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 8 3 Super Conducting Linac Development at Argonne Super Conducting Linac Development at Argonne 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 EN/FN Tandem Rm. Temp. Helix Superconducting Helix SC Booster Linac ATLAS Project Positive Ion Injector / ECR / Uranium-Upgrade ATLAS Energy Upgrade ANL RIA-SRF Development ANL SC Linac Operation The HELIX Age The HELIX Age * 1969 H. Klein et al (Frankfurt University) propose a heavy-ion linac using normal-conducting helical accelerating

  1. HAB Consensus Advice #116

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Subject: Budget for FY 2002 and 2003 Adopted: April 6, 2001 Page 1 April 6, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Harry Boston, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection 2440 Stevens Center Richland, WA 99352 Subject: Budget for FY 2002 and 2003 Dear Sirs, Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Prioritization Decisions Have Not Been Made Available for HAB Review. Department of

  2. HABAdv#167.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Subject: Stop Work Authority Adopted: November 5, 2004 Page 1 November 5, 2004 Paul Golan, Assistant Secretary of Energy U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 John Shaw, Acting Assistant Secretary Division of Environmental Safety and Health U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters 1000 Independence Avenue Washington, D.C. 20585 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Roy

  3. HABavd #133 HSW-EIS.PDF

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Subject: Hanford Solid Waste EIS Adopted: July 11, 02 Page 1 July 11, 2002 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Roy Schepens, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 Richland, WA 99352 Tom Fitzsimmons, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 John Iani, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue

  4. Gravitational Chern-Simons and the adiabatic limit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLellan, Brendan

    2010-12-15

    We compute the gravitational Chern-Simons term explicitly for an adiabatic family of metrics using standard methods in general relativity. We use the fact that our base three-manifold is a quasiregular K-contact manifold heavily in this computation. Our key observation is that this geometric assumption corresponds exactly to a Kaluza-Klein Ansatz for the metric tensor on our three-manifold, which allows us to translate our problem into the language of general relativity. Similar computations have been performed by Guralnik et al.[Ann. Phys. 308, 222 (2008)], although not in the adiabatic context.

  5. Search for Universal Extra Dimensions in p(p)over-bar Collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov V. M.; Abbott B.; Acharya B. S.; Adams M.; Adams T.; Alexeev G. D.; Alkhazov G.; Alton A.; Alverson G.; Aoki M.; Askew A.; Asman B.; Atkins S.; Atramentov O.; Augsten K.; Avila C.; BackusMayes J.; Badaud F.; Bagby L.; Baldin B.; Bandurin D. V.; Banerjee S.; Barberis E.; Baringer P.; Barreto J.; Bartlett J. F.; Bassler U.; Bazterra V.; Bean A.; Begalli M.; Belanger-Champagne C.; Bellantoni L.; Beri S. B.; Bernardi G.; Bernhard R.; Bertram I.; Besancon M.; Beuselinck R.; Bezzubov V. A.; Bhat P. C.; Bhatia S.; Bhatnagar V.; Blazey G.; Blessing S.; Bloom K.; Boehnlein A.; Boline D.; Boos E. E.; Borissov G.; Bose T.; Brandt A.; Brandt O.; Brock R.; Brooijmans G.; Bross A.; Brown D.; Brown J.; Bu X. B.; Buehler M.; Buescher V.; Bunichev V.; Burdin S.; Burnett T. H.; Buszello C. P.; Calpas B.; Camacho-Perez E.; Carrasco-Lizarraga M. A.; Casey B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez H.; Chakrabarti S.; Chakraborty D.; Chan K. M.; Chandra A.; Chapon E.; Chen G.; Chevalier-Thery S.; Cho D. K.; Cho S. W.; Choi S.; Choudhary B.; Cihangir S.; Claes D.; Clutter J.; Cooke M.; Cooper W. E.; Corcoran M.; Couderc F.; Cousinou M-C; Croc A.; Cutts D.; Das A.; Davies G.; de Jong S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo E.; Deliot F.; Demina R.; Denisov D.; Denisov S. P.; Desai S.; Deterre C.; DeVaughan K.; Diehl H. T.; Diesburg M.; Ding P. F.; Dominguez A.; Dorland T.; Dubey A.; Dudko L. V.; Duggan D.; Duperrin A.; Dutt S.; Dyshkant A.; Eads M.; Edmunds D.; Ellison J.; Elvira V. D.; Enari Y.; Evans H.; Evdokimov A.; Evdokimov V. N.; Facini G.; Ferbel T.; Fiedler F.; Filthaut F.; Fisher W.; Fisk H. E.; Fortner M.; Fox H.; Fuess S.; Garcia-Bellido A.; Garcia-Guerra G. A.; Gavrilov V.; Gay P.; Geng W.; Gerbaudo D.; Gerber C. E.; Gershtein Y.; Ginther G.; Golovanov G.; Goryachev V. N.; Goussiou A.; Grannis P. D.; Greder S.; Greenlee H.; Greenwood Z. D.; Gregores E. M.; Grenier G.; Gris Ph; Grivaz J-F; Grohsjean A.; Gruenendahl S.; Gruenewald M. W.; Guillemin T.; Gutierrez G.; Gutierrez P.; Haas A.; Hagopian S.; Haley J.; Han L.; Harder K.; Harel A.; Hauptman J. M.; Hays J.; Head T.; Hebbeker T.; Hedin D.; Hegab H.; Heinson A. P.; Heintz U.; Hensel C.; Heredia-De La Cruz I.; Herner K.; Hesketh G.; Hildreth M. D.; Hirosky R.; Hoang T.; Hobbs J. D.; Hoeneisen B.; Hohlfeld M.; Hubacek Z.; Hynek V.; Iashvili I.; Ilchenko Y.; Illingworth R.; Ito A. S.; Jabeen S.; Jaffre M.; Jamin D.; Jayasinghe A.; Jesik R.; Johns K.; Johnson M.; Jonckheere A.; Jonsson P.; Joshi J.; Jung A. W.; Juste A.; Kaadze K.; Kajfasz E.; Karmanov D.; Kasper P. A.; Katsanos I.; Kehoe R.; Kermiche S.; Khalatyan N.; Khanov A.; Kharchilava A.; Kharzheev Y. N.; Kohli J. M.; Kozelov A. V.; Kraus J.; Kulikov S.; Kumar A.; Kupco A.; Kurca T.; Kuzmin V. A.; Lammers S.; Landsberg G.; Lebrun P.; Lee H. S.; Lee S. W.; Lee W. M.; Lellouch J.; Li H.; Li L.; Li Q. Z.; Lietti S. M.; Lim J. K.; Lincoln D.; Linnemann J.; Lipaev V. V.; Lipton R.; Liu Y.; Lobodenko A.; Lokajicek M.; de Sa R. Lopes; Lubatti H. J.; Luna-Garcia R.; Lyon A. L.; Maciel A. K. A.; Mackin D.; Madar R.; Magana-Villalba R.; Malik S.; Malyshev V. L.; Mansour J.; Maravin Y.; Martinez-Ortega J.; McCarthy R.; McGivern C. L.; Meijer M. M.; Melnitchouk A.; Menezes D.; Mercadante P. G.; Merkin M.; Meyer A.; Meyer J.; et al.

    2012-03-30

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  6. Dirac Equation and Quantum Relativistic Effects in a Single Trapped Ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamata, L.; Leon, J.; Schaetz, T.; Solano, E.

    2007-06-22

    We present a method of simulating the Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions for a free spin-1/2 particle in a single trapped ion. The Dirac bispinor is represented by four ionic internal states, and position and momentum of the Dirac particle are associated with the respective ionic variables. We show also how to simulate the simplified 1+1 case, requiring the manipulation of only two internal levels and one motional degree of freedom. Moreover, we study relevant quantum-relativistic effects, like the Zitterbewegung and Klein's paradox, the transition from massless to massive fermions, and the relativistic and nonrelativistic limits, via the tuning of controllable experimental parameters.

  7. DRAFT ADVICE … UNACCEPTABLE PROGRAM IMPACTS UNDER FY 97 BUDGET

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Subject: K Basins Change Package Adopted: June 4, 2004 Page 1 June 4, 2004 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Roy Schepens, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 Richland, WA 99352 Linda Hoffman, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 John Iani, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue

  8. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generating Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Structure for GCM Calculations of Precipitation Pincus, R.(a) and Klein, S.A.(b), NOAA-CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center (a), NOAA/Princeton GFDL (b) Thirteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting The many highly non-linear processes associated with clouds are thought to be a significant factor in the arbitrary tuning of large-scale models. To help reduce the need for tuning we are developing a statistical cloud scheme with prognostic

  9. Microsoft Word - HABAdv #170 Hanford Buried Waste.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    70 Subject: Hanford Buried Waste Adopted: March 4, 2005 Page 1 March 4, 2005 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Roy Schepens, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 (H6-60) Richland, WA 99352 Ron Kreizenbeck, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Jay Manning, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600

  10. Search for Large Extra Dimensions via Single Photons Plus Missing Energy Final States at s^(1/2) = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrera, Edgar Fernando; /Florida State U.

    2008-12-01

    This dissertation presents a search for large extra dimensions in the single photon plus missing transverse energy final states. We use a data sample of approximately 2.7 fb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV (recorded with the D{sup -} detector) to investigate direct Kaluza Klein graviton production and set limits, at the 95% C.L., on the fundamental mass scale M{sub D} from 970 GeV to 816 GeV for two to eight extra dimensions.

  11. Solar radiation on variously oriented sloping surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopinathan, K.K. )

    1991-01-01

    Monthly average daily irradiation on surfaces tilted towards the equator and also inclined at various azimuth angles are estimated for two locations in Lesotho and the results are presented. The isotropic model suggested by Liu and Jordan (Trans. of Ashrae, 526, 1962) along with the modified equation of Klein (Solar Energy, 19, 4, 1977) are employed for the estimation purposes. Surface orientations are selected at three inclinations for six different azimuth angles. Conclusions are reached for optimum tilt and orientation for summer, winter and annual collection. Total annual radiation values are computed for all the slopes and orientations.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - Xie_twpice_NY06.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Variational Analysis of Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP_ICE) Data (01/22/2006 - 2/13/2006) The TWP_ICE Workshop , NASA/GISS, New York, NY, 13-15 November, 2006 A joint effort between LLNL (Xie, McCoy, Klein), BMRC (Hume, Jakob), SUNYSB (Zhang), and other TWPICE participants 143km 130km 172km 99km 148km A Quick Update Done! 3-hourly radiosondes (6 stations) Background field from the ECMWF analysis Radar precipitation Surface turbulence fluxes from Monash University (Darwin

  13. CMWG_Plenary_V2.ppt

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reports from the Cloud Modeling Working Group Ann Fridlind, Larry Berg, Tony Del Genio, ChrisAan Jakob, Steve Klein, Steve Krueger, Shaocheng Xie, Minghua Zhang 19 th Annual ARM Science Team MeeAng * Louisville, Kentucky * 31 March 2009 ACRF Data ↔ Modeling Skill * Model intercomparisons - M-PACE (NSA) - TWP-ICE (TWP) - ISDAC (NSA) * Other scienAfic accomplishments * Science plan contribuAons - Priority science quesAons - Data needs M-PACE Intercomparison Wrap-Up * 26 models took part * Two

