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1

Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co Panasonic Ecology Systems formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Panasonic Ecology Systems (formerly Matsushita Ecology Systems Co) Place Kasugai, Aichi, Japan Zip 468-8522 Sector Solar, Wind energy Product Japanese manufacturer of energy efficient residential and commercial electronic goods such as air conditioners, fans, and 'hybrid tower' which uses wind and solar power as street lights. Coordinates 35.277859°, 137.011215° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.277859,"lon":137.011215,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Ecological Informatics Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) site in Petersham, Massachusetts, USA (Fig. 1). This system

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

3

Ecological Resources and Systems | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Resources and Systems Ecological Resources and Systems Argonne develops and applies innovative approaches and tools to integrate environmental compliance and environmental performance into an organization's structure in a cost-effective manner. Argonne knows that our world exists in a delicate balance with technology. Our research focuses on measuring advanced energy and technology's effects on the world's ecological systems, creating preventive strategies to protect the Earth from harm and inventing new ways to preserve green resources for all. Highlights Kayakers and boats traverse the branch of the Chicago River in the downtown area. Every river contains a population of microbes; scientists at Argonne are partnering with the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District to map how the River's inhabitants change over the months and years. Click to enlarge.

4

Matsushita's Virtual Kitchen  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Virtual Kitchen, a retail application set up in Japan to help people choose appliances and furnishings for the relatively small kitchen apartment ...

5

Ecological Resources and Systems [EVS Program Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and gas pipelines, and energy production systems (nuclear, fossil, geothermal, wind, solar, wave, tidal, and hydroelectric). Highlights thumbnail for program highlight Glen...

6

Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Spatial agent-based models for socio-ecological systems: Challenges and prospects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Departing from the comprehensive reviews carried out in the field, we identify the key challenges that agent-based methodology faces when modeling coupled socio-ecological systems. Focusing primarily on the papers presented in this thematic issue, we ... Keywords: Agent-based model, Human-environment system, Multi-agent system, Review, Socio-ecological system

Tatiana Filatova, Peter H. Verburg, Dawn Cassandra Parker, Carol Ann Stannard

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Using geographic information systems to support student learning through urban ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes our urban street tree curriculum project in which we engage students in an ecological and economic evaluation of trees in highly populated areas through the use of Geographic Information Systems and modeling technologies. In particular, ...

Mike Barnett; Meredith Houle

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Empirical characterisation of agent behaviours in socio-ecological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agent-based modelling has become an important tool to investigate socio-ecological processes. Its use is partially driven by increasing demand from decision makers to provide support for understanding the potential implications of decisions in complex ... Keywords: Agent-based modelling

Alex Smajgl; Daniel G. Brown; Diego Valbuena; Marco G. A. Huigen

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Berkeley Lab Earth Sciences Division - Departments - Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

departments > ecology departments > ecology Ecology Department Core Capabilities Advanced Technology Bioenergy Biofuels Human Health Soil Systems Water Resources People Facilities, Centers & Labs Publications Ecology Department Principal Investigators Gary Andersen Harry Beller Nicholas Bouskill Eoin Brodie Romy Chakraborty Eric Dubinsky Hoi-Ying Holman Christer Jansson Janet Jansson Nigel Quinn Tamas Torok Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Ecology Department Historical Background ecology comic In 1995 the Center for Environmental Biotechnology was set up as a multidivisonal center under the direction of Dr. Jennie Hunter-Cevera. In 1998, the Ecology Department was created within the Earth Sciences

11

High-performance computing tools for the integrated assessment and modelling of social-ecological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrated spatio-temporal assessment and modelling of complex social-ecological systems is required to address global environmental challenges. However, the computational demands of this modelling are unlikely to be met by traditional Geographic Information ... Keywords: AML, CPU, Cluster, Concurrency, Environmental, GIS, GPU, Global challenges, Graphics processing unit (GPU), Grid, HPC, Multi-core, NPV, Parallel programming

Brett A. Bryan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Developing an integrated ecological resource management and monitoring plan as part of an environmental management system  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in defining the appropriate content of an Environmental Management System (EMS) as specified by ISO 14001 prompted a study to determine how ecological concerns should be integrated into an EMS and subsequently implemented. This paper describes an approach for developing objectives, targets, and processes for ecological resource management at those Department of Energy (DOE) facilities where an ecological resource management approach that goes beyond simple regulatory compliance is warranted. A major goal of this approach is to position DOE facilities so that they can proactively address ecological concerns, rather than being forced to respond retroactively to damage claims, restoration requirements, and/or bad publicity. Although DOE is not requiring ISO 14001 implementation at its facilities, it is recommending ISO 14001 as a voluntary approach to encourage good environmental practices, such as pollution prevention and sustainable development, by adopting an integrated systems approach. The DOE position is that existing DOE orders and policy statements are consistent with, and have elements of, the ISO 14001 EMS approach.

Michael, D.; Hooten, M. [Neptune and Co., Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kelly, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Roy-Harrison, W. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system-concept development and evaluation program-microwave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is concerned with the potential health and ecological effects of the microwave beam from the microwave power transmission system (MPTS) of the satellite power system (SPS). The report is written in the form of a detailed critical review of selected scientific articles from the published literature on the biological effects of nonionizing electromagnetic radiation, followed by an assessment of the possible effects of the SPS, based on exposure values for the reference system (US DOE and NASA, 1978).

Not Available

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

White, G.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

A Framework to Structure Agent-Based Modeling Data for Social-Ecological Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methodological issues on agent-based models for analyticalof a household level agent-based model of landcover change.individual-based and agent-based models. Ecological Modeling

Altaweel, Mark R; Alessa, Lilian N.; Kliskey, Andrew; Bone, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Mediating dual ecologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we investigated systems for supporting remote collaboration using mobile robots as communication media. It is argued that the use of a remote-controlled robot as a device to support communication involves two distinct ecologies: an ecology ... Keywords: CSCW, collaborative physical task, human-robot interaction, remote instruction, robot-mediated communication

Hideaki Kuzuoka; Jun'ichi Kosaka; Keiichi Yamazaki; Yasuko Suga; Akiko Yamazaki; Paul Luff; Christian Heath

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Studies on bottomland hardwood forest restoration and teaching with geographic information systems (GIS) in ecology labs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of graduate students in the sciences preparing for careers in academia has long included elements to advance students as science researchers, but recent emphasis is being placed on developing students as instructors and education researchers as well. As such, objectives of this study included assessments of seedling responses to hydrology typical of floods in urban settings, the role of created microtopography in community development of a bottomland hardwood forest, and the influence of geographic information systems (GIS) on student motivation and conceptual knowledge. Substantial losses of bottomlands in Texas necessitate restoration to regain the ecosystem services that they provide. Restoration of proper hydrology is the most important aspect of wetland restoration, but this can prove difficult in urbanizing environments where hydrology has been irreversibly altered. Microtopography has been shown to be an important component of bottomland hardwood forests, and its restoration may aid in hydrologic restoration as gradients are created that support a diverse community. Tree seedlings were subjected to experimental flooding regimes typical of floodplain forests in rural and urban settings. Growth rates of seedlings varied over time and differed depending on species and treatment. Created microtopography resulted in a spatially heterogeneous system similar to that of natural bottomlands and strongly influenced hydrology, soil properties, survival of planted seedlings, and abundance and distribution of colonizing species. Proper bottomland restoration in urbanizing environments should include species selection based on current and potential future hydrologic conditions. In addition, restoring microtopography may improve survival of a variety of species introduced during restoration, as well as enhance colonization of a diverse plant community under changing hydrologic regimes. Trends indicated a slight improvement in attitude and performance for students that used GIS. More important, the authenticity of the experience appeared to affect student attitude. The effective use of GIS in teaching may be scale-dependent. Smallscale phenomena may be assessed as easily in a field exercise as with GIS. Using GIS to assess large-scale, complex patterns may have a substantial impact on student understanding. Further studies are needed to determine direct benefits of teaching with GIS in undergraduate ecology classrooms.

Simmons, Matthew Earl

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ecological and Economical efficient Heating and Cooling by innovative Gas Motor Heat Pump Systems and Solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

options ·Universal application as an Air-Air System (VRF), Air-Water System or combined as a Mixed System application options · Option 1: Air-Air System (VRF) #12;· Option 2: Air-Air System (HVAC System) Gas Heat

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19

Applications of exergy to enhance ecological and environmental understanding and stewardship  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods can be used which combine thermodynamics with environmental and ecological disciplines to understand ecological systems and environmental impact. Such assessments of ecological and environmental factors are better understood using the thermodynamic ... Keywords: ecology, efficiency, energy, environment, exergy, sustainability

Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ecological Engineering Undergraduate Advising Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biochemistry and engineering analysis and design, students in this program will receive training in biology with ecological, agricultural and natural resource systems management. Students receive training in engineering engineering design and analysis techniques to address a wide range of ecological, agricultural and natural

Tullos, Desiree

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Designing for ecology : the ecological park  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis aims to define a) what an ecological park is, and b) whether it is a new model in park design. Reference to the literature on landscape ecology is used to analyze the natural ecological merit of these parks, ...

Power, Andres M

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS--PART A: SYSTEMS AND HUMANS 1 Special Issue on Digital Ecologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the miracles that evolution has created trying to decipher its mysteries, we electrical and electronics, the electrical power grid) is leading to what are usually referred to as cyber­physical systems. As a cyber systems of systems weaved by the Internet together with social networks of prosumers (producers

Ulieru, Mihaela

23

Valuation of ecological resources  

SciTech Connect

Ecological resources are resources that have functional value to ecosystems. Frequently, these functions are overlooked in terms of the value they provide to humans. Environmental economics is in search of an appropriate analysis framework for such resources. In such a framework, it is essential to distinguish between two related subsets of information: (1) ecological processes that have intrinsic value to natural ecosystems; and (2) ecological functions that are values by humans. The present study addresses these concerns by identifying a habitat that is being displaced by development, and by measuring the human and ecological values associated with the ecological resources in that habitat. It is also essential to determine which functions are mutually exclusive and which are, in effect, complementary or products of joint production. The authors apply several resource valuation tools, including contingent valuation methodology (CVM), travel cost methodology (TCM), and hedonic damage-pricing (HDP). One way to derive upper-limit values for more difficult-to-value functions is through the use of human analogs, because human-engineered systems are relatively inefficient at supplying the desired services when compared with natural systems. Where data on the relative efficiencies of natural systems and human analogs exist, it is possible to adjust the costs of providing the human analog by the relative efficiency of the natural system to obtain a more realistic value of the function under consideration. The authors demonstrate this approach in an environmental economic case study of the environmental services rendered by shrub-steppe habitats of Benton County, Washington State.

Scott, M.J.; Bilyard, G.R.; Link, S.O.; Ricci, P.F.; Seely, H.E.; Ulibarri, C.A.; Westerdahl, H.E.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Lake Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lake Ecology Lake Ecology Name: Jody Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: We have a partically natural/ partially man-dug lake in our back yard. It is approximately 3 acres in size. The fish in this tiny like are plentiful and HUGE :) Bass up to 20" s (so far) and blue gill up to 10"s (so far). My question is this... we appear to have a heavy goose population and I was wondering if they are the cause of the green slimmy stuff that is all over the top of the water as well as the lighter green slime on the plants growing under the water? Are the fish being harmed by waste from the geese and if so, what can I put in the water to ensure their health? Additionally, I noticed hundreds of frogs during the mating period yet I've yet to see even one tad pole and I am at the lake atleast 5 out of the 7 days in a week. Is there a reason for this. The frogs are two toned.. light green with patches of darker shades of green on the head and body. I've never seen frogs like these before but then again, I've never lived in wet lands prior. The frogs are also very agressive... tend to attack fishing line and even leap up to 4' in the air to attack a fishing rod. Thank heavens they don't have teeth! . We do not keep the fish we catch, we always release.

25

Monitoring the Long-Term Performance of Engineered Containment Systems for Radioactive Waste: What can We Learn From Ecological Monitoring Approaches?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to technical and economic limitations, chemical and radioactive wastes will require isolation in engineered containment facilities at many sites including the former nuclear weapons facilities within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Also, while our experience with currently favored designs is only a few decades at best, the materials being isolated may require effective containment for hundreds to thousands of years. It is becoming clear that without monitoring of both the engineered barriers and the associated institutional controls and intervention, engineered containment systems will ultimately fail. Monitoring of engineered barriers is often limited to groundwater monitoring and physical inspections. The database managed by the DOE Office of Legacy Management provides information concerning barrier performance at uranium mill tailings sites over several years to decades. The current monitoring approach that focuses on groundwater, while necessary for regulatory compliance, does not provide an early warning. Rather, it provides detection of barrier failure as opposed to indications of barrier degradation. Identification and monitoring of precursors to failure are needed. Furthermore, existing monitoring strategies typically omit ecological monitoring. Additional understanding of the interaction between barrier degradation and ecological dynamics could provide a basis for monitoring and managing barriers as well. Monitoring the long-term performance of systems of interest is a challenge not only to the Department of Energy but to other institutions and federal agencies. National Environmental Research Parks (NERP), National Estuarine Research Reserves (NERR), and Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) areas operated by the US government agencies are designed with the specific goal of intensely monitoring and conducting research over long time scales and within diverse geographical settings. This presentation will address the importance of understanding ecological interactions as they are expressed over decades and centuries in respect to federal long-term monitoring programs, and to delineate how multifaceted sets of ecological data can be used to interpret the overall integrity of ecosystems. Furthermore, important components of these programs will be identified that may have merit in the design of long-term monitoring programs for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites. (authors)

Traynham, B. [Vanderbilt Univ., Research Assistant, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Clarke, J.H. [Vanderbilt Univ., Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Burger, J. [Rutgers Univ., Professor, Biology (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Temporal representation of ecological knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This MSc thesis proposes a temporal logic to represent knowledge about seasonal cycles in ecosystems. The logic is mainly based on what we call modular temporal classes, and a simple temporal logic interpreter system is also defined and implemented to reason with ecological sentences expressed in a temporal language we call NatureTime.

Edjard De Souza Mota

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Industrial ecology Prosperity Game{trademark}  

SciTech Connect

Industrial ecology (IE) is an emerging scientific field that views industrial activities and the environment as an interactive whole. The IE approach simultaneously optimizes activities with respect to cost, performance, and environmental impact. Industrial Ecology provides a dynamic systems-based framework that enables management of human activity on a sustainable basis by: minimizing energy and materials usage; insuring acceptable quality of life for people; minimizing the ecological impact of human activity to levels that natural systems can sustain; and maintaining the economic viability of systems for industry, trade and commerce. Industrial ecology applies systems science to industrial systems, defining the system boundary to incorporate the natural world. Its overall goal is to optimize industrial activities within the constraints imposed by ecological viability, globally and locally. In this context, Industrial systems applies not just to private sector manufacturing and services but also to government operations, including provision of infrastructure. Sandia conducted its seventeenth Prosperity Game{trademark} on May 23--25, 1997, at the Hyatt Dulles Hotel in Herndon, Virginia. The primary sponsors of the event were Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory, who were interested in using the format of a Prosperity Game to address some of the issues surrounding Industrial Ecology. Honorary game sponsors were: The National Science Foundation; the Committee on Environmental Improvement, American Chemical Society; the Industrial and Engineering Chemistry Division, American Chemical Society; the US EPA--The Smart Growth Network, Office of Policy Development; and the US DOE-Center of Excellence for Sustainable Development.

Beck, D.; Boyack, K.; Berman, M.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation Into Renewable Energy: The Solar Canopy Illumination System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Into Renewable Energy: The Solar Canopy Illumination System Samuel Davies, Patrick Duvall, Timothy Russell Investigation Into Renewable Energy: The Solar Canopy Illumination System Samuel Davies Patrick Duvall Timothy of a building's energy usage, the solar canopy system is ideal for facilities, such as the new student union

29

Strategic Alliances in the Japanese Economy: Types, Critiques, Embeddedness, and Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hitachi, Matsushita, and Toyota compared. Californiaventure and NUMMI, the GM-Toyota joint venture in Northerncommitment to learning from Toyota, much of Toyotas system

Lincoln, James R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Terrestrial Ecology | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecology BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Terrestrial...

31

Environmental assessment for the satellite power system concept development and evaluation program: nonmicrowave health and ecological effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Concept Development and Evaluation Program is being carried out for a proposed Satellite Power System (SPS). For purposes of this evaluation, a preliminary reference system has been developed. SPS, as described in the reference system, would collect solar energy on satellites in geosychronous orbit in space. The energy would be converted to microwaves and beamed to an earth-receiving antenna (rectenna). One task in the environmental part of the program is the assessment of the nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment. These effects would result from all phases of SPS development and operation. This report covers the current knowledge regarding these effects, and is based on the reference system. The assessment is summarized as to scope, methodology, impacts of terrestrial development, launch and recovery of spacecraft, space activities (including health effects of the space environment, ionizing radiation, electromagnetic exposure, spacecraft charging and environmental interactions, occupational hazards, etc.) and construction and operation of rectenna (ground receiving station).

White, M.R.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Codirectors of the Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSERVATION ECOLOGY Codirectors of the Program: Daniel Howard, Ph.D., department head, Biology of Science in Conservation Ecology MAJOR: Conservation Ecology MINOR: Conservation Ecology New Mexico State University offers a new interdisciplinary, undergraduate program in Conservation Ecology. The goal

Castillo, Steven P.

33

(International meetings on ecology)  

SciTech Connect

the travelers attended the Fifth International Congress of Ecology (INTECOL) in Yokohama, Japan, and two presented invited papers and chaired symposia. One traveler also attended the OJI International Seminar in Gifu, Japan and the Fukuoka Symposium on Theoretical Ecology in Fukuoka, Japan and presented invited papers. At these scientific gatherings, a large number of symposia and specific presentations were relevant to current research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), especially in the areas of landscape dynamics, plant physiology, and aquatic ecosystems.

DeAngelis, D.L.; Garten, C.T. Jr.; Turner, M.G.

1990-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

34

Mathematical Models in Landscape Ecology: Stability Analysis and Numerical Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper a review of some mathematical models for the ecological evaluation of environmental systems is considered. Moreover a new model, capable to furnish more detailed information at the level of landscape units, is proposed. Numerical ... Keywords: 34D05, 92F05, Landscape ecology, Mathematical models, Stability analysis

Federica Gobattoni; Giuliana Lauro; Roberto Monaco; Raffaele Pelorosso

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

An ecologically inspired simulation tool for managing digital ecosystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an ecologically inspired multi-agent based simulation tool for finding and analysing networks of collaborations in a digital ecosystem. Digital ecosystems are defined as open, self-organising environments inside which digital ... Keywords: collaboration, complex networks, digital ecosystems, ecology, multi-agent systems, mutualism

Miguel Lurgi

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Organizing Ecologies of Complex Innovation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For many sectors like health care, financial services, or renewable energy, new products and services are generated by an ecology of business firms, nonprofit foundations, public institutions, and other agents. Knowledge to innovate is dispersed across ... Keywords: complexity, ecologies, innovation

Deborah Dougherty; Danielle D. Dunne

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ecology 2006 20, 656661  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Society Blackwell Publishing Ltd Nuptial feeding is reflected in tissue nitrogen isotope ratios, §Stable Isotope Laboratory, Department of Biology, Boston University, 5 Cummington St, 02215 Boston, USA, and ¶Department of Geology and Mineralogy, University of Erlangen-Nürnberg, 91054 Erlangen, Germany Summary 1

Lehmann, Gerlind

38

The ecology of Malware  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fight against malicious software (or malware, which includes everything from worms to viruses to botnets) is often viewed as an "arms race." Conventional wisdom is that we must continually "raise the bar" for the malware creators. However, the multitude ... Keywords: botnets, malware analysis, malware ecology, viruses, worms

Jedidiah R. Crandall; Roya Ensafi; Stephanie Forrest; Joshua Ladau; Bilal Shebaro

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Ecological Research Division, Marine Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents program summaries of the various projects sponsored during 1979 by the Marine Research Program of the Ecological Research Division. Program areas include the effects of petroleum hydrocarbons on the marine environment; a study of the baseline ecology of a proposed OTEC site near Puerto Rico; the environmental impact of offshore geothermal energy development; the movement of radionuclides through the marine environment; the environmental aspects of power plant cooling systems; and studies of the physical and biological oceangraphy of the continental shelves bordering the United States.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of radioactive material control deficiencies occurring at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) in September 1999. During the underlying event, SREL investigators transported radioactive environmental samples from the Ukraine to SREL and University of Georgia facilities without appropriate labeling, monitoring, and controls. These deficiencies were identified in September 1999; however, they were not formally reported to DOE via the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) until March 14, 2000. The Office

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 Enforcement Letter, Savannah River Ecology Laboratory - June 7, 2000 June 7, 2000 Issued to Savannah River Ecology Laboratory related to Radioactive Material Control Deficiencies at the Savannah River Site This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of radioactive material control deficiencies occurring at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) in September 1999. During the underlying event, SREL investigators transported radioactive environmental samples from the Ukraine to SREL and University of Georgia facilities without appropriate labeling, monitoring, and controls. These deficiencies were identified in September 1999; however, they were not formally reported to DOE via the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) until March 14, 2000. The Office

42

Integrated Modeling of Microbial Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling of Microbial Ecology in Subsurface Environments Speaker: Dr. Krishna Mahadevan Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry University of Toronto Date:...

43

Science and technology for industrial ecology  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and technological communities have a significant role to play and responsibility for the evolution of global sustainability (continuously improving quality of life into the indefinite future). Sustainability is not possible without a substantially improved science and technology basis for industrial ecology. Society needs data and understanding of complex ecological issues to govern itself in a sustainable manner. We should: support and develop multi-disciplinary programs which create the scientific basis for understanding natural and anthropogenic complex systems and for developing environmentally and economically efficient technology; demonstrate a systems-based approach to science and technology issues which is life-cycle comprehensive, integrates environmental considerations, and promotes conservation of natural resources; and encourage development of responsible, technically and scientifically valid, cost-effective environmental laws and practices.

Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

44

SRS ecology: Environmental information document  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Document is to provide a source of ecological information based on the exiting knowledge gained from research conducted at the Savannah River Site. This document provides a summary and synthesis of ecological research in the three main ecosystem types found at SRS and information on the threatened and endangered species residing there.

Wike, L.D.; Shipley, R.W.; Bowers, J.A. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Playing the Environment: Games as Virtual Ecologies Alendasocial realism, games, environment, ecology 1. INTRODUCTIONversions of the environment? The answer is multifaceted.

Chang, Alenda Y.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT -1997 UPDATE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the SRS Ecology: Environmental Information Document is to provide a source of information on the ecology of the Savannah River Site.

Halverson, N.V. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Wike, L.D.; Patterson, K.K.; Bowers, J.A.; Bryan, A.L.; Chen, K.F.; Cummins, C.L.; deCarmen, B.R.; Dixon, K.L.; Dunn, D.L. [and others

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

2011 Archaea: Ecology, Metabolism, & Molecular Biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archaea, one of three major evolutionary lineages of life, are a fascinating and diverse group of microbes with deep roots overlapping those of eukaryotes. The focus of the 'Archaea: Ecology Metabolism & Molecular Biology' GRC conference expands on a number of emerging topics highlighting new paradigms in archaeal metabolism, genome function and systems biology; information processing; evolution and the tree of life; the ecology and diversity of archaea and their viruses. The strength of this conference lies in its ability to couple a field with a rich history in high quality research with new scientific findings in an atmosphere of stimulating exchange. This conference remains an excellent opportunity for younger scientists to interact with world experts in this field.

Keneth Stedman

2011-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

48

UF in Belize Marine Ecology and Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Marine Ecology and Conservation Spring Extended: May 26-June 2, 2014 Understand Marine Ecology and Conservation. Explain Marine Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation Terms as they Relate to the Tropics of Belize. Compare and Contrast Marine Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation Principles and Practices

Florida, University of

49

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UF in Belize Wildlife Ecology & Conservation Spring Break March 1-9, 2014 Understand Ecology and Conservation. Explain Concepts and Terms. Compare and Contrast Wildlife Ecology, Habitat, and Conservation & Life Sciences Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation Courses are taught by UF faculty WIS4905

Watson, Craig A.

50

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center -- Industrial Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Select, Sandbox, Open Discussion Regarding Materials Sustainability ... Ecology, Sustainability: Economics, Lifecycle Analysis, Green House Gases, and...

51

Ecological safety of tidal-power projects  

SciTech Connect

The operating regime of tidal power plants requires ecological monitoring of their associated water area.

Fedorov, M. P.; Shilin, M. B. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnic University (Russian Federation)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

Environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program (CDEP). [Microwave and non-microwave health and ecological assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the satellite power system (SPS), satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit would collect solar energy in space, convert it to microwaves, and transmit the microwaves to receiving antennas (rectennas) on earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted to electricity. This SPS environmental assessment considers the microwave and nonmicrowave effects on the terrestrial environment and human health, atmospheric effects, and effects on electromagnetic systems. No environmental problem has been identified that would preclude the continued study of SPS technology. To increase the certainty of the assessment, some research has been initiated and long-term research is being planned.

Valentino, A.R.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Ecologic Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute Institute Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ecologic Institute Name Ecologic Institute Address Pfalzburger Strasse 43/44 Place Berlin, Germany Year founded 1995 Phone number +49 (30) 86880-0 Website http://ecologic.eu/ Coordinates 52.493143445°, 13.3453845978° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.493143445,"lon":13.3453845978,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Ecologic Analytics | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecologic Analytics Ecologic Analytics Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecologic Analytics Place Bloomington, Minnesota Zip 55425 Product Minnesota-based meter data management company. Coordinates 42.883574°, -90.926122° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.883574,"lon":-90.926122,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

55

Ohio River Ecological Research Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the 2009 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) fish community sampling near 14 Ohio River power plants. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

56

Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD): To create guidelines for ecologic site and infrastructure design that are  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD): GOALS · To create guidelines for ecologic site plan. #12;Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD): PROCESS · ANALYSIS of Landscape Units, Mapping and Site Principles For Ecologic Oriented Development (EOD) 1. COMPLETE WASTE AND WATER CYCLES 2. INTEGRATED

Ishii, Hiroshi

57

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the costs and benefits of a robust but possibly inappropriate response and a sensitive but possibly costly one. Such costs and benefits arise from the ecology of a particular system. Here, I consider how the nest mound and for- aging trails before foraging begins. Foragers find food and #12;510 The American

Tyler, Charles

58

Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan  

SciTech Connect

The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

None

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Interior Alaska as Social-Ecological System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

firewood river access / shallower #12;Social concerns · Oil development in ANWR · Outsiders harvesting

Ruess, Roger W.

60

Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5/002F 5/002F April 1998 Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment (Published on May 14, 1998, Federal Register 63(93):26846-26924) Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. NOTICE This report contains the full text of the Guidelines for Ecological Risk Assessment. However, the format of this version differs from the Federal Register version, as follows: text boxes that are included in this document at their point of reference were instead listed at the end of the Federal Register document as text notes, due to format limitations for Federal Register documents.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

SRS ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION DOCUMENT  

SciTech Connect

The SRS Ecology Environmental Information Document (EEID) provides a source of information on the ecology of Savannah River Site (SRS). The SRS is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)--owned property on the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of South Carolina, centered approximately 40 kilometers (25 miles) southeast of Augusta, Georgia. The entire site was designated a National Environmental Research Park in 1972 by the Atomic Energy Commission, the predecessor of DOE. This document summarizes and synthesizes ecological research and monitoring conducted on the three main types of ecosystems found at SRS: terrestrial, wetland and aquatic. It also summarizes the available information on the threatened and endangered species found on the Savannah River Site. SRS is located along the Savannah River and encompasses an area of 80,267 hectares (310 square miles) in three South Carolina counties. It contains diverse habitats, flora, and fauna. Habitats include upland terrestrial areas, wetlands, streams, reservoirs, and the adjacent Savannah River. These diverse habitats support a variety of plants and animals, including many commercially or recreationally valuable species and several rare, threatened, or endangered species. Soils are the basic terrestrial resource, influencing the development of terrestrial biological communities. Many different soils exist on the SRS, from hydric to well-drained, and from sand to clay. In general, SRS soils are predominantly well-drained loamy sands.

Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Eric Nelson, E; Nancy Halverson, N; John Mayer, J; Michael Paller, M; Rodney Riley, R; Michael Serrato, M

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

FRESHWATER ECOLOGY To help addressthese difficulties, a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.'cosystl.'ms Illlll..tion, #12;ECOLOGY NO \\-- - TBligN -..(dIy) ~ .YES TP.'~ugIl «TN' '.0 -1--- expensive options

Canberra, University of

64

David E. Scott | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scott, Brian Metts, and Stacey Lance) Assessing the Ecological Health of the D-Area Ash Plume Wetland (Principal Investigators -- David Scott, Tracey Tuberville, Brian Metts,...

65

Justin D. Congdon | Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ecology and ecotoxicology, including a major initiative on the effects of coal fly ash waste on aquatic and semi-aquatic organisms. Recent Projects: Turtle studies on the...

66

Problem Formulations for Ecological Risk Assessments Conducted...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- deformities, fin erosion, lesions, and tumors ERA - ecological risk assessment HHRA - human health risk assessments ow K - octanol-water partition coefficients oc K - organic...

67

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Industrial Ecology offers an introduction to the topic commences with an exploration of the prerequisites for achieving sustainable development,...

68

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center - Industrial Ecology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... ROI is a not-for-profit entity dedicated to promoting industrial ecology, particularly in developing countries. This website contains a collection of...

69

Industrial Ecology and Metal Production - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... Topic Title: Powerpoint: Industrial Ecology and Metal Production Topic Summary: Metal extraction is on the the most Earth-intrusive industrial...

70

Compilation of 1984 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program. Volume 2. TABS F-K. Annual progress reporT, January-December 1984  

SciTech Connect

A long-term program of monitoring for possible ELF electromagnetic influences on ecosystems in northwestern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is being conducted. Selection of study sites, monitoring protocols, and analytical methods were initiated in 1982. These activities, as well as data collection, were continued during 1983 and 1984. Progress is described for studying the terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems for the 11 projects comprising the Ecological Monitoring Program.

Fischer, R.L.; Beaver, D.L.; Asher, J.H.; Hill, R.W.; Burton, T.M.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Compilation of 1984 annual reports of the Navy ELF (extremely low frequency) communications system ecological monitoring program. Volume 1, TABS A-E. Annual progress report, January-December 1984  

SciTech Connect

A long-term program of monitoring for possible ELF electromagnetic influences on ecosystems in northwestern Wisconsin and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan, is being conducted. Selection of study sites, monitoring protocols, and analytical methods were initiated in 1982. These activities, as well as data collection, were continued during 1983 and 1984. Progress is described for studying the terrestrial, aquatic, and wetland ecosystems for the 11 projects comprising the Ecological Monitoring Program.

Anderson, M.; Bruhn, J.; Cattelino, P.; Jurgensen, M.; Lenz, G.W.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ecological  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

- Consequences of Nuclear Testing Amcl~itka isln,zd has a Iristory of disturbnnce by nroder~r matt, i,rclr~ding US. military operatio~ts on the isla~rd drrring Il'orld ll'nr % n~rterlnthrg the a~tder.qou~rd nuclear tests Nilrow nrrd Cannikin, for which preparation begntr in 1966. nlarry of the. terrestrial distarbnrrces resttlti,tg from ,taclear testing were superimposed o n scars remai~tirrg from the nrilitnry occt~pntiotz. Constrriction, road hirprouement, and the hlilrow an(/ Cnrrnikbt nt~clenr deto~rntions resulted bt the loss or deterioratio,t of about 420 Ira (1040ncres) of terrestrial hnbitnt, or less thmr 1.5% of the total area of An~clritka. A few streams and lakes were pollicted by drilling effluettts or human wastes; nornlalflrislting action is expected t

73

Implementation of a Two-Way Interactive Atmospheric and Ecological Model and Its Application to the Central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and ecosystem (CENTURY) modeling system has been developed to study regional-scale two-way interactions between the atmosphere and biosphere. Both atmospheric forcings and ecological ...

Lixin Lu; Roger A. Pielke Sr.; Glen E. Liston; William J. Parton; Dennis Ojima; Melannie Hartman

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

810 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 86, No. 3 Ecology, 86(3), 2005, pp. 810811  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

810 BOOK REVIEWS Ecology, Vol. 86, No. 3 Ecology, 86(3), 2005, pp. 810­811 2005 by the Ecological of environmental statistics it will ren- der the task of teaching a little less daunting. This book is divided, books on methodology must focus on a narrow audience, which always comprises just a slice

Gotelli, Nicholas J.

75

Adaptation for Nature: Ecological Impacts of Climate Change and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models CyberGIS for Geospatial Discovery and Innovation Ecological Impacts of Climate Change Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics in CAM5 Adaptation for Nature: Ecological...

76

Ecological Characterization Data for the 2004 Composite Analysis  

SciTech Connect

A composite analysis is required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 to ensure public safety through the management of active and planned low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities associated with the Hanford Site. The original Hanford Site Composite Analysis of 1998 must be revised and submitted to DOE Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in 2004 because of revisions to waste site information in the 100, 200, and 300 Areas, updated performance assessments and environmental impact statements (EIS), changes in inventory estimates for key sites and constituents, and a change in the definition of offsite receptors. Beginning in fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) initiated activities, including the development of data packages, to support the 2004 Composite Analysis. This report describes the data compiled in FY 2003 to support ecological site assessment modeling for the 2004 Composite Analysis. This work was conducted as part of the Characterization of Systems Task of the Groundwater Remediation Project (formerly the Groundwater Protection Program) managed by Fluor Hanford, Inc., Richland, Washington. The purpose of this report is to provide summaries of the characterization information and available spatial data on the biological resources and ecological receptors found in the upland, riparian, aquatic, and island habitats on the Hanford Site. These data constitute the reference information used to establish parameters for the ecological risk assessment module of the System Assessment Capability and other assessment activities requiring information on the presence and distribution of biota on the Hanford Site.

Downs, Janelle L.; Simmons, Mary A.; Stegen, Jennifer A.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Tiller, Brett L.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Zufelt, Rhett K.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Repeatability and transparency in ecological research Aaron M. Ellison1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in ecological research Aaron M. Ellison1 Harvard University, Harvard Forest, 324 North Main Street, Petersham

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

78

Ecological Effects of Coal Combustion Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive amount of research has been conducted to evaluate the potential adverse effects of coal-combustion products (CCPs) on the health of ecosystems. The objective of this project was to evaluate the ecological effects of CCPs and to identify the primary CCP-related factors that have the potential to pose the most substantial risk to ecological receptors. To meet this objective, the investigators conducted a comprehensive review of the peer-reviewed chemical and toxicological literature on the eco...

