National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for matrix client number

  1. Grid Client Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Client Tools Grid Client Tools Using OSG and Globus client software You can either run the OSG/Globus client software directly on the NERSC systems via "modules" or by downloading it to your workstation. On your workstation: Download and install the OSG client software. Then run the following to setup your environment: % . $INSTALL_DIR/setup.sh or % source $INSTALL_DIR/setup.csh On NERSC Compute Systems: Use the module command to load the OSG or Globus toolkit. Where possible, you

  2. Sophia Client Version 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-09

    Sophia Client Version 12 offers command line access to the Sophia Daemon and the Sophia database files. It provides print, fingerprint, acknowledge, color coding and status access to these other resources.

  3. OTP/LDAP Client Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-10-01

    The OTP/LDAP Client Library provides a C library, PAM module and Perl module which can be used by developers to easily incorporate two-factor authentication in to their various client applications.

  4. Clients

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at NERSC, you will need to grant access for TCP connections originating... Read More ftp Files can be transferred to and from HPSS via the standard internet protocol FTP. Read...

  5. Client and Tenant Education on Multifamily Retrofits | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Client and Tenant Education on Multifamily Retrofits Client and Tenant Education on Multifamily Retrofits Client education is a critical step in successful building retrofits. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 28546 Client education is a critical step in successful building retrofits. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL 28546 Even the best energy retrofit plans work only as well as the people occupying the building will allow. The Weatherization Assistance Program understands that a building is

  6. A Network Client Using the Gopher Information Discovery Protocol

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-10-05

    WSGOPHER uses the protocol known as Gopher, which is described in Internet RFC 1436. Specifically Gopher is a client/server protocol. Gopher servers provide information across the network to Gopher clients. WSGOPHER is an implementation of a Gopher client for Microsoft Windows 3.1 and Windows Sockets version 1.1.

  7. Agreement Matrix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be limited to 5 years. Certification: The Lab provided this DOE technology transfer matrix and explained all the options available including the availability of WFO agreements...

  8. V-082: Novell GroupWise Client Two Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities have been reported in Novell GroupWise Client, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system.

  9. Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization Clients

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the transcript for the Effective Energy Behavior Change for Low-Income Weatherization Clients webinar presented on May 31, 2012.

  10. Sync Matrix

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  11. DOE VPN Client User Guide | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    32 and 64-bit versions. DOE VPN Client.pdf (1.01 MB) More Documents & Publications Instructions for WebVPN Connectivity Using Two-Factor RSA Token with WebVPN Remote Access Options

  12. Request queues for interactive clients in a shared file system of a parallel computing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bent, John M.; Faibish, Sorin

    2015-08-18

    Interactive requests are processed from users of log-in nodes. A metadata server node is provided for use in a file system shared by one or more interactive nodes and one or more batch nodes. The interactive nodes comprise interactive clients to execute interactive tasks and the batch nodes execute batch jobs for one or more batch clients. The metadata server node comprises a virtual machine monitor; an interactive client proxy to store metadata requests from the interactive clients in an interactive client queue; a batch client proxy to store metadata requests from the batch clients in a batch client queue; and a metadata server to store the metadata requests from the interactive client queue and the batch client queue in a metadata queue based on an allocation of resources by the virtual machine monitor. The metadata requests can be prioritized, for example, based on one or more of a predefined policy and predefined rules.

  13. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  14. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3023307 Name: Madeleine Brown Organization: nJa Address: --- -------- -------- -- Country: Phone Number: United States Fax Number: n/a E-mail: --- -------- --------_._------ --- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Please send me a copy of the emails and records relating to the decision to allow the underage son of Bill Gates to tour Hanford in June 2010. Please also send the emails and records that justify the Department of Energy to prevent other minors from visiting B Reactor. Optional

  15. Request Number:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1074438 Name: Gayle Cooper Organization: nla Address: _ Country: United States Phone Number: Fax Number: nla E-mail: . ~===--------- Reasonably Describe Records Description: Information pertaining to the Department of Energy's cost estimate for reinstating pension benefit service years to the Enterprise Company (ENCO) employees who are active plan participants in the Hanford Site Pension Plan. This cost estimate was an outcome of the DOE's Worker Town Hall Meetings held on September 17-18, 2009.

  16. U-196: Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client Two Vulnerabilities | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 6: Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client Two Vulnerabilities U-196: Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client Two Vulnerabilities June 21, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Two vulnerabilities have been reported in Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. PLATFORM: Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client 2.x Cisco AnyConnect VPN Client 3.x ABSTRACT: The Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client is affected by the following vulnerabilities: Cisco AnyConnect Secure

  17. (Document Number)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A TA-53 TOUR FORM/RADIOLOGICAL LOG (Send completed form to MS H831) _____________ _____________________________ _________________________________ Tour Date Purpose of Tour or Tour Title Start Time and Approximate Duration ___________________________ ______________ _______________________ _________________ Tour Point of Contact/Requestor Z# (if applicable) Organization/Phone Number Signature Locations Visited: (Check all that apply, and list any others not shown. Prior approval must be obtained

  18. V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute Java Applets V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute Java Applets May 2, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis...

  19. V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users ...

  20. V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Users Gain Elevated Privileges | Department of Energy 4: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges V-134: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges April 15, 2013 - 1:30am Addthis PROBLEM: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Heap Overflow Lets Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges PLATFORM: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Cisco Secure Desktop ABSTRACT: Some vulnerabilities

  1. MetaMatrix Groupe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: MetaMatrix Groupe Address: 3206 Lamond Ct Place: San Jose, California Zip: 95148 Region: Bay Area Number of Employees: 1-10 Year Founded: 2004...

  2. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  3. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  4. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  5. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  6. Finding nonoverlapping substructures of a sparse matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2004-08-09

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices, thus the design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of non overlapping rectangular dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which has not been studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum non overlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm for 2 times 2 blocks that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. We discuss alternatives to rectangular blocks such as diagonal blocks and cross blocks and present complexity analysis and approximation algorithms.

  7. Fire Danger Matrix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Danger Matrix Fire Danger Matrix Focusing on fire prevention and protection. Matrix of fire danger ratings and descriptions Fire Danger Ratings Fire Danger Rating Wind Parameters Shot, Burn Activity Construction Sites Fuels Mitigation Spark Producing Activities Non- Motorized Activities Red Flag PROHIBITED: Approved with Restrictions: Approved Hazard Control Plan PROHIBITED: PROHIBITED: Approved with Restrictions: Two-way Communications Management Accountability Extreme *<10 mph Approved with

  8. Automatic switching matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  9. Improve client-contractor working relationships under PSM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Early, W.F. II [Early Consulting, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Many operating companies rely on engineering/procurement/construction (EPC) contractors to provide needed services during expansions and other capital project ventures. These service providers are obligated to work under the same process safety management (PSM) guidelines as the operating company. So what are the responsibilities for the operating company (client), contractor and others under PSM? Following the checklist, EPC contractors and operating companies can develop and assign process safety responsibilities early in project planning. Under these conditions, all involved project parties are fully aware of their individual obligations as mandated by 29 CFR 1910.119 Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals (OSHA PSM). Fully disclosing individual party responsibilities ensures dialogue between the client and the EPC contractor and other involved service providers. Clearly defining and communicating project responsibilities may influence project execution and associated costs considerably. The paper describes the project planning under PSM, PSM elements, process safety information, process hazard analysis, operating procedures, training, contractor programs, pre-startup safety review, mechanical integrity, incident investigations, emergency planning and response, and compliance audits.

  10. T-573: Windows Remote Desktop Client DLL Loading Error Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Windows Remote Desktop Client. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system.

  11. V-148: Novell iPrint Client Unspecified Buffer Overflow Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability has been reported in Novell iPrint Client, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system

  12. MATRIX AND VECTOR SERVICES

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-10-18

    PETRA V2 provides matrix and vector services and the ability construct, query, and use matrix and vector objects that are used and computed by TRILINOS solvers. It provides all basic matr5ix and vector operations for solvers in TRILINOS.

  13. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  14. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  15. DEAR Contract Clause Matrix

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Attached for your information is a corrected Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation contract clause matrix. This corrected clause matrix is also being posted to the Stripes library. The earlier edition incorrectly identified 952.204-73 and 952.211-70 as Section K Certifications but they are correctly identified as Section L Instructions. The clause at 952.5223-3 Agreement regarding workplace substance abuse programs at Department of Energy sites has also been added. Thanks to Christopher Miller in Albuquerque for spotting the errors. A revised matrix is attached.

  16. Contract Clause Matrix

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached for your information is a corrected Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation contract clause matrix. This corrected clause matrix is also being posted to the Stripes library. The earlier edition incorrectly designated 970.5223-78, Sustainable acquisition, as a required clause. It is only required in contracts under which the contractor operates Government-owned facilities, Government owned fleets or performs construction at a Government-owned facility.

  17. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  18. WIPP Field Practices: The Weatherization Client File: Accountability and Best Practices Webinar (text version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    It is about the client file, but more so it's about the large impact it has on the weatherized unit and how it can be used to track and complete a quality weatherized house.

  19. Solid Waste Information and Tracking System Client Server Conversion Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLASSCOCK, J.A.

    2000-02-10

    The Project Management Plan governing the conversion of SWITS to a client-server architecture. The PMP describes the background, planning and management of the SWITS conversion. Requirements and specification documentation needed for the SWITS conversion

  20. Sync Matrix Enterprise

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-12-01

    SME is an emergency response planning and exercise design and management software. SME implements an innovative approach of hosting its data in a customized Windows SharPoint Services (WSS) 3.0 site, and uses a Microsoft Win Forms technology as front-end to access the backend SharePoint list data as a client-server application. The utilization of WSS 3.0 allowed for a light weight application with the pwoer or project, data, document and user management tools that can linkmore » with everyday application such as Microsoft Office products, especially Outlook. The WinForms front-end application programmatically accesses the SharePoint List data through the exposed SharePoint Web Services application programming inerface (API). The SharePoint environment includes customized Web Parts that programmatically create new SharePoint sites with custom lists. The application also takes advantage of AJAX and Silverlight technologies to create a richer user experience for the SharePoint users.« less

  1. Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property:NumOfPlants Property:NumProdWells Property:NumRepWells Property:Number of Color Cameras Property:Number of Devices Deployed Property:Number of Plants included in...

  2. Basic Matrix Library (bml), Version 0.x

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-11-24

    The basic matrix library (bml) is a collection of various matrix data formats (in dense and sparse) and their associated algorithms for basic matrix operations.

  3. NSR Key Number Retrieval

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSR Key Number Retrieval Pease enter key in the box Submit

  4. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1997-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  5. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1996-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  6. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, Allan M.

    1999-01-01

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user's local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service.

  7. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, A.M.

    1996-08-06

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  8. Remote information service access system based on a client-server-service model

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Konrad, A.M.

    1997-12-09

    A local host computing system, a remote host computing system as connected by a network, and service functionalities: a human interface service functionality, a starter service functionality, and a desired utility service functionality, and a Client-Server-Service (CSS) model is imposed on each service functionality. In one embodiment, this results in nine logical components and three physical components (a local host, a remote host, and an intervening network), where two of the logical components are integrated into one Remote Object Client component, and that Remote Object Client component and the other seven logical components are deployed among the local host and remote host in a manner which eases compatibility and upgrade problems, and provides an illusion to a user that a desired utility service supported on a remote host resides locally on the user`s local host, thereby providing ease of use and minimal software maintenance for users of that remote service. 16 figs.

  9. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  10. Glass matrix armor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, Noel C.

    1991-01-01

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  11. Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    An emergency response to a disaster is complex, requiring the rapid integration, coordination, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and non-governmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions into a unified community response. For example, a community’s response actions to a fixed site hazardous materials incident could occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Response actions are directed and controlled by local governments and agencies situated withinmore » the response area, as well as by state and federal operaticns centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protective action decision-making process is greatly compressed. The response community must carefully plan and coordinate response operations in order to have confidence that they will be effectively implemented when faced with the potentially catastrophic nature of such releases. A graphical depiction of the entire response process via an emergency response synchronization matrix is an effective tool in optimizing the planning, exercising, and implementation of emergency plans. This system—based approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time in relation to hazard actions. It provides the opportunity to make real—time adjustments as necessary for maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. A response must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization.« less

  12. Scale dependency of the effective matrix diffusion coefficient

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, H.H.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Zhang, G.

    2003-05-30

    It has been recognized that matrix diffusion is an important process for retarding solute transport in fractured rock. Based on analyses of tracer transport data from a number of field tests, we demonstrate for the first time that the effective matrix-diffusion coefficient may be scale dependent and generally increases with test scale. A preliminary theoretical explanation of this scale dependency is also presented, based on the hypothesis that solute travel paths within a fracture network are fractals.

  13. Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix The key piece of knowledge necessary for building defenses capable of withstanding or surviving cyber and kinetic attacks is an understanding of the capabilities posed by threats to a government, function, or system. With the number of threats continuing to increase, it is no longer feasible to enumerate the capabilities of all known threats and then build

  14. WKB approximation for general matrix Hamiltonians

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjorken, J.D.; Orbach, H.S.

    1981-05-15

    We present a method of obtaining WKB-type solutions for generalized Schroedinger equations for which the Hamiltonian is an arbitrary matrix function of any number of pairs of canonical operators. Our solution reduces the problem to that of finding the matrix which diagonalizes the classical Hamiltonian and determining the scalar WKB wave functions for the diagonalized Hamiltonian's entries (presented explicitly in terms of classical quantities). If the classical Hamiltonian has degenerate eigenvalues, the solution contains a vector in the classically degenerate subspace. This vector satisfies a classical equation and is given explicitly in terms of the classical Hamiltonian as a Dyson series. As an example, we obtain, from the Dirac equation for an electron with anomalous magnetic moment, the relativistic spin-precession equation.

  15. Ceramic matrix composite article and process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite article

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cairo, Ronald Robert; DiMascio, Paul Stephen; Parolini, Jason Robert

    2016-01-12

    A ceramic matrix composite article and a process of fabricating a ceramic matrix composite are disclosed. The ceramic matrix composite article includes a matrix distribution pattern formed by a manifold and ceramic matrix composite plies laid up on the matrix distribution pattern, includes the manifold, or a combination thereof. The manifold includes one or more matrix distribution channels operably connected to a delivery interface, the delivery interface configured for providing matrix material to one or more of the ceramic matrix composite plies. The process includes providing the manifold, forming the matrix distribution pattern by transporting the matrix material through the manifold, and contacting the ceramic matrix composite plies with the matrix material.

  16. New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers New York Number of Natural Gas ...

  17. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers New Mexico Number of Natural ...

  18. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial ... Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers North Dakota Number of Natural ...

  19. Quantum random number generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pooser, Raphael C.

    2016-05-10

    A quantum random number generator (QRNG) and a photon generator for a QRNG are provided. The photon generator may be operated in a spontaneous mode below a lasing threshold to emit photons. Photons emitted from the photon generator may have at least one random characteristic, which may be monitored by the QRNG to generate a random number. In one embodiment, the photon generator may include a photon emitter and an amplifier coupled to the photon emitter. The amplifier may enable the photon generator to be used in the QRNG without introducing significant bias in the random number and may enable multiplexing of multiple random numbers. The amplifier may also desensitize the photon generator to fluctuations in power supplied thereto while operating in the spontaneous mode. In one embodiment, the photon emitter and amplifier may be a tapered diode amplifier.

  20. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  1. Assessing data quality for a federal environmental restoration project: Rationalizing the requirements of multiple clients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiszka, V.R.; Carlsen, T.M.