  14. Habadv#165 RCBRA.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Subject: River Corridor Baseline Risk Assessment (RCBRA) Adopted: September 10, 2004 Page 1 September 10, 2004 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Ron Kreizeneeck, Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Linda Hoffman, Director Washington State Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Subject: Risk Assessment Work Plan for the 100 Area

  15. Habadv-119.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Subject: B Reactor Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis Adopted: June 8, 2001 Page 1 June 8, 2001 Keith Klein, Manager U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations P.O. Box 550 (A7-50) Richland, WA 99352 Chuck Findley, Acting Regional Administrator U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 10 1200 Sixth Avenue Seattle, WA 98101 Tom Fitzsimmons, Director Washington Department of Ecology P.O. Box 47600 Olympia, WA 98504-7600 Re: B Reactor Engineering Evaluation and Cost Analysis Dear

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 06934566 .l\ ~ ~ ~~9 u.s. Department of Energy Hanford Site OEC 2 8 2004 04-0RP-O78 Mr. Todd Martin, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 1933 Jadwin Avenue, Suite 135 Rich1and, Washington 99352 Dear Mr. Martin: HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) CONSENSUS ADVICE #167 -STOP WORK AUTHORITY Reference: HAB letter from T. Martin to P. Golan and J. Shaw, DOE-HQ; K. Klein, RL; R. Schepens, ORP; L. Hoffman, Ecology; and R. Kreizeneeck, EPA, "Stop Work Authority," dated November 5, 2004. This letter

  17. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/102.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WMD-062 Advice # 102 From: Keith A. Klein Ms. Merilyn B. Reeves, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 723 The Parkway, Suite 200: B1 -41 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Ms. Reeves: RESPONSE TO HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ON POSSIBLE TRANSFER OF LOW- LEVEL (LLW) AND MIXED LOW-LEVEL WASTE (MLLW) TO HANFORD In reference to your letter to me, same subject as above, dated February 4, 2000, a concern was raised that the then-pending Record of Decision (ROD) for the U.S. Department of Energy, (DOE) Richland

  18. http://www.hanford.gov/boards/hab/response/106.htm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ERD- 114 Advice # 106 From: Keith A. Klein Ms. Merilyn B. Reeves, Chair Hanford Advisory Board 723 Parkway Suite 200: B1-41 Richland, Washington 99352 Dear Ms. Reeves: RESPONSE TO THE HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD (HAB) ADVICE ON THE 618-10 AND 618- 11 BURIAL GROUNDS Thank you for the clear HAB position and advice spelled out in your April 7, 2000, letter addressing the 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds. I appreciate your concern regarding these two significant sites. To address the board's main

  19. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with the Fermi-LAT (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may

  20. Extreme Science (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajo-Franklin, Caroline; Klein, Spencer; Minor, Andrew; Torok, Tamas

    2012-02-27

    On Feb. 27, 2012 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, four Berkeley Lab scientists presented talks related to extreme science - and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel.

  1. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Insects as Clear Air Vertical Velocity Profilers Edward Luke Brookhaven National Lab Pavlos Kollias McGill University Steve Klein LLNL Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Cloud Base Height Velocity Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity Velocity Updraft Insect Spectrum Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km) Velocity (m/s) Height (km)

  2. Search for universal extra dimensions in ppbar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren; /Florida State U. /Stockholm U.

    2011-12-01

    We present a search for Kaluza-Klein (KK) particles predicted by models with universal extra dimensions (UED) using a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7.3 fb{sup -1}, collected by the D0 detector at a p{bar p} center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV. The decay chain of KK particles can lead to a final state with two muons of the same charge. This signature is used to set a lower limit on the compactification scale of R{sup -1} > 260 GeV in a minimal UED model.

  3. Dirac equation in low dimensions: The factorization method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snchez-Monroy, J.A.; Quimbay, C.J.

    2014-11-15

    We present a general approach to solve the (1+1) and (2+1)-dimensional Dirac equations in the presence of static scalar, pseudoscalar and gauge potentials, for the case in which the potentials have the same functional form and thus the factorization method can be applied. We show that the presence of electric potentials in the Dirac equation leads to two KleinGordon equations including an energy-dependent potential. We then generalize the factorization method for the case of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. Additionally, the shape invariance is generalized for a specific class of energy-dependent Hamiltonians. We also present a condition for the absence of the Klein paradox (stability of the Dirac sea), showing how Dirac particles in low dimensions can be confined for a wide family of potentials. - Highlights: The low-dimensional Dirac equation in the presence of static potentials is solved. The factorization method is generalized for energy-dependent Hamiltonians. The shape invariance is generalized for energy-dependent Hamiltonians. The stability of the Dirac sea is related to the existence of supersymmetric partner Hamiltonians.

  4. The generalized Erlangen program and setting a geometry for four- dimensional conformal fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ne`eman, Y. |; Hehl, F.W.; Mielke, E.W.

    1993-10-22

    This is the text of a talk at the International Symposium on ``Mathematical Physics towards the XXI Century`` held in March 1993 at Beersheva, Israel. In the first part we attempt to summarize XXth Century Physics, in the light of Kelvin`s 1900 speech ``Dark Clouds over XIXth Century Physics.`` Contrary to what is usually said, Kelvin predicted that the ``clouds`` (relativity and quantum mechanics) would revolutionize physics and that one hundred years might be needed to harmonize them with classical physics. Quantum Gravity can be considered as a leftover from Kelvin`s program -- so are the problems with the interpretation of quantum mechanics. At the end of the XXth Century, the Standard Model is the new panoramic synthesis, drawn in gauge-geometric lines -- realizing the Erlangen program beyond F. Klein`s expectations. The hierarchy problem and the smallness of the cosmological constant are our ``clouds``, generations and the Higgs sector are to us what radioactivity was in 1900. In the second part we describe Metric-Affine spacetimes. We construct the Noether machinery and provide expressions for the conserved energy and hypermomentum. Superimposing conformal invariance over the affine structure induces the Virasoro-like infinite constraining algebra of diffeomorphisms, applied with constant parameters and opening the possibility of a 4DCFT, similar to 2DCFT.

  5. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {yields} {infinity} and r {yields} const > 0 as l {yields} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {yields} 0 as l {yields} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {Gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {Gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  6. Global strings in extra dimensions: The full map of solutions, matter trapping, and the hierarchy problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bronnikov, K. A.; Meierovich, B. E.

    2008-02-15

    We consider (d{sub 0} + 2)-dimensional configurations with global strings in two extra dimensions and a flat metric in d{sub 0} dimensions, endowed with a warp factor e{sup 2{gamma}} depending on the distance l from the string center. All possible regular solutions of the field equations are classified by the behavior of the warp factor and the extradimensional circular radius r(l). Solutions with r {sup {yields}} {infinity} and r {sup {yields}} const > 0 as l {sup {yields}} {infinity} are interpreted in terms of thick brane-world models. Solutions with r {sup {yields}} 0 as l {sup {yields}} l{sub c} > 0, i.e., those with a second center, are interpreted as either multibrane systems (which are appropriate for large enough distances l{sub c} between the centers) or as Kaluza-Klein-type configurations with extra dimensions invisible due to their smallness. In the case of the Mexican-hat symmetry-breaking potential, we build the full map of regular solutions on the ({epsilon}, {gamma}) parameter plane, where {epsilon} acts as an effective cosmological constant and {gamma} characterizes the gravitational field strength. The trapping properties of candidate brane worlds for test scalar fields are discussed. Good trapping properties for massive fields are found for models with increasing warp factors. Kaluza-Klein-type models are shown to have nontrivial warp factor behaviors, leading to matter particle mass spectra that seem promising from the standpoint of hierarchy problems.

  7. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS? space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H ? ?? decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H ? ?? rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. We perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  8. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS? space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H ? ?? decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemoreof gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H ? ?? rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. We perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.less

  9. Scalar field as a Bose-Einstein condensate?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castellanos, Elas; Escamilla-Rivera, Celia; Macas, Alfredo; Nez, Daro E-mail: cescamilla@mctp.mx E-mail: nunez@nucleares.unam.mx

    2014-11-01

    We discuss the analogy between a classical scalar field with a self-interacting potential, in a curved spacetime described by a quasi-bounded state, and a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate. In this context, we compare the Klein-Gordon equation with the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. Moreover, the introduction of a curved background spacetime endows, in a natural way, an equivalence to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation with an explicit confinement potential. The curvature also induces a position dependent self-interaction parameter. We exploit this analogy by means of the Thomas-Fermi approximation, commonly used to describe the Bose-Einstein condensate, in order to analyze the quasi bound scalar field distribution surrounding a black hole.

  10. Complex statistics and diffusion in nonlinear disordered particle chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antonopoulos, Ch. G.; Bountis, T.; Skokos, Ch.; Drossos, L.

    2014-06-15

    We investigate dynamically and statistically diffusive motion in a Klein-Gordon particle chain in the presence of disorder. In particular, we examine a low energy (subdiffusive) and a higher energy (self-trapping) case and verify that subdiffusive spreading is always observed. We then carry out a statistical analysis of the motion, in both cases, in the sense of the Central Limit Theorem and present evidence of different chaos behaviors, for various groups of particles. Integrating the equations of motion for times as long as 10{sup 9}, our probability distribution functions always tend to Gaussians and show that the dynamics does not relax onto a quasi-periodic Kolmogorov-Arnold-Moser torus and that diffusion continues to spread chaotically for arbitrarily long times.

  11. Generalised Eisenhart lift of the Toda chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cariglia, Marco; Gibbons, Gary

    2014-02-15

    The Toda chain of nearest neighbour interacting particles on a line can be described both in terms of geodesic motion on a manifold with one extra dimension, the Eisenhart lift, or in terms of geodesic motion in a symmetric space with several extra dimensions. We examine the relationship between these two realisations and discover that the symmetric space is a generalised, multi-particle Eisenhart lift of the original problem that reduces to the standard Eisenhart lift. Such generalised Eisenhart lift acts as an inverse Kaluza-Klein reduction, promoting coupling constants to momenta in higher dimension. In particular, isometries of the generalised lift metric correspond to energy preserving transformations that mix coordinates and coupling constants. A by-product of the analysis is that the lift of the Toda Lax pair can be used to construct higher rank Killing tensors for both the standard and generalised lift metrics.

  12. Distinguishing Supersymmetry From Universal Extra Dimensions or Little Higgs Models With Dark Matter Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan; Zaharijas, Gabrijela; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    There are compelling reasons to think that new physics will appear at or below the TeV-scale. It is not known what form this new physics will take, however. Although The Large Hadron collider is very likely to discover new particles associated with the TeV-scale, it may be difficult for it to determine the nature of those particles, whether superpartners, Kaluza-Klein modes or other states. In this article, we consider how direct and indirect dark matter detection experiments may provide information complementary to hadron colliders, which can be used to discriminate between supersymmetry, models with universal extra dimensions, and Little Higgs theories. We find that, in many scenarios, dark matter experiments can be effectively used to distinguish between these possibilities.