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Combination of job oriented simulation with ecological material flow analysis as integrated analysis tool for business production processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper outlines the application of a special Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) as combination of discrete event simulation with ecological material flow analysis for a selected production process. The software tool serves as decision ...

Philip Joschko; Bernd Page; Volker Wohlgemuth

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

8 References Agee, J.K. 1993. Fire ecology of Pacific Northwest forests. Island Press, Washington, D.C.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

classification of ecological communities: terrestrial vegetation of the United States. Volume II. The National. 1996. Incorporation of nitrogen and carbon from spawning coho salmon into the trophic system of small

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Selecting indicators of soil, microbial, and plant conditions to understand ecological changes in Georgia pine forests  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing how resource use and management activities affect ecological conditions is necessary to document and understand anthropogenic changes in ecological systems. Resource managers on military installations have the delicate task of balancing the training needs of soldiers effectively with the need to maintain a high quality of ecological conditions. This study considers ways that ecological indicators can provide information on impacts that training has on environmental characteristics that occur at different scales and in different sectors of the environment. The characteristics examined include soil chemistry, soil microbes, and vegetation. A discriminant function analysis was conducted to determine whether ecological indicators could differentiate among different levels of military use. A combination of 10 indicators explained 90% of the variation among plots from five different military use levels. Results indicated that an appropriate suite of ecological indicators for military resource managers includes soil, microbial, and vegetation characteristics. Since many of these indicators are related, managers at this location potentially have freedom to choose indicators that are relatively easy to measure, without sacrificing information.

Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Wolfe, Amy K [ORNL; Sobek, Edward A [ORNL

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

New Ecology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building Systems Integration LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create...

83

Guidance for Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Developing Developing Ecological Soil Screening Levels OSWER Directive 9285.7-55 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Solid Waste and Emergency Response 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, N.W. Washington, DC 20460 November 2003 This Page Intentionally Left Blank EXECUTIVE SUMMARY This document describes the process used to derive a set of risk-based ecological soil screening levels (Eco-SSLs) for many of the soil contaminants that are frequently of ecological concern for plants and animals at hazardous waste sites and provides guidance for their use. The Eco-SSL derivation process represents the group effort of a multi-stakeholder workgroup consisting of federal, state, consulting, industry, and academic participants led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI). The

84

Upton Reserve Ecological Research and Internships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Internships Research and Internships Every year, ecological and wildlife research is conducted to assist in understanding how the natural environment works. The information gained from these projects is used to make management decisions at the Laboratory. Many of these projects are conducted with the assistance of interns. Interns are high school or undergraduate students participating in the BNL's Office of Education summer programs. During 10 weeks, the students conduct experiments, population surveys, ecological monitoring, and other natural resource investigations. Students are required to complete a paper and/or poster as part of their internship. Examples of past research projects completed at BNL are available at the Environmental Protection Division's website.

85

Waste area grouping 2 Phase I task data report: Ecological risk assessment and White Oak Creek watershed screening ecological risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an ecological risk assessment for Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 2 based on the data collected in the Phase I remedial investigation (RI). It serves as an update to the WAG 2 screening ecological risk assessment that was performed using historic data. In addition to identifying potential ecological risks in WAG 2 that may require additional data collection, this report serves to determine whether there are ecological risks of sufficient magnitude to require a removal action or some other expedited remedial process. WAG 2 consists of White Oak Creek (WOC) and its tributaries downstream of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) main plant area, White Oak Lake (WOL), the White Oak Creek Embayment of the Clinch River, associated flood plains, and the associated groundwater. The WOC system drains the WOC watershed, an area of approximately 16.8 km{sup 2} that includes ORNL and associated WAGs. The WOC system has been exposed to contaminants released from ORNL and associated operations since 1943 and continues to receive contaminants from adjacent WAGs.

Efroymson, R.A.; Jackson, B.L.; Jones, D.S. [and others] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Ecological predictive maintenance in urban fleets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motor vehicles are one of the largest sources of air pollutants worldwide. Several studies had concluded that particulate matter (PM) are responsible for some respiratory, cardiovascular, lung diseases, increasing in death from heart and may cause lung ... Keywords: HMM, degradation, ecological, environmental, exploitation, maintenance, particulate emissions, pollutant emissions, predictive

Antnio Simes; Jos Torres Farinha; Incio Fonseca; Luis Ferreira

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Book Review Grasses and grassland ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book Review Grasses and grassland ecology D.J. Gibson. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press, and New-0198529187, and £34?95 / US $70 (paperback) ISBN 978-0198529194. The stated aim of this book is to provide a useful book for researchers and others with an interest in grassland. There can be few authors who have

Gibson, David

89

Ecological considerations of the solar alternative  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main solar technologies are considered including solar thermal power, photovoltaic cells, ocean thermal power, wind energy, solar heating and cooling, bioconversion, and agricultural and process heat. The direct and indirect ecological and environmental impacts of these technologies are discussed. (WHK)

Davidson, M.; Grether, D.; Wilcox, K.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

A Vista for Microbial Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

design alternative energy sources, such as converting algae into biodiesel. Everyday we use energy to integrate renewable energy sources into our electric grid systems that power entire communities. If you price of crude petroleum. 5 #12;Engineering and the Environment For years, Colorado State has taken

Löffler, Frank E.

91

ORIGINAL PAPER Invading with biological weapons: the role of shared disease in ecological invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Theory has been developed that examines the role of infectious disease in ecological invasions for particular natural systems. However, a general understanding of the role that shared disease may play in invasions is lacking. Here, we develop a strategic theoretical framework to determine the role of disease, in addition to competition, in ecological invasions and the expansion of species spatial range. We investigate the effect of different disease parameters on the replacement time of a native species by an alien invader. The outcome is critically dependent on the relative effects that the disease has on the two species and less dependent on the basic epidemiological characteristics of the interaction. This framework is also used to investigate the effect of disease on the spatial spread of the invader. Our results show an interesting phenomenon where a wave of disease spreads through the landscape ahead of the wave of replacement. Keywords Disease models. Spatial. Multi-species. Ecological invasions. Squirrelpox. Travelling waves

Sally S. Bell; Andrew White; Jonathan A. Sherratt; Mike Boots

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bylaws of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation, University of Florida Page 1 BYLAWS OF DEPARTMENT OF WILDLIFE ECOLOGY AND CONSERVATION UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA (Ratified February 2010) Preamble The shared goals of the faculty and administration of the Department of Wildlife Ecology and Conservation are to attain excellence

Watson, Craig A.

93

Packaging and distributing ecological data from multisite studies  

SciTech Connect

Studies of global change and other regional issues depend on ecological data collected at multiple study areas or sites. An information system model is proposed for compiling diverse data from dispersed sources so that the data are consistent, complete, and readily available. The model includes investigators who collect and analyze field measurements, science teams that synthesize data, a project information system that collates data, a data archive center that distributes data to secondary users, and a master data directory that provides broader searching opportunities. Special attention to format consistency is required, such as units of measure, spatial coordinates, dates, and notation for missing values. Often data may need to be enhanced by estimating missing values, aggregating to common temporal units, or adding other related data such as climatic and soils data. Full documentation, an efficient data distribution mechanism, and an equitable way to acknowledge the original source of data are also required.

Olson, R.J.; Voorhees, L.D.; Field, J.M.; Gentry, M.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

95

Washington State Department of Ecology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Washington State Department of Ecology Washington State Department of Ecology Jump to: navigation, search Name Washington State Department of Ecology Place Lacey, Washington State Zip 98503 References Washington State Department of Ecology[1] This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Washington State Department of Ecology is an organization located in Lacey, Washington State . References ↑ "Washington State Department of Ecology" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Washington_State_Department_of_Ecology&oldid=696505" Categories: Government Agencies Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

96

EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) 964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON) SUMMARY The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of long-term ecological infrastructure. DOE has evaluated and adopted the NSF EA to cover the NEON Project research activities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, and has issued a finding of no significant impact. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 29, 2013 EA-1964: FInding of No Significant Impact National Ecological Observation Network May 29, 2013 EA-1964: Final Environmental Assessment National Ecological Observation Network

97

SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), Image: Baltimore Ecosystem study (BES1), 2009-07-28 SAR Image: Niwot Ridge (Long term Ecological Research Site in Colorado), 2010-12-14 ORNL DAAC News ORNL DAAC News SUMMER 2011 T he ORNL Distrib- uted Active Archive Center (DAAC) is a NASA-sponsored source for biogeochemical and ecological data and services useful i n e n v i r o n m e n t a l research. The ORNL D A A C c u r r e n t l y archives and distributes greater than 900 prod- ucts categorized as Field Campaign, Land Validation, Regional and Global, or Model Archive. Please visit us online at http://daac.ornl.gov for a comprehensive description of data, and tools available from the ORNL DAAC. Archived news can be found at http://daac.ornl.gov/ news.shtml. http://www.nasa.gov * Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Subsets

98

The Gut Microbiota: Ecology and Function  

SciTech Connect

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is teeming with an extremely abundant and diverse microbial community. The members of this community have coevolved along with their hosts over millennia. Until recently, the gut ecosystem was viewed as black box with little knowledge of who or what was there or their specific functions. Over the past decade, however, this ecosystem has become one of fastest growing research areas of focus in microbial ecology and human and animal physiology. This increased interest is largely in response to studies tying microbes in the gut to important diseases afflicting modern society, including obesity, allergies, inflammatory bowel diseases, and diabetes. Although the importance of a resident community of microorganisms in health was first hypothesized by Pasteur over a century ago (Sears, 2005), the multiplicity of physiological changes induced by commensal bacteria has only recently been recognized (Hooper et al., 2001). The term 'ecological development' was recently coined to support the idea that development of the GI tract is a product of the genetics of the host and the host's interactions with resident microbes (Hooper, 2004). The search for new therapeutic targets and disease biomarkers has escalated the need to understand the identities and functions of the microorganisms inhabiting the gut. Recent studies have revealed new insights into the membership of the gut microbial community, interactions within that community, as well as mechanisms of interaction with the host. This chapter focuses on the microbial ecology of the gut, with an emphasis on information gleaned from recent molecular studies.

Willing, B.P.; Jansson, J.K.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Ecological Evaluation of Persuasive Messages Using Google AdWords  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years there has been a growing interest in crowdsourcing methodologies to be used in experimental research for NLP tasks. In particular, evaluation of systems and theories about persuasion is difficult to accommodate within existing frameworks. In this paper we present a new cheap and fast methodology that allows fast experiment building and evaluation with fully-automated analysis at a low cost. The central idea is exploiting existing commercial tools for advertising on the web, such as Google AdWords, to measure message impact in an ecological setting. The paper includes a description of the approach, tips for how to use AdWords for scientific research, and results of pilot experiments on the impact of affective text variations which confirm the effectiveness of the approach.

Guerini, Marco; Stock, Oliviero

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Spatial autocorrelation and red herrings in geographical ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000) Red-shifts and red herrings in geographical ecology.autocorrelation and red herrings in geographical ecologygenerates red herrings, such that virtually all past

Diniz, JAF; Bini, L M; Hawkins, Bradford A.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Digital Offshore Cadastre (DOC) - Pacific83 - Ecological Preserve...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Preserve Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov Communities Ocean Data Digital Offshore Cadastre...

102

Enhancing protection for unusually sensitive ecological areas from pipeline releases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECOLOGICAL AREAS FROM PIPELINE RELEASES Christina Sames;Administration, Office of Pipeline Safety, DPS-10/ 400 7thof a hazardous liquid pipeline accident. Pipeline operators

Sames, Christina; Fink, Dennis

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

2006 Annual Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Ecology Report for the Rocky Flats Site Click on the links below to access different portions of the electronic annual report. 2006 Annual Report Sections Diffuse Knapweed...

104

Health and Ecological Effects of Selenium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selenium is a naturally occurring element that can be found at background levels in food, soil, and water. It is also present in coal combustion products (CCPs) and CCP leachate. While selenium is essential to human and animal life, it has the potential to cause toxicity to humans and other organisms above a certain threshold level. This report summarizes the adverse human and ecological effects that can potentially occur from overexposure to selenium and the levels at which the effects can occur, with p...

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Steps 1-4, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 OVERVIEW The screening-level problem formulation and ecological effects evaluation is part of the initial ecological risk screening assessment. For this initial step, it is likely that site- specific information for determining the nature and extent of contamination and for characterizing ecological receptors at the site is limited. This step includes all the functions of problem formulation (more fully described in Steps 3 and 4) and ecological effects analysis, but on a screening level. The results of this step will be used in conjunction with exposure estimates in the preliminary risk calculation in Step 2. STEP 1: SCREENING-LEVEL PROBLEM FORMULATION AND ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS EVALUATION 1.1 INTRODUCTION Step 1 is the screening-level problem formulation process and ecological effects evaluation

106

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research, period ending July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This progress report gives an overview of research programs at the Savannah River Site. Topics include; environmental operations support, wood stork foraging and breeding, defense waste processing, environmental stresses, alterations in the environment due to pollutants, wetland ecology, biodiversity, pond drawdown studies, and environmental toxicology.

Vaitkus, M.R.; Wein, G.R. [eds.; Johnson, G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Ecology, 79(8), 1998, pp. 26032615 1998 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RICHNESS AND AUTOTROPHIC BIOMASS SHAHID NAEEM1 AND SHIBIN LI Department of Ecology, Evolution and Behavior) biomass is sen- sitive to variation in initial consumer (nondecomposer, heterotrophic protistan) diversity biomass and consumer species richness. Additional microcosm ex- periments showed that this relationship

Minnesota, University of

108

Ecology, 84(6), 2003, pp. 14891505 2003 by the Ecological Society of America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

seedlings of the invasive alien tree, Sapium sebiferum (Chinese tallow tree) and an ecologically similar words: biological invasions; Celtis laevigata; Chinese tallow tree; Enemies Hypothesis; herbivory; plant that are already underway. Focal species The alien Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum (L.) Roxb., Euphorbiaceae

Siemann, Evan

109

Industrial ecology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory summary statement  

SciTech Connect

At Livermore our hope and our intention is to make important contributions to global sustainability by basing both our scientific and technological research and our business practices on the principles of industrial ecology. Current efforts in the following fields are documented: global security, global ecology, energy for transportation, fusion energy, materials sciences, environmental technology, and bioscience.

Gilmartin, T.J.

1996-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

110

Ecological risks of DOE`s programmatic environmental restoration alternatives  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the ecological risks of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Restoration Program. The assessment is programmatic in that it is directed at evaluation of the broad programmatic alternatives outlined in the DOE Implementation Plan. It attempts to (1) characterize the ecological resources present on DOE facilities, (2) describe the occurrence and importance of ecologically significant contamination at major DOE facilities, (3) evaluate the adverse ecological impacts of habitat disturbance caused by remedial activities, and (4) determine whether one or another of the programmatic alternatives is clearly ecologically superior to the others. The assessment focuses on six representative facilities: the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL); the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP); the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), including the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Y-12 plant, and K-25 plant; the Rocky Flats Plant; the Hanford Reservation; and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ecological hazards of MTBE exposure: A research agenda  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel oxygenates are used in metropolitan areas across the United States in order to reduce the amount of carbon monoxide released into the atmosphere during the winter. The most commonly used fuel oxygenate is Methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). Its widespread use has resulted in releases into the environment. To date there has been only minimal effort to investigate ecological impacts caused by exposure to concentrations of MTBE typically found in environmental media. Research into the potential for MTBE to adversely affect ecological receptors is essential. Acquisition of such baselines data is especially critical in light of continuing inputs and potential accumulation of MTBE in environmental media. A research Agenda is included in this report and addresses: Assessing Ecological Impacts, Potential Ecological Impacts of MTBE (aquatic organisms, terrestrial organisms), Potential Ecological Endpoints, and A Summary of Research Needs.

Carlsen, T.; Hall, L.; Rice, D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

GIS Framework for Large River Geomorphic Classification to Aid in the Evaluation of Flow-Ecology Relationships  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the environmental benefits of proposed flow modification to large rivers provides invaluable insight into future hydropower project operations and relicensing activities. Providing a means to quantitatively define flow-ecology relationships is integral in establishing flow regimes that are mutually beneficial to power production and ecological needs. To compliment this effort an opportunity to create versatile tools that can be applied to broad geographic areas has been presented. In particular, integration with efforts standardized within the ecological limits of hydrologic alteration (ELOHA) is highly advantageous (Poff et al. 2010). This paper presents a geographic information system (GIS) framework for large river classification that houses a base geomorphic classification that is both flexible and accurate, allowing for full integration with other hydrologic models focused on addressing ELOHA efforts. A case study is also provided that integrates publically available National Hydrography Dataset Plus Version 2 (NHDPlusV2) data, Modular Aquatic Simulation System two-dimensional (MASS2) hydraulic data, and field collected data into the framework to produce a suite of flow-ecology related outputs. The case study objective was to establish areas of optimal juvenile salmonid rearing habitat under varying flow regimes throughout an impounded portion of the lower Snake River, USA (Figure 1) as an indicator to determine sites where the potential exists to create additional shallow water habitat. Additionally, an alternative hydrologic classification useable throughout the contiguous United States which can be coupled with the geomorphic aspect of this framework is also presented. This framework provides the user with the ability to integrate hydrologic and ecologic data into the base geomorphic aspect of this framework within a geographic information system (GIS) to output spatiotemporally variable flow-ecology relationship scenarios.

Vernon, Christopher R.; Arntzen, Evan V.; Richmond, Marshall C.; McManamay, R. A.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Ecology Environment Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment Inc Environment Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecology & Environment, Inc. Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Product Environmental consulting firm serving corporate and government clients Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

114

New Ecology Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inc Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name New Ecology Inc Address 130 Bishop Allen Drive Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip 02139 Sector Buildings Product Energy efficiency services for buildings, both in construction and existing Website http://www.newecology.org/ Coordinates 42.3666224°, -71.103596° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.3666224,"lon":-71.103596,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

115

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

116

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Chemical ecology investigations at the Geysers, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A chemical aquatic ecology program currently in progress at the Geysers geothermal field in Northern California is described. The ultimate objective of the program is to assess the long-term ecosystem effects of development-related effluents to the aquatic environment. The first phase was designed to: (1) identify partitioning and transport in water and sediment of a wide range of elemental constituents, and (2) to determine the degree of impact of geothermal development in an area where a natural background of thermal tributaries and abandoned mercury mine tailings exist. Selected constituents such as ammonia, boron, sulfate and potassium are shown to be enriched in both natural geothermal waters and in cooling tower waters and emissions. Analyses implicate geothermal units as significant contributors of aquatic input. The most probable transport process is cooling tower drift.

Ireland, R.R.; Carter, J.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Red herrings revisited: spatial autocorrelation and parameter estimation in geographical ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

autocorrelation and red herrings in geographical ecology. 2000. Red-shifts and red herrings in geographical ecology. email:bhawkins@uci.edu Red herrings revisited: spatial

Hawkins, Bradford A.; Diniz-Filho, Jose Alexandre F.; Bini, Luis Mauricio; De Marco, Paulo; Blackburn, Tim M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Elsevier Editorial System(tm) for Ecological Indicators Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Areas of Concern (AOC) littoral zones, Frenchman's Bay is adjacent to the Toronto AOC and has similar for a relatively narrow range of wetland types (IBI; Great Lakes AOC) or areas (WSATI; Toronto streams) and had

McMaster University

122

Modelling ecological systems with the calculus of wrapped compartments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Calculus of Wrapped Compartments is a framework based on stochastic multiset rewriting in a compartmentalised setting originally developed for the modelling and analysis of biological interactions. In this paper, we propose to use this calculus for ...

Pablo Ramn; Angelo Troina

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Footwall Faulting at Dixie Valley, Nevada. Geothermal2009. Draft Version Dixie Valley Candidate ConservationAgreement. Dixie Valley Working Group. Potter D. , Urquhart

Forrest, Matthew James

124

Medical Migration: Strategies for Affordable Care in an Unaffordable System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the whole thing. Our American medical system is a greedy ripcompanies, doctors, American Medical Association (AMA) andEcology of Health in Medical Anthropology in Medical

Miller-Thayer, Jennifer Catherine

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Intertidal Ecology of Riprap Jetties and Breakwaters: Marine Communities Inhabiting Anthropogenic Structures along the West Coast of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine EcologyMexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine Ecology

Pister, Benjamin A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Intertidal ecology of riprap jetties and breakwaters : marine communities inhabiting anthropogenic structures along the west coast of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine EcologyMexico via offshore oil and gas platforms." Marine Ecology

Pister, Benjamin Alan

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Spatial analysis and delineation of ecological landtype phases for the Hoosier National Forest, Indiana, USA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Forest Service adopted the National Hierarchical Framework of Ecological Units in 1993 with the ecological landtype (ELT) and ecological landtype phase (ELTP) forming the lowest levels of the hierarchy. This study examines the potential of computer ... Keywords: Ecological landtypes, Forest ecosystems, Forest management, GIS, Landform mapping, Landscape analysis

Andriy V. Zhalnin; George R. Parker

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The Long-Term Ecological Research community metadata standardisation project: a progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the process by which the Long-Term Ecological Research (LTER) Network standardised their metadata through the adoption of the Ecological Metadata Language (EML). We describe the strategies developed to improve motivation ... Keywords: EML, LTER Network, Long-Term Ecological Research Network, ecological metadata language, machine-mediated data synthesis, metadata management, metadata-driven data synthesis, standardisation

Inigo San Gil; Karen Baker; John Campbell; Ellen G. Denny; Kristin Vanderbilt; Brian Riordan; Rebecca Koskela; Jason Downing; Sabine Grabner; Eda Melendez; Jonathan M. Walsh; Mason Kortz; James Conners; Lynn Yarmey; Nicole Kaplan; Emery R. Boose; Linda Powell; Corinna Gries; Robin Schroeder; Todd Ackerman; Ken Ramsey; Barbara Benson; Jonathan Chipman; James Laundre; Hap Garritt; Don Henshaw; Barrie Collins; Christopher Gardner; Sven Bohm; Margaret O'Brien; Jincheng Gao; Wade Sheldon; Stephanie Lyon; Dan Bahauddin; Mark Servilla; Duane Costa; James Brunt

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Savannah River Ecology Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research Draft submitted July 31, 2001 Final submitted August 17,2001 Supported under Cooperative Agreement between The University of Georgia and the U.S. Department of Energy for The University of Georgia fiscal year ending June 30,2001 DE-F609-96SR18546 Paul M. Bertsch, Director Prepared by Laura Janecek and Brenda Rosier Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Drawer E Aiken, SC 29801 PH (803) 725-2472 FX 725-3309 E-mail: Rosier @srel.edu This report is provided for information only and is not to be considered formally contained herein without the express consent of the investigator. published literature. We request that no citations be made of information TABLE OF CONTENTS

130

Enforcement Letter, Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 Enforcement Letter, Safety and Ecology Corporation - NEL-2011-04 October 24, 2011 Enforcement Letter issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation related to Two Radiological Contamination Events at the Separations Process Research Unit at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory The Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight conducted an evaluation of the two contamination events at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) in Niskayuna, New York. On August 24, 2010, contaminated sludge leaked from two pumps inside the Building H2 Tank Farm Weather Enclosure after excessive pressure was applied to clear a clogged nozzle. The sludge contained radioisotopes from nuclear fuel reprocessing

131

Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corporation - Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, Safety and Ecology Corporation - EA-2005-03 June 14, 2005 Preliminary Notice of Violation issued to Safety and Ecology Corporation related to a 10 CFR Part 708 Violation at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Project This letter refers to the recent investigation by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement (OE) involving a contractor employee protection issue at the Portsmouth site. 10 CFR 708, "DOE Contractor Employee Protection Program," has been designated a nuclear safety regulation by DOE and, thus, it is enforceable under the Price-Anderson Amendments Act [See 64 FR 12861,12863 (1999)]. Pursuant to the structure of the regulation, a finding of contractor retaliation

132

Baseline ecological footprint of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Footprint Model is a mechanism for measuring the environmental effects of operations at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM). This analysis quantifies environmental impact associated with energy use, transportation, waste, land use, and water consumption at SNL/NM for fiscal year 2005 (FY05). Since SNL/NM's total ecological footprint (96,434 gha) is greater than the waste absorption capacity of its landholdings (338 gha), it created an ecological deficit of 96,096 gha. This deficit is equal to 886,470lha, or about 3,423 square miles of Pinyon-Juniper woodlands and desert grassland. 89% of the ecological footprint can be attributed to energy use, indicating that in order to mitigate environmental impact, efforts should be focused on energy efficiency, energy reduction, and the incorporation of additional renewable energy alternatives at SNL/NM.

Coplen, Amy K.; Mizner, Jack Harry,; Ubechel, Norion M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Applications of industrial ecology : manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work applies concepts from industrial ecology to analyses of manufacturing, recycling, and efficiency. The first part focuses on an environmental analysis of machining, with a specific emphasis on energy consumption. ...

Dahmus, Jeffrey B. (Jeffrey Brian), 1974-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2004 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

2004 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

135

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory 2005 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

2005 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of The University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina

Paul M. Bertsch

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Performance of Drought Indices for Ecological, Agricultural, and Hydrological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, the authors provide a global assessment of the performance of different drought indices for monitoring drought impacts on several hydrological, agricultural, and ecological response variables. For this purpose, they compare the ...

Sergio M. Vicente-Serrano; Santiago Beguera; Jorge Lorenzo-Lacruz; Jess Julio Camarero; Juan I. Lpez-Moreno; Cesar Azorin-Molina; Jess Revuelto; Enrique Morn-Tejeda; Arturo Sanchez-Lorenzo

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory FY2006 Annual Technical Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

FY2006 annual report of research conducted by the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, a research unit of the University of Georgia operating on the Savannah River Site in Aiken, County, SC.

Paul M. Bertsch

2006-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

"Ecological Lessons Learned 30 Years After Mount Saint Helens...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBG AUDITORIUM "Ecological Lessons Learned 30 Years After Mount Saint Helens", Dr. Virginia Dale, Oak Ridge National Laboratory http:mediacentral.princeton.eduid0bi7ab6iz...

139

1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability, Spring 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course covers the use of ecological and thermodynamic principles to examine interactions between humans and the natural environment.. Topics include conservation and constitutive laws, box models, feedback, thermodynamic ...

McLaughlin, Dennis B.

140

Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Field Sampling Plan for 2007  

SciTech Connect

This field sampling plan describes the field investigations planned for the Long-Term Ecological Monitoring Project at the Idaho National Laboratory Site in 2007. This plan and the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions constitute the sampling and analysis plan supporting long-term ecological monitoring sampling in 2007. The data collected under this plan will become part of the long-term ecological monitoring data set that is being collected annually. The data will be used t determine the requirements for the subsequent long-term ecological monitoring. This plan guides the 2007 investigations, including sampling, quality assurance, quality control, analytical procedures, and data management. As such, this plan will help to ensure that the resulting monitoring data will be scientifically valid, defensible, and of known and acceptable quality.

T. Haney R. VanHorn

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ecological Compliance Assessment Project: 1994 Summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Compliance Assessment Project (ECAP) began full operation on March 1, 1994. The project is designed around a baseline environmental data concept that includes intensive biological field surveys of key areas of the Hanford Site where the majority of Site activities occur. These surveys are conducted at biologically appropriate times of year to ensure that the data gathered are current and accurate. The data are entered into the ECAP database, which serves as a reference for the evaluation of review requests coming in to the project. This methodology provided the basis for over 90 percent of the review requests received. Field surveys conducted under ECAP are performed to document occurrence information for species of concern and to obtain habitat descriptions. There are over 200 species of concern on the Hanford Site, including plants, birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and invertebrates. In addition, Washington State has designated mature sagebrush-steppe habitat as a Priority Habitat meriting special protective measures. Of the projects reviewed, 17 resulted or will result in impacts to species or habitats of concern on the Hanford Site. The greatest impact has been on big sagebrush habitat. Most of the impact has been or will be within the 600 Area of the Site.

Brandt, C.A.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Assess the ecological sustainability of deploying energy cane on land previously used for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological sustainability of energy cane as a biofuel feedstock Objective Assess the ecological to the ecological sustainability of the wide-scale deployment of biofuel feedstocks. Key among these issues are how replacing current land use with biofuel feedstocks will affect the fluxes of greenhouse gases (CO2, CH4, N20

DeLucia, Evan H.

145

Envisioning an Ecologically Sustainable Campus At New England College  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Appropriation funding for our project Ecologically Sustainable Campus - New England College (NH). 67.09. supported five environmental initiatives: (1) a wood pellet boiler for our Science Building, (2) solar hot water panels and systems for five campus buildings, (3) campus-wide energy lighting efficiency project, (4) new efficiency boiler system in Colby Residence Hall, and (5) energy efficient lighting system for the new artificial athletic turf field. (1) New England College purchased and installed a new wood pellet boiler in the Science Building. This new boiler serves as the primary heating source for this building. Our boiler was purchased through New England Wood Pellet, LLC, located in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. The boiler selected was a Swebo, P500. 300KW wood pellet boiler. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative include the installation of a wood pellet boiler system that is environmentally friendly, highly efficient, and represents a sustainable and renewable resource for New England College. This project was completed on December 15, 2010. (2) New England College purchased and installed solar hot water panels and systems for the Science Building, the Simon Center (student center), the H. Raymond Danforth Library, Gilmore Dining Hall, and Bridges Gymnasium. The College worked with Granite State Plumbing & Heating, LLC, located in Weare, New Hampshire on this project. The solar panels are manufactured by Heat Transfer; the product is Heat Transfer 30-tube collector panels (Evacuated Tube Type) with stainless steel hardware. The interior equipment includes Super Stor Ultra stainless steel super insulated storage tank, Taco 009 Bronze circulator pump, Solar Relay Control Pack, and a Taco Thermal Expansion Tank. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative will allow the College to utilize the sun as an energy resource. These solar hot water panels and systems will alleviate our dependency on fossil fuel as our primary fuel resource and provide a reliable energy source that supplies the hot water needs for sanitation, dishwashing at our dining facilities, and shower facilities for our athletes. This project initiative was completed on June 30, 2010. (3) New England College has completed energy efficiency lighting projects throughout campus, which included upgrades and new systems throughout our buildings. This project also installed efficiency controls for the Lee Clement Arena and refrigeration equipment in the Gilmore Dining Hall. The College worked with Atlantic Energy Solutions, located in Foxboro, Massachusetts on our 50/50 energy efficiency lighting project and campus-wide audit. The actual implementation of the project was completed by D. Poole Electrical Services, located in Center Barnstead, New Hampshire. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative were to install energy efficient lighting systems throughout our campus buildings, which ultimately will provide New England College with a more efficient way to manage and control its energy use. This project initiative was completed on February 15, 2010. (4) New England College purchased and installed a high efficiency and clean burning system for the Colby Residence Hall, which is the primary housing for our freshman. We purchased and installed two Buderus Boilers, model number G515/10 with two Riello Burners, model number RL 38/2. The College worked with Granite State Plumbing & Heating, LLS, located in Weare, New Hampshire on the installation of this high efficiency and clean burning system for the Colby Residence Hall. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes for this initiative included the installation of a designed system of two boilers to provide redundancy for backup measures. This new system will provide New England College the flexibility to utilize just one smaller boiler to provide heat and hot water during non-peak periods thus continued reduction in energy use and our carbon footprint. This project initiative was completed on September 18, 2009. (5) New England College purchased and

Paula Amato; Gregory Palmer

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Envisioning an Ecologically Sustainable Campus At New England College  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Appropriation funding for our project Ecologically Sustainable Campus - New England College (NH). 67.09. supported five environmental initiatives: (1) a wood pellet boiler for our Science Building, (2) solar hot water panels and systems for five campus buildings, (3) campus-wide energy lighting efficiency project, (4) new efficiency boiler system in Colby Residence Hall, and (5) energy efficient lighting system for the new artificial athletic turf field. (1) New England College purchased and installed a new wood pellet boiler in the Science Building. This new boiler serves as the primary heating source for this building. Our boiler was purchased through New England Wood Pellet, LLC, located in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. The boiler selected was a Swebo, P500. 300KW wood pellet boiler. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative include the installation of a wood pellet boiler system that is environmentally friendly, highly efficient, and represents a sustainable and renewable resource for New England College. This project was completed on December 15, 2010. (2) New England College purchased and installed solar hot water panels and systems for the Science Building, the Simon Center (student center), the H. Raymond Danforth Library, Gilmore Dining Hall, and Bridges Gymnasium. The College worked with Granite State Plumbing & Heating, LLC, located in Weare, New Hampshire on this project. The solar panels are manufactured by Heat Transfer; the product is Heat Transfer 30-tube collector panels (Evacuated Tube Type) with stainless steel hardware. The interior equipment includes Super Stor Ultra stainless steel super insulated storage tank, Taco 009 Bronze circulator pump, Solar Relay Control Pack, and a Taco Thermal Expansion Tank. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative will allow the College to utilize the sun as an energy resource. These solar hot water panels and systems will alleviate our dependency on fossil fuel as our primary fuel resource and provide a reliable energy source that supplies the hot water needs for sanitation, dishwashing at our dining facilities, and shower facilities for our athletes. This project initiative was completed on June 30, 2010. (3) New England College has completed energy efficiency lighting projects throughout campus, which included upgrades and new systems throughout our buildings. This project also installed efficiency controls for the Lee Clement Arena and refrigeration equipment in the Gilmore Dining Hall. The College worked with Atlantic Energy Solutions, located in Foxboro, Massachusetts on our 50/50 energy efficiency lighting project and campus-wide audit. The actual implementation of the project was completed by D. Poole Electrical Services, located in Center Barnstead, New Hampshire. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes of this initiative were to install energy efficient lighting systems throughout our campus buildings, which ultimately will provide New England College with a more efficient way to manage and control its energy use. This project initiative was completed on February 15, 2010. (4) New England College purchased and installed a high efficiency and clean burning system for the Colby Residence Hall, which is the primary housing for our freshman. We purchased and installed two Buderus Boilers, model number G515/10 with two Riello Burners, model number RL 38/2. The College worked with Granite State Plumbing & Heating, LLS, located in Weare, New Hampshire on the installation of this high efficiency and clean burning system for the Colby Residence Hall. The primary goals, objectives, and outcomes for this initiative included the installation of a designed system of two boilers to provide redundancy for backup measures. This new system will provide New England College the flexibility to utilize just one smaller boiler to provide heat and hot water during non-peak periods thus continued reduction in energy use and our carbon footprint. This project initiative was completed on September 18, 2009. (5) New England College purchased and

Paula Amato; Gregory Palmer

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Annual Technical Progress Report of Ecological Research, June 30, 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA) and has been conducting ecological research on the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina for 50 years. The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts fundamental and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) SRS near Aiken, South Carolina. The Laboratory's research mission during the 2001 fiscal year was fulfilled with the publication of one book and 83 journal articles and book chapters by faculty, technical staff, students, and visiting scientists. An additional 77 journal articles have been submitted or are in press. Other noteworthy events took place as faculty members and graduate students received awards. These are described in the section Special Accomplishments of Faculty, Staff, Students, and Administration on page 54. Notable scientific accomplishments include work conducted on contaminant transport, global reptile decline, phytoremediation, and radioecology. Dr. Domy Adriano authored the second edition of his book ''Trace Elements in Terrestrial Environments: Biogeochemistry, Bioavailability, and Risks of Metals'', which was recently published by Springer-Verlag. The book provides a comprehensive treatment of many important aspects of trace elements in the environment. The first edition of the book, published in 1986, has become a widely acclaimed and cited reference. International attention was focused on the problem of reptile species decline with the publication of an article on this topic in the journal ''Bioscience'' in August, 2000. The article's authors included Dr. Whit Gibbons and a number of other SREL herpetologists who researched the growing worldwide problem of decline of reptile species. Factors related to these declines include habitat loss and degradation, introduction of invasive species, environmental pollution, disease, global climate change, and unsustainable commercial use. The conclusion reached by the article is that the disappearance of reptiles from the natural world is genuine and should be a matter of concern; current evidence suggests that these declines constitute a worldwide crisis. SREL's research in the area of phytoremediation was enhanced with the addition of Dr. Lee Newman as a faculty member in January 2001. Dr. Newman, an internationally recognized authority in the field, holds a joint appointment with the University of South Carolina and SREL. She is developing a collaborative program in phytoremediation on the SRS and offsite. Work is nearing completion on SREU s outdoor mesocosm irradiation facility, which is designed for studying the effects of low-level radiation doses on organisms. The 1-acre facility at Par Pond consists of 48 fiberglass tanks that can maintain small organisms such as fish and amphibians. Thirty of the tanks have sealed {sup 137}Cs sources suspended above them containing either 0.02,0.2, or 2.0 Ci. These sources can deliver average dose rates of 4, 40 and 400 mGy per day, respectively, to organisms under replicated conditions.