    1994-07-01

    Most environmental restoration projects at federal facilities face the difficult task of melding the quality assurance (QA) requirements of multiple clients, as well as dealing with historical data that are often of unknown quality. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), we have successfully integrated the requirements of our multiple clients by carefully developing a QA program that efficiently meets our clients` needs. The Site 300 Experimental Test Site is operated by LLNL in support of its national defense program. The responsibility for conducting environmental contaminant investigations and restoration at Site 300 is vested in the Site 300 Environmental Restoration Project (Site 300 ERP) of LLNL`s Environmental Restoration Division. LLNL Site 300 ERP must comply with the QA requirements of several clients, which include: the LLNL Environmental Protection Department, the DOE, the US Environmental Protection Agency-Region IX (EPA), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board -- Central Valley Region, and the California Department of Toxic Substances Control. This comprehensive QA program was used to determine the acceptability of historical data. The Site 300 ERP began soil and ground water investigations in 1982. However, we did not begin receiving analytical quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) data until 1989; therefore, the pre-1989 data that were collected are of unknown quality. The US EPA QAMS-005/80 defines data quality as the totality of features and characteristics of data that bears on its ability to satisfy a given purpose. In the current context, the characteristics of major importance are accuracy, precision, completeness, representativeness, and comparability. Using our established QA program, we determined the quality of this historical data based on its comparability to the post-1989 data. By accepting this historical data, we were able to save a considerable amount of money in recharacterization costs.

  2. Report number codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.N.

    1985-05-01

    This publication lists all report number codes processed by the Office of Scientific and Technical Information. The report codes are substantially based on the American National Standards Institute, Standard Technical Report Number (STRN)-Format and Creation Z39.23-1983. The Standard Technical Report Number (STRN) provides one of the primary methods of identifying a specific technical report. The STRN consists of two parts: The report code and the sequential number. The report code identifies the issuing organization, a specific program, or a type of document. The sequential number, which is assigned in sequence by each report issuing entity, is not included in this publication. Part I of this compilation is alphabetized by report codes followed by issuing installations. Part II lists the issuing organization followed by the assigned report code(s). In both Parts I and II, the names of issuing organizations appear for the most part in the form used at the time the reports were issued. However, for some of the more prolific installations which have had name changes, all entries have been merged under the current name.

  3. Ceramic Matrix Composites | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ceramic Matrix Composites Improve Engine Efficiency Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are a breakthrough materials technology for jet engines that started at our Global Research Center ...

  4. Quantum random number generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ma, Xiongfeng; Yuan, Xiao; Cao, Zhu; Zhang, Zhen; Qi, Bing

    2016-06-28

    Here, quantum physics can be exploited to generate true random numbers, which play important roles in many applications, especially in cryptography. Genuine randomness from the measurement of a quantum system reveals the inherent nature of quantumness -- coherence, an important feature that differentiates quantum mechanics from classical physics. The generation of genuine randomness is generally considered impossible with only classical means. Based on the degree of trustworthiness on devices, quantum random number generators (QRNGs) can be grouped into three categories. The first category, practical QRNG, is built on fully trusted and calibrated devices and typically can generate randomness at amore » high speed by properly modeling the devices. The second category is self-testing QRNG, where verifiable randomness can be generated without trusting the actual implementation. The third category, semi-self-testing QRNG, is an intermediate category which provides a tradeoff between the trustworthiness on the device and the random number generation speed.« less

  5. ALARA notes, Number 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

  6. Sandia Generated Matrix Tool (SGMT) v. 1.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-03-24

    Provides a tool with which create and characterize a very large set of matrix-based visual analogy problems that have properties that are similar to Raven™s Progressive Matrices (RPMs). The software uses the same underlying patterns found in RPMs to generate large numbers of unique matrix problems using parameters chosen by the researcher. Specifically, the software is designed so that researchers can choose the type, direction, and number of relations in a problem and then createmore » any number of unique matrices that share the same underlying structure (e.g. changes in numerosity in a diagonal pattern) but have different surface features (e.g. shapes, colors).Raven™s Progressive Matrices (RPMs) are a widely-used test for assessing intelligence and reasoning ability. Since the test is non-verbal, it can be applied to many different populations and has been used all over the world. However, there are relatively few matrices in the sets developed by Raven, which limits their use in experiments requiring large numbers of stimuli. This tool creates a matrix set in a systematic way that allows researchers to have a great deal of control over the underlying structure, surface features, and difficulty of the matrix problems while providing a large set of novel matrices with which to conduct experiments.« less

  7. Document Details Document Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Document Details Document Number Date of Document Document Title/Description [Links below to each document] D195066340 Not listed. N/A REVISIONS IN STRATIGRAPHIC NOMENCLATURE OF COLUMBIA RIVER BASALT GROUP D196000240 Not listed. N/A EPA DENIAL OF LINER LEACHATE COLLECTION SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS D196005916 Not listed. N/A LATE CENOZOIC STRATIGRAPHY AND TECTONIC EVOLUTION WITHIN SUBSIDING BASIN SOUTH CENTRAL WASHINGTON D196025993 RHO-BWI-ST-14 N/A SUPRABASALT SEDIMENTS OF COLD CREEK SYNCLINE AREA

  8. Semiclassical S-matrix for black holes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bezrukov, Fedor; Levkov, Dmitry; Sibiryakov, Sergey

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we propose a semiclassical method to calculate S-matrix elements for two-stage gravitational transitions involving matter collapse into a black hole and evaporation of the latter. The method consistently incorporates back-reaction of the collapsing and emitted quanta on the metric. We illustrate the method in several toy models describing spherical self-gravitating shells in asymptotically flat and AdS space-times. We find that electrically neutral shells reflect via the above collapse-evaporation process with probability exp(–B), where B is the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of the intermediate black hole. This is consistent with interpretation of exp(B) as the number of black hole states.more » The same expression for the probability is obtained in the case of charged shells if one takes into account instability of the Cauchy horizon of the intermediate Reissner-Nordström black hole. As a result, our semiclassical method opens a new systematic approach to the gravitational S-matrix in the non-perturbative regime.« less

  9. The TRUPACT-II Matrix Depleton Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Djordjevic, S.M.; Loehr, C.A.; Smith, M.C.; Banjac, V.; Lyon, W.F.

    1995-12-01

    Contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes will be shipped and disposed at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) shipping package. A primary transportation requirement for the TRUPACT-II is that the concentration of potentially flammable gases (i.e., hydrogen and methane) must not exceed 5 percent by volume in the package or the payload during a 60-day shipping period. Decomposition of waste materials by radiation, or radiolysis, is the predominant mechanism of gas generation during transport. The gas generation potential of a target waste material is characterized by a G-value, which is the number of molecules of gas generated per 100 eV of ionizing radiation absorbed by the target material. To demonstrate compliance with the flammable gas concentration requirement, theoretical worst-case calculations were performed to establish allowable wattage (decay heat) limits for waste containers. The calculations were based on the G-value for the waste material with the highest potential for flammable gas generation. The calculations also made no allowances for decreases of the G-value over time due to matrix depletion phenomena that have been observed by many experimenters. Matrix depletion occurs over time when an alpha-generating source particle alters the target material (by evaporation, reaction, or decomposition) into a material of lower gas generating potential. The net effect of these alterations is represented by the ``effective G-value.``

  10. Modular redundant number systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-31

    With the increased use of public key cryptography, faster modular multiplication has become an important cryptographic issue. Almost all public key cryptography, including most elliptic curve systems, use modular multiplication. Modular multiplication, particularly for the large public key modulii, is very slow. Increasing the speed of modular multiplication is almost synonymous with increasing the speed of public key cryptography. There are two parts to modular multiplication: multiplication and modular reduction. Though there are fast methods for multiplying and fast methods for doing modular reduction, they do not mix well. Most fast techniques require integers to be in a special form. These special forms are not related and converting from one form to another is more costly than using the standard techniques. To this date it has been better to use the fast modular reduction technique coupled with standard multiplication. Standard modular reduction is much more costly than standard multiplication. Fast modular reduction (Montgomery`s method) reduces the reduction cost to approximately that of a standard multiply. Of the fast multiplication techniques, the redundant number system technique (RNS) is one of the most popular. It is simple, converting a large convolution (multiply) into many smaller independent ones. Not only do redundant number systems increase speed, but the independent parts allow for parallelization. RNS form implies working modulo another constant. Depending on the relationship between these two constants; reduction OR division may be possible, but not both. This paper describes a new technique using ideas from both Montgomery`s method and RNS. It avoids the formula problem and allows fast reduction and multiplication. Since RNS form is used throughout, it also allows the entire process to be parallelized.

  11. Using the Domain Name System to Thwart Automated Client-Based Attacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Curtis R; Shue, Craig A

    2011-09-01

    On the Internet, attackers can compromise systems owned by other people and then use these systems to launch attacks automatically. When attacks such as phishing or SQL injections are successful, they can have negative consequences including server downtime and the loss of sensitive information. Current methods to prevent such attacks are limited in that they are application-specific, or fail to block attackers. Phishing attempts can be stopped with email filters, but if the attacker manages to successfully bypass these filters, then the user must determine if the email is legitimate or not. Unfortunately, they often are unable to do so. Since attackers have a low success rate, they attempt to compensate for it in volume. In order to have this high throughput, attackers take shortcuts and break protocols. We use this knowledge to address these issues by implementing a system that can detect malicious activity and use it to block attacks. If the client fails to follow proper procedure, they can be classified as an attacker. Once an attacker has been discovered, they will be isolated and monitored. This can be accomplished using existing software in Ubuntu Linux applications, along with our custom wrapper application. After running the system and seeing its performance on three popular Web browsers Chromium, Firefox and Internet Explorer as well as two popular email clients, Thunderbird and Evolution, we found that not only is this system conceivable, it is effective and has low overhead.

  12. Conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor devices with edge channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovskii, E. Yu. Bagraev, N. T.

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining the conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor structures with edge channels is proposed. The method is based on the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations based on Kirchhoff equations, made up of potential differences U{sub ij} measured at stabilized currents I{sub kl}, where i, j, k, l are terminal numbers. The matrix obtained by solving the system of equations completely describes the structure under study, reflecting its configuration and homogeneity. This method can find wide application when using the known Landauer-Buttiker formalism to analyze carrier transport in the quantum Hall effect and quantum spin Hall effect modes. Within the proposed method, the contribution of the contact area resistances R{sub c} to the formation of conductance matrix elements is taken into account. The possibilities of practical application of the results obtained in developing analog cryptographic devices are considered.

  13. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  14. Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 ...

  15. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  16. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  17. Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  18. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  19. Utah Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements...

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  20. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

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    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  1. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

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    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  2. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  3. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  4. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  5. Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  6. Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  7. Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Washington Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  8. Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wisconsin Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  9. Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Vermont Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  10. West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  11. New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  12. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  13. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  14. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  15. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  16. New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) New Hampshire Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  17. New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 ...

  18. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  19. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  1. North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  2. North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 ...

  3. SAMQUA - Quantum Numbers of Compound Nuclear States for R-Matrix...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Bouland, Olivier ; Babut, Richard 1 ; Larson, Nancy M. 2 + Show Author Affiliations Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique - DENLEPh - C.E. Cadarache, F-13108 St. ...

  4. dynamic-origin-destination-matrix

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic Origin-Destination Matrix Estimation in TRANSIMS Using Direction-Guided Parallel Heuristic Search Algorithms Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Associate Professor University at Buffalo, The State University of New York 233 Ketter Hall Buffalo, NY 14260 Phone: (716) 645-4367 FAX: (716) 645-3733 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. List of Authors ================ Adel W. Sadek, Ph.D. Shan Huang Liya Guo University at Buffalo, The State

  5. Solid waste information and tracking system client-server conversion project management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, D.L.

    1998-04-15

    This Project Management Plan is the lead planning document governing the proposed conversion of the Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) to a client-server architecture. This plan presents the content specified by American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) standards for software development, with additional information categories deemed to be necessary to describe the conversion fully. This plan is a living document that will be reviewed on a periodic basis and revised when necessary to reflect changes in baseline design concepts and schedules. This PMP describes the background, planning and management of the SWITS conversion. It does not constitute a statement of product requirements. Requirements and specification documentation needed for the SWITS conversion will be released as supporting documents.

  6. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohn, Mark S.; Anselmo, Mark

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  7. Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc PDF icon Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More Documents & ...

  8. Energy density matrix formalism for interacting quantum systems: a quantum Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krogel, Jaron T; Kim, Jeongnim; Reboredo, Fernando A

    2014-01-01

    We develop an energy density matrix that parallels the one-body reduced density matrix (1RDM) for many-body quantum systems. Just as the density matrix gives access to the number density and occupation numbers, the energy density matrix yields the energy density and orbital occupation energies. The eigenvectors of the matrix provide a natural orbital partitioning of the energy density while the eigenvalues comprise a single particle energy spectrum obeying a total energy sum rule. For mean-field systems the energy density matrix recovers the exact spectrum. When correlation becomes important, the occupation energies resemble quasiparticle energies in some respects. We explore the occupation energy spectrum for the finite 3D homogeneous electron gas in the metallic regime and an isolated oxygen atom with ground state quantum Monte Carlo techniques imple- mented in the QMCPACK simulation code. The occupation energy spectrum for the homogeneous electron gas can be described by an effective mass below the Fermi level. Above the Fermi level evanescent behavior in the occupation energies is observed in similar fashion to the occupation numbers of the 1RDM. A direct comparison with total energy differences demonstrates a quantita- tive connection between the occupation energies and electron addition and removal energies for the electron gas. For the oxygen atom, the association between the ground state occupation energies and particle addition and removal energies becomes only qualitative. The energy density matrix provides a new avenue for describing energetics with quantum Monte Carlo methods which have traditionally been limited to total energies.

  9. Number

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. ...

  10. Zinc Matrix Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Zip: 93101 Product: Develops high-performance rechargeable alkaline battery technology for commercial and military markets. References: Zinc Matrix Power Inc1...

  11. FERC Licensing Processes Matrix | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook: FERC Licensing Processes MatrixPermittingRegulatory GuidanceGuideHandbook...

  12. Two new constraints for the cumulant matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos-Cordoba, Eloy; Salvador, Pedro; Matito, Eduard; Piris, Mario

    2014-12-21

    We suggest new strict constraints that the two-particle cumulant matrix should fulfill. The constraints are obtained from the decomposition of ?S-^{sup 2}?, previously developed in our laboratory, and the vanishing number of electrons shared by two non-interacting fragments. The conditions impose stringent constraints into the cumulant structure without any need to perform an orbital optimization procedure thus carrying very small or no computational effort. These constraints are tested on the series of Piris natural orbital functionals (PNOF), which are among the most accurate ones available in the literature. Interestingly, even though all PNOF cumulants ensure correct overall ?S{sup ^2}? values, none of them is consistent with the local spin structure of systems that dissociate more than one pair of electrons. A careful analysis of the local spin components reveals the most important missing contributions in the cumulant expression thus suggesting a means to improve PNOF5. The constraints provide an inexpensive tool for the construction and testing of cumulant structures that complement previously known conditions such as the N-representability or the square of the total spin angular momentum, ?S{sup ^2}?.

  13. Matrix-free constructions of circulant and block circulant preconditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Chao; Ng, Esmond G.; Penczek, Pawel A.

    2001-12-01

    A framework for constructing circulant and block circulant preconditioners (C) for a symmetric linear system Ax=b arising from certain signal and image processing applications is presented in this paper. The proposed scheme does not make explicit use of matrix elements of A. It is ideal for applications in which A only exists in the form of a matrix vector multiplication routine, and in which the process of extracting matrix elements of A is costly. The proposed algorithm takes advantage of the fact that for many linear systems arising from signal or image processing applications, eigenvectors of A can be well represented by a small number of Fourier modes. Therefore, the construction of C can be carried out in the frequency domain by carefully choosing its eigenvalues so that the condition number of C{sup T} AC can be reduced significantly. We illustrate how to construct the spectrum of C in a way such that the smallest eigenvalues of C{sup T} AC overlaps with those of A extremely well while the largest eigenvalues of C{sup T} AC are smaller than those of A by several orders of magnitude. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the preconditioner on accelerating the solution of linear systems arising from image reconstruction application.

  14. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10 11 8 1990's 8 8 10 11 11 9 202 7 7 9 2000's 9 8 9 9 10 12 11 11 6 3 2010's 3 5 3 3 1 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural

  15. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 27 26 29 2000's 28 28 29 29 29 28 26 27 27 25 2010's 24 24 22 22 23 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Industrial

  16. Polymer Matrix Composites: A Perspective for a Special Issue of Polymer Reviews

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, Michael R.