  13. Science at the Theatre - Extreme Science - Promo Video

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer

    2013-05-29

    On Feb. 27 at 7 pm at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, join four Berkeley Lab scientists as they discuss extreme science -- and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel. Go here for more information and to view videos of previous Science at the Theater events: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  14. Fermion resonances on a thick brane with a piecewise warp factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Haitao; Liu Yuxiao; Zhao Zhenhua; Guo Heng

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the problems of resonances of massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) fermions on a single scalar constructed thick brane with a piecewise warp factor matching smoothly. The distance between two boundaries and the other parameters are determined by one free parameter through three junction conditions. For the generalized Yukawa coupling {eta}{Psi}{phi}{sup k{Psi}} with odd k=1,3,5,..., the mass eigenvalue m, width {Gamma}, lifetime {tau}, and maximal probability P{sub max} of fermion resonances are obtained. Our numerical calculations show that the brane without internal structure also favors the appearance of resonant states for both left- and right-handed fermions. The scalar-fermion coupling and the thickness of the brane influence the resonant behaviors of the massive KK fermions.

  15. Science at the Theatre - Extreme Science - Promo Video

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, Spencer

    2012-01-01

    On Feb. 27 at 7 pm at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, join four Berkeley Lab scientists as they discuss extreme science -- and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel. Go here for more information and to view videos of previous Science at the Theater events: http://www.lbl.gov/LBL-PID/fobl/

  16. Little Randall-Sundrum model and a multiply warped spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Kristian L.

    2008-06-15

    A recent work has investigated the possibility that the mass scale for the ultraviolet (UV) brane in the Randall-Sundrum (RS) model is of the order 10{sup 3} TeV. In this so called 'little Randall-Sundrum' (LRS) model the bounds on the gauge sector are less severe, permitting a lower Kaluza-Klein scale and cleaner discovery channels. However employing a low UV scale nullifies one major appeal of the RS model, namely, the elegant explanation of the hierarchy between the Planck and weak scales. In this work we show that by localizing the gauge, fermion, and scalar sector of the LRS model on a five dimensional slice of a doubly warped spacetime one may obtain the low UV brane scale employed in the LRS model and motivate the weak-Planck hierarchy. We also consider the generalization to an n-warped spacetime.

  17. Mirror effect induced by the dilaton field on the Hawking radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Kengo; Okamura, Takashi

    2006-11-03

    A ''stringy particle'' action is naturally derived from Kaluza-Klein compactification of a test string action coupled to the dilaton field in a conformally invariant manner. According to the standard procedure, we perform the second quantization of the stringy particle. As an interesting application, we consider evaporation of a near-extremal dilatonic black hole by Hawking radiation via the stringy particles. We show that a mirror surface which reflects them is induced by the dilaton field outside the the horizon when the size of the black hole is comparable to the Planck scale. As a result, the energy flux does not propagate across the surface, and hence the evaporation of the dilatonic black hole stops just before the naked singularity at the extremal state appears even though the surface gravity is non-zero in the extremal limit.

  18. Quantum singularities in the BTZ spacetime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitelli, Joao Paulo M.; Letelier, Patricio S.

    2008-06-15

    The spinless Banados-Teiltelboim-Zanelli spacetime is considered in the quantum theory context. Specifically, we study the case of a negative mass parameter using quantum test particles obeying the Klein-Gordon and Dirac equations. We study if this classical singular spacetime, with a naked singularity at the origin, remains singular when tested with quantum particles. The need for additional information near the origin is confirmed for massive scalar particles and all of the possible boundary conditions necessary to turn the spatial portion of the wave operator self-adjoint are found. When tested by massless scalar particles or fermions, the singularity is ''healed'' and no extra boundary condition is needed. Near infinity, no boundary conditions are necessary.

  19. An interpolation between the wave and diffusion equations through the fractional evolution equations Dirac like

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierantozzi, T.; Vazquez, L.

    2005-11-01

    Through fractional calculus and following the method used by Dirac to obtain his well-known equation from the Klein-Gordon equation, we analyze a possible interpolation between the Dirac and the diffusion equations in one space dimension. We study the transition between the hyperbolic and parabolic behaviors by means of the generalization of the D'Alembert formula for the classical wave equation and the invariance under space and time inversions of the interpolating fractional evolution equations Dirac like. Such invariance depends on the values of the fractional index and is related to the nonlocal property of the time fractional differential operator. For this system of fractional evolution equations, we also find an associated conserved quantity analogous to the Hamiltonian for the classical Dirac case.

  20. A naturalistic decision making model for simulated human combatants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUNTER,KEITH O.; HART,WILLIAM E.; FORSYTHE,JAMES C.

    2000-05-01

    The authors describe a naturalistic behavioral model for the simulation of small unit combat. This model, Klein's recognition-primed decision making (RPD) model, is driven by situational awareness rather than a rational process of selecting from a set of action options. They argue that simulated combatants modeled with RPD will have more flexible and realistic responses to a broad range of small-scale combat scenarios. Furthermore, they note that the predictability of a simulation using an RPD framework can be easily controlled to provide multiple evaluations of a given combat scenario. Finally, they discuss computational issues for building an RPD-based behavior engine for fully automated combatants in small conflict scenarios, which are being investigated within Sandia's Next Generation Site Security project.

  1. A temperature-dependent coarse-grained model for the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbott, Lauren J.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-12-22

    In this study, a coarse-grained (CG) model is developed for the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), using a hybrid top-down and bottom-up approach. Nonbonded parameters are fit to experimental thermodynamic data following the procedures of the SDK (Shinoda, DeVane, and Klein) CG force field, with minor adjustments to provide better agreement with radial distribution functions from atomistic simulations. Bonded parameters are fit to probability distributions from atomistic simulations using multi-centered Gaussian-based potentials. The temperature-dependent potentials derived for the PNIPAM CG model in this work properly capture the coil–globule transition of PNIPAM single chains and yield a chain-length dependence consistent with atomisticmore » simulations.« less

  2. A temperature-dependent coarse-grained model for the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbott, Lauren J.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2015-12-22

    In this study, a coarse-grained (CG) model is developed for the thermoresponsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), using a hybrid top-down and bottom-up approach. Nonbonded parameters are fit to experimental thermodynamic data following the procedures of the SDK (Shinoda, DeVane, and Klein) CG force field, with minor adjustments to provide better agreement with radial distribution functions from atomistic simulations. Bonded parameters are fit to probability distributions from atomistic simulations using multi-centered Gaussian-based potentials. The temperature-dependent potentials derived for the PNIPAM CG model in this work properly capture the coil–globule transition of PNIPAM single chains and yield a chain-length dependence consistent with atomistic simulations.

  3. Search for resonant diboson production in the ℓℓqq¯ final state in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-02-10

    This study reports on a search for narrow resonances in diboson production in the ℓℓqq¯ final state using pp collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20 fb–1 collected at √s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess of data events over the Standard Model expectation is observed. Upper limits at the 95 % confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for Kaluza–Klein gravitons predicted by the Randall–Sundrum model and for Extended Gauge Model W' bosons. These results lead to the exclusion of mass values below 740 andmore » 1590 GeV for the graviton and W' boson respectively.« less

  4. Dirac neutrino in warped extra dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, W.-F.; Ng, John N.; Wu, Jackson M. S.

    2009-12-01

    We implement Dirac neutrinos in the minimal custodial Randall-Sundrum setting via the Krauss-Wilczek mechanism. We demonstrate by giving explicit lepton mass matrices that with neutrinos in the normal hierarchy, lepton mass and mixing patterns can be naturally reproduced at the scale set by the constraints from electroweak precision measurements, and at the same time without violating bounds set by lepton flavor violations. Our scenario generically predicts a nonzero neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, as well as the existence of sub-TeV right-handed Kaluza-Klein neutrinos, which partner the right-handed standard model charged leptons. These relatively light KK neutrinos may be searched for at the LHC.

  5. SNe Ia tests of quintessence tracker cosmology in an anisotropic background

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, W.; Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. E-mail: saulo.carneiro@pq.cnpq.br

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the observational effects of a quintessence model in an anisotropic spacetime. The anisotropic metric is a non-rotating particular case of a generalized Gödel's metric and is classified as Bianchi III. This metric is an exact solution of the Einstein-Klein-Gordon field equations with an anisotropic scalar field ψ, which is responsible for the anisotropy of the spacetime geometry. We test the model against observations of type Ia supernovae, analyzing the SDSS dataset calibrated with the MLCS2k2 fitter, and the results are compared to standard quintessence models with Ratra-Peebles potentials. We obtain a good agreement with observations, with best values for the matter and curvature density parameters Ω{sub M} = 0.29 and Ω{sub k}= 0.01 respectively. We conclude that present SNe Ia observations cannot, alone, distinguish a possible anisotropic axis in the cosmos.

  6. Superradiance and black hole bomb in five-dimensional minimal ungauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aliev, Alikram N.

    2014-11-01

    We examine the black hole bomb model which consists of a rotating black hole of five-dimenensional minimal ungauged supergravity and a reflecting mirror around it. For low-frequency scalar perturbations, we find solutions to the Klein-Gordon equation in the near-horizon and far regions of the black hole spacetime. To avoid solutions with logarithmic terms, we assume that the orbital quantum number l takes on nearly, but not exactly, integer values and perform the matching of these solutions in an intermediate region. This allows us to calculate analytically the frequency spectrum of quasinormal modes, taking the limits as l approaches even or odd integers separately. We find that all l modes of scalar perturbations undergo negative damping in the regime of superradiance, resulting in exponential growth of their amplitudes. Thus, the model under consideration would exhibit the superradiant instability, eventually behaving as a black hole bomb in five dimensions.

  7. Exact quantization of a superparticle in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horigane, Tetsuo; Kazama, Yoichi

    2010-02-15

    As a step toward deeper understanding of the AdS/CFT correspondence, exact quantization of a Brink-Schwarz superparticle in the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} background with Ramond-Ramond flux is performed from the first principle in the phase space formulation. It includes the construction of the quantum Noether charges for the psu(2,2|4) superconformal symmetry and by solving the superconformal primary conditions we obtain the complete physical spectrum of the system with the explicit wave functions. The spectrum agrees precisely with the supergravity results, including all the Kaluza-Klein excitations. Our method and the result are expected to shed light on the eventual quantization of a superstring in this important background.

  8. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequence of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.