Bertsch, Paul M.; Janecek, Laura; Rosier, Brenda

2001-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

148

Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Monticello Mill Tailings Site Operable Unit III Ecological Risk Assessment September 1998 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand JunctionOffice Grand Junction, Colorado Project Number MSG-035-0004-00-000 Document Number Q0002l 00 Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC98-03 This page intentionally blank , ** 1 ( ( Document Number Q00021 00 Contents Contents Page Acronyms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. ix Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. xi 1.0 Introduction I-I 2.0 Problem Formulation : 2-1 2.1 Site Description 2-1 2.1.1 Physical Setting 2-1 2.1.2 Ecological Setting '.' 2-5 2.2 Ecological Contaminants of Concern 2-9 2.3 Contaminant Fate and Transport, Ecosystems Potentially at Risk, and Complete Exposure Pathways 2-11 i3.1

149

The ecology of dust: local- to global-scale perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Emission and redistribution of dust due to wind erosion in drylands drives major biogeochemical dynamics and provides important aeolian environmental connectivity at scales from individual plants up to the global scale. Yet, perhaps because most relevant research on aeolian processes has been presented in a geosciences rather than ecological context, most ecological studies do not explicitly consider dust-driven processes. To bridge this disciplinary gap, we provide a general overview of the ecological importance of dust, examine complex interactions between wind erosion and ecosystem dynamics from the plant-interspace scale to regional and global scales, and highlight specific examples of how disturbance affects these interactions and their consequences. Changes in climate and intensification of land use will both likely lead to increased dust production. To address these challenges, environmental scientists, land managers and policy makers need to more explicitly consider dust in resource management decisions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Field, Jason P [UA; Belnap, Jayne [NON LANL; Breshears, David D [UA; Neff, Jason [CU; Okin, Gregory S [UCLA; Painter, Thomas H [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Ravi, Sujith [UNIV OF ARIZONA; Reheis, Marith C [UCLA; Reynolds, Richard L [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Developing usable and robust mixed reality systems requires unique humancomputer interaction techniques and customized hardware systems. The design of the hardware is directed by the requirements of the rich 3D interactions that can be performed using immersive mobile MR systems. Geometry modeling and capture, navigational annotations, visualizations, and training simulations are all enhanced using augmented computer graphics. We present the design guidelines that have led us through 10 years of evolving mobile outdoor MR hardware systems.

Benjamin Avery; Ross T. Smith; Wayne Piekarski; Bruce H. Thomas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Direct and Spillover Effects of ATP-Funded Photonics ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... LG Electronics Microvision Denso (was Nippondenso) Cannon Orion Display Technology Matsushita Reflection Technology ...

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

152

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific re-vegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat re-vegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Re-vegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS. Copies of the PDF documents were sent to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information website in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Public Reading Facility.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) during the Calendar Year 2006. Program activities included: (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). Sensitive and protected/regulated species of the NTS include 44 plants, 1 mollusk, 2 reptiles, over 250 birds, and 26 mammals protected, managed, or considered sensitive as per state or federal regulations and natural resource agencies and organizations. The threatened desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) is the only species on the NTS protected under the Endangered Species Act. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources on which they depend were conducted for 34 projects. A total of 342.1 hectares (ha) (845.37 acres [ac]) was surveyed for these projects. Sensitive and protected/regulated species and important biological resources found included: 2 inactive tortoise burrows, 2 western burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia hypugaea), several horses (Equus caballus), 2 active predator burrows, mature Joshua trees (Yucca brevifolia), yuccas and cacti; and also 1 bird nest (2 eggs), 1 barn owl (Tyto alba) and 2 great-horned owls (Bubo virginianus). NSTec provided a written summary report of all survey findings and mitigation recommendations, where applicable. All flagged burrows were avoided during construction activities. Twenty one of the 34 projects had sites within the distribution range of the threatened desert tortoise. NNSA/NSO must comply with the terms and conditions of a permit (called a Biological Opinion) from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) when conducting work in tortoise habitat. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas. No desert tortoises were accidentally injured or killed, nor were any captured or displaced from project sites. One desert tortoise was accidentally killed along a paved road. One site specific revegetation plan was submitted this year as required by the desert tortoise habitat revegetation plan approved in 2004. This year a total of 1.89 ha (4.69 ac) of tortoise habitat was disturbed. Revegetation of habitat at the Bren Tower burn was completed in the spring of 2006. In the summer of 2006, NSTec scientists prepared a Biological Assessment of the security activities that were being conducted at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF). NNSA requested a Biological Opinion from FWS in late 2006. Ecosystem mapping and data management in 2006 focused primarily on two tasks: (a) converting hardcopies of about 17 reports (EMAC annual reports and selected topical reports from 1996 to 2003) into electronic versions (Portable Document Format [PDF] files) to facilitate electronic document exchange, rapid retrieval, duplication, and printing, and (b) conducting an annual vegetation survey to determine wildland fire hazards on the NTS.

David C. Anderson; Paul D. Greger; Derek B. Hall; Dennis J. Hansen; William K. Ostler

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Big Canyon Creek Ecological Restoration Strategy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

He-yey, Nez Perce for steelhead or rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), are a culturally and ecologically significant resource within the Big Canyon Creek watershed; they are also part of the federally listed Snake River Basin Steelhead DPS. The majority of the Big Canyon Creek drainage is considered critical habitat for that DPS as well as for the federally listed Snake River fall chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) ESU. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resources Management-Watershed (Tribe), in an effort to support the continued existence of these and other aquatic species, have developed this document to direct funding toward priority restoration projects in priority areas for the Big Canyon Creek watershed. In order to achieve this, the District and the Tribe: (1) Developed a working group and technical team composed of managers from a variety of stakeholders within the basin; (2) Established geographically distinct sub-watershed areas called Assessment Units (AUs); (3) Created a prioritization framework for the AUs and prioritized them; and (4) Developed treatment strategies to utilize within the prioritized AUs. Assessment Units were delineated by significant shifts in sampled juvenile O. mykiss (steelhead/rainbow trout) densities, which were found to fall at fish passage barriers. The prioritization framework considered four aspects critical to determining the relative importance of performing restoration in a certain area: density of critical fish species, physical condition of the AU, water quantity, and water quality. It was established, through vigorous data analysis within these four areas, that the geographic priority areas for restoration within the Big Canyon Creek watershed are Big Canyon Creek from stream km 45.5 to the headwaters, Little Canyon from km 15 to 30, the mainstem corridors of Big Canyon (mouth to 7km) and Little Canyon (mouth to 7km). The District and the Tribe then used data collected from the District's stream assessment and inventory, utilizing the Stream Visual Assessment Protocol (SVAP), to determine treatment necessary to bring 90% of reaches ranked Poor or Fair through the SVAP up to good or excellent. In 10 year's time, all reaches that were previously evaluated with SVAP will be reevaluated to determine progress and to adapt methods for continued success. Over 400 miles of stream need treatment in order to meet identified restoration goals. Treatments include practices which result in riparian habitat improvements, nutrient reductions, channel condition improvements, fish habitat improvements, invasive species control, water withdrawal reductions, improved hydrologic alterations, upland sediment reductions, and passage barrier removal. The Nez Perce Soil and Water Conservation District (District) and the Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management Watershed Division (Tribe) developed this document to guide restoration activities within the Big Canyon Creek watershed for the period of 2008-2018. This plan was created to demonstrate the ongoing need and potential for anadromous fish habitat restoration within the watershed and to ensure continued implementation of restoration actions and activities. It was developed not only to guide the District and the Tribe, but also to encourage cooperation among all stakeholders, including landowners, government agencies, private organizations, tribal governments, and elected officials. Through sharing information, skills, and resources in an active, cooperative relationships, all concerned parties will have the opportunity to join together to strengthen and maintain a sustainable natural resource base for present and future generations within the watershed. The primary goal of the strategy is to address aquatic habitat restoration needs on a watershed level for resident and anadromous fish species, promoting quality habitat within a self-sustaining watershed. Seven objectives have been developed to support this goal: (1) Identify factors limiting quality

Rasmussen, Lynn; Richardson, Shannon

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Science and technology for industrial ecology  

SciTech Connect

This paper first discusses the challenge offered by natural and anthropogenic systems in all of their complexity and then indicates some areas of research in which specific scientific and technological needs are identifiable.

Gilmartin, T.J.; Allenby, B.R.

1996-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

157

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for Designing and Conducting Ecological Risk Assessments, Appendix C and D, June, 1997  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH APPENDIX C SUPPLEMENTAL GUIDANCE ON LITERATURE SEARCH A literature search is conducted to obtain information on contaminants of concern, their potential ecological effects, and species of concern. This appendix is separated into two sections; Section C-1 describes the information necessary for the literature review portion of an ecological risk assessment. Topics include information for exposure profiles, bioavailability or bioconcentration factors for various compounds, life-history information for the species of concern or the surrogate species, and an ecological effects profile. Section C-2 lists information sources and techniques for a literature search and review. Topics include a discussion of how to select key words on which to base a search

158

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2000 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of he Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2000. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance,(3) ecosystem mapping, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 24 NTS projects. Seventeen sites were in desert tortoise habitat, and six acres of tortoise habitat were documented as being disturbed this year. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types o n the NTS was completed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Sitewide inventories were conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, raptor nests, and mule deer. Fifty-nine of 69 known owl burrows were monitored. Forty-four of the known burrows are in disturbed habitat. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid-March to early April. A total of 45 juvenile owls was detected from eight breeding pairs. One nest burrow was detected in the Mojave Desert,one in the Great Basin Desert, and six in the Transition ecoregion. Seventy bats, representing four bat species of concern, were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at selected tunnel and mine entrances verifying that some NTS mines and tunnels are used as bat roosts. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Four of the five foals observed last year have survived to yearlings. A monitoring plan for NTS horses was completed. Six active red-tailed hawk nests and 10 nestling red-tailed hawks were detected this year. Two spotlighting surveys for mule deer were conducted, each over three consecutive nights in October 1999 and August 2000. The mean sighting rate in October was 1.2 deer/10 kilometers (km) and 1.6 deer/10 km in August. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. Pahute Mesa Pond was confirmed to have vegetation,hydrology, and soil indicators that qualify the site as a jurisdictional wetland. The chemical spill test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center was reviewed for its potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

Wills, C.A.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2001. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species were conducted for 23 NTS projects. Eleven sites were in desert tortoise habitat. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 588 acres, where 568 acres of disturbance would be off-road driving. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoise s were accidentally injured or killed at project areas. One tortoise was crushed by a vehicle on a paved road. A topical report describing the classification of habitat types on the NTS was completed and distributed. The report is the culmination of three years of field vegetation mapping and the analysis of vegetation data from over 1,500 ecological landform units. Compilation of historical wildlife data was initiated. A long-term monitoring plan for important plant species that occur on the NTS was completed. Site-wide monitoring was conducted for the western burrowing owl, bat species of concern, wild horses, and raptor nests. Sixty-nine of 77 known owl burrows were monitored. As in previous years, some owls were present year round on the NTS. An overall decrease in active owl burrows was observed within all three ecoregions (Mojave Desert, Transition, Great Basin Desert) from October through January. An increase in active owl burrows was observed from mid March to early April. A total of 55 juvenile owls was detected from 11 breeding pairs. Pellet analysis of burrowing owls was completed which identified key prey species. A total of 272 bats, representing 10 bat species were captured in mist-nets at water sources in the Great Basin Desert ecoregion. Bats were detected with the Anabat II call-recording system at water sources and selected tunnel and mine entrances. Thirty-seven adult horses and 11 foals were counted this year. Two of the eleven foals observed last year survived to yearlings. Seven active raptor nests were found and monitored this year. These included two Great-horned Owl nests, three Barn Owl nests, and two Red-tailed Hawk nests. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical spill test plans for four experiments at the HAZMAT Spill Center were reviewed for their potential to impact biota downwind of spills on Frenchman Lake playa.

C. A. Wills

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Applying Ecological Interface Design to Experimental Apparatus Used to Monitor a Refrigeration Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A small refrigeration plant, for teaching refrigeration theory, used a control console built to traditional design guidelines: one output in the display for each sensor in the plant. This style of console is notorious for inducing high cognitive loads on operators and for displaying redundant data. Often the high cognitive load is the result of inconsistency between the intent for displaying the data and the format of the displayed data. An interface, based on Ecological Interface Design Theory (EID) was designed and implemented. The completed interface provided the operator with information commensurate with the operator's mental model derived from the system image. During testing of the new interface the expert operator's mental model of the refrigeration system was modified due to improved observation of the refrigeration plant's operational parameters. The application achieved the desired result and reduced the operator's workload by removing a cognitive task - determining system s...

Pat Lehane; Mark Toleman; John Benecke

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Event:Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South...

162

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

MARINE ECOLOGY PROGRESS SERIES Mar Ecol Prog Ser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stress, reactive oxygen species (ROS; e.g., hydrogen peroxide) and ROS-scavenging molecules (e.g., APX that together make these organisms of central ecological and economic importance. On the one hand, as oxygenic photosynthesizers, about 50% of the known species play a vital role in oxygen evolution and ocean primary production

Bermingham, Eldredge

164

Environmental resources of selected areas of Hawaii: Ecological resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has been prepared to make available and archive the background scientific data and related information collected on ecological resources during the preparation of the environmental impact statement (EIS) for Phases 3 and 4 of the Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP) as defined by the state of Hawaii in its April 1989 proposal to Congress. Since the state of Hawaii is no longer pursuing or planning to pursue the HGP, DOE considers the project to be terminated. The background scientific data and related information presented in this report focus on several areas of Hawaii County. In this report, reference is made to these areas as study areas rather than as areas where proposed or alternative facilities of the HGP would be located. The resource areas addressed herein include terrestrial ecology, aquatic ecology, and marine ecology. The scientific background data and related information that were obtained from review of the (1) scientific literature, (2) government and private sector reports, (3) studies done under DOE interagency agreements with the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and with the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE), and (4) observations made during site visits are being made available for future research in these areas.

Trettin, C.C.; Tolbert, V.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Jones, A.T. [Jones (Anthony T.), Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Smith, C.R. [Smith (Craig R.), Kailna, HI (United States); Kalmijn, A.J. [Kalmijn (Adrianus J.), Encinitas, CA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Romanian e-learning experience in ecological agriculture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecolearning is the first research project to test the methodology for e-learning training to organic producers in Romania. Given the necessary equipment (computer + software properly) and opportunities for farmers in Romania, Ecolearning address to: ... Keywords: e-learning, ecological agriculture, training courses

Daniela Cristiana Alexandrescu; Ion Toncea; Valentina Ofelia Robescu

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

HO #10 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Lambers et al. (2008)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HO #10 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Lambers et al. (2008) CO2 #12;HO #11 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Lambers et al. (2008) From Sage (1994) Photosynthesis Research 27:605-617 #12;HO #12 NRES 725: Plant Phys. Ecology Spring 2013 From Larcher (1995) Fom Lambers et al. (2008) #12

Nowak, Robert S.

167

(SCOPE workshop on Landscape boundaries: Consequences for biotic diversity and ecological flows): Foreign trip report, December 12--15, 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the foreign travel of R.H. Gardner of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), who attended the Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment (SCOPE) workshop, ''Landscape Boundaries: Consequences for Biotic Diversity and Ecological Flows,'' at the SCOPE headquarters in Paris, France. R.H. Gardner was invited by SCOPE, which paid expenses excluding salary, to participate in the presentation and discussion of the theoretical and empirical evidence of boundary effects on ecosystem dynamics. Ecotones, the transition zones between landscape elements, appear important in mediating the structure and functioning of ecological systems. The participants of the workshop represented a diverse array of scientists; they were invited to synthesize existing information, formulate theory, and develop management strategies. The Paris meeting concentrated on the theoretical and empirical means of measuring ecotone effects and the possible climate-mediated change in the structure and functioning of ecotones.

Gardner, R.H.

1988-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

168

From Theory to Application: Extreme Fire, Resilience, Restoration, and Education in Social-Ecological Disciplines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptual and theoretical advancements have been developed in recent years to break down the assumptions and traditional boundaries that establish seemingly independent disciplines, and the research outlined in this dissertation aspires to build on these advancements to provide innovative solutions to a broad array of modern problems in social-ecological. I used a variety of techniques to address challenges ranging from disconnections between theory and application, perceived versus realized roles of prescribed fire in resprouting shrublands, and the need for broader participation in research as part of undergraduate education. The chapters in this dissertation serve as a case-study approach across multiple scientific disciplines that overcome the traditions and assumptions that conflict with our ability to develop innovative solutions to modern social-ecological problems. First, I bridge theoretical and applied concepts by showing how recent theoretical advancements in resilience can be integrated into a predictive framework for environmental managers. Second, experimental data from multiple experiments were collected in two ecological regions of Texas to assess the potential for using extreme fire, in isolation and in combination with herbicide, as a novel intervention approach in resprouting shrublands of the southern Great Plains. The findings from these experiments demonstrate the importance of moving past traditional assumptions of when prescribed fire should be applied to demonstrate new patterns of woody plant responses to the applications of more extreme prescribed fires while not causing undesirable invasions by exotic grasses and exotic insects. Finally, I initiated a PhD instructed course on undergraduate research that sought to increase undergraduate participation while lowering the costs of conducting research. This chapter shows how traditional approaches of supporting undergraduate research are incapable of meeting the broader goals established by society and reveal a novel approach that can provide an additional pathway for supporting undergraduate student participation at large, research-based universities. Ultimately, this research suggests that our capacity to enhance services in social-ecological systems ultimately hinges upon the integration of theoretical and applied concepts that drive policy and governance and overcoming the assumptions and traditions that limit their integration.

Twidwell, Dirac

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Ecological correlates of anuran breeding activity and community structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple ecological factors can simultaneously affect species activity and community structure. The goal of my dissertation was to examine the effects of abiotic factors, biotic factors, and succession on anuran communities. I took a three pronged approach dividing the study into three major chapters. First I focused on abiotic factors that affect anuran breeding activity. I found that weather, rainfall and temperature affect the breeding activity of each species differently, and species in my study area can be placed into 5 different groups based on their association with weather and season: 1) breed within a predictable season (summer) independent of local weather patterns 2) breed opportunistically within a predictable season (summer) dependent on local rainfall 3) breed opportunistically within a predictable season (winter) dependent on local temperature 4) breed opportunistically dependent on local flood level rainfall events and 5) breed opportunistically year round dependent on local temperature in the winter and local rainfall in the summer. In the second part of the study, I created a simulation model of an anuran community using published life history parameters of the anuran species in my study system. Results of the model suggest colonizing ability is important for species with low fecundity and high susceptibility to predation. These early succession species tend to be constrained from later stages of succession by predators. Species that are resistant to predators are generally poor colonizers and tend to arrive late in succession, but once they colonize a pond they tend to persist and recruit successfully. Finally, I explored biotic mechanisms that might be important in structuring anuran communities. I found that with the exception of Rana sphenocephala, anuran species occupying sites with shorter hydroperiods had higher activity rates and were more susceptible to predation. Rana sphenocephala appeared to be better at escaping predation than the other species despite a relatively high activity rate. Examination of published phylogenies indicates R. sphenocephala is derived from a species group that uses permanent water suggesting that R. sphenocephala has retained many anti-predator defenses inherited from its ancestors, even though the species now exploits sites with low predator densities.

Saenz, Daniel

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

171

Reducing Uncertainty in Fisheries Management: The Time for Fishers' Ecological Knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation work presents a novel method for addressing system uncertainty to improve management of a small-scale fishery in St. Croix, United States Virgin Islands. Using fishers' ecological knowledge (FEK), this research examines existing perspectives and biases through the Q-Method to identify regulatory inefficiencies in the management framework and strengthen the rationale for including fishers into the management process, develops a coupled behavior-economics model to predict the likelihood of fishing the preferred grounds under a range of physical and regulatory conditions, establishes a baseline assessment of a spawning aggregation of mutton snapper following sixteen years of protection through a no-take marine protected area, and conducts a discrete choice method test to examine likely public support for FEK-based proposed regulatory alternatives. This work contributes to an under-studied and much-needed area of fisheries management, that of incorporating socioeconomic motivations within an ecosystem-based framework. As fisheries management efforts begin to embrace ecosystem-based approaches, the need for understanding and incorporating the knowledge and behavior of fishers into management has never been greater. Ecological goals of fishery sustainability and continued habitat function cannot be achieved without first understanding how fishers view and respond to any regulatory environment and then developing a framework that achieves the greatest support for those regulations. The time has come for incorporating FEK into ecosystem-based fisheries management.

Carr, Liam

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory Appalachian Regional Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory 2005 Math-Science-Technology Institute Oak Ridge, Tennessee Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area ARC Participants Darin Baugess Ben Mordan Debi Owens Yvonne Shafer Mentors Larry Pounds Harry Quarles Final Presentations Pollard Auditorium July 22, 2005 Ecological Study of the East Fork Ridge Mesic Forest Area Introduction: The Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) consists of approximately 33,000 to 36,000 acres. This large forested area of land contains numerous unique habitats and communities that are disappearing from other areas in Tennessee and the Southeast US. In 2004 John Devereux Joslin, Jr. investigated one community in the north end of the Oak Ridge Reservation called the East

173

The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

NONE

1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

174

Identifying Socio-ecological Factors Influencing the Use of Prescribed Fire to Maintain and Restore Ecosystem Health in Texas, USA and Northern Chihuahua, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is a critical need for more studies to identify socio-ecological drivers that affect conservation and management of fire adapted ecosystems, yet studies that identify such variables and explore their interaction in specific systems are not only scarce but limited to only a few systems. Although information on the socio-ecological effects of prescribed fire application exists, there is no integrative framework that simultaneously considers the interplay between social and ecological factors affecting the use of prescribed fires. Fire suppression, together with other human and natural disturbances in grassland systems that are adapted to episodic fire, are the major factors that have contributed to the recruitment of woody species into grasslands worldwide. Even though the ecology of restoring these fire prone systems back to a grassland state is becoming clearer, the major hurdle to reintroducing historic fire at a landscape scale is its social acceptability. To address these deficiencies, I studied the socio-ecological factors influencing the use of prescribed fire in Texas, USA and Chihuahua, Mexico using a combination of quantitative and qualitative approaches to examine how social and ecological factors affect ecosystem conservation and management of semi-arid grassland systems. For the Texas case study I used quantitative survey data analyzed using logistic regression models and structural equation models. For the Mexico case study I used qualitative interviews gathered using a snowball network sampling approach and coded them based on the analytic themes of land cover change, institutional failure, market drivers, and population dynamics. Results from the Texas case study suggest that risk taking orientation and especially, perceived support from others when implementing prescribed burns, play important roles in determining attitudes towards the use of high-intensity prescribed fires, which are sometimes needed to restore ecosystems. Results from the Texas case study also highlight how membership in Prescribed Burn Associations (PBAs) influence land manager decisions regarding the use of prescribed fire by reducing concerns over lack of skills, knowledge and resources. Results emphasize the potential for PBAs to reduce risk concerns regarding the application of prescribed fire and are relevant to management of brush encroached areas. Through PBAs, effective landscape-scale solutions to the brush encroachment problem can be achieved in Texas. Results from the Mexico case study show how fire stopped effectively being a driving factor on this system decades ago. Socio-political and ecological changes at the national, and international level produced changes in land use disrupting historical fire patterns and contributing to the ecological deterioration of the area. Droughts combined with poor management practices have depleted the fuel needed to carry a fire. Landowners also face safety and legal concerns but in most cases, even if a landowner decided to implement a prescribed burn, an ecological threshold has been crossed and current fine fuel loads (grass) are insufficient to carry a fire that is sufficiently intense to reduce brush cover and restore grassland and savanna ecosystems. Based on my findings I can conclude that ecologically sound adaptive management and social capital are fundamental components of the livelihoods of landowners and land managers in both case studies. Work and investment that is focused on strengthening this social capital will have the most profound effects in maintaining the integrity of grassland systems at a landscape scale.

Toledo, David

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

Cathy A. Wills

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development and application of an integrated ecological modelling framework to analyze the impact of wastewater discharges on the ecological water quality of rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modelling is an effective tool to investigate the ecological state of water resources. In developing countries, the impact of sanitation infrastructures (e.g. wastewater treatment plants) is typically assessed considering the achievement of legal physicochemical ... Keywords: Habitat suitability models, Information-theoretic approach, Integrated ecological modelling, MIKE 11, Multi-model inference

Javier E. Holguin-Gonzalez, Gert Everaert, Pieter Boets, Alberto Galvis, Peter L. M. Goethals

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Book review: Basic and Applied Ecology 4, pp. 281 (2003). Gibson DJ: Methods in comparative plant population ecology. Oxford University Press,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book review: Basic and Applied Ecology 4, pp. 281 (2003). Gibson DJ: Methods in comparative plant-19-850562-0 In recent years a number of useful books on methods in plant ecology have been published, e.g. Hendry). However, most of them deal with specialised aspects and a more general book aimed at intermediate students

Gibson, David

178

A Method for Creating anA Method for Creating an Ecological Site Extent MapEcological Site Extent Map  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

067XY150WY.R067XY150WY. 1.1. Enter theEnter the Ecological Site IDEcological Site ID 2.2. Enter aEnterMapArcMap Open Arc Toolbox and use the searchOpen Arc Toolbox and use the search function for the termfunction for the term Merge.Merge. Double clickDouble click thethe MergeMerge tool under thetool under the Data

179

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory annual technical progress report of ecological research for the year ending July 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) is a research unit of the University of Georgia (UGA). The overall mission of the Laboratory is to acquire and communicate knowledge of ecological processes and principles. SREL conducts basic and applied ecological research, as well as education and outreach programs, under a contract with the US Department of Energy (DOE) at the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina. Significant accomplishments were made during the past year in the areas of research, education and service. Major additions to SREL Facilities were completed that will enhance the Laboratory`s work in the future. Following several years of planning, opening ceremonies were held for the 5000 ft{sup 2} multi-purpose conference center that was funded by the University of Georgia Research Foundation (UGARF). The center is located on 68 acres of land that was provided by the US Department of Energy. This joint effort between DOE and UGARF supports DOE`s new initiative to develop partnerships with the private sector and universities. The facility is being used for scientific meetings and environmental education programs for students, teachers and the general public. A 6000 ft{sup 2} office and library addition to S@s main building officially opened this year, and construction plans are underway on a new animal care facility, laboratory addition, and receiving building.

Smith, M.H.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A Database and Meta-Analysis of Ecological Responses to Flow in the South Atlantic Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized and quantitative relationships between flow and ecology are pivotal to developing environmental flow standards based on socially acceptable ecological conditions. Informing management at regional scales requires compiling sufficient hydrologic and ecological sources of information, identifying information gaps, and creating a framework for hypothesis development and testing. We compiled studies of empirical and theoretical relationships between flow and ecology in the South Atlantic region (SAR) of the United States to evaluate their utility for the development of environmental flow standards. Using database searches, internet searches, and agency contacts, we gathered 186 sources of information that provided a qualitative or quantitative relationship between flow and ecology within states encompassing the SAR. A total of 109 of the 186 sources had sufficient information to support quantitative analyses. Ecological responses to natural changes in flow magnitude, frequency, and duration were highly variable regardless of the direction and magnitude of changes in flow. In contrast, the majority of ecological responses to anthropogenic-induced flow alterations were negative. Fish consistently showed negative responses to anthropogenic flow alterations whereas other ecological groups showed somewhat variable responses (e.g. macroinvertebrates and riparian vegetation) and even positive responses (e.g. algae). Fish and organic matter had sufficient sample sizes to stratify natural flow-ecology relationships by specific flow categories (e.g. high flow, baseflows) or by region (e.g. coastal plain, uplands). After stratifying relationships, we found that significant correlations existed between changes in natural flow and ecological responses. In addition, a regression tree explained 57% of the variation in fish responses to anthropogenic and natural changes in flow. Because of some ambiguity in interpreting the directionality in ecological responses, we utilized ecological gains or losses, where each represents a benefit or reduction to ecosystem services, respectively. Variables explained 49% of the variation in ecological gains and losses for all ecological groups combined. Altogether, our results suggested that the source of flow change and the ecological group of interest played primary roles in determining the direction and magnitude of ecological responses. Furthermore, our results suggest that developing broadly generalized relationships between ecology and changes in flow at a regional scale is unlikely unless relationships are placed within meaningful contexts, such as environmental flow components or by geomorphic setting.

McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Orth, Dr. Donald J [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Davis, Dr, Mary [Southeastern Aquatic Resources Partnership; Kauffman, John [John Kauffman LLC.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Guidance Manual for Conducting Screening Level Ecological Risk Assessments at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

This document presents reference material for conducting screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERAs)for the waste area groups (WAGs) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included in this document are discussions of the objectives of and processes for conducting SLERAs. The Environmental Protection Agency ecological risk assessment framework is closely followed. Guidance for site characterization, stressor characterization, ecological effects, pathways of contaminant migration, the conceptual site model, assessment endpoints, measurement endpoints, analysis guidance, and risk characterization are included.

R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; R. C. Morris

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Of fish and people: Managerial ecology in Newfoundland and Labrador cod fisheries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation aims to understand the history of, and possible alternatives to, managerial responses to socio-ecological issues by examining one of the largest natural resource (more)

Bavington, Dean Louis Yelwa

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The ecology of chemical defence in a filamentous marine red alga.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??I investigated the ecological functions of halogenated secondary metabolites from the red alga Asparagopsis armata, their localisation in specialised cells and also their cost of (more)

Paul, Nicholas Andrew

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The United States Regional Association of the International Association for Landscape Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from a meeting on landscape ecology. Topics include: conservation, climatic change, forest management, aquatic, wetland, rural and urban landscapes, land use, and biodiversity.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

The United States Regional Association of the International Association for Landscape Ecology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstracts are presented from a meeting on landscape ecology. Topics include: conservation, climatic change, forest management, aquatic, wetland, rural and urban landscapes, land use, and biodiversity.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Proceedings of the symposium on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Ecology Programs  

SciTech Connect

The symposium covered all aspects of ecological research being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site in southeastern Idaho. Entries wer made for the individual papers.

Markham, O.D.; Arthur, W.J. (eds.)

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

CURRICULUM VITAE, LAWREN SACK Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Tel: 310-825-6525  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forest, Petersham, MA. 4. Sack L, Holbrook NM. 2002. Leaf `hydrology': linking hydraulic conductance Forest Ecology Symposium, Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA. 2. Sack L. 2001. Temperate woody seedling

Grether, Gregory

188

update: Beyond taxonomical space: large?scale ecology meets functional and phylogenetic diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

andfunctionaldiversity. FunctionalEcology,25, Gaston,Beyond taxo? nomic diversity patterns: how do ?, ?andphylogenetic diversity respond to environmental

Cianciaruso, Marcus V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the programs activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Twenty-Five Years of Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Review of Environmental Problems and Remedial Actions  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy s Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated oncethrough cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody s biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Identification and simulation of a spatial ecological model in a lake with fractal boundary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a 2D ecological model of phytoplankton dynamics accounting for the distribution and the evolution of algae in a large basin located in the Amazonian region. The model is described by a set of reaction-drift-diffusion equations and is driven ... Keywords: Ecological model, Fractal boundary approximation, Model identification, Phytoplankton dynamics, Reaction-drift-diffusion equations

Chiara Mocenni; Emiliano Sparacino

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Integrating Ecological Data: Notes from the Grasslands ANPP Data Integration Project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating Ecological Data: Notes from the Grasslands ANPP Data Integration Project Judith B, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, 7 South African National Parks, Scientific Services across sites. The Grasslands ANPP Data Integration (GDI) project has brought together experts in ecology

193

Plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive as an ecologically beneficial component for liquid motor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plant for producing an oxygen-containing additive for liquid motor fuels comprises an anaerobic fermentation vessel, a gasholder, a system for removal of sulphuretted hydrogen, and a hotwell. The plant further comprises an aerobic fermentation vessel, a device for liquid substance pumping, a device for liquid aeration with an oxygen-containing gas, a removal system of solid mass residue after fermentation, a gas distribution device; a device for heavy gases utilization; a device for ammonia adsorption by water; a liquid-gas mixer; a cavity mixer, a system that serves superficial active and dispersant matters and a cooler; all of these being connected to each other by pipelines. The technical result being the implementation of a process for producing an oxygen containing additive, which after being added to liquid motor fuels, provides an ecologically beneficial component for motor fuels by ensuring the stability of composition fuel properties during long-term storage.

