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Sample records for mauna loa observatory

  1. Living in the shadow of Mauna Loa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirji, Zahra R. (Zahra Rafik)

    2013-01-01

    One of Hawaii's most dangerous natural hazards is sitting in plain sight: Mauna Loa volcano. The mighty mountain makes up more than fifty percent of the island and is the largest volcano on Earth. Since 1843, when people ...

  2. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Time-Domain Electromagnetics Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The...

  3. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  4. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Direct-Current...

  5. Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, NorthMauna Loa Southwest

  6. Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, NorthMauna Loa Southwest Rift

  7. Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area

  8. Volcano-earthquake interaction at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii Thomas R. Walter1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Volcano-earthquake interaction at Mauna Loa volcano, Hawaii Thomas R. Walter1,2 and Falk Amelung1 into the Southwest Rift Zone (SWRZ) or into the Northeast Rift Zone (NERZ) and by large earthquakes at the basal decollement fault. In this paper we examine the historic eruption and earthquake catalogues, and we test

  9. We describe a low cost high precision photometric imaging system, which has been in robotic operation for one year on the Mauna Loa observatory (Hawaii). The system, which can be easily duplicated, offers a 150 sq deg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guyon, Olivier

    We describe a low cost high precision photometric imaging system, which has been in roboticAchieving high precision photometry for identifying transiting exoplanets with a low-cost robotic DSLR-based imaging systemexoplanets with a low-cost robotic DSLR-based imaging system Mauna Kea Dual camera system

  10. Scale-free Universal Spectrum for Atmospheric Aerosol Size Distribution for Davos, Mauna Loa and Izana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2014-08-14

    Atmospheric flows exhibit fractal fluctuations and inverse power law form for power spectra indicating an eddy continuum structure for the selfsimilar fluctuations. A general systems theory for fractal fluctuations developed by the author is based on the simple visualisation that large eddies form by space-time integration of enclosed turbulent eddies, a concept analogous to Kinetic Theory of Gases in Classical Statistical Physics. The ordered growth of atmospheric eddy continuum is in dynamical equilibrium and is associated with Maximum Entropy Production. The model predicts universal (scale-free) inverse power law form for fractal fluctuations expressed in terms of the golden mean. Atmospheric particulates are held in suspension in the fractal fluctuations of vertical wind velocity. The mass or radius (size) distribution for homogeneous suspended atmospheric particulates is expressed as a universal scale-independent function of the golden mean, the total number concentration and the mean volume radius. Model predicted spectrum is in agreement (within two standard deviations on either side of the mean) with total averaged radius size spectra for the AERONET (aerosol inversions) stations Davos and Mauna Loa for the year 2010 and Izana for the year 2009 daily averages. The general systems theory model for aerosol size distribution is scale free and is derived directly from atmospheric eddy dynamical concepts. At present empirical models such as the log normal distribution with arbitrary constants for the size distribution of atmospheric suspended particulates are used for quantitative estimation of earth-atmosphere radiation budget related to climate warming/cooling trends. The universal aerosol size spectrum will have applications in computations of radiation balance of earth-atmosphere system in climate models.

  11. The Mauna Kea Observatories Near-Infrared Filter Set. I: Defining Optima 1-5m Bandpasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with obtaining precision photometry with the relatively wide infrared filters in use to date. Water vapor plays to be relatively immune to water vapor contamination, thereby driving filter bandwidths to be fairly narrowThe Mauna Kea Observatories Near-Infrared Filter Set. I: Defining Optima 1-5µm Bandpasses D. A

  12. Study of extreme-ultraviolet emission and properties of a coronal streamer from PROBA2/SWAP, HINODE/EIS and Mauna Loa Mk4 observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryaev, F.; Slemzin, V.; Vainshtein, L. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute of the RAS (LPI), Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Williams, David R., E-mail: goryaev_farid@mail.ru [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-01

    Wide-field extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) telescopes imaging in spectral bands sensitive to 1 MK plasma on the Sun often observe extended, ray-like coronal structures stretching radially from active regions to distances of 1.5-2 R {sub ?}, which represent the EUV counterparts of white-light streamers. To explain this phenomenon, we investigated the properties of a streamer observed on 2010 October 20 and 21, by the PROBA2/SWAP EUV telescope together with the Hinode/EIS (HOP 165) and the Mauna Loa Mk4 white-light coronagraph. In the SWAP 174 Å band comprising the Fe IX-Fe XI lines, the streamer was detected to a distance of 2 R {sub ?}. We assume that the EUV emission is dominated by collisional excitation and resonant scattering of monochromatic radiation coming from the underlying corona. Below 1.2 R {sub ?}, the plasma density and temperature were derived from the Hinode/EIS data by a line-ratio method. Plasma conditions in the streamer and in the background corona above 1.2 R {sub ?} from the disk center were determined by forward-modeling the emission that best fit the observational data in both EUV and white light. It was found that the plasma in the streamer above 1.2 R {sub ?} is nearly isothermal, with a temperature of T = 1.43 ± 0.08 MK. The hydrostatic scale-height temperature determined from the evaluated density distribution was significantly higher (1.72 ± 0.08 MK), which suggests the existence of outward plasma flow along the streamer. We conclude that, inside the streamer, collisional excitation provided more than 90% of the observed EUV emission, whereas, in the background corona, the contribution of resonance scattering became comparable with that of collisions at R ? 2 R {sub ?}.

  13. The origin of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dvorak, John [University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy (United States)

    2011-05-15

    I first stepped through the doorway of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1976, and I was impressed by what I saw: A dozen people working out of a stone-and-metal building perched at the edge of a high cliff with a spectacular view of a vast volcanic plain. Their primary purpose was to monitor the island's two active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. I joined them, working for six weeks as a volunteer and then, years later, as a staff scientist. That gave me several chances to ask how the observatory had started.

  14. Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, North

  15. Time-Domain Electromagnetics At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013)Open Energy InformationTikanderEnergy1974) |1986) | Open

  16. Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: Energy ResourcesMaui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to:

  17. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) JumpDillard(Kauahikaua &1986) | Open

  18. Self Potential At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk,SageScheucoSedco Hills,Information Hualalai NorthwestEnergy

  19. Mercury Vapor At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump1.2619821°, -80.1875065°Information1983)

  20. Aeromagnetic Survey At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) | Open EnergyEnergyMaui

  1. Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Area (Thomas,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queriesWind FarmArea (Thomas, 1986)

  2. The Evolution of the Loa in Spanish America.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasquariello, Anthony M.

    1970-04-01

    SPRING 1970 5 The Evolution of the Loa in Spanish America ANTHONY M. PASQUARIELLO The lex has a long history in the literary and cultural tradition o£ Spain and co'onial Spanish America. It usually functioned as a laudatory prologue or curtain... by the nomenclature was a later development. Until 1581, at least, the loa remained the exclusive property of the religious drama.2 The loas composed by the Mexican Fernán González de Eslava (1534-1601?) for eight of his colloquies were, therefore, almost...

  3. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure of Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes in Hawaii from local seismic tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, G; Shearer, PM; Matoza, RS; Okubo, PG; Amelung, F

    2014-01-01

    H. , and M. P. Poland (2013), Seismic detection of increasedPap. , Lin, G. (2013), Seismic investigation of magmaticdimensional crustal seismic velocity model for southern

  4. The loa: One Aspect of the Sorjuanian Mask

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Lee A.

    1983-04-01

    been considered incidental to her poetry since the publication of the first collection of her works, Inundación SPRING 1983 49 Castálida (1689) in which, ironically, half of her loas were first printed. By ignoring her drama, and particularly... been considered incidental to her poetry since the publication of the first collection of her works, Inundación SPRING 1983 49 Castálida (1689) in which, ironically, half of her loas were first printed. By ignoring her drama, and particularly...

  5. Fast Switching Phase Calibration: Effectiveness at Mauna Kea and Chajnantor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Fast Switching Phase Calibration: Effectiveness at Mauna Kea and Chajnantor M.A. Holdaway, Simon J We present estimates of how well fast switching phase calibration would perform at the Chajnantor, Chile, and Mauna Kea VLBA sites. Fast switching at Chajnantor would achieve better than 30 ffi r. m. s

  6. Large Kuiper Belt Objects: The Mauna Kea 8k CCD Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewitt, David C.

    Large Kuiper Belt Objects: The Mauna Kea 8k CCD Survey David Jewitt Institute for Astronomy, 2680 1998 January 14 #12; Large Kuiper Belt Objects Page 2 Abstract We describe a large­area ecliptic survey designed to assess the sky­plane surface density of bright Kuiper Belt Objects. We used a 8192 x 8192 pixel

  7. Wind Velocities at the Chajnantor and Mauna Kea Sites and the Effect on MMA Pointing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Wind Velocities at the Chajnantor and Mauna Kea Sites and the Effect on MMA Pointing M.A. Holdaway email: (mholdawa, sfoster, demerson, jcheng, fschwab)@nrao.edu August 9, 1996 Abstract We analyze wind April 1996 for the purposes of understanding the effects of the winds on pointing errors. Both

  8. Revised 3/29/20111 NOAA COOPERATIVE INSTITUTE DIRECTORS ANNUAL MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    , Mauna Loa Observatory, tsunami warning system, Easy-To-Deploy® buoys, NEXRAD Radar, Unmanned Aircraft in the atmosphere, ocean, space, land surface, and cryosphere ith t i holistic, integrated Earth system approaches Systems (UAS),S ea Grant Extension, · Hurricane track and intensity forecast improvement Advanced Weather

  9. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aciego, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    from Hualalai Volcano, Hawaii. Geochemistry Geophysicsfrom Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii. Science 161(3846), 1132-1135.Lake Waiau, Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Pacific Science Farley K.

  10. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  11. Sommers-Bausch Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Sommers-Bausch Observatory Handbook Ninth Edition, Fall 2013 DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICAL of the early years of SBO. Thanks also to the Denver Library for information and photos of Elmer Sommers, Ed here at Sommers-Bausch: Kelsey Johnson, Cori Krauss, John Weiss, James Roberts, Quyen Hart, Colin

  12. Sommers-Bausch Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    The Sommers-Bausch Observatory Handbook Eighth Edition, Fall 2012 DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICAL to the Denver Library for information and photos of Elmer Sommers, Ed Kosmicki of Summit Magazine for the 16 the educational mission here at Sommers-Bausch: Kelsey Johnson, Cori Krauss, John Weiss, James Roberts, Quyen Hart

  13. The National Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert J. Brunner; S. George Djorgovski; Thomas A. Prince; Alex S. Szalay

    2001-08-23

    As a scientific discipline, Astronomy is rather unique. We only have one laboratory, the Universe, and we cannot, of course, change the initial conditions and study the resulting effects. On top of this, acquiring Astronomical data has historically been a very labor-intensive effort. As a result, data has traditionally been preserved for posterity. With recent technological advances, however, the rate at which we acquire new data has grown exponentially, which has generated a Data Tsunami, whose wave train threatens to overwhelm the field. In this conference proceedings, we present and define the concept of virtual observatories, which we feel is the only logical answer to this dilemma.

  14. CHILBOLTON OBSERVATORY The Chilbolton Observatory in Hampshire is at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's energy balance. Scientists use CFARR's sophisticated RADAR (Radio Detection And Ranging), LIDAR (LIghtCHILBOLTON OBSERVATORY The Chilbolton Observatory in Hampshire is at the cutting-edge of world Monitoring Facility. CFARR CFARR is one of the world's most advanced experimental meteorological remote

  15. The Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2009-12-17

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

  16. Space Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Certifications required for all raw materials ­ Shelf Life (Polymerics) materials date controlled by QA · DesignsSpace Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory HST-COS FUV PER 11/8/00 FUV Detector System Materials;Space Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory HST-COS FUV PER 11/8/00 Materials and Processes · Materials

  17. PRECIPITATION AT ARMAGH OBSERVATORY 18381997

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRECIPITATION AT ARMAGH OBSERVATORY 1838­1997 C.J. Butler, A.D.S. Coughlin and D.T. Fee ABSTRACT the longest in the British Isles. Here we present the monthly mean daily precipitation recorded at Armagh with the compilation and calibration of one such body of data, namely the precipitation recorded at Armagh Observatory

  18. Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miao He; for the JUNO collaboration

    2014-12-13

    The Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) is a multipurpose neutrino-oscillation experiment designed to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to precisely measure oscillation parameters by detecting reactor antineutrinos, observe supernova neutrinos, study the atmospheric, solar neutrinos and geo-neutrinos, and perform exotic searches, with a 20 kiloton liquid scintillator detector of unprecedented $3\\%$ energy resolution (at 1 MeV) at 700-meter deep underground and to have other rich scientific possibilities. Currently MC study shows a sensitivity of the mass hierarchy to be $\\overline{\\Delta\\chi^2}\\sim 11$ and $\\overline{\\Delta\\chi^2}\\sim 16$ in a relative and an absolute measurement, respectively. JUNO has been approved by Chinese Academy of Sciences in 2013, and an international collaboration was established in 2014. The civil construction is in preparation and the R$\\&$D of the detectors are ongoing. A new offline software framework was developed for the detector simulation, the event reconstruction and the physics analysis. JUNO is planning to start taking data around 2020.

  19. Space Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Functional Test Pre-Vibration Functional BATC Acceptance Review · Verify Mechanical Integrity Only · Static Observatory HST-COS FUV PER 11/8/00 FUV Detector System Test Flow Vibration Test Post-Vibration Functional EMI Acceleration · Random Vibration · Sine Survey FUV detector Performance tests ·Long-Form Detector Functional

  20. Carnegie Mellon Opens Data Center Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carnegie Mellon Opens Data Center Observatory :: CyLab Press Releases In the News CSO Council INI Home > Media Center > In the News > Carnegie Mellon Opens Data Center Observatory Carnegie Mellon Opens Data Center Observatory On May 23, 2006 Carnegie Mellon University held a lab dedication ceremony

  1. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Contact Information David Tarboton Utah State University of Utah 135 South 1460 East Rm 719 Salt Lake City, Utah (801) 581-5033 wjohnson. The Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory development team is highly committed to this concept

  2. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-07-08

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 1017 eV and study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km2 overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. Additionally, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km2, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completionmore »in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km2 sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.« less

  3. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above $10^{17}$ eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water-Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km$^2$ overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km$^2$, 61 detector infill array. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km$^2$ sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Auger Observatory.

  4. The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander

    2015-07-08

    The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above 1017 eV and study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km2 overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. Additionally, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km2, 61-detector infilled array with 750 m spacing. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km2 sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Observatory.

  5. The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield...

  6. Virtual Global Magnetic ObservatoryVirtual Global Magnetic Observatory Network in Africa:Network in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    Virtual Global Magnetic ObservatoryVirtual Global Magnetic Observatory Network in Africa:Network in Africa: Capacity Building for ElectronicCapacity Building for Electronic Geophysical YearGeophysical Year · VGMO.NET is a middleware architecture that provides a new way for the worldwide geomagnetic community

  7. Hybrid Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Dawson; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-08

    A key feature of the Pierre Auger Observatory is its hybrid design, in which ultra high energy cosmic rays are detected simultaneously by fluorescence telescopes and a ground array. The two techniques see air showers in complementary ways, providing important cross-checks and measurement redundancy. Much of the hybrid capability stems from the accurate geometrical reconstruction it achieves, with accuracy better than either the ground array detectors or a single telescope could achieve independently. We have studied the geometrical and longitudinal profile reconstructions of hybrid events. We present the results for the hybrid performance of the Observatory, including trigger efficiency, energy and angular resolution, and the efficiency of the event selection.

  8. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  9. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  10. Axions at the International Axion Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redondo, Javier

    2016-01-01

    QCD axions with meV mass can be behind some stellar cooling anomalies and form all or part of the cold dark matter of the universe. We discuss on a proposed experiment to discover the solar flux of meV mass axions: the International AXion Observatory: IAXO.

  11. Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

  12. Observatory Conversion of Pixels to Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greisen, Eric

    Eric W. Greisen Mark Calabretta National Radio Astronomy Observatory Australia Telescope National 300 330 60 30 0 ­30 ­60 Hammer­Aitoff projection 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 180 210 240 270 300 330 60 30, pole (0, 30) 0 30 60 90 120 150 180 180 210 240 270 300 330 60 30 0 ­30 ­60 Hammer­Aitoff projection

  13. Bishop's University Astronomical Observatory October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that was built on the roof of Nicolls adjacent to the Observatory and the other is Bishop's first-ever solar of our visitors. The solar panel and battery system provide sufficient energy to easily light the deck that reduce the level of light pollution. The installation of the solar energy system and the replacement

  14. Operations of and Future Plans for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Performance and operation of the Surface Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory using high-elevation fluorescence telescopes (HEAT); (3) AMIGA - Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Radio detection of Cosmic Rays at the southern Auger Observatory; (5) Hardware Developments for the AMIGA enhancement at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) A simulation of the fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory using GEANT 4; (7) Education and Public Outreach at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) BATATA: A device to characterize the punch-through observed in underground muon detectors and to operate as a prototype for AMIGA; and (9) Progress with the Northern Part of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  16. The endless mantra : innovation at the Keck Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobra, Monica Godha

    2005-01-01

    A study of historical, current, and future developments at the Keck Observatory revealed a thriving philosophy of innovation. Intended to defy obsoletion and keep the observatory competitive over long time scales, this ...

  17. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aciego, S.M.; Jourdan, F.; DePaolo, D.J.; Kennedy, B.M.; Renne, P.R.; Sims, K.W.W.

    2009-10-01

    Late Quaternary, post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes on the Big Island of Hawaii have been dated using the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar and U-Th/He methods. The objective of the study is to compare the recently demonstrated U-Th/He age method, which uses basaltic olivine phenocrysts, with {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages measured on groundmass from the same samples. As a corollary, the age data also increase the precision of the chronology of volcanism on the Big Island. For the U-Th/He ages, U, Th and He concentrations and isotopes were measured to account for U-series disequilibrium and initial He. Single analyses U-Th/He ages for Hamakua lavas from Mauna Kea are 87 {+-} 40 ka to 119 {+-} 23 ka (2{sigma} uncertainties), which are in general equal to or younger than {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages. Basalt from the Polulu sequence on Kohala gives a U-Th/He age of 354 {+-} 54 ka and a {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 450 {+-} 40 ka. All of the U-Th/He ages, and all but one spurious {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages conform to the previously proposed stratigraphy and published {sup 14}C and K-Ar ages. The ages also compare favorably to U-Th whole rock-olivine ages calculated from {sup 238}U - {sup 230}Th disequilibria. The U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results agree best where there is a relatively large amount of radiogenic {sup 40}Ar (>10%), and where the {sup 40}Ar/{sup 36}Ar intercept calculated from the Ar isochron diagram is close to the atmospheric value. In two cases, it is not clear why U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar ages do not agree within uncertainty. U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results diverge the most on a low-K transitional tholeiitic basalt with abundant olivine. For the most alkalic basalts with negligible olivine phenocrysts, U-Th/He ages were unattainable while {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar results provide good precision even on ages as low as 19 {+-} 4 ka. Hence, the strengths and weaknesses of the U-Th/He and {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar methods are complimentary for basalts with ages of order 100-500 ka.

  18. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 25412554, 2014 www.atmos-chem-phys.net/14/2541/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    for Air Pollution/Environmental Technology, Duebendorf, Switzerland Correspondence to: L. X. Zhou (zhoulx-term measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration began at Mauna Loa, Hawaii (Keeling et al., 1976; Keeling, 2008

  19. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  20. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  1. PARKER LIBRARY STEWARD OBSERVATORY PLSO Guide to the Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    PARKER LIBRARY STEWARD OBSERVATORY PLSO Guide to the Library I. Circulation Guidelines A. Borrowers and Planetary Lab, and Kitt Peak National Observatory. b. Undergraduate astronomy majors, whose names and campus PLSO materials only in the library. b. Other persons who wish to borrow material from the library must

  2. Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array The processes that shape. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) will build a 25­30 year laboratory on the seafloor, in the water column, and at the ocean surface. It will make available novel platforms for oceanographic discovery

  3. 7 March 2013 Armagh Observatory Forthcoming Public Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for approximately half an hour. 2. St. Patrick's Day Event The Armagh Observatory and the Armagh Public Library Evensong from 3.15pm to 4.00pm. (www.stpatricks-cathedral.org) b. The Armagh Public Library and No. 57 March 2013 Armagh Observatory Forthcoming Public Events 1. "Comet PANSTARRS IS COMING" Students

  4. Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Web Science Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Ian Brown Web Science Institute University of Southampton University of Southampton Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK +44 (0)23 8059 5000 wh@soton.ac.uk Lisa Harris Web.j.harris@soton.ac.uk ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose an initial structure to support a taxonomy for Web Observatories (WO

  5. Field Operations Manager-Domain 3 The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is a $430 million dollar observatory project dedicated to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    ) is a $430 million dollar observatory project dedicated to understanding how changes in climate, land use

  6. The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

  7. GAMMA-400 gamma-ray observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Topchiev, N P; Bonvicini, V; Adriani, O; Aptekar, R L; Arkhangelskaja, I V; Arkhangelskiy, A I; Bakaldin, A V; Bergstrom, L; Berti, E; Bigongiari, G; Bobkov, S G; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bonechi, L; Bongi, M; Bottai, S; Castellini, G; Cattaneo, P W; Cumani, P; Dalkarov, O D; Dedenko, G L; De Donato, C; Dogiel, V A; Finetti, N; Gascon, D; Gorbunov, M S; Gusakov, Yu V; Hnatyk, B I; Kadilin, V V; Kaplin, V A; Kaplun, A A; Kheymits, M D; Korepanov, V E; Larsson, J; Leonov, A A; Loginov, V A; Longo, F; Maestro, P; Marrocchesi, P S; Martinez, M; Menshenin, A L; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Moiseev, A A; Mori, N; Moskalenko, I V; Naumov, P Yu; Papini, P; Paredes, J M; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Rappoldi, A; Ricciarini, S; Runtso, M F; Ryde, F; Serdin, O V; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stozhkov, Yu I; Suchkov, S I; Taraskin, A A; Tavani, M; Tiberio, A; Tyurin, E M; Ulanov, M V; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Ward, J E; Yurkin, Yu T; Zampa, N; Zirakashvili, V N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    The GAMMA-400 gamma-ray telescope with excellent angular and energy resolutions is designed to search for signatures of dark matter in the fluxes of gamma-ray emission and electrons + positrons. Precision investigations of gamma-ray emission from Galactic Center, Crab, Vela, Cygnus, Geminga, and other regions will be performed, as well as diffuse gamma-ray emission, along with measurements of high-energy electron + positron and nuclei fluxes. Furthermore, it will study gamma-ray bursts and gamma-ray emission from the Sun during periods of solar activity. The energy range of GAMMA-400 is expected to be from ~20 MeV up to TeV energies for gamma rays, up to 20 TeV for electrons + positrons, and up to 10E15 eV for cosmic-ray nuclei. For high-energy gamma rays with energy from 10 to 100 GeV, the GAMMA-400 angular resolution improves from 0.1{\\deg} to ~0.01{\\deg} and energy resolution from 3% to ~1%; the proton rejection factor is ~5x10E5. GAMMA-400 will be installed onboard the Russian space observatory.

  8. Observatory, 125, 319322, 2005 EARTH IN THE COSMIC SHOOTING GALLERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Vacheslav Emel'yanenko2 and Bill Napier3 1Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh, BT61 9DG 2South Ural University, Chelyabinsk, 454080, Russia 3Cardiff Centre for Astrobiology, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3

  9. Low-multiplicity Burst Search at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    Results are reported from a search for low-multiplicity neutrino bursts in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Such bursts could indicate the detection of a nearby core-collapse supernova explosion. The data were taken from ...

  10. Low Energy Investigations at Kamioka Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroyuki Sekiya

    2013-01-30

    At Kamioka Observatory many activities for low energy rare event search are ongoing. Super-Kamiokande(SK), the largest water Cherenkov neutrino detector, currently continues data taking as the fourth phase of the experiment (SK-IV). In SK-IV, we have upgraded the water purification system and tuned water flow in the SK tank. Consequently the background level was lowered significantly. This allowed SK-IV to derive solar neutrino results down to 3.5MeV energy region. With these data, neutrino oscillation parameters are updated from global fit; $\\Delta m^2_{12}=7.44^{+0.2}_{-0.19}\\times10^{-5} {\\rm eV}^2$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}=0.304\\pm0.013$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}=0.030^{+0.017}_{-0.015}$. NEWAGE, the directional sensitive dark matter search experiment, is currently operated as "NEWAGE-0.3a" which is a $0.20\\times0.25\\times0.31$ m$^3$ micro-TPC filled with CF4 gas at 152 Torr. Recently we have developed "NEWAGE-0.3b". It was succeeded to lower the operation pressure down to 76 Torr and the threshold down to 50 keV (F recoils). XMASS experiment is looking for scintillation signals from dark matter interaction in 1 ton of liquid xenon. It was designed utilizing its self-shielding capability with fiducial volume confinement. However, we could lower the analysis threshold down to 0.3 keVee using whole volume of the detector. In February 2012, low threshold and very large exposure data (5591 kg$\\cdot$days) were collected. With these data, we have excluded some part of the parameter spaces claimed by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT experiments.

  11. Design and Deployment of the Bonne Bay Observatory (B2O) B. de Young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    and data acquisition for the subsea node. Shore based computers collect the data from the observatory

  12. 8. Hokuriku Earthquake Prediction Observatory, Fukui (D.P.R.I.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    11 34 8. Hokuriku Earthquake Prediction Observatory, Fukui (D.P.R.I.) 9. Primate Research Institute Quality Control (Eng.) 12. Shigaraki MU Observatory (R.I.S.H) 13. Osakayama Earthquake Prediction Observatory, Otsu, Shiga (D.P.R.I.) 14. Abuyama Earthquake Prediction Observatory, Takatsuki, Osaka (D

  13. Present OH measurement limits and associated uncertainties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanner, D.J.; Eisele, F.L. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The first ion-assisted OH measurement instrument was developed and field tested in 1989. Since that time both instrument and technique have evolved substantially and several potential measurement interferences have been investigated. Included among these are reactions that could compete with the H2O/SO3 reaction, the effect of H2O on the NO3(-)-HNO3/H2SO4 reaction, and potential wall losses. These investigations have also provided data of relevance to atmospheric ion and neutral chemistry for the two reactions listed above, as well as for the OH measurement itself. Measurements made at Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii show for the first time a diurnal variation in tropospheric OH which spans more than 2 orders of magnitude. Nighttime measurements revealed hydroxyl radicals in the 10(exp 4) molecules/cc concentration.

  14. Supporting a Social Media Observatory with Customizable Index Structures --Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research activity in analysis of social media and micro- blogging data in recent years suggests media data. To support these "social media observatories" effectively, a storage platform must satisfy special requirements for loading and storage of multi-terabyte datasets, as well as efficient evaluation

  15. Wide-field stellar photometry in Piwnice Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gracjan Maciejewski

    2007-12-17

    In this paper research projects based on the wide-field CCD photometry performed in Piwnice Observatory are discussed. The used telescopes, as well as dedicated software pipeline for data reduction are presented. The prospects for collaboration between Polish and Bulgarian institutes in the field of wide-field photometry are also discussed.

  16. NASA/TP--2006214434 Examination of the Armagh Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA/TP--2006­214434 Examination of the Armagh Observatory Annual Mean Temperature Record, 1844, Alabama July 2006 #12;The NASA STI Program Office...in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement of aeronautics and space science. The NASA Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Program

  17. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

  18. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  19. The Royal Observatory Edinburgh: Astronomy past, present, and future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, John

    on James Clerk Maxwell Telescope in Hawaii World's first CCD-like sub-millimetre camera SCUBA2 survey led, VISTA) ­ Next generation CCD surveys ­ Virtual Observatory and e-science tools #12;Scientific outlook Aims: ·Probing the nature of dark matter and dark energy ·Understanding the format

  20. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Design, Calibration, and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory (HAWC) is under construction 4100 meters above sea level at Sierra Negra, Mexico. We describe the design and cabling of the detector, the characterization of the photomultipliers, and the timing calibration system. We also outline a next-generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique.

  1. Instruments and Science Programs at Fresno State's Campus Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringwald, Frederick A.

    an Orion Ultrablock Light-Pollution Filter, also called a nebular filter since it passes only hydrogen betaGlow Broadband light pollution filter, which also passes the hydrogen alpha line. The observatory's 1.25-inch Hutech IDAS light-pollution suppression (LPS) filter deserves special mention. It has five narrow bands

  2. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  3. The World Space Observatory (WSO-UV) - Current status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michela Uslenghi; Isabella Pagano; Cristian Pontoni; Salvatore Scuderi; Boris Shustov

    2008-01-14

    This paper reports on the current status of the World Space Observatory WSO-UV, a space mission for UV astronomy, planned for launch at the beginning of next decade. It is based on a 1.7 m telescope, with focal plane instruments including high resolution spectrographs, long slit low resolution spectrographs and imaging cameras.

  4. A SURVEY OF EGRET SOURCES USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V. The third EGRET catalog contained 271 new gamma-ray sources with energies above 100 MeV. The 271 sources in this catalog include the single 1991 solar flare, the Large Magellanic Cloud, five pulsars, one radio galaxy objects. Located in northern New Mexico, the Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water

  5. SUN-EARTH CONNECTION Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MISSIONS SUN-EARTH CONNECTION STEREO Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory Hinode CORONAL MASS. Twin spacecraft, placed in different orbits, take images to produce 3-D pictures of the Sun and Solar Japanese/US/UK mission to study interactions between the Sun's magnetic field and its outer atmosphere

  6. Radiosonde campaign in Paranal Observatory 2011: PWV measurement.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to SOW document this report is a deliverable to ESO as part of the contract. 1Avenida Gran Bretaña 1111, Valparaíso, Chile. Contact: omar.cuevas@uv.cl - michel.cure@uv.cl 2European Southern Observatory 3http://www

  7. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  8. Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear and en- hance the comprehensive synoptic observing programs at BBSO, which include the following ve studies. Statistical studies on sunspot areas and magnetic shear are among the highlights of this research

  9. The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug; The Gemini Observatory Science Operations Plan Phil Puxley, Fred Gillett, Matt Mountain and Doug Simons

  10. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  11. Geomagnetic observatory GAN Jakub Velimsky K. Chandra Shakar Rao Lars W. Pedersen Ahmed Muslim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    ´imsk´y et al. (ETH,UK,DTU,NGRI,GMO) Geomagnetic observatory GAN 27.4.2011/KG MFF UK 1 / 16 #12;Participating, Univ. Stuttgart) John Riddick (BGS, retired) Vel´imsk´y et al. (ETH,UK,DTU,NGRI,GMO) Geomagnetic Measurements and Observatory Practice, 1996) Vel´imsk´y et al. (ETH,UK,DTU,NGRI,GMO) Geomagnetic observatory

  12. US earthquake observatories: recommendations for a new national network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report is the first attempt by the seismological community to rationalize and optimize the distribution of earthquake observatories across the United States. The main aim is to increase significantly our knowledge of earthquakes and the earth's dynamics by providing access to scientifically more valuable data. Other objectives are to provide a more efficient and cost-effective system of recording and distributing earthquake data and to make as uniform as possible the recording of earthquakes in all states. The central recommendation of the Panel is that the guiding concept be established of a rationalized and integrated seismograph system consisting of regional seismograph networks run for crucial regional research and monitoring purposes in tandem with a carefully designed, but sparser, nationwide network of technologically advanced observatories. Such a national system must be thought of not only in terms of instrumentation but equally in terms of data storage, computer processing, and record availability.

  13. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  14. Hybrid Detection of UHECR with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Mostafa; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2006-07-31

    The Pierre Auger Observatory detects ultra-high energy cosmic rays by implementing two complementary air-shower techniques. The combination of a large ground array and fluorescence detectors, known as the "hybrid" concept, means that a rich variety of measurements can be made on a single shower, providing much improved information over what is possible with either detector alone. In this paper the hybrid reconstruction approach and its performance are described.

  15. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  16. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  17. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.