  9. Higgs production and decay in models of a warped extra dimension with a bulk Higgs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Archer, Paul R.; Carena, Marcela; Carmona, Adrian; Neubert, Matthias

    2015-01-13

    Warped extra-dimension models in which the Higgs boson is allowed to propagate in the bulk of a compact AdS5 space are conjectured to be dual to models featuring a partially composite Higgs boson. They offer a framework with which to investigate the implications of changing the scaling dimension of the Higgs operator, which can be used to reduce the constraints from electroweak precision data. In the context of such models, we calculate the cross section for Higgs production in gluon fusion and the H → γγ decay rate and show that they are finite (at one-loop order) as a consequencemore » of gauge invariance. The extended scalar sector comprising the Kaluza-Klein excitations of the Standard Model scalars is constructed in detail. The largest effects are due to virtual KK fermions, whose contributions to the cross section and decay rate introduce a quadratic sensitivity to the maximum allowed value y* of the random complex entries of the 5D anarchic Yukawa matrices. We find an enhancement of the gluon-fusion cross section and a reduction of the H → γγ rate as well as of the tree-level Higgs couplings to fermions and electroweak gauge bosons. As a result, we perform a detailed study of the correlated signal strengths for different production mechanisms and decay channels as functions of y*, the mass scale of Kaluza-Klein resonances and the scaling dimension of the composite Higgs operator.« less

  10. Comment on "Radiocarbon Calibration Curve Spanning 0 to 50,000 Years B.P. Based on Paired 230Th/234U/238U and 14C Dates on Pristine Corals" by R.G. Fairbanks, R. A. Mortlock, T.-C. Chiu, L. Cao, A. Kaplan, T. P. Guilderson, T. W. Fairbanks, A. L. Bloom, P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimer, P J; Baillie, M L; Bard, E; Beck, J W; Blackwell, P G; Buck, C E; Burr, G S; Edwards, R L; Friedrich, M; Guilderson, T P; Hogg, A G; Hughen, K A; Kromer, B; McCormac, G; Manning, S; Reimer, R W; Southon, J R; Stuiver, M; der Plicht, J v; Weyhenmeyer, C E

    2005-10-02

    Radiocarbon calibration curves are essential for converting radiocarbon dated chronologies to the calendar timescale. Prior to the 1980's numerous differently derived calibration curves based on radiocarbon ages of known age material were in use, resulting in ''apples and oranges'' comparisons between various records (Klein et al., 1982), further complicated by until then unappreciated inter-laboratory variations (International Study Group, 1982). The solution was to produce an internationally-agreed calibration curve based on carefully screened data with updates at 4-6 year intervals (Klein et al., 1982; Stuiver and Reimer, 1986; Stuiver and Reimer, 1993; Stuiver et al., 1998). The IntCal working group has continued this tradition with the active participation of researchers who produced the records that were considered for incorporation into the current, internationally-ratified calibration curves, IntCal04, SHCal04, and Marine04, for Northern Hemisphere terrestrial, Southern Hemisphere terrestrial, and marine samples, respectively (Reimer et al., 2004; Hughen et al., 2004; McCormac et al., 2004). Fairbanks et al. (2005), accompanied by a more technical paper, Chiu et al. (2005), and an introductory comment, Adkins (2005), recently published a ''calibration curve spanning 0-50,000 years''. Fairbanks et al. (2005) and Chiu et al. (2005) have made a significant contribution to the database on which the IntCal04 and Marine04 calibration curves are based. These authors have now taken the further step to derive their own radiocarbon calibration extending to 50,000 cal BP, which they claim is superior to that generated by the IntCal working group. In their papers, these authors are strongly critical of the IntCal calibration efforts for what they claim to be inadequate screening and sample pretreatment methods. While these criticisms may ultimately be helpful in identifying a better set of protocols, we feel that there are also several erroneous and misleading

  11. Possible ambiguities in the equation of state for neutron stars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Miyatsu, Tsuyoshi; Ryu, C. Y.; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Gngr, Can; Kele?, Vildan; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J.

    2014-05-02

    We addressed possible ambiguities on the properties of neutron stars (NSs) estimated in theoretical sides. First, roles of hyperons inside the NS are discussed through various relativistic mean field (RMF) theories. In particular, the extension of SU(6) spin-flavor symmetry to SU(3) flavor symmetry is shown to give rise to the increase of hyperon threshold density, similarly to the Fock term effects in RMF theories. As a result, about 2.0 solar mass is obtained with the hyperons. Second, the effect by the modified f(R) gravity, which leaves a room for the dark energy in the Einstein equation to be taken into account, is discussed for the NS in a strong magnetic field (MF). Our results show that the modified gravity with the Kaluza-Klein electro-magnetism theory expanded in terms of a length scale parameter may reasonably describe the NS in strong MF, so called magnetar. Even the super-soft equation of state is shown to be revived by the modified f(R) gravity.

  12. Kinetics of spin relaxation in quantum wires and channels: Boundary spin echo and formation of a persistent spin helix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slipko, Valeriy A.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2011-10-15

    In this paper we use a spin kinetic equation to study spin-polarization dynamics in one-dimensional (1D) wires and 2D channels. The spin kinetic equation is valid in both diffusive and ballistic spin transport regimes and therefore is more general than the usual spin drift-diffusion equations. In particular, we demonstrate that in infinite 1D wires with Rashba spin-orbit interaction the exponential spin-relaxation decay can be modulated by an oscillating function. In the case of spin relaxation in finite length 1D wires, it is shown that an initially homogeneous spin polarization spontaneously transforms into a persistent spin helix. We find that a propagating spin-polarization profile reflects from a system boundary and returns back to its initial position similarly to the reflectance of sound waves from an obstacle. The Green's function of the spin kinetic equation is derived for both finite and infinite 1D systems. Moreover, we demonstrate explicitly that the spin relaxation in specifically oriented 2D channels with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of equal strength occurs similarly to that in 1D wires of finite length. Finally, a simple transformation mapping 1D spin kinetic equation into the Klein-Gordon equation with an imaginary mass is found thus establishing an interesting connection between semiconductor spintronics and relativistic quantum mechanics.

  13. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fbmore » $$^{-1}$$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$$^{\\prime}$$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.« less

  14. Geometrical properties of the trans-spherical solutions in higher dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Gungwon; Kim, Hyeong-Chan; Lee, Jungjai

    2009-06-15

    We investigate the geometrical properties of static vacuum p-brane solutions of Einstein gravity in D=n+p+3 dimensions, which have spherical symmetry of S{sup n+1} orthogonal to the p directions and which are invariant under the translation along them. The solutions are characterized by the mass density and p number of tension densities. The causal structure of the higher-dimensional solutions is essentially the same as that of the five-dimensional ones. Namely, a naked singularity appears for most solutions except for the Schwarzschild black p-brane and the Kaluza-Klein bubble. We show that some important geometric properties such as the area of S{sup n+1} and the total spatial volume are characterized only by the three parameters (the mass density, the sum of tension densities, and the sum of tension density squares), rather than individual tension densities. These geometric properties are analyzed in detail in this parameter space and are compared with those of the five-dimensional case.

  15. Search for Large Extra Dimensions Based on Observations of Neutron Stars with the Fermi-LAT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-09-19

    Large extra dimensions (LED) have been proposed to account for the apparent weakness of gravitation. These theories also indicate that the postulated massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravitons may be produced by nucleon-nucleon bremsstrahlung in the course of core collapse of supernovae. Hannestad and Raffelt have predicted energy spectra of gamma ray emission from the decay of KK gravitons trapped by the gravity of the remnant neutron stars (NS). These and other authors have used EGRET data on NS to obtain stringent limits on LED. Fermi-LAT is observing radio pulsar positions obtained from radio and x-ray catalogs. NS with certain characteristics are unlikely emitter of gamma rays, and emit in radio and perhaps x-rays. This talk will focus on the blind analysis we plan to perform, which has been developed using the 1st 2 months of all sky data and Monte Carlo simulations, to obtain limits on LED based on about 1 year of Fermi-LAT data. Preliminary limits from this analysis using these first 2 months of data will be also be discussed.

  16. Neutron stars in a perturbative f(R) gravity model with strong magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheoun, Myung-Ki; Deliduman, Cemsinan; Gngr, Can; Kele?, Vildan; Ryu, C.Y.; Kajino, Toshitaka; Mathews, Grant J. E-mail: cemsinan@msgsu.edu.tr E-mail: kelesvi@itu.edu.tr E-mail: kajino@nao.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    In Kaluza-Klein electromagnetism it is natural to associate modified gravity with strong electromagnetic fields. Hence, in this paper we investigate the combined effects of a strong magnetic field and perturbative f(R) gravity on the structure of neutron stars. The effect of an interior strong magnetic field of about 10{sup 17?18} G on the equation of state is derived in the context of a quantum hadrodynamics (QHD) equation of state (EoS) including effects of the magnetic pressure and energy along with occupied Landau levels. Adopting a random orientation of interior field domains, we solve the modified spherically symmetric hydrostatic equilibrium equations derived for a gravity model with f(R) = R+?R{sup 2}. Effects of both the finite magnetic field and the modified gravity are detailed for various values of the magnetic field and the perturbation parameter ? along with a discussion of their physical implications. We show that there exists a parameter space of the modified gravity and the magnetic field strength, in which even a soft equation of state can accommodate a large ( > 2 M{sub s}un) maximum neutron star mass.

  17. Topological charges in SL(2,R) covariant massive 11-dimensional and type IIB supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callister, Andrew K.; Smith, Douglas J.

    2009-12-15

    In this paper we construct closed expressions that correspond to the topological charges of the various 1/2-BPS states of the maximal 10- and 11-dimensional supergravity theories. These expressions are related to the structure of the supersymmetry algebras in curved spacetimes. We mainly focus on IIB supergravity and 11-dimensional supergravity in a double M9-brane background, with an emphasis on the SL(2,R) multiplet structure of the charges and how these map between theories. This includes the charges corresponding to the multiplets of 7- and 9-branes in IIB. We find that examining the possible multiplet structures of the charges provides another tool for exploring the spectrum of BPS states that appear in these theories. As a prerequisite to constructing the charges we determine the field equations and multiplet structure of the 11-dimensional gauge potentials, extending previous results on the subject. The massive gauge transformations of the fields are also discussed. We also demonstrate how these massive gauge transformations are compatible with the construction of an SL(2,R) covariant kinetic term in the 11-dimensional Kaluza-Klein monopole worldvolume action.

  18. Sterile Neutrino Searches in MINOS and MINOS+ Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Junting

    2015-05-01

    This dissertation presents the searches on sterile neutrinos using the data collected in MINOS+ Experiment from September 2013 to September 2014, and the full data set of MINOS Experiment collected from 2005 to 2012. Anomalies in short baseline experiments, such as LSND and MiniBooNE, showed hints of sterile neutrinos, a type of neutrino that does not interact with the Standard Model particles. In this work, two models are considered: 3+1 and large extra dimension (LED). In the 3+1 model, one sterile neutrino state is added into the standard oscillation scheme consisting of three known active neutrino states ve, vμ and vτ. In the LED model, sterile neutrinos arise as Kaluza-Klein (KK) states due to assumed large extra dimensions. Mixing between sterile and active neutrino states may modify the oscillation patterns observed in the MINOS detectors. Both searches yield null results. For 3+1, a combined fit of MINOS and MINOS+ data gives a stronger limit on θ24 in the range of 10-2 eV2 < Δm412 < 1 eV2 than previous experiments. For LED, with the complete MINOS data set, the size of extra dimensions is constrained to be smaller than ~ 0.35 μm at 90% C.L. in the limit of a vanishing lightest neutrino mass.