Siryk, Yury Paul; Balytski, Ivan Peter; Korolyov, Volodymyr George; Klishyn, Olexiy Nick; Lnianiy, Vitaly Nick; Lyakh, Yury Alex; Rogulin, Victor Valery

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Use of Ecological Restoration Principles To Achieve Remedy Protection at the Fernald Preserve and Weldon Spring Sites

195

Deep-Sea Ecology_Monitoring Review_final.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4540 4540 Review of Deep-Sea Ecology and Monitoring as They Relate to Deep-Sea Oil and Gas Operations R.K. Kropp Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington January 2004 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC06-76RL01830 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process,

196

ORNUTM-13249 DRAFT AN ECOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF A VANADIUM  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ORNUTM-13249 ORNUTM-13249 DRAFT AN ECOLOGICAL INVESTIGATION OF A VANADIUM AND URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE 1. G. Smith, M. J. Peterson, and M. G. Ryon Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program Environmental Sciences Division Oak RidgeNational Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 1996 Prepared for Gretchen A. Pierce Healthand Safety Research Division Environmental Technology Section Oak RidgeNational Laboratory GrandJunction, Colorado Prepared by the Environmental Sciences Division Oak RidgeNational Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 Managed by LOCKHEED MARTIN ENERGY RESEARCH CORP. for the U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY under contract DE-AC05-960R22464 I. INTRODUCTION From 1942 through 1946, the Vanadium Corporation of America operated a vanadium and uranium mill in Monticello, Utah (Rust Geotech 1995a). In 1948, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) purchased the mill site

197

Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Central receiver power plant: an environmental, ecological, and socioeconomic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical details of the central receiver design are reviewed. Socio-economic questions are considered including: market penetration, air industrial sector model, demands on industry, employment, effluents associated with manufacture of components, strains due to intensive construction, water requirements, and land requirements. The ecological effects in the vicinity of the central receiver plant site are dealt with, with emphasis on effects on land surface, mammals, and reptiles and amphibians. Climatological considerations are reviewed including: desert types, effects of surface albedo modification, effects of aerosols, effects on evaporation rates, the heliostat canopy, effects on turbulent transfer rates, effects on the wind profile, a model of convection about a central receiver plant, and a global scenario. Drawings of heliostat and plant design are included in appendices. (MHR)

Davison, M.; Grether, D.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Feral Africanized honey bee ecology in a coastal prairie landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Honey bees, Apis mellifera, play an important role in many ecosystems, pollinating a wide variety of native, agricultural, and exotic plants. The recent decline in the number of feral and managed honey bee colonies in North America, as well as the arrival of Africanized honey bees, have caused concern about adequate pollination for agricultural crops and natural plant communities. However, little is known about feral colonies, and the feral population is the source for Africanized honey bees as they spread and infiltrate managed populations. The goal of my dissertation was to examine the ecology of feral honey bee colonies, adding the spatial context necessary to understand the population ecology and patterns of resource use by feral honey bees on the Welder Wildlife Refuge. I defined the functional heterogeneity of feral honey bee habitat by identifying the suitability of different habitats for feral colonies based on the distribution and abundance of important resources (cavities, nectar, and pollen). I evaluated the distribution and abundance of feral colonies by examining nest site characteristics, population trends, and spatial and temporal patterns in cavity use. Lastly, I examined resource use by evaluating patterns in pollen collection and identifying where and when honey bees searched for resources. Overall, the Welder Wildlife Refuge provided excellent habitat for feral honey bees, supporting a high density of feral colonies. The dense live oak habitat was the best overall source for cavities, nectar, and pollen. Nectar and pollen were abundant throughout the year, with the exception of December and January, when a large number of honey bees searched for resources. Cavities did not appear to vary in their suitability for feral colonies based on measured structural and environmental attributes, since no cavity attributes were correlated with indices of cavity quality. However, the cavity quality indices varied between cavities, suggesting some cavities were more suitable for feral honey bees than others. Colonies were aggregated within the study area, probably due to the distribution of resources. The invasion of Africanized honey bees appeared to fragment the existing European population, with Africanized colonies aggregated in distribution and European colonies random in distribution.

Baum, Kristen Anne

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites Safety and Ecology Corp. for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules June 14, 2005 - 4:53pm Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified Safety and Ecology Corporation, the contractor responsible for radiological safety at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Project in Portsmouth, Ohio, that it will fine the company $55,000 for violating the department's regulations prohibiting retaliation against employees who raise nuclear safety concerns. "We take safety very seriously at the Department of Energy," said Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health John Shaw. "Today's action illustrates the department's commitment to ensuring that any and all valid

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Event:Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Special Session of China Ecological Forum: Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation: on 2012/07/20 China Ecological Forum will host a special session, in which keynote speeches will be presented by Ms. Amina Mohamed, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP and UN Assistant Secretary-General, and Prof. Yanhua Liu, Counsellor at the Counsellors' Office of the State Council of China. The special forum, titled "Rio+20 and South-South Cooperation", is focused on the new opportunities and challenges for South-South Cooperation and the way China cooperates with other developing countries in a post Rio+20 era. The forum also aims to inspire the science community to enhance its support

202

On making sense : some recent investigations in time, metaphor, and ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-part text in which the author ultimately proposes the metaphorical artistic methodology of making sense, and articulates its role in radical ecological projects. The author discusses the body of work produced for her ...

Badger, Gina Elizabeth Eleanor

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Mesoscale Disturbance and Ecological Response to Decadal Climatic Variability in the American Southwest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ecological responses to climatic variability in the Southwest include regionally synchronized fires, insect outbreaks, and pulses in tree demography (births and deaths). Multicentury, tree-ring reconstructions of drought, disturbance history, and ...

Thomas W. Swetnam; Julio L. Betancourt

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

U.S. Bamboo house of the future : standardizing ecological living  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis focuses on ecological living through the use of bamboo. It explores how the material can be used for methods of prefabricated housing design within the United States. It also uses a "ht of parts" and describes ...

Wong, Lucy Lai

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steven Hallam of the University of British Columbia talks "From Fjords to Open Seas: Ecological Genomics of Expanding Oxygen Minimum Zones" on March 24, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Hallam, Steven

2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

1.018J / 7.30J Fundamentals of Ecology, Fall 2003  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic subject in ecology: understanding the flow of energy and materials through ecosystems, and what regulates the distribution and abundance of organisms. Productivity and biogeochemical cycles in ecosystems; trophic ...

Chisholm, Sallie W.

208

Organizational ecology and population dynamics in politics : an agent-based model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2.3.3 Using an Agent-Based Model . . . . .Chapter 3 An Agent Based Model of Organizational Ecology 3.1of cooperation: Agent-based models of competition and

Jung, Danielle Fitzpatrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

A neuro-computational intelligence analysis of the ecological footprint of nations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The per capita ecological footprint (EF) is one of the most-widely recognized measures of environmental sustainability. It seeks to quantify the Earth's biological capacity required to support human activity. This study uses three neuro-computational ...

Mohamed M. Mostafa; Rajan Nataraajan

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ecological effects of oil shale development: problems, perspectives, and approaches  

SciTech Connect

Although current oil shale developments in the Piceance Basin appear to have had little impact on ecosystems, it is important to recognize that planned expansion of the industry in the Basin will greatly magnify the potential for serious perturbations of the Piceance environs. The relatively small scale of the present oil shale activities in the Basin provides the biologist with a unique opportunity to establish and conduct quantitative studies designed to measure impacts as they occur. This paper is intended to focus attention on some of the problems, perspectives and recommended approaches to conducting ecosystem effects studies that will provide criteria for evaluation and mitigation of impacts should they occur. The purpose of this paper is not to criticize past and current environmental studies on oil shale, but in light of anticipated growth of the industry, to focus attention on the need to carefully define, design and execute ecological effects studies to quantify and provide mitigation criteria for impacts that will undoubtedly result from accelerated industry activities.

Hakonson, T.E.; White. G.C.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications  

SciTech Connect

The common goal of these diverse projects is to understand the mechanisms of how animal populations respond to the continual changes in their environment in both time and space. Our models are mechanistic allowing us to explore how a wide array of environmental variables may determine individual performance. Large scale climate change and its effect on animal populations can be seen as quantitative extensions of biological responses to smaller scales of environmental variability. Changes in developmental rates or reproductive levels of individuals, extension or contraction of geographic ranges, and modification of community organization have all been documented in response to previous changes in habitats. We know from our biophysical work that some changes in function are driven by microclimate conditions directly, and some are mediated indirectly through ecological parameters such as the food supply. Our research is guided by a comprehensive conceptual scheme of the interaction of an animal with its environment. The physical and physiological properties of the organism, and the range of available microclimates, set bounds on the performance of organismal function, such as growth, reproduction, storage, and behavior. To leave the most offspring over a lifetime, animals must perform those functions in a way that maximizes the amount of resources devoted to reproduction. Maximizing the total size of the budget and minimizing those budget items not devoted to reproduction are crucial. Animals trade off among expenditures for current and future reproduction. Both water and energy are important, potentially limiting resources. Projects described here include empirical studies and theoretical models.

Porter, W.P.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

An evaluation of the ecological consequences of partial-power operation of the K Reactor, SRS  

SciTech Connect

The K Reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS) shut-down in spring 1988 for maintenance and safety upgrades. Since that time the receiving stream for thermal effluent, Indian Grave Branch and Pen Branch, have undergone a pattern of post-thermal recovery that is typical of other SRS streams following removal of thermal stress. Divesity of fish and aquatic macroinvertebrate communities has increased and available habitats have been colonized by numerous species of herbaceous and woody plants. K Reactor is scheduled to resume operation in 1991 and operate through 1992 without a cooling tower to cool the discharge. It is likely that the reactor will operate at approximately one-third to one-half of full power (800--1200 MW thermal) during this period and effluent temperatures will be substantially lower than earlier operation at full power. Monthly average discharge temperatures at half-power operation will range from approximately 42{degrees}C in winter to 49{degrees}C in summer. The volume of water discharged will not be affected by altered power levels and will average approximately 10--11 m{sup 3}/s. The ecological consequences of this mode of operation on the Indian Grave/Pen Branch stream system have been evaluated.

Gladden, J.B.; Mackey, H.E.; Paller, M.H.; Specht, W.L.; Wike, L.D.; Wilde, E.W.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Aspen Ecology in Rocky Mountain National Park: Age Distribution, Genetics, and the Effects of Elk Herbivory  

SciTech Connect

Lack of aspen (Populus tremuloides) recruitment and canopy replacement of aspen stands that grow on the edges of grasslands on the low-elevation elk (Cervus elaphus) winter range of Rocky Mountain National Park (RMNP) in Colorado has been a cause of concern for more than 70 years (Packard, 1942; Olmsted, 1979; Stevens, 1980; Hess, 1993; R.J. Monello, T.L. Johnson, and R.G. Wright, Rocky Mountain National Park, 2006, written commun.). These aspen stands are a significant resource since they are located close to the park's road system and thus are highly visible to park visitors. Aspen communities are integral to the ecological structure of montane and subalpine landscapes because they contain high native species richness of plants, birds, and butterflies (Chong and others, 2001; Simonson and others, 2001; Chong and Stohlgren, 2007). These low-elevation, winter range stands also represent a unique component of the park's plant community diversity since most (more than 95 percent) of the park's aspen stands grow in coniferous forest, often on sheltered slopes and at higher elevations, while these winter range stands are situated on the low-elevation ecotone between the winter range grasslands and some of the park's drier coniferous forests.

Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Yin, Tongming [ORNL

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Jump to: navigation, search Name EcoCampus, Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Facility EcoCampus PV Sector Solar Facility Type Solar PV Facility Status In Service Owner Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Developer Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Energy Purchaser Center for Creative Ecology, Kibbutz Lotan, Israel Address Kibbutz Lotan Location Israel, Zip 88855 Coordinates 29.987877559303°, 35.085187554359° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.987877559303,"lon":35.085187554359,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

215

Preliminary environmental assessment for the satellite power system (SPS). Volume 1. Executive summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the preliminary assessment of the environmental impacts of a SPS is given. Microwave health and ecological effects, other effects on health and the environment, effects on the atmosphere, and effects on communications systems are summarized. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

A Strategic Project Appraisal framework for ecologically sustainable urban infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Actors in the built environment are progressively considering environmental and social issues alongside functional and economic aspects of development projects. Infrastructure projects represent major investment and construction initiatives with attendant environmental, economic and societal impacts across multiple scales. To date, while sustainability strategies and frameworks have focused on wider national aspirations and strategic objectives, they are noticeably weak in addressing micro-level integrated decision making in the built environment, particularly for infrastructure projects. The proposed approach of this paper is based on the principal that early intervention is the most cost-effective and efficient means of mitigating the environmental effects of development projects, particularly macro infrastructure developments. A strategic overview of the various project alternatives, taking account for stakeholder and expert input, could effectively reduce project impacts/risks at low cost to the project developers but provide significant benefit to wider communities, including communities of future stakeholders. This paper is the first exploratory step in developing a more systematic framework for evaluating strategic alternatives for major metropolitan infrastructure projects, based on key sustainability principles. The developed Strategic Project Appraisal (SPA) framework, grounded in the theory of Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA), provides a means of practically appraising project impacts and alternatives in terms of quantified ecological limits; addresses the neglected topic of metropolitan infrastructure as a means of delivering sustainability outcomes in the urban context and more broadly, seeks to open a debate on the potential for SEA methodology to be more extensively applied to address sustainability challenges in the built environment. Practically applied and timed appropriately, the SPA framework can enable better decision-making and more efficient resource allocation ensuring low impact infrastructure development.

Morrissey, John, E-mail: john.morrissey@rmit.edu.au [Centre for Design, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); Iyer-Raniga, Usha, E-mail: usha.iyer-raniga@rmit.edu.au [School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia); McLaughlin, Patricia; Mills, Anthony [School of Property, Construction and Project Management, RMIT University, GPO Box 2476, Melbourne VIC 3001 (Australia)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Thermal ecology and habitat selection of two cryptic skinks (Scincidae: Emoia cyanura, E. impar) on Mo'orea, French Polynesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

113. Bennett A. F. 1980. The thermal dependence of lizard1996. Microhabitat Use and Thermal Ecology of Two Narrowly1996. Body temperature, thermal tolerance and influence of

McElroy, Matt T

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1977 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 2. Ecological sciences  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for 19 sections of this report. A list is included of publications during 1977 that discuss research on the ecological impact of energy technologies.

Vaughan, B.E.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Geopolitics of Oil, Gas, and Ecology in the Caucasus and Caspian Sea Basin. 1998 Caucasus Conference Report.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998. OIL AND ECOLOGY Azerbaijan International OperatingCommitment to the Environment. Baku, Azerbaijan. 1996. .Export Pipeline. Baku, Azerbaijan. 1996. . Technical

Garcelon, Marc; Walker, Edward W.; Patten-Wood, Alexandra; Radovich, Aleksandra

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Twenty-Plus Years of Environmental Change and Ecological Recovery of East Fork Poplar Creek: Background and Trends in Water Quality  

SciTech Connect

In May 1985, a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, allowing discharge of effluents to East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC). The effluents ranged from large volumes of chlorinated once-through cooling water and cooling tower blow-down to smaller discharges of treated and untreated process wastewaters, which contained a mixture of heavy metals, organics, and nutrients, especially nitrates. As a condition of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed to meet two major objectives: demonstrate that the established effluent limitations were protecting the classified uses of EFPC, and document the ecological effects resulting from implementing a Water Pollution Control Program at the Y-12 Complex. The second objective is the primary focus of the other papers in this special series. This paper provides a history of pollution and the remedial actions that were implemented; describes the geographic setting of the study area; and characterizes the physicochemical attributes of the sampling sites, including changes in stream flow and temperature that occurred during implementation of the BMAP. Most of the actions taken under the Water Pollution Control Program were completed between 1986 and 1998, with as many as four years elapsing between some of the most significant actions. The Water Pollution Control Program included constructing nine new wastewater treatment facilities and implementation of several other pollution-reducing measures, such as a best management practices plan; area-source pollution control management; and various spill-prevention projects. Many of the major actions had readily discernable effects on the chemical and physical conditions of EFPC. As controls on effluents entering the stream were implemented, pollutant concentrations generally declined and, at least initially, the volume of water discharged from the Y-12 Complex declined. This reduction in discharge was of ecological concern and led to implementation of a flow management program for EFPC. Implementing flow management, in turn, led to substantial changes in chemical and physical conditions of the stream: stream discharge nearly doubled and stream temperatures decreased, becoming more similar to those in reference streams. While water quality clearly improved, meeting water quality standards alone does not guarantee protection of a waterbody's biological integrity. Results from studies on the ecological changes stemming from pollution-reduction actions, such as those presented in this series, also are needed to understand how best to restore or protect biological integrity and enhance ecological recovery in stream ecosystems. With a better knowledge of the ecological consequences of their decisions, environmental managers can better evaluate alternative actions and more accurately predict their effects.

Smith, John G [ORNL; Stewart, Arthur J [ORNL; Loar, James M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nonpoint Source Pollution from Land Use Workshop. Novemberasked to investigate pollution from land use activities. Newland and water interactions and point and non-point sources of pollution

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

office. Participants included transportation and environmental professionals involved with stormwater managementEnvironmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide ManagementEnvironmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Great Lakes National Program Office (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide Management

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

ECOLOGICAL AND ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILITY OF TROPICAL REEF SYSTEMS: ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE TOURISM IN THE EXUMA CAYS, BAHAMAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

visitor manage-ment. Pres- ently, the Park has initiated programs to protect the seabed (e.g., installing would include specific objectives to protect corals, seagrass beds or other seabed communities. The cost

Sealey, Kathleen Sullivan

224

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as well as in water conservation might help to slow anyrecent years because water conservation efforts is expecteddemand management and water conservation and the use of

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Building voluntary sustainability : how urban design can promote care for ecological systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human behavior is, in aggregate present state, unsustainable by the ecosystem of the earth. This thesis develops a behavior change model of how societies can move from unsustainable to sustainable behavior, and, because ...

Markel, Christina Paige Buist

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Assessing Habitat Quality of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/Haida Gwaii, by Algorithm, Airphoto Interpretation, and Aerial Survey Methods By F. Louise Waterhouse Alan E, by Algorithm, Airphoto Interpretation, and Aerial Survey Methods. Research Section, Coast Forest Region, BC

227

Supporting Water, Ecological, and Transportation Systems in the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

8-9, 2004. Ann Arbor, Michigan. Great Lakes InformationKeystone, Colorado. Lake Michigan (MI) Lakewide ManagementOffice (GLNPO) Lake Michigan Lakewide Management Plan (LaMP)

Beck, Judy; Kamke, Sherry; Majerus, Kimberly

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture Systems ~ Wildlife Using Combined Snowpack and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Inverting the above equation and solving for the real and imaginary parts one finds G r R r rRC R r LC RC L

229

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA HUMANS AS PREDATORS AND PREY IN ECOLOGICAL SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Wisconsin. 59 2.S4 Buck harvest per license (blue) and license sales (red) in MN, WI, PA, and VA. 60 3.1 Map 4.3 Catch per unit effort at the steady state spider monkey population size for bow hunters and gun by bow and gun hunters. 145 4.6 Comparing model output and data to validate the biodemographic mode

Mangel, Marc

230

Incorporating ecological risk assessment into remedial investigation/feasibility study work plans  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document (1) provides instructions on preparing the components of an ecological work plan to complement the overall site remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan and (2) directs the user on how to implement ecological tasks identified in the plan. Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA), and RI/FS work plan will have to be developed as part of the site-remediation scoping process. Specific guidance on the RI/FS process and the preparation of work plans has been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1988a). This document provides guidance to US Department of Energy (DOE) staff and contractor personnel for incorporation of ecological information into environmental remediation planning and decision making at CERCLA sites.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Landscape ecological planning: Integrating land use and wildlife conservation for biomass crops  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

What do a mussel shoat, a zoo, and a biomass plantation have in common? Each can benefit from ecology-based landscape planning. This paper provides examples of landscape ecological planning from some diverse projects the author has worked on, and discusses how processes employed and lessons learned from these projects are being used to help answer questions about the effects of biomass plantings (hardwood tree crops and native grasses) on wildlife habitat. Biomass environmental research is being designed to assess how plantings of different acreage, composition and landscape context affect wildlife habitat value, and is addressing the cumulative effect on wildlife habitat of establishing multiple biomass plantations across the landscape. Through landscape ecological planning, answers gleaned from research can also help guide biomass planting site selection and harvest strategies to improve habitat for native wildlife species within the context of economically viable plantation management - thereby integrating the needs of people with those of the environment.

Schiller, A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Geothermal handbook. Geothermal project, 1976. [Ecological effects of geothermal resources development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geothermal program of Fish and Wildlife Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior, aims to develop ecologically sound practices for the exploration, development, and management of geothermal resources and the identification of the biological consequences of such development so as to minimize adverse effects on fish and wildlife resources. This handbook provides information about the ecological effects of geothermal resource development. Chapters are included on US geothermal resources; geothermal land leasing; procedures for assessing the effects on fish and game; environmental impact of exploratory and field development operations; and wildlife habitat improvement methods for geothermal development.

Not Available

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Ecological Risk Assessment Guidance for Superfund: Process for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5. What is the condition of the bank (e.g., height, slope, extent of vegetative cover)? 6. Is the system influenced by tides? yes no What information was...

234

Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

REVIEW Wind of change: new insights on the ecology and evolution of pollination and mating in wind- pollinated plants. At least 10 % of angiosperms are wind pollinated, and this mode of pollination has evolved. Here, the evolution and functional ecology of pollination and mating in wind-pollinated plants

Barrett, Spencer C.H.

235

Abstracts and program proceedings of the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains information about the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter. The topics discussed include: extinction risk assessment modelling, ecological risk analysis of uranium mining, impacts of pesticides, demography, habitats, atmospheric deposition, and climate change.

Kercher, J.R.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Study Abroad in China Summer Course PB495/595: Plant Resources and Ecology in Eastern China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study Abroad in China ­ Summer Course PB495/595: Plant Resources and Ecology in Eastern China to famous mountains, wetland parks, and lakes in eastern China, students will gain skills in field botany and knowledge of wetland and lake ecology, plant biodiversity and its uses in China. The course enhances cross

Xiang, Jenny Qiuyun

237

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY SEMINAR Join us on Mondays, 4-5 pm in 150 Ecology!  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CONSERVATION BIOLOGY SEMINAR FALL 2013 Join us on Mondays, 4-5 pm in 150 Ecology! 9-Sep CB Faculty and Cultural Dimensions of Conservation USGS-Minnesota Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit Asst. Leader 7-Oct Yosef Cohen Evolutionary Distributions Fisheries, Wildlife and Conservation Biology 14-Oct David

Weiblen, George D

238

Conservation Biology (Biology 45300) An Ecology Course for the Fall of 2007 with RF Rockwell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation Biology (Biology 45300) An Ecology Course for the Fall of 2007 with RF Rockwell Biology 45300 - Conservation Biology This undergraduate course provides an introduction to conservation biology with an emphasis on the interplay of various fields of biology in the mamangement and conservation

Lombardi, John R.

239

Survey of ecological resources at selected US Department of Energy sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owns and manages a wide range of ecological resources. During the next 30 years, DOE Headquarters and Field Offices will make land-use planning decisions and conduct environmental remediation and restoration activities in response to federal and state statutes. This document fulfills, in part, DOE`s need to know what types of ecological resources it currently owns and manages by synthesizing information on the types and locations of ecological resources at 10 DOE sites: Hanford Site, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, Rocky Flats Plant, Los Alamos National Laboratory, savannah River Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, and Fernald Environmental Management Project. This report summarizes information on ecosystems, habitats, and federally listed threatened, endangered, and candidate species that could be stressed by contaminants or physical activity during the restoration process, or by the natural or anthropogenic transport of contaminants from presently contaminated areas into presently uncontaminated areas. This report also provides summary information on the ecosystems, habitats, and threatened and endangered species that exist on each of the 10 sites. Each site chapter contains a general description of the site, including information on size, location, history, geology, hydrology, and climate. Descriptions of the major vegetation and animal communities and of aquatic resources are also provided, with discussions of the treatened or endangered plant or animal species present. Site-specific ecological issues are also discussed in each site chapter. 106 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

McAllister, C.; Beckert, H.; Abrams, C. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Visualizing Situational Data: Applying Information Fusion for Detecting Social-Ecological Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As anthropogenic and environmental behaviors rapidly evolve many ecosystems and communities, managers of natural resources, scientists, and other stakeholders increasingly need tools that can rapidly alert them to emerging events that can affect social ... Keywords: data mining, decision support, events, information fusion, social-ecological, text analysis, visualization

Mark R. Altaweel; Lillian N. Alessa; Andrew D. Kliskey

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The Impact of Membership Overlap on Growth: An Ecological Competition View of Online Groups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dominant narrative of the Internet has been one of unconstrained growth, abundance, and plenitude. It is in this context that new forms of organizing, such as online groups, have emerged. However, the same factors that underlie the utopian narrative ... Keywords: competition, membership overlap, online communities, online groups, organizational ecology

Xiaoqing Wang; Brian S. Butler; Yuqing Ren

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

C H A P T E R F O U R Ecological Interactions and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site. In most cases, evaluating abundance by volume or biomass allows more ecologically meaningful dominate the biomass and species representation in benthic marine communities to the point that referring abundance in terms of both number of individuals and biomass at various Caribbean and Great Barrier Reefs

Ronquist, Fredrik

243

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable RAPIDLY RENEWABLE MATERIALS: WOOL AND CORK Done by: Bin Ou-Yang David Tan Ritesh Bhan #12;i ABSTRACT This report presents an investigation into the feasibility of using two rapidly renewable materials, cork

244

Plant Ecology 171: 2333, 2004. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the hills. Water electrical conductivity (EC) values at the upper surface of the water table of this site of water potentials and transpiration rates across sites could be explained by higher values of soil the coastline of Tuscany have important ecological, environmental, historical and economical functions. Umbrella

Mencuccini, Maurizio

245

Efficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable Buildings M. Kostic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and use (a bleep on a human history radar screen), the following energy future activities, in orderEfficient and Sustainable Energy: Ecology and Energy Challenges Energy Efficient and Sustainable As "Location, location, and location" is the most important for Realtors, the "(Energy) Efficiency, efficiency

Kostic, Milivoje M.

246

COINS: an integrative modelling shell for carbon accounting and general ecological analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is common for a range of models to be developed to investigate broadly similar ecological and environmental phenomena. This inevitably results in collections of models that, although individually possessing unique characteristics, also share a number ... Keywords: Carbon modelling, Model integration, Simulation modelling

S. H. Roxburgh; I. D. Davies

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Teaching-Learning Ecologies: Mapping the Environment to Structure Through Action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although organizational theorists have long argued that environments shape organizational structures, they have paid little attention to the processes by which the shaping occurs. This paper examines these processes by showing how environments shape ... Keywords: action, ecology, environment, learning, structure, teaching

Diane E. Bailey; Stephen R. Barley

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evan DeLucia of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute talks about "The Promise and Challenge of Producing Biofuel Feedstocks: An Ecological Perspective" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

DeLucia, Evan

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

249

Nuclear power plants: Ecology and health physics. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning ecological and health aspects related to nuclear power plants. References cover radiation protection, occupational exposure, reactor safety and shielding, reactor accidents, and radiation measuring instruments. Genetic radiation effects, radiation-induced neoplasms, and radiation contaminants are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory radioecology and ecology programs. 1983 progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in research on: the baseline ecology of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), the effects of disturbance on animal and plant communities, and the behavior of radionuclides in the environment surrounding radioactive waste sites. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports. (ACR)

Markham, O. D. [ed.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ecological Optimization Performance of An Irreversible Quantum Otto Cycle Working with an Ideal Fermi Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The model of an irreversible Otto cycle using an ideal Fermi gas as the working fluid, which is called as the irreversible Fermi Otto cycle, is established in this paper. Based on the equation of state of an ideal Fermi gas, the ecological optimization ...

Feng Wu; Lingen Chen; Fengrui Sun; Chih Wu; Fangzhong Guo; Qing Li

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Summary of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs. Version 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This summary document presents results in a broad context; it is not limited to findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This book is organized to present the findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and correlative programs in accordance with the originally stated objectives of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group. This plan, in essence, traces plutonium from its injection into the environment to movement in the ecosystem to development of cleanup techniques. Information on other radionuclides was also obtained and will be presented briefly. Chapter 1 presents a brief description of the ecological setting of the Test Range Complex. The results of investigations for plutonium distribution are presented in Chapter 2 for the area surrounding the Test Range Complex and in Chapter 3 for on-site locations. Chapters 4 and 5 present the results of investigations concerned with concentrations and movement, respectively, of plutonium in the ecosystem of the Test Range Complex, and Chapter 6 summarizes the potential hazard from this plutonium. Development of techniques for cleanup and treatment is presented in Chapter 7, and the inventory of radionuclides other than plutonium is presented briefly in Chapter 8.

Friesen, H.N. [Raytheon Services Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The development of high definition television : an ecology of games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study is an analysis of the forces that shaped the overall character of a new US television system, high definition or HDTV, between the early 1980s and 2010, with a primary focus on the period leading up the Federal ...

Neil, Suzanne Chambliss

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Public Trust Doctrine: Where Ecology Meets Natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locations with freestanding water over the seabed. The utilization of piezocone penetration tests (CPTu) automated seabed supported frames, and (c) dynamic positioning ships. Seabed systems include proprietary-penetrometers, and vanes, as well as coring rock to 150 m depths below the seabed (see Figure 3). In some arrangements

Sagarin, Rafe

255

Gecko: A continuous 2d world for ecological modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An individual-based simulation system, named Gecko, is presented for modeling multiple species at multiple trophic levels, on a spatially explicit, continuous two-dimensional landscape. Biologically motivated rules are specified at an individual level, ... Keywords: Echo, Gecko, Swarm, allometry, ecosystem dynamics, ecosystem modeling, individual-based model, spatial competition

Ginger Booth

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Molecular Ecology (2006) 15, 18 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02863.x 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Ecology (2006) 15, 1­8 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2005.02863.x © 2006 Blackwell Publishing submitted each year to Molecular Ecology. At the time this editorial was written, we were on track is a 28% increase over the 2002 Impact Factor of 3.01. Molecular Ecology currently ranks fifth out of 107

Rieseberg, Loren

257

Work plan for conducting an ecological risk assessment at J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation and feasibility study (RI/FS) of the J-Field area at APG pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. J-Field is within the Edgewood Area of APG in Harford County, Maryland, and activities at the Edgewood Area since World War II have included the development, manufacture, testing, and destruction of chemical agents and munitions. The J-Field site was used to destroy chemical agents and munitions by open burning and open detonation. This work plan presents the approach proposed to conduct an ecological risk assessment (ERA) as part of the RI/FS program at J-Field. This work plan identifies the locations and types of field studies proposed for each area of concern (AOC), the laboratory studies proposed to evaluate toxicity of media, and the methodology to be used in estimating doses to ecological receptors and discusses the approach that will be used to estimate and evaluate ecological risks at J-Field. Eight AOCs have been identified at J-Field, and the proposed ERA is designed to evaluate the potential for adverse impacts to ecological receptors from contaminated media at each AOC, as well as over the entire J-Field site. The proposed ERA approach consists of three major phases, incorporating field and laboratory studies as well as modeling. Phase 1 includes biotic surveys of the aquatic and terrestrial habitats, biological tissue sampling and analysis, and media toxicity testing at each AOC and appropriate reference locations. Phase 2 includes definitive toxicity testing of media from areas of known or suspected contamination or of media for which the Phase 1 results indicate toxicity or adverse ecological effects. In Phase 3, the uptake models initially developed in Phase 2 will be finalized, and contaminant dose to each receptor from all complete pathways will be estimated.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.] [and others

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The ecology of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an ecosystem significantly different from other delta ecosystems in North America. The Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta is one of the 60 largest river deltas in the world and is the largest river delta on the west coast. As the hub of California's water system, the delta is of immense municipal, agricultural, and industrial importance. The amount of freshwater that flows through the delta controls the delta's productivity and regulates the life cycles of many of its organisms. The vast estuary of the Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers is one of the most highly modified and intensively managed estuaries in the world. Biological processes in the delta are obscured by the temporal dynamics of the system. Many of the most significant alterations, such as leveeing, diking, and agricultural practices, are not now recognized as such by most citizens, making conservation and protection of the delta difficult. 308 refs., 43 figs., 11 tabs.

Herbold, B.; Moyle, P.B. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Dept. of Wildlife and Fisheries Biology)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

An ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified ecological survey was conducted on July 15, 1992, using the modified point-centered quarter sampling technique (Kooser and Rankin). The survey was conducted to identify community types and the presence of areas with the potential to be identified as wetlands. The survey was cross-referenced with topographical maps for Waverly, Waverly South, Lucasville, and Wakefield (Department of Interior, 1987), with Wetlands Identification: Federal Manual for Identifying and Delineating Jurisdictional Wetlands (Government Institutes, 1989)' and with the endangered and threatened species lists for Ohio. Additionally, the Division of Natural Areas and Preserves, Department of Natural Resources, was consulted. The Pike County Soil Conservation District Office was consulted to determine

260

Produced water discharges to the Gulf of Mexico: Background information for ecological risk assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews ecological risk assessment concepts and methods; describes important biological resources in the Gulf of Mexico of potential concern for produced water impacts; and summarizes data available to estimate exposure and effects of produced water discharges. The emphasis is on data relating to produced water discharges in the central and western Gulf of Mexico, especially in Louisiana. Much of the summarized data and cited literature are relevant to assessments of impacts in other regions. Data describing effects on marine and estuarine fishes, mollusks, crustaceans and benthic invertebrates are emphasized. This review is part of a series of studies of the health and ecological risks from discharges of produced water to the Gulf of Mexico. These assessments will provide input to regulators in the development of guidelines and permits, and to industry in the use of appropriate discharge practices.

Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; DePhillips, M.P.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/human_ecology Deans Message  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human Ecology students working together in a study group This year was very good for the Faculty. Research and innovation were very strong. Our students are successful and we offer them more opportunities each year. These remarkable achievements continue our long history of influential contributions to the University and the Manitoba community. Over the years, contexts of the Facultys work changed, as did our partners. But the underlying values have not. Human Ecology uses values such as responsiveness and relatedness between people to promote the health and quality of life. In our work these values translate as efforts to prevent disease, delay the onset of disease and prevent social dysfunction within families and communities. The Faculty identifies interdisciplinary health promotion as the guiding principle for its work. Preparations for the Centennial celebrations in 2010 have started. In the next few years we will have many opportunities to celebrate our achievements, contributions and unique values. Join us!

Cover Photo; Dr. Gustaaf Sevenhuysen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Mass drug administration for the control and elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria: an ecological study from Jiangsu province, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drug administration, Primaquine, Plasmodium vivax, China *drug administration for the control and elimination of Plasmodium vivax malaria: an ecological study from Jiangsu province, China.Chinas recent use of focal MDA. The optimal timing, frequency, drug(

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Household adoption of ecological sanitation : an assessment of agricultural value and user perspectives in Nyanza Province, Kenya  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological sanitation, or ecosan, refers to a range of sanitation technologies in which human excreta is recovered and retained on-site, and eventually reused. However, when a culture does not have a tradition of reusing ...

Robinson, Brian E. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The evolution and ecology of interspecific territoriality: Studies of Anolis lizards and North American wood-warblers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E. Bermingham. 2002. What is a wood-warbler? Molecularmultilocus phylogeny for the wood-warblers and a revisedplayback experiments with wood warblers. Ecology 82:207-218.

Losin, Neil

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Red Snapper Ecology and Fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Based on a symposium held in San  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Red Snapper Ecology and Fisheries in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. Based on a symposium held in San in the Gulf of Mexico, which is the subject of this vol- ume. The book includes contributions from experts

Aguirre, Windsor E.

266

Remedial investigation report for J-Field, Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. Volume 3: Ecological risk assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Management Division of the U.S. Army Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG), Maryland, is conducting a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) of the J-Field area at APG, pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. As part of that activity, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted an ecological risk assessment (ERA) of the J-Field site. This report presents the results of that assessment.

Hlohowskyj, I.; Hayse, J.; Kuperman, R.; Van Lonkhuyzen, R.

2000-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

267

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 011 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2011 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies that were conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River and to investigate associations with hydrological, ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

268

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2010 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) consisted of adult and juvenile fish surveys, habitat evaluations, and water quality studies conducted upstream and downstream of 11 participating power plants that cover nearly 600 river miles. The principal research objectives of this study were to evaluate possible effects of thermal effluents on the temporal and spatial distributions of juvenile and adult fish in the Ohio River, and to investigate associations with hydrological, water ...

2012-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

269

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2006 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2006 ORERP fish population sampling near 12 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2005 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2005 ORERP fish population sampling near the Ohio River power stations. In 2005, the program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies near 17 electric generating stations that covered nearly the entire (~1000 mile) length of the river.

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP): 2007 Ohio River Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ohio River Ecological Research Program (ORERP) is the largest collaborative power plant research program in the world. This report presents the results of the 2007 ORERP fish population sampling near 10 Ohio River power plants that covered nearly the entire (1,000 mile) length of the river. The sampling program consisted of adult/juvenile fish, habitat, and water quality field studies conducted upstream and downstream of the participating power plants.

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

272

The ecology of Barataria Basin, Louisiana: An estuarine profile  

SciTech Connect

The Barataria Basin lies entirely in Louisiana between the natural levees of the active Mississippi River and the abandoned Bayou Lafourche distributary. It is characterized by a network of interconnecting water bodies which allows transport of water, materials, and migrating organisms throughout the basin. Natural and artificial levees and barrier islands are the only high, well-drained ground in the basin, which is otherwise characterized by extensive swamp forests and fresh, brackish, and salt marshes. These wetlands and water bodies are extremely productive biologically and provide valuable nursery habitat for a number of commercial and recreational fish and shellfish, as well as habitat for wintering waterfowl and furbearers. The basin is a dynamic system undergoing constant change because of geologic and human processes. The network of bays, lakes, and bayous has gradually enlarged over time due to natural subsidence and erosion. Superimposed on these natural processes has been the construction of levees for flood control and network of canals constructed for oil and gas exploration and extraction. These human activities have altered natural hydrologic patterns in the basin and may directly or indirectly contribute to wetland losses. Controlling wetland deterioration in the basin is a major management concern.

Conner, W.H.; Day, J.W. Jr. (eds.)

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Ecological Assessment of Hazardous Waste Sites: A Field and Laboratory Reference  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecological Assessment of Ecological Assessment of Hazardous Waste Sites: A Field and Laboratory Reference U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Environmental Research Laboratory 200 S. W. 35th Street Corvallis, OR 97333 ECOLOGICAL ASSESSMENTS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES: A FIELD AND LABORATORY REFERENCE DOCUMENT Edited By William Warren-Hicks l Benjamin R. Parkhurst 2 Samuel S. Baker, Jr. 1 1 Kilkelly Environmental Associates Highway 70 West - The Water Garden Raleigh, NC 27622 2 Western Aquatics, Inc. P.O. BOX 546 203 Grand Avenue Laramie, WY 82070 DISCLAIMER T h e i n f o r m a t i o n i n t h i s d o c u m e n t h a s b e e n f u n d e d b y t h e U n i t e d S t a t e s Environmental Protection Agent h by Contract Number 68-03-3439 to Kilkelly Environmenta] Associates, Raleig , NC 27622. It has been subject to the Agency's peer and administrative review, and it has been approved for publication as an EPA

274

Priorities for ecological research on energy crops in the north central states  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Following the principles set by the National Biofuels Roundtable, a workshop was held in March 1995 which brought together a group of stakeholders and experts in the field of biomass energy and ecology. The mission of the workshop was to identify and set priorities for ecological research to ensure that large-scale biomass energy development in the North Central states occurs in an ecologically sound, sustainable manner. The workshop found that questions about the landscape-scale deployment of biomass plantations were most pressing. The workshop recommended that adaptive resource management principles be applied in a phased development of increasingly larger plantations. Each phase of development would help to answer questions about landscape-scale development; improving the design of subsequent phases. Principles of sustainable agriculture should also be applied to biomass plantations to minimize impact on soils and water quality, maintain productivity and benefit the rural economy. Results of the workshop will be helpful to natural resource and research agencies, as well as utilities and biomass energy developers.

Ugoretz, S.M. [Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (United States); Rineer, K.C. [Public Service Commission of Wisconsin (United States); Downing, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

Determination of ecologically vital groundwaters at selected sites in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is classifying groundwaters at sites in its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Of particular concern is the potential presence of groundwaters that are highly vulnerable to contamination and that are either (1) irreplaceable sources of drinking water or (2) ecologically vital. Conditions at nine FUSRAP sites were evaluated to determine if ecologically vital groundwaters are present. The sites evaluated were Wayne Interim Storage Site, Maywood Interim Storage Site, and Middlesex Sampling Plant in New Jersey; Ashland 2 Site, Seaway Industrial Park, Colonie Interim storage Site, and Niagara Falls Storage Site in New York; and the St. Louis Airport Site and Hazelwood Interim Storage Site in Missouri. The analyses indicated that groundwaters are vulnerable to contamination at all but two of the sites -- the Ashland 2 and Seaway Industrial Park sites in New York. Groundwater discharge points were identified within a 2-mile radius (i.e., the classification review area) of all of the sites. No ecologically vital groundwater areas exist in the vicinities of any of the nine FUSRAP sites evaluated. 35 refs., 17 figs.

Vinikour, W.S.; Yin, S.C.L.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Infrastructure Ecology for Sustainable and Resilient Urban Infrastructure Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The population growth coupled with increasing urbanization is predicted to exert a huge demand on the growth and retrofit of urban infrastructure, particularly in water and energy systems. The U.S. population is estimated to grow by 23% (UN, 2009) between 2005 and 2030. The corresponding increases in energy and water demand were predicted as 14% (EIA, 2009) and 20% (Elcock, 2008), respectively. The water-energy nexus needs to be better understood to satisfy the increased demand in a sustainable manner without conflicting with environmental and economic constraints. Overall, 4% of U.S. power generation is used for water distribution (80%) and treatment (20%). 3% of U.S. water consumption (100 billion gallons per day, or 100 BGD) and 40% of U.S. water withdrawal (340 BGD) are for thermoelectric power generation (Goldstein and Smith, 2002). The water demand for energy production is predicted to increase most significantly among the water consumption sectors by 2030. On the other hand, due to the dearth of conventional water sources, energy intensive technologies are increasingly in use to treat seawater and brackish groundwater for water supply. Thus comprehending the interrelation and interdependency between water and energy system is imperative to evaluate sustainable water and energy supply alternatives for cities. In addition to the water-energy nexus, decentralized or distributed concept is also beneficial for designing sustainable water and energy infrastructure as these alternatives require lesser distribution lines and space in a compact urban area. Especially, the distributed energy infrastructure is more suited to interconnect various large and small scale renewable energy producers which can be expected to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In the case of decentralized water infrastructure, on-site wastewater treatment facility can provide multiple benefits. Firstly, it reduces the potable water demand by reusing the treated water for non-potable uses and secondly, it also reduces the wastewater load to central facility. In addition, lesser dependency on the distribution network contributes to increased reliability and resiliency of the infrastructure. The goal of this research is to develop a framework which seeks an optimal combination of decentralized water and energy alternatives and centralized infrastructures based on physical and socio-economic environments of a region. Centralized and decentralized options related to water, wastewater and stormwater and distributed energy alternatives including photovoltaic (PV) generators, fuel cells and microturbines are investigated. In the context of the water-energy nexus, water recovery from energy alternatives and energy recovery from water alternatives are reflected. Alternatives recapturing nutrients from wastewater are also considered to conserve depleting resources. The alternatives are evaluated in terms of their life-cycle environmental impact and economic performance using a hybrid life cycle assessment (LCA) tool and cost benefit analysis, respectively. Meeting the increasing demand of a test bed, an optimal combination of the alternatives is designed to minimize environmental and economic impacts including CO2 emissions, human health risk, natural resource use, and construction and operation cost. The framework determines the optimal combination depending on urban density, transmission or conveyance distance or network, geology, climate, etc. Therefore, it will be also able to evaluate infrastructure resiliency against physical and socio-economic challenges such as population growth, severe weather, energy and water shortage, economic crisis, and so on.

Jeong, Hyunju [Georgia Institute of Technology; Pandit, Arka [Georgia Institute of Technology; Crittenden, John [Georgia Institute of Technology; Xu, Ming [University of Michigan; Perrings, Charles [Arizona State University; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Li, Ke [University of Georgia; French, Steve [Georgia Institute of Technology

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Developing custom fire behavior fuel models from ecologically complex fuel structures for upper Atlantic Coastal Plain forests.  

SciTech Connect

Currently geospatial fire behavior analyses are performed with an array of fire behavior modeling systems such as FARSITE, FlamMap, and the Large Fire Simulation System. These systems currently require standard or customized surface fire behavior fuel models as inputs that are often assigned through remote sensing information. The ability to handle hundreds or thousands of measured surface fuelbeds representing the fine scale variation in fire behavior on the landscape is constrained in terms of creating compatible custom fire behavior fuel models. In this study, we demonstrate an objective method for taking ecologically complex fuelbeds from inventory observations and converting those into a set of custom fuel models that can be mapped to the original landscape. We use an original set of 629 fuel inventory plots measured on an 80,000 ha contiguous landscape in the upper Atlantic Coastal Plain of the southeastern United States. From models linking stand conditions to component fuel loads, we impute fuelbeds for over 6000 stands. These imputed fuelbeds were then converted to fire behavior parameters under extreme fuel moisture and wind conditions (97th percentile) using the fuel characteristic classification system (FCCS) to estimate surface fire rate of spread, surface fire flame length, shrub layer reaction intensity (heat load), non-woody layer reaction intensity, woody layer reaction intensity, and litter-lichen-moss layer reaction intensity. We performed hierarchical cluster analysis of the stands based on the values of the fire behavior parameters. The resulting 7 clusters were the basis for the development of 7 custom fire behavior fuel models from the cluster centroids that were calibrated against the FCCS point data for wind and fuel moisture. The latter process resulted in calibration against flame length as it was difficult to obtain a simultaneous calibration against both rate of spread and flame length. The clusters based on FCCS fire behavior parameters represent reasonably identifiable stand conditions, being: (1) pine dominated stands with more litter and down woody debriscomponents than other stands, (2) hardwood and pine stands with no shrubs, (3) hardwood dominated stands with low shrub and high non-woody biomass and high down woody debris, (4) stands with high grass and forb (i.e., non-woody) biomass as well as substantial shrub biomass, (5) stands with both high shrub and litter biomass, (6) pine-mixed hardwood stands with moderate litter biomass and low shrub biomass, and (7) baldcypress-tupelo stands. Models representing these stand clusters generated flame lengths from 0.6 to 2.3 musing a 30 km h{sub 1} wind speed and fireline intensities of 100-1500 kW m{sub 1} that are typical within the range of experience on this landscape. The fuel models ranked 1 < 2 < 7 < 5 < 4 < 3 < 6 in terms of both flame length and fireline intensity. The method allows for ecologically complex data to be utilized in order to create a landscape representative of measured fuel conditions and to create models that interface with geospatial fire models.

Parresol, Bernard, R.; Scott, Joe, H.; Andreu, Anne; Prichard, Susan; Kurth, Laurie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Councils Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program.

Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Johnson, Gary E.; Sather, Nichole K.; Storch, Adam; Jones, Tucker A.; Mallette, Christine; Dawley, Earl M.; Skalski, John R.; Teel, David; Moran, Paul

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

279

Review: An integrated biophysical and socio-economic framework for analysis of climate change adaptation strategies: The case of a New Zealand dairy farming system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of effective climate change adaptation strategies for complex, adaptive socio-ecological systems such as farming systems, requires an in-depth understanding of both the dynamic nature of the systems themselves and the changing environment ... Keywords: Adaptation, Climate change, Framework, Interdisciplinary research, Modelling, Resilience, Soft systems

Electra Kalaugher; Janet F. Bornman; Anthony Clark; Pierre Beukes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Bibliography for the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography encompasses systems definition and engineering aspects; environmental assessment of microwave health and ecology, risks to space workers and atmospheric effects; a societal assessment covering resource requirements (land and materials) international and institutional issues; and a comparative assessment of the SPS Reference System relative to other advanced energy technologies, such as fusion. (MHR)

Abromavage, M.; Calzadilla, R.; Murray, M.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

KBSLUA: A knowledge-based system applied in river land use assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assessment of river land use is an important, but complex and time-consuming task that has to deal with a huge amount of data, domain regulations, legal aspects, and expert knowledge in terms of environmental protection, ecology, and water resource ... Keywords: Geographic information system, Knowledge-based system, River land use

Tzai-Zang Lee; Chien-Hsing Wu; Hsien-Hui Wei

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

National Climate Assessment: Indicators System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indicators System Print E-mail Indicators System Print E-mail What are the goals for the NCA indicators? The vision for the National Climate Assessment (NCA) is to create a system of indicators that will help inform policy-makers and citizens understand key aspects of our changing climate. Scientific information about physical climate conditions, climate impacts, vulnerabilities, and preparedness will be tracked and compiled. These measures are called indicators. The goals of the Indicators System are to: Provide meaningful, authoritative climate-relevant measures about the status, rates, and trends of key physical, ecological, and societal variables and values Inform decisions on management, research, and education at regional to national scales Identify climate-related conditions and impacts to help develop effective mitigation and adaptation measures

283

Literature Review on the Effects of Prescription Fire on theEcology of Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has historically conducted prescription burns across approximately 2,000 acres of Site 300 on an annual basis to safeguard test facilities and operations from the risk of wildfire encroachment. Prescription burns began in 1960, and although fire frequency varies among the designated burn areas, all have been burned at least once. A patchwork of native perennial grassland communities and associated special-status plant and animal populations occur onsite in many areas that have been receiving these treatments. Because the size and locations of prescription burns may shift in coming years, an evaluation is warranted to determine how these shifts may affect listed biota, including rare plants, and the distinct ecological conditions present on the site. This report presents the results of a literature review conducted by ICF International (ICF) to collect basic information on native perennial grasslands in California, the influence of fire on these grasslands, and management tools for restoring and maintaining them. The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature on California native grasslands and summarize the current state of knowledge pertaining to the possible effects -- both beneficial and detrimental -- of prescribed fire on the ecology of Site 300. The results of this review are intended to inform future management practices that may be carried out at Site 300 to maintain the plant and wildlife communities and to ensure that the ecological conditions benefit the special-status species that inhabit the Site. This review is also intended to identify a study approach to investigate changes over the next 10 years in the burned areas and in areas where burning will be discontinued.

Preston, R

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

Larval ecology and synchronous reproduction of two crustacean species : Semibalanus balanoides in New England, USA and Gecarcinus quadratus in Veraguas, Panama  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The environmental cues for synchronous reproduction were investigated for two highly abundant, ecologically important crustacean species: the temperate acorn barnacle, Semibalanus balanoides, and the tropical terrestrial ...

Gyory, Joanna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in- itiated in

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Agent-based Ecological Model Calibration - on the Edge of a New Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present a new approach to ecological model calibration -- an agent-based software. This agent works on three stages: 1- It builds a matrix that synthesizes the inter-variable relationships; 2- It analyses the steady-state sensitivity of different variables to different parameters; 3- It runs the model iteratively and measures model lack of fit, adequacy and reliability. Stage 3 continues until some convergence criteria are attained. At each iteration, the agent knows from stages 1 and 2, which parameters are most likely to produce the desired shift on predicted results.

Pereira, Antonio; Reis, Luis Paulo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Pigeon Ecology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

common pigeon, it will survive the winter just fine, as long as it doesn't get too much shock going from warm indoors to cold outdoors - acclimate it by keeping it a day or two in...

288

Microbial Ecology  

mixed with an equal volume of chloroform in a phase-lock gel tube (Eppendorf, Westbury, NY, USA) and ... respectively (Fig. 1), and contained over 40 ...

289

Ecological Studies  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Studies Book 1 Rulison Animal (and Fish) Printout . . Results g4-..* 9%- mc,-y----T. . , -..-- x.. ? ,.-: ? . - ; : . * r - . - . ; r m - - - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

290

Index of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group and associated publications available in the Coordination and Information Center  

SciTech Connect

This publication was created by the Coordination and Information Center (CIC) to provide a readily available research tool for use by researchers interested in a specific area covered in the holdings of the CIC Archives. The Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG) was formed and functioned in agreement with Planning Directive NVO-76 (July 29, 1970 and revised January 1, 1974, (CIC-165845 and CIC-16439) respectively) to coordinate the ecological and other environmental programs necessary to support the continued nuclear testing activities; and to provide a mechanism to effectively comply with requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, Executive Order 11514, and AEC Manual Chapter 0510.'' The publication contains only citations to documents currently available at the CIC. It represents a significant portion of the principal research findings of the Nevada Applied Ecology Group.

Maza, B.G.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Behavioral ecology of bald eagles along the northwest coast: a landscape perspective. [Haliaeetus leucocephalus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the range of the bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) has been subjected to anthropogenic disturbance of greater magnitude than the natural regimes of pre-European settlement times. Consequently, many eagle populations are depauperate. Eagle populations are large and stable, however, along the relatively pristine Pacific Northwest Coast of North America. This study examines: (1) the behavior and ecology of bald eagles along the northwest coast; and (2) the effects of environmental disturbance and resource dynamics on the ecology and evolution of eagles. The ephemeral nature of food supplies along the northwest coast apparently results in eagles being limited primarily by food stress. The foraging behavior of eagles was analyzed using evolutionary game theory as a theoretical construct. Productivity was found to be variable and generally declining in southeast Alaska. Eagles maximized energy input for survival by feeding opportunistically, making broad-scale movements to find food patches, locating food within a patch by searching for prey or for conspecifics with prey, assessing prey profitability, acquiring food by hunting and stealing, and by defending food through threat displays or fighting. Eagles obtain food for reproduction by defending feeding territories and by storing food in their nests. These strategies and adaptations translate up scale and influence characteristics of the regional population. 34 figs., 21 tabs.

Hansen, A.J.; Dyer, M.I.; Shugart, H.H.; Boeker, E.L.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington for the Tank Waste Remediation System, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington file:///I|/Data%20Migration%20Task/EIS-0189-FEIS-Summary-1996.HTM[6/27/2011 11:21:59 AM] The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires Federal agencies to analyze the potential environmental impacts of their proposed actions to assist them in making informed decisions. A similar Washington State law, the State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA), requires State agencies, including the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), to analyze environmental impacts before making decisions that could impact the environment. A major emphasis of both laws is to promote public awareness of these actions and provide opportunities for public involvement. Because NEPA and SEPA requirements are similar, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Ecology

293

Analysis of ecological effects of geopressured-geothermal resource development. Geopressured-geothermal technical paper No. 4  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities involved in geopressured-geothermal resource production are identified and their ecological impacts are discussed. The analysis separates those activites that are unique to geopressured-geothermal development from those that also occur in oil and gas and other resource developments. Of the unique activities, those with the greatest potential for serious ecological effect are: (1) accidental brine discharge as a result of a blowout during well drilling; (2) subsidence; (3) fault activation and enhanced seismicity; and (4) subsurface contamination of water, hydrocarbon, and mineral reservoirs. Available methods to predict and control these effects are discussed.

Not Available

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Approach and strategy for performing ecological risk assessments for the U.S. Department of Energy`s Oak Ridge Reservation: 1994 revision  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance for planning and performing ecological risk assessments on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The tiered approach to ecological risk assessment has been implemented, generic conceptual models have been developed, and a general approach for developing ecological assessment endpoints and measurement endpoints has been agreed upon. The document also includes changes in terminology to agree with the terminology in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) framework for ecological risk assessment. Although ecological risks are equal in regulatory importance to human health risks, formal procedures for ecological risk assessment are poorly developed. This report will provide specific guidance and promote the use of consistent approaches for ecological risk assessments at individual sites on the ORR. The strategy discussed in this report is consistent with the overall strategy for site management and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) compliance and with relevant EPA guidance. The general approach and strategy presented herein was developed for the ORR, but it should be applicable to other complex CERCLA sites that possess significant ecological resources.

Suter, G.W. II; Sample, B.E.; Jones, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2002 Report (Part Two of Two)  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during fiscal year 2002. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center. Biological surveys for the presence of sensitive species and important biological resources were conducted for 26 NTS projects. These projects have the potential to disturb a total of 374 acres. Thirteen of the projects were in desert tortoise habitat, and 13.38 acres of desert tortoise habitat were disturbed. No tortoises were found in or displaced from project areas, and no tortoises were accidentally injured or killed at project areas or along paved roads. Compilation of historical wildlife data continued this year in efforts to develop faunal distribution maps for the NTS. Photographs associated with the NTS ecological landform units sampled to create the NTS vegetation maps were cataloged for future retrieval and analysis. The list of sensitive plant species for which long-term population monitoring is scheduled was revised. Six vascular plants and five mosses were added to the list. Plant density estimates from ten populations of Astragalus beatleyae were collected, and eight known populations of Eriogonum concinnum were visited to assess plant and habitat status. Minimal field monitoring of western burrowing owl burrows occurred. A report relating to the ecology of the western burrowing owl on the Nevada Test Site was prepared which summarizes four years of data collected on this species' distribution, burrow use, reproduction, activity patterns, and food habits. Bat roost sites within seven buildings slated for demolition were identified, and a BN biologist was a contributing author of the Nevada Bat Conservation Plan published by the Nevada Bat Working Group. Thirty-three adult horses and five foals were counted this year. Six active raptor nests (two American kestrel, two Red-tailed hawk, and two Great-horned owl nests) were found and monitored this year. Selected wetlands and man-made water sources were monitored for physical parameters and wildlife use. No dead animals were observed this year in any plastic-lined sump. The chemical release test plan for one experiment at the HAZMAT Spill Center on Frenchman Lake playa was reviewed. Seasonal sampling of downwind and upwind transects near the spill center was conducted to document baseline conditions of biota.

C. A. Wills

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Ecological Modelling 117 (1999) 261267 Modeling bird mortality associated with the M/V Citrus oil spill  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ecological Modelling 117 (1999) 261­267 Modeling bird mortality associated with the M/V Citrus oil of Ornithology, American Museum of Natural History, Central Park West at 79th Street, New York NY 10024, USA/V Citrus oil spill in February 1996. Most of the islands beaches were searched on an irregular schedule

Rockwell, Robert F.

297

Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale2 In press with Ecology and Society as an Insight Article5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Bioenergy Sustainability at the Regional Scale2 3 4 In press with Ecology and Society Mulholland1 , G. Philip Robertson3 8 9 10 1 Center for Bioenergy Sustainability, Environmental Sciences by the UT-Battelle, LLC, for DOE under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.32 33 #12;Bioenergy Sustainability

298

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 20072010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (Sandy River delta (rkm 192208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

OHA January 8, 2003), affirmed, Safety & Ecology Corp. v. DOE (October 15, 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEC is a sub-contractor of Bechtel Jacobs Corporation, the SEC is a sub-contractor of Bechtel Jacobs Corporation, the DOE's managing contractor at the Portsmouth site in Piketon, Ohio. January 8, 2003 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Appeal Name of Petitioner: Susan Rice Gossett Date of Filing: September 13, 2002 Case Number: VBA-0062 This Decision considers an Appeal of an Initial Agency Decision (IAD) issued on May 8, 2002, involving a Complaint filed by Susan Rice Gossett (Gossett or the Complainant) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. In her Complaint, Gossett claims that her former employer, the Safety and Ecology Company (SEC) terminated her as a retaliation for making disclosures that are protected under Part 708. 1/ In the IAD, the Hearing Officer determined that Gossett

300

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Human Health and Ecological Risk Assessment Work Plan Mud Pit Release Sites, Amchitka Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This Work Plan describes the approach that will be used to conduct human health and ecological risk assessments for Amchitka Island, Alaska, which was utilized as an underground nuclear test site between 1965 and 1971. During this period, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U.S. Department of Energy) conducted two nuclear tests (known as Long Shot and Milrow) and assisted the U.S. Department of Defense with a third test (known as Cannikin). Amchitka Island is approximately 42 miles long and located 1,340 miles west-southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, in the western end of the Aleutian Island archipelago in a group of islands known as the Rat Islands. Historically including deep drilling operations required large volumes of drilling mud, a considerable amount of which was left on the island in exposed mud pits after testing was completed. Therefore, there is a need for drilling mud pit remediation and risk assessment of historical mud pit releases. The scope of this work plan is to document the environmental objectives and the proposed technical site investigation strategies that will be utilized for the site characterization of the constituents in soil, surface water, and sediment at these former testing sites. Its goal is the collection of data in sufficient quantity and quality to determine current site conditions, support a risk assessment for the site surfaces, and evaluate what further remedial action is required to achieve permanent closure of these three sites that will protect both human health and the environment. Suspected compounds of potential ecological concern for investigative analysis at these sites include diesel-range organics, polyaromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, volatile organic compounds, and chromium. The results of these characterizations and risk assessments will be used to evaluate corrective action alternatives to include no further action, the implementation of institutional controls, capping on site, or off-sit e disposal of contaminated waste. The results of this evaluation will be presented in a subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE /NV

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

302

An evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions of West Lake on the Hanford site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

West Lake and its immediate surrounding basin represent a unique habitat that is dominated by highly saline water and soil. The basin offers a valuable research site for studies of a rare and complex wetland area in the desert. This report is an evaluation of the chemical, radiological, and ecological conditions at West Lake and describes how ground water influences site properties. The scope of this evaluation consisted of a sampling program in 1989 and a review of data from the perspective of assessing the impact of Hanford Site operations on the physical, chemical, and ecological conditions of West Lake and its surrounding basin. The water level in West Lake fluctuates in relation to changes in the water table. The connection between West Lake and ground water is also supported by the presence of {sup 3}H and {sup 99}Tc in the ground water and in the lake. There are relatively high concentrations of uranium in West Lake; the highest concentrations are found in the northernmost isolated pool. Analyses of water, sediment, vegetation, and soil indicate possible shifts of isotropic ratios that indicate a reduction of {sup 235}U. Uranium-236 was not detected in West Lake water; its presence would indicate neutron-activated {sup 235}U from fuel reprocessing at Hanford. Trace metals are found at elevated concentrations in West Lake. Arsenic, chromium, copper, and zinc were found at levels in excess of US Environmental Protection Agency water quality criteria. Levels of radiological and chemical contamination in the West Lake basin are relatively low. Concentrations of fission isotopes exceed those that could be explained by atmospheric fallout, but fall short of action levels for active waste management areas. 31 refs., 8 figs., 18 tabs.

Poston, T.M.; Price, K.L.; Newcomer, D.R.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Effects of extending the light phase on diapause induction in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

white light emitting diode (LED) (NSPW500BS; Nichia Co., Tokushima, Japan) that was wired to externally mounted time switches (TB23; Matsushita Electric...

304

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.7 Appliances  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2008 Microwave Oven Manufacturer Market Shares (Percent of Products Produced) Company Market Share (%) LG Electronics (Goldstar) 33% Sharp 15% Samsung 15% Daewoo 7% Matsushita...

305

Applying Virtual Environments to Manufacturing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Users bring their architectural plans to the Matsushita store ... extension to the original virtual wind tunnel, NASA ... tracker with a graphics generator or a ...

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

306

Environmental effects of solar thermal power systems: ecological observations during construction of the Barstow 10 MWe pilot STPS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring plan used consists of comparisons of a few meteorological variables and changes in the states of a limited array of indicator species or assemblages of species of plants and animals. Observations inlude aerial photography of the site, saltation meter measurements downwind from the site to measure fluxes of windblown sand, measurements of airborne particulates and atmospheric pollutants, and baseline temperature profiles made at two sites near the heliostat field to measure micro-meteorological patterns. Observations were made of annual plants both in off-field plots and in heliostat field, of shrubs, birds, rodents, reptiles, and sensitive species listed as rare or endangered. (LEW)

Turner, F.B. (ed.) [ed.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Ecological Effects and In-situ Detection of Particulate Contaminants in Aqueous Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ecological effects and mechanistic efficiency of chemical oil spill countermeasures must be evaluated prior to their ethical application during real spill response scenarios. Equally important is the ability to monitor the effectiveness of any spill response in real time, permitting informed response management. In-situ sensors are key components of such event based monitoring and continuous monitoring programs. This project investigates crude oil toxicity as a particulate suspension, suitability of in-situ instrumentation to measure crude oil suspensions, and the applicability of using acoustic backscatter to measure suspended solids and sub-surface oil droplet suspension concentrations. The ecological effects to inter- and sub-tidal sediment dwelling organisms exposed to crude oil, both treated with a chemical dispersant and un-treated, was evaluated. Elevated toxicity, expressed as percent mortality and reduced luminescence, and oil concentrations were observed in inter-tidal sediments receiving oil only treatments compared to oil-plus-dispersant treatments. Sub-tidal sediments showed heterogeneous distribution of crude oil with elevated amphipod mortality compared to no oil controls suggesting an oil-sediment aggregation mechanism. A separate laboratory scale study found that the soluble crude oil fractions were responsible for the observed mortality in pelagic species while the more dominant oil droplet fractions were relatively non-toxic. Subsequent studies focused on the in-situ detection of crude oil and particle suspensions in aqueous environments. The first showed that both in-situ fluorescence spectroscopy and Laser In-Situ Scattering Transmissometry (LISST) can effectively measure crude oil concentrations in aqueous environments. The applicability of the LISST implies that crude oil in an aqueous medium can be measured as a particle suspension. Acoustic backscatter (ABS) was investigated for its applicability as a surrogate measurement technology for aqueous particle suspensions. This study showed a log linear correlation between ABS and volume concentration (VC) over a variable particle size distribution. This correlation is due to the dependency of both ABS and VC to the particle size distribution. Log-linear ABS responses to oil-droplet suspension volume concentrations were also demonstrated. However, the inability to reproduce response factors suggests that more work is required to produce viable calibrations that may be used for sub-surface oil plume detection.

Fuller, Christopher Byron

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nesting ecology of dickcissels on reclaimed surface-mined lands in Freestone County, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface mining and subsequent reclamation often results in the establishment of large areas of grassland that can benefit wildlife. Grasslands have declined substantially over the last 150 years, resulting in declines of many grassland birds. The dickcissel (Spiza americana), a neotropical migrant, is one such bird whose numbers have declined in the last 30 years due to habitat loss, increased nest predation and parasitism, and over harvest (lethally controlled as an agricultural pest on its wintering range in Central and South America). Reclaimed surface-mined lands have been documented to provide important breeding habitat for dickcissels in the United States, emphasizing the importance of reclamation efforts. Objectives were to understand specific aspects of dickcissel nesting ecology (i.e., nest-site selection, nest success, and nest parasitism, and identification of nest predators) on 2 spatial scales on TXU Energy?s Big Brown Mine, near Fairfield, Texas, and to subsequently provide TXU Energy with recommendations to improve reclaimed areas as breeding habitat for dickcissels. I examined the influence of nest-site vegetation characteristics and the effects of field-level spatial factors on dickcissel nesting ecology on 2 sites reclaimed as wildlife habitat. Additionally, I developed a novel technique to identify predators at active nests during the 2003 field season. During 2002?2003, 119 nests were monitored. On smaller spatial scales, dickcissels were likely to select nest-sites with low vegetation, high densities of bunchgrasses and tall forbs, and areas with higher clover content. Probability of nest success increased with nest heights and vegetation heights above the nest, characteristics associated with woody nesting substrates. Woody nesting substrates were selected and bunchgrasses were avoided. Oak (Quercus spp.) saplings remained an important nesting substrate throughout the breeding season. On a larger scale, nest-site selection was likely to occur farther from wooded riparian areas and closer to recently-reclaimed areas. Nest parasitism was likely to occur near roads and wooded riparian areas. Results suggest reclaimed areas could be improved by planting more bunchgrasses, tall forbs (e.g., curly-cup gumweed [Grindelia squarrosa] and sunflower [Helianthus spp.]), clover (Trifolium spp.), and oaks (a preferred nesting substrate associated with higher survival rates). Larger-scale analysis suggests that larger tracts of wildlife areas should be created with wooded riparian areas comprising a minimal portion of a field?s edge.