    2012-09-04

    Polymer matrix composites, with their high specific strength and stiffness, are used in a wide range of applications from large wind turbine blades to microelectronics. This perspective article provides a brief primer on polymer matrix composites, discusses some of their advantages and limitations, and describes a number of emerging trends in the field. In addition, it introduces four review articles on the topics of recent developments in carbon fibers, natural fiber reinforced composites, evaluation of the interface between the fiber reinforcement and polymer matrix, and carbon nanotube reinforced polymers.

  17. ARM - Measurement - Particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    number concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Particle number concentration The number of particles present in any given volume of air. Categories Aerosols Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those

  18. Total Number of Operable Refineries

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge

  19. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

  20. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 93 98 100 1990's 100 113 114 117 119 120 121 93 93 109 2000's 90 90 96 97 179 192 207 220 189 192 2010's 184 177 177 195 218 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016

  1. Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 73 73 74 1990's 80 81 80 66 89 74 87 81 110 108 2000's 178 233 66 65 69 69 73 76 82 85 2010's 94 102 108 120 126 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring

  2. Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 435 435 428 1990's 457 452 459 462 453 463 466 462 454 397 2000's 71 73 439 412 593 716 711 693 693 396 2010's 384 381 372 372 369 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  3. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 190 200 230 1990's 284 228 244 194 135 126 170 194 317 314 2000's 308 295 877 179 121 127 133 133 155 130 2010's 120 123 127 132 131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  4. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 358 344 354 1990's 526 532 532 526 519 530 534 480 514 555 2000's 526 504 488 450 414 425 439 395 383 390 2010's 368 371 379 383 386 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  5. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241 233 235 1990's 240 243 248 249 252 253 250 265 257 264 2000's 297 316 182 184 186 179 170 185 165 112 2010's 114 129 134 138 141 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  6. Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 575 552 460 1990's 452 377 388 433 481 515 517 561 574 573 2000's 520 518 451 421 398 432 475 467 449 607 2010's 581 630 507 528 520 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  7. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 219 132 64 1990's 62 65 66 75 144 167 183 189 203 200 2000's 217 198 194 191 196 195 192 188 199 187 2010's 184 178 179 183 189 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  8. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,158 1,152 1,122 1990's 1,135 1,107 1,096 1,066 1,064 359 363 336 325 302 2000's 317 283 54 236 223 223 245 256 243 260 2010's 249 245 248 271 266 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  9. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 261 267 270 1990's 275 283 319 355 381 396 444 481 464 445 2000's 416 402 533 526 475 542 528 548 598 598 2010's 580 556 574 566 575 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016

  10. Visual Matrix Clustering of Social Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; May, Richard A.

    2013-07-01

    The prevailing choices to graphically represent a social network in todays literature are a node-link graph layout and an adjacency matrix. Both visualization techniques have unique strengths and weaknesses when applied to different domain applications. In this article, we focus our discussion on adjacency matrix and how to turn the matrix-based visualization technique from merely showing pairwise associations among network actors (or graph nodes) to depicting clusters of a social network. We also use node-link layouts to supplement the discussion.

  11. Neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simkovic, Fedor [BLTP, JINR Dubna, 141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2011-11-23

    The fundamental importance of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) is widely recognized. Observation of the decay would tell us that the total lepton number is not conserved and that, consequently, neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. The 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay is discussed in context of neutrino oscillation data. The perspectives of the experimental 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay searches are analyzed. The importance of reliable determination of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is pointed out.

  12. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-01-27

    The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

  13. Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-12-05

    To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

  14. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60,707 61,365 60,377 1990's 60,405 60,947 61,319 60,599 62,045 61,275 61,117 51,661 63,819 53,943 2000's 55,194 55,692 56,560 55,999 57,087 57,389 56,548 55,761 58,160 56,454 2010's 56,246 56,553 56,608 58,005 57,191 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  15. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 675 684 702 1990's 712 718 696 718 766 2,432 2,234 11,553 10,673 10,342 2000's 10,161 10,504 9,156 9,022 8,463 7,973 7,697 7,668 11,627 7,863 2010's 7,912 7,955 8,160 8,495 8,791 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  16. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 400,218 403,657 406,723 1990's 407,094 413,354 418,611 413,358 428,201 427,720 439,931 444,970 523,790 460,173 2000's 475,673 476,275 487,332 492,451 497,391 501,279 499,504 494,005 512,013 512,551 2010's 510,776 514,481 515,338 527,397 522,408 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  17. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18,294 18,921 19,924 1990's 20,694 22,124 22,799 23,207 24,521 25,593 26,613 27,629 29,030 30,521 2000's 31,789 32,782 33,877 34,590 35,792 37,093 38,546 40,128 41,098 41,303 2010's 40,801 40,944 41,192 41,710 42,338 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 213,422 219,981 236,237 1990's 256,119 283,307 295,714 305,099 336,353 364,112 393,783 426,221 458,737 490,029 2000's 520,233 550,850 580,319 610,756 648,551 688,058 726,772 750,570 758,315 760,391 2010's 764,435 772,880 782,759 794,150 808,970 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  19. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 213,601 219,257 225,347 1990's 233,075 236,519 237,861 240,684 245,190 250,223 259,663 254,991 258,076 266,102 2000's 269,561 269,327 271,160 271,203 272,445 277,767 270,552 272,555 272,899 270,596 2010's 268,346 268,647 267,793 269,081 269,758 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,929 8,163 8,356 1990's 8,301 8,479 8,573 8,678 8,655 8,650 8,672 7,779 8,112 8,136 2000's 8,267 8,515 8,111 8,098 7,899 8,328 6,929 6,858 6,806 6,712 2010's 6,571 6,482 6,381 6,554 6,526 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  1. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,648,972 2,678,838 2,714,839 1990's 2,766,912 2,801,716 2,826,713 2,867,959 2,921,536 2,967,375 2,994,891 3,041,948 3,050,960 3,111,108 2000's 3,178,840 3,195,584 3,208,466 3,225,908 3,250,068 3,272,307 3,263,062 3,273,791 3,262,716 3,253,184 2010's 3,240,619 3,236,160 3,244,274 3,271,074 3,283,869 -

  2. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 87,824 86,666 86,172 1990's 85,790 86,744 87,120 88,181 87,494 88,358 89,852 90,284 89,711 80,986 2000's 80,558 79,045 80,029 79,733 79,512 78,726 78,745 93,991 94,247 94,314 2010's 92,430 93,903 94,537 95,385 96,004 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  3. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,772 2,689 2,877 1990's 2,889 2,840 2,859 2,912 2,853 2,845 2,843 2,531 3,295 3,040 2000's 2,821 3,403 3,438 3,367 3,283 2,855 2,811 2,822 2,920 2,618 2010's 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  4. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 809,171 805,107 806,875 1990's 814,296 824,172 832,677 842,130 845,448 856,604 866,531 872,454 877,236 867,922 2000's 859,951 868,314 875,338 876,420 875,271 880,403 879,589 920,616 923,650 924,745 2010's 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  5. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 40,967 41,998 43,997 1990's 47,175 55,374 50,251 51,910 53,700 55,409 57,613 60,419 63,085 65,034 2000's 66,893 68,098 69,150 74,515 71,762 73,520 74,683 80,998 76,868 76,893 2010's 77,370 77,822 78,237 79,276 80,480 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  6. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 676 1,034 738 1990's 699 787 740 696 765 791 799 704 695 718 2000's 717 821 842 926 907 1,118 1,060 1,136 1,075 1,051 2010's 1,053 1,066 1,076 1,085 1,099 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016

  7. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 280,670 288,066 302,156 1990's 326,177 376,166 354,256 371,151 391,845 411,465 433,638 456,960 477,796 502,000 2000's 523,952 542,799 563,744 625,398 595,495 626,685 647,635 664,455 674,421 675,582 2010's 682,737 688,681 693,507 700,211 707,010 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 166,901 172,615 178,545 1990's 186,772 191,103 193,863 198,299 206,812 209,245 214,340 215,057 216,519 223,732 2000's 228,037 225,911 226,957 227,708 231,051 233,132 231,540 234,597 233,462 233,334 2010's 233,751 233,588 235,049 237,922 239,681 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  9. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,089 6,070 6,023 1990's 6,238 6,344 6,496 6,407 6,388 6,328 6,441 6,492 6,736 7,080 2000's 6,330 6,159 5,880 5,577 5,726 5,577 5,241 4,868 4,772 4,745 2010's 4,624 5,007 5,066 5,024 5,084 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  10. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,237,877 2,271,801 2,291,242 1990's 2,311,795 2,333,377 2,363,575 2,386,249 2,393,053 2,413,715 2,431,909 2,452,524 2,493,639 2,486,704 2000's 2,519,794 2,542,724 2,559,024 2,572,584 2,591,458 2,600,574 2,605,782 2,620,755 2,631,340 2,635,886 2010's 2,646,211 2,667,392 2,678,547

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 53 54,306 55,400 56,822 1990's 56,903 57,265 58,068 57,827 60,320 60,902 62,064 65,919 76,467 64,185 2000's 66,193 65,794 65,788 65,297 65,223 65,294 66,337 65,879 65,313 67,674 2010's 68,163 67,696 67,252 67,136 67,806 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  12. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,313 2,293 2,380 1990's 2,431 2,523 2,509 2,458 2,477 2,491 2,512 2,496 2,464 2,620 2000's 2,792 2,781 2,730 2,743 2,799 2,787 2,735 2,704 2,757 3,057 2010's 3,039 2,988 3,045 3,143 3,244 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  13. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 656 662,217 668,432 683,528 1990's 686,149 700,195 711,043 730,114 744,394 751,890 766,322 781,711 788,464 775,311 2000's 805,689 807,770 806,389 809,754 806,660 809,454 808,801 796,476 792,236 785,005 2010's 778,985 772,892 767,396 765,957 769,418 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 116,571 119,458 122,803 1990's 124,919 128,223 129,973 131,925 134,336 137,162 139,097 140,515 141,307 145,631 2000's 148,411 148,830 150,092 151,586 151,943 159,649 154,322 155,885 157,223 155,615 2010's 156,557 161,293 158,213 158,965 159,596 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,497 5,696 6,196 1990's 6,439 6,393 6,358 6,508 6,314 6,250 6,586 6,920 6,635 19,069 2000's 10,866 9,778 10,139 8,913 5,368 5,823 5,350 5,427 5,294 5,190 2010's 5,145 5,338 5,204 5,178 5,098 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  16. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,250,476 1,275,401 1,306,747 1990's 1,327,772 1,358,640 1,377,023 1,402,770 1,438,483 1,463,640 1,489,647 1,509,142 1,531,914 1,570,253 2000's 1,604,456 1,613,373 1,657,640 1,644,715 1,588,738 1,707,195 1,661,186 1,677,857 1,678,158 1,662,663 2010's 1,669,026 1,707,148 1,673,132 1,681,841 1,693,267

  17. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 80,797 81,294 82,549 1990's 83,047 84,387 85,325 86,452 86,918 88,585 89,663 90,643 91,300 92,306 2000's 93,836 95,485 96,496 96,712 97,274 97,767 97,823 97,979 98,144 98,416 2010's 98,396 98,541 99,113 99,017 99,182 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,033 1,937 1,895 1990's 1,883 1,866 1,835 1,903 1,957 1,957 2,066 1,839 1,862 1,797 2000's 1,831 1,830 1,855 1,791 1,746 1,744 1,670 1,651 1,652 1,626 2010's 1,528 1,465 1,469 1,491 1,572 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Iowa Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 690,532 689,655 701,687 1990's 706,842 716,088 729,081 740,722 750,678 760,848 771,109 780,746 790,162 799,015 2000's 812,323 818,313 824,218 832,230 839,415 850,095 858,915 865,553 872,980 875,781 2010's 879,713 883,733 892,123 895,414 900,420 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 82,934 83,810 85,143 1990's 85,539 86,874 86,840 87,735 86,457 88,163 89,168 85,018 89,654 86,003 2000's 87,007 86,592 87,397 88,030 86,640 85,634 85,686 85,376 84,703 84,715 2010's 84,446 84,874 84,673 84,969 85,867 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  1. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,440 4,314 4,366 1990's 4,357 3,445 3,296 4,369 3,560 3,079 2,988 7,014 10,706 5,861 2000's 8,833 9,341 9,891 9,295 8,955 8,300 8,152 8,327 8,098 7,793 2010's 7,664 7,954 7,970 7,877 7,429 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  2. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 725,676 733,101 731,792 1990's 747,081 753,839 762,545 777,658 773,357 797,524 804,213 811,975 841,843 824,803 2000's 833,662 836,486 843,353 850,464 855,272 856,761 862,203 858,304 853,125 855,454 2010's 853,842 854,730 854,800 858,572 861,092 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  3. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 63,024 63,971 65,041 1990's 67,086 68,461 69,466 71,998 73,562 74,521 76,079 77,693 80,147 80,283 2000's 81,588 81,795 82,757 84,110 84,493 85,243 85,236 85,210 84,985 83,862 2010's 84,707 84,977 85,129 85,999 85,318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  4. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,391 1,436 1,443 1990's 1,544 1,587 1,608 1,585 1,621 1,630 1,633 1,698 1,864 1,813 2000's 1,801 1,701 1,785 1,695 1,672 1,698 1,658 1,599 1,585 1,715 2010's 1,742 1,705 1,720 1,767 1,780 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 596,320 606,106 614,058 1990's 624,477 633,942 644,281 654,664 668,774 685,481 696,989 713,509 726,960 735,371 2000's 744,816 749,106 756,234 763,290 767,022 770,080 770,171 771,047 753,531 754,761 2010's 758,129 759,584 757,790 761,575 760,131 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  6. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 67,382 66,472 64,114 1990's 62,770 61,574 61,030 62,055 62,184 62,930 62,101 62,270 63,029 62,911 2000's 62,710 62,241 62,247 63,512 60,580 58,409 57,097 57,127 57,066 58,396 2010's 58,562 58,749 63,381 59,147 58,611 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  7. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,617 1,503 1,531 1990's 1,504 1,469 1,452 1,592 1,737 1,383 1,444 1,406 1,380 1,397 2000's 1,318 1,440 1,357 1,291 1,460 1,086 962 945 988 954 2010's 942 920 963 916 883 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  8. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 952,079 946,970 934,472 1990's 934,007 936,423 940,403 941,294 945,387 957,558 945,967 962,786 962,436 961,925 2000's 964,133 952,753 957,048 958,795 940,400 905,857 868,353 879,612 886,084 889,570 2010's 893,400 897,513 963,688 901,635 899,378 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  9. Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,435 3,731 3,986 1990's 4,250 4,455 4,838 4,979 5,297 5,819 6,414 6,606 6,662 6,582 2000's 6,954 6,936 7,375 7,517 7,687 8,178 8,168 8,334 8,491 8,815 2010's 9,084 9,681 10,179 11,415 11,810 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  10. Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maine Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,134 11,933 11,902 1990's 12,000 12,424 13,766 13,880 14,104 14,917 14,982 15,221 15,646 15,247 2000's 17,111 17,302 17,921 18,385 18,707 18,633 18,824 18,921 19,571 20,806 2010's 21,142 22,461 23,555 24,765 27,047 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  11. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 51,252 53,045 54,740 1990's 55,576 61,878 62,858 63,767 64,698 66,094 69,991 69,056 67,850 69,301 2000's 70,671 70,691 71,824 72,076 72,809 73,780 74,584 74,856 75,053 75,771 2010's 75,192 75,788 75,799 77,117 77,846 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  12. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,222 5,397 5,570 1990's 5,646 520 514 496 516 481 430 479 1,472 536 2000's 329 795 1,434 1,361 1,354 1,325 1,340 1,333 1,225 1,234 2010's 1,255 1,226 1,163 1,173 1,179 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release