  19. Flavor structure of warped extra dimension models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Perez, Gilad; Soni, Amarjit

    2005-01-01

    We recently showed that warped extra-dimensional models with bulk custodial symmetry and few TeV Kaluza-Klein (KK) masses lead to striking signals at B factories. In this paper, using a spurion analysis, we systematically study the flavor structure of models that belong to the above class. In particular we find that the profiles of the zero modes, which are similar in all these models, essentially control the underlying flavor structure. This implies that our results are robust and model independent in this class of models. We discuss in detail the origin of the signals in B physics. We also briefly study other new physics signatures that arise in rare K decays (K{yields}{pi}{nu}{nu}), in rare top decays [t{yields}c{gamma}(Z,gluon)], and the possibility of CP asymmetries in D{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates such as K{sub S}{pi}{sup 0} and others. Finally we demonstrate that with light KK masses, {approx}3 TeV, the above class of models with anarchic 5D Yukawas has a 'CP problem' since contributions to the neutron electric dipole moment are roughly 20 times larger than the current experimental bound. Using AdS/CFT correspondence, these extra-dimensional models are dual to a purely 4D strongly coupled conformal Higgs sector thus enhancing their appeal.

  20. Mass gap for gravity localized on Weyl thick branes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbosa-Cendejas, N.; Santos, M. A. Reyes; Herrera-Aguilar, A.; Schubert, C.

    2008-06-15

    We consider thick brane configurations in a pure geometric Weyl integrable 5D space-time, a non-Riemannian generalization of Kaluza-Klein (KK) theory involving a geometric scalar field. Thus, the 5D theory describes gravity coupled to a self-interacting scalar field which gives rise to the structure of the thick branes. We continue the study of the properties of a previously found family of solutions which is smooth at the position of the brane but involves naked singularities in the fifth dimension. Analyzing their graviton spectrum, we find that a particularly interesting situation arises for a special case in which the 4D graviton is separated from the KK gravitons by a mass gap. The corresponding effective Schroedinger equation has a modified Poeschl-Teller potential and can be solved exactly. Apart from the massless 4D graviton, it contains one massive KK bound state, and the continuum spectrum of delocalized KK modes. We also discuss the mass hierarchy problem, and explicitly compute the corrections to Newton's law in the thin brane limit.

  1. Gamma-ray polarization of the synchrotron self-compton process from a highly relativistic jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Zhe; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2014-11-01

    The high polarization observed in the prompt phase of some gamma-ray bursts invites extensive study of the emission mechanism. In this paper, we investigate the polarization properties of the synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) process from a highly relativistic jet. A magnetic-dominated, baryon-loaded jet ejected from the central engine travels with a large Lorentz factor. Shells with slightly different velocities collide with each other and produce shocks. The shocks accelerate electrons to a power-law distribution and, at the same time, magnify the magnetic field. Electrons move in the magnetic field and produce synchrotron photons. Synchrotron photons suffer from the Compton scattering (CS) process and then are detected by an observer located slightly off-axis. We analytically derive the formulae of photon polarization in the SSC process in two magnetic configurations: a magnetic field in the shock plane and perpendicular to the shock plane. We show that photons induced by the SSC process can be highly polarized, with the maximum polarization Π ∼ 24% in the energy band [0.5, 5] MeV. The polarization depends on the viewing angles, peaking in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. In the energy band [0.05, 0.5] MeV, in which most γ-ray polarimeters are active, the polarization is about twice that in the Thomson limit, reaching Π ∼ 20%. This implies that the Klein-Nishina effect, which is often neglected in the literature, should be carefully considered.

  2. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $$t\\bar{t}$$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1more » pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.« less

  3. Propagation of gamma rays and production of free electrons in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimant, Y. S.; Nusinovich, G. S.; Romero-Talamas, C. A.; Granatstein, V. L.; Sprangle, P.; Penano, J.

    2012-10-15

    This paper is devoted to the analysis of production of free electrons in air by gamma-rays leaking from radioactive materials. A model based on the Klein-Nishina scattering theory is used to calculate scattering cross sections and approximate the electron production rate. The model includes the effects of primary gamma-quanta radiated by the source as well as that scattered in air. Comparison of the model with the mcnpx kinetic code (http://mcnpx.lanl.gov/) in a sample problem shows excellent agreement. The motivation for this research comes from the recently proposed concept of remote detection of concealed radioactive materials [V. L. Granatstein and G. S. Nusinovich, J. Appl. Phys. 108, 063304 (2010)]. The concept is based on the breakdown in air at the focal point of a high-power beam of electromagnetic waves produced by a THz gyrotron with a 10-20 {mu}s pulse. The presence of a radioactive material can greatly exceed the production rate of free electrons over the natural background rate. Additional electrons act as seeds to initiate the breakdown and create sufficiently dense plasma at the focal region. The dense plasma can then be remotely detected as an unambiguous effect of the concealed radioactive material.

  4. Search for physics beyond the standard model in final states with a lepton and missing transverse energy in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-05-22

    A search for new physics in proton-proton collisions having final states with an electron or muon and missing transverse energy is presented. The analysis uses data collected in 2012 with the CMS detector, at an LHC center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$^{-1}$. No significant deviation of the transverse mass distribution of the charged lepton-neutrino system from the standard model prediction is found. Mass exclusion limits of up to 3.28 TeV at a 95% confidence level for a W$^{\\prime}$ boson with the same couplings as that of the standard model W boson are determined. Results are also derived in the framework of split universal extra dimensions, and exclusion limits on Kaluza-Klein W$^{(2)}_{{\\rm KK}}$ states are found. The final state with large missing transverse energy also enables a search for dark matter production with a recoiling W boson, with limits set on the mass and the production cross section of potential candidates. Finally, limits are established for a model including interference between a left-handed W$^{\\prime}$ boson and the standard model W boson, and for a compositeness model.

  5. Erratum: Search for Anomalous $t\\bar{t}$ Production in the Highly-Boosted All-Hadronic Final State

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-03-28

    A search is presented for a massive particle, generically referred to as a Z', decaying into a t t-bar pair. The search focuses on Z' resonances that are sufficiently massive to produce highly Lorentz-boosted top quarks, which yield collimated decay products that are partially or fully merged into single jets. The analysis uses new methods to analyze jet substructure, providing suppression of the non-top multijet backgrounds. The analysis is based on a data sample of proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5 inverse femtobarns. Upper limits in the range of 1 pb are set on the product of the production cross section and branching fraction for a topcolor Z' modeled for several widths, as well as for a Randall--Sundrum Kaluza--Klein gluon. In addition, the results constrain any enhancement in t t-bar production beyond expectations of the standard model for t t-bar invariant masses larger than 1 TeV.

  6. Gamma ray lines from a universal extra dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertone, G.; Jackson, C. B.; Shaughnessy, G.; Tait, T. M.P.; Vallinotto, A.

    2012-03-01

    Indirect Dark Matter searches are based on the observation of secondary particles produced by the annihilation or decay of Dark Matter. Among them, gamma-rays are perhaps the most promising messengers, as they do not suffer deflection or absorption on Galactic scales, so their observation would directly reveal the position and the energy spectrum of the emitting source. Here, we study the detailed gamma-ray energy spectrum of Kaluza--Klein Dark Matter in a theory with 5 Universal Extra Dimensions. We focus in particular on the two body annihilation of Dark Matter particles into a photon and another particle, which produces monochromatic photons, resulting in a line in the energy spectrum of gamma rays. Previous calculations in the context of the five dimensional UED model have computed the line signal from annihilations into \\gamma \\gamma, but we extend these results to include \\gamma Z and \\gamma H final states. We find that these spectral lines are subdominant compared to the predicted \\gamma \\gamma signal, but they would be important as follow-up signals in the event of the observation of the \\gamma \\gamma line, in order to distinguish the 5d UED model from other theoretical scenarios.

  7. Total-derivative supersymmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haba, Naoyuki; Uekusa, Nobuhiro

    2010-05-15

    On an interval compactification in supersymmetric theory, boundary conditions for bulk fields must be treated carefully. If they are taken arbitrarily following the requirement that a theory is supersymmetric, the conditions could give redundant constraints on the theory. We construct a supersymmetric action integral on an interval by introducing brane interactions with which total-derivative terms under the supersymmetry transformation become zero due to a cancellation. The variational principle leads equations of motion and also boundary conditions for bulk fields, which determine boundary values of bulk fields. By estimating mass spectrum, spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in this simple setup can be realized in a new framework. This supersymmetry breaking does not induce a massless R axion, which is favorable for phenomenology. It is worth noting that fermions in hyper-multiplet, gauge bosons, and the fifth-dimensional component of gauge bosons can have zero-modes (while the other components are all massive as Kaluza-Klein modes), which fits the gauge-Higgs unification scenarios.

  8. Houston Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program (Houston PREP). Final report, June 9, 1997--July 25, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The 1997 Houston Pre-Freshman Enrichment Program (PREP) was conducted at the campus of the University of Houston-Downtown from June 9 to July 25, 1997. Program participants were recruited from the Greater Houston Area. All participants were identified as high-achieving students with an interest in learning about the engineering and science professions. The goal of the program was to better prepare our pre-college youth prior to entering college as mathematics, science and engineering majors. The program participants were middle school and high school students from the Aldine, Alief, Channel View, Clear Creek, Cypress-Fairbanks, Fort Bend, Galena Park, Houston, Humble, Katy, Klein, North Forest, Pasadena, Private, and Spring Branch Independent School Districts. Of the 194 students starting the program, 165 students were from economically and socially disadvantage groups under-represented in the engineering and science professions, and 118 of the 194 were women. Our First Year group for 1997 composed of 96% minority and women students. Second and Third Year students combined were 96% minority or women. With financial support from the Center for Computational Sciences and Advanced Distributed Simulation, the Fourth Year Program was added to PREP this year. Twelve students completed the program (83% minority or women).

  9. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; et al

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in themore » observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.« less

  10. Search for high-mass diboson resonances with boson-tagged jets in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-12-10

    A search is performed for narrow resonances decaying into WW, WZ, or ZZ boson pairs using 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. Diboson resonances with masses in the range from 1.3 to 3.0 TeV are sought after using the invariant mass distribution of dijets where both jets are tagged as a boson jet, compatible with a highly boosted W or Z boson decaying to quarks, using jet mass and substructure properties. The largest deviation from a smoothly falling background in the observed dijet invariant mass distribution occurs around 2 TeV in the WZ channel, with a global significance of 2.5 standard deviations. Exclusion limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the production cross section times branching ratio for the WZ final state of a new heavy gauge boson, W', and for the WW and ZZ final states of Kaluza-Klein excitations of the graviton in a bulk Randall-Sundrum model, as a function of the resonance mass. As a result, W' bosons with couplings predicted by the extended gauge model in the mass range from 1.3 to 1.5 TeV are excluded at 95% confidence level.

  11. Quantum fields in toroidal topology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, F.C.; Malbouisson, A.P.C.; Santana, A.E.