Dixon, Thomas Pingul

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Forest Productivity and Diversity: Using Ecological Theory and Landscape Models to Guide Sustainable Forest Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sustainable forest management requires maintaining or increasing ecosystem productivity, while preserving or restoring natural levels of biodiversity. Application of general concepts from ecological theory, along with use of mechanistic, landscape-based computer models, can contribute to the successful achievement of both of these objectives. Ecological theories based on the energetics and dynamics of populations can be used to predict the general distribution of individual species, the diversity of different types of species, ecosystem process rates and pool sizes, and patterns of spatial and temporal heterogeneity over a broad range of environmental conditions. This approach requires subdivision of total biodiversity into functional types of organisms, primarily because different types of organisms respond very differently to the spatial and temporal variation of environmental conditions on landscapes. The diversity of species of the same functional type (particularly among plants) tends to be highest at relatively low levels of net primary productivity, while the total number of different functional types (particularly among animals) tends to be highest at high levels of productivity (e.g., site index or potential net primary productivity). In general, the diversity of animals at higher trophic levels (e.g., predators) reaches its maximum at much higher levels of productivity than the diversity of lower trophic levels (e.g., plants). This means that a single environment cannot support high diversity of all types of organisms. Within the framework of the general patterns described above, the distributions, population dynamics, and diversity of organisms in specific regions can be predicted more precisely using a combination of computer simulation models and GIS data based on satellite information and ground surveys. Biophysical models that use information on soil properties, climate, and hydrology have been developed to predict how the abundance and spatial distribution of various plants and animals. These models can be, used to predict the patterns of forest type and structure that develop in response to variation in productivity and disturbance across complex landscapes, as well as species diversity and the distribution and population fluctuations of threatened species in specific regions.

Huston, M.A.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Modeling of interactions among sustainability components of an agro-ecosystem using local knowledge through cognitive mapping and fuzzy inference system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the way the ecological and social components interact in a settlement (a village, town, city) is the key to manage effectively the coupled human-natural system and start programs for its sustainability. This paper presents the utility of ... Keywords: Agricultural sustainability, Cognitive mapping, Coupled human-natural system, Fuzzy inference, Local knowledge, Participatory

T. Rajaram; Ashutosh Das

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The results of an ecological risk assessment screening at the Idaho National Engineering`s waste area group 2  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in southeastern Idaho and occupies approximately 890 square miles on the northwestern portion of the eastern Snake River Plain. INEL has been devoted to nuclear energy research and related activities since its establishment in 1949. In the process of fulfilling this mission, wastes were generated, including radioactive and hazardous materials. Most materials were effectively stored or disposed of, however, some release of contaminants to the environment has occurred. For this reason, the INEL was listed by the US environmental Protection Agency on the National Priorities List (NPL), in November, 1989. This report describes the results of an ecological risk assessment performed for the Waste Area Groups 2 (WAG 2) at the INEL. It also summarizes the performance of screening level ecological risk assessments (SLERA).

VanHorn, R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Molecular Ecology (2007) 16, 20792089 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03265.x 2007 The Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

directions, or coalescing and moving onwards as a single, larger band (Cowan 1929; Sorenson & Jeppson 1940 and space. Molecular Ecology, 12, 89­103. Sorenson CJ, Jeppson LR (1940) Some insect pests of farm crops

Gwynne, Darryl T.

313

Annual Report for 1981 to the DOE Office of the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Protection, Safety, and Emergency Preparedness. Part 2. Ecological Sciences. [Lead abstract  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 38 reports for this Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1981 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. This part dealt with research conducted in the ecological sciences.

Vaughan, B.E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The effects of size-selective harvesting on the population biology and ecology of a sex-changing limpet species, Lottia gigantea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Experimental Marine Biology and Ecology 166:1-17. Moreno,Coast. Environmental Biology of Fishes 77:51-61. Lindberg,intertidal zones. Marine Biology 150:399-413. Savage, V.

Fenberg, Phillip Benjamin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Molecular Ecology (2008) 17, 19831997 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.03722.x 2008 The Authors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular Ecology (2008) 17, 1983­1997 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2008.03722.x © 2008 The Authors range disjunction using molecular data and to further our understanding of phylogeographical patterns

California at Santa Cruz, University of

316

Interaction of 8-Hydroxyquinoline with Soil Environment Mediates Its Ecological Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: Allelopathic functions of plant-released chemicals are often studied through growth bioassays assuming that these chemicals will directly impact plant growth. This overlooks the role of soil factors in mediating allelopathic activities of chemicals, particularly non-volatiles. Here we examined the allelopathic potential of 8-hydroxyquinoline (HQ), a chemical reported to be exuded from the roots of Centaurea diffusa. Methodology/Principal Findings: Growth bioassays and HQ recovery experiments were performed in HQ-treated soils (non-sterile, sterile, organic matter-enriched and glucose-amended) and untreated control soil. Root growth of either Brassica campestris or Phalaris minor was not affected in HQ-treated non-sterile soil. Soil modifications (organic matter and glucose amendments) could not enhance the recovery of HQ in soil, which further supports the observation that HQ is not likely to be an allelopathic compound. Hydroxyquinoline-treated soil had lower values for the CO2 release compared to untreated non-sterile soil. Soil sterilization significantly influenced the organic matter content, PO 4-P and total organic nitrogen levels. Conclusion/Significance: Here, we concluded that evaluation of the effect of a chemical on plant growth is not enough in evaluating the ecological role of a chemical in plant-plant interactions. Interaction of the chemical with soil factors largely

Devika Bajpai; M. S. Rajeswari

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Linking Molecular Microbiology and Geochemistry to Better Understand Microbial Ecology in Coastal Marine Sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The overall objective of the research presented here was to combine multiple geochemical parameters and molecular characterizations to provide a novel view of active microbial community ecology of sediments in a large-river deltaic estuary. In coastal and estuarine environments, a large portion of benthic respiration has been attributed to sulfate reduction and implicated as an important mechanism in hypoxia formation. The use of high-resolution sampling of individual sediment cores and high throughput nucleic acid extraction techniques combined with 454 FLX sequencing provided a robust understanding of the metabolically active benthic microbial community within coastal sediments. This was used to provide further understanding and show the importance of simultaneously analyzing the connectivity of sulfur and iron cycling to the structure and function of the microbial population. Although aqueous sulfide did not accumulate in the sediments of the northern Gulf of Mexico, active sulfate reduction was observed in all locations sampled. Microbial recycling and sequestration as iron sulfides prevented the release of sulfide from the sediment. Prominent differences were observed between the sample locations and with depth into the sediment column. This study emphasized the importance of combining novel molecular techniques with simultaneous traditional geochemical measurements to show the interdependence of microbiology and geochemistry. In addition, this study highlights the need to consider microbial community biogeography along with small-scale variations in geochemistry and biology that impact the overall cycling of redox elements when constructing biogeochemical models in marine sediments.

Reese, Brandi Kiel

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

.Industrial Ecology and Global Change R. SOCOLOW, C. ANDREV/S, F. BERKHOUT, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Development RobertWilliams Abstract Advanced technologies such as gasifier/gas turbine systems for electric

319

ADVANCES ON THE USE OF GEOSYNTHETICS IN HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS Jorge G. Zornberg, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change little. Water diverted from Bendora Dam (the middle dam) is supplied to Canberra via a gravity examines the ecological effects of serial impoundments (three dams) on a rocky upland stream and Sons, New York] and the Australian Rivers Assessment System (AUSRIVAS) to predict pre-dam biota. First

Zornberg, Jorge G.

320

Ecology of the river dolphin, Inia geoffrensis, in the Cinaruco River, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Cinaruco River is a tributary of the Orinoco River, and forms the southern boundary of Venezuela's newest national park, Santos Luzardo. Like other rivers of this region, the Cinaruco River undergoes an extreme seasonal flood cycle. River dolphins were studied from November 1993 to June 1994 to gather baseline data regarding their ecology, including distribution, habitat affinity, group size, population composition, and prey availability. Transects from watercraft were used to count river dolphins, and observation effort was recorded. River dolphin habitat was characterized by broad hydrologic features (i.e., river, lagoon, side channel or confluence), structural composition (i.e., beach, rocks, cutbank, submerged vegetation) and complexity. Population composition by age class was determined according to size. Photo-identification was used to recognize individual dolphins. Potential preyfish availability within habitats was determined by using seine nets and gillnets. Dolphin diet was inferred from one stomach sample and the literature. Dolphins were seen most often during falling water, and least often during rising water. Dolphins were most often seen in confluence areas, and were seldom seen in side channels. The presence of rocks or beaches was associated with a greater frequency of dolphin sightings, and sightings increased with habitat complexity. Average group size for the 8-mo study was 2.0 (O?.05) dolphins, and was greatest during rising water. Greatest densities occurred during failing water, at 3.8 (+O.54) dolphins/km. Calves were first sighted at the end of the dry season and became more common as the waters rose. Six individuals were recognized and resighted by photo-identification; one of these was sighted 8 times over a period of 186 days. The fish diversity of the study area was high, and comprised at least 161 species. The stomach of one Inia contained 15 fish, representing at least 4 species.

McGuire, Tamara Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ecology of large piscivorous fishes in Guri Reservoir, Venezuela, with notes on fish community structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Venezuela's growing human population is accompanied by a growing need for electricity which has largely been met with hydroelectric power, and yet the full effects of river impoundment on river ecosystems are not known. Venezuela currently has the second largest hydroelectric facility in the world, the Raul Leoni Dam (Guri Reservoir). Formed by the blackwater Caroni River, Guri is characterized by low pH, low nutrients, and high dissolved organic matter. Water level fluctuations associated with hydroelectric facility operations may have large effects on tropical fish spawning, feeding, and survival. The primary sportfishes in the reservoir are the peacock basses (Cichla spp.), that exhibited heightened fish production immediately after inundation. However, during the 1990's, sportfishermen at Guri began complaining about decreased catches. To investigate claims of declining Cichla populations and to compare current fish community structure with a previous survey, the four large piscivorous fishes of Guri Reservoir were sampled. Samples from the northern area of the reservoir had 50 species representing 18 different families. The dominant species in seine samples was the characid Hemigrammus micropterus. In these samples, Cichla temensis, Cichla cf orinocensis, Plagioscion squamosissimus and Hydrolycus scomberoides had greater body condition compared with values for conspecifics from a previous study. Conversely, catch per unit effort for Cichla in gillnets decreased in the current study. Prochilodus rubrotaeniatus, a detritivorous characiform, was the dominant species captured in gillnets. Cichla spp. appear to breed throughout the year with a peak before the rainy season. Hydrolycus scomberoides and Plagioscion squamosissimus partitioned resources, with the former consuming the largest prey and the smallest prey consumed by the latter. Cichla temensis and Plagioscion squamosissimus had high diet overlap among prey types but consumed prey of different sizes. Niche breadths for all species were low. Claims of declining Cichla populations in Guri appear to have some foundation. Blackwater physicochemistry, the reservoir "boombust" cycle, and fishing pressure all influence fish ecology in Guri Reservoir.

Williams, John David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ecological survey for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of field ecological surveys conducted by the Center for Integrated Environmental Technologies (CIET) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) at four candidate locations for the siting of the Mixed and Low-Level Waste Treatment Facility (MLLWTF) and the Idaho Waste Processing Facility (IWPF). The purpose of these surveys was to comply with all Federal laws and Executive Orders to identify and evaluate any potential environmental impacts because of the project. The boundaries of the candidate location were marked with blaze-orange lath survey marker stakes by the project management. Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements of the marker stakes were made, and input to the Arc/Info{reg_sign} geographic information system (GIS). Field surveys were conducted to assess any potential impact to any important species, important habitats, and to any environmental study areas. The GIS location data was overlayed onto the INEL vegetation map and an analysis of vegetation classes on the locations was done. Results of the field surveys indicate use of Candidate Location {number_sign}1 by pygmy rabbits (Sylvilagus idahoensis) and expected use by them of Candidate Locations {number_sign}3 and {number_sign}9. Pygmy rabbits are categorized as a C2 species by the US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS). Two other C2 species, the ferruginous hawk (Buteo regalis) and the loggerhead shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) would also be expected to frequent the candidate locations. Candidate Location {number_sign}5 at the north end of the INEL is in the winter range of a large number of pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana).

Hoskinson, R.L.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Efficient Bulk Data Replication for the Earth System Grid  

SciTech Connect

The Earth System Grid (ESG) community faces the difficult challenge of managing the distribution of massive data sets to thousands of scientists around the world. To move data replicas efficiently, the ESG has developed a data transfer management tool called the Bulk Data Mover (BDM). We describe the performance results of the current system and plans towards extending the techniques developed so far for the up- coming project, in which the ESG will employ advanced networks to move multi-TB datasets with the ulti- mate goal of helping researchers understand climate change and its potential impacts on world ecology and society.

Sim, Alex; Gunter, Dan; Natarajan, Vijaya; Shoshani, Arie; Williams, Dean; Long, Jeff; Hick, Jason; Lee, Jason; Dart, Eli

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats of the Lower Columbia River, 20072010  

SciTech Connect

The TFM study was designed to investigate the ecology and early life history of juvenile salmonids within shallow (<5 m) tidal freshwater habitats of the LCRE. We started collecting field data in June 2007. Since then, monthly sampling has occurred in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (rkm 192208) and at other sites and times in lower river reaches of tidal freshwater (rkm 110 to 141). This report provides a comprehensive synthesis of data covering the field period from June 2007 through April 2010.

Johnson, Gary E.; Storch, Adam; Skalski, J. R.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Mallette, Christine; Borde, Amy B.; Van Dyke, E.; Sobocinski, Kathryn L.; Sather, Nichole K.; Teel, David; Dawley, Earl M.; Ploskey, Gene R.; Jones, Tucker A.; Zimmerman, Shon A.; Kuligowski, D. R.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1979 to the DOE Assistant Secretary for Environment. Part 2. Ecological sciences  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in Environment, Health, and Safety conducted during fiscal year 1979 is reported. This volume consists of project reports from the Ecological Sciences research department. The reports are grouped under the following subject areas: National Environmental Research Park and land use; Alaskan resource research; shale oil; synfuels; nuclear waste; fission; marine research programs; statistical development of field research; nuclear fusion; pumped storage and hydroelectric development; pathways modelling, assessment and Hanford project support; electric field and microwave research; and energy research for other agencies. (ACR)

Vaughan, B.E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ecological Technologies of a Chinese Traditional Folk House in Hot-Summer and Cold-Winter Zone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regional climate should be considered in building design for energy-efficiency and environmental protection, and there are many helpful practices that are climate-responsive in traditional folk houses. Plotting of a Chinese traditional folk house located in Hunan province was conducted. Ecological technologies of the Chinese traditional folk house in the hot-Summer and cold-Winter zone were analyzed from site selection, general plane, plane design, section plane design, construction technologies, built materials, and so on. Based on the analysis results, proposals are suggested for modern residence design in China.

Xie, M.; Zhang, G.; Xu, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I studied flock composition, distribution and foraging ecology of wintering wading birds along the Gulf of Mexico coast. I focused on geographic variability in wintering wading bird assemblages, the processes that structured these assemblages and habitat use by wading birds. I found considerable variation among three sites, Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), Texas; Marsh Island Wildlife Refuge (MIWR), Louisiana; and Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (CNWR), Florida. Species comprising wintering wading bird assemblages varied regionally. ANWR had the most species-rich assemblage, with eight species. MIWR had only six wading bird species. And CNWR had only three different species. Processes that structured wintering wading bird assemblages also varied regionally. In ANWR, Texas, the Random Fraction niche apportionment model (RF model) best explained the empirical abundance data for ANWR. For abundance data from MIWR a good fit was obtained with the MacArthur Fraction (MF) model and the Power Fraction (PF) models. None of the models fully explained the CNWR abundance data. I also examined patterns of habitat partitioning among wintering wading birds at three different scales at two sites, Matagorda Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR) and Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge (LANWR). At the macrohabitat level, wintering wading birds showed interspecific differences in macrohabitat use of both open water habitats and vegetated flats. At the mesohabitat level all species at MINWR used the category nearest the edge most often, alternatively, at LANWR wading birds were most often in the mesohabitat category of 8.1- 12 m. from the edge. In both locations wading birds partitioned habitat based on water depth. Finally, I found that Great Egrets and Snowy Egrets participated more often in flock foraging and derived more benefits from feeding in flocks than other species. Great Egrets feeding in flocks had a higher mean strike rate than those foraging alone, whereas Snowy Egrets had a higher success rate foraging in flocks than those foraging alone. In the case of the darkercolored species (e.g., Great Blue Herons, etc.) they either showed no difference in behaviors between birds foraging in flocks versus those foraging alone or they actually did worse when they foraged in flocks.

Sherry, Dawn Ann

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ecological patterns of the small mammal communities at El Cielo Biosphere Reserve, Tamaulipas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scarce knowledge of Neotropical small mammal communities prevents experimental inquiry on the mechanisms structuring these communities. In this study, I examined patterns of local assembly of the small mammal communities on the eastern slopes of El Cielo Biosphere Reserve (ECBR) in Tamaulipas, Mexico, at two spatial scales. At the landscape level I tested patterns of species co-occurrences between four sites with a null model. At the local level I addressed floor microhabitat use, vertical structure use and temporal partitioning. I studied these niche axes at two adjoining forest types, Tropical Subdeciduous Forest (TSDF) and Cloud Forest (CF), that had different structural complexity. Total trapping effort consisted of 19,712 trapnights distributed over three years. In 1,365 capture events I recorded 789 individuals representing 14 species. Abundant species, mostly Peromyscus species that are of intermediate body size, co-occurred less often than expected by chance, whereas rare species, mainly Reithrodontomys species of small size, occurred at random over study sites. This pattern suggests that species interactions might be responsible for this non-random structure. Both the TSDF and CF had striking differences in both microhabitat use and temporal partitioning. In the TSDF common species (>8 individuals) organized along a microhabitat gradient from grassy/open areas to closed forest areas. Temporal partitioning for the whole community was less than expected by chance with use of an ad hoc null model. Species from ecotone/open areas avoided use of middle portions of the night whereas the single forest species concentrated activity in this period. So, it is plausible that predator avoidance strategies might have higher impact on temporal partitioning as compared to competitive interactions. In high contrast the CF community was codominated by two Peromyscus species that overlapped heavily in both their microhabitat use and diel activity patterns. Ecological separation of these two species probably occurs along a niche axis not considered in my study or might be facilitated by their body mass difference. Overall, I provide the first account of community patterns for small mammals at ECBR. These patterns can provide the basis for experimental manipulations to ascertain mechanisms responsible for structure at these communities.

Castro-Arellano, Ivan

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Ecological effects of experimental drought and prescribed fire in a southern California coastal grassland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a global network of carbon dioxide ?ux measurement systems.of ecosystem scale carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy ?interannual variation in carbon dioxide exchange and carbon

Potts, D.L.; Suding, K.N.; Winston, G.C.; Rocha, A.V.; Goulden, M.L.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2007 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the first annual report for the study titled 'Ecology of Juvenile Salmonids in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta in the Lower Columbia River'. Hereafter, we refer to this research as the Tidal Freshwater Monitoring (TFM) Study. The study is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS). The project is performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The goal of the 2007-2009 Tidal Freshwater Monitoring Study is to answer the following questions: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE; Figure 1) are yearling and subyearling salmonids found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions?1 And, what is the ecological importance2 of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of Upper Columbia River spring Chinook salmon and steelhead and Snake River fall Chinook salmon? Research in 2007 focused mainly on the first question, with fish stock identification data providing some indication of Chinook salmon presence at the variety of habitat types sampled. The objectives and sub-objectives for the 2007 study were as follows: (1) Habitat and Fish Community Characteristics-Provide basic data on habitat and fish community characteristics for yearling and subyearling salmonids at selected sites in the tidal freshwater reach in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (1a) Characterize vegetation assemblage percent cover, conventional water quality, substrate composition, and beach slope at each of six sampling sites in various tidal freshwater habitat types. (1b) Determine fish community characteristics, including species composition, abundance, and temporal and spatial distributions. (1c) Estimate the stock of origin for the yearling and subyearling Chinook salmon captured at the sampling sites using genetic analysis. (1d) Statistically assess the relationship between salmonid abundance and habitat parameters, including ancillary variables such as temperature and river stage. (2) Acoustic Telemetry Monitoring-Assess feasibility of applying Juvenile Salmon Acoustic Telemetry System (JSATS) technology to determine migration characteristics from upriver of Bonneville Dam through the study area (vicinity of the Sandy River delta/Washougal River confluence). (2a) Determine species composition, release locations, and distributions of JSATS-tagged fish. (2b) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for these fish. Additionally, both objectives serve the purpose of baseline research for a potential tidal rechannelization project on the Sandy River. The U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Bonneville Power Administration and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is currently pursuing reconnection of the east (relict) Sandy River channel with the current channel to improve fish and wildlife habitat in the Sandy River delta. Our study design and the location of sampling sites in this reach provide baseline data to evaluate the potential restoration.

Sobocinski, Kathryn; Johnson, Gary; Sather, Nichole [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2008-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

331

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Energy & Buildings: Sustainable Strategies for Ponderosa Hub  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plant. The steam distribution system is used to distribute the steam through the distribution pipes lines. The natural gas and electricity are then distributed to the core academic, ancillary and tenant the district energy system, which then generates steam in order to heat the buildings on campus. 1.2 CURRENT

332

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, ecological risk assessment at CERCLA sites [such as the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR)], has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source operable unit. Consequently the species that are generally considered are those with home ranges small enough such that multiple individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the contaminated site. This approach is adequate for sites with single, discrete areas of contamination that only provide habitat for species with limited requirements. This approach is not adequate however for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. Because wide-ranging wildlife species may travel between and use multiple contaminated sites they may be exposed to and be at risk from contaminants from multiple locations. Use of a particular contaminated site by wide-ranging species will be dependent upon the amount of suitable habitat available at that site. Therefore to adequately evaluate risks to wide-ranging species at the ORR-wide scale, the use of multiple contaminated sites must be weighted by the amount of suitable habitat on OUs. This reservation-wide ecological risk assessment is intended to identify which endpoints are significantly at risk; which contaminants are responsible for this risk; and which OUs significantly contribute to risk.

Sample, B.E.; Baron, L.A.; Jackson, B.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NETL: Gasification Systems - Feed Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Gasification Systems Feed Systems Research on commercial gasifier feed systems is occurring in two primary areas of fuel (i.e. coal, biomass, etc.) feed and advanced...

334

Integrating bioenergetics and foraging behavior : the physiological ecology of larval cod (Gadus morhua)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How do larval cod, Gadus morhua, balance foraging effort against the high cost of swimming in a viscous hydrodynamic regime? A respirometry system was developed to measure the activity metabolism of individual larvae. The ...

Ruzicka, James Joseph, 1966-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Life-cycle analysis and the ecology of Sarah C. Davis1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuel Supply Chain Infrastructure: Optimizing the Evolution of Cellulosic Biofuel The rapid and production options for an economically viable supply chain while considering the geographic Intelligent Transportation Systems Logistics Management Supply Chain Management Modeling and Simulation

DeLucia, Evan H.

336

Report on the workshop on ecological impacts of solar energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first phase of the workshop was an attempt to prioritize the impact parameters and establish some form of research program to evaluate these impacts. The second phase was to establish priority research and program needs for monitoring the impacts of the planned Solar Thermal Power System to be constructed near Barstow, California. This monitoring and research program is to be designed to be applicable to other proposed solar powered systems and should include impacts of all phases of construction, operation, and maintenance. (MOW)

Patten, D.T.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY COVER: Climate change impacts have been linked to ecological and agricultural shifts, public health and economic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY i #12;COVER: Climate change impacts have been linked to ecological assessment Research Report from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Office of Biological://www.sc.doe.gov/ober/BER_workshops.html PNNL-18417 #12;#12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY v PREFaCE This report represents the discussions

338

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.0 POTENTIAL ECOLOGICAL IMPACTS FROM URANIUM MINES This document has focused on the potential risks to humans from exposures to unreclaimed uranium mining materials. The potential effects in the consideration of unreclaimed uranium mines. Although the Superfund characterization process includes

339

Nafus, A., Mcclaran, M. P., Archer, S. R. & Throop, H. L. (2009) Multi-species allometric models predict grass biomass in semi-Desert rangeland. Rangeland Ecology & Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

predict grass biomass in semi-Desert rangeland. Rangeland Ecology & Management (In Press) Abstract Multi-species allometric models to predict grass biomass may increase field study efficiency by eliminating the need-species regression models predicting current years' aboveground biomass for 8 common cespitose grass species. Simple

Archer, Steven R.

340

Nitrogen and carbon isotope values of individual amino acids: a tool to study foraging ecology of penguins in the Southern Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nitrogen and carbon isotope values of individual amino acids: a tool to study foraging ecology Cedex, France 5 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Hawaii, USA 6 NIOO-KNAW, Yerseke, 79360 Villiers-en-Bois, France Running header: Compound-specific isotope analysis and penguin isotopic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a user's guide to EPRI's RIVRISK framework, Version 5.0, which can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. The report also documents RIVRISK's theoretical foundation and graphical user interface. Industrial and government staff concerned with chemical and thermal releases will find this report useful.

2000-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

342

Molecular Ecology Notes (2006) 6, 505507 doi: 10.1111/j.1471-8286.2006.01296.x 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Chinese tallow (Triadica sebifera) S. J. DEWALT, E. SIEMANN and W. E. ROGERS Department of Ecology microsatellite loci for Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera, Euphorbiaceae), which is native to East Asia Molecularmarkerscanaidinreconstructingtheintroduction history of non-native invasive plants. Chinese tallow tree [Triadica sebifera (L.) Small

Siemann, Evan

343

Mapping the footsteps of the green anole: A template for publishing ecological data on the World Wide Web  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the handful of years since the World Wide Web (WWW or Web) came into being, Web sites have developed at an astonishing rate. With the influx of Web pages comes a disparity of site types, including personal homepages, commercial sales sites, and educational data. The variety of sites and the deluge of information contained on the Web exemplify the individual nature of the WWW. Whereas some people argue that it is this eclecticism which gives the Web its charm, we propose that sites which are repositories of technical data would benefit from standardization. This paper proffers a methodology for publishing ecological research on the Web. The template we describe uses capabilities of HTML (the HyperText Markup Language) to enhance the value of the traditional scientific paper.

Carnes, E.T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Truett, D.F. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States); Truett, L.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point, North Carolina  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the proposed disposal of Wilmington Harbor and Military Ocean Terminal, Sunny Point (MOTSU), North Carolina, sediments in the ocean. The report is divided into five sections. Section 1.0 is the introduction containing a brief overview of the study and the study objectives. Section 2.0 describes the methods and materials used for sample collection, processing, toxicological and bioaccumulation testing, physical/chemical analysis of sediments and tissues, data analysis, and quality assurance procedures. Section 3.0 presents the results of field collections, sediment chemistry, toxicological testing, and tissue chemistry resulting from bioaccumulation exposures. Section 4.0 presents a discussion of the results and summary conclusions concerning the acceptability of the Wilmington Harbor and MOTSU dredged material for ocean disposal. Section 5.0 lists the literature cited in support of this document. A series of appendixes contain detailed data listings.

Ward, J.A.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, M.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (US)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Ecology before ecology: biogeography and ecology in Lyell's `Principles'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the foundations of the history and philosophy of science, especially on Thomas Kuhn's 1962 [18] account of how, students experimented with acrylic, foam, wool cloths, plastic straws and the computer simulator means when you rub the straw with the wool), it made it one charge. But then when you made

Brown, Richard

346

Ecological half-life of 137Cs in fish from a stream contaminated by nuclear reactor effluents  

SciTech Connect

Radiocesium ({sup 137}Cs) concentrations were determined during 1974, 1981 and 1998 for seven species of fish inhabiting a stream (Steel Creek) contaminated by effluents from a nuclear reactor to examine the decline of this radionuclide in a natural ecosystem. Median {sup 137}Cs concentrations were highest in Micropterus salmoides (largemouth bass) during each year of the investigation (1974 = 6.67 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body; 1981 = 3.72 Bq g{sup -1}; 1998 = 0.35 Bq g{sup -1}), but no patterns of differences were observed among Aphredoderus sayanus (pirate perch), Esox americanus (redfin pickerel), Lepomis auritus (redbreast sunfish), L. gulosus (warmouth), L. punctatus (spotted sunfish), and Notropis cummingsae (dusky shiner). Results demonstrated a rapid decline in {sup 137}Cs within fish from Steel Creek during the 24-year period. For example, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in all fish species declined significantly among years, even after accounting for radioactive decay. The observed percent declines in {sup 137}Cs concentrations of individual species were 3-4 times greater between 1974 and 1981 compared to that expected by physical decay alone, and 2-3 times greater during 1981-1998. Ecological half-lives (EHLs) of {sup 137}Cs in fish ranged from 4.43 years in A. sayanus to 6.53 years in L. gulosus. The EHL for {sup 137}Cs in all fish species combined was 5.54 years. Current levels of {sup 137}Cs in fish from Steel Creek (1.16 Bq g{sup -1} dry wt. of whole body to below detection limits) indicate that the consumption of fish from this ecosystem poses little risk to humans and sensitive wildlife species. These results demonstrate the importance of incorporating the concept of ecological half-life into determinations concerning the length and severity of potential risks associated with radiocontaminants.

Peles, J. [Pennsylvania State University, McKeesport; BryanJr, A. [Savannah River Ecology Lab; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ribble, D. [Trinity University; Smith, M. [Savannah River Ecology Lab

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR Population Dynamics and Within-Plant Distribution of the Mite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pests in agricultural systems (Jeppson et al. 1975, Lindquistetal.1996).Theminutesizeofthesesucking on the leaf (Jeppson et al. 1975). High populations of this mite can cause papaya leaf margins to roll. Proc. Hawaii Entomol. Soc. 31: 30. Jeppson, L. R., H. H. Keifer, and E. W. Baker. 1975. Mites injurious

Rosenheim, Jay A.

348

Physiological ecology and behaviour of bonefish (Albula vulpes) in tropical tidal flats Karen Jennifer Murchie  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

when compared to temperate systems. The goal of this thesis was to use bonefish (Albula vulpes% protein, 4% ash, and 3% lipid, which is consistent with the wet weight values of the majority of fishes. Collectively, this body of work revealed that bonefish use strategies that make them capable of handling

Cooke, Steven J.

349

Extension Note Research Disciplines: Ecology ~ Geology ~ Geomorphology ~ Hydrology ~ Pedology ~ Silviculture ~ Wildlife  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

creeks in the Roberts Creek Study Forest. Two partial logging systems were tested: variable retention (VR) in the Oregon Cascades reported that the sizes of large peak flows remain largely unchanged by logging-on- snow (ROS) and radiation snowmelt. As a result, peak streamflows in harvested watersheds can be either

350

Photovoltaic system in system LABI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is prepared a new model marked as DE10 to extens the system LABI. It is a photovoltaic system. Utilizing of model is into the field of university studying and as a pilot test system for all extern experts. A special parts of model are measurement ... Keywords: automation, measurement, photovoltaic system, sun energy

Hruska Frantisek

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The role of seasonal wetlands in the ecology of the American alligator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) has been frequently studied in large reservoirs and coastal marshes. Large ontogenetic shifts in their diet and morphology have been linked with changes in habitat use, with adult males using deep, open water and juveniles and nesting females relying on vegetated marsh. In certain regions of the inland portion of the alligators range, these different aquatic habitats are represented by seasonal wetlands and riverine systems that are separated by a terrestrial matrix. Ontogenetic habitat shifts, therefore, would require overland movements between systems, which has important implications for conservation of the species. I tested several commonly used methods of surveying alligator populations to determine the most effective method of studying alligators in seasonal wetlands. I then used systematic trapping, nest surveys and radio telemetry to determine habitat use and overland movement rates by different sex and size classes. I found that seasonal wetlands provided nesting and nursery sites for these inland alligator populations, but that both juveniles undergoing an ontogenetic shift and nesting females move between the wetlands and riverine systems. Overland movements by alligators between the wetland and riverine habitats establish a level of functional connectivity between these aquatic ecosystems. I constructed a habitat suitability index of both the wetlands and the surrounding landscape to determine which patch and landscape characteristics were important to wetland use by alligators. I found that both descriptive wetland characteristics and the spatial relationships between wetlands were important predictors of alligator use. Overland movement was related to upland landuse as well as distance between aquatic habitats. Conserving a variety of wetland sizes and types within an intact upland matrix is critical to maintaining connectivity across the landscape. Furthermore, understanding how species may act as mobile links between ecosystems, particularly those with ontogenetic niche shifts, illustrates the importance of approaching conservation from a landscape perspective.

Subalusky, Amanda Lee

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

File Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

File Systems File Systems File Systems For a general description of the different file systems available on PDSF please see Eliza File Systems and Other File Systems. Below is a summary of how STAR uses the various systems: /common The STAR software is installed on /common. For 32sl44 it is under /common/star/star44 and for sl53 it is under /common/star/star53. In both cases the software consists primarily of a STAR-specific ROOT installation on which releases of the STAR libraries are built as shown on the Local STAR Libraries page. /eliza3, /eliza6, /eliza9, /eliza14, /eliza15, /eliza17 STAR has space on 6 elizas as shown in the table below. File System star space (TB) use eliza3 39 production eliza6 9 production eliza9 39 production eliza14 34 production, user space under /eliza14/star/pwg

353

Memorandum of Understanding Between the United States Department of Energy and the Washington State Department of Ecology for Development of the Hanford Site Tank Closure and Waste Management EIS ("TC&WM EIS")  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

THE THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, AND THE WASHINGTON STATE DEPARTMENT OF ECOLOGY, FOR DEVELOPMENT OF THE HANFORD SITE TANK CLOSURE AND WASTE MANAGEMENT EIS ("TC&WM EIS") I. INTRODUCTION The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) have mutual responsibilities for accomplishing cleanup of the Hanford Site as well as continuing ongoing waste management activities consistent with applicable federal and state laws and regulations. The Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (otherwise called the "Tri-Party Agreement", or "TPA") contains various enforceable milestones that apply to tank waste management activities. DOE is also required to comply with applicable requirements of

354

Further studies of long-term ecological effects of exposure to uranium  

SciTech Connect

Spatial variability in sampling for soil uranium distribution by a polar coordinate system was evaluated in randomly selected soil cores at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Variations for surface (0- to 2.5-cm-deep) soils were 0.18 at 10 m from the nuclear weapons test detonation point and 0.96 at 50 m. Results were strongly influenced by past uranium dispersal patterns, variable leaching of uranium debris, and surface water runoff. A total surface (0- to 5-cm) soil uranium inventory within a 12.6-ha circle centered on the E-F detonation point was estimated to be 3000 kg when calculated by soil uranium concentration isopleths and 4500 kg when using annuli of a polar coordinate sampling system. Uranium concentrations in tissues of deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) and pocket gophers (Thomomys bottae) were sufficiently different to conclude that the greater bioavailability of uranium in the top few millimeters of soil at E-F Site, combined with the difference in grooming and food habits of the animals, resulted in greater contamination of deer mice than of pocket gophers.