    1996-02-01

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  18. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY. XVII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Wycoff, Gary L. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil

    2011-08-15

    The results of 3362 intensified CCD observations of double stars, made with the 26 inch refractor of the U.S. Naval Observatory, are presented. Each observation of a system represents a combination of over 2000 short-exposure images. These observations are averaged into 1970 mean relative positions and range in separation from 0.''78 to 72.''17, with a mean separation of 14.''76. This is the 17th in this series of papers and covers the period 2010 January 6 through December 20. Also presented are 10 pairs that are resolved for the first time.

  20. The "PISCO" speckle camera at Pic du Midi Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Louis Prieur; Laurent Koechlin; Christine André; Gérard Gallou; Christian Lucuix

    2006-09-29

    We present a new speckle camera designed and built at Observatoire Midi-Pyr\\'{e}n\\'{e}es. This focal instrument has been used for four years with the 2-meter Bernard Lyot Telescope of Pic du Midi observatory. It can be set in various operating modes: full pupil imaging, masked-pupil imaging, spectroscopy, wave-front sensor and stellar coronagraphy, hence its name "PISCO" ("Pupil Interferometry Speckle COronagraph"). Restored images of double and triple stars have demonstrated its capabilities in providing close to diffraction limited images (0.06 arcsec in V). PISCO has been fully tested and is now ready to be used by the whole astronomical community.

  1. Ultrahigh Energy Neutrinos at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; et al

    2013-01-01

    The observation of ultrahigh energy neutrinos (UHE?s) has become a priority in experimental astroparticle physics. UHE?s can be detected with a variety of techniques. In particular, neutrinos can interact in the atmosphere (downward-going?) or in the Earth crust (Earth-skimming?), producing air showers that can be observed with arrays of detectors at the ground. With the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory we can detect these types of cascades. The distinguishing signature for neutrino events is the presence of very inclined showers produced close to the ground (i.e., after having traversed a large amount of atmosphere). In this workmore »we review the procedure and criteria established to search for UHE?s in the data collected with the ground array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This includes Earth-skimming as well as downward-going neutrinos. No neutrino candidates have been found, which allows us to place competitive limits to the diffuse flux of UHE?s in the EeV range and above.« less

  2. The UFFO (Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory) Pathfinder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, I H; Lim, H; Nam, J W; Chen, Pisin; Khrenov, B A; Kim, Y -K; Lee, C -H; Lee, J; Linder, E V; Panasyuk, M; Park, J H; Smoot, G F; Uhm, Z L

    2009-01-01

    Hundreds of gamma-ray burst (GRB) UV-optical light curves have been measured since the discovery of optical afterglows, however, even after nearly 5 years of operation of the SWIFT observatory, only a handful of measurements have been made soon (within a minute) after the gamma ray signal. This lack of early observations fails to address burst physics at the short time scales associated with burst events and progenitors. Because of this lack of sub-minute data, the characteristics of the UV-optical light curve of short-hard type GRB and rapid-rising GRB, which may account for ~30% of all GRB, remain practically unknown. We have developed methods for reaching the sub-minute and the sub-second timescales in a small spacecraft observatory appropriate for launch on a microsatellite. Rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the UV-optical instrument at the GRB position, we use rapidly moving mirrors to redirect our optical beam. Our collaboration has produced a unique MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) ...

  3. Euro-VO - Coordination of Virtual Observatory activities in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genova, Francoise; Arviset, Christophe; Lawrence, Andy; Pasian, Fabio; Solano, Enrique; Wambsganss, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The European Virtual Observatory Euro-VO has been coordinating European VO activities through a series of projects co-funded by the European Commission over the last 15 years. The bulk of VO work in Europe is ensured by the national VO initiatives and those of intergovernmental agencies. VO activities at the European level coordinate the work in support of the three "pillars" of the Virtual Observatory: support to the scientific community, take-up by the data providers, and technological activities. Several Euro-VO projects have also provided direct support to selected developments and prototyping. This paper explains the methodology used by Euro-VO over the years. It summarizes the activities which were performed and their evolutions at different stages of the development of the VO, explains the Euro-VO role with respect to the international and national levels of VO activities, details the lessons learnt for best practices for the coordination of the VO building blocks, and the liaison with other European i...

  4. The Pierre Auger Observatory II: Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Hadronic Interaction models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; A. Chou; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; U. Cotti; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; W. J. M. de Mello Junior; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D'Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; D. García Gámez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Góra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. -H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D. -H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Lemiere; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; C. Morris; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo; I. Rodriguez-Cabo; M. D. Rodríguez-Frías; G. Ros; J. Rosado

    2011-07-24

    Studies of the composition of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory, including examination of hadronic physics effects on the structure of extensive air showers.

  5. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  6. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Gamma Ray Observatory, located at an altitude of 8,600 feet in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico of the solar mag

  7. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  8. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  9. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson,Cathy; Rowland,Joel; Gangodagamage,Chandana

    2013-12-08

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  10. The Large Observatory For X-ray Timing: LOFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozzo, E

    2013-01-01

    LOFT, the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing, is a new space mission concept devoted to observations of Galactic and extra-Galactic sources in the X-ray domain with the main goals of probing gravity theory in the very strong field environment of black holes and other compact objects, and investigating the state of matter at supra-nuclear densities in neutron stars. The instruments on-board LOFT, the Large area detector and the Wide Field Monitor combine for the first time an unprecedented large effective area (~10 m2 at 8 keV) sensitive to X-ray photons mainly in the 2-30 keV energy range and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based telescopes (down to 200 eV at 6 keV). LOFT is currently competing for a launch of opportunity in 2022 together with the other M3 mission candidates of the ESA Cosmic Vision Program.

  11. Low Multiplicity Burst Search at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SNO Collaboration

    2010-11-24

    Results are reported from a search for low-multiplicity neutrino bursts in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Such bursts could indicate detection of a nearby core-collapse supernova explosion. The data were taken from Phase I (November 1999 - May 2001), when the detector was filled with heavy water, and Phase II (July 2001 - August 2003), when NaCl was added to the target. The search was a blind analysis in which the potential backgrounds were estimated and analysis cuts were developed to eliminate such backgrounds with 90% confidence before the data were examined. The search maintained a greater than 50% detection probability for standard supernovae occurring at a distance of up to 60 kpc for Phase I and up to 70 kpc for Phase II. No low-multiplicity bursts were observed during the data-taking period.

  12. Searching for Double Beta Decay with the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C.; /SLAC

    2007-03-16

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) Collaboration is building a series of experiments to search for the neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The first experiment, known as EXO-200, will utilize 200 kg of xenon enriched to 80% in the isotope of interest, making it the largest double beta decay experiment to date by one order of magnitude. This experiment is rapidly being constructed, and will begin data taking in 2007. The EXO collaboration is also developing a technique to identify on an event-by-event basis the daughter barium ion of the double beta decay. If successful, this method would eliminate all conventional radioactive backgrounds to the decay, resulting in an ideal experiment. We summarize here the current status of EXO-200 construction and the barium tag R&D program.

  13. VAMOS: a Pathfinder for the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Ángeles, F; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Avila-Aroche, A; Solares, H A Ayala; Badillo, C; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Belmont, E; Benítez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cabrera, I; Carramiñana, A; Castañeda-Martínez, L; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Azuara, A; Diaz-Cruz, L; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; Dultzin, D; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; García-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, A; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmán-Cerón, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hernández-Cervantes, L; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lara, G; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garcia, R; Marinelli, A; Martínez, L A; Martínez, H; Martínez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Page, D P; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Ramírez, I; Renter, A; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Sala, F; Ruiz-Velasco, E L; Ryan, J; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Suarez, F; Taboada, I; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Tinoco, S; Ukwatta, T N; Galicia, J F Valdés; Vanegas, P; Vázquez, A; Villaseñor, L; Wall, W; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01

    VAMOS was a prototype detector built in 2011 at an altitude of 4100m a.s.l. in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The aim of VAMOS was to finalize the design, construction techniques and data acquisition system of the HAWC observatory. HAWC is an air-shower array currently under construction at the same site of VAMOS with the purpose to study the TeV sky. The VAMOS setup included six water Cherenkov detectors and two different data acquisition systems. It was in operation between October 2011 and May 2012 with an average live time of 30%. Besides the scientific verification purposes, the eight months of data were used to obtain the results presented in this paper: the detector response to the Forbush decrease of March 2012, and the analysis of possible emission, at energies above 30 GeV, for long gamma-ray bursts GRB111016B and GRB120328B.

  14. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY. XVIII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Friedman, Elizabeth A. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil

    2012-05-15

    The results of 2490 intensified CCD observations of double stars, made with the 26 inch refractor of the U.S. Naval Observatory, are presented. Each observation of a system represents a combination of over 2000 short-exposure images. These observations are averaged into 1462 mean relative positions and range in separation from 0.''56 to 71.''80, with a mean separation of 14.''81. This is the 18th in this series of papers and covers the period 2011 January 3 through 2011 December 18. Also presented are four pairs which are resolved for the first time, thirteen other pairs which appear to be lost, and linear elements for four additional pairs.

  15. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY. XIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Hurowitz, Haley M. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil

    2013-09-15

    The results of 2916 intensified CCD observations of double stars, made with the 26 inch refractor of the U.S. Naval Observatory, are presented. Each observation of a system represents a combination of over two thousand short-exposure images. These observations are averaged into 1584 mean relative positions and range in separation from 0.''54 to 98.''09, with a median separation of 11.''73. This is the 19th in this series of papers and covers the period 2012 January 5 through 2012 December 18. Also presented are 10 pairs that are reported for the first time, 17 pairs that appear to be lost, linear elements for 18 pairs, and orbital elements for 2 additional pairs.

  16. The Antarctic Submillimeter Telescope and Remote Observatory (AST/RO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony A. Stark; John Bally; Simon P. Balm; T. M. Bania; Alberto D. Bolatto; Richard A. Chamberlin; Gregory Engargiola; Maohai Huang; James G. Ingalls; Karl Jacobs; James M. Jackson; Jacob W. Kooi; Adair P. Lane; K. -Y. Lo; Rodney D. Marks; Christopher L. Martin; Dennis Mumma; Roopesh Ojha; Rudolf Schieder; Johannes Staguhn; Juergen Stutzki; Christopher K. Walker; Robert W. Wilson; Gregory A. Wright; Xiaolei Zhang; Peter Zimmermann; Ruediger Zimmermann

    2000-12-15

    AST/RO, a 1.7 m diameter telescope for astronomy and aeronomy studies at wavelengths between 200 and 2000 microns, was installed at the South Pole during the 1994-1995 Austral summer. The telescope operates continuously through the Austral winter, and is being used primarily for spectroscopic studies of neutral atomic carbon and carbon monoxide in the interstellar medium of the Milky Way and the Magellanic Clouds. The South Pole environment is unique among observatory sites for unusually low wind speeds, low absolute humidity, and the consistent clarity of the submillimeter sky. Four heterodyne receivers, an array receiver, three acousto-optical spectrometers, and an array spectrometer are installed. A Fabry-Perot spectrometer using a bolometric array and a Terahertz receiver are in development. Telescope pointing, focus, and calibration methods as well as the unique working environment and logistical requirements of the South Pole are described.

  17. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-Based Mock Galaxy Catalogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernyk, Maksym; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R; Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires an expert knowledge of galaxy modelling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalogue suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light-cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, a...

  18. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -www.nrl.navy.mil] ­ S/WAVES Heritage: WIND WAVES [www-lep.gsfc.nasa.gov/waves/waves.html] ­ IMPACT Heritage: WIND 3Dp.sr.unh.edu/data.html] and at UCLA with IMPACT #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 7STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory MissionThompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

  19. Adaptive optics system for the IRSOL solar observatory Renzo Ramelli a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Switzerland Abstract We present a low cost adaptive optics system developed for the solar observatoryAdaptive optics system for the IRSOL solar observatory by Renzo Ramelli a , Roberto Bucher b filter system REFERENCES [1] Bianda, M., Ramelli, R., and Gisler, D., Observing the Second Solar Spectrum

  20. A Search for TeV Emission from Active Galaxies using the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    A Search for TeV Emission from Active Galaxies using the Milagro Observatory by Elizabeth A. HaysV Emission from Active Galaxies using the Milagro Observatory Elizabeth A. Hays, Doctor of Philosophy, 2004 the results of two separate searches of the Milagro data for TeV emission. A real-time search of the entire

  1. A New High Contrast Imaging Program at Palomar Observatory SASHA HINKLEY,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A New High Contrast Imaging Program at Palomar Observatory SASHA HINKLEY,1,2 BEN R. OPPENHEIMER,3-term high contrast imaging program at the 200 inch (5 m) Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory. The primary. The entire combination is mounted behind the Palomar adaptive optics (AO) system. The spectrograph obtains

  2. Big Bear Solar Observatory -New Jersey Institute of Technology 2005 Greetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Big Bear Solar Observatory - New Jersey Institute of Technology 2005 Greetings The Center for Solar-Terrestrial Reasearch (CSTR) at New Jersey Institute of Technology operates Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO), which provides a unique and precise measure of the Earth's reflectance (a critical climate parameter since

  3. Design, Environmental and Sustainability Constraints of new African Observatories: The example of the Mozambique Radio Astronomy Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Domingos; Ribeiro, Valerio A R M; Loots, Anita; Thondikulam, Venkatasubramani L; Gaylard, Michael; van Ardenne, Arnold; Colafrancesco, Sergio; Bergano, Miguel; Amador, Jose Carlos; Maia, Rodrigo; Melo, Rui

    2013-01-01

    The Mozambique Radio Astronomy Observatory (MRAO) will be a first milestone towards development of radioastronomy in Mozambique. Development of MRAO will constitute a preparation step towards participation in the upcoming Africa VLBI Network and the Square Kilometer Array project. The MRAO first antenna is planned to serve as a capacitation and training facility and will be installed after the conversion of a 7-meter telecom dish in South Africa. Therefore, this first radiotelescope design has to comply with local spectral and environmental constraints. Furthermore, power availability and long term sustainability with potential inclusion of solar power and control of Radio Frequency Interference are analyzed. Here we outline some of the design, environmental and power sustainability constraints.

  4. The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The red triangles are volcano locations. Dark-orange areas have a higher volcanic hazard; light-orange areas have a lower volcanic hazard. Dark-gray areas have a higher ash fall hazard; light-gray areas have years. · Mauna Loa, in Hawaii, is the world's largest active volcano. · The Cascade Range--home to more

  5. We already have clear evidence for climate change with a 0.75C rise in global temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    ,whichis releasedaslong-waveinfraredor`heat'radiation. Greenhouse gases such as water vapour, carbon dioxide, methane gas) deposited hundreds of millions years ago, releasing the carbon back into the atmosphere of about 4000 metres on the summit of Mauna Loa in Hawaii; a remote site free from local pollution

  6. ResearchMICHIGAN TECHNOLOGICAL UNIVERSITY > 2012 The comeback ooze

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for bigger people--by design Rising sun A new dawn for solar power 16 19 20 3RESE ARCH 2012 | Michigan On the slopes of Mauna Loa--one of the world's most active volcanoes--Hawaiian honeycreepers make their home, where the human footprint has been minimal. Kipukas are home to native vegetation, insects, rare birds

  7. AEROSOLS AND CLIMATE THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    to address two major pollutants that have an impact on warming: black soot and tropospheric ozone. Both the industrial period. #12;GLOBAL CARBON DIOXIDE OVER THE INDUSTRIAL PERIOD 360 340 320 300 280 CO2MixingRatio,µmol/mol(air. D. Keeling ICE CORES SIPLE STATION ANTARCTICA MAUNA LOA HAWAII #12;GREENHOUSE GAS MIXING RATIOS

  8. Figures 1 et 2 : relevs de tempratures au Pic du Midi Figure 3 : relevs de concentration en dioxyde de carbone au Pic du Midi, Begur (Catalogne) et

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dintrans, Boris

    Aérologie Figures 1 et 2 : relevés de températures au Pic du Midi #12;Figure 3 : relevés de concentration en dioxyde de carbone au Pic du Midi, à Begur (Catalogne) et à Mauna Loa (Hawaï) Questions : Les-rouge. Comment peut-on expliquer l'élévation de température nocturne observée au Pic du Midi ? Quelle hypothèse

  9. THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    THE GREENHOUSE EFFECT Stephen E. Schwartz Atmospheric Sciences Division CSSP Lecture July 30, 2002. D. Keeling ICE CORES SIPLE STATION ANTARCTICA MAUNA LOA HAWAII #12;GREENHOUSE GAS MIXING RATIOS Hansen et al., PNAS. 1998 #12;GREENHOUSE GAS FORCINGS OVER THE INDUSTRIAL PERIOD 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0

  10. Session 1 edited 2007 by Sharon Anthony and E.J. Zita Is the climate changing?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    connections between CO2 and global temperatures. Figure 1: World carbon emissions (millions of metric tons) as a function of date, with CO2 concentration (ppmv) as a function of date for the Siple Ice Core and Mauna Loa. Global, Regional, and National CO2 Emis- sion Estimates from Fossil Fuel Burning, Cement Production

  11. SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

    The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

  12. Astrophysics Motivation behind the Pierre Auger Southern Observatory Enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustavo Medina-Tanco; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-09-06

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration intends to extend the energy range of its southern observatory in Argentina for high quality data from 0.1 to 3 EeV. The extensions, described in accompanying papers, include three additional fluorescence telescopes with a more elevated field of view (HEAT) and a nested surface array with 750 and 433 m spacing respectively and additional muon detection capabilities (AMIGA). The enhancement of the detector will allow measurement of cosmic rays, using the same techniques, from below the second knee up to the highest energies observed. The evolution of the spectrum through the second knee and ankle, and corresponding predicted changes in composition, are crucial to the understanding of the end of Galactic confinement and the effects of propagation on the lower energy portion of the extragalactic flux. The latter is strongly related to the cosmological distribution of sources and to the composition of the injected spectrum. We discuss the science motivation behind these enhancements as well as the impact of combined HEAT and AMIGA information on the assessment of shower simulations and reconstruction techniques.

  13. LOFT: the Large Observatory For X-ray Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belloni, Tomaso M

    2012-01-01

    LOFT, the large observatory for X-ray timing, is a new mission concept competing with other four candidates for a launch opportunity in 2022-2024. LOFT will be performing high-time resolution X-ray observations of compact objects, combining for the first time an unprecedented large collecting area for X-ray photons and a spectral resolution approaching that of CCD-based X-ray instruments (down to 200 eV FWHM at 6 keV). The operating energy range is 2-80 keV. The main science goals of LOFT are the measurement of the neutron stars equation of states and the test of General Relativity in the strong field regime. The breakthrough capabilities of the instruments on-board LOFT will permit to open also new discovery windows for a wide range of Galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources. In this contribution, we provide a general description of the mission concept and summarize its main scientific capabilities.

  14. Conceptual Design of the International Axion Observatory (IAXO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armengaud, E; Betz, M; Brax, P; Brun, P; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Carosi, G P; Caspers, F; Caspi, S; Cetin, S A; Chelouche, D; Christensen, F E; Dael, A; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Derbin, A V; Desch, K; Diago, A; Döbrich, B; Dratchnev, I; Dudarev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galán, J; García, J A; Garza, J G; Geralis, T; Gimeno, B; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Gómez, H; González-Díaz, D; Guendelman, E; Hailey, C J; Hiramatsu, T; Hoffmann, D H H; Horns, D; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Isern, J; Imai, K; Jakobsen, A C; Jaeckel, J; Jakov?i?, K; Kaminski, J; Kawasaki, M; Karuza, M; Kr?mar, M; Kousouris, K; Krieger, C; Laki?, B; Limousin, O; Lindner, A; Liolios, A; Luzón, G; Matsuki, S; Muratova, V N; Nones, C; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Raffelt, G; Redondo, J; Ringwald, A; Russenschuck, S; Ruz, J; Saikawa, K; Savvidis, I; Sekiguchi, T; Semertzidis, Y K; Shilon, I; Sikivie, P; Silva, H; Kate, H ten; Tomas, A; Troitsky, S; Vafeiadis, T; Bibber, K van; Vedrine, P; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Walckiers, L; Weltman, A; Wester, W; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K

    2014-01-01

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) will be a forth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal-to-noise ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, currently the most powerful axion helioscope, reaching sensitivity to axion-photon couplings down to a few $\\times 10^{-12}$ GeV$^{-1}$ and thus probing a large fraction of the currently unexplored axion and ALP parameter space. IAXO will also be sensitive to solar axions produced by mechanisms mediated by the axion-electron coupling $g_{ae}$ with sensitivity $-$for the first time$-$ to values of $g_{ae}$ not previously excluded by astrophysics. With several other possible physics cases, IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. In this paper we present the conceptual design of IAXO, w...

  15. The Fourth US Naval Observatory CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacharias, Norbert; Girard, Terry; Henden, Arne; Bartlett, Jennifer; Monet, Dave; Zacharias, Marion

    2012-01-01

    The fourth United States Naval Observatory (USNO) CCD Astrograph Catalog, UCAC4 was released in August 2012 (double-sided DVD and CDS data center Vizier catalog I/322). It is the final release in this series and contains over 113 million objects; over 105 million of them with proper motions. UCAC4 is an updated version of UCAC3 with about the same number of stars also covering all-sky. Bugs were fixed, Schmidt plate survey data were avoided, and precise 5-band photometry were added. Astrograph observations have been supplemented for bright stars by FK6, Hipparcos and Tycho-2 data to compile a UCAC4 star catalog complete to about magnitude R = 16. Epoch 1998 to 2004 positions are obtained from observations with the 20 cm aperture USNO Astrograph's red lens, equipped with a 4k by 4k CCD. Mean positions and proper motions are derived by combining these observations with over 140 ground- and space-based catalogs, including Hipparcos/Tycho and the AC2000.2, as well as unpublished measures of over 5000 plates from ...

  16. Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) as an advanced astronomical research enviroment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Shirasaki; M. Tanaka; S. Kawanomoto; S. Honda; M. Ohishi; Y. Mizumoto; N. Yasuda; Y. Masunaga; Y. Ishihara; J. Tsutsumi; H. Nakamoto; Y. Kobayashi; M. Sakamoto

    2006-04-28

    We present the design and implementation of the Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) system. JVO is a portal site to various kinds of astronomical resources distributed all over the world. We have developed five components for constructing the portal: (1) registry, (2) data service, (3) workflow system, (4) data analysis service (5) portal GUI. Registry services are used for publishing and searching data services in the VO, and they are constructed using an OAI-PMH metadata harvesting protocol and a SOAP web service protocol so that VO standard architecture is applied. Data services are developed based on the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) which is an international VO standard and an extension of the standard SQL. The toolkit for building the ADQL-based service is released to the public on the JVO web site. The toolkit also provides the protocol translation from a Simple Image Access Protocol (SIAP) to ADQL protocol, so that both the VO standard service can be constructed using our toolkit. In order to federate the distributed databases and analysis services, we have designed a workflow language which is described in XML and developed execution system of the workflow. We have succeeded to connect to a hundred of data resources of the world as of April 2006. We have applied this system to the study of QSO environment by federating a QSO database, a Subaru Suprim-Cam database, and some analysis services such a SExtractor and HyperZ web services. These experiences are described is this paper.

  17. Was Lepenski Vir an ancient Sun or Pleiades observatory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankovic, Vladan; Krmar, Miodrag

    2015-01-01

    In this work we consider some old hypotheses according to which remarkable mesolithic village Lepenski Vir (9500 -- 5500 BC) at the right (nearly west) Danube riverside in the Iron gate in Serbia was an ancient (one of the oldest) Sun observatory. We use method recently suggested by A. C. Sparavigna, concretely we use "freely available software" or local Sun radiation direction simulation computer programs. In this way we obtain and discuss pictures of the sunrise in the Lepenski Vir during winter and summer solstice and spring and autumn equinox in relation to position of the mountains, especially Treskavac (Trescovat) and Kukuvija at left (nearly east) Danube riverside (in Romania). While mountain Kukuvija represents really the marker for the Sun in date of the winter solstice, mountain Treskavac, in despite to usual opinions, does not represent a real marker for the Sun in date of the summer solstice. Sun rises behind Treskavac, roughly speaking, between 22.April and 1. May. It corresponds to year period w...

  18. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY AT THE U.S. NAVAL OBSERVATORY. XVI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Brian D.; Hartkopf, William I.; Wycoff, Gary L. E-mail: wih@usno.navy.mil

    2011-05-15

    The results of 1031 speckle-interferometric observations of double stars, made with the 26 inch refractor of the U.S. Naval Observatory, are presented. Each speckle-interferometric observation of a system represents a combination of over two thousand short-exposure images. These observations are averaged into 457 mean relative positions and range in separation from 0.''15 to 16.''94, with a median separation of 3.''03. The range in V-band magnitudes for the primary (secondary) of observed targets is 3.1-12.9 (3.2-13.3). This is the sixteenth in a series of papers presenting measurements obtained with this system and covers the period 2009 January 12 through 2009 December 17. Included in these data are 12 older measurements whose positions were previously deemed possibly aberrant, but are no longer classified this way following a confirming observation. Also, 10 pairs with a single observation are herein confirmed. This paper also includes the first data obtained using a new ICCD with fiber optic cables.

  19. The Final Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was a water Cherenkov detector dedicated to investigate elementary particles called neutrinos. It successfully took data between 1999 and 2006. The detector was unique in its use of heavy water as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of solar neutrino mixing. In fact, SNO conclusively showed that solar neutrinos oscillate on their way from the core of the Sun to the Earth. This groundbreaking observation was made during three independent phases of the experiment. Even if data taking ended, SNO is still in a mode of precise determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters because all along SNO had developed several methods to tell charged-current events apart from neutral-current events. This ability is crucial for the final and ultimate data analysis of all the phases. The physics reach of a combined three-phase solar analysis will be reviewed together with results and subtleties about solar neutrino physics.

  20. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  1. Highlights from the High Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pretz, John

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory was completed this year at a 4100-meter site on the flank of the Sierra Negra volcano in Mexico. HAWC is a water Cherenkov ground array with the capability to distinguish 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays from the hadronic cosmic-ray background. HAWC is uniquely suited to study extremely high energy cosmic-ray sources, search for regions of extended gamma-ray emission, and to identify transient gamma-ray phenomena. HAWC will play a key role in triggering multi-wavelength and multi-messenger studies of active galaxies, gamma-ray bursts, supernova remnants and pulsar wind nebulae. Observation of TeV photons also provide unique tests for a number of fundamental physics phenomena including dark matter annihilation and primordial black hole evaporation. Operation began mid-2013 with the partially-completed detector. Multi-TeV emission from the Galactic Plane is clearly seen in the first year of operation, confirming a number of known TeV sources, and a numb...

  2. Relative Photometry with data from the Peter van de Kamp Observatory D. Cohen and E. Jensen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, David

    Relative Photometry with data from the Peter van de Kamp Observatory D with those reduced images. While in principle, we could "do photometry on" some can download the data: http://astro.swarthmore.edu/~cohen/telescope/sample_photometry

  3. A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonley, Thomas John

    2009-01-01

    Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of 1 < cos([theta]zenith) ...

  4. Impact of the Geo-synchronous Orbit Radiation Environment on the Design of Astronomical Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruk, Jeffrey W; Armani, Nerses; Stauffer, Craig; Hirata, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Geo-Synchronous orbits are appealing for Solar or astrophysical observatories because they permit continuous data downlink at high rates. The radiation environment in these orbits presents unique challenges, however. This paper describes the characteristics of the radiation environment in Geo-Synchronous orbit and the implications for instrument design. Radiation-induced background event rates are given for some simplified shielding models, and for a detailed model of the proposed Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope observatory.

  5. Search for Ultra-High Energy Photons with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Healy; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-09-28

    Data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory are used to search for air showers initiated by ultra-high energy (UHE) photons. Results of searches are reported from hybrid observations where events are measured with both fluorescence and array detectors. Additionally, a more stringent test of the photon fluxes predicted with energies above 10^19 eV is made using a larger data set measured using only the surface detectors of the observatory.

  6. Light pollution at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Pedani

    2004-07-06

    Sky spectra were obtained from archival science frames taken with DoLoRes at the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo with a wavelength range ~3800 - 8000Ang and resolution of 2.8Ang/pix and 3.6Ang/pix. Our spectra include all the important Sodium and Mercury light pollution lines and span a wide interval of azimuth and observing conditions, essential to disentangle environmental and seasonal effects. New sodium and mercury lines were also detected for the first time at the observatory. Light pollution from NaD_{5892-8} emitted by the LPS lamps increased by a factor of 1.5 - 2 with respect to the average values of 1998. At the same time, light pollution from Hg lines decreased by ~40% and reaches the 1998 levels only when observing toward the towns. The contribution of NaD_{5892-8} from LPS lamps to sky background is 0.05-0.10mag at V-band and 0.07-0.12mag at R-band. Synthetic sky brightness measures calculated from our spectra at V, B and R bands are in good agreement with those of Benn & Ellison(1998) if we take into account that our observations were done during 2003, seven years after the last sunspot minimum. The effects of the application of the Canary Sky Law are directly visible in the spectra as a 50% dimming of the Hg light-polluting lines in the spectra taken after local midnight.

  7. INSIGHTS INTO FILAMENT ERUPTION ONSET FROM SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L.; Freeland, Samuel L. E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov

    2011-04-10

    We examine the buildup to and onset of an active region filament confined eruption of 2010 May 12, using EUV imaging data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Atmospheric Imaging Array and line-of-sight magnetic data from the SDO Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager. Over the hour preceding eruption the filament undergoes a slow rise averaging {approx}3 km s{sup -1}, with a step-like trajectory. Accompanying a final rise step {approx}20 minutes prior to eruption is a transient preflare brightening, occurring on loops rooted near the site where magnetic field had canceled over the previous 20 hr. Flow-type motions of the filament are relatively smooth with speeds {approx}50 km s{sup -1} prior to the preflare brightening and appear more helical, with speeds {approx}50-100 km s{sup -1}, after that brightening. After a final plateau in the filament's rise, its rapid eruption begins, and concurrently an outer shell 'cocoon' of the filament material increases in emission in hot EUV lines, consistent with heating in a newly formed magnetic flux rope. The main flare brightenings start {approx}5 minutes after eruption onset. The main flare arcade begins between the legs of an envelope-arcade loop that is nearly orthogonal to the filament, suggesting that the flare results from reconnection among the legs of that loop. This progress of events is broadly consistent with flux cancellation leading to formation of a helical flux rope that subsequently erupts due to onset of a magnetic instability and/or runaway tether cutting.

  8. THE FOURTH US NAVAL OBSERVATORY CCD ASTROGRAPH CATALOG (UCAC4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharias, N.; Finch, C. T.; Bartlett, J. L.; Girard, T. M.; Henden, A.; Monet, D. G.; Zacharias, M. I.

    2013-02-01

    The fourth United States Naval Observatory (USNO) CCD Astrograph Catalog, UCAC4, was released in 2012 August (double-sided DVD and CDS data center Vizier catalog I/322). It is the final release in this series and contains over 113 million objects; over 105 million of them with proper motions (PMs). UCAC4 is an updated version of UCAC3 with about the same number of stars also covering all-sky. Bugs were fixed, Schmidt plate survey data were avoided, and precise five-band photometry was added for about half the stars. Astrograph observations have been supplemented for bright stars by FK6, Hipparcos, and Tycho-2 data to compile a UCAC4 star catalog complete from the brightest stars to about magnitude R = 16. Epoch 1998-2004 positions are obtained from observations with the 20 cm aperture USNO Astrograph's 'red lens', equipped with a 4k by 4k CCD. Mean positions and PMs are derived by combining these observations with over 140 ground- and space-based catalogs, including Hipparcos/Tycho and the AC2000.2, as well as unpublished measures of over 5000 plates from other astrographs. For most of the faint stars in the southern hemisphere, the first epoch plates from the Southern Proper Motion program form the basis for PMs, while the Northern Proper Motion first epoch plates serve the same purpose for the rest of the sky. These data are supplemented by 2MASS near-IR photometry for about 110 million stars and five-band (B, V, g, r, i) APASS data for over 51 million stars. Thus the published UCAC4, as were UCAC3 and UCAC2, is a compiled catalog with the UCAC observational program being a major component. The positional accuracy of stars in UCAC4 at mean epoch is about 15-100 mas per coordinate, depending on magnitude, while the formal errors in PMs range from about 1 to 10 mas yr{sup -1} depending on magnitude and observing history. Systematic errors in PMs are estimated to be about 1-4 mas yr{sup -1}.