    2011-10-15

    The standard representation of c*-algebra is used to describe fields in compactified space-time dimensions characterized by topologies of the type {Gamma}{sub D}{sup d}=(S{sup 1}){sup d}xM{sup D-d}. The modular operator is generalized to introduce representations of isometry groups. The Poincare symmetry is analyzed and then we construct the modular representation by using linear transformations in the field modes, similar to the Bogoliubov transformation. This provides a mechanism for compactification of the Minkowski space-time, which follows as a generalization of the Fourier integral representation of the propagator at finite temperature. An important result is that the 2x2 representation of the real-time formalism is not needed. The end result on calculating observables is described as a condensate in the ground state. We initially analyze the free Klein-Gordon and Dirac fields, and then formulate non-abelian gauge theories in {Gamma}{sub D}{sup d}. Using the S-matrix, the decay of particles is calculated in order to show the effect of the compactification. - Highlights: > C*-algebra is used to describe fields in compactified space-time dimensions. > The space-time is characterized by toroidal topologies. > Representations of the Poincare group are studied by using the modular operator. > We derive non-abelian gauge theories in compactified regions of space-time. > We show the compactification effect in the decay of particles using the S-matrix.

  12. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb? for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z'SSM resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z'? lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Similarly, lower limits on ?, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.

  13. Search for Randall-Sundrum Gravitons in Dielectron and Diphoton Final States with 5.4fb-1 of D0 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Ning; /Columbia U.

    2010-03-01

    A search for the lightest Kaluza-Klein mode of the graviton in the Randall-Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension is performed in the dielectron and diphoton channels. The data set used for the search corresponds to 5.4 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron between July 2002 and Summer 2009. We search for resonances in the invariant mass spectrum of two electromagnetic showers from the decay of the graviton to either electron-positron pairs or photon pairs. To optimize the sensitivity, the dielectron and diphoton channels are analyzed separately, then the results are combined together in the end. We also investigate whether, due to the unique spin-2 nature of the graviton, the angular distribution of the final state particles can be used to significantly enhance the sensitivity of the search. We set 95% confidence level upper limits on the graviton production cross section times branching fraction into electron-positron pairs of between {approx} 7 fb and {approx} 0.5 fb for a range of graviton masses from 220 GeV and 1050 GeV, respectively. Compared with Randall-Sundrum model predictions, these results correspond to lower limits on the lightest graviton mass between 440 GeV and 1040 GeV, for the dimensionless graviton coupling to the Standard Model fields k/{bar M}{sub Pl} in the range from 0.01 to 0.1. In addition, for coupling k/{bar M}{sub Pl} of 0.01, gravitons with masses between 460 GeV and 560 GeV are also excluded at 95% confidence level. These results represent the most sensitive limits to date.

  14. Systematics of Coupling Flows in AdS Backgrounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberger, Walter D.; Rothstein, Ira Z.

    2003-03-18

    We give an effective field theory derivation, based on the running of Planck brane gauge correlators, of the large logarithms that arise in the predictions for low energy gauge couplings in compactified AdS}_5 backgrounds, including the one-loop effects of bulk scalars, fermions, and gauge bosons. In contrast to the case of charged scalars coupled to Abelian gauge fields that has been considered previously in the literature, the one-loop corrections are not dominated by a single 4D Kaluza-Klein mode. Nevertheless, in the case of gauge field loops, the amplitudes can be reorganized into a leading logarithmic contribution that is identical to the running in 4D non-Abelian gauge theory, and a term which is not logarithmically enhanced and is analogous to a two-loop effect in 4D. In a warped GUT model broken by the Higgs mechanism in the bulk,we show that the matching scale that appears in the large logarithms induced by the non-Abelian gauge fields is m_{XY}^2/k where m_{XY} is the bulk mass of the XY bosons and k is the AdS curvature. This is in contrast to the UV scale in the logarithmic contributions of scalars, which is simply the bulk mass m. Our results are summarized in a set of simple rules that can be applied to compute the leading logarithmic predictions for coupling constant relations within a given warped GUT model. We present results for both bulk Higgs and boundary breaking of the GUT gauge

  15. Exploring the blazar zone in high-energy flares of FSRQs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacciani, L.; Donnarumma, I.; Tavecchio, F.; Stamerra, A.; Carrasco, L.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Uemura, M.

    2014-07-20

    The gamma-ray emission offers a powerful diagnostic tool to probe jets and their surroundings in flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs). In particular, sources emitting at high energies (>10 GeV) give us the strongest constraints. This motivates us to start a systematic study of flares with bright emission above 10 GeV, examining archival data of the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray telescope. At the same time, we began to trigger Target of Opportunity observations to the Swift observatory at the occurrence of high-energy flares, obtaining a wide coverage of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for several FSRQs during flares. Among others, we investigate the SED of a peculiar flare of 3C 454.3, showing a remarkably hard gamma-ray spectrum, quite different from the brightest flares of this source, and a bright flare of CTA 102. We modeled the SED in the framework of the one-zone leptonic model, using also archival optical spectroscopic data to derive the luminosity of the broad lines and thus estimate the disk luminosity, from which the structural parameters of the FSRQ nucleus can be inferred. The model allowed us to evaluate the magnetic field intensity in the blazar zone and to locate the emitting region of gamma-rays in the particular case in which gamma-ray spectra show neither absorption from the broad-line region (BLR) nor the Klein-Nishina curvature expected in leptonic models assuming the BLR as the source of seed photons for the External Compton scenario. For FSRQs bright above 10 GeV, we were able to identify short periods lasting less than one day characterized by a high rate of high-energy gamma-rays and hard gamma-ray spectra. We discussed the observed spectra and variability timescales in terms of injection and cooling of energetic particles, arguing that these flares could be triggered by magnetic reconnection events or turbulence in the flow.

  16. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Kiesenhofer, W.; Knünz, V.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C. -E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Bansal, M.; Bansal, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Luyckx, S.; Ochesanu, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Blekman, F.; Blyweert, S.; D’Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Maes, M.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Villella, I.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Gay, A. P. R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Léonard, A.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Adler, V.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Costantini, S.; Crucy, S.; Dildick, S.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva Diblen, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Thyssen, F.; Tytgat, M.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; du Pree, T.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Nuttens, C.; Pagano, D.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Dos Reis Martins, T.; Mora Herrera, C.; Pol, M. E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santaolalla, J.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Bernardes, C. A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Aleksandrov, A.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Hadjiiska, R.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Tao, J.; Wang, Z.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Polic, D.; Puljak, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Mekterovic, D.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Radi, A.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Eerola, P.; Fedi, G.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Dalchenko, M.; Dobrzynski, L.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Mironov, C.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Paganini, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Veelken, C.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. -L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. -M.; Chabert, E. C.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J. -C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A. -C.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Beaupere, N.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Brochet, S.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chasserat, J.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Kurca, T.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Xiao, H.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Bontenackels, M.; Edelhoff, M.; Feld, L.; Hindrichs, O.; Klein, K.; Ostapchuk, A.; Perieanu, A.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Weber, H.; Wittmer, B.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Erdmann, M.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Klingebiel, D.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Reithler, H.; Schmitz, S. A.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Weber, M.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Haj Ahmad, W.; Heister, A.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Perchalla, L.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Behrenhoff, W.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Bergholz, M.; Bethani, A.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Cakir, A.; Calligaris, L.; Campbell, A.; Choudhury, S.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Horton, D.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Krücker, D.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Lutz, B.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I. -A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Novgorodova, O.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Roland, B.; Ron, E.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Saxena, P.; Schmidt, R.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Vargas Trevino, A. D. R.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. 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T.; Spagnolo, P.; Squillacioti, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vernieri, C.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D’imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Grassi, M.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Micheli, F.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Soffi, L.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Ortona, G.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Potenza, A.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Tamponi, U.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Umer, T.; Zanetti, A.; Chang, S.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Park, H.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Kim, T. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K. S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, J. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Seo, H.; Yu, I.; Juodagalvis, A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Ali, M. A. B. Md; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Reucroft, S.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khalid, S.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Wolszczak, W.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. 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V.; Vinogradov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Bunichev, V.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Perfilov, M.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Ekmedzic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Battilana, C.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Domínguez Vázquez, D.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. 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I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Wollny, H.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Buchmann, M. A.; Casal, B.; Chanon, N.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marini, A. C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Mohr, N.; Nägeli, C.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pauss, F.; Peruzzi, M.; Quittnat, M.; Rebane, L.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Weber, H. A.; Amsler, C.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Millan Mejias, B.; Ngadiuba, J.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Taroni, S.; Verzetti, M.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Ferro, C.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Volpe, R.; Yu, S. S.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. 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I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Lawson, P.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; John, J. St.; Sulak, L.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Christopher, G.; Cutts, D.; Demiragli, Z.; Dhingra, N.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Kukartsev, G.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Luk, M.; Narain, M.; Segala, M.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Miceli, T.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Searle, M.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Farrell, C.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Rakness, G.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Rikova, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Nguyen, H.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Wimpenny, S.; Andrews, W.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D’Agnolo, R. T.; Evans, D.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Palmer, C.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Sudano, E.; Tadel, M.; Tu, Y.; Vartak, A.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Barge, D.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Danielson, T.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Justus, C.; Mccoll, N.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; To, W.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Rogan, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Timciuc, V.; Vlimant, J. R.; Wilkinson, R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Iiyama, Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Nauenberg, U.; Smith, J. G.; Stenson, K.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Anderson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gao, Y.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hirschauer, J.; Hooberman, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Kaadze, K.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Kwan, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V. I.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitbeck, A.; Whitmore, J.; Yang, F.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carver, M.; Cheng, T.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Furic, I. K.; Hugon, J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Rinkevicius, A.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Bazterra, V. E.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Kurt, P.; Moon, D. H.; O’Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Duru, F.; Haytmyradov, M.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Rahmat, R.; Sen, S.; Tan, P.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Swartz, M.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Sekaric, J.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Wood, J. S.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Saini, L. K.; Shrestha, S.; Skhirtladze, N.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Klute, M.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y. -J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Keller, J.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malik, S.; Meier, F.; Snow, G. R.; Zvada, M.; Dolen, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R. -J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Chan, K. M.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Pearson, T.; Planer, M.; Ruchti, R.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Smith, G.; Winer, B. L.; Wolfe, H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hebda, P.; Hunt, A.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Brownson, E.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Gutay, L.; Hu, Z.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, K.; Kress, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Maroussov, V.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Kaplan, S.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Krutelyov, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Kunori, S.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Sharma, M.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Friis, E.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Levine, A.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ross, I.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Vuosalo, C.; Woods, N.

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb–1 for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z SSM ' resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z ψ ' lighter than 2.57 TeV, and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Thus lower limits on Λ, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.