  13. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 755,294 760,754 767,219 1990's 774,707 782,373 894,677 807,204 824,137 841,772 871,012 890,195 901,455 939,029 2000's 941,384 959,772 978,319 987,863 1,009,455 1,024,955 1,040,941 1,053,948 1,057,521 1,067,807 2010's 1,071,566 1,077,168 1,078,978 1,099,272 1,101,292 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  14. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 84,636 93,005 92,252 1990's 85,775 88,746 85,873 102,187 92,744 104,453 105,889 107,926 108,832 113,177 2000's 117,993 120,984 122,447 123,006 125,107 120,167 126,713 128,965 242,693 153,826 2010's 144,487 138,225 142,825 144,246 139,556 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable;

  15. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,626 7,199 13,057 1990's 6,539 5,006 8,723 7,283 8,019 10,447 10,952 11,058 11,245 8,027 2000's 8,794 9,750 9,090 11,272 10,949 12,019 12,456 12,678 36,928 19,208 2010's 12,751 10,721 10,840 11,063 10,946 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  16. Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Massachusetts Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,082,777 1,100,635 1,114,920 1990's 1,118,429 1,127,536 1,137,911 1,155,443 1,179,869 1,180,860 1,188,317 1,204,494 1,212,486 1,232,887 2000's 1,278,781 1,283,008 1,295,952 1,324,715 1,306,142 1,297,508 1,348,848 1,361,470 1,236,480 1,370,353 2010's 1,389,592 1,408,314 1,447,947

  17. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 178,469 185,961 191,474 1990's 195,766 198,890 201,561 204,453 207,629 211,817 214,843 222,726 224,506 227,159 2000's 230,558 225,109 247,818 246,123 246,991 253,415 254,923 253,139 252,382 252,017 2010's 249,309 249,456 249,994 250,994 253,127 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  18. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10,885 11,117 11,452 1990's 11,500 11,446 11,460 11,425 11,308 11,454 11,848 12,233 11,888 14,527 2000's 11,384 11,210 10,468 10,378 10,088 10,049 9,885 9,728 10,563 18,186 2010's 9,332 9,088 8,833 8,497 8,156 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  19. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,452,554 2,491,149 2,531,304 1990's 2,573,570 2,609,561 2,640,579 2,677,085 2,717,683 2,767,190 2,812,876 2,859,483 2,903,698 2,949,628 2000's 2,999,737 3,011,205 3,110,743 3,140,021 3,161,370 3,187,583 3,193,920 3,188,152 3,172,623 3,169,026 2010's 3,152,468 3,153,895 3,161,033 3,180,349

  20. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 88,789 90,256 92,916 1990's 95,474 97,388 99,707 93,062 102,857 103,874 105,531 108,686 110,986 114,127 2000's 116,529 119,007 121,751 123,123 125,133 126,310 129,149 128,367 130,847 131,801 2010's 132,163 132,938 134,394 135,557 136,382 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  1. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,585 2,670 2,638 1990's 2,574 2,486 2,515 2,477 2,592 2,531 2,564 2,233 2,188 2,267 2000's 2,025 1,996 2,029 2,074 2,040 1,432 1,257 1,146 1,131 2,039 2010's 2,106 1,770 1,793 1,870 1,878 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  2. Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Minnesota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 872,148 894,380 911,001 1990's 946,107 970,941 998,201 1,074,631 1,049,263 1,080,009 1,103,709 1,134,019 1,161,423 1,190,190 2000's 1,222,397 1,249,748 1,282,751 1,308,143 1,338,061 1,364,237 1,401,362 1,401,623 1,413,162 1,423,703 2010's 1,429,681 1,436,063 1,445,824 1,459,134 1,472,663 - = No

  3. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 43,362 44,170 44,253 1990's 43,184 43,693 44,313 45,310 43,803 45,444 46,029 47,311 45,345 47,620 2000's 50,913 51,109 50,468 50,928 54,027 54,936 55,741 56,155 55,291 50,713 2010's 50,537 50,636 50,689 50,153 50,238 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  4. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,312 1,263 1,282 1990's 1,317 1,314 1,327 1,324 1,313 1,298 1,241 1,199 1,165 1,246 2000's 1,199 1,214 1,083 1,161 996 1,205 1,181 1,346 1,132 1,141 2010's 980 982 936 933 943 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  5. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 370,094 372,238 376,353 1990's 382,251 386,264 392,155 398,472 405,312 415,123 418,442 423,397 415,673 426,352 2000's 434,501 438,069 435,146 438,861 445,212 445,856 437,669 445,043 443,025 437,715 2010's 436,840 442,479 442,840 445,589 444,423 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  6. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,711 97,939 99,721 1990's 105,164 117,675 125,174 125,571 132,378 130,318 133,445 135,553 135,417 133,464 2000's 133,969 135,968 137,924 140,057 141,258 142,148 143,632 142,965 141,529 140,633 2010's 138,670 138,214 144,906 142,495 143,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  7. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,832 2,880 3,063 1990's 3,140 3,096 2,989 3,040 3,115 3,033 3,408 3,097 3,151 3,152 2000's 3,094 3,085 2,935 3,115 3,600 3,545 3,548 3,511 3,514 3,573 2010's 3,541 3,307 3,692 3,538 3,497 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,180,546 1,194,985 1,208,523 1990's 1,213,305 1,211,342 1,220,203 1,225,921 1,281,007 1,259,102 1,275,465 1,293,032 1,307,563 1,311,865 2000's 1,324,282 1,326,160 1,340,726 1,343,614 1,346,773 1,348,743 1,353,892 1,354,173 1,352,015 1,348,781 2010's 1,348,549 1,342,920 1,389,910 1,357,740

  9. Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 21,382 22,246 22,219 1990's 23,331 23,185 23,610 24,373 25,349 26,329 26,374 27,457 28,065 28,424 2000's 29,215 29,429 30,250 30,814 31,357 31,304 31,817 32,472 33,008 33,731 2010's 34,002 34,305 34,504 34,909 35,205 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  10. Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 167,883 171,785 171,156 1990's 174,384 177,726 182,641 188,879 194,357 203,435 205,199 209,806 218,851 222,114 2000's 224,784 226,171 229,015 232,839 236,511 240,554 245,883 247,035 253,122 255,472 2010's 257,322 259,046 259,957 262,122 265,849 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,342 15,093 14,012 1990's 13,767 14,931 15,064 15,315 15,348 15,580 17,036 15,907 16,171 16,317 2000's 16,366 16,027 16,170 17,164 17,490 17,904 18,016 18,062 19,286 19,843 2010's 19,977 20,146 20,387 20,617 20,894 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  12. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 113,175 112,126 113,129 1990's 113,598 113,463 114,793 116,027 117,385 119,544 131,910 125,740 127,324 127,750 2000's 129,274 129,897 133,445 135,441 137,434 140,013 142,385 143,644 152,439 153,062 2010's 153,852 155,181 157,226 158,889 160,896 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11 11,484 11,649 11,806 1990's 11,921 12,071 12,204 12,359 12,475 12,584 12,732 12,945 13,176 13,409 2000's 13,711 14,002 14,342 14,502 13,999 14,120 14,384 13,408 12,764 13,215 2010's 12,998 13,027 13,133 13,246 13,399 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  14. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 66 67,648 68,612 69,540 1990's 70,808 72,565 74,268 75,842 77,670 79,474 81,348 83,596 86,243 88,924 2000's 91,297 93,896 97,077 100,404 104,360 108,401 112,269 115,500 119,039 120,124 2010's 121,166 121,736 122,983 124,411 126,416 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  15. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 46 46,702 46,636 46,776 1990's 47,292 53,982 47,781 47,678 48,568 49,145 49,693 50,115 51,712 53,022 2000's 54,056 54,724 56,260 56,082 56,186 56,572 57,091 57,169 57,586 57,191 2010's 56,676 56,547 56,532 56,585 56,649 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  16. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 545 567,962 564,195 572,461 1990's 586,866 642,659 604,899 610,337 635,335 661,192 689,597 724,911 764,167 802,469 2000's 846,016 884,789 925,927 957,442 993,885 1,042,662 1,088,574 1,119,266 1,128,264 1,130,047 2010's 1,138,448 1,146,286 1,157,688 1,172,003 1,186,794 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  17. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 60 60,355 61,630 61,848 1990's 61,530 61,731 62,221 62,952 63,821 65,490 67,293 68,413 69,974 71,389 2000's 72,933 71,875 71,530 71,016 70,655 69,990 69,475 69,495 69,144 69,043 2010's 67,987 67,815 68,765 68,791 69,011 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  18. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 1,410 1,151 1,412 1990's 1,396 1,367 1,319 1,364 1,417 1,366 1,488 1,336 1,300 1,393 2000's 1,414 1,122 1,407 1,269 1,223 1,120 1,120 1,055 1,104 1,025 2010's 1,079 1,133 990 1,020 1,009 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  19. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 475 480,839 485,112 491,110 1990's 488,850 495,148 504,722 513,466 521,176 531,182 539,952 544,460 550,017 554,121 2000's 560,055 552,716 553,192 553,211 554,844 555,861 555,905 557,966 556,746 557,355 2010's 549,970 551,795 549,959 549,764 549,034 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  20. California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 413 404,507 407,435 410,231 1990's 415,073 421,278 412,467 411,648 411,140 411,535 408,294 406,803 588,224 416,791 2000's 413,003 416,036 420,690 431,795 432,367 434,899 442,052 446,267 447,160 441,806 2010's 439,572 440,990 442,708 444,342 443,115 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA =

  1. California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 31 44,764 44,680 46,243 1990's 46,048 44,865 40,528 42,748 38,750 38,457 36,613 35,830 36,235 36,435 2000's 35,391 34,893 33,725 34,617 41,487 40,226 38,637 39,134 39,591 38,746 2010's 38,006 37,575 37,686 37,996 37,548 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  2. California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916

  3. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 108 109,770 110,769 112,004 1990's 112,661 113,945 114,898 115,924 115,994 118,502 121,221 123,580 125,178 129,041 2000's 131,613 134,393 136,489 138,621 138,543 137,513 139,746 141,420 144,719 145,624 2010's 145,460 145,837 145,960 150,145 150,235 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  4. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1 896 923 976 1990's 1,018 1,074 1,108 1,032 1,176 1,528 2,099 2,923 3,349 4,727 2000's 4,994 4,729 4,337 4,054 4,175 4,318 4,472 4,592 4,816 5,084 2010's 6,232 6,529 6,906 7,293 7,823 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  5. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 925 942,571 955,810 970,512 1990's 983,592 1,002,154 1,022,542 1,044,699 1,073,308 1,108,899 1,147,743 1,183,978 1,223,433 1,265,032 2000's 1,315,619 1,365,413 1,412,923 1,453,974 1,496,876 1,524,813 1,558,911 1,583,945 1,606,602 1,622,434 2010's 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1,690,581 -

  6. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 38 40,886 41,594 43,703 1990's 45,364 45,925 46,859 45,529 45,042 45,935 47,055 48,195 47,110 49,930 2000's 52,384 49,815 49,383 50,691 50,839 52,572 52,982 52,389 53,903 54,510 2010's 54,842 55,028 55,407 55,500 56,591 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  7. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2 2,709 2,818 2,908 1990's 3,061 2,921 2,923 2,952 3,754 3,705 3,435 3,459 3,441 3,465 2000's 3,683 3,881 3,716 3,625 3,470 3,437 3,393 3,317 3,196 3,138 2010's 3,063 3,062 3,148 4,454 4,217 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  8. Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 400 411,349 417,831 424,036 1990's 428,912 430,078 432,244 427,761 428,157 431,909 433,778 436,119 438,716 442,457 2000's 458,388 458,404 462,574 466,913 469,332 475,221 478,849 482,902 487,320 489,349 2010's 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 522,658 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  9. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6 6,180 6,566 7,074 1990's 7,485 7,895 8,173 8,409 8,721 9,133 9,518 9,807 10,081 10,441 2000's 9,639 11,075 11,463 11,682 11,921 12,070 12,345 12,576 12,703 12,839 2010's 12,861 12,931 12,997 13,163 13,352 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  10. Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Delaware Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 81 82,829 84,328 86,428 1990's 88,894 91,467 94,027 96,914 100,431 103,531 106,548 109,400 112,507 115,961 2000's 117,845 122,829 126,418 129,870 133,197 137,115 141,276 145,010 147,541 149,006 2010's 150,458 152,005 153,307 155,627 158,502 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  11. Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 41 42,376 43,178 43,802 1990's 43,674 45,012 45,123 47,344 47,851 46,459 47,578 48,251 46,778 50,052 2000's 50,888 53,118 53,794 55,121 55,324 55,479 55,259 57,320 58,125 59,549 2010's 60,854 61,582 63,477 64,772 67,460 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  12. Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Florida Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 442 444,848 446,690 452,544 1990's 457,648 467,221 471,863 484,816 497,777 512,365 521,674 532,790 542,770 556,628 2000's 571,972 590,221 603,690 617,373 639,014 656,069 673,122 682,996 679,265 674,090 2010's 675,551 679,199 686,994 694,210 703,535 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  13. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 94 98,809 102,277 106,690 1990's 108,295 109,659 111,423 114,889 117,980 120,122 123,200 123,367 126,050 225,020 2000's 128,275 130,373 128,233 129,867 128,923 128,389 127,843 127,832 126,804 127,347 2010's 124,759 123,454 121,243 126,060 122,573 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 3,034 3,144 3,079 1990's 3,153 3,124 3,186 3,302 3,277 3,261 3,310 3,310 3,262 5,580 2000's 3,294 3,330 3,219 3,326 3,161 3,543 3,053 2,913 2,890 2,254 2010's 2,174 2,184 2,112 2,242 2,481 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Georgia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,190 1,237,201 1,275,128 1,308,972 1990's 1,334,935 1,363,723 1,396,860 1,430,626 1,460,141 1,495,992 1,538,458 1,553,948 1,659,730 1,732,865 2000's 1,680,749 1,737,850 1,735,063 1,747,017 1,752,346 1,773,121 1,726,239 1,793,650 1,791,256 1,744,934 2010's 1,740,587 1,740,006 1,739,543 1,805,425

  16. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,896 2,852 2,842 1990's 2,837 2,786 2,793 3,222 2,805 2,825 2,823 2,783 2,761 2,763 2000's 2,768 2,777 2,781 2,804 2,578 2,572 2,548 2,547 2,540 2,535 2010's 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  17. Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Hawaii Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 28,502 28,761 28,970 1990's 29,137 29,701 29,805 29,984 30,614 30,492 31,017 30,990 30,918 30,708 2000's 30,751 30,794 30,731 30,473 26,255 26,219 25,982 25,899 25,632 25,466 2010's 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  18. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 17,482 18,454 18,813 1990's 19,452 20,328 21,145 21,989 22,999 24,150 25,271 26,436 27,697 28,923 2000's 30,018 30,789 31,547 32,274 33,104 33,362 33,625 33,767 37,320 38,245 2010's 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722 40,229 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  19. Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 104,824 111,532 113,898 1990's 113,954 126,282 136,121 148,582 162,971 175,320 187,756 200,165 213,786 227,807 2000's 240,399 251,004 261,219 274,481 288,380 301,357 316,915 323,114 336,191 342,277 2010's 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 367,394 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  20. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241,367 278,473 252,791 1990's 257,851 261,107 263,988 268,104 262,308 264,756 265,007 268,841 271,585 274,919 2000's 279,179 278,506 279,838 281,877 273,967 276,763 300,606 296,465 298,418 294,226 2010's 291,395 293,213 297,523 282,743 294,391 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  1. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 19,460 20,015 25,161 1990's 25,991 26,489 27,178 27,807 25,788 25,929 29,493 28,472 28,063 27,605 2000's 27,348 27,421 27,477 26,698 29,187 29,887 26,109 24,000 23,737 23,857 2010's 25,043 23,722 23,390 23,804 23,829 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  2. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,170,364 3,180,199 3,248,117 1990's 3,287,091 3,320,285 3,354,679 3,388,983 3,418,052 3,452,975 3,494,545 3,521,707 3,556,736 3,594,071 2000's 3,631,762 3,670,693 3,688,281 3,702,308 3,754,132 3,975,961 3,812,121 3,845,441 3,869,308 3,839,438 2010's 3,842,206 3,855,942 3,878,806 3,838,120