  9. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  10. Design of a telescope pointing and tracking subsystem for the Big Bear Solar Observatory New Solar Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Design of a telescope pointing and tracking subsystem for the Big Bear Solar Observatory New Solar Telescope J. R. Varsika and G.Yangb aBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, California, U.S.A.; bNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey, U.S.A. ABSTRACT The New Solar

  11. LamontDoherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth Institute at Columbia Univ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 12 Lamont­Doherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth-DOHERTYEARTHOBSERVATORYTHEEARTHINSTITUTEATCOLUMBIAUNIVERSITYBIENNIALREPORT2000­2002 #12;Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is renowned in the internationLamont-Doherty Earth suc- cess and innovation in advancing understanding of Earth, for itcess and innovation in advancing

  12. Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland), with reference to simultaneous data obtained by a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories. The aurora simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories, J. Geophys. Res., 109

  13. Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the drivers for building solar telescopes with large apertures. Recent advances in adaptive optics (AO) make it possible to build solar telescopes in an open configuration and thus go beyond the conventional meterProgress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory C. Denkera, P. R

  14. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China email: youfenwang@shao.ac.cn University Of Hertfordshire, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joergens, Viki

    Youfen Wang , Hugh Jones, Ricky Smart, Federico Marocco, Zhengyi Shao et al. 1. Introduction Most L is a useful bridge between studies of stars and planets. Parallaxes are a model independent parameter that can use the methods adopted in the Torino Observatory Parallax Program (Smart et al. 2003, 2007

  15. The Armagh Observatory was founded and endowed by Archbishop Richard Robinson, who wished to establish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Richard Robinson was born in 1708 into a high society Yorkshire family. He was educated at Westminster of Armagh Observatory. This was to be his last completed building in Armagh. Architecture and Grounds of Culture, Arts and Leisure, while the Science and Technology Facilities Council supports individual

  16. The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    For large-diameter solar telescopes operating at the theoretical diffraction limit, one of the main designThe Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory Angelo P. Verdonia and Carsten Denkera aNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, 323 Martin

  17. PRELIMINARY PARALLAXES OF 40 L AND T DWARFS FROM THE US NAVAL OBSERVATORY INFRARED ASTROMETRY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golimowski, David A.

    Observatory, Flagstaff Station, P.O. Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ 86002; fjv@nofs.navy.mil, aah@nofs.navy.mil, cbl@nofs.navy.mil, guetter@nofs.navy.mil, jam@nofs.navy.mil, blaise@nofs.navy.mil A. J. Burgasser2 Division of Astronomy

  18. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V emission from the galactic plane, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma ray bursts- clei (AGN), supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high1 Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss a for the Milagro Collaboration

  19. The Armagh Observatory was founded and endowed by Archbishop Richard Robinson, who wished to establish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interests lie in solar system astronomy and the dynamics of bodies such as comets and asteroids, the Sun, the solar system, and solar-system -- terrestrial relationships. The Observatory is one of the UK and Ireland's leading astronomical research institutes. Basic operational costs are borne by the Department

  20. The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) M.W.E. Smith a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    Gravitational radiation Neutrinos Cosmic rays Gamma-ray bursts Supernovae a b s t r a c t We summarize including the Swift [6] and Fermi [7] satellites, the HESS [8], VERITAS [9], and MAGIC [10] TeV gamma-ray telescopes, and the HAWC [11] TeV gamma-ray observatory. Collectively, these facilities promise the first

  1. Estimating concentrations of heat producing elements in the crust near the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, Ontario, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observatory, Ontario, Canada Catherine Phaneuf, Jean-Claude Mareschal GEOTOP, University of Quebec at Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 1 August 2013 in the Creighton Mine, near Sudbury, Ontario. The facility has been upgraded and a new kiloton scale liquid

  2. Beyond the Second Generation of Laser-Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Hild

    2011-11-27

    This article gives an overview of potential upgrades of second generation gravitational wave detectors and the required key technologies to improve the limiting noise sources. In addition the baseline design of the Einstein Telescope, a European third generation gravitational wave observatory, is briefly discussed.

  3. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltrami, Hugo

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk December 2002. [1] Soils constitute the largest terrestrial source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed

  4. The Observer April 2003 page 3 Adaptive Optics Available at CSU Fresno Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringwald, Frederick A.

    The Observer April 2003 page 3 Adaptive Optics Available at CSU Fresno Observatory By Greg Morgan-tilt mirror continually adjusts the telescopes light cone to hold a guide star on a designated pixel an AO-7 adaptive optics device. It is just one of the many state-of-the-art instruments available

  5. Why are we still studying cosmic rays? Pierre Auger Observatory: past, present, future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    higher than the Calculated Chance Rate ­ even when the counters were as far as 300 m apart. #12;Large GM;photomultiplier Steel tank Cherenkov Light emission in water 41° When a particle travels faster than the velocity Auger Project A new cosmic ray observatory designed for a high statistics study of the The Highest

  6. A Wireless Internet-Based Observatory: The Real-time Coastal Observation Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Wireless Internet-Based Observatory: The Real-time Coastal Observation Network (ReCON) S. A community and educational institutions through the internet. A real-time database management system provides to the success of regional coastal ocean observing systems. The pervasiveness of wireless internet technology

  7. High-energy Atmospheric Muon Flux Expected at India-Based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukanta Panda; Sergei I. Sinegovsky

    2008-02-04

    We calculate the zenith-angle dependence of conventional and prompt high-energy muon fluxes at India-Based Neutrino Observatory (INO) depth. This study demonstrates a possibility to discriminate models of the charm hadroproduction including the low-x QCD behaviour of hadronic cross-sections relevant at very high energies.

  8. Building a new space weather facility at the National Observatory Ioannis Kontogiannis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasiadis, Anastasios

    Building a new space weather facility at the National Observatory of Athens Ioannis Kontogiannis) the operation of a small full-disk solar telescope to conduct regular observations of the Sun in the H of solar wind, and affecting the near- Earth space environment in numerous ways. Both flares and CMEs

  9. Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos- R. Hazamaa , P Be solar 's. The present status of MOON for the low energy solar experiment is briefly discussed the pp solar flux with good accuracy. 1. INTRODUCTION Realtime studies of the high-energy component of 8

  10. Prospects for and Status of CUORE ? The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, E B

    2009-07-07

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a next generation experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless DBD of {sup 130}Te using a bolometric technique. The present status of the CUORE is presented along with the latest results from its prototype, CUORICINO.

  11. A study of the abundance and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric carbon dioxide and oceanic carbon in relation to the global carbon cycle. Final technical report, February 15, 1990--July 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, C.D.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge can be gained about the fluxes and storage of carbon in natural systems and their relation to climate by detecting temporal and spatial patterns in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. When patterns in its {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C isotopic ratio are included in the analysis, there is also a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. The authors systematically measured the concentration and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio of atmospheric CO{sub 2} to produce time series data essential to reveal these temporal and spatial patterns. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, the result also involved measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water and of CO{sub 2} in air near growing land plants. The study was coordinated with a study of the same title concurrently funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The study called for continued atmospheric measurements at an array of ten stations from the Arctic Basin to the South Pole. Air was collected in flasks brought back to the laboratory for analysis, except at Mauna Loa. Observatory, Hawaii, where continuous measurements were also carried out.

  12. 3rd International Workshop on Scientific Use of Submarine Cables and Related Technologies, 25-27 June 2003, Tokyo, Japan Physical Oceanography from Deep Ocean Submarine Cable Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    -27 June 2003, Tokyo, Japan Physical Oceanography from Deep Ocean Submarine Cable Observatories Douglas S. LUTHER Department of Oceanography, University of Hawaii KEYWORDS: Physical Oceanography, Observatories" are reviewed. Perhaps the more important role for observatories in physical oceanography may be the provision

  13. Adaptive optics system for the IRSOL solar observatory Renzo Ramellia, Roberto Bucherb, Leopoldo Rossinia,b,c, Michele Biandaa, Silvano Balemib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a low cost adaptive optics system developed for the solar observatory at Istituto Ricerche SolariAdaptive optics system for the IRSOL solar observatory Renzo Ramellia, Roberto Bucherb, Leopoldo The solar observatory at Istituto Ricerche Solari Locarno (IRSOL) focuses its activity on precise

  14. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; A. Aab; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; M. Ahlers; E. J. Ahn; I. Al Samarai; I. F. M. Albuquerque; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; A. Almela; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; R. Alves Batista; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; C. Aramo; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; A. M. Badescu; K. B. Barber; J. Bäuml; C. Baus; J. J. Beatty; K. H. Becker; J. A. Bellido; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; I. Brancus; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; M. Buscemi; K. S. Caballero-Mora; B. Caccianiga; L. Caccianiga; M. Candusso; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; A. G. Chavez; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; J. Chudoba; M. Cilmo; R. W. Clay; G. Cocciolo; R. Colalillo; L. Collica; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; M. J. Cooper; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; R. Dallier; B. Daniel; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; S. J. de Jong; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; J. de Oliveira; V. de Souza; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; A. Di Matteo; J. C. Diaz; M. L. D\\'\\iaz Castro; P. N. Diep; F. Diogo; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; Q. Dorosti Hasankiadeh; M. T. Dova; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; M. Erfani; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; H. Falcke; K. Fang; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; M. Fernandes; B. Fick; J. M. Figueira; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; B. D. Fox; O. Fratu; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; T. Fuji; R. Gaior; B. Garc\\'\\ia; S. T. Garcia Roca; D. Garcia-Gamez; D. Garcia-Pinto; G. Garilli; A. Gascon Bravo; F. Gate; H. Gemmeke; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giammarchi; M. Giller; C. Glaser; H. Glass; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. F. Gómez Vitale; P. Gonçalves; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; A. Gorgi; P. Gorham; P. Gouffon; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; A. F. Grillo; T. D. Grubb; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; P. Hansen; D. Harari; T. A. Harrison; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; P. Heimann; A. E. Herve; G. C. Hill; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; E. Holt; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; P. Horvath; M. Hrabovský; D. Huber; T. Huege; A. Insolia; P. G. Isar; K. Islo; I. Jandt; S. Jansen; C. Jarne; M. Josebachuili; A. Kääpä; O. Kambeitz; K. H. Kampert; P. Kasper; I. Katkov; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; R. Krause; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; D. Kuempel; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; D. LaHurd; L. Latronico; R. Lauer; M. Lauscher; P. Lautridou; S. Le Coz; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agëra; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; M. Malacari; S. Maldera; J. Maller; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; V. Marin; I. C. Mari?; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Mart\\'\\inez Bravo; D. Martraire; J. J. Mas\\'\\ias Meza; H. J. Mathes; S. Mathys; A. J. Matthews; J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurel; D. Maurizio; E. Mayotte; P. O. Mazur; C. Medina; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; S. Messina; R. Meyhandan; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; L. Middendorf; I. A. Minaya; L. Miramonti; B. Mitrica; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; C. Morello; J. C. Moreno; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; D. Newton; M. Niechciol; L. Niemietz; T. Niggemann; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; V. Novotny; L. Nožka; L. Ochilo; A. Olinto; M. Oliveira; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; P. Papenbreer; G. Parente; A. Parra; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; C. Peters; S. Petrera; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; M. Plum; A. Porcelli; C. Porowski; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; V. Purrello; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; S. Quinn; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; I. Rodriguez Cabo; G. Rodriguez Fernandez; J. Rodriguez Rojo; M. D. Rodr\\'\\iguez-Fr\\'\\ias; G. Ros; J. Rosado; T. Rossler; M. Roth; E. Roulet; A. C. Rovero; C. Rühle; S. J. Saffi; A. Saftoiu; F. Salamida; H. Salazar; F. Salesa Greus

    2014-07-11

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than $60^\\circ$ detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Herschel Space Observatory - An ESA facility for far-infrared and submillimetre astronomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilbratt, G L; Passvogel, T; Crone, G; Doyle, D; Gageur, U; Heras, A M; Jewell, C; Metcalfe, L; Ott, S; Schmidt, M

    2010-01-01

    Herschel was launched on 14 May 2009, and is now an operational ESA space observatory offering unprecedented observational capabilities in the far-infrared and submillimetre spectral range 55-671 {\\mu}m. Herschel carries a 3.5 metre diameter passively cooled Cassegrain telescope, which is the largest of its kind and utilises a novel silicon carbide technology. The science payload comprises three instruments: two direct detection cameras/medium resolution spectrometers, PACS and SPIRE, and a very high-resolution heterodyne spectrometer, HIFI, whose focal plane units are housed inside a superfluid helium cryostat. Herschel is an observatory facility operated in partnership among ESA, the instrument consortia, and NASA. The mission lifetime is determined by the cryostat hold time. Nominally approximately 20,000 hours will be available for astronomy, 32% is guaranteed time and the remainder is open to the worldwide general astronomical community through a standard competitive proposal procedure.

  16. Astrometrical Observations of Pluto - Charon System with the Automated Telescopes of Pulkovo Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devyatkin, Alexander V; Slesarenko, Vyacheslav Yu

    2015-01-01

    The space probe 'New Horizon' was launched on 19th of January 2006 in order to study Pluto and its moons. Spacecraft will fly by Pluto as close as 12500 km in the middle of July 2015 and will get the most detailed images of Pluto and its moon until this moment. At the same time, observation obtained by the ground-based telescopes may also be helpful for the research of such distant system. Thereby, the Laboratory of observational astrometry of Pulkovo Observatory of RAS made a decision to reprocess observations obtained during last decade. More than 350 positional observations of Pluto - Charon system were carried out with the mirror astrograph ZA-320M at Pulkovo and Maksutov telescope MTM-500M near Kislovodsk. These observations were processed by means of software system APEX-II developed in Pulkovo observatory and numerical simulation was performed to calculate the differences between positions of photocenter and barycenter of Pluto - Charon system.

  17. Light pollution at high zenith angles, as measured at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krisciunas, Kevin; Sanhueza, Pedro; Smith, Malcolm G

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of measurements of the V-band sky brightness obtained at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in December 2006 and December 2008 we confirm the functional form of the basic model of Garstang (1989, 1991). At high zenith angles we measure an enhancement of a factor of two over Garstang's later model when there is no marine cloud layer over La Serena/Coquimbo. No corresponding enhancement is found in the B-band.

  18. OBSERVATORY OPPORTUNITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    solar system objects, as well as distant stars, black holes, galaxies, quasars, and other mysterious on the plains of San Augustin fifty miles west of Socorro, New Mexico. Each antenna is 25 m in diameter located at the Array Operations Center in Socorro, New Mexico. Acting like a giant eye 8,600 km wide

  19. Heliophysics Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aulanier, Guillaume

    ........................................................................................................9 4.2 SQL query.................................................................................................................................14 SQL basics

  20. Observatory Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    . Gaudette, G. Milton, B.Sur Chalk River Laboratories, AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 CANADA 2 J

  1. ASTRONOMICAL OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Wendell T.

    HOUSE 164 COLLEGE PARK FIRE STATION 802 110 ANNE ARUNDEL 060 SHOEMAKER 037 BIOMOLECULAR SCIENCES 296 GOLF COURSE CLUB HOUSE 166 CENTER FOR YOUNG CHILDREN 381 201 158 SHUTTLE BUS FACILITY 424 010 237 999 FIELD CAMBRIDGE COMMUNITY CENTER 097 382 109 103 119 CAMPUS FARM ANIMAL SCIENCES/ AGRICULTURE

  2. Maunawili, Hawaii: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, NorthMauna Loa

  3. Maxwell Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna Loa Northeast

  4. McAdams Wright Ragen | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna Loa

  5. Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

    2003-12-23

    We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

  6. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  7. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Dark Matter, Cosmology, and Fundamental Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory (HAWC) is designed to perform a synoptic survey of the TeV sky. The high energy coverage of the experiment will enable studies of fundamental physics beyond the Standard Model, and the large field of view of the detector will enable detailed studies of cosmologically significant backgrounds and magnetic fields. We describe the sensitivity of the full HAWC array to these phenomena in five contributions shown at the 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (July 2013).

  8. Defocused Observations of Selected Exoplanet Transits with T100 in TUBITAK National Observatory of Turkey (TUG)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basturk, Ozgur; Ozavci, Ibrahim; Yorukoglu, Onur; Selam, Selim O

    2015-01-01

    It is crucial to determine masses and radii of extrasolar planets with high precision to have constraints on their chemical composition, internal structure and thereby their formation and evolution. In order to achieve this goal, we apply the defocus technique in the observations of selected planetary systems with the 1 m Turkish telescope T100 in TUBITAK National Observatory (TUG). With this contribution, we aim to present preliminary analyses of transit light curves of the selected exoplanets KELT-3b, HAT-P-10b/WASP-11b, HAT-P-20b, and HAT-P-22b, observed with this technique using T100.

  9. An upper limit to photons from first data taken by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Risse

    2007-01-03

    Many models for ultra-high energy cosmic rays postulate exotic scenarios to explain the sources or the nature of these particles. A characteristic feature of these models is the prediction of a significant flux of photons at ultra-high energy. The Pierre Auger Observatory offers a great potential to search for such photons. We present shower observables with sensitivity to photons and the search strategy employed. An upper limit to photon primaries is derived from first Auger data. Prospects for constraining theoretical source models are discussed.

  10. High-Resolution Spectroscopy with the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Canizares, Claude R. [MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States

    2010-01-08

    The capabilities of the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton for high-resolution spectroscopy have brought tradition plasma diagnostic techniques to the study of cosmic plasma. Observations have probed nearly every class of astronomical object, from young proto-starts through massive O starts and black hole binaries, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and the intergalactic medium. Many of these sources show remarkable rich spectra that reveal new physical information, such as emission measure distributions, elemental abundances, accretion disk and wind signatures, and time variability. This talk will present an overview of the Chandra instrumentaton and selected examples of spectral observations of astrophysical and cosmological importance.

  11. Coverage and large scale anisotropies estimation methods for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Jean-Christophe; /Paris, IN2P3

    2005-07-01

    When searching for anisotropies in the arrival directions of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays, one must estimate the number of events expected in each direction of the sky in the case of a perfect isotropy. We present in this article a new method, developed for the Auger Observatory, based on a smooth estimate of the zenith angle distribution obtained from the data itself (which is essentially unchanged in the case of the presence of a large scale anisotropy pattern). We also study the sensitivity of several methods to detect large-scale anisotropies in the cosmic ray arrival direction distribution : Rayleigh analysis, dipole fitting and angular power spectrum estimation.

  12. Energy Estimation of Cosmic Rays with the Engineering Radio Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anastasi, Gioacchino Alex; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Blazek, Jiri; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Bohá?ová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bretz, Thomas; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Anjos, Rita dos; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filip?i?, Andrej; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Gamez, Diego; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; G?as, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Keilhauer, Bianca; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Kuempel, Daniel; Mezek, Gasper Kukec; Kunka, Norbert; Awad, Alaa Metwaly Kuotb; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mari?, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano; Micheletti, Maria Isabel; Middendorf, Lukas; Minaya, Ignacio A; Miramonti, Lino; Mitrica, Bogdan; Molina-Bueno, Laura; Mollerach, Silvia; Montanet, François

    2015-01-01

    The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is part of the Pierre Auger Observatory and is used to detect the radio emission of cosmic-ray air showers. These observations are compared to the data of the surface detector stations of the Observatory, which provide well-calibrated information on the cosmic-ray energies and arrival directions. The response of the radio stations in the 30 to 80 MHz regime has been thoroughly calibrated to enable the reconstruction of the incoming electric field. For the latter, the energy density is determined from the radio pulses at each observer position and is interpolated using a two dimensional function that takes into account signal asymmetries due to interference between the geomagnetic and charge excess emission components. The spatial integral over the signal distribution gives a direct measurement of the energy transferred from the primary cosmic ray into radio emission in the AERA frequency range. We measure 15.8 MeV of radiation energy for a 1 EeV air shower arriving per...

  13. The Jay Baum Rich telescope: a Centurion 28 at the Wise Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brosch, Noah; Niv, Saar; Manulis, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    We describe the third telescope of the Wise Observatory, a 0.70-m Centurion 28 (C28IL) installed in 2013 and named the Jay Baum Rich telescope to enhance significantly the wide-field imaging possibilities of the observatory. The telescope operates from a 5.5-m diameter dome and is equipped with a large-format red-sensitive CCD camera, offering a ~one square degree imaged field sampled at 0".83/pixel. The telescope was acquired to provide an alternative to the existing 1-m telescope for studies such as microlensing, photometry of transiting exo-planets, the follow-up of supernovae and other optical transients, and the detection of very low surface brightness extended features around galaxies. The operation of the C28IL is robotic, requiring only the creation of a night observing plan that is loaded in the afternoon prior to the observations. The entire facility was erected for a component and infrastructure cost of well under 300k$ and a labor investment of about two person-year. The successful implementation ...

  14. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Takai, H.; Allen, C.; Beard, L.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Byrne, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A.; Gillman, W.H.; Hanlon, W.; Hanson, J.; Jayanthmurthy, C.; Kunwar, S.; Larson, S. L.; Myers, I.; Prohira, S.; Ratzlaff, K.; Sokolsky, P.; Thomson, G. B.; Von Maluski, D.

    2014-08-19

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe the design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.

  15. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbasi, R.; Takai, H.; Allen, C.; Beard, L.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Byrne, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A.; et al

    2014-08-19

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe themore »design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.« less

  16. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Allen, C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Beard, L. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Belz, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Besson, D. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Moscow Engineering and Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); Byrne, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Abou Bakr Othman, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Farhang-Boroujeny, B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gardner, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gillman, W.H. [Gillman and Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hanlon, W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hanson, J. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Jayanthmurthy, C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kunwar, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Larson, S. L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Myers, I. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Prohira, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Ratzlaff, K. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Sokolsky, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thomson, G. B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Von Maluski, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest “conventional” cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe the design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.

  17. Detecting particles with cell phones: the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandenbroucke, Justin; Karn, Peter; Meehan, Matthew; Plewa, Matthew; Ruggles, Tyler; Schultz, David; Peacock, Jeffrey; Simons, Ariel Levi

    2015-01-01

    In 2014 the number of active cell phones worldwide for the first time surpassed the number of humans. Cell phone camera quality and onboard processing power (both CPU and GPU) continue to improve rapidly. In addition to their primary purpose of detecting photons, camera image sensors on cell phones and other ubiquitous devices such as tablets, laptops and digital cameras can detect ionizing radiation produced by cosmic rays and radioactive decays. While cosmic rays have long been understood and characterized as a nuisance in astronomical cameras, they can also be identified as a signal in idle camera image sensors. We present the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), a platform for outreach and education as well as for citizen science. Consisting of an app and associated database and web site, DECO harnesses the power of distributed camera image sensors for cosmic-ray detection.

  18. Detecting particles with cell phones: the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Vandenbroucke; Silvia Bravo; Peter Karn; Matthew Meehan; Matthew Plewa; Tyler Ruggles; David Schultz; Jeffrey Peacock; Ariel Levi Simons

    2015-10-26

    In 2014 the number of active cell phones worldwide for the first time surpassed the number of humans. Cell phone camera quality and onboard processing power (both CPU and GPU) continue to improve rapidly. In addition to their primary purpose of detecting photons, camera image sensors on cell phones and other ubiquitous devices such as tablets, laptops and digital cameras can detect ionizing radiation produced by cosmic rays and radioactive decays. While cosmic rays have long been understood and characterized as a nuisance in astronomical cameras, they can also be identified as a signal in idle camera image sensors. We present the Distributed Electronic Cosmic-ray Observatory (DECO), a platform for outreach and education as well as for citizen science. Consisting of an app and associated database and web site, DECO harnesses the power of distributed camera image sensors for cosmic-ray detection.

  19. The History of the Mysterious Eclipses of KH 15D: Asiago Observatory, 1967-1982

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John A. Johnson; Joshua N. Winn

    2003-12-23

    We are gathering archival observations to determine the photometric history of the unique and unexplained eclipses of the pre-main-sequence star KH 15D. Here we present a light curve from 1967-1982, based on photographic plates from Asiago Observatory. During this time, the system alternated periodically between bright and faint states, as observed today. However, the bright state was 0.9 mag brighter than the modern value, and the fractional variation between bright and faint states (Delta I = 0.7 mag) was smaller than observed today (3.5 mag). A possible explanation for these findings is that the system contains a second star that was previously blended with the eclipsing star, but is now completely obscured.

  20. The exposure of the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It consists of a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level and a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The 'hybrid' detection mode combines the information from the two subsystems. We describe the determination of the hybrid exposure for events observed by the fluorescence telescopes in coincidence with at least one water-Cherenkov detector of the surface array. A detailed knowledge of the time dependence of the detection operations is crucial for an accurate evaluation of the exposure. We discuss the relevance of monitoring data collected during operations, such as the status of the fluorescence detector, background light and atmospheric conditions, that are used in both simulation and reconstruction.

  1. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-triggered GRBs with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M S; Atkins, R; Benbow, W; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) making it an ideal all-sky monitor of the northern hemisphere in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. More than 45 satellite-triggered gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have occurred in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, with the rate of bursts increasing significantly with the launch of Swift. We discuss the most recent results of a search for very high energy (VHE) emission from these GRBs.

  2. New method for atmospheric calibration at the Pierre Auger Observatory using FRAM, a robotic astronomical telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segev BenZvi; Martina Bohacova; Brian Connolly; Jiri Grygar; Miroslav Hrabovsky; Tatiana Karova; Dusan Mandat; Petr Necesal; Dalibor Nosek; Libor Nozka; Miroslav Palatka; Miroslav Pech; Michael Prouza; Jan Ridky; Petr Schovanek; Radomir Smida; Petr Travnicek; Primo Vitale; Stefan Westerhoff; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-12

    FRAM - F/(Ph)otometric Robotic Atmospheric Monitor is the latest addition to the atmospheric monitoring instruments of the Pierre Auger Observatory. An optical telescope equipped with CCD camera and photometer, it automatically observes a set of selected standard stars and a calibrated terrestrial source. Primarily, the wavelength dependence of the attenuation is derived and the comparison between its vertical values (for stars) and horizontal values (for the terrestrial source) is made. Further, the integral vertical aerosol optical depth can be obtained. A secondary program of the instrument, the detection of optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts, has already proven successful. The hardware setup, software system, data taking procedures, and first analysis results are described in this paper.

  3. 8Li electron spectrum versus 8B neutrino spectrum: implications for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Jonkmans; I. S. Towner; B. Sur

    1998-02-25

    The sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to measure the shape of the recoil electron spectrum in the charged-current reaction of $^{8}$B solar neutrinos interacting with deuterium can be improved if the results of a $^{8}$Li beta-decay calibration experiment are included in the test. We calculate an improvement in sensitivity, under certain idealistic assumptions, of about a factor of 2, sufficient to resolve different neutrino-oscillation solutions to the solar-neutrino problem. We further examine the role of recoil and radiative corrections on both the $^{8}$B neutrino spectrum and the $^{8}$Li electron spectrum and conclude that the influence of these effects on the ratio of the two spectra as measured by SNO is very small.

  4. Physics Potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Hasan, Rashid; Salim, Mohammad; Singh, S K; Inbanathan, S S R; Singh, Venktesh; Subrahmanyam, V S; Behera, Shiba Prasad; Chandratre, Vinay B; Dash, Nitali; Datar, Vivek M; Kashyap, V K S; Mohanty, Ajit K; Pant, Lalit M; Chatterjee, Animesh; Choubey, Sandhya; Gandhi, Raj; Ghosh, Anushree; Tiwari, Deepak; Ajmi, Ali; Sankar, S Uma; Behera, Prafulla; Chacko, Aleena; Jafer, Sadiq; Libby, James; Raveendrababu, K; Rebin, K R; Indumathi, D; Meghna, K; Lakshmi, S M; Murthy, M V N; Pal, Sumanta; Rajasekaran, G; Sinha, Nita; Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Khatun, Amina; Mehta, Poonam; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kanishka, R; Kumar, A; Shahi, J S; Singh, J B; Ghosh, Monojit; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Gupta, Chandan; Raut, Sushant; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bose, Suvendu; Ghosal, Ambar; Jash, Abhik; Kar, Kamalesh; Majumdar, Debasish; Majumdar, Nayana; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Saha, Satyajit; Acharya, B S; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Kolahal; Dasgupta, Sudeshna; Devi, Moon Moon; Dighe, Amol; Majumder, Gobinda; Mondal, Naba K; Redij, Asmita; Samuel, Deepak; Satyanarayana, B; Thakore, Tarak; Ravikumar, C D; Vinodkumar, A M; Gangopadhyay, Gautam; Raychaudhuri, Amitava; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Gaur, Ankit; Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Sanjeev; Naimuddin, Md; Bari, Waseem; Malik, Manzoor A; Singh, Jyotsna; Krishnaveni, S; Ravikumar, H B; Ranganathaiah, C; Mahapatra, Swapna; Biswas, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Ganai, Rajesh; Ghosh, Tapasi; Viyogi, Y P

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substant...

  5. Software Holography: Interferometric Data Analysis for the Challenges of Next Generation Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel F. Morales; Michael Matejek

    2008-10-28

    Next generation radio observatories such as the MWA, LWA, LOFAR, CARMA and SKA provide a number of challenges for interferometric data analysis. These challenges include heterogeneous arrays, direction-dependent instrumental gain, and refractive and scintillating atmospheric conditions. From the analysis perspective, this means that calibration solutions can not be described using a single complex gain per antenna. In this paper we use the optimal map-making formalism developed for CMB analyses to extend traditional interferometric radio analysis techniques--removing the assumption of a single complex gain per antenna and allowing more complete descriptions of the instrumental and atmospheric conditions. Due to the similarity with holographic mapping of radio antenna surfaces, we call this extended analysis approach software holography. The resulting analysis algorithms are computationally efficient, unbiased, and optimally sensitive. We show how software holography can be used to solve some of the challenges of next generation observations, and how more familiar analysis techniques can be derived as limiting cases.

  6. Development of Atmospheric Monitoring System at Akeno Observatory for the Telescope Array Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Yamamoto; M. Teshima; M. Chikawa; N. Hayashida; S. Kawakami; N. Minagawa; Y. Morizane; M. Sasano; K. Yasui

    2002-08-09

    We have developed an atmospheric monitoring system for the Telescope Array experiment at Akeno Observatory. It consists of a Nd:YAG laser with an alt-azimuth shooting system and a small light receiver. This system is installed inside an air conditioned weather-proof dome. All parts, including the dome, laser, shooter, receiver, and optical devices are fully controlled by a personal computer utilizing the Linux operating system. It is now operated as a back-scattering LIDAR System. For the Telescope Array experiment, to estimate energy reliably and to obtain the correct shower development profile, the light transmittance in the atmosphere needs to be calibrated with high accuracy. Based on observational results using this monitoring system, we consider this LIDAR to be a very powerful technique for Telescope Array experiments. The details of this system and its atmospheric monitoring technique will be discussed.

  7. The Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission is the third in a coordinated sequence of science missions within the Solar Terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian, Eric

    generated by the solar dynamo. CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS One of the most important scientific advances the determination of the structure of the ambient solar wind. Two space based observatories, one drifting aheadThe Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO) mission is the third in a coordinated sequence

  8. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 Atmospheric "Super Test Beam" for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    _spokespersons@fnal.gov Abstract: We present results from 200 hours of operation of an atmospheric super test beam system developed system combines a Raman backscatter LIDAR receiver with a calibrated pulsed UV laser system to generate Facilities (CLF [1] & XLF) generate tracks that are recorded by the Auger Observatory fluorescence detector

  9. Time at the Royal Observatory The rotation of the Earth gives us two kinds of time (1) ordinary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Ian S.