  17. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Fabjan, C.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; et al

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb–1 for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z SSM ' resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z ψ ' lighter than 2.57more » TeV, and Randall-Sundrum Kaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Thus lower limits on Λ, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.« less

  18. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pairmore » resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.« less

  19. A search for \\( t\\overline{t} \\) resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-08-28

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of \\( \\sqrt{s}=8 \\) TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to \\( {W}^{+}b{W}^{-}\\overline{b} \\), with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to \\( t\\overline{t} \\). These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  20. A de Sitter tachyon thick braneworld

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Germn, Gabriel; Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo; Malagn-Morejn, Dagoberto; Mora-Luna, Refugio Rigel; Rocha, Roldo da E-mail: aha@fis.unam.mx E-mail: rigel@ifm.umich.mx

    2013-02-01

    Among the multiple 5D thick braneworld models that have been proposed in the last years, in order to address several open problems in modern physics, there is a specific one involving a tachyonic bulk scalar field. Delving into this framework, a thick braneworld with a cosmological background induced on the brane is here investigated. The respective field equations derived from the model with a warped 5D geometry are highly non-linear equations, admitting a non-trivial solution for the warp factor and the tachyon scalar field as well, in a de Sitter 4D cosmological background. Moreover, the non-linear tachyonic scalar field, that generates the brane in complicity with warped gravity, has the form of a kink-like configuration. Notwithstanding, the non-linear field equations restricting character does not allow one to easily find thick brane solutions with a decaying warp factor which leads to the localization of 4D gravity and other matter fields. We derive such a thick brane configuration altogether in this tachyon-gravity setup. When analyzing the spectrum of gravity fluctuations in the transverse traceless sector, the 4D gravity is shown to be localized due to the presence of a single zero mode bound state, separated by a continuum of massive Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes by a mass gap. It contrasts with previous results, where there is a KK massive bound excitation providing no clear physical interpretation. The mass gap is determined by the scale of the metric parameter H. Finally, the corrections to Newton's law in this model are computed and shown to decay exponentially. It is in full compliance to corrections reported in previous results (up to a constant factor) within similar braneworlds with induced 4D de Sitter metric, despite the fact that the warp factor and the massive modes have a different form.

  1. STOCHASTIC ACCELERATION AND THE EVOLUTION OF SPECTRAL DISTRIBUTIONS IN SYNCHRO-SELF-COMPTON SOURCES: A SELF-CONSISTENT MODELING OF BLAZARS' FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tramacere, A.; Taylor, A. M.; Massaro, E.

    2011-10-01

    The broadband spectral distributions of non-thermal sources, such as those of several known blazars, are well described by a log-parabolic fit. The second-degree term in these fits measures the curvature in the spectrum. In this paper, we investigate whether the curvature parameter observed in the spectra of the synchrotron emission can be used as a fingerprint of stochastic acceleration. As a first approach, we use the multiplicative central limit theorem to show how fluctuations in the energy gain result in the broadening of the spectral shape, introducing a curvature into the energy distribution. Then, by means of a Monte Carlo description, we investigate how the curvature produced in the electron distribution is linked to the diffusion in momentum space. To get a more generic description of the problem we turn to the diffusion equation in momentum space. We first study some 'standard' scenarios, in order to understand the conditions that make the curvature in the spectra significant, and the relevance of cooling during the acceleration process. We try to quantify the correlation between the curvature and the diffusive process in the pre-equilibrium stage, and investigate how the transition between the Klein-Nishina and the Thomson regimes, in inverse Compton cooling, determine the curvature in the distribution at equilibrium. We apply these results to some observed trends, such as the anticorrelation between the peak energy and the curvature term observed in the spectra of Mrk 421, and a sample of BL Lac objects whose synchrotron emission peaks at X-ray energies.

  2. Search for Higgs Boson Pair Production in the bbbb Final State Using pp Collision Data at root ?s=8 TeV from the ATLAS Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for Higgs boson pair production \\(pp \\rightarrow hh\\) is performed with 19.5 fb\\(^{-1}\\) of protonproton collision data at \\(\\sqrt{s}=8\\) TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum \\(b\\bar{b}\\) system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b-tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the RandallSundrum model with a warped extra dimensionmoreas well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for \\(pp\\rightarrow G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}} \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} \\) of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a KaluzaKlein graviton \\(G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}}\\) mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. The search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b})\\) of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}) = 3.6 \\pm 0.5\\) fb.less

  3. On two-parameter models of photon cross sections: Application to dual-energy CT imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Li Sicong; Devic, Slobodan; Whiting, Bruce R.; Lerma, Fritz A.

    2006-11-15

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the theoretically achievable accuracy in estimating photon cross sections at low energies (20-1000 keV) from idealized dual-energy x-ray computed tomography (CT) images. Cross-section estimation from dual-energy measurements requires a model that can accurately represent photon cross sections of any biological material as a function of energy by specifying only two characteristic parameters of the underlying material, e.g., effective atomic number and density. This paper evaluates the accuracy of two commonly used two-parameter cross-section models for postprocessing idealized measurements derived from dual-energy CT images. The parametric fit model (PFM) accounts for electron-binding effects and photoelectric absorption by power functions in atomic number and energy and scattering by the Klein-Nishina cross section. The basis-vector model (BVM) assumes that attenuation coefficients of any biological substance can be approximated by a linear combination of mass attenuation coefficients of two dissimilar basis substances. Both PFM and BVM were fit to a modern cross-section library for a range of elements and mixtures representative of naturally occurring biological materials (Z=2-20). The PFM model, in conjunction with the effective atomic number approximation, yields estimated the total linear cross-section estimates with mean absolute and maximum error ranges of 0.6%-2.2% and 1%-6%, respectively. The corresponding error ranges for BVM estimates were 0.02%-0.15% and 0.1%-0.5%. However, for photoelectric absorption frequency, the PFM absolute mean and maximum errors were 10.8%-22.4% and 29%-50%, compared with corresponding BVM errors of 0.4%-11.3% and 0.5%-17.0%, respectively. Both models were found to exhibit similar sensitivities to image-intensity measurement uncertainties. Of the two models, BVM is the most promising approach for realizing dual-energy CT cross-section measurement.

  4. Separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general nonextremal rotating charged black hole spacetimes in minimal five-dimensional gauged supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Shuangqing

    2009-10-15

    We continue to investigate the separability of massive field equations for spin-0 and spin-1/2 charged particles in the general, nonextremal, rotating, charged, Chong-Cvetic-Lue-Pope black holes with two independent angular momenta and a nonzero cosmological constant in minimal D=5 gauged supergravity theory. We show that the complex Klein-Gordon equation and the modified Dirac equation with the inclusion of an extra counterterm can be separated by variables into purely radial and purely angular parts in this general Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons background spacetime. A second-order symmetry operator that commutes with the complex Laplacian operator is constructed from the separated solutions and expressed compactly in terms of a rank-2 Staeckel-Killing tensor which admits a simple diagonal form in the chosen pentad one-forms so that it can be understood as the square of a rank-3 totally antisymmetric tensor. A first-order symmetry operator that commutes with the modified Dirac operator is expressed in terms of a rank-3 generalized Killing-Yano tensor and its covariant derivative. The Hodge dual of this generalized Killing-Yano tensor is a generalized principal conformal Killing-Yano tensor of rank-2, which can generate a 'tower' of generalized (conformal) Killing-Yano and Staeckel-Killing tensors that are responsible for the whole hidden symmetries of this general, rotating, charged, Kerr-anti-de Sitter black hole geometry. In addition, the first laws of black hole thermodynamics have been generalized to the case that the cosmological constant can be viewed as a thermodynamical variable.

  5. Search for Higgs boson pair production in the bb¯bb¯ final state from pp collision at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for Higgs boson pair production \\(pp \\rightarrow hh\\) is performed with 19.5 fb\\(^{-1}\\) of proton–proton collision data at \\(\\sqrt{s}=8\\) TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum \\(b\\bar{b}\\) system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b-tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the Randall–Sundrum model with a warped extra dimensionmore » as well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for \\(pp\\rightarrow G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}} \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} \\) of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a Kaluza–Klein graviton \\(G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}}\\) mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. Thus, the search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b})\\) of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}) = 3.6 \\pm 0.5\\) fb.« less

  6. Search for Higgs boson pair production in the bb¯bb¯ final state from pp collision at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-09

    A search for Higgs boson pair production \\(pp \\rightarrow hh\\) is performed with 19.5 fb\\(^{-1}\\) of proton–proton collision data at \\(\\sqrt{s}=8\\) TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum \\(b\\bar{b}\\) system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b-tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the Randall–Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension as well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for \\(pp\\rightarrow G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}} \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b} \\) of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a Kaluza–Klein graviton \\(G^{*}_{\\mathrm {KK}}\\) mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. Thus, the search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b})\\) of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of \\(\\sigma (pp \\rightarrow hh \\rightarrow b\\bar{b}b\\bar{b}) = 3.6 \\pm 0.5\\) fb.

  7. Search for physics beyond the standard model in dilepton mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at ? = 8 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-04-07

    Dimuon and dielectron mass spectra, obtained from data resulting from proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV and recorded by the CMS experiment, are used to search for both narrow resonances and broad deviations from standard model predictions. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 20.6 (19.7) fb? for the dimuon (dielectron) channel. No evidence for non-standard-model physics is observed and 95% confidence level limits are set on parameters from a number of new physics models. The narrow resonance analyses exclude a Sequential Standard Model Z'SSM resonance lighter than 2.90 TeV, a superstring-inspired Z'? lighter than 2.57 TeV and Randall-SundrummoreKaluza-Klein gravitons with masses below 2.73, 2.35, and 1.27 TeV for couplings of 0.10, 0.05, and 0.01, respectively. A notable feature is that the limits have been calculated in a model-independent way to enable straightforward reinterpretation in any model predicting a resonance structure. The observed events are also interpreted within the framework of two non-resonant analyses: one based on a large extra dimensions model and one based on a quark and lepton compositeness model with a left-left isoscalar contact interaction. Lower limits are established on MS, the scale characterizing the onset of quantum gravity, which range from 4.9 to 3.3 TeV, where the number of additional spatial dimensions varies from 3 to 7. Similarly, lower limits on ?, the energy scale parameter for the contact interaction, are found to be 12.0 (15.2) TeV for destructive (constructive) interference in the dimuon channel and 13.5 (18.3) TeV in the dielectron channel.less

  8. A 750 GeV messenger of dark conformal symmetry breaking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Zhang, Cen

    2016-03-03

    The tentative hints for a diphoton resonance at a mass of ~750 GeV from the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC may be interpreted as first contact with a “dark” sector with a spontaneously broken conformal symmetry. The implied TeV scale of the dark sector may be motivated by the interaction strength required to accommodate a viable thermal relic dark matter (DM) candidate. We model the conformal dynamics using a Randall-Sundrum-type five-dimensional geometry whose IR boundary is identified with the dynamics of the composite dark sector, while the Standard Model (SM) matter content resides on the UV boundary, correspondingmore » to “elementary” fields. We allow the gauge fields to reside in the five-dimensional bulk, which can be minimally chosen to be SU(3)c×U(1)Y. The “dark” radion is identified as the putative 750 GeV resonance. Heavy vectorlike fermions, often invoked to explain the diphoton excess, are not explicitly present in our model and are not predicted to appear in the spectrum of TeV scale states. Our minimal setup favors scalar DM of O(TeV) mass. A generic expectation in this scenario, suggested by DM considerations, is the appearance of vector bosons at ~ few TeV, corresponding to the gluon and hypercharge Kaluza-Klein (KK) modes that couple to UV boundary states with strengths that are suppressed uniformly compared to their SM values. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that these KK modes could be within the reach of the LHC in the coming years.« less

  9. Inverse Compton Emission from Galactic Supernova Remnants: Effect of the Interstellar Radiation Field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Troy A.; Moskalenko, Igor V.; Strong, Andrew W.; /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE

    2006-08-01

    The evidence for particle acceleration in supernova shells comes from electrons whose synchrotron emission is observed in radio and X-rays. Recent observations by the HESS instrument reveal that supernova remnants also emit TeV {gamma}-rays; long awaited experimental evidence that supernova remnants can accelerate cosmic rays up to the ''knee'' energies. Still, uncertainty exists whether these {gamma}-rays are produced by electrons via inverse Compton scattering or by protons via {pi}{sup 0}-decay. The multi-wavelength spectra of supernova remnants can be fitted with both mechanisms, although a preference is often given to {pi}{sup 0}-decay due to the spectral shape at very high energies. A recent study of the interstellar radiation field indicates that its energy density, especially in the inner Galaxy, is higher than previously thought. In this paper we evaluate the effect of the interstellar radiation field on the inverse Compton emission of electrons accelerated in a supernova remnant located at different distances from the Galactic Centre. We show that contribution of optical and infra-red photons to the inverse Compton emission may exceed the contribution of cosmic microwave background and in some cases broaden the resulted {gamma}-ray spectrum. Additionally, we show that if a supernova remnant is located close to the Galactic Centre its {gamma}-ray spectrum will exhibit a ''universal'' cutoff at very high energies due to the Klein-Nishina effect and not due to the cut-off of the electron spectrum. As an example, we apply our calculations to the supernova remnants RX J1713.7-3946 and G0.9+0.1 recently observed by HESS.