Hanson, W.C.; Miera, F.R. Jr.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Ecological Analysis of the Impact of Weather, Land Cover and Politics on Childhood Pneumonia in Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pneumonia is the main killer of under-five children worldwide. The developing nations suffer the most. But within such countries, the spatial and temporal distribution of pneumonia cases is not uniform; yet little is known of the spatial and temporal distribution of pneumonia or the factors that might affect spatial and temporal variability. This dissertation explores the causes of spatial and temporal variation in under-five pneumonia morbidity in Tanzania. This study uses an ecological analysis to explore weather, land cover and politics as potential drivers of the observed differences in the distribution of pneumonia. A study is at an ecological level when it examines the population-level health aspects. That is, ecological analyses in health studies evaluate groups of people rather than individuals. The current study found that weather variables such as temperature and atmospheric pressure partially explained pneumonia variance. The strength of weather-pneumonia association varies over space and time in both seasonal elements (temporal factors) and broadly-defined climate zones (spatial factors). For example, the prevalence rate was higher in the regions with bimodal rainfall compared with the regions with unimodal rainfall, with a statistically difference 117.3 (95% confidence interval: 36.6 to 198.0) cases per 100,000. In addition, within the regions (mikoa) with unimodal rainfall regime, however, the rainy season (msimu) had lower rates of pneumonia compared to the dry season (kiangazi). Land use and land cover also were partial drivers of pneumonia. Some land cover typesparticularly urban areas and croplandswere associated with high rates of childhood pneumonia. In addition, districts (wilaya) categorized as urban land cover had high rates of pneumonia compared to those categorized as only rural. To determine the associations between politics and pneumonia, this study compared the pneumonia cases in the administrative locations that received less central government funding with those locations that were financially rewarded for voting for the ruling party. The locations with lower funding generally had higher rates of childhood pneumonia. However, it is unclear whether these locations had higher rates of childhood pneumonia because of, or in addition, to their funding gaps. In sum, this dissertation evaluated population-level factors affecting distribution of childhood pneumonia. Like other similarly population-level studies, this dissertation provides an understanding of the coarse-scale dynamics related to childhood pneumonia. By so doing, it contributes to the pneumonia etiology scientific literature. That is, this dissertation contributes to the understanding of within-nation pneumonia distribution in developing nations. It is the first in Tanzania to evaluate the impact of weather, land cover and politics on childhood pneumonia. By evaluating the impact of weather and land cover, this dissertation also provides an example of non socio-economic factors affecting health inequalities. By analyzing a large landmass of two main climatic types, this dissertation also contributes appreciation of non-stationarity of temporal variations of childhood pneumonia, in addition to the commonly-evaluated spatial variations.

Mgendi, Mlenge 1971-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Preliminary environmental assessment for the Satellite Power System (SPS). Revision 1. Volume 2. Detailed assessment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is considering several options for generating electrical power to meet future energy needs. The satellite power system (SPS), one of these options, would collect solar energy through a system of satellites in space and transfer this energy to earth. A reference system has been described that would convert the energy to microwaves and transmit the microwave energy via directive antennas to large receiving/rectifying antennas (rectennas) located on the earth. At the rectennas, the microwave energy would be converted into electricity. The potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the satellite power system are being assessed as a part of the Department of Energy's SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program. This report is Revision I of the Preliminary Environmental Assessment for the Satellite Power System published in October 1978. It refines and extends the 1978 assessment and provides a basis for a 1980 revision that will guide and support DOE recommendations regarding future SPS development. This is Volume 2 of two volumes. It contains the technical detail suitable for peer review and integrates information appearing in documents referenced herein. The key environmental issues associated with the SPS concern human health and safety, ecosystems, climate, and electromagnetic systems interactions. In order to address these issues in an organized manner, five tasks are reported: (I) microwave-radiation health and ecological effects; (II) nonmicrowave health and ecological effectss; (III) atmospheric effects; (IV) effects on communication systems due to ionospheric disturbance; and (V) electromagnetic compatibility. (WHK)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Stable isotope assessment of temporal and geographic differences in feeding ecology of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The feeding ecology of northern fur seals (Callorhinus ursinus) and their primary prey was examined by analyzing their skin tissues for stable-carbon and nitrogen isotope content. The Pribilof Island northern fur seal population was designated as depleted in 1988 because their numbers were, and continue to be, below their optimum sustainable population. The primary cause for this decline is thought to be a decrease in their prey base in the eastern Bering Sea. Determination of fur seal feeding ecology is important so that disturbances in prey availability can be further studied. This study was able to augment current northern fur seal dietary knowledge using stable-carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis. Parturient and lactating female and juvenile male skin tissue and prey items were analyzed. Female and male tissues were collected in July, August and November, and July and August, 1997, respectively, from both St. Paul and St. George Islands. July/August samples represented spring migratory diet, while November samples illustrated breeding season diet. Females were found to be more enriched isotopically in ?N and C over juvenile males during their migration. November females on St. Paul island were enriched in ?N over July/August females, while St. George females were not significantly enriched. July/August females on St. George Island were more enriched in C over November females, while St. Paul females were not significantly enriched. There were no differences in ?N or C enrichment for migratory animals of the some sex traveling to either island, and there was no difference in ?N between islands for November females. There was a significant difference in C values between islands for November females with St. Paul being more enriched. Prey analysis showed step-wise enrichments for two species and prey stable isotope values were compared to fur seal values for an estimation of dietary content. Females appear to be feeding at a higher trophic level and feeding more coastally than males during migration. Migratory females appear to be feeding more coastally than breeding season females.

Kurle, Carolyn Mary

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Development of a Species Distribution Model for the East Pacific Green Sea Turtle using Ecological Geoprocessing Tools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

East Pacific green sea turtles, Chelonia mydas, play ecologically important roles in marine habitats which range from grazing (and thus regularly "mowing") algae and seagrass beds to cycling nutrients between the ocean and land. However, these important grazers have been hunted to ecological extinction in some places for their eggs, meat, and skin. The conservation initiative for the survival of sea turtles requires the protection of their primary habitats in conjunction with a decrease in their interaction with humans. One way these objectives can be met is through the creation of species distribution maps (SDMs). For this thesis, a SDM was created from a generalized additive model used to identify major feeding areas for East Pacific green turtles residing in the Galapagos Islands. The input for the model was green turtle sighting locations during a June 2010 marine life observation survey and remotely sensed values of four oceanographic parameters obtained from satellite sensors (Bathymetry, Sea Surface Temperature, Chlorophyll a, and Current Speed). Line transects of intertidal and subtidal shoreline regions of the islands of Isabela, San Cristobal, and Floreana were also completed, to describe similarities and differences in macroalgal abundance between the locations. A generalized additive model (GAM) explained 56% of the data's null deviance and had a true positive rate of 0.83. The corresponding species distribution map indicated that East Pacific green sea turtles prefer to forage in warm, low chlorophyll a, slow moving waters at depths mostly less than 250m throughout the archipelago. ANOVA analyses showed that macroalgal abundance was statistically different (p-value < 0.01) between the islands of San Cristobal and Isabela. The line transects analysis also documented that red algae was the most prominent phyla at the sites and that the macroalgal abundance did not vary much between months June 2010 and April/May 2011. With these results, potential foraging areas for East Pacific green turtles can be identified and protected. Future studies will be focused on the collection of macroalgae from coastal areas outlined in the SDM and the interactions between green turtles and their competitors and/or predators. This information can be used to validate the areas delineated by the model and to further the understanding of the spatial-temporal effects on macroalgal abundance.

Duncan, Roxanne

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

System Effectiveness  

SciTech Connect

An effective risk assessment system is needed to address the threat posed by an active or passive insider who, acting alone or in collusion, could attempt diversion or theft of nuclear material. It is critical that a nuclear facility conduct a thorough self-assessment of the material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) system to evaluate system effectiveness. Self-assessment involves vulnerability analysis and performance testing of the MPC&A system. The process should lead to confirmation that mitigating features of the system effectively minimize the threat, or it could lead to the conclusion that system improvements or upgrades are necessary to achieve acceptable protection against the threat. Analysis of the MPC&A system is necessary to understand the limits and vulnerabilities of the system to internal threats. Self-assessment helps the facility be prepared to respond to internal threats and reduce the risk of theft or diversion of nuclear material. MSET is a self-assessment or inspection tool utilizing probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methodology to calculate the system effectiveness of a nuclear facility's MPC&A system. MSET analyzes the effectiveness of an MPC&A system based on defined performance metrics for MPC&A functions based on U.S. and international best practices and regulations. A facility's MC&A system can be evaluated at a point in time and reevaluated after upgrades are implemented or after other system changes occur. The total system or specific subareas within the system can be evaluated. Areas of potential performance improvement or system upgrade can be assessed to determine where the most beneficial and cost-effective improvements should be made. Analyses of risk importance factors show that sustainability is essential for optimal performance. The analyses reveal where performance degradation has the greatest detrimental impact on total system risk and where performance improvements have the greatest reduction in system risk. The risk importance factors show the amount of risk reduction achievable with potential upgrades and the amount of risk reduction actually achieved after upgrades are completed. Applying the risk assessment tool gives support to budget prioritization by showing where budget support levels must be sustained for MC&A functions most important to risk. Results of the risk assessment are also useful in supporting funding justifications for system improvements that significantly reduce system risk.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

State Waste Discharge Permit application: 400 Area Septic System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order negotiations, the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology agreed that liquid effluent discharges to the ground on the Hanford Site which affects groundwater or has the potential to affect groundwater would be subject to permitting under the structure of Chapter 173-216 (or 173-218 where applicable) of the Washington Administrative Code, the State Waste Discharge Permit Program. This document constitutes the State Waste Discharge Permit application for the 400 Area Septic System. The influent to the system is domestic waste water. Although the 400 Area Septic System is not a Public Owned Treatment Works, the Public Owned Treatment Works application is more applicable than the application for industrial waste water. Therefore, the State Waste Discharge Permit application for Public Owned Treatment Works Discharges to Land was used.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gasification Systems Projects & Performers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Gasification Systems Projects & Performers Gasification Systems - Key Technologies Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization and Plant Supporting Systems Syngas...

362

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Systems: Advanced Systems: high Performance fenestration systems Research areas: Research activities to improve the performance of windows and other fenestration products must address window systems issues as well as Glazing Materials research. LBNL activities in the area of Advanced Systems include research at both the product level and the building envelope and building systems levels. Highly insulating windows - using non structural center layers Lower cost solutions to more insulating three layer glazing systems, with the potential to turn windows in U.S. heating dominated residential applications into net-energy gainers. Highly Insulating Window Frames In collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, we are researching the potentials for highly insulating window frames. Our initial work examines European frames with reported U-factors under 0.15 Btu/hr-ft2-F. Future research aims to analyze these designs, verify these performance levels and ensure that procedures used to calculate frame performance are accurate.

363

DOE/EA-1660: Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Land's Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, WA (07/20/09)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 2009 July 2009 DOE/EA-1660F Environmental Assessment Combined Community Communications Facility and Infrastructure Cleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Richland, Washington 99352 Final Environmental Assessment July 2009 Sum-1 Summary Introduction. This Environmental Assessment (EA) provides information and analyses of proposed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities associated with consolidating existing communications operations and removing excess facilities and infrastructure within the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) at the Hanford Site near the City of Richland, Washington. Purpose and Need. To meet long-term federal agency missions, DOE needs to reduce indirect costs and

364

Ecological Restoration Under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act: Issues in Implementation: Presentation at the AFS-EPRI 2004 Symp osium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compact disc (CD) contains presentations made at the EPRI sponsored symposium "Ecological Restoration Under 316(b) of the Clean Water Act: Issues in Implementation" held in association with the annual meeting of the American Fisheries Society (AFS), Madison, WI, August 22-25, 2004. The CD extends the technical information presented in the 2003 EPRI report (1007454) "Enhancement Strategies for Mitigating Potential Operational Impacts of Cooling Water Intake Structures: Approaches for Enhancing ...

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Survey of Revegetated Areas on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve: Status and Initial Monitoring Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office removed a number of facilities and debris from the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument (HRNM). Revegetation of disturbed sites is necessary to stabilize the soil, reduce invasion of these areas by exotic weeds, and to accelerate re-establishment of native plant communities. Seven revegetation units were identified on ALE based on soils and potential native plant communities at the site. Native seed mixes and plant material were identified for each area based on the desired plant community. Revegetation of locations affected by decommissioning of buildings and debris removal was undertaken during the winter and early spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. This report describes both the details of planting and seeding for each of the units, describes the sampling design for monitoring, and summarizes the data collected during the first year of monitoring. In general, the revegetation efforts were successful in establishing native bunchgrasses and shrubs on most of the sites within the 7 revegetation units. Invasion of the revegetation areas by exotic annual species was minimal for most sites, but was above initial criteria in 3 areas: the Hodges Well subunit of Unit 2, and Units 6 and 7.

Downs, Janelle L.; Link, Steven O.; Rozeboom, Latricia L.; Durham, Robin E.; Cruz, Rico O.; Mckee, Sadie A.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Probabilistic ecological risk assessment and source apportionment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments from Yellow Sea  

SciTech Connect

Based on the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 12 surface sediment samples from Yellow Sea, the relative risk of 9 PAHs was investigated using joint risk probability distribution curves and overlapping area, which were generated based on the distributions of exposure and acute toxicity data (LC50), and the sources of PAHs were apportioned using principal component analysis. It was found that joint probability curve and overlapping area indicated the acceptable ecological risk of individual PAHs, only a small fraction of the benthic organisms was affected. Among the nine PAHs studied, the overall risk of pyrene was the highest, with that of naphthalene the lowest. For lower exposure levels at which the percentage of species affected was less than 10%, the risk associated with phenanthrene and fluorene were clearly higher than that of the other seven PAHs. It was indicated that PAHs in surface sediments mainly originated from vehicular emissions, coal combustion sources, coke oven emission and wood combustion, petroleum origin made little influence on sources of PAHs by PCA.

Liu, A.X.; Lang, Y.H.; Xue, L.D.; Liao, S.L.; Zhou, H. [Ocean University of China, Qingdao (China). College for Environmental Science & Engineering

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Mass and energy budgets of animals: Behavioral and ecological implications. Annual technical progress report, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The common goal of these diverse projects is to understand the mechanisms of how animal populations respond to the continual changes in their environment in both time and space. Our models are mechanistic allowing us to explore how a wide array of environmental variables may determine individual performance. Large scale climate change and its effect on animal populations can be seen as quantitative extensions of biological responses to smaller scales of environmental variability. Changes in developmental rates or reproductive levels of individuals, extension or contraction of geographic ranges, and modification of community organization have all been documented in response to previous changes in habitats. We know from our biophysical work that some changes in function are driven by microclimate conditions directly, and some are mediated indirectly through ecological parameters such as the food supply. Our research is guided by a comprehensive conceptual scheme of the interaction of an animal with its environment. The physical and physiological properties of the organism, and the range of available microclimates, set bounds on the performance of organismal function, such as growth, reproduction, storage, and behavior. To leave the most offspring over a lifetime, animals must perform those functions in a way that maximizes the amount of resources devoted to reproduction. Maximizing the total size of the budget and minimizing those budget items not devoted to reproduction are crucial. Animals trade off among expenditures for current and future reproduction. Both water and energy are important, potentially limiting resources. Projects described here include empirical studies and theoretical models.

Porter, W.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Ecological Genomics of Fungi: Repeated Elements in Filamentous Fungi with a Focus on Wood-Decay Fungi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the last decade, the genome of several dozen filamentous fungi have been sequenced. Interestingly, vast diversity in genome size was observed (Fig. 2.1) with 14-fold differences between the 9 Mb of the human pathogenic dandruff fungus (Malassezia globosa; Xu, Saunders, et al., 2007) and the 125 Mb of the ectomycorrhizal black truffle of P rigord (Tuber melanosporum; Martin, Kohler, et al., 2010). Recently, Raffaele and Kamoun (2012) highlighted that the genomes of several lineages of filamentous plant pathogens have been shaped by repeat-driven expansion. Indeed, repeated elements are ubiquitous in all prokaryote and eukaryote genomes; however, their frequencies can vary from just a minor percentage of the genome to more that 60 percent of the genome. Repeated elements can be classified in two major types: satellites DNA and transposable elements. In this chapter, the different types of repeated elements and how these elements can impact genome and gene repertoire will be described. Also, an intriguing link between the transposable elements richness and diversity and the ecological niche will be highlighted.

Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Payen, Thibaut [INRA, Nancy, France; Petitpierre, Denis [INRA, Nancy, France; Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Preliminary assessment of the ecological risks to wide-ranging wildlife species on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 1996 update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than approximately 50 years of operations, storage, and disposal of wastes generated by the three facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) (the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant) has resulted in a mosaic of uncontaminated property and lands that are contaminated to varying degrees. This contaminated property includes source areas and the terrestrial and aquatic habitats down gradient from these source areas. Although the integrator OUs generally contain considerable habitat for biota, the source OUs provide little or no suitable habitat. Historically, ecological risk assessment at Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites has focused on species that may be definitively associated with a contaminated area or source OU. Endpoints considered in source OUs include plants, soil/litter invertebrates and processes, aquatic biota found in on-OU sediments and surface waters, and small herbivorous, omnivorous, and vermivorous (i.e., feeding on ground, litter, or soil invertebrates) wildlife. All of these endpoints have limited spatial distributions or home ranges such that numerous individuals or a distinct population can be expected to reside within the boundaries of the source OU. Most analyses are not adequate for large sites with multiple, spatially separated contaminated areas such as the ORR that provide habitat for wide-ranging wildlife species. This report is a preliminary response to a plan for assessing risks to wide-ranging species.

Sample, B.E.; Hinzman, R.L.; Jackson, B.L.; Baron, L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

AEP Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Avoid costs of retrofitting systems to support secure access Produced by the Yankee Group http://www.yankeegroup.com Page 25. ...

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Great 2008 Chinese ice storm, its socioeconomic-ecological impact, and sustainability lessons learned  

SciTech Connect

. Extreme events often expose vulnerabilities of socioeconomic infrastructures and point to directions of much-needed policy change. Integrated impact assessment of such events can lead to finding of sustainability principles. Southern and central China has for decades been undergoing a breakneck pace of socioeconomic development. In early 2008, a massive ice storm struck this region, immobilizing millions of people. The storm was a consequence of sustained convergence between tropical maritime and continental polar air masses, caused by an anomalously stable atmospheric general circulation pattern in both low and high latitudes. Successive waves of freezing rain occurred during a month period, coating southern and central China with a layer of ice 50 to 160mm in thickness. We conducted an integrated impact assessment of this event to determine whether and how the context of socioeconomic and human-disturbed natural systems may affect the transition of natural events into human disasters. We found: 1) without contingency plans, advanced technologies dependent on interrelated energy supplies can create worse problems during extreme events, 2) the weakest link in disaster response lies between science and decision making, 3) biodiversity is a form of long-term insurance for sustainable forestry against extreme events, 4) sustainable extraction of non-timber goods and services is essential to risk planning for extreme events in forest resources use, 5) extreme events can cause food shortage directly by destroying crops and indirectly by disrupting food distribution channels, 6) concentrated economic development increases societal vulnerability to extreme events, and 7) formalized institutional mechanisms are needed to ensure that unexpected opportunities to learn lessons from weather disasters are not lost in distracting circumstances.

Zhou, Dr. Benzhi [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Ding, Yihui [National Climate Center, China; Wu, Zhongmin [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Shao, Lan [China National Forestry Industry Association; An, Yanfei [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Cao, Yonghui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Duan, Aiguo [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Kong, Weijian [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Li, Changzhu [Hunan Academy of Forestry, China; Li, Zhengcai [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Sun, Honggang [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Shengkun [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Xiaoming [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Xu [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Yang, Xiaosheng [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Yu, Mukui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Zeng, Bingshan [Chinese Academy of Forestry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification Systems Coal and Power Systems Gasification Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting Systems Feed Systems Feed Systems Gasifier Optimization & Plant Supporting...

373

Directing ecological restoration: impact of organic amendments on above- and belowground ecosystem characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing interest among restoration ecologists exists in developing strategies that stimulate biotic interactions and promote self-regulation in restored systems. These approaches should target above- and belowground organisms because they interact to regulate ecosystem pattern and process. In the following dissertation, I compare the ability of organic amendments to alter above- and belowground biological community structure and function to promote prairie establishment on Castle Drive Landfill in Garland, Dallas County, Texas. Treatments included altering the location of organic amendments in the soil profile, either applied to surface or incorporated, and varying the amount applied. Plant community composition, grass population dynamics, soil nutrient conditions, and soil biological parameters were monitored for three growing seasons. Aboveground, the surface treatments were superior for the establishment of desired and undesired plant species. Plant density patterns can be attributed to the amelioration of physical conditions and the accidental burial of seed during incorporation. Grass population dynamics suggest that surface-amended plots supported establishment, but high-volume incorporated treatments were better for enhancing survival through seasonal and long-term drought. Belowground biological responses were affected by the plant community, and not by the amendment treatments. Soil microbial biomass and carbon mineralization potential were larger in those treatments with greater plant density. The structure of the nematode community suggests that decomposition in the surface-amended plots was directed through bacterial channels while decomposition in the incorporated plots was through fungal channels. It is likely that the higher rates of plant productivity in surface treatments stimulated root exudation, thereby favoring bacteria and the nematodes that feed on them. Treatment differences in decomposition pathway were attenuated after 17 months. The soil quality indicators, Cmic/Corg, qCO2, nematode family richness and nematode density, were not affected by the restoration treatments or plant density, but did increase over time. The results of this study suggest that restoration managers should direct their energies into establishing and promoting a high-quality plant community. This can be manipulated with amendments, but care is needed not to exceed thresholds within location treatments.

Biederman, Lori Ann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

S.P. Rupp

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Power system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power system includes a prime mover, a transmission, and a fluid coupler having a selectively engageable lockup clutch. The fluid coupler may be drivingly connected between the prime mover and the transmission. Additionally, the power system may include a motor/generator drivingly connected to at least one of the prime mover and the transmission. The power-system may also include power-system controls configured to execute a control method. The control method may include selecting one of a plurality of modes of operation of the power system. Additionally, the control method may include controlling the operating state of the lockup clutch dependent upon the mode of operation selected. The control method may also include controlling the operating state of the motor/generator dependent upon the mode of operation selected.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

376

Decontamination and inspection plan for Phase 3 closure of the 300 area waste acid treatment system  

SciTech Connect

This decontamination and inspection plan (DIP) describes decontamination and verification activities in support of Phase 3 closure of the 300 Area Waste Acid Treatment System (WATS). Phase 3 is the third phase of three WATS closure phases. Phase 3 attains clean closure conditions for WATS portions of the 334 and 311 Tank Farms (TF) and the 333 and 303-F Buildings. This DIP also describes designation and management of waste and debris generated during Phase 3 closure activities. Information regarding Phase 1 and Phase 2 for decontamination and verification activities closure can be found in WHC-SD-ENV-AP-001 and HNF-1784, respectively. This DIP is provided as a supplement to the closure plan (DOE/RL-90-11). This DIP provides the documentation for Ecology concurrence with Phase 3 closure methods and activities. This DIP is intended to provide greater detail than is contained in the closure plan to satisfy Ecology Dangerous Waste Regulations, Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-610 requirement that closure documents describe the methods for removing, transporting, storing, and disposing of all dangerous waste at the unit. The decontamination and verification activities described in this DIP are based on the closure plan and on agreements reached between Ecology and the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) during Phase 3 closure activity workshops and/or project manager meetings (PMMs).

LUKE, S.N.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

U.S. Department of Energy and Polish Institute for Ecology of Industrial Areas Joint Coordinating Committee for Environmental Systems FY00 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The complexity of environmental pollution, not reported all over the world, increases the demand for novel, highly efficient and cost-effective rehabilitation technologies.

Altman, D.J.

2001-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

378

ABSTRACT. The concept of resilience has been widely used in the study of socio-ecological systems, with its key components identified as resistance, latitude, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this by examining the status of tortoises that occur in Madagascar (Dry Spiny Forest), South Africa (Karoo in the Karoo (Boycott and Bourquin 2000, Fig. 2b). The last species we consider is the North American desert and represents 7.5% of the country's total area. South Africa's Succulent Karoo covers an area of 102, 691 km2

Indiana University

379

RHESSys: Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation SystemAn Object-Oriented Approach to Spatially Distributed Modeling of Carbon, Water, and Nutrient Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Process-based models that can represent multiple and interacting processes provide a framework for combining field-based measurements with evolving science-based models of specific hydroecological processes. Use of these models, however, requires ...

C. L. Tague; L. E. Band

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Preliminary environmental assessment for the satellite power system (SPS)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A preliminary assessment of the impact of the Satellite Power System (SPS) on the environment is presented. Information that has appeared in documents referenced herein is integrated and assimilated. The state-of-knowledge as perceived from recently completed DOE-sponsored studies is disclosed, and prospective research and study programs that can advance the state-of-knowledge and provide an expanded data base for use in an assessment planned for 1980 are defined. Alternatives for research that may be implemented in order to achieve this advancement are also discussed in order that a plan can be selected which will be consistent with the fiscal and time constraints on the SPS Environmental Assessment Program. Health and ecological effects of microwave radiation, nonmicrowave effects on health and the environment (terrestrial operations and space operations), effects on the atmosphere, and effects on communications systems are examined in detail. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United...

382

Type systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study of type systems has emerged as one of the most active areas of research in programming languages, with applications in software engineering, language design, high-performance compiler implementation, and security. This chapter discusses the ...

Benjamin C. Pierce

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Battery system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A battery module includes a plurality of battery cells and a system configured for passing a fluid past at least a portion of the plurality of battery cells in a parallel manner.

Dougherty, Thomas J; Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B; Andrew, Michael G

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

384

Photovoltaic Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A photovoltaic (PV), or solar electric system, is made up of several photovoltaic solar cells. An individual PV cell is usually small, typically producing about 1 or 2 watts of power. To boost the...

385

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASoS) engineering and foundations for global design.  

SciTech Connect

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which must be recognized and reckoned with to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Design within CASoS requires the fostering of a new discipline, CASoS Engineering, and the building of capability to support it. Towards this primary objective, we created the Phoenix Pilot as a crucible from which systemization of the new discipline could emerge. Using a wide range of applications, Phoenix has begun building both theoretical foundations and capability for: the integration of Applications to continuously build common understanding and capability; a Framework for defining problems, designing and testing solutions, and actualizing these solutions within the CASoS of interest; and an engineering Environment required for 'the doing' of CASoS Engineering. In a secondary objective, we applied CASoS Engineering principles to begin to build a foundation for design in context of Global CASoS

Brodsky, Nancy S.; Finley, Patrick D.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brown, Theresa Jean; Linebarger, John Michael; Moore, Thomas W.; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Phoenix : Complex Adaptive System of Systems (CASoS) engineering version 1.0.  

SciTech Connect

Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex ecological, sociological, economic and/or technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation and the world. Perturbations/disruptions in CASoS have the potential for far-reaching effects due to pervasive interdependencies and attendant vulnerabilities to cascades in associated systems. Phoenix was initiated to address this high-impact problem space as engineers. Our overarching goals are maximizing security, maximizing health, and minimizing risk. We design interventions, or problem solutions, that influence CASoS to achieve specific aspirations. Through application to real-world problems, Phoenix is evolving the principles and discipline of CASoS Engineering while growing a community of practice and the CASoS engineers to populate it. Both grounded in reality and working to extend our understanding and control of that reality, Phoenix is at the same time a solution within a CASoS and a CASoS itself.

Moore, Thomas W.; Quach, Tu-Thach; Detry, Richard Joseph; Conrad, Stephen Hamilton; Kelic, Andjelka; Starks, Shirley J.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Brodsky, Nancy S.; Verzi, Stephen J.; Brown, Theresa Jean; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Sunderland, Daniel J.; Mitchell, Michael David; Ames, Arlo Leroy; Maffitt, S. Louise; Finley, Patrick D.; Russell, Eric Dean; Zagonel, Aldo A.; Reedy, Geoffrey E.; Mitchell, Roger A.; Corbet, Thomas Frank, Jr.; Linebarger, John Michael

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Systems Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Systems Studies Activity had two objectives: (1) to investigate nontechnical barriers to the deployment of biomass production and supply systems and (2) to enhance and extend existing systems models of bioenergy supply and use. For the first objective, the Activity focused on existing bioenergy markets. Four projects were undertaken: a comparative analysis of bioenergy in Sweden and Austria; a one-day workshop on nontechnical barriers jointly supported by the Production Systems Activity; the development and testing of a framework for analyzing barriers and drivers to bioenergy markets; and surveys of wood pellet users in Sweden, Austria and the US. For the second objective, two projects were undertaken. First, the Activity worked with the Integrated BioEnergy Systems (TBS) Activity of TEA Bioenergy Task XIII to enhance the BioEnergy Assessment Model (BEAM). This model is documented in the final report of the IBS Activity. The Systems Studies Activity contributed to enhancing the feedstock portion of the model by developing a coherent set of willow, poplar, and switchgrass production modules relevant to both the US and the UK. The Activity also developed a pretreatment module for switchgrass. Second, the Activity sponsored a three-day workshop on modeling bioenergy systems with the objectives of providing an overview of the types of models used to evaluate bioenergy and promoting communication among bioenergy modelers. There were nine guest speakers addressing different types of models used to evaluate different aspects of bioenergy, ranging from technoeconomic models based on the ASPEN software to linear programming models to develop feedstock supply curves for the US. The papers from this workshop have been submitted to Biomass and Bioenergy and are under editorial review.

Graham, R.L.

1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ecology of Juvenile Salmon in Shallow Tidal Freshwater Habitats in the Vicinity of the Sandy River Delta, Lower Columbia River, 2008 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The tidal freshwater monitoring (TFM) project reported herein is part of the research, monitoring, and evaluation effort developed by the Action Agencies (Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers [USACE], and the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation) in response to obligations arising from the Endangered Species Act (ESA) as a result of operation of the Federal Columbia River Power System. The project is being performed under the auspices of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Project No. 2005-001-00). The research is a collaborative effort among the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and the University of Washington. The overarching goal of the TFM project is to bridge the gap in knowledge between tidal freshwater habitats and the early life history attributes of migrating salmon. The research questions include: In what types of habitats within the tidal freshwater area of the Columbia River are juvenile salmon found, when are they present, and under what environmental conditions? What is the ecological contribution of shallow (0-5 m) tidal freshwater habitats to the recovery of ESA-listed salmon in the Columbia River basin? Field data collection for the TFM project commenced in June 2007 and since then has continued monthly at six to nine sites in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta (river kilometer 192-208). While this report includes summary data spanning the 19-month period of study from June 2007 through December 2008, it highlights sampling conducted during calendar year 2008. Detailed data for calendar year 2007 were reported previously. The 2008 research objectives were as follows: (1) Characterize the vegetation composition and percent cover, conventional water quality, water surface elevation, substrate composition, bathymetry, and beach slope at the study sites within the vicinity of the Sandy River delta. (2) Characterize the fish community and juvenile salmon migration, including species composition, length-frequency distribution, density (number/m{sup 2}), and temporal and spatial distributions in the vicinity of the Sandy River delta in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). (3) Determine the stock of origin for juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) captured at sampling sites through genetic identification. (4) Characterize the diets of juvenile Chinook and coho (O. kisutch) salmon captured within the study area. (5) Estimate run timing, residence times, and migration pathways for acoustic-tagged fish in the study area. (6) Conduct a baseline evaluation of the potential restoration to reconnect the old Sandy River channel with the delta. (7) Apply fish density data to initiate a design for a juvenile salmon monitoring program for beach habitats within the tidal freshwater segment of the LCRE (river kilometer 56-234).

Sather, NK; Johnson, GE; Storch, AJ [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

2009-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

NETL: Gasification - Systems Analyses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System Analyses Gasification Systems Systems Analyses Go to the NETL Gasification Systems Program's Systems and Industry Analyses Studies Technology & CostPerformance Studies NETL...

390

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

391

Lighting Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Purple LED lamp Purple LED lamp Lighting Systems Lighting research is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of lighting systems in buildings and homes across the nation. The goal is to reduce lighting energy consumption by 50% over twenty years by improving the efficiency of light sources, and controlling and delivering illumination so that it is available, where and when needed, and at the required intensity. Research falls into four main areas: Sources and Ballasts, Light Distribution Systems, Controls and Communications, and Human Factors. Contacts Francis Rubinstein FMRubinstein@lbl.gov (510) 486-4096 Links Lighting Research Group Batteries and Fuel Cells Buildings Energy Efficiency Applications Commercial Buildings Cool Roofs and Heat Islands Demand Response Energy Efficiency Program and Market Trends

392

ARAC system  

SciTech Connect

In spite of the remarkable safety record of the nuclear industry as a whole, recent public concern over the potential impact of the industry's accelerated growth has prompted ERDA to expand its emergency response procedures. The Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability, ARAC, is a computer communications system designed to enhance the existing emergency response capability of ERDA nuclear facilities. ARAC will add at least two new functions to this capability: centralized, real-time data acquisition and storage, and simulation of the long range atmospheric transport of hazardous materials. To perform these functions, ARAC employs four major sub-systems or facilities: the site facility, the central facility, the global weather center and the regional model. The system has been under development for the past two years at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory of the University of California. (auth)

Kelly, M.F.; Wyman, R.H.