    Time at the Royal Observatory ISG STAR TIME The rotation of the Earth gives us two kinds of time (1) ordinary Sun-related time of 24 hours and (2) Sidereal time relating to the stars. This means that a star's position in the sky is always the same at the same sidereal time. A sidereal day is shorter by about four

  10. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Faculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia transport. R. CENGIZ ERTEKIN Professor, PhD 1984, UC Berkeley. Hydrodynamics/elasticity, computational

  11. Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean Data and a PARADIGM Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, James S.

    Intercomparison of Biogeochemical Properties at Atlantic and Pacific Observatory Sites Using Ocean compare 34 locations in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans with respect to key upper ocean ecological by SeaWiFS mean chlorophyll: low chlorophyll ocean gyres, comparatively high chlorophyll ocean margin

  12. SCIENCE WITH THE STELLA ROBOTIC OBSERVATORY M. Weber 1 , K. G. Strassmeier 1 , J. Bartus 1 , H. Korhonen 1 , Zs. Kovari 2 , K. Olah 2 , A. Schwope 1 , A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 SCIENCE WITH THE STELLA ROBOTIC OBSERVATORY M. Weber 1 , K. G. Strassmeier 1 , J. Bartus 1 , H The STELLA robotic observatory is made up of two telescopes (1.2m & 0.8m), one equipped with a high res. The observatory is fully robotic, and its strengths are in long­term monitoring and survey programs on one side

  13. High-Energy Cosmic Ray Event Data from the Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory in Mendoza, Argentina is the result of an international collaboration funded by 15 countries and many different organizations. Its mission is to capture high-energy cosmic ray events or air showers for research into their origin and nature. The Pierre Auger Collaboration agreed to make 1% of its data available to the public. The Public Event Explorer is a search tool that allows users to browse or search for and display figures and data plots of events collected since 2004. The repository is updated daily, and, as of June, 2014, makes more than 35,000 events publicly available. The energy of a cosmic ray is measured in Exa electron volts or EeV. These event displays can be browsed in order of their energy level from 0.1 to 41.1 EeV. Each event has an individual identification number.

    The event displays provide station data, cosmic ray incoming direction, various energy measurements, plots, vector-based images, and an ASCII data file.

  14. A Large Area Detector proposed for the Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zane, S; Kennedy, T; Feroci, M; Herder, J -W Den; Ahangarianabhari, M; Argan, A; Azzarello, P; Baldazzi, G; Barret, D; Bertuccio, G; Bodini, P; Bozzo, E; Cadoux, F; Cais, P; Campana, R; Coker, J; Cros, A; Del Monte, E; De Rosa, A; Di Cosimo, S; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Favre, Y; Feldman, C; Fraser, G; Fuschino, F; Grassi, M; Hailey, M R; Hudec, R; Labanti, C; Macera, D; Malcovati, P; Marisaldi, M; Martindale, A; Mineo, T; Muleri, F; Nowak, M; Orlandini, M; Pacciani, L; Perinati, E; Petracek, V; Pohl, M; Rachevski, A; Smith, P; Santangelo, A; Seyler, J -Y; Schmid, C; Soffitta, P; Suchy, S; Tenzer, C; Uttley, P; Vacchi, A; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Wilms, J; Winter, B

    2012-01-01

    The Large Observatory for X-ray Timing (LOFT) is one of the four candidate ESA M3 missions considered for launch in the 2022 time-frame. It is specifically designed to perform fast X-ray timing and probe the status of the matter near black holes and neutron stars. The LOFT scientific payload is composed of a Large Area Detector (LAD) and a Wide Field Monitor (WFM). The LAD is a 10 m2-class pointed instrument with 20 times the collecting area of the best past timing missions (such as RXTE) over the 2-30 keV range, which holds the capability to revolutionize studies of X-ray variability down to the millisecond time scales. Its ground-breaking characteristic is a low mass per unit surface, enabling an effective area of ~10 m^2 (@10 keV) at a reasonable weight. The development of such large but light experiment, with low mass and power per unit area, is now made possible by the recent advancements in the field of large-area silicon detectors - able to time tag an X-ray photon with an accuracy <10 {\\mu}s and an...

  15. Constraints on Type IIn Supernova Progenitor Outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilinski, Christopher; Li, Weidong; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01

    We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe~IIn). The KAIT database contains multiple pre-SN images for 5 SNe~IIn (plus one ambiguous case of a SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate (FDR) statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These limiting magnitudes (typically reaching $m_R \\approx 19.5\\,\\mathrm{mag}$) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and $\\eta$ Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events $\\sim40$ days before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant (BSG) precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe~IIn...

  16. The search for TeV-scale dark matter with the HAWC observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harding, J. Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays and cosmic rays. Located at an elevation of 4100 m on the Sierra Negra mountain in Mexico, HAWC observes extensive air showers from gamma and cosmic rays with an array of water tanks which produce Cherenkov light in the presence of air showers. With a field-of-view capable of observing 2/3 of the sky each day, and a sensitivity of 1 Crab/day, HAWC will be able to map out the sky in gamma and cosmic rays in detail. In thismore »paper, we discuss the capabilities of HAWC to map out the directions and spectra of TeV gamma rays and cosmic rays coming from sources of dark matter annihilation. We discuss the HAWC sensitivity to multiple extended sources of dark matter annihilation and the possibility of HAWC observations of annihilations in nearby dark matter subhalos.« less

  17. On the sensitivity of the HAWC observatory to gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Aguilar, S; Alfaro, R; Almaraz, E; Álvarez, C; Álvarez-Romero, J de D; Álvarez, M; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Badillo, C; Barber, A; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; Benítez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Bonamente, E; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R; Cabrera, I; Carramiñana, A; Carrasco, L; Castillo, M; Chambers, L; Conde, R; Condreay, P; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; D'Olivo, J C; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; Delay, S; Delepine, D; DeYoung, T; Diaz, L; Diaz-Cruz, L; Dingus, B L; Duvernois, M A; Edmunds, D; Ellsworth, R W; Fick, B; Fiorino, D W; Flandes, A; Fraija, N I; Galindo, A; García-Luna, J L; García-Torales, G; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmán-Ceron, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harris, T; Hays, E; Hernandez-Cervantes, L; Hüntemeyer, P H; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Jimenez, J J; Karn, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kieda, D; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lauer, R; Lee, W H; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Martínez, H; Martínez, J; Martínez, L A; Martínez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J; McEnery, J E; Medina-Tanco, G; Mendoza-Torres, J E; Miranda-Romagnoli, P A; Montaruli, T; Moreno, E; Mostafa, M; Napsuciale, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Tapia, A Olmos; Orozco, V; Pérez, V; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Perkins, J S; Pretz, J; Ramirez, C; Ramírez, I; Rebello, D; Rentería, A; Reyes, J; Rosa-González, D; Rosado, A; Ryan, J M; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Shoup, A; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, W; Suárez, F; Suarez, N; Taboada, I; Tellez, A F; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Valdes-Galicia, J; Vanegas, P; Vasileiou, V; Vázquez, O; Vázquez, X; Villaseñor, L; Wall, W; Walters, J S; Warner, D; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A

    2011-01-01

    We present the sensitivity of HAWC to Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). HAWC is a very high-energy gamma-ray observatory currently under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. It will observe atmospheric air showers via the water Cherenkov method. HAWC will consist of 300 large water tanks instrumented with 4 photomultipliers each. HAWC has two data acquisition (DAQ) systems. The main DAQ system reads out coincident signals in the tanks and reconstructs the direction and energy of individual atmospheric showers. The scaler DAQ counts the hits in each photomultiplier tube (PMT) in the detector and searches for a statistical excess over the noise of all PMTs. We show that HAWC has a realistic opportunity to observe the high-energy power law components of GRBs that extend at least up to 30 GeV, as it has been observed by Fermi LAT. The two DAQ systems have an energy threshold that is low enough to observe events similar to GRB 090510 and GRB 090902b with the characteristics observed by Fermi LAT. HAWC will prov...

  18. Massive Structures of Galaxies at High Redshifts in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Eugene

    2016-01-01

    If the Universe is dominated by cold dark matter and dark energy as in the currently popular LCDM cosmology, it is expected that large scale structures form gradually, with galaxy clusters of mass M > ~10^14 Msun appearing at around 6 Gyrs after the Big Bang (z ~ 1). Here, we report the discovery of 59 massive structures of galaxies with masses greater than a few x 10^13 Msun at redshifts between z=0.6 and 4.5 in the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. The massive structures are identified by running top-hat filters on the two dimensional spatial distribution of magnitude-limited samples of galaxies using a combination of spectroscopic and photometric redshifts. We analyze the Millennium simulation data in a similar way to the analysis of the observational data in order to test the LCDM cosmology. We find that there are too many massive structures (M > 7 x 10^13 Msun) observed at z > 2 in comparison with the simulation predictions by a factor of a few, giving a probability of < 1/2500 of the ob...

  19. The potential of the HAWC Observatory to observe violations of Lorentz Invariance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nellen, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The framework of relativistic quantum-field theories requires Lorentz Invariance. Many theories of quantum gravity, on the other hand, include violations of Lorentz Invariance at small scales and high energies. This generates a lot of interest in establishing limits on such effects, and, if possible, observing them directly. Gamma-ray observatories provide a tool to probe parts of the parameter space of models of Lorentz Invariance Violation that is not accessible in terrestrial laboratories and man-made accelerators. Transients, especially gamma-ray bursts, are a particularly promising class of events to search for such phenomena. By combining cosmological distances with high energy emission and short duration, emitting photons up to 30 GeV in less than a second, one can measure the energy dependence of the speed of photons to one part in $10^{16}$. We will discuss the potential of HAWC to detect effects of the violation of Lorentz Invariance and place its sensitivity in the context of existing limits.

  20. The next generation of axion helioscopes: The international axion observatory (IAXO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armengaud, E. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); Avignone, F. T. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States); Betz, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Brax, P. [eIPHT, Centre d’E´tudes de Saclay (CEA-Saclay), Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brun, P. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); Cantatore, G. [Sezione di Trieste and Univ. di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Carmona, J. M. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Carosi, G. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caspers, F. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Caspi, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Cetin, S. A. [Dogus Univ., Istanbul (Turkey); Chelouche, D. [Univ. of Haifa, Haifa (Israel); Christensen, F. E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Dael, A. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); Dafni, T. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Davenport, M. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Derbin, A. V. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russia); Desch, K. [Physikalisches Institut der Univ. Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Diago, A. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Döbrich, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Dratchnev, I. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russia); Dudarev, A. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Eleftheriadis, C. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Fanourakis, G. [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Ferrer-Ribas, E. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); Galán, J. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); García, J. A. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Garza, J. G. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Geralis, T. [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Athens (Greece); Gimeno, B. [Univ. de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Giomataris, I. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); Gninenko, S. [Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS), Moscow (Russian Federation); Gómez, H. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); González-Díaz, D. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Guendelman, E. [Ben Gurion Univ. Beer Sheva (Israel); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Hiramatsu, T. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Hoffmann, D. H.H. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany); Horns, D. [Univ. Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany); Iguaz, F. J. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Irastorza, I. G. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Isern, J. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai, Bellaterra (Spain); Imai, K. [Univ. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Jakobsen, A. C. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark); Jaeckel, J. [Univ. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Jakov?i?, K. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kaminski, J. [Physikalisches Institut der Univ. Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Kawasaki, M. [Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Karuza, M. [Univ. of Rijeka (Croatia); Kr?mar, M. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Kousouris, K. [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneve (Switzerland); Krieger, C. [Physikalisches Institut der Univ. Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Laki?, B. [Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Croatia); Limousin, O. [CEA Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lindner, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Liolios, A. [Aristotle Univ., Thessaloniki (Greece); Luzón, G. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Matsuki, S. [Kyoto Univ., Kyoto (Japan); Muratova, V. N. [St. Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, St. Petersburg (Russia); Nones, C. [CEA Irfu, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ortega, I. [Univ. de Zaragoza, Zaragoza (Spain); Papaevangelou, T. [CEA Irfu, Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-yvette (France); Pivovaroff, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a proposed 4th-generation axion helioscope with the primary physics research goal to search for solar axions via their Primakoff conversion into photons of 1 – 10 keV energies in a strong magnetic field. IAXO will achieve a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling ga? down to a few ×10?¹² GeV?¹ for a wide range of axion masses up to ~ 0.25 eV. This is an improvement over the currently best (3rd generation) axion helioscope, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), of about 5 orders of magnitude in signal strength, corresponding to a factor ~ 20 in the axion photon coupling. IAXO’s sensitivity relies on the construction of a large superconducting 8-coil toroidal magnet of 20 m length optimized for axion research. Each of the eight 60 cm diameter magnet bores is equipped with x-ray optics focusing the signal photons into ~ 0.2 cm² spots that are imaged by very low background x-ray detectors. The magnet will be built into a structure with elevation and azimuth drives that will allow solar tracking for 12 hours each day. This contribution is a summary of our papers [1, 2, 3] and we refer to these for further details.

  1. The next generation of axion helioscopes: The international axion observatory (IAXO)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogel, J. K.; Armengaud, E.; Avignone, F. T.; Betz, M.; Brax, P.; Brun, P.; Cantatore, G.; Carmona, J. M.; Carosi, G. P.; Caspers, F.; et al

    2015-03-24

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a proposed 4th-generation axion helioscope with the primary physics research goal to search for solar axions via their Primakoff conversion into photons of 1 – 10 keV energies in a strong magnetic field. IAXO will achieve a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling ga? down to a few ×10?¹² GeV?¹ for a wide range of axion masses up to ~ 0.25 eV. This is an improvement over the currently best (3rd generation) axion helioscope, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), of about 5 orders of magnitude in signal strength, corresponding to a factor ~ 20more »in the axion photon coupling. IAXO’s sensitivity relies on the construction of a large superconducting 8-coil toroidal magnet of 20 m length optimized for axion research. Each of the eight 60 cm diameter magnet bores is equipped with x-ray optics focusing the signal photons into ~ 0.2 cm² spots that are imaged by very low background x-ray detectors. The magnet will be built into a structure with elevation and azimuth drives that will allow solar tracking for 12 hours each day. This contribution is a summary of our papers [1, 2, 3] and we refer to these for further details.« less

  2. Measurement of radium concentration in water with Mn-coated beads at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Andersen

    2003-04-01

    We describe a method to measure the concentration of 224Ra and 226Ra in the heavy water target used to detect solar neutrinos at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and in the surrounding light water shielding. A water volume of (50-400) m^3 from the detector is passed through columns which contain beads coated with a compound of manganese oxide onto which the Ra dissolved in the water is adsorbed. The columns are removed, dried, and mounted below an electrostatic chamber into which the Rn from the decay of trapped Ra is continuously flowed by a stream of nitrogen gas. The subsequent decay of Rn gives charged Po ions which are swept by the electric field onto a solid-state alpha counter. The content of Ra in the water is inferred from the measured decay rates of 212Po, 214Po, 216Po, and 218Po. The Ra extraction efficiency is >95%, the counting efficiency is 24% for 214Po and 6% for 216Po, and the method can detect a few atoms of 224Ra per m^3 and a few tens of thousands of atoms of 226Ra per m^3. Converted to equivalent equilibrium values of the topmost elements of the natural radioactive chains, the detection limit in a single assay is a few times 10^(-16) g Th or U/cm^3. The results of some typical assays are presented and the contributions to the systematic error are discussed.

  3. HOMOLOGOUS FLUX ROPES OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ting; Zhang, Jun E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2013-12-01

    We present the first Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of four homologous flux ropes in the active region (AR) 11745 on 2013 May 20-22. The four flux ropes are all above the neutral line of the AR, with endpoints anchoring at the same region, and have a generally similar morphology. The first three flux ropes rose with a velocity of less than 30 km s{sup –1} after their appearance, and subsequently their intensities at 131 Å decreased and the flux ropes became obscure. The fourth flux rope erupted last, with a speed of about 130 km s{sup –1} and formed a coronal mass ejection (CME). The associated filament showed an obvious anti-clockwise twist motion at the initial stage, and the twist was estimated at 4?. This indicates that kink instability possibly triggers the early rise of the fourth flux rope. The activated filament material was spatially within the flux rope and showed consistent evolution in the early stages. Our findings provide new clues for understanding the characteristics of flux ropes. Firstly, multiple flux ropes are successively formed at the same location during an AR evolution process. Secondly, a slow-rise flux rope does not necessarily result in a CME, and a fast-eruption flux rope does result in a CME.

  4. THREE-DIMENSIONAL RECONSTRUCTION OF AN ERUPTING FILAMENT WITH SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND STEREO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun; Zhang Yuzong; Yang Shuhong E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn

    2011-09-20

    On 2010 August 1, a global solar event was launched involving almost the entire Earth-facing side of the Sun. This event mainly consisted of a C3.2 flare, a polar crown filament eruption, and two Earth-directed coronal mass ejections. The observations from the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and STEREO showed that all the activities were coupled together, suggesting a global character of the magnetic eruption. We reconstruct the three-dimensional geometry of the polar crown filament using observations from three different viewpoints (STEREO A, STEREO B, and SDO) for the first time. The filament undergoes two eruption processes. First, the main body of the filament rises up, while it also moves toward the low-latitude region with a change in inclination by {approx}48{sup 0} and expands only in the altitudinal and latitudinal direction in the field of view of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. We investigate the true velocities and accelerations of different locations along the filament and find that the highest location always has the largest acceleration during this eruption process. During the late phase of the first eruption, part of the filament material separates from the eastern leg. This material displays a projectile motion and moves toward the west at a constant velocity of 141.8 km s{sup -1}. This may imply that the polar crown filament consists of at least two groups of magnetic systems.

  5. An array of low-background $^3$He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Amsbaugh; J. M. Anaya; J. Banar; T. J. Bowles; M. C. Browne; T. V. Bullard; T. H. Burritt; G. A. Cox-Mobrand; X. Dai; H. Deng; M. Di Marco; P. J. Doe; M. R. Dragowsky; C. A. Duba; F. A. Duncan; E. D. Earle; S. R. Elliott; E. -I. Esch; H. Fergani; J. A. Formaggio; M. M. Fowler; J. E. Franklin; P. Geissbühler; J. V. Germani; A. Goldschmidt; E. Guillian; A. L. Hallin; G. Harper; P. J. Harvey; R. Hazama; K. M. Heeger; J. Heise; A. Hime; M. A. Howe; M. Huang; L. L. Kormos; C. Kraus; C. B. Krauss; J. Law; I. T. Lawson; K. T. Lesko; J. C. Loach; S. Majerus; J. Manor; S. McGee; K. K. S. Miknaitis; G. G. Miller; B. Morissette; A. Myers; N. S. Oblath; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. W. Ollerhead; S. J. M. Peeters; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; S. D. Reitzner; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; P. Skensved; A. R. Smith; M. W. E. Smith; T. D. Steiger; L. C. Stonehill; P. M. Thornewell; N. Tolich; B. A. VanDevender; T. D. Van Wechel; B. L. Wall; H. Wan Chan Tseung; J. Wendland; N. West; J. B. Wilhelmy; J. F. Wilkerson; J. M. Wouters

    2007-05-23

    An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been built in order to make a unique measurement of the total active flux of solar neutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the third phase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 and November 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve the neutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of 36 strings of proportional counters filled with a mixture of $^3$He and CF$_4$ gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteron neutral current reaction in the D$_2$O, and four strings filled with a mixture of $^4$He and CF$_4$ gas for background measurements. The proportional counter diameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCD array is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional counters ever produced. This article describes the design, construction, deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses the electronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signatures and backgrounds.

  6. Physics Potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ICAL Collaboration; Shakeel Ahmed; M. Sajjad Athar; Rashid Hasan; Mohammad Salim; S. K. Singh; S. S. R. Inbanathan; Venktesh Singh; V. S. Subrahmanyam; Shiba Prasad Behera; Vinay B. Chandratre; Nitali Dash; Vivek M. Datar; V. K. S. Kashyap; Ajit K. Mohanty; Lalit M. Pant; Animesh Chatterjee; Sandhya Choubey; Raj Gandhi; Anushree Ghosh; Deepak Tiwari; Ali Ajmi; S. Uma Sankar; Prafulla Behera; Aleena Chacko; Sadiq Jafer; James Libby; K. Raveendrababu; K. R. Rebin; D. Indumathi; K. Meghna; S. M. Lakshmi; M. V. N. Murthy; Sumanta Pal; G. Rajasekaran; Nita Sinha; Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla; Amina Khatun; Poonam Mehta; Vipin Bhatnagar; R. Kanishka; A. Kumar; J. S. Shahi; J. B. Singh; Monojit Ghosh; Pomita Ghoshal; Srubabati Goswami; Chandan Gupta; Sushant Raut; Sudeb Bhattacharya; Suvendu Bose; Ambar Ghosal; Abhik Jash; Kamalesh Kar; Debasish Majumdar; Nayana Majumdar; Supratik Mukhopadhyay; Satyajit Saha; B. S. Acharya; Sudeshna Banerjee; Kolahal Bhattacharya; Sudeshna Dasgupta; Moon Moon Devi; Amol Dighe; Gobinda Majumder; Naba K. Mondal; Asmita Redij; Deepak Samuel; B. Satyanarayana; Tarak Thakore; C. D. Ravikumar; A. M. Vinodkumar; Gautam Gangopadhyay; Amitava Raychaudhuri; Brajesh C. Choudhary; Ankit Gaur; Daljeet Kaur; Ashok Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; Md. Naimuddin; Waseem Bari; Manzoor A. Malik; Jyotsna Singh; S. Krishnaveni; H. B. Ravikumar; C. Ranganathaiah; Swapna Mahapatra; Saikat Biswas; Subhasis Chattopadhyay; Rajesh Ganai; Tapasi Ghosh; Y. P. Viyogi

    2015-05-27

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.

  7. Hadron energy response of the Iron Calorimeter detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon Moon Devi; Anushree Ghosh; Daljeet Kaur; Lakshmi S. Mohan; Sandhya Choubey; Amol Dighe; D. Indumathi; Sanjeev Kumar; M. V. N. Murthy; Md. Naimuddin

    2013-10-30

    The results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of the hadron energy response for the magnetized Iron CALorimeter detector, ICAL, proposed to be located at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is presented. Using a GEANT4 modeling of the detector ICAL, interactions of atmospheric neutrinos with target nuclei are simulated. The detector response to hadrons propagating through it is investigated using the hadron hit multiplicity in the active detector elements. The detector response to charged pions of fixed energy is studied first, followed by the average response to the hadrons produced in atmospheric neutrino interactions using events simulated with the NUANCE event generator. The shape of the hit distribution is observed to fit the Vavilov distribution, which reduces to a Gaussian at high energies. In terms of the parameters of this distribution, we present the hadron energy resolution as a function of hadron energy, and the calibration of hadron energy as a function of the hit multiplicity. The energy resolution for hadrons is found to be in the range 85% (for 1GeV) -- 36% (for 15 GeV).

  8. The search for TeV-scale dark matter with the HAWC observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harding, J. Patrick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a wide field-of-view detector sensitive to 100 GeV - 100 TeV gamma rays and cosmic rays. Located at an elevation of 4100 m on the Sierra Negra mountain in Mexico, HAWC observes extensive air showers from gamma and cosmic rays with an array of water tanks which produce Cherenkov light in the presence of air showers. With a field-of-view capable of observing 2/3 of the sky each day, and a sensitivity of 1 Crab/day, HAWC will be able to map out the sky in gamma and cosmic rays in detail. In this paper, we discuss the capabilities of HAWC to map out the directions and spectra of TeV gamma rays and cosmic rays coming from sources of dark matter annihilation. We discuss the HAWC sensitivity to multiple extended sources of dark matter annihilation and the possibility of HAWC observations of annihilations in nearby dark matter subhalos.

  9. Evaluation of expected solar flare neutrino events in the IceCube observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Wasseige, G; Hanson, K; van Eijndhoven, N; Klein, K -L

    2015-01-01

    Since the end of the eighties and in response to a reported increase in the total neutrino flux in the Homestake experiment in coincidence with a solar flare, solar neutrino detectors have searched for solar flare signals. Neutrinos from the decay of mesons, which are themselves produced in collisions of accelerated protons with the solar atmosphere, would provide a novel window on the underlying physics of the acceleration process. For our studies we focus on the IceCube Neutrino Observatory, a cubic kilometer neutrino detector located at the geographical South Pole. Due to its Supernova data acquisition system and its DeepCore component, dedicated to low energy neutrinos, IceCube may be sensitive to solar flare neutrinos and thus permit either a measurement of the signal or the establishment of more stringent upper limits on the solar flare neutrino flux. We present an approach for a time profile analysis based on a stacking method and an evaluation of a possible solar flare signal in IceCube using the Gean...

  10. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Bleve; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-11

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  11. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at ?s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; et al

    2012-08-10

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505±22(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  12. EMERGING DIMMINGS OF ACTIVE REGIONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu Yang; Sun Xudong, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: yliu@sun.stanford.edu, E-mail: xudong@sun.stanford.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the emerging dimmings (EDs) of 24 isolated active regions (IARs) from 2010 June to 2011 May. All the IARs show EDs in lower-temperature lines (e.g., 171 A) at their early emerging stages. Meanwhile, in higher temperature lines (e.g., 211 A), the ED regions brighten continuously. There are two types of EDs: fan-shaped and halo-shaped. There are 19 fan-shaped EDs and 5 halo-shaped ones. The EDs appear to be delayed by several to more than ten hours relative to the first emergence of the IARs. The shortest delay is 3.6 hr and the longest is 19.0 hr. The EDs last from 3.3 hr to 14.2 hr, with a mean duration of 8.3 hr. Before the appearance of the EDs, the emergence rate of the magnetic flux of the IARs is between 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx hr{sup -1} to 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx hr{sup -1}. The larger the emergence rate is, the shorter the delay time is. While the dimmings appear, the magnetic flux of the IARs ranges from 8.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx to 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx. These observations imply that the reconfiguration of the coronal magnetic fields due to reconnection between the newly emerging flux and the surrounding existing fields results in a new thermal distribution which leads to a dimming for the cooler channel (171 A) and brightening in the warmer channels.

  13. URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

    2003-03-27

    The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

  14. Observations of comet ISON (C/2012 S1) from Lowell observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.

    2015-01-01

    We observed the dynamically new sungrazing comet ISON (C/2012 S1) extensively at Lowell Observatory throughout 2013 in order to characterize its behavior prior to perihelion. ISON had “typical” abundances for an Oort Cloud comet. Its dust production, as measured by Af?, remained nearly constant during the apparition but its CN gas production increased by ?50 ×. The minimum active area necessary to support observed water production rates exceeded the likely surface area of the nucleus and suggests a population of icy grains in the coma. Together with the flattening of the dust radial profile over time, this is consistant with ejection of a large quantity of slow moving dust and icy grains in the coma at large heliocentric distance. The dust morphology was dominated by the tail, but a faint sunward dust fan was detected in March, April, May, and September. We imaged multiple gas species in September, October, and November. All gas species were more extended than the dust coma, although only CN had sufficient signal-to-noise for detailed morphological study. Excess CN signal was observed in the sunward hemisphere in September and early October. In November the excess CN signal was in the tailward hemisphere and two faint CN features appeared approximately orthogonal to the tail with position angles varying by about ±20° from night to night. Using numerical modeling, we best reproduced the orientation and shape of these features as well as the bulk brightness with a pole oriented approximately toward the Sun and a single source located within ?35° of the equator. Variations in position angle and relative brightness of the CN features from night to night suggest a rotation period shorter than 24 hr. The production rates and coma morphology suggest a nucleus that was active over nearly its entire sunward facing hemisphere in September and October but which underwent a significant mass loss event, potentially including fragmentation, shortly before November 1. Significant subsequent mass loss likely continued at the same site over subsequent days/weeks and may have catastrophically weakened the nucleus prior to perihelion.

  15. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at ?s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Anti?i?, T.; Aramo, C.; Arganda, E.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Bäcker, T.; Balzer, M.; Barber, K. B.; Barbosa, A. F.; Bardenet, R.; Barroso, S. L. C.; Baughman, B.; Bäuml, J.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, B. R.; Becker, K. H.; Bellétoile, A.; Bellido, J. A.; BenZvi, S.; Berat, C.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohá?ová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Bruijn, R.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Burton, R. E.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Catalano, O.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chauvin, J.; Cheng, S. H.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chirinos Diaz, J.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cook, H.; Cooper, M. J.; Coppens, J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Creusot, A.; Criss, A.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Dallier, R.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; De Donato, C.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Vega, G.; de Mello Junior, W. J. M.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Souza, V.; de Vries, K. D.; Decerprit, G.; del Peral, L.; del Río, M.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diep, P. N.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dong, P. N.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, J. C.; Dova, M. T.; D’Urso, D.; Dutan, I.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Fajardo Tapia, I.; Falcke, H.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Ferrero, A.; Fick, B.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fliescher, S.; Fracchiolla, C. E.; Fraenkel, E. D.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Gaior, R.; Gamarra, R. F.; Gambetta, S.; García, B.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gascon, A.; Gemmeke, H.; Gesterling, K.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giller, M.; Glass, H.; Gold, M. S.; Golup, G.; Gomez Albarracin, F.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, D.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gookin, B.; Góra, D.; Gorgi, A.; Gouffon, P.; Gozzini, S. R.; Grashorn, E.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grigat, M.; Grillo, A. F.; Guardincerri, Y.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Guzman, A.; Hague, J. D.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harmsma, S.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Herve, A. E.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holmes, V. C.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horneffer, A.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Ionita, F.; Italiano, A.; Jarne, C.; Jiraskova, S.; Josebachuili, M.; Kadija, K.; Kampert, K. H.; Karhan, P.; Kasper, P.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Knapp, J.; Koang, D.-H.; Kotera, K.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuehn, F.; Kuempel, D.; Kulbartz, J. K.; Kunka, N.; La Rosa, G.; Lachaud, C.; Lauer, R.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Lemiere, A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Lyberis, H.; Macolino, C.; Maldera, S.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, J.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marquez Falcon, H. R.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Mathes, H. J.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurizio, D.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menichetti, E.; Menshikov, A.; Mertsch, P.; Meurer, C.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Miller, W.; Miramonti, L.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morales, B.; Morello, C.; Moreno, E.; Moreno, J. C.; Morris, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Mueller, S.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navarro, J. L.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nhung, P. T.; Niemietz, L.; Nierstenhoefer, N.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Nožka, L.; Nyklicek, M.; Oehlschläger, J.; Olinto, A.; Olmos-Gilbaja, V. M.; Ortiz, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Parente, G.; Parizot, E.; Parra, A.; Parsons, R. D.; Pastor, S.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; P?kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Pesce, R.; Petermann, E.; Petrera, S.; Petrinca, P.; Petrolini, A.; Petrov, Y.; Petrovic, J.; Pfendner, C.; Phan, N.

    2012-08-01

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505±22(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  16. The Pierre Auger Observatory scaler mode for the study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST

    2011-01-01

    Since data-taking began in January 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been recording the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles for the self-calibration of the ground detectors of its surface detector array. After correcting for atmospheric effects, modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and transient events are observed. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. In this study, the available data are presented together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, where a strong correlation with neutron monitor data is found.