  3. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15,128 16,096 16,924 1990's 17,765 18,430 18,607 21,178 21,208 21,472 21,664 21,862 22,136 22,254 2000's 22,592 22,815 23,364 23,270 22,994 23,082 23,150 23,007 23,010 22,988 2010's 23,049 23,177 23,359 23,742 23,934 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  4. Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Rhode Island Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 180,656 185,861 190,796 1990's 195,100 196,438 197,926 198,563 200,959 202,947 204,259 212,777 208,208 211,097 2000's 214,474 216,781 219,769 221,141 223,669 224,320 225,027 223,589 224,103 224,846 2010's 225,204 225,828 228,487 231,763 233,786 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  5. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 35,414 37,075 38,856 1990's 39,904 39,999 40,968 42,191 45,487 47,293 48,650 50,817 52,237 53,436 2000's 54,794 55,257 55,608 55,909 56,049 56,974 57,452 57,544 56,317 55,850 2010's 55,853 55,846 55,908 55,997 56,172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  6. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,256 1,273 1,307 1990's 1,384 1,400 1,568 1,625 1,928 1,802 1,759 1,764 1,728 1,768 2000's 1,715 1,702 1,563 1,574 1,528 1,535 1,528 1,472 1,426 1,358 2010's 1,325 1,329 1,435 1,452 1,426 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  7. South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 302,321 313,831 327,527 1990's 339,486 344,763 357,818 370,411 416,773 412,259 426,088 443,093 460,141 473,799 2000's 489,340 501,161 508,686 516,362 527,008 541,523 554,953 570,213 561,196 565,774 2010's 570,797 576,594 583,633 593,286 604,743 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  8. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,480 12,438 12,771 1990's 13,443 13,692 14,133 16,523 15,539 16,285 16,880 17,432 17,972 18,453 2000's 19,100 19,378 19,794 20,070 20,457 20,771 21,149 21,502 21,819 22,071 2010's 22,267 22,570 22,955 23,214 23,591 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  9. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 101,468 102,084 103,538 1990's 105,436 107,846 110,291 128,029 119,544 124,152 127,269 130,307 133,095 136,789 2000's 142,075 144,310 147,356 150,725 148,105 157,457 160,481 163,458 165,694 168,096 2010's 169,838 170,877 173,856 176,204 179,042 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 77,104 81,159 84,040 1990's 88,753 89,863 91,999 94,860 97,943 101,561 103,867 105,925 109,772 112,978 2000's 115,691 118,561 120,130 131,916 125,042 124,755 126,970 126,324 128,007 127,704 2010's 127,914 128,969 130,139 131,091 131,001 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available;

  11. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,206 2,151 2,555 1990's 2,361 2,369 2,425 2,512 2,440 2,393 2,306 2,382 5,149 2,159 2000's 2,386 2,704 2,657 2,755 2,738 2,498 2,545 2,656 2,650 2,717 2010's 2,702 2,729 2,679 2,581 2,595 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  12. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 534,882 565,856 599,042 1990's 627,031 661,105 696,140 733,363 768,421 804,724 841,232 867,793 905,757 937,896 2000's 969,537 993,363 1,009,225 1,022,628 1,037,429 1,049,307 1,063,328 1,071,756 1,084,102 1,083,573 2010's 1,085,387 1,089,009 1,084,726 1,094,122 1,106,681 - = No Data Reported; -- =

  13. Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 294,879 284,013 270,227 1990's 268,181 269,411 292,990 297,516 306,376 325,785 329,287 332,077 320,922 314,598 2000's 315,906 314,858 317,446 320,786 322,242 322,999 329,918 326,812 324,671 313,384 2010's 312,277 314,041 314,811 314,036 317,217 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  14. Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,852 4,427 13,383 1990's 13,659 13,770 5,481 5,823 5,222 9,043 8,796 5,339 5,318 5,655 2000's 11,613 10,047 9,143 9,015 9,359 9,136 8,664 11,063 5,568 8,581 2010's 8,779 8,713 8,953 8,525 8,406 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,155,948 3,166,168 3,201,316 1990's 3,232,849 3,274,482 3,285,025 3,346,809 3,350,314 3,446,120 3,501,853 3,543,027 3,600,505 3,613,864 2000's 3,704,501 3,738,260 3,809,370 3,859,647 3,939,101 3,984,481 4,067,508 4,156,991 4,205,412 4,248,613 2010's 4,288,495 4,326,156 4,370,057 4,424,103 4,469,282 -

  16. Integrated optic vector-matrix multiplier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-27

    A vector-matrix multiplier is disclosed which uses N different wavelengths of light that are modulated with amplitudes representing elements of an N.times.1 vector and combined to form an input wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) light stream. The input WDM light stream is split into N streamlets from which each wavelength of the light is individually coupled out and modulated for a second time using an input signal representing elements of an M.times.N matrix, and is then coupled into an output waveguide for each streamlet to form an output WDM light stream which is detected to generate a product of the vector and matrix. The vector-matrix multiplier can be formed as an integrated optical circuit using either waveguide amplitude modulators or ring resonator amplitude modulators.

  17. JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning.

  18. Nuclear waste storage container with metal matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sump, Kenneth R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention relates to a storage container for high-level waste having a metal matrix for the high-level waste, thereby providing greater impact strength for the waste container and increasing heat transfer properties.

  19. Fuel cell with electrolyte matrix assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur; Pudick, Sheldon; Wang, Chiu L.

    1988-01-01

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell employing a substantially immobilized electrolyte imbedded therein and having a laminated matrix assembly disposed between the electrodes of the cell for holding and distributing the electrolyte. The matrix assembly comprises a non-conducting fibrous material such as silicon carbide whiskers having a relatively large void-fraction and a layer of material having a relatively small void-fraction.

  20. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKigney, Edward Allen; Burrell, Anthony Keiran; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cooke, David Wayne; Ott, Kevin Curtis; Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal; Del Sesto, Rico Emilio; Gilbertson, Robert David; Muenchausen, Ross Edward; McCleskey, Thomas Mark

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  1. Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spellman, G.P.

    1995-12-22

    A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

  2. Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Absecon, NJ); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2006-03-28

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  3. Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL Jump to: navigation, search Name: Matrix Agro Pvt. Ltd. (MAPL) Place: Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 500034 Sector: Biomass Product: Hyderabad-based...

  4. Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristi...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristic determinant and edge universality Prev Next Title: Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical ...

  5. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, T. R. Chui, S. T.

    2014-04-14

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures.

  6. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Chao M.; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1999-01-01

    A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

  7. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1999-02-09

    A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

  8. Polymeric matrix materials for infrared metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dirk, Shawn M; Rasberry, Roger D; Rahimian, Kamyar

    2014-04-22

    A polymeric matrix material exhibits low loss at optical frequencies and facilitates the fabrication of all-dielectric metamaterials. The low-loss polymeric matrix material can be synthesized by providing an unsaturated polymer, comprising double or triple bonds; partially hydrogenating the unsaturated polymer; depositing a film of the partially hydrogenated polymer and a crosslinker on a substrate; and photopatterning the film by exposing the film to ultraviolet light through a patterning mask, thereby cross-linking at least some of the remaining unsaturated groups of the partially hydrogenated polymer in the exposed portions.

  9. HXeOBr in a xenon matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khriachtchev, Leonid; Tapio, Salla; Domanskaya, Alexandra V.; Raesaenen, Markku; Isokoski, Karoliina; Lundell, Jan

    2011-03-28

    We report on a new noble-gas molecule HXeOBr prepared in a low-temperature xenon matrix from the HBr and N{sub 2}O precursors by UV photolysis and thermal annealing. This molecule is assigned with the help of deuteration experiments and ab initio calculations including anharmonic methods. The H-Xe stretching frequency of HXeOBr is observed at 1634 cm{sup -1}, which is larger by 56 cm{sup -1} than the frequency of HXeOH identified previously. The experiments show a higher thermal stability of HXeOBr molecules in a xenon matrix compared to HXeOH.

  10. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keklinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  11. Polymer matrix electroluminescent materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marrocco, III, Matthew L.; Motamedi, Farshad J.; Abdelrazzaq, Feras Bashir; Abdelrazzaq, legal representative, Bashir Twfiq

    2012-06-26

    Photoluminescent and electroluminescent compositions are provided which comprise a matrix comprising aromatic repeat units covalently coordinated to a phosphorescent or luminescent metal ion or metal ion complexes. Methods for producing such compositions, and the electroluminescent devices formed therefrom, are also disclosed.

  12. Device for collecting and analyzing matrix-isolated samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1979-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device is disclosed for matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for presenting these distinct samples for spectrometric examination. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carrousel having a number of external, reflecting surfaces around its axis of rotation for holding samples. A gas inlet is provided for depositing sample and matrix material on the individual reflecting surfaces maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. Two optical windows or lenses are installed in the vacuum chamber walls for transmitting a beam of electromagnetic radiation, for instance infrared light, through a selected sample. Positioned within the chamber are two concave mirrors, the first aligned to receive the light beam from one of the lenses and focus it to the sample on one of the reflecting surfaces of the carrousel. The second mirror is aligned to receive reflected light from that carrousel surface and to focus it outwardly through the second lens. The light beam transmitted from the sample is received by a spectrometer for determining absorption spectra.

  13. Density matrix embedding in an antisymmetrized geminal power bath

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Welborn, Matthew; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2015-07-14

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) has emerged as a powerful tool for performing wave function-in-wave function embedding for strongly correlated systems. In traditional DMET, an accurate calculation is performed on a small impurity embedded in a mean field bath. Here, we extend the original DMET equations to account for correlation in the bath via an antisymmetrized geminal power (AGP) wave function. The resulting formalism has a number of advantages. First, it allows one to properly treat the weak correlation limit of independent pairs, which DMET is unable to do with a mean-field bath. Second, it associates a size extensive correlation energy with a given density matrix (for the models tested), which AGP by itself is incapable of providing. Third, it provides a reasonable description of charge redistribution in strongly correlated but non-periodic systems. Thus, AGP-DMET appears to be a good starting point for describing electron correlation in molecules, which are aperiodic and possess both strong and weak electron correlation.

  14. T-635: Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code and Local Users Gain Elevated Privileges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client contains a vulnerability that could allow an unauthenticated, remote attacker to execute arbitrary code on a targeted system. The vulnerability exists due to improper validation of program executables downloaded by the Cisco AnyConnect Secure Mobility Client. An unauthenticated, remote attacker could exploit the vulnerability by convincing the targeted user to view a malicious website. If successful, the attacker could execute arbitrary code on the system with the privileges of the user. Cisco confirmed the vulnerability in a security advisory and released software updates.

  15. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  16. Random matrix models for chiral and diquark condensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanderheyden, B.; Jackson, A.D.

    2005-06-14

    We consider random matrix models for the thermodynamic competition between chiral symmetry breaking and diquark condensation in QCD at finite temperature and finite baryon density. The models produce mean field phase diagrams whose topology depends solely on the global symmetries of the theory. We discuss the block structure of the interactions that is imposed by chiral, spin, and color degrees of freedom and comment on the treatment of density and temperature effects. Extension of the coupling parameters to a larger class of theories allows us to investigate the robustness of the phase topology with respect to variations in the dynamics of the interactions. We briefly study the phase structure as a function of coupling parameters and the number of colors.

  17. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  18. Ceramic fiber ceramic matrix filter development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P.; Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M.

    1994-09-01

    The objectives of this project were to develop a novel type of candle filter based on a ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composite material, and to extend the development to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1-meter-long candle filters. The goal is to develop a ceramic filter suitable for use in a variety of fossil energy system environments such as integrated coal gasification combined cycles (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and other advanced coal combustion environments. Further, the ceramic fiber ceramic matrix composite filter, hereinafter referred to as the ceramic composite filter, was to be inherently crack resistant, a property not found in conventional monolithic ceramic candle filters, such as those fabricated from clay-bonded silicon carbide. Finally, the adequacy of the filters in the fossil energy system environments is to be proven through simulated and in-plant tests.

  19. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  20. 2d PDE Linear Asymmetric Matrix Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1983-10-01

    ILUCG2 (Incomplete LU factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d problems) was developed to solve a linear asymmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as plasma diffusion, equilibria, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These equations share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized with finite-difference or finite-elementmore » methods, the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ILUCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. A generalization of the incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For problems having a symmetric matrix ICCG2 should be used since it runs up to four times faster and uses approximately 30% less storage. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source, containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  1. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward; Mckigney, Edward Allen; Gilbertson, Robert David

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  2. Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1986-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring.

  3. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positive semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.

  4. Low-rank matrix decomposition and spatio-temporal sparse recovery for STAP radar

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sen, Satyabrata

    2015-08-04

    We develop space-time adaptive processing (STAP) methods by leveraging the advantages of sparse signal processing techniques in order to detect a slowly-moving target. We observe that the inherent sparse characteristics of a STAP problem can be formulated as the low-rankness of clutter covariance matrix when compared to the total adaptive degrees-of-freedom, and also as the sparse interference spectrum on the spatio-temporal domain. By exploiting these sparse properties, we propose two approaches for estimating the interference covariance matrix. In the first approach, we consider a constrained matrix rank minimization problem (RMP) to decompose the sample covariance matrix into a low-rank positivemore » semidefinite and a diagonal matrix. The solution of RMP is obtained by applying the trace minimization technique and the singular value decomposition with matrix shrinkage operator. Our second approach deals with the atomic norm minimization problem to recover the clutter response-vector that has a sparse support on the spatio-temporal plane. We use convex relaxation based standard sparse-recovery techniques to find the solutions. With extensive numerical examples, we demonstrate the performances of proposed STAP approaches with respect to both the ideal and practical scenarios, involving Doppler-ambiguous clutter ridges, spatial and temporal decorrelation effects. As a result, the low-rank matrix decomposition based solution requires secondary measurements as many as twice the clutter rank to attain a near-ideal STAP performance; whereas the spatio-temporal sparsity based approach needs a considerably small number of secondary data.« less

  5. Fission matrix-based Monte Carlo criticality analysis of fuel storage pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farlotti, M.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    Standard Monte Carlo transport procedures experience difficulties in solving criticality problems in fuel storage pools. Because of the strong neutron absorption between fuel assemblies, source convergence can be very slow, leading to incorrect estimates of the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction. This study examines an alternative fission matrix-based Monte Carlo transport method that takes advantage of the geometry of a storage pool to overcome this difficulty. The method uses Monte Carlo transport to build (essentially) a fission matrix, which is then used to calculate the criticality and the critical flux. This method was tested using a test code on a simple problem containing 8 assemblies in a square pool. The standard Monte Carlo method gave the expected eigenfunction in 5 cases out of 10, while the fission matrix method gave the expected eigenfunction in all 10 cases. In addition, the fission matrix method provides an estimate of the error in the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction, and it allows the user to control this error by running an adequate number of cycles. Because of these advantages, the fission matrix method yields a higher confidence in the results than standard Monte Carlo. We also discuss potential improvements of the method, including the potential for variance reduction techniques. (authors)

  6. Large N (=3) Neutrinos and Random Matrix Theory (Journal Article...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Large N (3) Neutrinos and Random Matrix Theory Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large N (3) Neutrinos and Random Matrix Theory You are accessing a ...

  7. Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Map of the ...