1975-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

393

Beyond climate-smart agriculture: toward safe operating spaces for global food systems  

SciTech Connect

Agriculture is considered to be climate-smart when it contributes to increasing food security, adaptation and mitigation in a sustainable way. This new concept now dominates current discussions in agricultural development because of its capacity to unite the agendas of the agriculture, development and climate change communities under one brand. In this opinion piece authored by scientists from a variety of international agricultural and climate research communities, we argue that the concept needs to be evaluated critically because the relationship between the three dimensions is poorly understood, such that practically any improved agricultural practice can be considered climate-smart. This lack of clarity may have contributed to the broad appeal of the concept. From the understanding that we must hold ourselves accountable to demonstrably better meet human needs in the short and long term within foreseeable local and planetary limits, we develop a conceptualization of climate-smart agriculture as agriculture that can be shown to bring us closer to safe operating spaces for agricultural and food systems across spatial and temporal scales. Improvements in the management of agricultural systems that bring us significantly closer to safe operating spaces will require transformations in governance and use of our natural resources, underpinned by enabling political, social and economic conditions beyond incremental changes. Establishing scientifically credible indicators and metrics of long-term safe operating spaces in the context of a changing climate and growing social-ecological challenges is critical to creating the societal demand and political will required to motivate deep transformations. Answering questions on how the needed transformational change can be achieved will require actively setting and testing hypotheses to refine and characterize our concepts of safer spaces for social-ecological systems across scales. This effort will demand prioritizing key areas of innovation, such as (1) improved adaptive management and governance of social-ecological systems; (2) development of meaningful and relevant integrated indicators of social-ecological systems; (3) gathering of quality integrated data, information, knowledge and analytical tools for improved models and scenarios in time frames and at scales relevant for decision-making; and (4) establishment of legitimate and empowered science policy dialogues on local to international scales to facilitate decision making informed by metrics and indicators of safe operating spaces.

Gulledge, Jay [ORNL; Neufeldt, Heinrich [ORNL; Jahn, Margaret M [ORNL; Lezaks, David P [ORNL; Meinke, Jan H [ORNL; Scholes, Robert J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

BAE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information fusion system designs require sensor and resource management (SM) for effective and efficient data collection, processing, and dissemination. Common Level 4 fusion sensor management (or process refinement) inter-relations with target tracking and identification (Level 1 fusion) have been detailed in the literature. At the ISIF Fusion Conference, a panel discussion was held to examine the contemporary issues and challenges pertaining to the interaction between SM and situation and threat assessment (Level 2/3 fusion). This summarizes the key tenants of the invited panel experts. The common themes were: 1) Addressing the user in system control, 2) Determining a standard set of metrics,

Erik Blasch; John Salerno; Ivan Kadar; Ken Hintz; J. Biermann; Chee Chong; Subrata Das

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Department of Wildlife Ecology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a researcher s right to publish; as an institution, however, the Laboratory does not endorse the viewpoint..................................................................... C-1 Appendix D: DOE 2005 Pollution Prevention Awards for LANL................................D-1 #12 of Energy (DOE)1 charged LANL with several new tasks, including war reserve pit production. DOE evaluated

Mazzotti, Frank

396

Ecological Risk Assessments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Laboratory Fellows list New Fellows are Mark Chadwick, Cheryl Kuske, Geoff Reeves and Frank Pabian. December 10, 2013 Video Los Alamos Shows Airport Security Technology at Work...

397

Savannah River Ecology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Field Sites SREL is supported largely by external funding. Major sources include DOE Environmental Management, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, USGS, US Department of the...

398

Ecology 2003 91, 383395  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includeaeoliandepositsof Cajonsandof Holoceneage and highly eroded alluvial Randsburg-Muroc soils of Pleistocene age (Hulin determines community structure can be viewed as the superior competitor, then these observations lend support superior competitors. Net-positive effects of Ambrosia on Acamptopappus may explain the observed

Schenk, H. Jochen

399

Ecology 2007 21, 713720  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

partitioning theory in global patterns of plant biomass allocation M. C. MCCARTHY and B. J. ENQUIST Department (OPT) suggests that plants should allocate biomass to the organ that acquires the most limiting and root functions. 2. Recently, an alternative approach, allometric biomass partitioning theory (APT

Enquist, Brian Joseph

400

Ecology 2004 18, 584591  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chamber for 4 days. Nematodes from mineral soil were extracted by a cotton-wool filter method followed of freeliving nematodes II. Life history parameters of Caenor- habditis briggsae (Nematoda) at different levels

Neher, Deborah A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Ecology 2003 91, 10221033  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, Petersham, MA 01366, USA t Oak Ridge National Laboratory Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA u Harvard Forest, Harvard University, Petersham, MA 01366, USA a g r i c u l t u r

Hu, Feng Sheng

402

Ecology 2007 95, 565573  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bellemare et al. (2002) 9. Petersham, MA, USA Plot (20 ? 20 m) 1830 31 43 Gerhardt & Foster (2002) 10

Vellend, Mark

403

Ecology 2003 91, 923931  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vegetation more than that of trees (competitive release). 2 We tested these predictions using Chinese tallow may be particularly strong for this alien plant species. Key-words: Chinese tallow tree, facilitation

Siemann, Evan

404

Ecology 2007 95, 689697  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of invaders. 2 We investigated these hypotheses using Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum), which help to explain the frequent success of woody species invading grasslands. Key-words: Chinese tallow

Siemann, Evan

405

Maritime Transportation System: Trends and Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007-R-5 Water is an essential resource in the U.S. economy. It plays a crucial role in supporting many economic activities and ensuring the quality of human life and the health of ecological systems. Despite this, the value of water may not be widely appreciated because only some water resources and water uses are easily visible or noticed while others are not. Among the Institute for Water Resources (IWR) Future Directions program activities are the identification of emerging water challenges and opportunities and the tactical engagement of U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) senior leaders on these issues. Such critical thinking is an essential prerequisite to strategy development and planning. IWR has developed this series of Water Resources Outlook papers, commissioned utilizing outside experts, to identify emerging issues and implications for the Nation. These issues and implications will be presented in the form of provocation sessions with external and internal subject matter experts and stakeholders and will inform the USACE strategic planning process. Maritime Transportation System: Trends and Outlook USACE major responsibilities for waterborne commerce include dredging, development and maintenance of the inland and coastal waterways and related maritime infrastructure, and

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Investigating Army systems and Systems of Systems for value robustness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis proposes a value robustness approach to architect defense systems and Systems of Systems (SoS). A value robust system or SoS has the ability to provide continued value to stakeholders by performing well to meet ...

Koo, Kevin C. K. (Kevin Cheng Keong)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility Garners LEED Platinum View the NREL Press Release. NREL's multistory Energy Systems Integration...

408

Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GASIFICATION SYSTEMS GASIFICATION SYSTEMS U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PLAN PREFACE ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

409

Burner systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A burner system particularly useful for downhole deployment includes a tubular combustion chamber unit housed within a tubular coolant jacket assembly. The combustion chamber unit includes a monolithic tube of refractory material whose inner surface defines the combustion zone. A metal reinforcing sleeve surrounds and extends the length of the refractory tube. The inner surface of the coolant jacket assembly and outer surface of the combustion chamber unit are dimensioned so that those surfaces are close to one another in standby condition so that the combustion chamber unit has limited freedom to expand with that expansion being stabilized by the coolant jacket assembly so that compression forces in the refractory tube do not exceed about one-half the safe compressive stress of the material; and the materials of the combustion chamber unit are selected to establish thermal gradient parameters across the combustion chamber unit to maintain the refractory tube in compression during combustion system start up and cool down sequences.

Doherty, Brian J. (Marblehead, MA)

1984-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

410

CONTROL SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A boiling water type nuclear reactor power system having improved means of control is described. These means include provisions for either heating the coolant-moderator prior to entry into the reactor or shunting the coolantmoderator around the heating means in response to the demand from the heat engine. These provisions are in addition to means for withdrawing the control rods from the reactor. (AEC)

Shannon, R.H.; Williamson, H.E.

1962-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gasification system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for injecting coal and process fluids into a fluidized bed gasification reactor. Three concentric tubes extend vertically upward into the fluidized bed. Coal particulates in a transport gas are injected through an inner tube, and an oxygen rich mixture of oxygen and steam are injected through an inner annulus about the inner tube. A gaseous medium relatively lean in oxygen content, such as steam, is injected through an annulus surrounding the inner annulus.

Haldipur, Gaurang B. (Hempfield, PA); Anderson, Richard G. (Penn Hills, PA); Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning for Variable Selection Analysis and Modeling of Biological Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuzzy Inductive Reasoning (FIR) is a qualitative inductive modeling and simulation methodology for dealing with dynamical systems. It has proven to be a powerful tool for qualitative model identification and prediction of future behavior of various kinds of dynamical systems, especially from the soft sciences, such as biology, biomedicine, and ecology. This paper focuses on modeling aspects of the FIR methodology. It is shown that the FIR variable selection analysis is a useful tool not only for FIR but also for other classical quantitative methodologies such as NARMAX (Nonlinear AutoRegressive Moving Average modeling with eXternal inputs). The tool allows to obtain models that interpret a system under study in optimal ways, in the sense that these models are well suited for predicting the future behavior of the system they represent. The FIR variable selection analysis turns out to work well even in those applications where standard statistical variable selection analysis does not pro...

Angela Nebot; Francois E. Cellier; Ra' ul Carvajal V

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

J. Math. Biol. DOI 10.1007/s00285-013-0672-8 Mathematical Biology Absolute stability and dynamical stabilisation in predator-prey systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Many ecological systems exhibit multi-year cycles. In such systems, invasions have a complicated spatiotemporal structure. In particular, it is common for unstable steady states to exist as long-term transients behind the invasion front, a phenomenon known as dynamical stabilisation. We combine absolute stability theory and computation to predict how the width of the stabilised region depends on parameter values. We develop our calculations in the context of a model for a cyclic predator-prey system, in which the invasion front and spatiotemporal oscillations of predators and prey are separated by a region in which the coexistence steady state is dynamically stabilised.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Integrated System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Window System Our research activities in the field of high performance windows have led us to conclude that even by using high performance insulating glass units, low conductivity frames, and warm edge spacers, there are still untapped sources for improving energy efficiency in the design and use of residential windows. While such high performance windows are a dramatic improvement over conventional units, they do not reduce conductive losses through wall framing around the window, offer guarantees against excessive wall/window infiltration nor do they adapt to the daily and seasonal potentials for night insulation and summer shading. To meet this need, we have been working on the design, development, and prototyping of Integrated Window Systems (IWS) since 1993. Integrated Window Systems are a form of panelized construction where the wall panel includes an operable or fixed window sash, recessed night insulation, integral solar shading, and is built in a factory setting in order to minimize thermal short circuits and infiltration at joints. IWSs can be built in modular lengths to facilitate their installation with conventional wood frame stick construction or other forms of panelized construction.

416

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimal gap width for double and triple glazing systems Optimal gap width for double and triple glazing systems Glazing systems in the US are commonly designed with a 1/2 " (12.7 mm) gap. The optimal gap width depends on many factors, such as gas fill (air, argon, krypton), the use of Low-e coatings, the environmental conditions (temperature difference across the window), and the calculation standard used. NFRC standard conditions are -18 C (-0.4 F) outside, and 21 C (69.8 F) inside. The calculation standard used in the US is based on the ISO 15099 standard. European standard conditions are 0 C (32 F) outside, and 20 C (68 F) inside. The calculation standard is based on the EN 673 standard. A number of common glazing configurations both with and without Low-e coatings, and with a variety of gas fills were evaluated using both the North American NFRC standard and the European EN 673 standard. All results were calculated using WINDOW 6.3 from LBNL. All IGU's (Insulated Glazing Units) have a standard height of 1 meter.

417

Braking system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

Norgren, D.U.

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

418

Report on the remedial investigation of Bear Creek Valley at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 6: Appendix G -- Baseline ecological risk assessment report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Remedial Investigation (RI) Report characterizes the nature and extent of contamination, evaluates the fate and transport of contaminants, and assesses risk to human health and the environment resulting from waste disposal and other US Department of Energy (DOE) operations in Bear Creek Valley (BCV). BCV, which is located within the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) encompasses multiple waste units containing hazardous and radioactive wastes arising from operations at the adjacent Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The primary waste units discussed in this RI Report are the S-3 Site, Oil Landfarm (OLF), Boneyard/Burnyard (BYBY), Sanitary Landfill 1 (SL 1), and Bear Creek Burial Grounds (BCBG). These waste units, plus the contaminated media resulting from environmental transport of the wastes from these units, are the subject of this RI. This BCV RI Report represents the first major step in the decision-making process for the BCV watershed. The RI results, in concert with the follow-on FS will form the basis for the Proposed Plan and Record of Decision for all BCV sites. This comprehensive decision document process will meet the objectives of the watershed approach for BCV. Appendix G contains ecological risks for fish, benthic invertebrates, soil invertebrates, plants, small mammals, deer, and predator/scavengers (hawks and fox). This risk assessment identified significant ecological risks from chemicals in water, sediment, soil, and shallow ground water. Metals and PCBs are the primary contaminants of concern.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Components of systems software for parallel systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Systems software for clusters and other parallel systems affects multiple types of users. End users interact with it to submit and interact with application jobs and to avail themselves of scalable system tools. Systems administrators interact with it ...

Ewing Lusk

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

ANALYSIS OF CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR VEHICLE HYBRID POWERTRAINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Ecological and socioeconomic factors determine high interest in the development of pollution-free vehicles. At present use of electro-vehicles is suppressed by a number of technological factors. Vehicles with alternative powertrains are transitional stage between development of pollution-free vehicles and vehicles with conventional internal combustion engine. According to these aspects the investigation on conventional hybrid drives and their control systems is carried out in the article. The equations that allow evaluating effectiveness of regenerative braking for different variants of hybrid drive are given. The AMESim software is used as the modeling environment, in which models of hybrid vehicles are developed and the results of virtual simulation are analyzed. Also a number of recommendations for increasing of regenerative braking effectiveness are given.

Siarhei Kliauzovich

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Seeing the world through the nose of a bird: new developments in the sensory ecology of procellariiform seabirds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CN) systems. Functionally, SNs are velocity detectors, i.e.that nerve fibers innervating SNs exhibit increased activitybetween responses of CNs vs. SNs is due to the fact that in

Nevitt, G A; Bonadonna, F

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Advanced Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glazing Systems Glazing Systems Using Non-Structural Center Glazing Layers Windows in the United States use aproximately 2 quads a year in heating energy, approximately one third of all building space heating energy used and the largest single end use attributed to windows. Even if all existing windows were replaced with today’s ENERGY STAR low-e products (U values < 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F), windows related heating would still be over 1 Quad. Because heating loads are strongly tied to conductive losses, technologies which lead to lower window U-factors are the key to reducing heating energy. A 0.1 Btu/hr-ft2-F window is targeted as a product, which will meet the requirements of zero-energy homes. Dynamic control of solar gains will further reduce heating needs by allowing winter solar heat gains to be effectively utilized while limiting cooling season gains. Significant cooling load savings can also be expected from lower U-factor windows in certain climates and from dynamic windows in all climates.

423

Open space system study for the Dacca metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Open space facilities proposed in the Master Plan for Dacca, 1960, based on zoning by land subdivision, although inadequate in terms of population needs, were never realized -- partly due to their turnover to other land hungry urban developments. A comprehensive step to solve the problem of open space needs for present and future Decca was sought through an ecological approach. The search was for land of intrinsic open space value to be developed with compatible land uses to arrive at a system of multiple values. The map of Dacca published by the geological survey of Pakistan and supporting reference material was analysed for an understanding of the city's various features -- water and wetland, settlement pattern, climate, community, transportation and vegetation. The analytical facts were synthesized to socio-cultural image study, road system study, end finally, open space system study. These studies are based on existing and future physical, socio-cultural growth patterns. It was found out that the rivers, canals, wetlands encircling Dacca could "be the median of an open space system developed with the compatible land use of flood and erosion control, drainage, water supply, agriculture, water transportation and recreation. The system incorporates existing parks, open spaces, and historic value nodes, proposes pedestrian shopping malls, pedestrian, levels in highways, and, reserves spaces for institution and housing expansion.

Rab, Wajeda Jafar

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Battery system  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a battery system for use with a battery powered device. It comprises a battery pack, the battery pack including; battery cells; positive and negative terminals serially coupled to the battery cells, the positive terminal being adapted to deliver output current to a load and receive input current in the direction of charging current; circuit means coupled to the positive and negative terminals and producing at an analog output terminal an analog output signal related to the state of charge of the battery cells; and display means separate from the battery pack and the battery powered device and electrically coupled to the analog output terminal for producing a display indicating the state of charge of the battery cells in accordance with the analog output signal.

Sokira, T.J.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Transfer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transport system includes a traveling rail (1) which constitutes a transport route and a transport body (3) which is capable of traveling on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. Flexible drive tubes (5) are arranged on the traveling rail in the longitudinal direction of the traveling rail. The transport body includes a traveling wheel (4) which is capable of rolling on the traveling rail and drive wheels (2) which are capable of rolling on the drive tubes upon receiving the rotational drive power generated by pressure of a pressure medium supplied to the drive tubes while depressing the drive tubes. The traveling rail includes a plurality of transport sections and the transport body is capable of receiving a rotational drive force from the drive tubes at every transport sections. If necessary, a transport route changeover switch which changes over the transport route can be provided between the transport sections.

Kurosawa, Kanji (Tokyo, JP); Koga, Bunichiro (Miyagi, JP); Ito, Hideki (Miyagi, JP); Kiriyama, Shigeru (Miyagi, JP); Higuchi, Shizuo (Kanagawa, JP)

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

Environmental Management System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video Community, Environment Environmental Stewardship Environmental Protection Environmental Management System Environmental Management System An Environmental...

427

Systems Infrastructure (SYS 18)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure John Hicks, Karencomponents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests,

Richard Guy; John Hicks; Karen Weeks

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

SYS 5: Systems Infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networked Sensing Systems Infrastructure Kevin Chang, Johnnents The Systems Infrastructure team assembles, tests, and

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Regenerating dross : a campus for sustainable energy systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The following thesis began as an investigation into post-industrial urban waste and the ecological remediation potential that such landscapes embody. It looks at the forces (more)

Cogliati, Jeff

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Intensive archaeological survey of the proposed Savannah River Ecology Laboratory Conference Center and Educational Facility, Savannah River Site, Aiken County, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Documented in this report are the methods and results of an intensive archaeological survey for the proposed University of Georgia Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) Conference Center and Educational Facility on the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS). Archaeological investigations conducted by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) on the 70-acre project area and associated rights-of-way consisted of subsurface testing at two previously recorded sites and the discovery of one previously unrecorded site. The results show that 2 sites contain archaeological remains that may yield significant information about human occupations in the Aiken Plateau and are therefore considered eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. Adverse impacts to these sites can be mitigated through avoidance.

Stephenson, K.; Crass, D.C.; Sassaman, K.E.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a constituent of dissolved organic matter, DNA may be consumed by microorganisms inhabiting various freshwater and marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of carbon, energy, nitrogen, and phosphorus for microorganisms residing in the upper layer of Columbia River (WA, USA) water column as well as a sole source of phosphorus for the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens and for Bacillus subtilis ATCC 49760. Our results suggest that DNA assimilation by S. oneidensis is linked to the activity of Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s) and extracellular phosphatase(s). The ability to use DNA as the sole source of phosphorus may be of particular ecological advantage for microorganisms living under Fe(III)-reducing conditions where bioavailability of inorganic phosphate may be limited by the formation of vivianite [Fe3(PO4)28H20].

Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine G.; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.

2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation site-specific work plan/health and safety checklist for the ecological assessment task, Kingfisher Study  

SciTech Connect

This report provides specific details and requirements for the WAG 2 remedial investigation and site investigation Ecological Assessment Task, Kingfisher Study, including information that will contribute to safe completion of the project. The report includes historical background; a site map; project organization; task descriptions and hazard evaluations; controls; and monitoring, personal protective equipment, decontamination, and medical surveillance program requirements. The report also includes descriptions of site personnel and their certifications as well as suspected WAG 2 contaminants and their characteristics. The primary objective of the WAG 2 Kingfisher Study is to assess the feasibility of using kingfishers as biological monitors of contaminants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Kingfisher sample collection will be used to determine the levels of contaminants and degree of bioaccumulation within a common piscivorous bird feeding on contaminated fish from streams on the ORR.

Holt, V.L.; Baron, L.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Remote Sensing and Field Mapping: Requisite Bed Fellows for Assessing River Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

al. 1991. What Does Remote Sensing Do For Ecology? Ecology,B. 2006. Introduction to remote sensing. Edition 4. Guilford2004. The role of remote sensing technology in the EU water

Beagle, Julie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

The Apache Longbow-Hellfire Missile Test at Yuma Proving Ground: Ecological Risk Assessment for Tracked Vehicle Movement across Desert Pavement  

SciTech Connect

A multiple stressor risk assessment was conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, as a demonstration of the Military Ecological Risk Assessment Framework. The focus was a testing program at Cibola Range, which involved an Apache Longbow helicopter firing Hellfire missiles at moving targets, M60-A1 tanks. This paper describes the ecological risk assessment for the tracked vehicle movement component of the testing program. The principal stressor associated with tracked vehicle movement was soil disturbance, and a resulting, secondary stressor was hydrological change. Water loss to washes and wash vegetation was expected to result from increased infiltration and/or evaporation associated with disturbances to desert pavement. The simulated exposure of wash vegetation to water loss was quantified using estimates of exposed land area from a digital ortho quarter quad aerial photo and field observations, a 30 30 m digital elevation model, the flow accumulation feature of ESRI ArcInfo, and a two-step process in which runoff was estimated from direct precipitation to a land area and from water that flowed from upgradient to a land area. In all simulated scenarios, absolute water loss decreased with distance from the disturbance, downgradient in the washes; however, percentage water loss was greatest in land areas immediately downgradient of a disturbance. Potential effects on growth and survival of wash trees were quantified by using an empirical relationship derived from a local unpublished study of water infiltration rates. The risk characterization concluded that neither risk to wash vegetation growth or survival nor risk to mule deer abundance and reproduction was expected. The risk characterization was negative for both the incremental risk of the test program and the combination of the test and pretest disturbances.

Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Hargrove, William Walter [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions Reductions: Moving UBC Beyond Climate Neutral System Project 2009 Scenario 1: Climate Action Partnership. Contribution of Food Greenhouse Gas Emissions it will have on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The majority of foods served on campus originate from

436

In Situ Measurement of the Water Vapor 18O/16O Isotope Ratio for Atmospheric and Ecological Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a system for in situ measurement of H216O/H218O in air based on tunable diode laser (TDL) absorption spectroscopy is described. Laboratory tests showed that its 60-min precision (one standard deviation) was 0.21 at a water vapor ...

Xuhui Lee; Steve Sargent; Ronald Smith; Bert Tanner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

NREL: Energy Systems Integration - Energy Systems Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Systems Integration Facility Newsroom The Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) will be one of the only megawatt-scale test facilities in the United States that...

438

Ecological and Wildlife Risk Assessment of Chemicals Encountered in Vegetation Management on Electric Utility Rights-of-Way  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The management of vegetation on electric utility rights-of-way (ROWs) is an essential part of managing electrical transmission and distribution systems. A variety of manual, mechanical, and chemical methods, singly or in combination, are used for this purpose. The method or methods selected must be safe for humans and the environment and cost-effective in accomplishing the goals of ROW management. This report reviews environmental and wildlife safety through an assessment of risk to the environment, incl...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

439

NERSC Computational Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

My NERSC Getting Started Computational Systems Edison Hopper Carver Dirac PDSF Genepool Testbeds Retired Systems Data & File Systems Network Connections Queues and Scheduling Job...

440

Minimal fusion systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We define minimal fusion systems in a way that every non-solvable fusion system has a section which is minimal. Minimal fusion systems can also be (more)

Henke, Ellen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Laser Music System.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? A Laser Music System has been created, that combines a laser and light sensor system with an infrared distance sensing system that detects the (more)

Woodruff, Astra

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Communication Systems Chair of Communication Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, porn sites, web services, ... :-)) #12;8 | 28 Communication Systems network insecurity Inner and intra

Schindelhauer, Christian

443

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS Transportation systems are the building blocks of modern society. Efficient mobility improves the quality of life. However, transportation systems by their very nature also affect quality. The transportation systems graduate pro- gram provides in-depth knowledge on the design

Wang, Yuhang

444

The Risk Assessment Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide Risk Exposure Models for Chemicals User's Guide 1. Introduction The purpose of this calculator is to assist Remedial Project Managers (RPMs), On Scene Coordinators (OSC's), risk assessors and others involved in decision-making at hazardous waste sites and to determine whether levels of contamination found at the site may warrant further investigation or site cleanup, or whether no further investigation or action may be required. The risk values presented on this site are chemical-specific values for individual contaminants in air, water, soil and biota that may warrant further investigation or site cleanup. It should be noted that the risks in this calculator are based upon human health risk and do not address potential ecological risk. Some sites in sensitive ecological settings may also need to be evaluated for potential

445

Complex System Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of terms such as Engineering Systems, System of systems and others have been coming into greater use over the past decade to denote systems of importance but with implied higher complexity than for the term ...

Magee, Christopher

2004-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

446

Effect of the Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dams on the Reproductive Success of Kokanee in the Flathead System; Technical Addendum to the Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This addendum to the Final Report presents results of research on the zooplankton and fish communities of Flathead Lade. The intent of the Study has been to identify the impacts of hydroelectric operations at Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on the reproductive success of kokanee an to propose mitigation for these impacts. Recent changes in the trophic ecology of the lake, have reduced the survival of kokanee. In the last three year the Study has been redirected to identify, if possible, the biological mechanisms which now limit kokanee survival, and to test methods of enhancing the kokanee fishery by artificial supplementation. These studies were necessary to the formulation of mitigation plans. The possibility of successfully rehabilitating the kokanee population, is the doubt because of change in the trophic ecology of the system. This report first presents the results of studies of the population dynamics of crustacean zooplankton, upon which planktivorous fish depend. A modest effort was directed to measuring the spawning escapement of kokanee in 1988. Because of its relevance to the study, we also report assessments of 1989 kokanee spawning escapement. Hydroacoustic assessment of the abundance of all fish species in Flathead Lake was conducted in November, 1988. Summary of the continued efforts to document the growth rates and food habits of kokanee and lake whitefish are included in this report. Revised kokanee spawning and harvest estimates, and management implications of the altered ecology of Flathead Lake comprise the final sections of this addendum. 83 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Beattie, Will; Tohtz, Joel

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Systems Engineering Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... advances, and deploys measurement science to address application of engineering information systems to complex cyber-physical systems. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Networked Control Systems Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and deploys measurement science for sensor networks and control systems used in manufacturing, construction, and other cyber-physical systems ...

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

449

Systems Integration Division Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems integration and engineering, life cycle assessment, cyber-physical systems, productivity measurement, sustainability and energy efficiency. ...

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

450

Complex Systems Program Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Systems Program seeks to understand the fundamental science of these ... Complex Systems Fundamentals Roldan Pozo; Measurement Science for ...

2011-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

451

Public Safety Communication Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... integrate legacy communication and information systems and ... will support system analysis and troubleshooting ... create a global market for equipment ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

452

NETL: Gasification Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brochures Gasification Systems Reference Shelf - Brochures The Gasification Technology brochures are as follows: Gasification Plant Databases (Aug 2013) Gasification Systems...

453

Environmental Management Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Management Systems Technical Assistance Tools Technical Assistance Tool: Integrating Sustainable Practices into Environmental Management Systems , November 2009...

454

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensors, Instrumentation Systems science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Sensors, Instrumentation Systems National security depends on science and technology. The...

455

How sulphate-reducing microorganisms cope with stress: Lessons from systems biology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulphate-reducing microorganisms (SRMs) are a phylogenetically diverse group of anaerobes encompassing distinct physiologies with a broad ecological distribution. As SRMs have important roles in the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and various metals, an understanding of how these organisms respond to environmental stresses is of fundamental and practical importance. In this Review, we highlight recent applications of systems biology tools in studying the stress responses of SRMs, particularly Desulfovibrio spp., at the cell, population, community and ecosystem levels. The syntrophic lifestyle of SRMs is also discussed, with a focus on system-level analyses of adaptive mechanisms. Such information is important for understanding the microbiology of the global sulphur cycle and for developing biotechnological applications of SRMs for environmental remediation, energy production, biocorrosion control, wastewater treatment and mineral recovery.

Zhou, J.; He, Q.; Hemme, C.L.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Hillesland, K.; Zhou, A.; He, Z.; Nostrand, J.D. Van; Hazen, T.C.; Stahl, D.A.; Wall, J.D.; Arkin, A.P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Revegetation Plan for Areas of the Fitzner-Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve Affected by Decommissioning of Buildings and Infrastructure and Debris Clean-up Actions  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office is working to remove a number of facilities on the Fitzner Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE), which is part of the Hanford Reach National Monument. Decommissioning and removal of buildings and debris on ALE will leave bare soils and excavated areas that need to be revegetated to prevent erosion and weed invasion. Four main areas within ALE are affected by these activities (DOE 2009;DOE/EA-1660F): 1) facilities along the ridgeline of Rattlesnake Mountain, 2) the former Nike missile base and ALE HQ laboratory buildings, 3) the aquatic research laboratory at Rattlesnake Springs area, and 4) a number of small sites across ALE where various types of debris remain from previous uses. This revegetation plan addresses the revegetation and restoration of those land areas disturbed by decommissioning and removal of buildings, facilities and associated infrastructure or debris removal. The primary objective of the revegetation efforts on ALE is to establish native vegetation at each of the sites that will enhance and accelerate the recovery of the native plant community that naturally persists at that location. Revegetation is intended to meet the direction specified by the Environmental Assessment (DOE 2009; DOE/EA-1660F) and by Stipulation C.7 of the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) for the Rattlesnake Mountain Combined Community Communication Facility and InfrastructureCleanup on the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve, Hanford Site, Richland Washington(DOE 2009; Appendix B). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company (CPRC) and in consultation with the tribes and DOE-RL developed a site-specific strategy for each of the revegetation units identified within this document. The strategy and implementation approach for each revegetation unit identifies an appropriate native species mix and outlines the necessary site preparation activities and specific methods for seeding and planting at each area. evegetation work is scheduled to commence during the first quarter of FY 2011 to minimize the amount of time that sites are unvegetated and more susceptible to invasion by non-native weedy annual species.

Downs, Janelle L.; Durham, Robin E.; Larson, Kyle B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Simulation and Analysis for Applying the Double-Stage Coupled Heat Pump System in the Villa of Cold Area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conventional heating mode is a one-way circulation in cold areas, which causes abatement in the reserves of energy source and increases environmental pollution. An ecological cycle heating system, an air-to-water + apartment water-to-water double-stage coupled heat pump system, is presented in this paper based on analyzing the characteristics of the villa district heating. Prediction and analysis of the feasibility of the double-stage coupled heat pump system in cold areas were carried after the components and characteristics of the system are introduced. The lumped parameter method was used to establish a mathematical model of the whole system, and the system control methods and the volume of the heat storage tank were decided to get the best value of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF). Furthermore, the application of the double-stage coupled heat pump system in some representative cities of cold areas in China was analyzed. The results show that the novel heat pump system can be used for heating the villa district in cold areas. To make the HSPF of the system much better, the water circulations of the double-stage coupled heat pump system also were analyzed in this paper; some improvements are put forward, and single-double stages mixed heat pumps system for the villa districts heating are introduced.

Yang, L.; Yao, Y.; Ma, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

A Framework for Risk Analysis for Ecological Restoration Projects in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a framework for incorporating risk analysis into the six-step planning process for ecosystem restoration projects. This report is part of a larger research and development effort to develop procedures and guidelines for risk analysis in USACE ecosystem restoration planning. The focus is on risk analysis: identifying the range of possible outcomes from alternative ecosystem restoration actions, assessing the potential for achieving the desired outcome, characterizing the likelihood of adverse consequences, and communicating these findings to stakeholders and decision makers. This framework document makes simplifying assumptions to allow a focus on incorporating risk information in the planning and decision-making process. A conceptual model of the site and landscape is advocated as a central organizing structure within the six-step process for ecosystem restoration project planning. This is responsive to USACE directives that restoration projects be conceived in a systems context using an ecosystem and/or watershed approach. The conceptual model delineates the empirical quantities to be addressed in risk analysis and modeling. Although the planning process is described in six distinct steps, in practice these steps are iterative and often carried out simultaneously. Risk analysis within this context has the same character. The approach for incorporating risk analysis into the planning process provides direction intended to help the planner: Identify the levels of uncertainty that are acceptable, at the start of the planning process. Use conceptual and numerical models to communicate the planning teams understanding of the ecosystem to others, and reduce the risk of mis-specifying the system. Consider the uncertainty associated with the variables chosen to measure project effects. Use alternative designs to manage identified uncertainty. Use risk information to eliminate alternatives with unacceptable risk from consideration. Incorporate risk analysis into the USACE four criteria of effectiveness, efficiency, completeness, and acceptability. Use an alternatives irreducible uncertainty as an attribute to be considered along with other attributes in the comparison of alternative plans. Use risk information in the final plan selection process. There are three other efforts associated with this framework document, which offer information and guidance for incorporating risk analysis into cost-estimation, and biological and hydrologic modeling.

Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Thom, Ronald M.; Hofseth, Keith

2005-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

459

System Demonstration Multilingual Weather Forecast Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Demonstration Multilingual Weather Forecast Generation System Tianfang Yao DongmoZhang Qian (Multilingual Weather Forecasts Assistant) system will be demonstrated. It is developed to generate the multilingual text of the weather forecasts automatically. The raw data from the weather observation can be used

460

Addendum to the User's Guide for RIVRISK Version 5.0: A Model to Assess Potential Human Health and Ecological Risks from Power Plant and Industrial Facility Releases to Rivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an addendum to the User's Guide for EPRI's RIVRISK analytic framework, Version 5.0. RIVRISK can be used to assess human health and ecological risks associated with industrial and power plant chemical and thermal releases to rivers. Some minor inconsistencies between the original User's Guide (EPRI Report 1000733) and the model examples were discovered during model applications. This addendum provides modified pages of the User's Guide that correct those inconsistencies. Those planning to use RIVR...

2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matsushita ecology systems" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ocean thermal energy conversion ecological data report from OSS Researcher in Gulf of Mexico, (GOTEC-01), July 12-23, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ecological measurements important for environmental assessment of the effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were initiated in July 1977 at the proposed Gulf of Mexico site off the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. The initial cruise of the OSS Researcher, in a joint effort with the Atlantic Oceanic and Meteorological Laboratories (AOML) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) took place from 12 to 23 July 1977. The measurements were taken at 15 oceanographic stations to a maximum depth of 1000 m. Water was analyzed for trace metals, nutrients and chlorophyll a and ATP. Physical data, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were supplied by NOAA-AOML. Two bioassays were carried out using indigenous phytoplankton to estimate the effect of deep water on the rates of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake of photic zone algae. The Deep Scattering Layer (DSL) was monitored at the site by a continuously recording 12 kHz depth sounder at the Mobile site. This report presents data collected during the cruise.

Quinby-Hunt, M.S. (comp.)