  17. The Lateral Trigger Probability function for the Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Ray Showers detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; E. J. Ahn; I. F. M. Albuquerque; D. Allard; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muñiz; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; T. Anti?i?; A. Anzalone; C. Aramo; E. Arganda; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; T. Bäcker; M. Balzer; K. B. Barber; A. F. Barbosa; R. Bardenet; S. L. C. Barroso; B. Baughman; J. Bäuml; J. J. Beatty; B. R. Becker; K. H. Becker; A. Bellétoile; J. A. Bellido; S. BenZvi; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blümer; M. Bohá?ová; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; R. Bruijn; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; R. E. Burton; K. S. Caballero-Mora; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; O. Catalano; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; J. Chauvin; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; A. Chou; J. Chudoba; R. W. Clay; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceição; F. Contreras; H. Cook; M. J. Cooper; J. Coppens; A. Cordier; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Creusot; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; S. Dagoret-Campagne; R. Dallier; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; C. De Donato; S. J. de Jong; G. De La Vega; W. J. M. de Mello Junior; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; V. de Souza; K. D. de Vries; G. Decerprit; L. del Peral; M. del Río; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; J. C. Diaz; M. L. Díaz Castro; P. N. Diep; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; J. C. dos Anjos; M. T. Dova; D. D'Urso; I. Dutan; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; I. Fajardo Tapia; H. Falcke; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; A. Ferrero; B. Fick; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; S. Fliescher; C. E. Fracchiolla; E. D. Fraenkel; U. Fröhlich; B. Fuchs; R. Gaior; R. F. Gamarra; S. Gambetta; B. García; D. García Gámez; D. Garcia-Pinto; A. Gascon; H. Gemmeke; K. Gesterling; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giller; H. Glass; M. S. Gold; G. Golup; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gómez Berisso; P. Gonçalves; D. Gonzalez; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; D. Góra; A. Gorgi; P. Gouffon; S. R. Gozzini; E. Grashorn; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; M. Grigat; A. F. Grillo; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; A. Guzman; J. D. Hague; P. Hansen; D. Harari; S. Harmsma; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; A. E. Herve; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; V. C. Holmes; P. Homola; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; M. Hrabovský; T. Huege; A. Insolia; F. Ionita; A. Italiano; C. Jarne; S. Jiraskova; M. Josebachuili; K. Kadija; K. H. Kampert; P. Karhan; P. Kasper; B. Kégl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; J. Knapp; D. -H. Koang; K. Kotera; N. Krohm; O. Krömer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; F. Kuehn; D. Kuempel; J. K. Kulbartz; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; C. Lachaud; P. Lautridou; M. S. A. B. Leão; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Lemiere; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. López; A. Lopez Agüera; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; C. Macolino; S. Maldera; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; J. Marin; V. Marin; I. C. Maris; H. R. Marquez Falcon; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Martínez Bravo; H. J. Mathes; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurizio; P. O. Mazur; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; P. Mertsch; C. Meurer; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; W. Miller; L. Miramonti; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; B. Morales; C. Morello; E. Moreno; J. C. Moreno; C. Morris; M. Mostafá; C. A. Moura; S. Mueller; M. A. Muller; G. Müller; M. Münchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra ‡; J. L. Navarro; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; P. T. Nhung; L. Niemietz; N. Nierstenhoefer; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; L. Nožka; M. Nyklicek; J. Oehlschläger; A. Olinto; P. Oliva; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; G. Parente; E. Parizot; A. Parra; R. D. Parsons; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; S. Petrera; P. Petrinca; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; J. Petrovic; C. Pfendner; N. Phan; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; V. H. Ponce; M. Pontz; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; H. Rivera; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; C. Robledo; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; G. Rodriguez; J. Rodriguez Martino; J. Rodriguez Rojo

    2011-11-28

    In this paper we introduce the concept of Lateral Trigger Probability (LTP) function, i.e., the probability for an extensive air shower (EAS) to trigger an individual detector of a ground based array as a function of distance to the shower axis, taking into account energy, mass and direction of the primary cosmic ray. We apply this concept to the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory consisting of a 1.5 km spaced grid of about 1600 water Cherenkov stations. Using Monte Carlo simulations of ultra-high energy showers the LTP functions are derived for energies in the range between 10^{17} and 10^{19} eV and zenith angles up to 65 degs. A parametrization combining a step function with an exponential is found to reproduce them very well in the considered range of energies and zenith angles. The LTP functions can also be obtained from data using events simultaneously observed by the fluorescence and the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory (hybrid events). We validate the Monte-Carlo results showing how LTP functions from data are in good agreement with simulations.

  18. Search for patterns by combining cosmic-ray energy and arrival directions at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; et al

    2015-06-20

    Energy-dependent patterns in the arrival directions of cosmic rays are searched for using data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We investigate local regions around the highest-energy cosmic rays with $E \\ge 6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV by analyzing cosmic rays with energies above $E \\ge 5 \\times 10^{18}$ eV arriving within an angular separation of approximately 15$^{\\circ }$ . We characterize the energy distributions inside these regions by two independent methods, one searching for angular dependence of energy-energy correlations and one searching for collimation of energy along the local system of principal axes of the energy distribution. No significant patterns aremore »found with this analysis. As a result, the comparison of these measurements with astrophysical scenarios can therefore be used to obtain constraints on related model parameters such as strength of cosmic-ray deflection and density of point sources.« less

  19. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  20. Ocean pC02 Data from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 1994 - 2009

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Takahashi, T.

    The Earth Institute of Columbia University has, as an overarching goal, to help achieve sustainable development primarily by expanding the world's understanding of Earth as one integrated system. The Earth Institute encompasses centers of excellence with an established reputation for groundbreaking research, including the renowned Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), home to more than 200 researchers who study Earth and its systems. The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, led by Dr. Taro Takahashi, studies pCO2 in seawater, carbon sequestration models related to deep aquifers, and air-sea CO2 flux. Datasets from ocean cruises in the years 1994 to the present are made available from this website, along with a list of publications, and cruise maps.

  1. Searches for High Frequency Variations in the $^8$B Solar Neutrino Flux at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SNO Collaboration

    2009-10-13

    We have performed three searches for high-frequency signals in the solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), motivated by the possibility that solar $g$-mode oscillations could affect the production or propagation of solar $^8$B neutrinos. The first search looked for any significant peak in the frequency range 1/day to 144/day, with a sensitivity to sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 12% or greater. The second search focused on regions in which $g$-mode signals have been claimed by experiments aboard the SoHO satellite, and was sensitive to signals with amplitudes of 10% or greater. The third search looked for extra power across the entire frequency band. No statistically significant signal was detected in any of the three searches.

  2. Planck Intermediate Results. XXXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck SZ sources with telescopes in the Canary Islands Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Böhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Ferragamo, A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Génova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gjerløw, E; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hempel, A; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Lietzen, H; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Stolyarov, V; Streblyanska, A; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tramonte, D; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories, as part of the general optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. In total, 78 SZ sources are discussed. Deep imaging observations were obtained for most of those sources; spectroscopic observations in either in long-slit or multi-object modes were obtained for many. We found optical counterparts for 73 of the 78 candidates. This sample includes 53 spectroscopic redshifts determinations, 20 of them obtained with a multi-object spectroscopic mode. The sample contains new redshifts for 27 Planck clusters that were not included in the first Planck SZ source catalogue (PSZ1).

  3. Infrared Spectroscopic Data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), SDSS-III Data Release 10

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 is the first spectroscopic release from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), including spectra and derived stellar parameters for more than 50,000 stars. APOGEE is an ongoing survey of ~100,000 stars accessing all parts of the Milky Way. By operating in the infrared (H-band) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, APOGEE is better able to detect light from stars lying in dusty regions of the Milky Way than surveys conducted in the optical, making this survey particularly well-suited for exploring the Galactic disk and bulge. APOGEE's high resolution spectra provide detailed information about the stellar atmospheres; DR10 provides derived effective temperatures, surface gravities, overall metallicities, and information on the abundances of several chemical elements. [copied from http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/irspec/

  4. TeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to search the entire northern hemisphere for such objects. The search for short bursts of TeV gamma rays hasTeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2 W) are presented. The data have been searched for steady point sources of TeV gamma rays between declinations of 1

  5. The GONG++ DATA Processing Pipeline F. Hill,, J. Bolding, C. Toner, T. Corbard, S. Wampler, B. Goodrich, J. Goodrich, P. Eliason National Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    The GONG++ DATA Processing Pipeline F. Hill,, J. Bolding, C. Toner, T. Corbard, S. Wampler, B. Goodrich, J. Goodrich, P. Eliason­ National Solar Observatory Introduction The GONG++ data processing pipeline is currently under construction. This system will produce the GONG++ science data products

  6. The AMMA-CATCH Gourma observatory site in Mali: Relating climatic variations to changes in vegetation, surface hydrology, fluxes and natural resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guichard, Francoise

    The AMMA-CATCH Gourma observatory site in Mali: Relating climatic variations to changes, 38041 Grenoble Cedex 9, France c Centre IRD, Quartier Hippodrome, BP 2528, Bamako, Mali d Laboratoire, LMTG, F-31400 Toulouse, France l Institut d'Economie Rurale, BP 258 ­ rue Mohamed V, Bamako, Mali m

  7. VIRTUAL OBSERVATORY: Plate Content Digitization, Archive Mining & Image Sequence Processing edited by M. Tsvetkov, V. Golev, F. Murtagh, and R. Molina, Heron Press, Soa, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project D. Mink1 , A. Doane2 R. Simcoe2 E. Los2 J. Grindlay3 1 Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory digitizing the catalog of plates, constructing an automatic pipeline to make the scanned images useful. Telescopes in the United States, South America, New Zealand, and South Africa gave complete sky coverage over

  8. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Astronomy: The Visible and Invisible Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. Astronomy: The Visible and Invisible Universe #12;The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under a cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc. A light wave is a light wave

  9. Supplement of Atmos. Chem. Phys., 15, 113133, 2015 http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/15/113/2015/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    -Alesund, Svalbard (Spitsbergen), Norway and Sweden SUM 72.58 -38.48 3238.0 Summit, Greenland BRW 71.32 -156.60 11, Mongolia NWR 40.05 -105.58 3526.0 Niwot Ridge, Colorado, USA AZR 38.77 -27.38 40.0 Terceira Island, Azores, Midway, USA ASK 23.18 5.42 2728.0 Assekrem, Algeria MLO 19.53 -155.58 3397.0 Mauna Loa, Hawai, USA KUM 19

  10. Maurice, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,InformationIllinois:Martin,OpenMatthews, NorthMauna LoaMaurice,

  11. Piggyback Tectonics- Long-Term Growth Of Kilauea On The South Flank Of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. Pike County Light & Power Co (Pennsylvania) | Open Energy Information

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  13. Pike County Light & Power Co | Open Energy Information

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  14. Pike Research | OpenEI Community

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  15. Pilgrim Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  16. Piller Power Systems GmbH | Open Energy Information

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  17. Pilot Power Group Inc | Open Energy Information

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  18. Pinehurst, North Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  19. Pingnan County Hengli Hydropower Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  20. Pingnan Daixi Liyudang Hydropower Development Co Ltd | Open Energy

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  1. Pingnan Houlongxi Hydropower Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  2. Pingwu County Dongfangshanshui Resource Development Co Ltd | Open Energy

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  3. Pingwu County Guangyao Power Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  4. Pingwu County Yetang Hydropower Development Co Ltd | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  5. Pinnacle Biofuels Inc | Open Energy Information

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  6. Pioneer Distilleries Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  7. Pioneer Electric Coop, Inc (Alabama) | Open Energy Information

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  8. Pioneer Genco Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  9. Mauritius-Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE) | Open Energy

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  10. Mauritius: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  11. MaxWest Environmental Systems | Open Energy Information

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  12. Maxwell Technologies | Open Energy Information

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  13. Maxwell, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  14. Mayaterials Inc | Open Energy Information

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  15. Maynard, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. McAdoo Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  17. McArthur, Ohio: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  18. McCabe Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

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  19. McCaysville, Georgia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  20. McClellan, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  1. McCoy Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. McDonough Power Coop | Open Energy Information

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  3. McFadden Ridge Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  4. McFarland, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  5. McGee Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  6. McGuinness Hills Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  7. McKenna Charter School Wind Project | Open Energy Information

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  8. McKenzie Electric Coop Inc (North Dakota) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  9. McKinley Wind Park | Open Energy Information

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  10. McKinney Wal-Mart Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  11. McKinney, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  12. McKinsey on Smart Grid | Open Energy Information

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  13. McKittrick, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  14. McLean, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  15. McLendon-Chisholm, Texas: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

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  16. McMinnville Electric System | Open Energy Information

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  17. McNamee Lawrence Co | Open Energy Information

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  18. McNary-John Day | Open Energy Information

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  19. McNeilus Wind Farm I | Open Energy Information

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  20. McNeilus Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

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  1. McNeilus Wind Farm III | Open Energy Information

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  2. McNeilus Wind Farm IV | Open Energy Information

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  3. Mccredie Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  4. Mccredie Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  5. Mcdermitt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  6. Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

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  7. Mead Westaco | Open Energy Information

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  8. Meadow Creek | Open Energy Information

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  9. Meadow Lake II (3Q10) | Open Energy Information

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  10. Meadow Lake II | Open Energy Information

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  11. Meadow Lake III | Open Energy Information

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  12. Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information

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  13. Meadow Lake Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

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  14. Meadow Ridge | Open Energy Information

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  15. Meadow Town Corporation (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

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  16. Mears Technology | Open Energy Information

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  17. Measurement and Monitoring of the World's Forests: A Review and Summary

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindIIMears Technology

  18. Measurement and Verification of Low Income Energy Efficiency Programs in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindIIMears

  19. Measuring Energy Access: Supporting a Global Target | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville Mt GeothermalMauna LoaMcAdooWindIIMearsInformation

  20. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P [LIP, Coimbra; Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D

    2011-12-30

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE < 1.74 x 10-7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV < E < 1 x 1020 eV.

  1. An improved limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Aranda, Victor Manuel; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernán Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Ave, Maximo; Avenier, Michel; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Barber, Kerri B; Bäuml, Julia; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Bleve, Carla; Blümer, Hans; Bohá?ová, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Brown, William C; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceição, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dembinski, Hans; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Díaz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fernandes, Mateus; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filip?i?, Andrej; Fox, Brendan; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martín Miguel; Fuchs, Benjamin; Fujii, Toshihiro; García, Beatriz; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; G?as, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gómez; Vitale, Primo F Gómez; González, Nicolás; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guardincerri, Yann; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matías Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hörandel, Jörg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovský, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kääpä, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Kégl, Balazs; Keilhauer, Bianca; Keivani, Azadeh; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Krömer, Oliver; Kuempel, Daniel; Kunka, Norbert; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; López, Rebeca; Casado, Aida López; Louedec, Karim; Lu, Lu; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Maldera, Simone; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mari?, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martin, Lilian; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martínez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masías; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurel, Detlef; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Neutrinos in the cosmic ray flux with energies near 1 EeV and above are detectable with the Surface Detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We report here on searches through Auger data from 1 January 2004 until 20 June 2013. No neutrino candidates were found, yielding a limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos that challenges the Waxman-Bahcall bound predictions. Neutrino identification is attempted using the broad time-structure of the signals expected in the SD stations, and is efficiently done for neutrinos of all flavors interacting in the atmosphere at large zenith angles, as well as for "Earth-skimming" neutrino interactions in the case of tau neutrinos. In this paper the searches for downward-going neutrinos in the zenith angle bins $60^\\circ-75^\\circ$ and $75^\\circ-90^\\circ$ as well as for upward-going neutrinos, are combined to give a single limit. The $90\\%$ C.L. single-flavor limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos with an $E^{-2}$ spectrum in the energy ra...

  2. Characterizing the Habitable Zones of Exoplanetary Systems with a Large Ultraviolet/Visible/Near-IR Space Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    France, Kevin; Linsky, Jeffrey; Roberge, Aki; Ayres, Thomas; Barman, Travis; Brown, Alexander; Davenport, James; Desert, Jean-Michel; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Fleming, Brian; Fontenla, Juan; Fossati, Luca; Froning, Cynthia; Hallinan, Gregg; Hawley, Suzanne; Hu, Renyu; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasting, James; Kowlaski, Adam; Loyd, Parke; Mauas, Pablo; Miguel, Yamila; Osten, Rachel; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Schneider, Christian; Segura, Antigona; Stocke, John; Tian, Feng; Tumlinson, Jason; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wood, Brian; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the surface and atmospheric conditions of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of low-mass stars is currently one of the greatest astronomical endeavors. Knowledge of the planetary effective surface temperature alone is insufficient to accurately interpret biosignature gases when they are observed in the coming decades. The UV stellar spectrum drives and regulates the upper atmospheric heating and chemistry on Earth-like planets, is critical to the definition and interpretation of biosignature gases, and may even produce false-positives in our search for biologic activity. This white paper briefly describes the scientific motivation for panchromatic observations of exoplanetary systems as a whole (star and planet), argues that a future NASA UV/Vis/near-IR space observatory is well-suited to carry out this work, and describes technology development goals that can be achieved in the next decade to support the development of a UV/Vis/near-IR flagship mission in the 2020s.

  3. Early-type stars observed in the ESO UVES Paranal Observatory Project - V. Time-variable interstellar absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEvoy, Catherine M; Dufton, Philip L; Smith, Keith T; Kennedy, Michael B; Keenan, Francis P; Lambert, David L; Welty, Daniel E; Lauroesch, James T

    2015-01-01

    The structure and properties of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales, sub-au to 1 pc, are poorly understood. We compare interstellar absorption-lines, observed towards a selection of O- and B-type stars at two or more epochs, to search for variations over time caused by the transverse motion of each star combined with changes in the structure in the foreground ISM. Two sets of data were used: 83 VLT- UVES spectra with approximately 6 yr between epochs and 21 McDonald observatory 2.7m telescope echelle spectra with 6 - 20 yr between epochs, over a range of scales from 0 - 360 au. The interstellar absorption-lines observed at the two epochs were subtracted and searched for any residuals due to changes in the foreground ISM. Of the 104 sightlines investigated with typically five or more components in Na I D, possible temporal variation was identified in five UVES spectra (six components), in Ca II, Ca I and/or Na I absorption-lines. The variations detected range from 7\\% to a factor of 3.6 in co...

  4. Search for gamma-rays from the unusually bright GRB 130427A with the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; BenZvi, S Y; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T O; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Ponce, E; Pretz, J; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H; Álvarez, J D

    2014-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift $z\\lesssim0.5$, featuring the highest energy photon so far detected from a GRB and the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory is a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. It features two data acquisition (DAQ) systems - one designed to readout full air-shower events (main DAQ) and the other one counting the signals in each photomultiplier tube (scaler DAQ). The burst occurred at a zenith angle of $57^\\circ$, when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector and collecting data with the scaler DAQ only. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, 8 different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC de...

  5. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P [LIP, Coimbra; Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D

    2011-12-30

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE -7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV 20 eV.

  6. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P

    2011-12-30

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associatedmore »systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE -7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV 20 eV.« less

  7. Precovery of near-Earth asteroids by a citizen-science project of the Spanish Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solano, E; Pulido, R; Carry, B

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a citizen-science project conducted by the Spanish Virtual Observatory (SVO) to improve the orbits of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) using data from astronomical archives. The list of NEAs maintained at the Minor Planet Center (MPC) is checked daily to identify new objects or changes in the orbital parameters of already catalogued objects. Using NEODyS we compute the position and magnitude of these objects at the observing epochs of the 938 046 images comprising the Eigth Data Release of the Sloan Digitised Sky Survey (SDSS). If the object lies within the image boundaries and the magnitude is brighter than the limiting magnitude, then the associated image is visually inspected by the project's collaborators (the citizens) to confirm or discard the presence of the NEA. If confirmed, accurate coordinates and, sometimes, magnitudes are submitted to the MPC. Using this methodology, 3,226 registered users have made during the first fifteen months of the project more than 167,000 measurements wh...

  8. Measurement of the proton-air cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}=57$ TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, Auger

    2012-08-01

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505 {+-} 22(stat){sub -36}{sup +28}(syst)] mb is found.

  9. LARGE DUST PARTICLES FROM COMETS. K. J. Meech, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu HI, 96822, USA, meech@ifa.hawaii.edu, T. L. Farnham, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001, farnham@lowell.edu.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meech, Karen Jean

    LARGE DUST PARTICLES FROM COMETS. K. J. Meech, Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu HI, 96822, USA, meech@ifa.hawaii.edu, T. L. Farnham, Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, AZ 86001

  10. Searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; et al

    2015-04-24

    In this study, we analyze the distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in 10 years of operation. The data set, about three times larger than that used in earlier studies, includes arrival directions with zenith angles up to 80°, thus covering from $-90{}^\\circ $ to $+45{}^\\circ $ in declination. After updating the fraction of events correlating with the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalog, we subject the arrival directions of the data with energies in excess of 40 EeV to different tests for anisotropy. We search for localizedmore »excess fluxes, self-clustering of event directions at angular scales up to 30°, and different threshold energies between 40 and 80 EeV. We then look for correlations of cosmic rays with celestial structures both in the Galaxy (the Galactic Center and Galactic Plane) and in the local universe (the Super-Galactic Plane). We also examine their correlation with different populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2MRS catalog, AGNs detected by Swift-BAT, radio galaxies with jets, and the Centaurus A (Cen A) galaxy. None of the tests show statistically significant evidence of anisotropy. The strongest departures from isotropy (post-trial probability $\\sim 1.4$%) are obtained for cosmic rays with $E\\gt 58$ EeV in rather large windows around Swift AGNs closer than 130 Mpc and brighter than 1044 erg/s (18° radius), and around the direction of Centaurus A (15° radius).« less

  11. A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; ,

    2012-01-01

    Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Veron-Cetty Veron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt-L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20, 30, ..., 110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 51 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

  12. Radio-optical reference frame link using the U.S. Naval observatory astrograph and deep CCD imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zacharias, N.; Zacharias, M. I.

    2014-05-01

    Between 1997 and 2004 several observing runs were conducted, mainly with the CTIO 0.9 m, to image International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) counterparts (mostly QSOs) in order to determine accurate optical positions. Contemporary to these deep CCD images, the same fields were observed with the U.S. Naval Observatory astrograph in the same bandpass. They provide accurate positions on the Hipparcos/Tycho-2 system for stars in the 10-16 mag range used as reference stars for the deep CCD imaging data. Here we present final optical position results of 413 sources based on reference stars obtained by dedicated astrograph observations that were reduced following two different procedures. These optical positions are compared to radio very long baseline interferometry positions. The current optical system is not perfectly aligned to the ICRF radio system with rigid body rotation angles of 3-5 mas (= 3? level) found between them for all three axes. Furthermore, statistically, the optical-radio position differences are found to exceed the total, combined, known errors in the observations. Systematic errors in the optical reference star positions and physical offsets between the centers of optical and radio emissions are both identified as likely causes. A detrimental, astrophysical, random noise component is postulated to be on about the 10 mas level. If confirmed by future observations, this could severely limit the Gaia to ICRF reference frame alignment accuracy to an error of about 0.5 mas per coordinate axis with the current number of sources envisioned to provide the link. A list of 36 ICRF sources without the detection of an optical counterpart to a limiting magnitude of about R = 22 is provided as well.

  13. A digital seismogram archive of nuclear explosion signals, recorded at the Borovoye Geophysical Observatory, Kazakhstan, from 1966 to 1996

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    An, Vadim A.; Ovtchinnikov, Vladimir M.; Kaazik, Pyotr B.; Adushkin, Vitaly V.; Sokolova, Inna N.; Aleschenko, Iraida B.; Mikhailova, Natalya N.; Kim, Won -Young; Richards, Paul G.; Patton, Howard J.; et al

    2015-03-27

    Seismologists from Kazakhstan, Russia, and the United States have rescued the Soviet-era archive of nuclear explosion seismograms recorded at Borovoye in northern Kazakhstan during the period 1966–1996. The signals had been stored on about 8000 magnetic tapes, which were held at the recording observatory. After hundreds of man-years of work, these digital waveforms together with significant metadata are now available via the project URL, namely http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/Monitoring/Data/ as a modern open database, of use to diverse communities. Three different sets of recording systems were operated at Borovoye, each using several different seismometers and different gain levels. For some explosions, more thanmore »twenty different channels of data are available. A first data release, in 2001, contained numerous glitches and lacked many instrument responses, but could still be used for measuring accurate arrival times and for comparison of the strengths of different types of seismic waves. The project URL also links to our second major data release, for nuclear explosions in Eurasia recorded in Borovoye, in which the data have been deglitched, all instrument responses have been included, and recording systems are described in detail. This second dataset consists of more than 3700 waveforms (digital seismograms) from almost 500 nuclear explosions in Eurasia, many of them recorded at regional distances. It is important as a training set for the development and evaluation of seismological methods of discriminating between earthquakes and underground explosions, and can be used for assessment of three-dimensional models of the Earth’s interior structure.« less

  14. Searches for anisotropies in the arrival directions of the highest energy cosmic rays detected by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Samarai, I. Al; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Bohá?ová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; Almeida, R. M. de; Domenico, M. De; Jong, S. J. de; Neto, J. R. T. de Mello; Mitri, I. De; Oliveira, J. de; Souza, V. de; Peral, L. del; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Giulio, C. Di; Matteo, A. Di; Diaz, J. C.; Castro, M. L. Díaz; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filip?i?, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Gamez, D. Garcia-; Pinto, D. Garcia-; Garilli, G.; Bravo, A. Gascon; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Berisso, M. Gómez; Vitale, P. F. Gómez; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Hansen, D. Kruppke-; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Coz, S. Le; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Louedec, K.; Bahilo, J. Lozano; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mari?, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Bravo, O. Martínez; Martraire, D.; Meza, J. J. Masías; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Tanco, G. Medina-; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mi?anovi?, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Bueno, L. Molina-; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Dei, D. Pakk Selmi-; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; P?kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.

    2015-04-24

    In this study, we analyze the distribution of arrival directions of ultra-high-energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in 10 years of operation. The data set, about three times larger than that used in earlier studies, includes arrival directions with zenith angles up to 80°, thus covering from $-90{}^\\circ $ to $+45{}^\\circ $ in declination. After updating the fraction of events correlating with the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the Véron-Cetty and Véron catalog, we subject the arrival directions of the data with energies in excess of 40 EeV to different tests for anisotropy. We search for localized excess fluxes, self-clustering of event directions at angular scales up to 30°, and different threshold energies between 40 and 80 EeV. We then look for correlations of cosmic rays with celestial structures both in the Galaxy (the Galactic Center and Galactic Plane) and in the local universe (the Super-Galactic Plane). We also examine their correlation with different populations of nearby extragalactic objects: galaxies in the 2MRS catalog, AGNs detected by Swift-BAT, radio galaxies with jets, and the Centaurus A (Cen A) galaxy. None of the tests show statistically significant evidence of anisotropy. The strongest departures from isotropy (post-trial probability $\\sim 1.4$%) are obtained for cosmic rays with $E\\gt 58$ EeV in rather large windows around Swift AGNs closer than 130 Mpc and brighter than 1044 erg/s (18° radius), and around the direction of Centaurus A (15° radius).

  15. Overview of the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory: site description and selected science results from 2008 to 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega, John; Turnipseed, A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.; Day, D. A.; Gochis, David; Huffman, J. A.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Levin, E. J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; DeMott, Paul J.; Tobo, Y.; Patton, E. G.; Hodzic, Alma; Cui, Y. Y.; Harley, P.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Monson, Russell K.; Eller, A. S.; Greenberg, J. P.; Barth, Mary; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Palm, B. B.; Jiminez, J. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Geron, Chris; Offenberg, J.; Ryan, M. G.; Fornwalt, Paula J.; Pryor, S. C.; Keutsch, Frank N.; DiGangi, J. P.; Chan, A. W.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Wolfe, G. M.; Kim, S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Cantrell, Chris; Mauldin, R. L.; Smith, James N.

    2014-01-01

    The Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen (BEACHON) project seeks to understand the feedbacks and interrelationships between hydrology, biogenic emissions, carbon assimilation, aerosol properties, clouds and associated feedbacks within water-limited ecosystems. The Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory (MEFO) was established in 2008 by the National Center for Atmospheric Research to address many of the BEACHON research objectives, and it now provides a fixed field site with significant infrastructure. MEFO is a mountainous, semi-arid ponderosa pine-dominated forest site that is normally dominated by clean continental air but is periodically influenced by anthropogenic sources from Colorado Front Range cities. This article summarizes the past and ongoing research activities at the site, and highlights some of the significant findings that have resulted from these measurements. These activities include – soil property measurements; – hydrological studies; – measurements of high-frequency turbulence parameters; – eddy covariance flux measurements of water, energy, aerosols and carbon dioxide through the canopy; – determination of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions and their influence on regional atmospheric chemistry; – aerosol number and mass distributions; – chemical speciation of aerosol particles; – characterization of ice and cloud condensation nuclei; – trace gas measurements; and – model simulations using coupled chemistry and meteorology. In addition to various long-term continuous measurements, three focused measurement campaigns with state-of-the-art instrumentation have taken place since the site was established, and two of these studies are the subjects of this special issue: BEACHON-ROCS (Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study, 2010) and BEACHON-RoMBAS (Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study, 2011).

  16. OVERVIEW OF THE SDSS-IV MaNGA SURVEY: MAPPING NEARBY GALAXIES AT APACHE POINT OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bundy, Kevin; Bershady, Matthew A.; Wake, David A.; Tremonti, Christy; Diamond-Stanic, Aleksandar M.; Law, David R.; Cherinka, Brian; Yan, Renbin; Sánchez-Gallego, José R.; Drory, Niv; MacDonald, Nicholas; Weijmans, Anne-Marie; Thomas, Daniel; Masters, Karen; Coccato, Lodovico; Aragón-Salamanca, Alfonso; Avila-Reese, Vladimir; Badenes, Carles; Falcón-Barroso, Jésus; Belfiore, Francesco; and others

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of a new integral field spectroscopic survey called MaNGA (Mapping Nearby Galaxies at Apache Point Observatory), one of three core programs in the fourth-generation Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS-IV) that began on 2014 July 1. MaNGA will investigate the internal kinematic structure and composition of gas and stars in an unprecedented sample of 10,000 nearby galaxies. We summarize essential characteristics of the instrument and survey design in the context of MaNGA's key science goals and present prototype observations to demonstrate MaNGA's scientific potential. MaNGA employs dithered observations with 17 fiber-bundle integral field units that vary in diameter from 12'' (19 fibers) to 32'' (127 fibers). Two dual-channel spectrographs provide simultaneous wavelength coverage over 3600-10300 Å at R ? 2000. With a typical integration time of 3 hr, MaNGA reaches a target r-band signal-to-noise ratio of 4-8 (Å{sup –1} per 2'' fiber) at 23 AB mag arcsec{sup –2}, which is typical for the outskirts of MaNGA galaxies. Targets are selected with M {sub *} ? 10{sup 9} M {sub ?} using SDSS-I redshifts and i-band luminosity to achieve uniform radial coverage in terms of the effective radius, an approximately flat distribution in stellar mass, and a sample spanning a wide range of environments. Analysis of our prototype observations demonstrates MaNGA's ability to probe gas ionization, shed light on recent star formation and quenching, enable dynamical modeling, decompose constituent components, and map the composition of stellar populations. MaNGA's spatially resolved spectra will enable an unprecedented study of the astrophysics of nearby galaxies in the coming 6 yr.

  17. HAWC ?-Ray Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    States. Personnel from the Institutes of Astronomy, Nuclear Sciences, Physics, and Geophysics at UNAM and INAOE have played a very prominent role in the construction of HAWC and...

  18. European Southern Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    ? These objects may be visible through their supernovae/hypernovae or their surrounding ionization zones. How many

  19. Armagh Observatory Annual Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 4.2 Light Pollution

  20. Glenn Schneider Steward Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    , the recent solar eclipse can fairly lay claim to be the first astronomical event to be observed from an airplane. Although the flight and observation made at Fort Sill, Okla., were not undertaken with any: ECLIPSE OBSERVATIONS FROM AIRPLANES 1st Flight: TSE 08 June 1918, Fort Sill, Oklahoma, USA #12;Scientific

  1. Apache Point Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    around the globe by astronomers using the Internet and a unique software program. Originally used objects. Utilizing many of the successful design technology of the ARC 3.5-m telescope, New Mexico State in the Sacramento Mountains of south-central New Mexico. Four telescopes are currently operated: The Sloan

  2. Observatory Joachim Puls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    for expanding atmospheres with the isothermal sound, speed a v 2 v v 1 d GM a da a dr r r dr g esc can be neglected, sinc 2 v a v v 1 v e GM a R d GM g g g g GM dr r r 2 1 ( ) GM r r luminosity in wind at infinity is vv v 2 with maximum m v ass loss, if 2 2 2 GM GM L M M R R L L

  3. New ChaNges to Federal direCt loaNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Andrew

    receive an origination fee rebate for any Federal Direct Loans (Stafford and PLUS) disbursed on or after

  4. Digital Loa and Faith You Can Taste: Hoodoo in the American Imagination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boson, Crystal Michelle

    2014-05-31

    Utilizing popular culture mediums and artifacts, this dissertation examines the ways in which the American imaginary plasticizes the faith of Hoodoo and continually strips it of its religious, historic, and cultural impacts. ...