  8. Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cross Reference Matrix Introduction This cross-reference matrix is intended to provide NRC reviewers with an aid to show where Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP) (NUREG-1804) acceptance criteria as well as 10 CFR Part 63 regulations are addressed within the Yucca Mountain Repository License Application. This matrix does not assert compliance with 10 CFR Part 63 or the YMRP; it is provided as an aid to reviewers. The information contained in this matrix is generally repeated in tables at the

  9. CESP Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1: Stakeholder Matrix CESP Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix from Step 2: Identify and Engage Stakeholders of the Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning. CESP Tool 2.1: Stakeholder Matrix (27.87 KB) More Documents & Publications Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning: Step 2 Guide to Community Energy Strategic Planning CESP Tool 9.1: Monitoring Plan Template

  10. SALTSTONE MATRIX CHARACTERIZATION AND STADIUM SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2009-07-30

    SIMCO Technologies, Inc. was contracted to evaluate the durability of the saltstone matrix material and to measure saltstone transport properties. This information will be used to: (1) Parameterize the STADIUM{reg_sign} service life code, (2) Predict the leach rate (degradation rate) for the saltstone matrix over 10,000 years using the STADIUM{reg_sign} concrete service life code, and (3) Validate the modeled results by conducting leaching (water immersion) tests. Saltstone durability for this evaluation is limited to changes in the matrix itself and does not include changes in the chemical speciation of the contaminants in the saltstone. This report summarized results obtained to date which include: characterization data for saltstone cured up to 365 days and characterization of saltstone cured for 137 days and immersed in water for 31 days. Chemicals for preparing simulated non-radioactive salt solution were obtained from chemical suppliers. The saltstone slurry was mixed according to directions provided by SRNL. However SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel made a mistake in the premix proportions. The formulation SIMCO personnel used to prepare saltstone premix was not the reference mix proportions: 45 wt% slag, 45 wt% fly ash, and 10 wt% cement. SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel used the following proportions: 21 wt% slag, 65 wt% fly ash, and 14 wt% cement. The mistake was acknowledged and new mixes have been prepared and are curing. The results presented in this report are assumed to be conservative since the excessive fly ash was used in the SIMCO saltstone. The SIMCO mixes are low in slag which is very reactive in the caustic salt solution. The impact is that the results presented in this report are expected to be conservative since the samples prepared were deficient in slag and contained excess fly ash. The hydraulic reactivity of slag is about four times that of fly ash so the amount of hydrated binder formed per unit volume in the SIMCO saltstone samples is

  11. 2d PDE Linear Symmetric Matrix Solver

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1983-10-01

    ICCG2 (Incomplete Cholesky factorized Conjugate Gradient algorithm for 2d symmetric problems) was developed to solve a linear symmetric matrix system arising from a 9-point discretization of two-dimensional elliptic and parabolic partial differential equations found in plasma physics applications, such as resistive MHD, spatial diffusive transport, and phase space transport (Fokker-Planck equation) problems. These problems share the common feature of being stiff and requiring implicit solution techniques. When these parabolic or elliptic PDE''s are discretized withmore » finite-difference or finite-element methods,the resulting matrix system is frequently of block-tridiagonal form. To use ICCG2, the discretization of the two-dimensional partial differential equation and its boundary conditions must result in a block-tridiagonal supermatrix composed of elementary tridiagonal matrices. The incomplete Cholesky conjugate gradient algorithm is used to solve the linear symmetric matrix equation. Loops are arranged to vectorize on the Cray1 with the CFT compiler, wherever possible. Recursive loops, which cannot be vectorized, are written for optimum scalar speed. For matrices lacking symmetry, ILUCG2 should be used. Similar methods in three dimensions are available in ICCG3 and ILUCG3. A general source containing extensions and macros, which must be processed by a pre-compiler to obtain the standard FORTRAN source, is provided along with the standard FORTRAN source because it is believed to be more readable. The pre-compiler is not included, but pre-compilation may be performed by a text editor as described in the UCRL-88746 Preprint.« less

  12. Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, G.T.

    1986-06-10

    A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring. 10 figs.

  13. Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fratoni, Massimiliano; Terrani, Kurt A

    2012-01-01

    Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be

  14. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, D. O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  15. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  16. Polymer matrix composites research: A survey of federally sponsored programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This report identifies research conducted by agencies of the federal government other than the Department of Energy (DOE) in the area of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). DOE commissioned the report to avoid duplicating other agencies' efforts in planning its own research program for PMCs. PMC materials consist of high-strength, short or continuous fibers fused together by an organic matrix. Compared to traditional structural metals, PMCs provide greater strength and stiffness, reduced weight and increased heat resistance. The key contributors to PMC research identified by the survey are the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). The survey identified a total of 778 projects. More than half of the total projects identified emphasize materials research with a goal toward developing materials with improved performance. Although an almost equal number of identified materials projects focus on thermosets and thermoplastics receive more attention because of their increased impact resistance and their easy formability and re-formability. Slightly more than one third of projects identified target structures research. Only 15 percent of the projects identified focus on manufacturing techniques, despite the need for efficient, economical methods manufacturing products constructed of PMCs--techniques required for PMCs to gain widespread acceptance. Three issues to be addressed concerning PMCs research are economy of use, improvements in processing, and education and training. Five target technologies have been identified that could benefit greatly from increased use of PMCs: aircraft fuselages, automobile frames, high-speed machinery, electronic packaging, and construction.

  17. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwall, Johan; /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Freitas, Ayres; /Pittsburgh U.; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

    2012-04-10

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

  18. Electrometallurgical treatment of aluminum-matrix fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willit, J.L.; Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.; McPheeters, C.C.; Laidler, J.J.

    1996-08-01

    The electrometallurgical treatment process described in this paper builds on our experience in treating spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor (EBR-II). The work is also to some degree, a spin-off from applying electrometallurgical treatment to spent fuel from the Hanford single pass reactors (SPRs) and fuel and flush salt from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) in treating EBR-II fuel, we recover the actinides from a uranium-zirconium fuel by electrorefining the uranium out of the chopped fuel. With SPR fuel, uranium is electrorefined out of the aluminum cladding. Both of these processes are conducted in a LiCl-KCl molten-salt electrolyte. In the case of the MSRE, which used a fluoride salt-based fuel, uranium in this salt is recovered through a series of electrochemical reductions. Recovering high-purity uranium from an aluminum-matrix fuel is more challenging than treating SPR or EBR-II fuel because the aluminum- matrix fuel is typically -90% (volume basis) aluminum.

  19. Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Climate Zone Number 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400...

  20. ARM - Measurement - Cloud particle number concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud particle number concentration The total number of cloud particles present in any given volume...

  1. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  2. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  3. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.

    1988-04-22

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs. 11 figs.

  4. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  5. Matrix Characterization in Threat Material Detection Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obhodas, J.; Sudac, D.; Valkovic, V.

    2009-03-10

    Matrix characterization in the threat material detection is of utmost importance, it generates the background against which the threat material signal has to be identified. Threat materials (explosive, chemical warfare, ...) are usually contained within small volume inside large volumes of variable matrices. We have studied the influence of matrix materials on the capability of neutron systems to identify hidden threat material. Three specific scenarios are considered in some details: case 1--contraband material in the sea containers, case 2 - explosives in soil (landmines), case 3 - explosives and chemical warfare on the sea bottom. Effects of container cargo material on tagged neutron system are seen in the increase of gamma background and the decrease of neutron beam intensity. Detection of landmines is more complex because of variable soil properties. We have studied in detail space and time variations of soil elemental compositions and in particular hydrogen content (humidity). Of special interest are ammunitions and chemical warfare on the sea bottom, damping sites and leftovers from previous conflicts (WW-I, WW-II and local). In this case sea sediment is background source and its role is similar to the role of the soil in the landmine detection. In addition to geochemical cycling of chemical elements in semi-enclosed sea, like the Adriatic Sea, one has to consider also anthropogenic influence, especially when studying small scale variations in concentration levels. Some preliminary experimental results obtained with tagged neutron sensor inside an underwater vehicle are presented as well as data on sediment characterization by X-Ray Fluorescence.

  6. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carney, S. E.; Brown, F. B.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

  7. An advanced algorithm for construction of Integral Transport Matrix Method operators using accumulation of single cell coupling factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, B. P.; Azmy, Y. Y.

    2013-07-01

    The Integral Transport Matrix Method (ITMM) has been shown to be an effective method for solving the neutron transport equation in large domains on massively parallel architectures. In the limit of very large number of processors, the speed of the algorithm, and its suitability for unstructured meshes, i.e. other than an ordered Cartesian grid, is limited by the construction of four matrix operators required for obtaining the solution in each sub-domain. The existing algorithm used for construction of these matrix operators, termed the differential mesh sweep, is computationally expensive and was developed for a structured grid. This work proposes the use of a new algorithm for construction of these operators based on the construction of a single, fundamental matrix representing the transport of a particle along every possible path throughout the sub-domain mesh. Each of the operators is constructed by multiplying an element of this fundamental matrix by two factors dependent only upon the operator being constructed and on properties of the emitting and incident cells. The ITMM matrix operator construction time for the new algorithm is demonstrated to be shorter than the existing algorithm in all tested cases with both isotropic and anisotropic scattering considered. While also being a more efficient algorithm on a structured Cartesian grid, the new algorithm is promising in its geometric robustness and potential for being applied to an unstructured mesh, with the ultimate goal of application to an unstructured tetrahedral mesh on a massively parallel architecture. (authors)

  8. RE-Powering America's Land Initiative Tracking Matrix | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Initiative Tracking Matrix RE-Powering America's Land Initiative Tracking Matrix Using publically available information, the Environmental Protection Agency's RE-Powering America's Land Initiative project tracking matrix maintains a list of completed renewable energy installations on contaminated sites and landfills. This document provides summary statistics of known installations and discusses emerging trends. Partner Agency: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Resource Type:

  9. Application of nuclear density functionals to lepton number violating weak processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Tomas R.; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel

    2012-10-20

    We present an application of energy density functional methods with the Gogny interaction to the calculation of nuclear matrix elements (NME) for neutrinoless double beta decay and double electron capture. Beyond mean field effects have been included by particle number and angular momentum restoration and shape mixing within the generator coordinate method (GCM) framework. We analyze in detail the NME for {sup 116}Cd nucleus which is one of the most promising candidates to detect neutrinoless double beta decay.

  10. Complex matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    operand of the complex matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. ... and replicate the second complex vector value within a second target vector register. ...

  11. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    vector operand of the matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. ... the element to each of a plurality of elements of a second target vector register. ...

  12. CP Violation and the Determination of the CKM Matrix (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: CP Violation and the Determination of the CKM Matrix Authors: Porter, Frank ; Caltech Publication Date: 2013-06-04 OSTI Identifier: ...

  13. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often ...

  14. Introducing the Target-Matrix Paradigm for Mesh Optimization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Introducing the Target-Matrix Paradigm for Mesh Optimization via Node-movement. Abstract not provided. Authors: Knupp, Patrick Michael Publication Date: 2010-10-01 OSTI ...

  15. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A Mechanisms...

  16. Random-matrix approach to the statistical compound nuclear reaction...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Random Matrix Theory, Integrable Systems, and Topology in Physics ; 2015-11-02 - 2015-11-02 ; Stony Brook, New York, United ...

  17. Matrix, Drug Testing for DOE Security Clearance- September 1, 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following matrix identifies those individuals required to have a current negative drug test as a prerequisite for being processed for a security clearance

  18. Gas generation matrix depletion quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide the necessary expertise, experience, equipment and instrumentation, and management structure to: Conduct the matrix depletion experiments using simulated waste for quantifying matrix depletion effects; and Conduct experiments on 60 cylinders containing simulated TRU waste to determine the effects of matrix depletion on gas generation for transportation. All work for the Gas Generation Matrix Depletion (GGMD) experiment is performed according to the quality objectives established in the test plan and under this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP).

  19. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Matrix multiplication operations with data ...

  20. M-flation: inflation from matrix valued scalar fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashoorioon, Amjad; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Sheikh-Jabbari, M.M. E-mail: firouz@physics.mcgill.ca

    2009-06-01

    We propose an inflationary scenario, M-flation, in which inflation is driven by three N N hermitian matrices ?{sub i}, i = 1, 2, 3. The inflation potential of our model, which is strongly motivated from string theory, is constructed from ?{sub i} and their commutators. We show that one can consistently restrict the classical dynamics to a sector in which the ?{sub i} are proportional to the N N irreducible representations of SU(2). In this sector our model effectively behaves as an N-flation model with 3N{sup 2} number of fields and the effective inflaton field has a super-Planckian field value. Furthermore, the fine-tunings associated with unnaturally small couplings in the chaotic type inflationary scenarios are removed. Due to the matrix nature of the inflaton fields there are 3N{sup 2}?1 extra scalar fields in the dynamics. These have the observational effects such as production of iso-curvature perturbations on cosmic microwave background. Moreover, the existence of these extra scalars provides us with a natural preheating mechanism and exit from inflation. As the effective inflaton field can traverse super-Planckian distances in the field space, the model is capable of producing a considerable amount of gravity waves that can be probed by future CMB polarization experiments such as PLANCK, QUIET and CMBPOL.

  1. Improved parallel solution techniques for the integral transport matrix method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zerr, Robert J; Azmy, Yousry Y

    2010-11-23

    Alternative solution strategies to the parallel block Jacobi (PBJ) method for the solution of the global problem with the integral transport matrix method operators have been designed and tested. The most straightforward improvement to the Jacobi iterative method is the Gauss-Seidel alternative. The parallel red-black Gauss-Seidel (PGS) algorithm can improve on the number of iterations and reduce work per iteration by applying an alternating red-black color-set to the subdomains and assigning multiple sub-domains per processor. A parallel GMRES(m) method was implemented as an alternative to stationary iterations. Computational results show that the PGS method can improve on the PBJ method execution by up to {approx}50% when eight sub-domains per processor are used. However, compared to traditional source iterations with diffusion synthetic acceleration, it is still approximately an order of magnitude slower. The best-performing case are opticaUy thick because sub-domains decouple, yielding faster convergence. Further tests revealed that 64 sub-domains per processor was the best performing level of sub-domain division. An acceleration technique that improves the convergence rate would greatly improve the ITMM. The GMRES(m) method with a diagonal block preconditioner consumes approximately the same time as the PBJ solver but could be improved by an as yet undeveloped, more efficient preconditioner.

  2. On the binary expansions of algebraic numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, David H.; Borwein, Jonathan M.; Crandall, Richard E.; Pomerance, Carl

    2003-07-01

    Employing concepts from additive number theory, together with results on binary evaluations and partial series, we establish bounds on the density of 1's in the binary expansions of real algebraic numbers. A central result is that if a real y has algebraic degree D > 1, then the number {number_sign}(|y|, N) of 1-bits in the expansion of |y| through bit position N satisfies {number_sign}(|y|, N) > CN{sup 1/D} for a positive number C (depending on y) and sufficiently large N. This in itself establishes the transcendency of a class of reals {summation}{sub n{ge}0} 1/2{sup f(n)} where the integer-valued function f grows sufficiently fast; say, faster than any fixed power of n. By these methods we re-establish the transcendency of the Kempner--Mahler number {summation}{sub n{ge}0}1/2{sup 2{sup n}}, yet we can also handle numbers with a substantially denser occurrence of 1's. Though the number z = {summation}{sub n{ge}0}1/2{sup n{sup 2}} has too high a 1's density for application of our central result, we are able to invoke some rather intricate number-theoretical analysis and extended computations to reveal aspects of the binary structure of z{sup 2}.

  3. Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  4. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

    1990-01-01

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

  5. Digraph matrix analysis applications to systems interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alesso, H.P.; Altenbach, T.; Lappa, D.; Kimura, C.; Sacks, I.J.; Ashmore, B.C.; Fromme, D.; Smith, C.F.; Williams, W.

    1984-01-01

    Complex events such as Three Mile Island-2, Brown's Ferry-3 and Crystal River-3 have demonstrated that previously unidentified system interdependencies can be important to safety. A major aspect of these events was dependent faults (common cause/mode failures). The term systems interactions has been introduced by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to identify the concepts of spatial and functional coupling of systems which can lead to system interdependencies. Spatial coupling refers to dependencies resulting from a shared environmental condition; functional coupling refers to both dependencies resulting from components shared between safety and/or support systems, and to dependencies involving human actions. The NRC is currently developing guidelines to search for and evaluate adverse systems interactions at light water reactors. One approach utilizes graph theoretical methods and is called digraph matrix analysis (DMA). This methodology has been specifically tuned to the systems interaction problem. The objective of this paper is to present results from two DMA applications and to contrast them with the results from more traditional fault tree approaches.