  10. Houston prefreshman enrichment program (Houston PREP). Final report, June 10, 1996--August 1, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The 1996 Houston Pre-freshman Enrichment Program (PREP) was conducted on the campus of the University of Houston-Downtown from June 10 to August 1, 1996. Program Participants were recruited from the Greater Houston area. All participants were identified as high achieving students with an interest in learning about the engineering and science professions. The goal of the program was to better prepare our pre-college youth prior to entering college as mathematics, science and engineering majors. The program participants were middle school and high school students from the Aldine, Alief, Channel View, Crockett, Cypress-Fairbanks, Fort Bend, Galena Park, Houston, Humble, Katy, Klein, North Forest, Pasadena, Private, and Spring Branch Independent School Districts. Of the 197 students starting the program, 170 completed, 142 students were from economically and socially disadvantage groups underrepresented in the engineering and science professions, and 121 of the 197 were female. Our First Year group for 1996 composed of 96% minority and women students. Our Second and Third Year students were 100% and 93.75% minority or women respectively. This gave an overall minority and female population of 93.75%. This year, special efforts were again made to recruit students from minority groups, which caused a significant increase in qualified applicants. However, due to space limitations, 140 applicants were rejected. Investigative and discovery learning were key elements of PREP. The academic components of the program included Algebraic Structures, Engineering, Introduction to Computer Science, Introduction to Physics, Logic and Its Application to Mathematics, Probability and Statistics, Problem Solving Seminar using computers and PLATO software, SAT Preparatory Seminars, and Technical Writing.

  11. A search for $ t\\overline{t} $ resonances using lepton-plus-jets events in proton-proton collisions at $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; Garberson, F.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Ge, P.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geerts, D. A. A.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giangiobbe, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Grabas, H. M. X.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafström, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohs, J. P.; Grohsjean, A.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Gupta, S.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. 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E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs is reported. The search is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 of proton-proton collision data collected at a centre-of-mass energy of s√=8s=8 TeV. The lepton-plus-jets final state is used, where the top pair decays to W+bW-b¯¯W+bW-b¯, with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other hadronically. The invariant mass spectrum of top quark pairs is examined for local excesses or deficits that are inconsistent with the Standard Model predictions. No evidence for a top quark pair resonance is found, and 95% confidence-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states in benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross-section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' boson decaying to top pairs range from 4.2 pb to 0.03 pb for resonance masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolour Z' boson with mass below 1.8 TeV is excluded. Upper limits are set on the cross-section times branching ratio for a broad colour-octet resonance with Γ/m = 15% decaying to tt¯tt¯. These range from 4.8 pb to 0.03 pb for masses from 0.4 TeV to 3.0 TeV. A Kaluza-Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall-Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.2 TeV.

  12. Search for tt¯ resonances in the lepton plus jets final state with ATLAS using 4.7 fb⁻¹ of pp collisions at √s=7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.; Abajyan, T.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdel Khalek, S.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; et al

    2013-07-23

    A search for new particles that decay into top quark pairs (tt¯) is performed with the ATLAS experiment at the LHC using an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb⁻¹ of proton–proton (pp ) collision data collected at a center-of-mass energy √s =7 TeV . In the tt¯ →WbWb decay, the lepton plus jets final state is used, where one W boson decays leptonically and the other hadronically. The tt¯ system is reconstructed using both small-radius and large-radius jets, the latter being supplemented by a jet substructure analysis. A search for local excesses in the number of data events compared to themore » Standard Model expectation in the tt¯ invariant mass spectrum is performed. No evidence for a tt¯ resonance is found and 95% credibility-level limits on the production rate are determined for massive states predicted in two benchmark models. The upper limits on the cross section times branching ratio of a narrow Z' resonance range from 5.1 pb for a boson mass of 0.5 TeV to 0.03 pb for a mass of 3 TeV. A narrow leptophobic topcolor Z' resonance with a mass below 1.74 TeV is excluded. Limits are also derived for a broad color-octet resonance with Γ/m=15.3% . A Kaluza–Klein excitation of the gluon in a Randall–Sundrum model is excluded for masses below 2.07 TeV.« less

  13. Transforming the representation of the boundary layer and low clouds for high-resolution regional climate modeling: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hsin-Yuan; Hall, Alex

    2013-07-24

    Stratocumulus and shallow cumulus clouds in subtropical oceanic regions (e.g., Southeast Pacific) cover thousands of square kilometers and play a key role in regulating global climate (e.g., Klein and Hartmann, 1993). Numerical modeling is an essential tool to study these clouds in regional and global systems, but the current generation of climate and weather models has difficulties in representing them in a realistic way (e.g., Siebesma et al., 2004; Stevens et al., 2007; Teixeira et al., 2011). While numerical models resolve the large-scale flow, subgrid-scale parameterizations are needed to estimate small-scale properties (e.g. boundary layer turbulence and convection, clouds, radiation), which have significant influence on the resolved scale due to the complex nonlinear nature of the atmosphere. To represent the contribution of these fine-scale processes to the resolved scale, climate models use various parameterizations, which are the main pieces in the model that contribute to the low clouds dynamics and therefore are the major sources of errors or approximations in their representation. In this project, we aim to 1) improve our understanding of the physical processes in thermal circulation and cloud formation, 2) examine the performance and sensitivity of various parameterizations in the regional weather model (Weather Research and Forecasting model; WRF), and 3) develop, implement, and evaluate the advanced boundary layer parameterization in the regional model to better represent stratocumulus, shallow cumulus, and their transition. Thus, this project includes three major corresponding studies. We find that the mean diurnal cycle is sensitive to model domain in ways that reveal the existence of different contributions originating from the Southeast Pacific land-masses. The experiments suggest that diurnal variations in circulations and thermal structures over this region are influenced by convection over the Peruvian sector of the Andes cordillera, while

  14. Resonance searches with the $t\\overline{t}$ Invariant Mass Distribution measured with the D\\O\\, Experiment at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,\\textrm{TeV}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schliephake, Thorsten Dirk; /Wuppertal U.

    2010-06-01

    masses are therefore presumed to be a window to test the SM for deviations caused by new physics. The heaviest fundamental particle which is in our reach is the top quark. Its mass is almost as large as that of a complete tungsten atom. It is so heavy, that it decays faster than it can hadronize. It seems the perfect probe to study new physics at the moment. In this analysis the top quark is used as a probe to search for a new resonance, whose properties are similar to a SM Z boson but is much more massive. This analysis will study t{bar t} decays to search for an excess in the invariant mass distribution of the t{bar t} pairs. Resonant states are suggested for massive Z-like bosons in extended gauge theories, Kaluza Klein states of the gluon or Z, axigluons, topcolor, and other beyond the Standard Model theories. Independent of the exact model a resonant production mechanism should be visible in the t{bar t} invariant mass distribution. In this thesis a model-independent search for a narrow-width heavy resonance X decaying into t{bar t} is performed. In the SM, the top quark decays into a W boson and a b quark nearly 100% of the time, which has been proven experimentally, too. The t{bar t} event signature is fully determined by the W boson decay modes. In this analysis, only the lepton+jets final state, which results from the leptonic decay of one of the W bosons and the hadronic decay of the other, is considered. The event signature is an isolated electron or muon with high transverse momentum, large transverse energy imbalance due to the undetected neutrino, and at least three jets, two of which result from the hadronization of b quarks.

  15. Genetic dissection of bioenerrgy traits in sorghum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vermerris, Wilfred; Kresovich, Stephen; Murray, Seth; Pedersen, Jeffery; Rooney, William; Sattler, Scott.

    2012-06-15

    1) Vermerris W, Saballos A (2012) Genetic enhancement of sorghum for biomass utilization. In Paterson, A. (Ed.) Genetics and Genomics of the Saccharinae, Springer, New York, NY. pp. 391-428. 2) Felderhoff T, Murray SC, Klein PE, Sharma A, Hamblin MT, Kresovich S, Vermerris W, Rooney, WL (2012) QTLs for energy-related traits in a sweet x grain sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] mapping population. Crop Science 52: 2040-2049. 3) Sattler SE, Palmer NA, Saballos A, Greene AM, Xin Z, Sarath G, Vermerris W, Pedersen JF (2012) Identification and characterization of four missense mutations in Brown midrib12 (Bmr12), the caffeic acid O-methyltranferase (COMT) of sorghum. BioEnergy Research (in press) DOI 10.1007/s12155-012-9197-z 4) Saballos A, Sattler S, Sanchez E, Foster TP, Xin Z, Kang CH, Pedersen J, Vermerris W (2012). Brown midrib2 encodes the major 4-coumarate:CoA ligase involved in lignin biosynthesis in sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench). The Plant Journal 70: 818-830. doi: 10.1111/j.1365-313X.2012.04933. 5) Vermerris, W (2011) Survey of genomics approaches to improve bioenergy traits in maize, sorghum and sugarcane. Journal of Integrative Plant Biology 53: 105-119 6) Saballos A, Ejeta G, Sanchez E, Kang CH, Vermerris W (2009) A genome-wide analysis of the cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase family in sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] identifies SbCAD2 as the Brown midrib6 gene. Genetics 181: 783-795. 7) Saballos A, Vermerris W, Rivera L, Ejeta G (2008) Allelic association, chemical characterization and saccharification properties of brown midrib mutants of sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench). BioEnergy Research 2: 193-204 8) Felderhoff TJ. (2012) QTLs for energy related traits in a sweet x grain RIL sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] population. M.S. Thesis, Texas A&M University. Publications in preparation (tentative titles) 9) Felderhoff T, Murray SC, Klein PE, Sharma A, Hamblin MT, Kresovich S, Vermerris W, Rooney, WL (2013) QTLs for biomass and juice