  5. Low Energy Threshold Analysis of the Phase I and Phase II Data Sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The SNO Collaboration

    2010-06-09

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is T_eff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved with water Cherenkov detector data. In units of 10^6 cm^{-2} s^{-1}, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from 8B decay in the Sun measured using the neutral current (NC) reaction of neutrinos on deuterons, with no constraint on the 8B neutrino energy spectrum, is found to be Phi_NC = 5.140 ^{+0.160}_{-0.158} (stat) ^{+0.132}_{-0.117} (syst). These uncertainties are more than a factor of two smaller than previously published results. Also presented are the spectra of recoil electrons from the charged current reaction of neutrinos on deuterons and the elastic scattering of electrons. A fit to the SNO data in which the free parameters directly describe the total 8B neutrino flux and the energy-dependent nu_e survival probability provides a measure of the total 8B neutrino flux Phi_8B = 5.046 ^{+0.159}_{-0.152} (stat) ^{+0.107}_{-0.123} (syst). Combining these new results with results of all other solar experiments and the KamLAND reactor experiment yields best-fit values of the mixing parameters of theta_{12}=34.06 ^{+1.16}_{-0.84} degrees and Delta m^2_{21}=7.59 ^{+0.20}_{-0.21} x 10^{-5} eV^2. The global value of Phi_8B is extracted to a precision of ^{+2.38}_{-2.95} %. In a three-flavor analysis the best fit value of sin^2\\theta_{13} is 2.00 ^{+2.09}_{-1.63} x 10^{-2}. Interpreting this as a limit implies an upper bound of sin^2\\theta_{13} < 0.057 (95% C. L.).

  6. MEASURING THE COOLING OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN CASSIOPEIA A WITH ALL CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Ho, W. C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Shternin, P. S.; Yakovlev, D. G. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Patnaude, D. J.; David, L., E-mail: alshamou@ualberta.ca [Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The thermal evolution of young neutron stars (NSs) reflects the neutrino emission properties of their cores. Heinke and Ho measured a 3.6% ± 0.6% decay in the surface temperature of the Cassiopeia A (Cas A) NS between 2000 and 2009, using archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S detector in Graded mode. Page et al. and Shternin et al. attributed this decay to enhanced neutrino emission from a superfluid neutron transition in the core. Here we test this decline, combining analysis of the Cas A NS using all Chandra X-ray detectors and modes (HRC-S, HRC-I, ACIS-I, ACIS-S in Faint mode, and ACIS-S in Graded mode) and adding a 2012 May ACIS-S Graded mode observation, using the most current calibrations (CALDB 4.5.5.1). We measure the temperature changes from each detector separately and test for systematic effects due to the nearby filaments of the supernova remnant. We find a 0.92%-2.0% decay over 10 yr in the effective temperature, inferred from HRC-S data, depending on the choice of source and background extraction regions, with a best-fit decay of 1.0% ± 0.7%. In comparison, the ACIS-S Graded data indicate a temperature decay of 3.1%-5.0% over 10 yr, with a best-fit decay of 3.5% ± 0.4%. Shallower observations using the other detectors yield temperature decays of 2.6% ± 1.9% (ACIS-I), 2.1% ± 1.0% (HRC-I), and 2.1% ± 1.9% (ACIS-S Faint mode) over 10 yr. Our best estimate indicates a decline of 2.9% ± 0.5%{sub stat} ± 1.0{sub sys}% over 10 yr. The complexity of the bright and varying supernova remnant background makes a definitive interpretation of archival Cas A Chandra observations difficult. A temperature decline of 1%-3.5% over 10 yr would indicate extraordinarily fast cooling of the NS that can be regulated by superfluidity of nucleons in the stellar core.

  7. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert “Bob” Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  8. Simultaneous Observation of Solar Neutrons from the ISS and High Mountain Observatories in association with a flare on July 8, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muraki, Y; Koga, K; Kakimoto, F; Goka, T; Gonzalez, L X; Masuda, S; Matsubara, Y; Matsumoto, H; Miranda, P; Okudaira, O; Obara, T; Salinas, J; Sako, T; Shibata, S; Ticona, R; Tsunesada, Y; Valdes-Galicia, J F; Watanabe, K; Yamamoto, T

    2015-01-01

    An M6.5-class flare was observed at N12E56 of the solar surface at 16:06 UT on July 8, 2014. In association with this flare, solar neutron detectors located on two high mountains, Mt. Sierra Negra and Chacaltaya and at the space station observed enhancements in the neutral channel. The authors analysed these data and a possible scenario of enhancements produced by high-energy protons and neutrons is proposed, using the data from continuous observation of a solar surface by the ultraviolet telescope onboard the Solar Dynamical Observatory (SDO).

  9. NELIOTA: ESA's new NEO lunar impact monitoring project with the 1.2m telescope at the National Observatory of Athens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonanos, A Z; Boumis, P; Bellas-Velidis, I; Maroussis, A; Dapergolas, A; Fytsilis, A; Charmandaris, V; Tsiganis, K; Tsinganos, K

    2015-01-01

    NELIOTA is a new ESA activity launched at the National Observatory of Athens in February 2015 aiming to determine the distribution and frequency of small near-earth objects (NEOs) via lunar monitoring. The project involves upgrading the 1.2m Kryoneri telescope at the National Observatory of Athens, procuring two fast-frame cameras, and developing a software system, which will control the telescope and the cameras, process the images and automatically detect NEO impacts. NELIOTA will provide a web-based user interface, where the impact events will be reported and made available to the scientific community and the general public. The objective of this 3.5 year activity is to design, develop and implement a highly automated lunar monitoring system, which will conduct an observing campaign for 2 years in search of NEO impact flashes on the Moon. The impact events will be verified, characterised and reported. The 1.2m telescope will be capable of detecting flashes much fainter than current, small-aperture, lunar m...

  10. LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY—AN ENSEMBLE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei

    2013-10-10

    This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 Å channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE INFLUENCE OF ANTHROPOGENIC EMISSIONS AND TRANSPORT VARIABILITY ON SULFATE AEROSOL CONCENTRATIONS AT MAUNA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Jeffrey

    confirmed that anthropogenic pollutants from Asian sources can be transported long distances with important implications for future air quality and global climate change. Located in the remote Pacific Ocean (19.54°N, obtained at MLO by the University of Hawaii at Manoa. Daily filter samples of total aerosol concentrations

  12. LARGE-SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10{sup 18} eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

  13. CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV FROM LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY SEARCHES IN DATA OF THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahlers, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Antici'c, T.; Arganda, E.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-01

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

  14. Reconstructing Past Solar Activity using Meridian Solar Observations: the Case of the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (1833-1840)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaquero, J M

    2014-01-01

    Solar meridian observations have been used to evaluate the solar activity of the past. Some important examples are the solar meridian observations made at the Basilica of San Petronio in Bologna by several astronomers and the observations made by Hevelius published in his book Machina Coelestis. However, we do not know whether these observations, which were not aimed to estimate the solar activity, are reliable for evaluating solar activity. In this paper, we present the marginal notes about sunspots that are included in the manuscripts of the meridian solar observations made at the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy during the period 1833-1840. We compare these observations with other solar activity indices such as sunspot area and number. Our conclusion is that solar meridian observations should be used with extreme caution to evaluate past solar activity.

  15. Search for TeV Gamma-Ray Emission from Point-like Sources in the Inner Galactic Plane with a Partial Configuration of the HAWC Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Reyes, A D Becerril; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Bernal, A; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Capistrán, T; Carramiñana, A; Casanova, S; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de León, S Coutiño; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Enriquez-Rivera, O; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Garfias, F; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hernandez, S; Hüntemeyer, P; Hui, C M; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Raya, G Luis; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Ren, Z; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tibolla, O; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Vrabel, K; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yapici, T; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2015-01-01

    A survey of the inner Galaxy region of Galactic longitude l in [+15, +50] degree and latitude b in [-4,+4] degree is performed using one-third of the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory operated during its construction phase. To address the ambiguities arising from unresolved sources in the data, we use a maximum likelihood technique to identify point source candidates. Ten sources and candidate sources are identified in this analysis. Eight of these are associated with known TeV sources but not all have differential fluxes compatible with previous measurements. Three sources are detected with significances $>5\\,\\sigma$ after accounting for statistical trials, and are associated with known TeV sources.

  16. Estimation of low energy neutron flux ($E_n\\leq15$ MeV) in India-based Neutrino Observatory cavern using Monte Carlo techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dokania, N; Mathimalar, S; Garai, A; Nanal, V; Pillay, R G; Bhushan, K G

    2015-01-01

    The neutron flux at low energy ($E_n\\leq15$ MeV) resulting from the radioactivity of the rock in the underground cavern of the India-based Neutrino Observatory is estimated using Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron production rate due to the spontaneous fission of U, Th and ($\\alpha, n$) interactions in the rock is determined employing the actual rock composition. It has been demonstrated that the total flux is equivalent to a finite size cylindrical rock ($D=L=140$ cm) element. The energy integrated neutron flux thus obtained at the center of the underground tunnel is 2.76 (0.47) $\\times 10^{-6}\\rm~n ~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$. The estimated neutron flux is of the same order ($\\sim10^{-6}\\rm~n ~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$)~as measured in other underground laboratories.

  17. Estimation of low energy neutron flux ($E_n\\leq15$ MeV) in India-based Neutrino Observatory cavern using Monte Carlo techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Dokania; V. Singh; S. Mathimalar; A. Garai; V. Nanal; R. G. Pillay; K. G. Bhushan

    2015-09-23

    The neutron flux at low energy ($E_n\\leq15$ MeV) resulting from the radioactivity of the rock in the underground cavern of the India-based Neutrino Observatory is estimated using Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron production rate due to the spontaneous fission of U, Th and ($\\alpha, n$) interactions in the rock is determined employing the actual rock composition. It has been demonstrated that the total flux is equivalent to a finite size cylindrical rock ($D=L=140$ cm) element. The energy integrated neutron flux thus obtained at the center of the underground tunnel is 2.76 (0.47) $\\times 10^{-6}\\rm~n ~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$. The estimated neutron flux is of the same order ($\\sim10^{-6}\\rm~n ~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$)~as measured in other underground laboratories.

  18. Simulations Study of Muon Response in the Peripheral Regions of the Iron Calorimeter Detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanishka, R; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Indumathi, D; Sinha, Nita

    2015-01-01

    The magnetized Iron CALorimeter detector (ICAL) which is proposed to be built in the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) laboratory, aims to study atmospheric neutrino oscillations primarily through charged current interactions of muon neutrinos and anti-neutrinos with the detector. The response of muons and charge identification efficiency, angle and energy resolution as a function of muon momentum and direction are studied from GEANT4-based simulations in the peripheral regions of the detector. This completes the characterisation of ICAL with respect to muons over the entire detector and has implications for the sensitivity of ICAL to the oscillation parameters and mass hierarchy compared to the studies where only the resolutions and efficiencies of the central region of ICAL were assumed for the entire detector. Selection criteria for track reconstruction in the peripheral region of the detector were determined from the detector response. On applying these, for the 1--20 GeV energy region of interest fo...

  19. Day-night asymmetry of high and low energy solar neutrino events in Super-Kamiokande and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2000-09-19

    In the context of solar neutrino oscillations among active states, we briefly discuss the current likelihood of Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which appear to be currently favored at large mixing, where small Earth regeneration effects might still be observable in Super-Kamiokande (SK) and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). We point out that, since such effects are larger at high (low) solar neutrino energies for high (low) values of the mass square difference \\delta m^2, it may be useful to split the night-day rate asymmetry in two separate energy ranges. We show that the difference \\Delta of the night-day asymmetry at high and low energy may help to discriminate the two large-mixing solutions at low and high \\delta m^2 through a sign test, both in SK and in SNO, provided that the sensitivity to \\Delta can reach the (sub)percent level.

  20. Three-Year Global Survey of Coronal Null Points from Potential-Field-Source-Surface (PFSS) Modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freed, Michael; McKenize, David

    2014-01-01

    This article compiles and examines a comprehensive coronal magnetic-null-point survey created by potential-field-source-surface (PFSS) modeling and Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (SDO/AIA) observations. The locations of 582 potential magnetic null points in the corona were predicted from the PFSS model between Carrington Rotations (CR) 2098 (June 2010) and 2139 (July 2013). These locations were manually inspected, using contrast-enhanced SDO/AIA images in 171 angstroms at the east and west solar limb, for structures associated with nulls. A Kolmogorov--Smirnov (K--S) test showed a statistically significant difference between observed and predicted latitudinal distributions of null points. This finding is explored further to show that the observability of null points could be affected by the Sun's asymmetric hemisphere activity. Additional K--S tests show no effect on observability related to eigenvalues associated with the fan and spine structure surrounding null points or to the orie...

  1. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; ,

    2011-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  2. EVIDENCE FOR THE WAVE NATURE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu

    2012-07-20

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves have been found for about 15 years. However, significant controversy remains over their physical natures and origins. In this paper, we report an EUV wave that was accompanied by an X1.9 flare and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME). Using high temporal and spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory, we are able to investigate the detailed kinematics of the EUV wave. We find several arguments that support the fast-mode wave scenario. (1) The speed of the EUV wave (570 km s{sup -1}) is higher than the sound speed of the quiet-Sun corona. (2) Significant deceleration of the EUV wave (-130 m s{sup -2}) is found during its propagation. (3) The EUV wave resulted in the oscillations of a loop and a filament along its propagation path, and a reflected wave from the polar coronal hole is also detected. (4) Refraction or reflection effect is observed when the EUV wave was passing through two coronal bright points. (5) The dimming region behind the wavefront stopped to expand when the wavefront started to become diffuse. (6) The profiles of the wavefront exhibited a dispersive nature, and the magnetosonic Mach number of the EUV wave derived from the highest intensity jump is about 1.4. In addition, triangulation indicates that the EUV wave propagated within a height range of about 60-100 Mm above the photosphere. We propose that the EUV wave observed should be a nonlinear fast-mode magnetosonic wave that propagated freely in the corona after it was driven by the CME expanding flanks during the initial period.

  3. A low-noise transimpedance amplifier for the detection of “Violin-Mode” resonances in advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory suspensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockerbie, N. A.; Tokmakov, K. V.

    2014-11-15

    This paper describes the design and performance of an extremely low-noise differential transimpedance amplifier, which takes its two inputs from separate photodiodes. The amplifier was planned to serve as the front-end electronics for a highly sensitive shadow-displacement sensing system, aimed at detecting very low-level “Violin-Mode” (VM) oscillations in 0.4 mm diameter by 600 mm long fused-silica suspension fibres. Four such highly tensioned fibres support the 40 kg test-masses/mirrors of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory interferometers. This novel design of amplifier incorporates features which prevent “noise-gain peaking” arising from large area photodiode (and cable) capacitances, and which also usefully separate the DC and AC photocurrents coming from the photodiodes. In consequence, the differential amplifier was able to generate straightforwardly two DC outputs, one per photodiode, as well as a single high-gain output for monitoring the VM oscillations—this output being derived from the difference of the photodiodes’ two, naturally anti-phase, AC photocurrents. Following a displacement calibration, the amplifier's final VM signal output was found to have an AC displacement responsivity at 500 Hz of (9.43 ± 1.20) MV(rms) m{sup ?1}(rms), and, therefore, a shot-noise limited sensitivity to such AC shadow- (i.e., fibre-) displacements of (69 ± 13) picometres/?Hz at this frequency, over a measuring span of ±0.1 mm.

  4. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; Alexander Aab; Pedro Abreu; Marco Aglietta; Eun-Joo Ahn; Imen Al Samarai; Ivone Albuquerque; Ingomar Allekotte; Patrick Allison; Alejandro Almela; Jesus Alvarez Castillo; Jaime Alvarez-Muñiz; Rafael Alves Batista; Michelangelo Ambrosio; Amin Aminaei; Luis Anchordoqui; Sofia Andringa; Carla Aramo; Victor Manuel Aranda; Fernando Arqueros; Nicusor Arsene; Hernán Gonzalo Asorey; Pedro Assis; Julien Aublin; Maximo Ave; Michel Avenier; Gualberto Avila; Nafiun Awal; Alina Mihaela Badescu; Kerri B Barber; Julia Bäuml; Colin Baus; Jim Beatty; Karl Heinz Becker; Jose A Bellido; Corinne Berat; Mario Edoardo Bertaina; Xavier Bertou; Peter Biermann; Pierre Billoir; Simon G Blaess; Alberto Blanco; Miguel Blanco; Carla Bleve; Hans Blümer; Martina Bohá?ová; Denise Boncioli; Carla Bonifazi; Nataliia Borodai; Jeffrey Brack; Iliana Brancus; Ariel Bridgeman; Pedro Brogueira; William C Brown; Peter Buchholz; Antonio Bueno; Stijn Buitink; Mario Buscemi; Karen S Caballero-Mora; Barbara Caccianiga; Lorenzo Caccianiga; Marina Candusso; Laurentiu Caramete; Rossella Caruso; Antonella Castellina; Gabriella Cataldi; Lorenzo Cazon; Rosanna Cester; Alan G Chavez; Andrea Chiavassa; Jose Augusto Chinellato; Jiri Chudoba; Marco Cilmo; Roger W Clay; Giuseppe Cocciolo; Roberta Colalillo; Alan Coleman; Laura Collica; Maria Rita Coluccia; Ruben Conceição; Fernando Contreras; Mathew J Cooper; Alain Cordier; Stephane Coutu; Corbin Covault; James Cronin; Richard Dallier; Bruno Daniel; Sergio Dasso; Kai Daumiller; Bruce R Dawson; Rogerio M de Almeida; Sijbrand J de Jong; Giuseppe De Mauro; Joao de Mello Neto; Ivan De Mitri; Jaime de Oliveira; Vitor de Souza; Luis del Peral; Olivier Deligny; Hans Dembinski; Niraj Dhital; Claudio Di Giulio; Armando Di Matteo; Johana Chirinos Diaz; Mary Lucia Díaz Castro; Francisco Diogo; Carola Dobrigkeit; Wendy Docters; Juan Carlos D'Olivo; Alexei Dorofeev; Qader Dorosti Hasankiadeh; Maria Teresa Dova; Jan Ebr; Ralph Engel; Martin Erdmann; Mona Erfani; Carlos O Escobar; Joao Espadanal; Alberto Etchegoyen; Heino Falcke; Ke Fang; Glennys Farrar; Anderson Fauth; Norberto Fazzini; Andrew P Ferguson; Mateus Fernandes; Brian Fick; Juan Manuel Figueira; Alberto Filevich; Andrej Filip?i?; Brendan Fox; Octavian Fratu; Martín Miguel Freire; Benjamin Fuchs; Toshihiro Fujii; Beatriz García; Diego Garcia-Pinto; Florian Gate; Hartmut Gemmeke; Alexandru Gherghel-Lascu; Piera Luisa Ghia; Ugo Giaccari; Marco Giammarchi; Maria Giller; Dariusz G?as; Christian Glaser; Henry Glass; Geraldina Golup; Mariano Gómez Berisso; Primo F Gómez Vitale; Nicolás González; Ben Gookin; Jacob Gordon; Alessio Gorgi; Peter Gorham; Philippe Gouffon; Nathan Griffith; Aurelio Grillo; Trent D Grubb; Fausto Guarino; Germano Guedes; Matías Rolf Hampel; Patricia Hansen; Diego Harari; Thomas A Harrison; Sebastian Hartmann; John Harton; Andreas Haungs; Thomas Hebbeker; Dieter Heck; Philipp Heimann; Alexander E Herve; Gary C Hill; Carlos Hojvat; Nicholas Hollon; Ewa Holt; Piotr Homola; Jörg Hörandel; Pavel Horvath; Miroslav Hrabovský; Daniel Huber; Tim Huege; Antonio Insolia; Paula Gina Isar; Ingolf Jandt; Stefan Jansen; Cecilia Jarne; Jeffrey A Johnsen; Mariela Josebachuili; Alex Kääpä; Olga Kambeitz; Karl Heinz Kampert; Peter Kasper; Igor Katkov; Balazs Kégl; Bianca Keilhauer; Azadeh Keivani; Ernesto Kemp; Roger Kieckhafer; Hans Klages; Matthias Kleifges; Jonny Kleinfeller; Raphael Krause; Nicole Krohm; Oliver Krömer; Daniel Kuempel; Norbert Kunka; Danielle LaHurd; Luca Latronico; Robert Lauer; Markus Lauscher; Pascal Lautridou; Sandra Le Coz; Didier Lebrun; Paul Lebrun; Marcelo Augusto Leigui de Oliveira; Antoine Letessier-Selvon; Isabelle Lhenry-Yvon; Katrin Link; Luis Lopes; Rebeca López; Aida López Casado; Karim Louedec; Lu Lu; Agustin Lucero; Max Malacari; Simone Maldera; Manuela Mallamaci; Jennifer Maller; Dusan Mandat; Paul Mantsch; Analisa Mariazzi; Vincent Marin; Ioana Mari?; Giovanni Marsella; Daniele Martello; Lilian Martin; Humberto Martinez; Oscar Martínez Bravo; Diane Martraire; Jimmy Masías Meza; Hermann-Josef Mathes; Sebastian Mathys; James Matthews; John Matthews; Giorgio Matthiae; Detlef Maurel; Daniela Maurizio; Eric Mayotte; Peter Mazur; Carlos Medina; Gustavo Medina-Tanco; Rebecca Meissner; Victor Mello; Diego Melo; Alexander Menshikov; Stefano Messina; Rishi Meyhandan; Maria Isabel Micheletti; Lukas Middendorf; Ignacio A Minaya; Lino Miramonti; Bogdan Mitrica; Laura Molina-Bueno; Silvia Mollerach; François Montanet; Carlo Morello; Miguel Mostafá; Celio A Moura; Marcio Aparecido Muller; Gero Müller; Sarah Müller

    2015-03-26

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than $60^{\\circ}$ detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above $5.3{\\times}10^{18}$ eV, the "ankle", the flux can be described by a power law $E^{-\\gamma}$ with index $\\gamma=2.70 \\pm 0.02 \\,\\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.1\\,\\text{(sys)}$ followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy ($E_\\text{s}$) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find $E_\\text{s}=(5.12\\pm0.25\\,\\text{(stat)}^{+1.0}_{-1.2}\\,\\text{(sys)}){\\times}10^{19}$ eV.

  5. Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

    2007-02-01

    This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

  6. High sensitivity measurement of 224Ra and 226Ra in water with an improved hydrous titanium oxide technique at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aharmim; B. T. Cleveland; X. Dai; G. Doucas; J. Farine; H. Fergani; R. Ford; R. L. Hahn; E. D. Hallman; N. A. Jelley; R. Lange; S. Majerus; C. Mifflin; A. J. Noble; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Rodriguez-Jimenez; D. Sinclair; M. Yeh

    2009-02-01

    The existing hydrous titanium oxide (HTiO) technique for the measurement of 224Ra and 226Ra in the water at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has been changed to make it faster and less sensitive to trace impurities in the HTiO eluate. Using HTiO-loaded filters followed by cation exchange adsorption and HTiO co-precipitation, Ra isotopes from 200-450 tonnes of heavy water can be extracted and concentrated into a single sample of a few millilitres with a total chemical efficiency of 50%. Combined with beta-alpha coincidence counting, this method is capable of measuring 2.0x10^3 uBq/kg of 224Ra and 3.7x10^3 uBq/kg of 226Ra from the 232Th and 238U decay chains, respectively, for a 275 tonne D2O assay, which are equivalent to 5x10^16 g Th/g and 3x10^16 g U/g in heavy water.

  7. The Study of TeV Variability and Duty Cycle of Mrk 421 from 3 Years of Observations with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Allen, B T; Aune, T; Barber, A S; Berley, D; Braun, J; Chen, C; Christopher, G E; Delay, R S; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fraija, N; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Hüntemeyer, P H; Imran, A; Kolterman, B E; Linnemann, J T; Marinelli, A; McEnery, J E; Morgan, T; Mincer, A I; Nemethy, P; Patricelli, B; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schneider, M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2014-01-01

    TeV flaring activity with time scales as short as tens of minutes and an orphan TeV flare have been observed from the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421). The TeV emission from Mrk 421 is believed to be produced by leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. In this scenario, correlations between the X-ray and the TeV fluxes are expected, TeV orphan flares are hardly explained and the activity (measured as duty cycle) of the source at TeV energies is expected to be equal or less than that observed in X-rays if only SSC is considered. To estimate the TeV duty cycle of Mrk 421 and to establish limits on its variability at different time scales, we continuously observed Mrk 421 with the Milagro observatory. Mrk 421 was detected by Milagro with a statistical significance of 7.1 standard deviations between 2005 September 21 and 2008 March 15. The observed spectrum is consistent with previous observations by VERITAS. We estimate the duty cycle of Mrk 421 for energies above 1 TeV for different hypothesis of the bas...

  8. Cross-calibration of the X-ray Instruments onboard the Chandra, INTEGRAL, RXTE, Suzaku, Swift, and XMM-Newton Observatories using G21.5-0.9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Plucinsky, Paul P; Beardmore, Andrew P; Ishida, Manabu; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Posson-Brown, Jennifer L L; Read, Andrew M; Saxton, Richard D; Shaposhnikov, Nikolai V

    2010-01-01

    Context. The Crab nebula has been used as a celestial calibration source of the X-ray flux and spectral shape for many years by X-ray astronomy missions. However, the object is often too bright for current and future missions equipped with instruments with improved sensitivity. Aims. We use G21.5-0.9 as a viable, fainter substitute to the Crab, which is another pulsar-wind nebula with a time-constant powerlaw spectrum with a flux of a few milli Crab in the X-ray band. Using this source, we conduct a cross-calibration study of the instruments onboard currently active observatories: Chandra ACIS, Suzaku XIS, Swift XRT, XMM-Newton EPIC (MOS and pn) for the soft-band, and INTEGRAL IBIS-ISGRI, RXTE PCA, and Suzaku HXD-PIN for the hard band. Methods. We extract spectra from all the instruments and fit them under the same astrophysical assumptions. We compare the spectral parameters of the G21.5-0.9 model: power-law photon index, H-equivalent column density of the interstellar photoelectric absorption, flux in the s...

  9. SEARCH FOR POINT-LIKE SOURCES OF ULTRA-HIGH ENERGY NEUTRINOS AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY AND IMPROVED LIMIT ON THE DIFFUSE FLUX OF TAU NEUTRINOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, IFGW, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-10

    The surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory can detect neutrinos with energy E{sub {nu}} between 10{sup 17} eV and 10{sup 20} eV from point-like sources across the sky south of +55 Degree-Sign and north of -65 Degree-Sign declinations. A search has been performed for highly inclined extensive air showers produced by the interaction of neutrinos of all flavors in the atmosphere (downward-going neutrinos), and by the decay of tau leptons originating from tau neutrino interactions in Earth's crust (Earth-skimming neutrinos). No candidate neutrinos have been found in data up to 2010 May 31. This corresponds to an equivalent exposure of {approx}3.5 years of a full surface detector array for the Earth-skimming channel and {approx}2 years for the downward-going channel. An improved upper limit on the diffuse flux of tau neutrinos has been derived. Upper limits on the neutrino flux from point-like sources have been derived as a function of the source declination. Assuming a differential neutrino flux k{sub PS} {center_dot} E {sup -2}{sub {nu}} from a point-like source, 90% confidence level upper limits for k{sub PS} at the level of Almost-Equal-To 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -7} and 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} have been obtained over a broad range of declinations from the searches for Earth-skimming and downward-going neutrinos, respectively.

  10. OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF THE EMERGING EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN AS SEEN WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitta, L. P.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E.; Kariyappa, R.; Hasan, S. S.; Hanslmeier, A.

    2013-05-01

    We used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to study coronal loops at small scales, emerging in the quiet Sun. With HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, we derive the integrated and unsigned photospheric magnetic flux at the loop footpoints in the photosphere. These loops are bright in the EUV channels of AIA. Using the six AIA EUV filters, we construct the differential emission measure (DEM) in the temperature range 5.7-6.5 in log T (K) for several hours of observations. The observed DEMs have a peak distribution around log T Almost-Equal-To 6.3, falling rapidly at higher temperatures. For log T < 6.3, DEMs are comparable to their peak values within an order of magnitude. The emission-weighted temperature is calculated, and its time variations are compared with those of magnetic flux. We present two possibilities for explaining the observed DEMs and temperatures variations. (1) Assuming that the observed loops are composed of a hundred thin strands with certain radius and length, we tested three time-dependent heating models and compared the resulting DEMs and temperatures with the observed quantities. This modeling used enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), a zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic code. The comparisons suggest that a medium-frequency heating model with a population of different heating amplitudes can roughly reproduce the observations. (2) We also consider a loop model with steady heating and non-uniform cross-section of the loop along its length, and find that this model can also reproduce the observed DEMs, provided the loop expansion factor {gamma} {approx} 5-10. More observational constraints are required to better understand the nature of coronal heating in the short emerging loops on the quiet Sun.

  11. Herschel Space ObservatoryHerschel Space Observatory Science &Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    more about the Herschel mission try the following resources: WORLD WIDE WEB SITES Herschel UK outreach measurements of the gas and dust between the stars in our Galaxy. In visible light, this dust appears dark is no longer dark but glows with its own light, producing stunning images. After our own Milky Way

  12. Solar & Heliospheric Observatory The SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Petrus C.

    of propellants. The maximum power supply from the solar cells is 1400 Watt, with a maximum payload consumption vantage position has allowed nearly uninterrupted observations of the Sun, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year

  13. NEUTRINO PHYSICS (NONACCELERATOR) Kamioka Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    ] on neutrinoless double beta decay (0). The only way out would be to have two Majorana neutrinos whose

  14. NEUTRINO PHYSICS (NONACCELERATOR) Kamioka Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    -9007(96)01989-8] PACS numbers: 23.40.Hc, 21.10.Tg, 21.60.Cs, 27.40.+z Neutrinoless double beta decay (bb0n) is the most

  15. Universe Awareness meeting Armagh Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , poverty, etc. There is also a lot of light pollution, which prevents naked eye observations. In this case). The issue of reducing light pollution aligns cl

  16. Data Center Observatory General Schematic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and pumps; use cycled for even wear · Pumps have back-up generators · Pumping system also includes 2 1U Rack 1 3U Air FM40 Air FM40 Campuschilledwaterloop PUMP ROOM (FMS BUILDING) CICBUILDING · High-action sprinkler system · Distance-read sub-floor leak detection system PUMP ROOM · Redundant heat exchangers

  17. The Armagh Observatory Business Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .5 in 2009/2010); £179.3k on buildings, buildings refurbishment and grounds costs (cf. £145.3k in 2009

  18. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29 1.921 1.892 1.887 HHAWC

  19. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided65Bob8, 20115, 2014text of

  20. HAWC γ-Ray Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Lowï‚— WeUpdate JonGuided65Bob8, 20115, 2014text ofHAWC

  1. A QUARTER-CENTURY OF OBSERVATIONS OF COMET 10P/TEMPEL 2 AT LOWELL OBSERVATORY: CONTINUED SPIN-DOWN, COMA MORPHOLOGY, PRODUCTION RATES, AND NUMERICAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Matthew M.; Schleicher, David G.; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Christensen, Samantha R. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Road, Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Farnham, Tony L., E-mail: knight@lowell.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2012-11-01

    We report on photometry and imaging of Comet 10P/Tempel 2 obtained at Lowell Observatory from 1983 through 2011. We measured a nucleus rotation period of 8.950 {+-} 0.002 hr from 16 nights of imaging acquired between 2010 September and 2011 January. This rotation period is longer than the period we previously measured in 1999, which was itself longer than the period measured in 1988, and demonstrates that Tempel 2 is continuing to spin down, presumably due to torques caused by asymmetric outgassing. A nearly linear jet was observed which varied little during a rotation cycle in both R and CN images acquired during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions. We measured the projected direction of this jet throughout the two apparitions and, under the assumption that the source region of the jet was near the comet's pole, determined a rotational pole direction of R.A./decl. = 151 Degree-Sign /+59 Degree-Sign from CN measurements and R.A./decl. = 173 Degree-Sign /+57 Degree-Sign from dust measurements (we estimate a circular uncertainty of 3 Degree-Sign for CN and 4 Degree-Sign for dust). Different combinations of effects likely bias both gas and dust solutions and we elected to average these solutions for a final pole direction of R.A./decl. = 162 Degree-Sign {+-} 11 Degree-Sign /+58 Degree-Sign {+-} 1 Degree-Sign . Photoelectric photometry was acquired on 3 nights in 1983, 2 nights in 1988, 19 nights in 1999/2000, and 10 nights in 2010/2011. The activity exhibited a steep 'turn-on' {approx}3 months prior to perihelion (the exact timing of which varies) and a relatively smooth decline after perihelion. The activity during the 1999 and 2010 apparitions was similar; limited data in 1983 and 1988 (along with IUE data from the literature) were systematically higher and the difference cannot be explained entirely by the smaller perihelion distance. We measured a 'typical' composition, in agreement with previous investigators. Monte Carlo numerical modeling with our pole solution best replicated the observed coma morphology for a source region located near a comet latitude of +80 Degree-Sign and having a radius of {approx}10 Degree-Sign . Our model reproduced the seasonal changes in activity, suggesting that the majority of Tempel 2's activity originates from a small active region located near the pole. We also find that a cosine-squared solar angle function gives the best fit as compared to a standard cosine function.