  6. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" ... be shipped from the United States to the ITER International Organization in Cadarache, ...

  7. Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Poster ...

  8. Calculating Atomic Number Densities for Uranium

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-01-01

    Provides method to calculate atomic number densities of selected uranium compounds and hydrogenous moderators for use in nuclear criticality safety analyses at gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment facilities.

  9. Presentation to: Client

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOSTON CHICAGO DALLAS DENVER LOS ANGELES MENLO PARK MONTREAL NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO WASHINGTON April 8, 2008 State Policies For Energy Efficiency: EIA's 2008 Energy Conference - 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis The Role of Energy Efficiency in Meeting Future Demand Susan Tierney Status and Observations April 8, 2008 EIA - 2008 Energy Conference - 30 th Anniversary Meeting Page 2 State Policies Targeting Energy Efficiency* What are the states doing - § What are new efforts and

  10. Hanford 222-S Laboratory Analysis and Testing Services Contract Number DE-EM0003722

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract Number DE-EM0003722 Modification 001 J-1 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J - LIST OF ATTACHMENTS Attachment Description Page Number J.1 LIST OF APPLICABLE DOE DIRECTIVES J-2 J.2 LIST OF DELIVERABLES J-5 J.3 HANFORD SITE SERVICES AND INTERFACE REQUIREMENTS MATRIX J-11 J.4 APPLICATIONS, PERMITS, AND NOTICES OF CONSTRUCTION J-120 J.5 DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WAGE DETERMINATIONS  J-5.1 Wage Determination No.: 2005-2570 Rev No.15 Dated 06/19/2013  J-5.2

  11. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maricle, Donald L.; Putnam, Gary C.; Stewart, Jr., Robert C.

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  12. Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ann Almgren Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics February 4, 2014 Ann Almgren. Berkeley Lab Downloads Almgren-nug2014.pdf | Adobe Acrobat PDF file Low Mach Number Models in Computational Astrophysics - Ann Almgren, Berkeley Lab Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:50

  13. Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, M. J.; Taylor, J. D.; McCormick, R. L.

    2004-09-01

    In this report, we present a compilation of reported cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. The compiled database contains cetane values for 299 pure compounds, including 156 hydrocarbons and 143 oxygenates. Cetane number is a relative ranking of fuels based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition. The cetane number is typically measured either in a combustion bomb or in a single-cylinder research engine. This report includes cetane values from several different measurement techniques - each of which has associated uncertainties. Additionally, many of the reported values are determined by measuring blending cetane numbers, which introduces significant error. In many cases, the measurement technique is not reported nor is there any discussion about the purity of the compounds. Nonetheless, the data in this report represent the best pure compound cetane number values available from the literature as of August 2004.

  14. An Innovative Carbonate Fuel Cell Matrix, Abstract #188

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Surendranath, Arun; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2015-05-28

    The electrolyte matrix in direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) is a microporous ceramic structure sandwiched between the electrodes to isolate the fuel from the oxidant, store electrolyte and facilitate ionic transport. FCE has advanced DFC electrolyte matrix over the years and demonstrated that the matrix meets the requirements for greater than 5 year life based on accelerated tests and field stack operations. However, development of advanced designs and materials that can further increase the performance and extend cell life will enable accelerated MCFC deployment. This paper will report the progress on the development of an unique and innovative matrix design that offers numerous benefits to the carbonate fuel cell performance and durability. In addition, this paper will also review parameters that affect matrix material stability and approaches to extend cell life.

  15. Summary of Granulation Matrix Testing for the Plutonium Immobilization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C.C.

    2001-10-19

    In FY00, a matrix for process development testing was created to identify those items related to the ceramic process that had not been fully developed or tested and to help identify variables that needed to be tested. This matrix, NMTP/IP-99-003, was jointly created between LLNL and SRTC and was issued to all affected individuals. The matrix was also used to gauge the progress of the development activities. As part of this matrix, several series of tests were identified for the granulation process. This summary provides the data and results from the granulation testing. The results of the granulation matrix testing were used to identify the baseline process for testing in the PuCTF with cold surrogates in B241 at LLNL.

  16. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  17. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http:www.eia.govsurveyformeia14instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https:...

  18. Identification of Export Control Classification Number - ITER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Export Control Classification Number - ITER (April 2012) As the "Shipper of Record" please provide the appropriate Export Control Classification Number (ECCN) for the products (equipment, components and/or materials) and if applicable the nonproprietary associated installation/maintenance documentation that will be shipped from the United States to the ITER International Organization in Cadarache, France or to ITER Members worldwide on behalf of the Company. In rare instances an

  19. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication

  20. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-06-15

    Low temperature random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the soft edge, which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

  1. Supersymmetry of Green-Schwarz superstring and matrix string theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, Seungjoon; Shin, Hyeonjoon

    2001-08-15

    We study the dynamics of a Green-Schwarz superstring on the gravitational wave background corresponding to the matrix string theory and the supersymmetry transformation rules of the superstring. The dynamics is obtained in the light-cone formulation and is shown to agree with that derived from matrix string theory. The supersymmetry structure has corrections due to the effect of the background and is identified with that of the low-energy one-loop effective action of matrix string theory in a two superstring background in the weak string coupling limit.

  2. Combinatorial theory of the semiclassical evaluation of transport moments. I. Equivalence with the random matrix approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berkolaiko, G.; Kuipers, J.

    2013-11-15

    To study electronic transport through chaotic quantum dots, there are two main theoretical approaches. One involves substituting the quantum system with a random scattering matrix and performing appropriate ensemble averaging. The other treats the transport in the semiclassical approximation and studies correlations among sets of classical trajectories. There are established evaluation procedures within the semiclassical evaluation that, for several linear and nonlinear transport moments to which they were applied, have always resulted in the agreement with random matrix predictions. We prove that this agreement is universal: any semiclassical evaluation within the accepted procedures is equivalent to the evaluation within random matrix theory. The equivalence is shown by developing a combinatorial interpretation of the trajectory sets as ribbon graphs (maps) with certain properties and exhibiting systematic cancellations among their contributions. Remaining trajectory sets can be identified with primitive (palindromic) factorisations whose number gives the coefficients in the corresponding expansion of the moments of random matrices. The equivalence is proved for systems with and without time reversal symmetry.

  3. Transparent Metal-Organic Framework/Polymer Mixed Matrix Membranes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transparent Metal-Organic FrameworkPolymer Mixed Matrix Membranes as Water Vapor Barriers Previous Next List Bae, Youn Jue; Cho, Eun Seon; Qu, Fen; Sun, Daniel T.; Williams, ...

  4. Effect of significant processing variables on thermoplastic matrix pultruded composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madenjian, A.R.; Tessier, N.J.; Schott, N.R.; Arnold, E.

    1985-04-01

    Thermoplastic matrix pultruded composites offer attractive cost savings in production. Processing techniques which lead to high speed production are discussed. The major advantages and limitations of thermoplastic materials are also presented.

  5. An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

    1993-03-01

    The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

  6. Testing the density matrix expansion against ab initio calculations of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trapped neutron drops | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Testing the density matrix expansion against ab initio calculations of trapped neutron drops Authors: Bogner, S., Furnstahl, R.J., Hergert, H., Kortelainen, M., Maris, P., Stoitsov, M., Vary, J.P. Microscopic input to a universal nuclear energy density functional can be provided through the density matrix expansion (DME), which has recently been revived and improved. Several DME implementation strategies are tested for neutron

  7. Higher order matrix differential equations with singular coefficient matrices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fragkoulis, V. C.; Kougioumtzoglou, I. A.; Pantelous, A. A.; Pirrotta, A.

    2015-03-10

    In this article, the class of higher order linear matrix differential equations with constant coefficient matrices and stochastic process terms is studied. The coefficient of the highest order is considered to be singular; thus, rendering the response determination of such systems in a straightforward manner a difficult task. In this regard, the notion of the generalized inverse of a singular matrix is used for determining response statistics. Further, an application relevant to engineering dynamics problems is included.

  8. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  9. Approximate resolution of hard numbering problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailleux, O.; Chabrier, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    We present a new method for estimating the number of solutions of constraint satisfaction problems. We use a stochastic forward checking algorithm for drawing a sample of paths from a search tree. With this sample, we compute two values related to the number of solutions of a CSP instance. First, an unbiased estimate, second, a lower bound with an arbitrary low error probability. We will describe applications to the Boolean Satisfiability problem and the Queens problem. We shall give some experimental results for these problems.

  10. Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-30

    Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

  11. WIPP Documents - All documents by number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Note: Documents that do not have document numbers are not included in this listing. Large file size alert This symbol means the document may be a large file size. All documents by number Common document prefixes DOE/CAO DOE/TRU DOE/CBFO DOE/WIPP DOE/EA NM DOE/EIS Other DOE/CAO Back to top DOE/CAO 95-1095, Oct. 1995 Remote Handled Transuranic Waste Study This study was conducted to satisfy the requirements defined by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act and considered by DOE to be a prudent exercise in

  12. Battling bird flu by the numbers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience,

  13. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nock, A. Kumar, S. Sommers, H.-J. Guhr, T.

    2014-03-15

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  14. The 17 GHz active region number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selhorst, C. L.; Pacini, A. A.; Costa, J. E. R.; Gimnez de Castro, C. G.; Valio, A.; Shibasaki, K.

    2014-08-01

    We report the statistics of the number of active regions (NAR) observed at 17 GHz with the Nobeyama Radioheliograph between 1992, near the maximum of cycle 22, and 2013, which also includes the maximum of cycle 24, and we compare with other activity indexes. We find that NAR minima are shorter than those of the sunspot number (SSN) and radio flux at 10.7 cm (F10.7). This shorter NAR minima could reflect the presence of active regions generated by faint magnetic fields or spotless regions, which were a considerable fraction of the counted active regions. The ratio between the solar radio indexes F10.7/NAR shows a similar reduction during the two minima analyzed, which contrasts with the increase of the ratio of both radio indexes in relation to the SSN during the minimum of cycle 23-24. These results indicate that the radio indexes are more sensitive to weaker magnetic fields than those necessary to form sunspots, of the order of 1500 G. The analysis of the monthly averages of the active region brightness temperatures shows that its long-term variation mimics the solar cycle; however, due to the gyro-resonance emission, a great number of intense spikes are observed in the maximum temperature study. The decrease in the number of these spikes is also evident during the current cycle 24, a consequence of the sunspot magnetic field weakening in the last few years.

  15. Pennsylvania Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 618 606 604 540 627 666 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 4,745 4,624 5,007 5,066 5,024 5,084 1987-2014...

  16. Washington Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    059,239 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1987-2014 Sales 1,067,979 1,079,277 1,088,762 1,102,318 1,118,193 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 98,965 99,231...

  17. Kansas Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    855,454 853,842 854,730 854,800 858,572 861,092 1987-2014 Sales 853,842 854,730 854,779 858,546 861,066 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 21 26 26 2004-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers...

  18. Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50F and SI Units 5000 < CDD10C...

  19. Nondestructive Waste Assay Using Gamma-Ray Active & Passive Computed Tomography. Mixed Waste Focus Area. OST Reference Number 2123

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    1999-09-01

    This project was supported by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) and the Federal Environmental Technology Center (FETC) to develop an improved nondestructive assay (NDA) capability that uses gamma-ray computed tomography and gamma-energy spectral analysis techniques to perform waste assay measurements. It was the intent of the Gamma-Ray Active & Passive Computed Tomography (A&PCT) development and demonstration project to enhance the overall utility of waste assay through the implementation of techniques that can accommodate known measurement complications, e.g., waste matrix and radioactive material distribution heterogeneities. This technology can measure the radionuclide content in all types of waste regardless of their classification as low level (LLW), transuranic (TRU) or mixed (MLLW or MTRU). The nondestructive waste assay capability needed to support Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste characterization needs is necessarily a function of the waste form configurations in inventory. These waste form configurations exhibit a number of variables impacting assay system response that must be accounted for to ensure valid measurement data. Such variables include: matrix density, matrix elemental composition, matrix density distribution, radioactive material radionuclidic/isotopic composition, radioactive material physical/chemical form, and physical distribution in the waste matrix. Existing nondestructive assay technologies have identified capability limits with respect to these variables. Certain combinations of these variables result in waste configurations within the capability of one or more of the existing systems. Other combinations that are prevalent in the inventory are outside of the capability of such systems.

  20. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Elements) Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 2 3 3 3 1 1 0 0 0 0 2001 0 0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 2002 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2003 0 0 2 2 2 2 2 2

  1. Oklahoma Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    924,745 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 1987-2014 Sales 914,869 922,240 927,346 931,981 937,237 1997-2014 Transported 0 0 0 0 0 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 94,314 92,430 93,903 94,537 95,385 96,004 1987-2014 Sales 88,217 89,573 90,097 90,861 91,402 1998-2014 Transported 4,213 4,330 4,440 4,524 4,602 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 439 452 430 382 464 489 1967-2014 Industrial Number of Consumers 2,618 2,731 2,733 2,872 2,958 3,063 1987-2014

  2. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  3. WIPP Site By The Numbers August 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    0 ft. By the Numbers The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a Department of Energy facility designed to safely isolate defense- related transuranic (TRU) waste from people and the environment. WIPP, which began waste disposal operations in 1999, is located 26 miles outside of Carlsbad, New Mexico. Waste temporarily stored at sites around the country is shipped to WIPP and permanently disposed in rooms mined out of an ancient salt formation below the surface. TRU waste destined for WIPP

  4. Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in

  5. Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 5 5 4 4 2000's 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 0 0 2010's 0 0 0 4 4 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages: Number of Producing Gas

  6. Table B14. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",4657,3528,688,114,48,27,251 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Number

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    of Elements) Acquifers Capacity (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 49 2000's 49 39 38 43 43 44 44 43 43 43 2010's 43 43 44 47 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date: 09/30/2016 Referring Pages: Number of

  8. Practical and fast quantum random number generation based on photon arrival time relative to external reference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie, You-Qi; Zhang, Jun Pan, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Zhen; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2014-02-03

    We present a practical high-speed quantum random number generator, where the timing of single-photon detection relative to an external time reference is measured as the raw data. The bias of the raw data can be substantially reduced compared with the previous realizations. The raw random bit rate of our generator can reach 109 Mbps. We develop a model for the generator and evaluate the min-entropy of the raw data. Toeplitz matrix hashing is applied for randomness extraction, after which the final random bits are able to pass the standard randomness tests.

  9. Modeling fatigue crack growth in cross ply titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakuckas, J.G. Jr.; Johnson, W.S.

    1993-05-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of fiber bridging matrix cracks in cross-ply SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates containing center holes was investigated. Experimental observations revealed that matrix cracking was far more extensive and wide spread in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates compared to that in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. In addition, the fatigue life of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates was significantly longer than that of the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. The matrix cracking observed in both material systems was analyzed using a fiber bridging (FB) model which was formulated using the boundary correction factors and weight functions for center hole specimen configurations. A frictional shear stress is assumed in the FB model and was used as a curve fitting parameter to model matrix crack growth data. The higher frictional shear stresses calculated in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates resulted in lower stress intensity factors in the matrix and higher axial stresses in the fibers compared to those in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates at the same applied stress levels.