  2. z {approx} 4 H{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ORIGINS DEEP SURVEY: TRACING THE DOMINANT MODE FOR GROWTH OF GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shim, Hyunjin; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Dickinson, Mark; Lin Lihwai; Yan, Chi-Hung; Spinrad, Hyron; Stern, Daniel

    2011-09-01

    We present evidence for strong H{alpha} emission in galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts in the range of 3.8 < z < 5.0 over the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey fields. Among 74 galaxies detected in the Spitzer IRAC 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m bands, more than 70% of the galaxies show clear excess at 3.6 {mu}m compared to the expected flux density from stellar continuum only. We provide evidence that this 3.6 {mu}m excess is due to H{alpha} emission redshifted into the 3.6 {mu}m band, and classify these 3.6 {mu}m excess galaxies to be H{alpha} emitter (HAE) candidates. The selection of HAE candidates using an excess in broadband filters is sensitive to objects whose rest-frame H{alpha} equivalent width (EW) is larger than 350 A. The H{alpha} inferred star formation rates (SFRs) of the HAEs range between 20 and 500 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and are a factor of {approx}6 larger than SFRs inferred from the UV continuum. The ratio between the H{alpha} luminosity and UV luminosity of HAEs is also on average larger than that of local starbursts. Possible reasons for such strong H{alpha} emission in these galaxies include different dust extinction properties, young stellar population ages, extended star formation histories, low metallicity, and a top-heavy stellar initial mass function. Although the correlation between UV slope {beta} and L{sub H{alpha}}/L{sub UV} raises the possibility that HAEs prefer a dust extinction curve which is steeper in the UV, the most dominant factor that results in strong H{alpha} emission appears to be star formation history. The H{alpha} EWs of HAEs are large despite their relatively old stellar population ages constrained by spectral energy distribution fitting, suggesting that at least 60% of HAEs produce stars at a constant rate. Under the assumption that the gas supply is sustained, HAEs are able to produce {approx}> 50% of the stellar mass density that is encompassed in massive (M{sub *} > 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}) galaxies at z {approx} 3. This 'strong H{alpha} phase' of star formation plays a dominant role in galaxy growth at z {approx} 4, and they are likely progenitors of massive red galaxies at lower redshifts.

  3. Outgassing Behavior of C/2012 S1 (ISON) From September 2011 to June 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meech, Karen J; Kleyna, Jan; Ansdell, Megan; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Hainaut, Olivier; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Rector, Travis; Riesen, Timm; Keane, Jacqueline V; Reipurth, Bo; Hsieh, Henry H; Michaud, Peter; Milani, Giannantonio; Bryssinck, Erik; Ligustri, Rolando; Trabatti, Roberto; Tozzi, Gian-Paolo; Mottola, Stefano; Kuehrt, Ekkehard; Bhatt, Bhuwan; Sahu, Devendra; Lisse, Carey; Denneau, Larry; Jedicke, Robert; Magnier, Eugene; Wainscoat, Richard

    2013-01-01

    We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained during the time period immediately after discovery (r=6.28 AU) until it moved into solar conjunction in mid-2013 June using the UH2.2m, and Gemini North 8-m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2m telescope in Spain, the VYSOS-5 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawaii and data from the CARA network. Additional pre-discovery data from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 2011 September 30 (r=9.4 AU). The images showed a similar tail morphology due to small micron sized particles throughout 2013. Observations at sub-mm wavelengths using the JCMT on 15 nights between 2013 March 9 (r=4.52 AU) and June 16 (r=3.35 AU) were used to search for CO and HCN rotation lines. No gas was detected, with upper limits for CO ranging between (3.5-4.5)E27 molec/s. Combined with published water production rate estimates we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound ...

  4. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; et al

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water solublemore »fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, ?v, was calculated. The ?v, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ~ 0.15 for the accumulation mode and ~ 0.36 for the coarse mode, respectively. The obtained ?v, ws for the accumulation mode is in good agreement with earlier data reported for remote sites in the Amazon rain forest (?v ≈ 0.15) and a Colorado boreal forest (?v ≈ 0.16). We used the Zdanovskii–Stokes–Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule to predict the chemical composition dependent hygroscopicity, ?v, p. The obtained ?v, p values overestimate the experimental FDHA-KIM-derived ?v, ws by factors of 1.8 and 1.5 for the accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. This divergence can be partly explained by incomplete dissolution of the hygroscopic inorganic compounds resulting from kinetic limitations due to a sparingly soluble organic coating. The TEM and STXM-NEXAFS results indicate that aged submicron (>300 nm) and supermicron aerosol particles possess core-shell structures with an inorganic core, and are enriched in organic carbon at the mixed particle surface. The direct FDHA kinetic studies provide a bulk diffusion coefficient of water of ~ 10?12 cm2 s?1 indicating a semi-solid state of the organic-rich phase leading to kinetic limitations of water uptake and release during hydration and dehydration cycles. Overall the present ZOTTO data set, obtained in the growing season, has revealed a strong influence of organic carbon on the hygroscopic properties of the ambient aerosols. The sparingly soluble organic coating controls hygroscopic growth, phase transitions, and microstructural rearrangement processes. The observed kinetic limitations can strongly influence the outcome of experiments performed on multi-second time scales, such as the commonly applied HTDMA (Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer) and CCNC (Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter) measurements.« less

  5. Searches for large-scale anisotropy in the arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above energy of 10{sup 19} eV at the Pierre Auger observatory and the telescope array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Andringa, S.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Asorey, H.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Castillo, J. Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Arqueros, F.; Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; Telescope Array Collaboration; and others

    2014-10-20

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 10{sup 19} eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 10{sup 19} eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  6. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander; et al,

    2014-10-07

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  7. Ground-based observations of Kepler asteroseismic targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uytterhoeven, K; Southworth, J; Randall, S; Ostensen, R; Molenda-Zakowicz, J; Marconi, M; Kurtz, D W; Kiss, L; Gutierrez-Soto, J; Frandsen, S; De Cat, P; Bruntt, H; Briquet, M; Zhang, X B; Telting, J H; Steslicki, M; Ripepi, V; Pigulski, A; Paparo, M; Oreiro, R; Choong, Ngeow Chow; Niemczura, E; Nemec, J; Narwid, A; Mathias, P; Martin-Ruiz, S; Lehman, H; Kopacki, G; Karoff, C; Jackiewicz, J; Henden, A A; Handler, G; Grigachene, A; Green, E M; Garrido, R; Machado, L Fox; Debosscher, J; Creevey, O L; Catanzaro, G; Bognar, Z; Biazzo, K; Bernabei, S

    2010-01-01

    We present the ground-based activities within the different working groups of the Kepler Asteroseismic Science Consortium (KASC). The activities aim at the systematic characterization of the 5000+ KASC targets, and at the collection of ground-based follow-up time-series data of selected promising Kepler pulsators. So far, 35 different instruments at 30 telescopes on 22 different observatories in 12 countries are in use, and a total of more than 530 observing nights has been awarded. (Based on observations made with the Isaac Newton Telescope, William Herschel Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope, Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, Mercator Telescope (La Palma, Spain), and IAC-80 (Tenerife, Spain). Also based on observations taken at the observatories of Sierra Nevada, San Pedro Martir, Vienna, Xinglong, Apache Point, Lulin, Tautenburg, Loiano, Serra la Nave, Asiago, McDonald, Skinakas, Pic du Midi, Mauna Kea, Steward Observatory, Bialkow Observatory of the Wroclaw University, Piszkesteto Mountain Station, Observato...

  8. X6.9-CLASS FLARE-INDUCED VERTICAL KINK OSCILLATIONS IN A LARGE-SCALE PLASMA CURTAIN AS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, A. K. [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences (ARIES), Manora Peak, Nainital 263 002 (India); Goossens, M. [Centre for Mathematical Plasma Astrophysics, Department of Mathematics, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-11-01

    We present rare observational evidence of vertical kink oscillations in a laminar and diffused large-scale plasma curtain as observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The X6.9-class flare in active region 11263 on 2011 August 9 induces a global large-scale disturbance that propagates in a narrow lane above the plasma curtain and creates a low density region that appears as a dimming in the observational image data. This large-scale propagating disturbance acts as a non-periodic driver that interacts asymmetrically and obliquely with the top of the plasma curtain and triggers the observed oscillations. In the deeper layers of the curtain, we find evidence of vertical kink oscillations with two periods (795 s and 530 s). On the magnetic surface of the curtain where the density is inhomogeneous due to coronal dimming, non-decaying vertical oscillations are also observed (period ? 763-896 s). We infer that the global large-scale disturbance triggers vertical kink oscillations in the deeper layers as well as on the surface of the large-scale plasma curtain. The properties of the excited waves strongly depend on the local plasma and magnetic field conditions.

  9. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D.; Zhao Junwei; Ofman, Leon

    2011-07-20

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    of an SIS detector receiver. The results are summarized in the NEP d column of Table I. In general sensitivity, AT (which is proportional to minimum detectable flux, Smin = 2kAT/nA) gives: 2NEP ATd - \\ 2 kB 2 factor in the denominator arises because AT is for one second integration while NEP is for 1 Hz video

  11. National Radio Astronomy Observatory Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    = EBXPSI hhhhhhh = EfficiencyErrorSurface EfficiencyBlockage EfficiencyizationCrosspolar EfficiencyErrorPhase EfficiencySpillover EfficiencyionIllumincat E B X P S I = = = = = = h h h h h h #12;Gain of Reflector

  12. IATP | Trade Observatory | Headlines q What's new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    States, Australia and South Africa have united in an international industry effort to move rapidly information q Register online Subscribe to WTO Watch View archives From ethanol to privatization, water

  13. JOHN W. ARCHER NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    , in conjunction with computer-aided analysis of the behavior of the non-linear varactor imped- ance, were used circuit requirements for the implementation of efficient frequency multi- pliers, then relates, the measured performance of the frequency multipliers is presented. ImPLEMENTATION Any non-linear impedance

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Through Dewar and Tank Assembly . . . . . . 5 Figure 3 Cross Section Through Mixer Mounting Structure . . . . . . 6 Figure it Heat Shield Mounting Arrangement . . . . · · ·. . . . . 9 Figure 5 Block Diagram of RF

  15. The Status of the STACEE Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Covault; L. M. Boone; D. Bramel; E. Chae; P. Fortin; D. M Gingrich; J. A. Hinton; D. S. Hanna; R. Mukherjee; C. Mueller R. A. Ong; K. Ragan; R. A. Scalzo; D. R. Schuette; C. G. Theoret; D. A. Williams

    2001-07-21

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is a ground-based instrument designed to study astrophysical sources of gamma radiation in the energy range of 50 to 500 GeV. STACEE uses an array of large heliostat mirrors at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. The heliostats are used to collect Cherenkov light produced in gamma-ray air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The construction of STACEE started in 1997 and has been completed in 2001. During the 1998-99 observing season, we used a portion of the experiment, STACEE-32, to detect gamma-rays from the Crab Nebula. The completed version of STACEE uses 64 heliostat mirrors, having a total collection area of 2300 m^2. During the last year, we have also installed custom electronics for pulse delay and triggering, and 1 GHz Flash ADCs to read out the photomultiplier tubes. The commissioning of the full STACEE instrument is underway. Preliminary observations and simulation work indicate that STACEE will have an energy threshold below 70 GeV and a reach for extragalactic gamma-ray sources out to redshift of ~1.0. In this paper we describe the design and performance of STACEE.

  16. Michael L. Stevens Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it affects us) Earth's magnetic field the key players: the solar wind The sun's dynamic corona also solar does the sun affect Earth and the NEE? #12;1.0 Geoeffectiveness · Solar wind (SW) plasma impinges;#12;1.1 The solar wind FAST (~750 km/s) from open field sun (coronal holes, polar hole) high latitudes at solar min

  17. Setting and Maintaining Arecibo Observatory's Timing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frequency Standard 14 Time Code Generators TRAK Synchronized Time Code Generator 38 EECO Time Code Generator the time codes if the TRAC Synchronized Time Code Generator fails. Soon the TrueTime time code generator) Time Code Generator TRAK Synchronized Time Code Generator EECO Time Code Generator Transfer standard

  18. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory The SNO Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Milton, B.Sur Chalk River Laboratories, AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 CANADA2 J. Bigu, J

  19. nuclex/9910016 The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    .T.H. Clifford, R. Deal, E.D. Earle, E. Gaudette, G. Milton, B.Sur Chalk River Laboratories, AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 CANADA 2 J. Bigu, J.H.M. Cowan, D.L. Cluff, E.D. Hallman, R.U. Haq, J. Hewett, J

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Colonization of subsurface microbial observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , containing fluids in thermodynamic disequilibrium with the basaltic crust. Little is known about microbial. Crustal samples recovered from ocean drilling operations are often compromised for micro- biological of the Juan de Fuca Ridge record a dynamic, post-drilling response of crustal microbial ecosystems to changing

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Cu OUTPUT WAVEGUIDE INPUT WAVEGUIDE CIRCULARCHOKE NON--CONTAC11NG MOVABLESHORTINPUTMESHORT OUTPUTTEESHORT

  2. Dutch Open Telescope Virtual Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Rob

    telescope building. The DOT is open and is mounted on a 15 m high open tower to exploit the superior atmospheric seeing at La Palma brought by the oceanic trade wind. The clamshell bad-weather canopy is folded to feed the solar physics research by the small DOT group at Utrecht, but very much underexploits

  3. New observatory studies universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarship supportsFeet) UndergroundArgonne National|

  4. ~;;. rl~.....)J bJ(/)t!IVtffl. ~._-v. CUrt/1?U' 'l~ ,. CJ.~td glt.{iclL~Zsi,jSiel '7/S, (;LOa'!).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    occur in the :Stem.; J,' #12;146 THE ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION 147 3 not own transmission lines so their ability to wheel power to customers depends entirely on their ability), using Edison Electric Institute data. While the generation side of electric power systems usually

  5. Dr. P. V.~Walt&, Jr* V Aamooiato~ Mvieion L&&r C@ Divirien Loas Alaws SoiautlSlc Ubcratory

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers CoMadison -T: Designation ofSEP 2

  6. OUTGASSING BEHAVIOR OF C/2012 S1 (ISON) FROM 2011 SEPTEMBER TO 2013 JUNE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meech, Karen J.; Yang, Bin; Kleyna, Jan; Chiang, Hsin-Fang; Riesen, Timm; Keane, Jacqueline V.; Reipurth, Bo; Hsieh, Henry H.; Ansdell, Megan; Hainaut, Olivier; Vincent, Jean-Baptiste; Boehnhardt, Hermann; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Rector, Travis; Michaud, Peter; Milani, Giannantonio; Bryssinck, Erik; Ligustri, Rolando; Trabatti, Roberto; Tozzi, Gian-Paolo; and others

    2013-10-20

    We report photometric observations for comet C/2012 S1 (ISON) obtained during the time period immediately after discovery (r = 6.28 AU) until it moved into solar conjunction in mid-2013 June using the UH2.2 m, and Gemini North 8 m telescopes on Mauna Kea, the Lowell 1.8 m in Flagstaff, the Calar Alto 1.2 m telescope in Spain, the VYSOS-5 telescopes on Mauna Loa Hawaii and data from the CARA network. Additional pre-discovery data from the Pan STARRS1 survey extends the light curve back to 2011 September 30 (r = 9.4 AU). The images showed a similar tail morphology due to small micron sized particles throughout 2013. Observations at submillimeter wavelengths using the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope on 15 nights between 2013 March 9 (r = 4.52 AU) and June 16 (r = 3.35 AU) were used to search for CO and HCN rotation lines. No gas was detected, with upper limits for CO ranging between 3.5-4.5 × 10{sup 27} molecules s{sup –1}. Combined with published water production rate estimates we have generated ice sublimation models consistent with the photometric light curve. The inbound light curve is likely controlled by sublimation of CO{sub 2}. At these distances water is not a strong contributor to the outgassing. We also infer that there was a long slow outburst of activity beginning in late 2011 peaking in mid-2013 January (r ? 5 AU) at which point the activity decreased again through 2013 June. We suggest that this outburst was driven by CO injecting large water ice grains into the coma. Observations as the comet came out of solar conjunction seem to confirm our models.

  7. THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2 FLARE, RIBBONS, CORONAL FRONT, AND MASS EJECTION: INTERPRETING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL VIEWS FROM THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND STEREO GUIDED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC FLUX-ROPE MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Aulanier, Guillaume; Pariat, Etienne; Delannee, Cecile E-mail: title@lmsal.com E-mail: etienne.pariat@obspm.fr

    2011-09-10

    The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central {delta}-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ('EIT wave'), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere. The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the 'EIT wave', are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 A (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 A (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 A (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much more obvious than true wave phenomena, we discuss how different magnetic environments within and around the erupting region can lead to the signatures of either or both of these aspects.

  8. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aciego, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    helium compositions between 6.7 and 12 R/Ra, and corresponding concentrations of 3 He released in heating below detectionhelium isotopic composition of air ( 3 He/ 4 He = 1.39 x 10 -6 ). The detection

  9. Combined U-Th/He and 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of post-shield lavas from the Mauna Kea and Kohala volcanoes, Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aciego, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    E. (1977) Subcommission on Geochronology - Convention on Useof Decay Constants in Geochronology and Cosmochronology.U-Th/He and 40 Ar/ 39 Ar Geochronology of Post-shield Lavas

  10. The Flare Activity of SgrA*; New Coordinated mm to X-Ray Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Eckart; F. K. Baganoff; R. Schoedel; M. Morris; R. Genzel; G. C. Bower; D. Marrone; J. M. Moran; T. Viehmann; M. W. Bautz; W. N. Brandt; G. P. Garmire; T. Ott; S. Trippe; G. R. Ricker; C. Straubmeier; D. A. Roberts; F. Yusef-Zadeh; J. H. Zhao; R. Rao

    2005-12-16

    We report new simultaneous near-infrared/sub-millimeter/X-ray observations of the SgrA* counterpart associated with the massive 3-4x10**6 solar mass black hole at the Galactic Center. The main aim is to investigate the physical processes responsible for the variable emission from SgrA*. The observations have been carried out using the NACO adaptive optics (AO) instrument at the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope and the ACIS-I instrument aboard the Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as the Submillimeter Array SMA on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and the Very Large Array in New Mexico. We detected one moderately bright flare event in the X-ray domain and 5 events at infrared wavelengths.

  11. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piper, Stephen C; Keeling, Ralph F

    2012-01-03

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  12. SECRETLY ECCENTRIC: THE GIANT PLANET AND ACTIVITY CYCLE OF GJ 328

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Paul; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; MacQueen, Phillip J.; Boss, Alan P.

    2013-09-10

    We announce the discovery of a {approx}2 Jupiter-mass planet in an eccentric 11 yr orbit around the K7/M0 dwarf GJ 328. Our result is based on 10 years of radial velocity (RV) data from the Hobby-Eberly and Harlan J. Smith telescopes at McDonald Observatory, and from the Keck Telescope at Mauna Kea. Our analysis of GJ 328's magnetic activity via the Na I D features reveals a long-period stellar activity cycle, which creates an additional signal in the star's RV curve with amplitude 6-10 m s{sup -1}. After correcting for this stellar RV contribution, we see that the orbit of the planet is more eccentric than suggested by the raw RV data. GJ 328b is currently the most massive, longest-period planet discovered around a low-mass dwarf.

  13. Education and public outreach of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, B.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael; Snow, G.

    2005-08-01

    The Auger collaboration's broad mission in education, outreach and public relations is coordinated in a separate task. Its goals are to encourage and support a wide range of outreach efforts that link schools and the public with the Auger scientists and the science of cosmic rays, particle physics, and associated technologies. This report focuses on recent activities and future initiatives.

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    TU VLA GB Library ER Library Library Downtown VIA Library R. Lacasse IR Library Library Mountain P to weather information, 16 bits of digital input and output were provided. In order to provide isolation Ch 7 64 Digital Output, 16 Bits DO Alarm, output a 1 to close a contact D1-D3 Spare output contact

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    DISTRIBUTION: GB CV TU VLA GB Library ER Library Library Downtown VLA Library R. Norrod IR Library Library by NRAO to convert the voltage produced by the continuum square law detector to a digital signal due to digitization allowed It will be assumed that the counter is enabled and disabled by pulse edges

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    condition. Metering of the individual batteries with an expanded scale meter allows the user to estimate No. 109 BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD Michael Balister OCTOBER 1971 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD

  17. Extrasolar planet transit photometry at Wallace Astrophysical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Wen-fai

    2008-01-01

    Extrasolar planet transit photometry is a relatively new astronomical technique developed over the past decade. Transit photometry is the measurement of a star's brightness as an orbiting planet passes in front of the star ...

  18. Probing Dark Energy via Neutrino and Supernova Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Lawrence J.

    2008-01-01

    In the case of (UV) light measurements, the comoving rateFor instance the measurements of UV light are subject tomeasurements of light emitted from galaxies, mostly in the UV (

  19. Department of Astronomy Astronomy Observatory -14" Telescope Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    controller, go to the Objects menu. Select from the cataloged deep space objects (M for Messier, NGC), solar the camera, dew heaters and mount are bundled and were setup to stay out of the way. They have gotten loose

  20. The Magdalena Ridge Observatory interferometer: 2014 status update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Romero, V.; Payne, I.; Haniff, C. A.; Buscher, D. F.; Dahl, C.; Farris, A.; Fisher, M.; Jurgenson, C.; Klinglesmith, D.; McCracken, T.; Napolitano, M.; Olivares, A.; Riker, J.; Rochelle, S.; Salcido, C.; Santoro, F.; Schmidt, L.; Selina, R.; Seneta, E. B.; Shtromberg, A.; Sun, X.; Wilson, D. M. A.; Young, J. S.

    2014-07-24

    mode for the existing PICNIC detector which has a 500 Hz frame rate before including the fringe tracking algorithms. Custom periscope optics fabrications are delayed and will be built as funds become available. In the long-term, we intend to install... periscope optics and installing ICoNN in the inner BCA. • 2016: Receiving and installing telescope and enclosures 1 and 2 at MROI. Attaining first fringe measurements using two MROI telescopes. The business plan and operational model for the MROI...

  1. Mechanical Design of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, John

    and transporter, fast tip-tilt system, beam relay system, delay line system, beam compressor, automated alignment and testing inside the integration hall at Advanced Mechanical and Optical System (AMOS) test facility

  2. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Electronics Division Internal Report No. 62

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    the relay turns the noise tube off. #12;. Tests The prototype unit has been subjected to a test consisting reads 0-200 mA. The tube may be fired remotely by a 28 V relay so arranged so that energi- zing of the test. No tests have been made on the temperature performance. For good per- formance over a wide

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    tests made on the 750 Mc and the 1410 Mc systems which were installed on the 300-foot telescope transition, 7 1/2 feet of : RG--9 coaxial cable, and a RF Products 48 VDC coaxial relay), were installed LAC-3 mixer- preamplifier. Test results of the parametric amplifier are covered in Internal Report No

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK/ WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    -End Instrumentation Chassis .......... . 4 1. Constant Current Power Supplies for GaAs FET's 4 2. Solid State Relay · · · · ·· · .. ·· ···· ·· · 6 LAB TEST DATA Gain Measurements ........ . ...... -- ····· · ··· 4.· · .0 0... · 7 Noise Tem erature Measurements ..... Impedance Measurements TELESCOPE TEST DATA Gain Measurements Noise Tem erature

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    and tested in the lab. Measurements on Tunnel Diode Amplifier, Novrnt?,er_14, 1962 The noise temperature was also measured. A minimum occurred at 105 my (measured at the test point), the voltage recommended be disconnected at the relay chassis and a cable clamp mounted behind the chassis must be re- moved also) Switch

  6. New Approaches in Embedded Networked Sensing for Terrestrial Ecological Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    methods for measuring energy dynamics beneath vege- tation canopies using either measured or estimated solar and thermal

  7. The Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope, a Cultural Treasure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Ian S.

    1897. It features a hydraulically-operated rising floor. Many of the other buildings on the site have for numerically-controlled machining, vacuum coating, metrology, electroplating and other technical matters needed

  8. Development, Deployment, and Operation of Kilo Nalu Nearshore Cabled Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    includes a central distribution node at 12 m depth which controls DC power for up to four secondary nodes development, obtain long-term time-series observations for validation of ocean prediction models and to enable shore of the island of Oahu, supplies data and power connections to a suite of instruments over an array

  9. Partnerships Drive Informatics Solutions for Biological Imaging at Ocean Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    combined with new sensor technologies Unprecedented observing capabilities Unprecedented "big data resolution Metadata Web services Post- processing Accession New system components interoperate with existing links to images, metadata, raw data Updated in near- real time as new data is collected http

  10. New Approaches in Embedded Networked Sensing for Terrestrial Ecological Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    video camera sensor and location metadata, as well as anyfor metadata tags that are consistent with existing sensor

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    components Purchased components are those purchased from outside vendors already assembled, i. e. White or from previous purchase orders. #12;- 2 (2) Small previous purchase orders or from mail order catalogs-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 18. 52 (7) Power Supply - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 676,21 (8) Cabinet Assembly

  12. The Storminess Record from Armagh Observatory, N. Ireland 17962002. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the difficulties in asse bling such chronologies, even fro one site. The weather diary record from 1796

  13. Experiment Profile: COUPP NAME: Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fermilab Experiment E831

    with the way the universe evolved and its matter density. WHAT IS COUPP LOOKING FOR? A nuclear recoil from a high-pitched "plink", like a submarine's sonar. WHAT EXPERIMENTS DOES IT BUILD ON? SIMPLE and PICASSO

  14. Gemini Observatory's Facility Instrument Program Gemini Preprint #90

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PI observing program input through our Observing Tool, the use of pipeline processing for data, cost, schedule, and risk are tracked regularly, initial budgets are more realistically defined based

  15. Neutral Current Detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    at WIPP and LANL in building the many detectors and other apparatus which were used as part of this thesis

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    : August 1967 DISTRIBUTION: GB CV TU VLA GB Library ER Library Library-Downtown AOC Library G. Anderson IR Library Library-Mountain D. Bagri E. Childers R. Bradley G. Behrens L. Ben°_ R. Fisher C. Burgess M and a photograph is shown in Figure 2. The receiver can accept input signals of 3 types: 1) A detected signal of 1

  17. Meteorological Data recorded at Armagh Observatory: Vol 3 Metadata,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    13 Reports on station 33 Stationery 14 Instrument list 34 List of inspectors reports 15 Plans been scanned electronically and the images made available to the general public via the World­Wide Web and receipts, details of procedures, inspection reports, maps, drawings and photographs. Some

  18. Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Krizmanic; Gerry Skinner; Neil Gehrels

    2006-01-03

    The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

  19. The ASTRO-H X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kelley, Richard; Aharonian, Henri AartsFelix; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Akimoto, Fumie; Allen, Steve; Anabuki, Naohisa; Angelini, Lorella; Arnaud, Keith; Asai, Makoto; Audard, Marc; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Azzarello, Philipp; Baluta, Chris; Bamba, Aya; Bando, Nobutaka; Bautz, Mark; Blandford, Roger; Boyce, Kevin; Brown, Greg; Cackett, Ed; Chernyakova, Maria; Coppi, Paolo; Costantini, Elisa; de Plaa, Jelle; Herder, Jan-Willem den; DiPirro, Michael; Done, Chris; Dotani, Tadayasu; Doty, John; Ebisawa, Ken; Eckart, Megan; Enoto, Teruaki; Ezoe, Yuichiro; Fabian, Andrew; Ferrigno, Carlo; Foster, Adam; Fujimoto, Ryuichi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Funk, Stefan; Furuzawa, Akihiro; Galeazzi, Massimiliano; Gallo, Luigi; Gandhi, Poshak; Gendreau, Keith; Gilmore, Kirk; Haas, Daniel; Haba, Yoshito; Hamaguchi, Kenji; Hatsukade, Isamu; Hayashi, Takayuki; Hayashida, Kiyoshi; Hiraga, Junko; Hirose, Kazuyuki; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hoshino, Akio; Hughes, John; Hwang, Una; Iizuka, Ryo; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ishibashi, Kazunori; Ishida, Manabu; Ishimura, Kosei; Ishisaki, Yoshitaka; Ito, Masayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Iyomoto, Naoko; Kaastra, Jelle; Kallman, Timothy; Kamae, Tuneyoshi; Kataoka, Jun; Katsuda, Satoru; Kawahara, Hajime; Kawaharada, Madoka; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kawasaki, Shigeo; Khangaluyan, Dmitry; Kilbourne, Caroline; Kimura, Masashi; Kinugasa, Kenzo; Kitamoto, Shunji; Kitayama, Tetsu; Kohmura, Takayoshi; Kokubun, Motohide; Kosaka, Tatsuro; Koujelev, Alex; Koyama, Katsuji; Krimm, Hans; Kubota, Aya; Kunieda, Hideyo; LaMassa, Stephanie; Laurent, Philippe; Lebrun, Francois; Leutenegger, Maurice; Limousin, Olivier; Loewenstein, Michael; Long, Knox; Lumb, David; Madejski, Grzegorz; Maeda, Yoshitomo; Makishima, Kazuo; Marchand, Genevieve; Markevitch, Maxim; Matsumoto, Hironori; Matsushita, Kyoko; McCammon, Dan; McNamara, Brian; Miller, Jon; Miller, Eric; Mineshige, Shin; Minesugi, Kenji; Mitsuishi, Ikuyuki; Miyazawa, Takuya; Mizuno, Tsunefumi; Mori, Hideyuki; Mori, Koji; Mukai, Koji; Murakami, Toshio; Murakami, Hiroshi; Mushotzky, Richard; Nagano, Housei; Nagino, Ryo; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakajima, Hiroshi; Nakamori, Takeshi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Namba, Yoshiharu; Natsukari, Chikara; Nishioka, Yusuke; Nobukawa, Masayoshi; Nomachi, Masaharu; Dell, Steve O'; Odaka, Hirokazu; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Mina; Ogi, Keiji; Ohashi, Takaya; Ohno, Masanori; Ohta, Masayuki; Okajima, Takashi; Okamoto, Atsushi; Okazaki, Tsuyoshi; Ota, Naomi; Ozaki, Masanobu; Paerels, Frits; Paltani, Stephane; Parmar, Arvind; Petre, Robert; Pohl, Martin; Porter, F Scott; Ramsey, Brian; Reis, Rubens; Reynolds, Christopher; Russell, Helen; Safi-Harb, Samar; Sakai, Shin-ichiro; Sameshima, Hiroaki; Sanders, Jeremy; Sato, Goro; Sato, Rie; Sato, Yoichi; Sato, Kosuke; Sawada, Makoto; Serlemitsos, Peter; Seta, Hiromi; Shibano, Yasuko; Shida, Maki; Shimada, Takanobu; Shinozaki, Keisuke; Shirron, Peter; Simionescu, Aurora; Simmons, Cynthia; Smith, Randall; Sneiderman, Gary; Soong, Yang; Stawarz, Lukasz; Sugawara, Yasuharu; Sugita, Hiroyuki; Sugita, Satoshi; Szymkowiak, Andrew; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Takeda, Shin-ichiro; Takei, Yoh; Tamagawa, Toru; Tamura, Takayuki; Tamura, Keisuke; Tanaka, Takaaki; Tanaka, Yasuo; Tashiro, Makoto; Tawara, Yuzuru; Terada, Yukikatsu; Terashima, Yuichi; Tombesi, Francesco; Tomida, Hiroshi; Tsuboi, Yoko; Tsujimoto, Masahiro; Tsunemi, Hiroshi; Tsuru, Takeshi; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Uchiyama, Yasunobu; Uchiyama, Hideki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Ueno, Shiro; Uno, Shinichiro; Urry, Meg; Ursino, Eugenio; de Vries, Cor; Wada, Atsushi; Watanabe, Shin; Werner, Norbert; White, Nicholas; Yamada, Takahiro; Yamada, Shinya; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Yamasaki, Noriko; Yamauchi, Shigeo; Yamauchi, Makoto; Yatsu, Yoichi; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Yoshida, Atsumasa; Yuasa, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    The joint JAXA/NASA ASTRO-H mission is the sixth in a series of highly successful X-ray missions initiated by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS). ASTRO-H will investigate the physics of the high-energy universe via a suite of four instruments, covering a very wide energy range, from 0.3 keV to 600 keV. These instruments include a high-resolution, high-throughput spectrometer sensitive over 0.3-2 keV with high spectral resolution of Delta E < 7 eV, enabled by a micro-calorimeter array located in the focal plane of thin-foil X-ray optics; hard X-ray imaging spectrometers covering 5-80 keV, located in the focal plane of multilayer-coated, focusing hard X-ray mirrors; a wide-field imaging spectrometer sensitive over 0.4-12 keV, with an X-ray CCD camera in the focal plane of a soft X-ray telescope; and a non-focusing Compton-camera type soft gamma-ray detector, sensitive in the 40-600 keV band. The simultaneous broad bandpass, coupled with high spectral resolution, will enable the pursuit o...

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    volts. Total power outputs from any channel can be displayed on the front panel meter by switching by a front panel switch. Total power output of any channel, selected by a switch, is also available utilizes the general design principle of using several filters with different center frequencies

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    scans spaced 5' apart (one-half of a half-power beamwidth) in two days' observing. Alternatively, a 5 are adequate to reach the confusion limit during drift scans. Either beam switching or load switching may to the square of the beam offset. The present design is limited to four closely-spaced feeds for this reason

  2. The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe,...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    opportunities available for additional collaborations. Next Steps * A vacuum pump and vessel are now in place. * A set of tracks for the vacuum vessel have been installed. * The...

  3. Sandia Energy - Sandia's Frontier Observatory for Research In...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    well as to allow scientists to identify a replicable, commercial pathway to enhanced geothermal systems (EGSs)." In addition to the site itself, the FORGE effort will include a...

  4. Cosmological Questions for the European Southern Observatory Very Large Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Tytler

    1996-08-12

    The next decade promises an observational revolution which will change cosmology forever. The precise measurement of the angular anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background should specify to a few percent all of the parameters of the cosmological model which effect astrophysics. The growth of structure will then be determined (but not yet observed) until gravitational collapse becomes highly non-linear and stars, galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN) form. These processes are hard to model with basic physics because they are complex and allow a rich variety of expression. Instead observations will determine when the first stars and quasars formed, and how and when galaxies assembled. If we can reconcile the numerous contradictions which characterize the subject today, cosmology will become a mature subject, founded on the agreement between detailed, inclusive and realistic models, which make precise predictions, and the wealth of new data which will come from a wide variety of observations, at all wavelengths. This is an ambitious schedule, but nothing less is worthy of the outstanding capabilities of the 8 -- 10 m telescopes, the next generation space telescope, the opportunities at millimeterto sub-millimeter wavelengths and advanced computer modeling. The ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT) should play a major role in this revolution.

  5. Scottish Observatory for Work and Health University of Glasgow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    .3% in 2008. (On flow rates are expressed as percent of the WAP not on IB). 5. The off flow rates are more

  6. New Accessibility Observatory to provide annual rankings for cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    DIES Accelerating the pace of transportation innovation NOvember 2013 Catalystcts.umn.edu Major American cities get--in specific locations and compare that with the cost of managing blowing and drifting snow on the roadway safety, improved visibility, fewer snow plow trips, lower salt usage, and fewer traffic slowdowns

  7. Wales Observatory on Human Rights of Children and Young People

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    for Communities & Tackling Poverty, Jeff Cuthbert AM Anita Tiesen, UNICEF UK Professor Barbara Bennett Woodhouse Reid, Children are Unbeatable Disability ­ Children's Commissioner Children and Poverty ­ Pat Dunmore

  8. The Digital Sky Project: Prototyping Virtual Observatory Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J Brunner; T. Prince; J. Good; T. Handley; C. Lonsdale; S. G. Djorgovski

    2000-11-10

    Astronomy is entering a new era as multiple, large area, digital sky surveys are in production. The resulting datasets are truly remarkable in their own right; however, a revolutionary step arises in the aggregation of complimentary multi-wavelength surveys (i.e., the cross-identification of a billion sources). The federation of these large datasets is already underway, and is producing a major paradigm shift as Astronomy has suddenly become an immensely data-rich field. This new paradigm will enable quantitatively and qualitatively new science, from statistical studies of our Galaxy and the large-scale structure in the universe, to discoveries of rare, unusual, or even completely new types of astronomical objects and phenomena. Federating and then exploring these large datasets, however, is an extremely challenging task. The Digital Sky project was initiated with this task in mind and is working to develop the techniques and technologies necessary to solve the problems inherent in federating these large databases, as well as the mining of the resultant aggregate data.

  9. HAWC Observatory to study universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    large distances-making it possible to see objects and events far outside our own galaxy. Construction is now complete on the newest tool available to study these explosive...

  10. Sandia Energy - Sandia's Frontier Observatory for Research In

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput AnalysisSinkhole OfficialsWork on CriegeeEuropeanGeothermal Energy

  11. The Enriched Xenon Observatory (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference)FeedbackProperties of Graphene (Journal Article) |Article)theA

  12. HAWC Observatory to study universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29 1.921 1.892 1.887 HHAWCHAWC

  13. James Cronin, CP Violation, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenryInhibitingInteractivePGASelectronJames Craw James Craw

  14. Los Alamos observatory fingers cosmic ray 'hot spots'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to local Unitedto STEMLANLTeamLos Alamos

  15. A New Mel;hod of' N-gram S(;al:istics for Lmge Nulril.)er of' n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,(:ters. From this exl)eriment it 1)ecame (:loa,r t]l&t the au- tomatic extraction or detern,i,tation of words

  16. Causes and Implications of Persistent Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Biases in Earth System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL] [ORNL; Randerson, James T. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Arora, Vivek K. [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada] [Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Meteorological Service of Canada; Bao, Qing [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics] [State Key Laboratory of Numerical Modeling for Atmospheric Sciences and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics; Cadule, Patricia [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment] [Institut Pierre Simon Laplace, Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environment; Ji, Duoying [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing] [State Key Laboratory of Earth Surface Processes and Resource Ecology, Beijing; Jones, Chris D. [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office] [Hadley Centre, U.K. Met Office; Kawamiya, Michio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)] [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC); Khatiwala, Samar [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY] [Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University, Palisades, NY; Lindsay, Keith [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)] [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Obata, Atsushi [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan] [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan; Shevliakova, Elena [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Six, Katharina D. [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany] [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg, Germany; Tjiputra, Jerry F. [Uni Climate, Uni Research] [Uni Climate, Uni Research; Volodin, Evgeny M. [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow] [Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Science, Moscow; Wu, Tongwen [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing] [China Meteorological Administration (CMA), Beijing

    2014-01-01

    The strength of feedbacks between a changing climate and future CO2 concentrations are uncertain and difficult to predict using Earth System Models (ESMs). We analyzed emission-driven simulations--in which atmospheric CO2 levels were computed prognostically--for historical (1850-2005) and future periods (RCP 8.5 for 2006-2100) produced by 15 ESMs for the Fifth Phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). Comparison of ESM prognostic atmospheric CO2 over the historical period with observations indicated that ESMs, on average, had a small positive bias in predictions of contemporary atmospheric CO2. Weak ocean carbon uptake in many ESMs contributed to this bias, based on comparisons with observations of ocean and atmospheric anthropogenic carbon inventories. We found a significant linear relationship between contemporary atmospheric CO2 biases and future CO2 levels for the multi-model ensemble. We used this relationship to create a contemporary CO2 tuned model (CCTM) estimate of the atmospheric CO2 trajectory for the 21st century. The CCTM yielded CO2 estimates of 600 {plus minus} 14 ppm at 2060 and 947 {plus minus} 35 ppm at 2100, which were 21 ppm and 32 ppm below the multi-model mean during these two time periods. Using this emergent constraint approach, the likely ranges of future atmospheric CO2, CO2-induced radiative forcing, and CO2-induced temperature increases for the RCP 8.5 scenario were considerably narrowed compared to estimates from the full ESM ensemble. Our analysis provided evidence that much of the model-to-model variation in projected CO2 during the 21st century was tied to biases that existed during the observational era, and that model differences in the representation of concentration-carbon feedbacks and other slowly changing carbon cycle processes appear to be the primary driver of this variability. By improving models to more closely match the long-term time series of CO2 from Mauna Loa, our analysis suggests uncertainties in future climate projections can be reduced.

  17. The effects of level of automation and adaptive automation on human performance, situation awareness and workload in a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    The effects of level of automation and adaptive automation on human performance, situation., 4731 East Forest Peak, Marietta, GA 30066, USA Keywords: Level of automation (LOA); adaptive automation of automation (LOAs) for maintaining operator involvement in complex systems control and facilitating situation

  18. Level of automation eOEects on performance, situation awareness and workload in a dynamic control task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    Level of automation eOEects on performance, situation awareness and workload in a dynamic control, Mississippi State, Mississippi 39762-9542, USA Keywords: Level of automation (LOA); Human-centred automation; Situation awareness (SA); Workload; Out-of-the-loop performance Various levels of automation (LOA

  19. ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT: SECTION 7 CONSULTATION BIOLOGICAL OPINION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from the following information sources: · Request by BP Exploration (Alaska), Inc. (BPXA) for a LOA (USFWS), depending upon the protected species that may be affected. Formal consultations on most listed Division (NMFS PRl) requested formal consultation on regulations and subsequent Letter ofAuthorization (LOA

  20. Fast reactor safety program. Progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The goal of the DOE LMFBR Safety Program is to provide a technology base fully responsive to safety considerations in the design, evaluation, licensing, and economic optimization of LMFBRs for electrical power generation. A strategy is presented that divides safety technology development into seven program elements, which have been used as the basis for the Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) for the Program. These elements include four lines of assurance (LOAs) involving core-related safety considerations, an element supporting non-core-related plant safety considerations, a safety R and D integration element, and an element for the development of test facilities and equipment to be used in Program experiments: LOA-1 (prevent accidents); LOA-2 (limit core damage); LOA-3 (maintain containment integrity); LOA-4 (attenuate radiological consequences); plant considerations; R and D integration; and facility development.

  1. New Hubble Space Telescope Observations of Heavy Elements in Four Metal-Poor Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roederer, Ian U; Sobeck, Jennifer S; Beers, Timothy C; Cowan, John J; Frebel, Anna; Ivans, Inese I; Schatz, Hendrik; Sneden, Christopher; Thompson, Ian B

    2012-01-01

    Elements heavier than the iron group are found in nearly all halo stars. A substantial number of these elements, key to understanding neutron-capture nucleosynthesis mechanisms, can only be detected in the near-ultraviolet. We report the results of an observing campaign using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope to study the detailed heavy element abundance patterns in four metal-poor stars. We derive abundances or upper limits from 27 absorption lines of 15 elements produced by neutron-capture reactions, including seven elements (germanium, cadmium, tellurium, lutetium, osmium, platinum, and gold) that can only be detected in the near-ultraviolet. We also examine 202 heavy element absorption lines in ground-based optical spectra obtained with the Magellan Inamori Kyocera Echelle Spectrograph on the Magellan-Clay Telescope at Las Campanas Observatory and the High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer on the Keck I Telescope on Mauna Kea. We have detected up to 34 elements hea...

  2. The Sierra Nevada-San Joaquin Hydrologic Observatory (SNSJHO): a WATERS network test bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Jason; Meng, Xiande; Rice, Robert; Butler, Chris; Harmon, T C; Bales, Roger

    2007-01-01

    quality, irrigation demand and hydropower operations have a very strong interest in influencing mountain watershed management. •

  3. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brueckner; K. Buckland; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. D. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglià; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; T. Denker; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Díaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; S. Drasco; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endröczi; R. Engel; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gáspár; N. Gehrels; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. Á. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. González; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goßler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; K. Haris; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov

    2013-04-02

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and can be as large as thousands of square degrees with only 2 sensitive detectors operating. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 sq deg to 20 sq deg will require at least 3 detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ~2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should one of the LIGO detectors be relocated in India as expected, many gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  4. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aasi, J; Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Austin, L; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Bao, Y; Barayoga, J C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bhadbade, T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Bowers, J; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brueckner, F; Buckland, K; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castiglia, A D; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dahl, K; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Del Pozzo, W; Deleeuw, E; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Drago, M; Drasco, S; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Eikenberry, S S; Endröczi, G; Engel, R; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fang, Q; Farr, B F; Farr, W; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Ferrante, I; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M A; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gáspár, M E; Gehrels, N; Gelencser, G; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L Á; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil-Casanova, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Griffo, C; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Haris, K; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Huang, V; Huerta, E A; Hughey, B; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, H; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasprzack, M; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B K; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kozameh, C; Kremin, A

    2013-01-01

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals...

  5. SEARCHING FOR A STOCHASTIC BACKGROUND OF GRAVITATIONAL WAVES WITH THE LASER INTERFEROMETER GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Nelson

    . Bayer,8 K. Belczynski,12 J. Betzwieser,8 P. Beyersdorf,13 B. Bhawal,1 I. A. Bilenko,14 G. Billingsley,1. Kozak,1 B. Krishnan,7 P. Kwee,27 P. K. Lam,5 M. Landry,9 B. Lantz,13 A. Lazzarini,1 B. Lee,11 M. Lei,1 V

  6. Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) The SMT is the most accurate submillimeter astronomical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    Spaceframe support: Carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) Tubes with invar steel joints (3040 kg weight

  7. Measurement of the Muon content of Extensive Air Showers with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Espadanal; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2015-05-20

    Several methods developed within the Pierre Auger Collaboration for the estimation of the muonic component of the Extensive Air Showers observed in the surface Cherenkov detectors are described. The results derived from the data show a deficit of muons predicted by the current hadronic interactions models at ultra-high energies.

  8. Clouds at Arctic Atmospheric Observatories. Part I: Occurrence and Macrophysical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    distributions, temperature, mi- crophysical properties, thickness, and phase composition. Arctic cloud to derive estimates of cloud occurrence fraction, vertical distribution, persistence in time, diurnal cycle seasons for which the sun is above the horizon for at least part of the day. 1. Introduction Clouds play

  9. Development of Regional Coastal Ocean Observatories and the Potential Benefits to Marine Sanctuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    impacted on global and mesoscale processes in marine ecosystems through fishing, eutrophication, commercial marine sanctuaries, we must elucidate the synergistic interactions between global, mesoscale, and local

  10. NSF funded Critical Zone Observatories (CZOs) are a network of 10 environmental laboratories to study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (California) Boulder Creek CZO (Colorado) Susquehanna-Shale Hills CZO (Pennsylvania) Christina River Basin CZO (Pennsylvania/Delaware) Jemez River Basin ­ Sta. Catalina CZO (New Mexico/Arizona) Luquillo CZO (Puerto Rico

  11. Grid-Based Galaxy Morphology Analysis for the National Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deelman, Ewa

    Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA 90202 (ISI), deelman@isi.edu Raymond Plante National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Champaign, IL 61820 rplante California, Marina Del Rey, CA 90292 (ISI), {carl, gurmeet, mei}@isi.edu Gretchen Greene, Robert Hanisch

  12. MOON (Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) for double beta decay M. Nomachia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    experiments. The neutrino mass matrix is severely constrained by experiment [1]. Limits on neutrinoless double beta decay require the ee element to be less than about 10 eV, and there must be an eigenstate, pre

  13. Robust Signal Extraction Methods and Monte Carlo Sensitivity Studies for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    +. An important part of the SNO+ physics program will be a search for neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out a reasonable choice for the 150 Nd neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, these half lives correspond are competitive with those expected from all other near-term neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. ii #12

  14. Dark Matter Annihilation and Decay Searches with the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harding, J Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In order to observe annihilation and decay of dark matter, several types of potential sources should be considered. Some sources, such as dwarf galaxies, are expected to have very low astrophysical backgrounds but fairly small dark matter densities. Other sources, like the Galactic center, are expected to have larger densities of dark matter but also have more complicated backgrounds from other astrophysical sources. To search for signatures of dark matter, the large field-of-view of the HAWC detector, covering 2 sr at a time, especially enables searches from sources of dark matter annihilation and decay, which are extended over several degrees on the sky. With a sensitivity over 2/3 of the sky, HAWC has the ability to probe a large fraction of the sky for the signals of TeV-mass dark matter. In particular, HAWC should be the most sensitive experiment to signals coming from dark matter with masses greater than 10-100 TeV. We present the HAWC sensitivity to annihilating and decaying dark matter signals for sev...

  15. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    . In many cases, Chinese aggregate imports actually rise in response to a RMB depreciation and decline when we allow for different import intensities for different components of aggregate demand elasticity is sensitive to the treatment of time trends. Estimates of aggregate imports are more problematic

  16. Virtual Observatories of the Future ASP Conference Series, Vol. 3 108

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Roy

    and 2 are footnotes, and at the bottom of the table is an explanation that they are different equinoxes

  17. Digital Elevation Model, 0.25 m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cathy Wilson; Garrett Altmann

    2015-11-20

    This 0.25m horizontal resolution digital elevation model, DEM, was developed from Airborne Laser Altimetry flown by Aerometric Inc, now known as Quantum Spatial, Inc. on 12 July, 2013. One Mission was flown and the data jointly processed with LANL personnel to produce a 0.25m DEM covering a region approximately 2.8km wide and 12.4km long extending from the coast above North Salt Lagoon to south of Gas Well Road. This DEM encompasses a diverse range of hydrologic, geomorphic, geophysical and biological features typical of the Barrow Peninsula. Vertical accuracy at the 95% confidence interval was computed as 0.143m. The coordinate system, datum, and geoid for this DEM are UTM Zone 4N, NAD83 (2011), NAVD88 (GEOID09).

  18. On the Effect of the Interplanetary Medium on Nanodust Observations by the Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chat, G Le; Zaslavsky, A; Pantellini, F; Meyer-Vernet, N; Belheouane, S; Maksimovic, M

    2015-01-01

    New measurements using radio and plasma-wave instruments in interplanetary space have shown that nanometer-scale dust, or nanodust, is a significant contributor to the total mass in interplanetary space. Better measurements of nanodust will allow us to determine where it comes from and the extent to which it interacts with the solar wind. When one of these nanodust grains impacts a spacecraft, it creates an expanding plasma cloud, which perturbs the photoelectron currents. This leads to a voltage pulse between the spacecraft body and the antenna. Nanodust has a high charge/mass ratio, and therefore can be accelerated by the interplanetary magnetic field to speeds up to the speed of the solar wind: significantly faster than the Keplerian orbital speeds of heavier dust. The amplitude of the signal induced by a dust grain grows much more strongly with speed than with mass of the dust particle. As a result, nanodust can produce a strong signal, despite their low mass. The WAVES instruments on the twin Solar TErre...

  19. A Long Relative Humidity Series for Armagh Observatory Its relevance to the occurrence of 19th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the radiative balance of the atmosphere, dwarfing the contributions of other greenhouse gases including carbon dioxide. It is surprising, therefore, how few studies of the long-term variability of atmospheric water Atlantic (N. Atlantic Oscillation) and a more remote and less periodic Arctic Oscillation. A number

  20. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory # C.J. Virtue (for the SNO Collaboration + ) a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as a Class 2500 cleanroom. Two prin­ ciple structures comprise the detector as shown in #12; Figure 1

  1. An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    im- mediately into the cleanroom, placed into a vacuumthe University of Washing- ton cleanroom where the detectorand endcaps in nylon cleanroom bags, minimizing exposure to

  2. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    of capital moving in search of the highest return (and in this example, there is no risk in nominal terms to enter into an agreement this period to exchange currencies k periods hence at a forward rate F known) is termed "uncovered interest rate parity". This expression holds when investors do not require compensation

  3. AMIsurvey, chimenea and other tools: Automated imaging for transient surveys with existing radio-observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staley, Tim D

    2015-01-01

    In preparing the way for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders, there is a pressing need to begin probing the transient sky in a fully robotic fashion using the current generation of radio telescopes. Effective exploitation of such surveys requires a largely automated data-reduction process. This paper introduces an end-to-end automated reduction pipeline, AMIsurvey, used for calibrating and imaging data from the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager Large Array. AMIsurvey makes use of several component libraries which have been packaged separately for open-source release. The most scientifically significant of these is chimenea, which implements a telescope agnostic algorithm for automated imaging of pre-calibrated multi-epoch radio-synthesis data, making use of CASA subroutines for the underlying image-synthesis operations. At a lower level, AMIsurvey relies upon two libraries, drive-ami and drive-casa, built to allow use of mature radio-astronomy software packages from within Python scripts. These packages...

  4. The Cosmic Web Imager : An integral field spectrograph for the Hale Telescope at Palomar Observatory. Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Chris

    The Cosmic Web Imager : An integral field spectrograph for the Hale Telescope at Palomar ABSTRACT We describe the Cosmic Web Imager (CWI), a UV-VIS integral field spectrograph designed Spectroscopy, VPH Gratings, Cosmic Web Imager 1. THE COSMIC WEB IMAGER INSTRUMENT 1.1. CWI Mission The Cosmic

  5. MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Alamos National Laboratory University of Maryland, University of California Santa Cruz, University acceleration and the gamma- #12;ray production. VHE measurements may be critical to the understanding of gamma cascades made by photo-pion production or possibly through synchrotron emission of protons [11]. VHE

  6. Testing the Extensional Detachment Paradigm: A Borehole Observatory in the Sevier Desert Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christie-Blick, Nicholas

    Scientific Drilling, No. 8, September 2009 57 doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.8.09.2009 Low-angle normal faults of forty-seven scientists and drilling experts from five countries met for four days on 15­18 July 2008 was held at two venues in Utah (the Utah Department of Natural Resources in Salt Lake City, and Solitude

  7. Effort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories Research Assitant, Institute of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ocean

  8. Arecibo Observatory Technical Memo AOTM 200001 THE LBW FEED: THE MUELLER MATRIX IN 1999 AND 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of MA+F ; there are only six independent elements. We present five below; the sixth element m QUANTITIES: TWO YEARS, TWO FREQUENCIES Quantity Mar99, 1420.4 Mar00, 1420.4 Mar00, 1665.3 mQI 0 \\Sigma 0:0004 0 \\Sigma 0:0007 0 \\Sigma 0:0005 mUI 0:0112 \\Sigma 0:0002 0:0065 \\Sigma 0:0007 0:0044 \\Sigma 0:0006 m

  9. Benchmarking the power of amateur observatories for the TTV exoplanets detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baluev, Roman V; Shaidulin, Vakhit Sh; Sokova, Iraida A; Jones, Hugh R A; Tuomi, Mikko; Anglada-Escudé, Guillem; Benni, Paul; Colazo, Carlos A; Schneiter, Matias E; D'Angelo, Carolina S Villarreal; Burdanov, Artem Yu; Fernández-Lajús, Eduardo; Ba?türk, Özgür; Hentunen, Veli-Pekka; Shadick, Stan

    2015-01-01

    We perform an analysis of ~80000 photometric measurements for the following 10 stars hosting transiting planets: WASP-2, -4, -5, -52, Kelt-1, CoRoT-2, XO-2, TrES-1, HD 189733, GJ 436. Our analysis includes mainly transit lightcurves from the Exoplanet Transit Database, public photometry from the literature, and some proprietary photometry privately supplied by other authors. Half of these lightcurves were obtained by amateurs. From this photometry we derive 306 transit timing measurements, as well as improved planetary transit parameters. Additionally, for 5 of these 10 stars we present a set of radial velocity measurements obtained from the spectra stored in the HARPS and HARPS-N archives using the HARPS-TERRA pipeline. Our analysis of these TTV and RV data did not reveal significant hints of additional orbiting bodies in almost all of the cases. In the WASP-4 case, we found hints of marginally significant TTV signals having amplitude 10-20 sec, although their parameters are model-dependent and uncertain, wh...

  10. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Milagro Collaboration; R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; J. Bussons; D. G. Coyne; T. DeYoung; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; L. A. Kelley; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; D. A. Williams; S. Westerhoff; M. E. Wilson; X. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2004-02-06

    The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV to 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and ~100 GeV energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments and a fluence sensitivity at VHE energies comparable to that of dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE observations can place important constraints on gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor and emission models. We present limits on the VHE flux of 40 s -- 3 h duration transients nearby to earth, as well as sensitivity distributions which have been corrected for gamma-ray absorption by extragalactic background light and cosmological effects. The sensitivity distributions suggest that the typical intrinsic VHE fluence of GRBs is similar or weaker than the keV -- MeV emission, and we demonstrate how these sensitivity distributions may be used to place observational constraints on the absolute VHE luminosity of gamma-ray bursts for any GRB emission and progenitor model.

  11. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Bussons, J; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Westerhoff, S; Wilson, M E; Xu, X; Yodh, G B

    2004-01-01

    The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV to 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and ~100 GeV energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments and a fluence sensitivity at VHE energies comparable to that of dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE observations can place important constraints on gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor and emission models. We present limits on the VHE flux of 40 s -- 3 h duration transients nearby to earth, as well as sensitivity distributions which have been corrected for gamma-ray absorption by extragalactic background light and cosmological effects. The sensitivity distributions suggest that the typical intrinsic VHE fluence of GRBs is similar or weaker than the keV -- MeV emission, and we demonstrate how these sensitivit...

  12. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Briggs; D. L. Band; R. M. Kippen; R. D. Preece; C. Kouveliotou; J. van Paradijs; G. H. Share; R. J. Murphy; S. M. Matz; A. Connors; C. Winkler; M. L. McConnell; J. M. Ryan; O. R. Williams; C. A. Young; B. Dingus; J. R. Catelli; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    1999-03-16

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the CGRO detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations, and the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fit by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared to this function is observed below ~15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the nu f_nu spectrum, E_p, reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 +/- 110 keV, and then falls to \\~300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above ~MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE, clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power-law. Using the redshift value of >= 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray fluence exceeds 10E54 ergs.

  13. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton $\\gamma$-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Preece, R D; Kouveliotou, C; Van Paradijs, J; Share, G H; Murphy, R J; Matz, S M; Connors, A; Winkler, C; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Williams, O R; Young, C A; Dingus, B L; Catelli, J R; Wijers, R A M J

    1999-01-01

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the CGRO detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations, and the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fit by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared to this function is observed below ~15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the nu f_nu spectrum, E_p, reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 +/- 110 keV, and then falls to consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4...

  14. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-Redshift Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01

    photometry curve for type Ia supernovae and the redshift vsdistributions for observed supernovae. Figure 5 from Millermain efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley.

  15. The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey: The Multi-Telescope Robotic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Lehner; C. -Y. Wen; J. -H. Wang; S. L. Marshall; M. E. Schwamb; Z. -W. Zhang; F. B. Bianco; J. Giammarco; R. Porrata; C. Alcock; T. Axelrod; Y. -I. Byun; W. P. Chen; K. H. Cook; R. Dave; S. -K. King; T. Lee; H. -C. Lin; S. -Y. Wang

    2009-03-16

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) operates four fully automatic telescopes to search for occultations of stars by Kuiper Belt Objects. It is a versatile facility that is also useful for the study of initial optical GRB afterglows. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS multi-telescope system, control software, and high-speed imaging.

  16. The First U.S. Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope Catalog (URAT1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zacharias, Norbert; Subasavage, John; Bredthauer, Greg; Crockett, Chris; DiVittorio, Mike; Ferguson, Erik; Harris, Fred; Harris, Hugh; Henden, Arne; Kilian, Chris; Munn, Jeff; Rafferty, Ted; Rhodes, Al; Schultheiss, Mike; Tilleman, Trudy; Wieder, Gary

    2015-01-01

    URAT1 is an observational, astrometric catalog covering most of the Dec >= -15 deg area and a magnitude range of about R = 3 to 18.5. Accurate positions (typically 10 to 30 mas standard error) are given for over 228 million objects at a mean epoch around 2013.5. For the over 188 million objects matched with the 2MASS point source catalog proper motions (typically 5 to 7 mas/yr std. errors) are provided. These data are supplemented by 2MASS and APASS photometry. Observations, reductions and catalog construction are described together with results from external data verifications. The catalog data are served by CDS, Starsbourg (I/329). There is no DVD release.

  17. White Papers submitted in advance of Keck Observatory Strategic Planning meeting, Sept. 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Al

    into the giant planets of our solar system, Tom Stallard et al. (4) The Keck the simple observation that a nulling baseline across a Keck aperture, of order 7.5 m, would halve the length, and at very low cost. First, the use of the long L-band behind the Keck AO system means that the Strehl ratio

  18. Elena Podladchikova, David Berghmans, Frederic Clette SIDC-Royal Observatory of Belgium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikova, Elena

    Automatically detect from EUV solar image EIT wave and Dimmings for purposes of space weather forecasting WE S d) Final Dimming EIT Wave 7 April 1997, long duration event Dimming area increases next 5h like wave quantities will depend explicitly on: Distance from eruption center, i.e. length of r (defined

  19. Mees Observatory telescope and camera checklist Last revised 1 September 2011 DMW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamajek, Eric E.

    in control room. Computers, left to right on the console: the (downstairs) user interface computer (UIC), telescope control system (TCS). Further right, on the lab table, is the CCD camera's laptop computer. TCS the bottom stair. 2. Plug in computer console in the control room (Figure 1). Figure 1: computer console

  20. Searching for Very High Energy Emission from Pulsars Using the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Alvarez Ochoa; P. M. Saz Parkinson; A. Belfiore; A. Carramiñana; C. Rivière; E. Moreno Barbosa; for the HAWC collaboration

    2015-08-20

    There are currently over 160 known gamma-ray pulsars. While most of them are detected only from space, at least two are now seen also from the ground. MAGIC and VERITAS have measured the gamma ray pulsed emission of the Crab pulsar up to hundreds of GeV and more recently MAGIC has reported emission at $\\sim2$ TeV. Furthermore, in the Southern Hemisphere, H.E.S.S. has detected the Vela pulsar above 30 GeV. In addition, non-pulsed TeV emission coincident with pulsars has been detected by many groups, including the Milagro Collaboration. These GeV-TeV observations open the possibility of searching for very-high-energy (VHE, > 100GeV) pulsations from gamma-rays pulsars in the HAWC field of view.