  10. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part I - Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, F. B.; Carney, S. E.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    The theory underlying the fission matrix method is derived using a rigorous Green's function approach. The method is then used to investigate fundamental properties of the transport equation for a continuous-energy physics treatment. We provide evidence that an infinite set of discrete, real eigenvalues and eigenfunctions exist for the continuous-energy problem, and that the eigenvalue spectrum converges smoothly as the spatial mesh for the fission matrix is refined. We also derive equations for the adjoint solution. We show that if the mesh is sufficiently refined so that both forward and adjoint solutions are valid, then the adjoint fission matrix is identical to the transpose of the forward matrix. While the energy-dependent transport equation is strictly bi-orthogonal, we provide surprising results that the forward modes are very nearly self-adjoint for a variety of continuous-energy problems. A companion paper (Part II - Applications) describes the initial experience and results from implementing this fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  11. A two-dimensional matrix correction for off-axis portal dose prediction errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Daniel W.; Kumaraswamy, Lalith; Bakhtiari, Mohammad; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This study presents a follow-up to a modified calibration procedure for portal dosimetry published by Bailey et al. ['An effective correction algorithm for off-axis portal dosimetry errors,' Med. Phys. 36, 4089-4094 (2009)]. A commercial portal dose prediction system exhibits disagreement of up to 15% (calibrated units) between measured and predicted images as off-axis distance increases. The previous modified calibration procedure accounts for these off-axis effects in most regions of the detecting surface, but is limited by the simplistic assumption of radial symmetry. Methods: We find that a two-dimensional (2D) matrix correction, applied to each calibrated image, accounts for off-axis prediction errors in all regions of the detecting surface, including those still problematic after the radial correction is performed. The correction matrix is calculated by quantitative comparison of predicted and measured images that span the entire detecting surface. The correction matrix was verified for dose-linearity, and its effectiveness was verified on a number of test fields. The 2D correction was employed to retrospectively examine 22 off-axis, asymmetric electronic-compensation breast fields, five intensity-modulated brain fields (moderate-high modulation) manipulated for far off-axis delivery, and 29 intensity-modulated clinical fields of varying complexity in the central portion of the detecting surface. Results: Employing the matrix correction to the off-axis test fields and clinical fields, predicted vs measured portal dose agreement improves by up to 15%, producing up to 10% better agreement than the radial correction in some areas of the detecting surface. Gamma evaluation analyses (3 mm, 3% global, 10% dose threshold) of predicted vs measured portal dose images demonstrate pass rate improvement of up to 75% with the matrix correction, producing pass rates that are up to 30% higher than those resulting from the radial correction technique alone. As in

  12. Property:NumberOfLEDSTools | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name NumberOfLEDSTools Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLEDSTools&oldid322418" Feedback Contact needs updating Image...

  13. Property:Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants Included in Planned Estimate Property Type String Description Number of...

  14. Property:Number of Color Cameras | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Color Cameras Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Color Cameras Property Type Number Pages using the property "Number of Color Cameras" Showing 25 pages using this...

  15. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O.; Gutierrez, G.; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of themorematrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.less

  16. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ?? decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, P. K.

    2013-12-30

    To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0?/0N) for the 0{sup +} ? 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ?? decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

  17. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  18. Experimental Stations by Number | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Experimental Stations by Number Beam Line by Techniques Photon Source Parameters Station Type Techniques Energy Range Contact Person Experimental Station 1-5 X-ray Materials Small-angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) focused 4600-16000 eV Christopher J. Tassone Tim J. Dunn Experimental Station 2-1 X-ray Powder diffraction Thin film diffraction Focused 5000 - 14500 eV Apurva Mehta Charles Troxel Jr Experimental Station 2-2 X-ray X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy 5000 to 37000 eV Ryan Davis

  19. Health Code Number (HCN) Development Procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petrocchi, Rocky; Craig, Douglas K.; Bond, Jayne-Anne; Trott, Donna M.; Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2013-09-01

    This report provides the detailed description of health code numbers (HCNs) and the procedure of how each HCN is assigned. It contains many guidelines and rationales of HCNs. HCNs are used in the chemical mixture methodology (CMM), a method recommended by the department of energy (DOE) for assessing health effects as a result of exposures to airborne aerosols in an emergency. The procedure is a useful tool for proficient HCN code developers. Intense training and quality assurance with qualified HCN developers are required before an individual comprehends the procedure to develop HCNs for DOE.

  20. Remediation of Occupied Commercial Property Subject to Widespread Radium-226 Contamination - Confidential Client in the South-West of England - 12570

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, Philip

    2012-07-01

    AMEC was contacted by a company that managed commercial office space in 2010. High Rn- 222 measurements had been observed throughout the facility and the landlord had been advised to commission a radiological survey of the site. The site had been purchased by the client in the 1990's. Initial desk studies found that the building had operated for around 50 years as a compass factory. Non-intrusive investigation identified widespread Ra-226 contamination. Ra-226 was found in the fabric of the building, in attic spaces, buried under floor boards and underlying car parks. Intrusive investigation was undertaken to estimate volume(s) of waste, waste categories, activity concentrations and the total inventory of radioactive materials on site. This work identified the presence of 180 GBq of Ra-226 on site. A programme of work is currently underway to remediate the site tackling areas posing the greatest risk to site occupants as a priority. We have worked closely with Regulators, our client, and tenants, to decontaminate the fabric of the building whilst areas of the building remain occupied. The radiological risk, from irradiation, ingestion and inhalation (of Ra-226 and Rn- 222) has been assessed before, during and after intervention to minimise the risks to site occupants. Tenants were moved from areas of unacceptable radiological risk to areas unaffected by the presence of radioactive materials. Rn-222 mitigation measures were installed during the remedial operations to minimise the hazard from Rn-222 that was liberated as a result of decontamination activities. Decontamination techniques were required to be sympathetic to the building as the ageing structure was in danger of collapse during several phases of work. The first phase of remediation is now complete and the decontaminated building is being returned for use as office space. The radiological risks have been significantly reduced and, in areas where decontamination was not possible (e.g. due to concerns over

  1. INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE ''BURINGIN'' AND DIRECT DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney C. Ewing; Lumin Wang

    2002-10-30

    Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am, 244 Cm and 237 Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burnup of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-cycle of burn-up. Direct disposal can considerably reduce cost, processing requirements, and radiation exposure to workers.

  2. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  3. Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.

    1981-01-27

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  4. Building Number/Name: Date prepared: Responsible Contractor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22-S February 2, 2012 WRPS C M Smith; E A Hill PAST OPERATIONS Beryllium brought in facility: YES Form of beryllium: LIQUID matrix Period of beryllium operations (dates): (1) ...

  5. Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 15 1990's 11 12 22 59 87 87 88 91 95 96 2000's 98 96 106 109 111 114 114 186 322 285 2010's 276 322 270 357 310 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  6. Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 18 1990's 19 16 16 18 19 17 18 17 15 19 2000's 17 20 18 15 15 15 14 18 21 24 2010's 26 24 27 26 28 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  7. Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 8 1990's 7 7 9 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 2000's 7 7 5 7 7 7 7 7 7 7 2010's 7 8 9 7 7 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  8. Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4 1990's 8 6 5 8 12 15 24 0 0 0 2000's 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2010's 0 53 100 26 28 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring

  9. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 220,655 410,695 2000's 433,944 464,412 475,420 489,324 495,586 499,402 539,557 2010's 716,692 763,597 837,652 881,196 885,257 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next

  10. Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 108 1990's 111 110 112 113 104 100 102 141 148 99 2000's 152 170 165 195 224 227 231 239 261 261 2010's 269 277 185 159 170 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016

  11. Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3 1990's 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 8 8 8 2000's 9 8 7 9 6 6 7 7 6 6 2010's 5 5 5 5 5 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date: 9/30/2016 Referring Pages:

  12. Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 241 1990's 356 373 382 385 390 372 370 372 185 300 2000's 280 300 225 240 251 316 316 43 45 51 2010's 50 40 40 34 36 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  13. South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 53 1990's 54 54 38 47 55 56 61 60 59 60 2000's 71 68 69 61 61 69 69 71 71 89 2010's 102 100 95 65 68 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  14. Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 700 1990's 690 650 600 505 460 420 2000's 380 350 400 430 280 400 330 305 285 310 2010's 230 210 212 1,089 1,024 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/31/2016 Next

  15. Michigan Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3,169,026 3,152,468 3,153,895 3,161,033 3,180,349 3,192,807 1987-2014 Sales 2,952,550 2,946,507 2,939,693 2,950,315 2,985,315 1997-2014 Transported 199,918 207,388 221,340 230,034 207,492 1997-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 252,017 249,309 249,456 249,994 250,994 253,127 1987-2014 Sales 217,325 213,995 212,411 213,532 219,240 1998-2014 Transported 31,984 35,461 37,583 37,462 33,887 1998-2014 Average Consumption per Consumer (Thousand Cubic Ft.) 649 611 656 578 683 736 1967-2014 Industrial

  16. U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 62 63 59 63 58 61 59 63 62 65 2001 61 61 63 65 64 60 58 56 54 58 59 58 2002 54 57 54 50 51 50 52 50 56 57 50 43 2003 40 41 41 40 38 39 41 43 39 39 38 42 2004 43 45 45 45 44 49 48 49 48 48 49 50 2005 52 53 51 50 55 57 54 55 56 57 57 58 2006 55 57 59 58 58 57

  17. Alaska Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    of Elements) Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 2000's 13 4 23 12

  18. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a

  19. Pre-form ceramic matrix composite cavity and method of forming and method of forming a ceramic matrix composite component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Monaghan, Philip Harold; Delvaux, John McConnell; Taxacher, Glenn Curtis

    2015-06-09

    A pre-form CMC cavity and method of forming pre-form CMC cavity for a ceramic matrix component includes providing a mandrel, applying a base ply to the mandrel, laying-up at least one CMC ply on the base ply, removing the mandrel, and densifying the base ply and the at least one CMC ply. The remaining densified base ply and at least one CMC ply form a ceramic matrix component having a desired geometry and a cavity formed therein. Also provided is a method of forming a CMC component.

  20. Two modulator generalized ellipsometer for complete mueller matrix measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jellison, Jr., Gerald E.; Modine, Frank A.

    1999-01-01

    A two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) comprising two polarizer-photoelastic modulator (PEM) pairs, an optical light source, an optical detection system, and associated data processing and control electronics, where the PEMs are free-running. The input light passes through the first polarizer-PEM pair, reflects off the sample surface or passes through the sample, passes through the second PEM-polarizer pair, and is detected. Each PEM is free running and operates at a different resonant frequency, e.g., 50 and 60 kHz. The resulting time-dependent waveform of the light intensity is a complicated function of time, and depends upon the exact operating frequency and phase of each PEM, the sample, and the azimuthal angles of the polarizer-PEM pairs, but can be resolved into a dc component and eight periodic components. In one embodiment, the waveform is analyzed using a new spectral analysis technique that is similar to Fourier analysis to determine eight sample Mueller matrix elements (normalized to the m.sub.00 Mueller matrix element). The other seven normalized elements of the general 4.times.4 Mueller matrix can be determined by changing the azimuthal angles of the PEM-polarizer pairs with respect to the plane of incidence. Since this instrument can measure all elements of the sample Mueller matrix, it is much more powerful than standard ellipsometers.

  1. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  2. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. ); Frederico, T. , Sao Jose dos Campos, SP . Inst. de Estudos Avancados); Krein, . Inst. de Fisica Teorica); Williams, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  3. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S.; Frederico, T.; Krein,; Williams, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  4. New Advances in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, Jose Barea [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. Unidad Asociada al Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-08-04

    We present the matrix elements necessary to evaluate the half-life of some neutrinoless double beta decay candidates in the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM). We compare our results with those from other models and extract some simple features of the calculations.

  5. The problem of the universal density functional and the density matrix functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobrov, V. B. Trigger, S. A.

    2013-04-15

    The analysis in this paper shows that the Hohenberg-Kohn theorem is the constellation of two statements: (i) the mathematically rigorous Hohenberg-Kohn lemma, which demonstrates that the same ground-state density cannot correspond to two different potentials of an external field, and (ii) the hypothesis of the existence of the universal density functional. Based on the obtained explicit expression for the nonrel-ativistic particle energy in a local external field, we prove that the energy of the system of more than two non-interacting electrons cannot be a functional of the inhomogeneous density. This result is generalized to the system of interacting electrons. It means that the Hohenberg-Kohn lemma cannot provide justification of the universal density functional for fermions. At the same time, statements of the density functional theory remain valid when considering any number of noninteracting ground-state bosons due to the Bose condensation effect. In the framework of the density matrix functional theory, the hypothesis of the existence of the universal density matrix functional corresponds to the cases of noninteracting particles and to interaction in the Hartree-Fock approximation.

  6. Hawaii Number of Natural Gas Consumers

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2012 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2013 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2014 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2015 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2016 1 1 1 1 0 0

    25,466 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 1987-2014 Sales 25,389 25,305 25,184 26,374 28,919 1998-2014 Commercial Number of Consumers 2,535 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 1987-2014 Sales 2,551 2,560 2,545 2,627 2,789 1998-2014 Average Consumption per

  7. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 200,387 206,261 212,496 1990's 217,548 215,408 212,726 215,948 219,061 222,632 224,749 226,714 234,459 232,831 2000's 243,541 212,726 214,526 223,564 223,595 226,007 227,819 230,855 229,235 234,125 2010's 234,158 234,721 237,602 236,746 240,083 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  8. New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Jersey Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 6,265 6,123 6,079 1990's 5,976 8,444 11,474 11,224 10,608 10,362 10,139 17,625 16,282 10,089 2000's 9,686 9,247 8,473 9,027 8,947 8,500 8,245 8,036 7,680 7,871 2010's 7,505 7,391 7,290 7,216 7,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  9. New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 23,276 24,654 27,426 1990's 25,008 28,837 28,198 23,833 21,833 22,484 15,300 23,099 5,294 6,136 2000's 6,553 6,501 3,068 2,984 2,963 3,752 3,642 7,484 7,080 6,634 2010's 6,236 6,609 5,910 6,311 6,313 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  10. Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 34,450 1990's 34,586 34,760 34,784 34,782 34,731 34,520 34,380 34,238 34,098 33,982 2000's 33,897 33,917 34,593 33,828 33,828 33,735 33,945 34,416 34,416 34,963 2010's 34,931 46,717 35,104 32,664 32,967 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  11. Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 27,443 1990's 24,547 28,216 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 29,734 30,101 21,790 2000's 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 36,704 38,060 38,364 41,921 43,600 2010's 44,000 41,238 40,000 39,776 40,070 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  12. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 30,000 1990's 30,300 31,000 31,000 31,100 31,150 31,025 31,792 32,692 21,576 23,822 2000's 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 46,654 49,750 52,700 55,631 57,356 2010's 44,500 54,347 55,136 53,762 70,400 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W

  13. Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,701 1990's 2,362 3,392 3,350 3,514 3,565 3,526 4,105 4,156 4,171 4,204 2000's 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 5,523 6,227 6,591 6,860 6,913 2010's 7,026 7,063 6,327 6,165 6,118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  14. Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,310 1990's 1,307 1,334 1,333 1,336 1,348 1,347 1,367 1,458 1,479 1,498 2000's 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 2,321 2,336 2,350 525 563 2010's 620 914 819 921 895 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual

  15. Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 13,935 1990's 16,980 17,948 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 21,500 21,000 17,568 2000's 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 18,946 19,713 19,713 17,862 21,243 2010's 22,145 25,758 24,697 23,792 24,354 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  16. Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kentucky Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11,248 1990's 11,713 12,169 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 13,825 14,381 14,750 2000's 13,487 14,370 14,367 12,900 13,920 14,175 15,892 16,563 16,290 17,152 2010's 17,670 14,632 17,936 19,494 19,256 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  17. Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 16,309 1990's 16,889 15,271 13,512 15,569 12,958 14,169 15,295 14,958 18,399 16,717 2000's 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 18,838 17,459 18,145 19,213 18,860 2010's 19,137 21,235 19,792 19,528 19,251 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  18. Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,207 1990's 1,438 2,620 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 6,825 7,000 6,750 2000's 7,068 7,425 7,700 8,600 8,500 8,900 9,200 9,712 9,995 10,600 2010's 10,100 11,100 10,900 10,550 10,500 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  19. Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 543 1990's 585 629 507 620 583 535 568 560 527 560 2000's 997 1,143 979 427 1,536 1,676 1,836 2,315 2,343 2,320 2010's 1,979 5,732 1,669 1,967 1,645 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company

  20. Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,700 1990's 2,607 2,802 2,890 3,075 2,940 2,918 2,990 3,071 3,423 3,634 2000's 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 5,751 6,578 6,925 7,095 7,031 2010's 6,059 6,477 6,240 5,754 5,754 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure

  1. Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,431 1990's 2,600 2,821 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 5,160 5,166 4,950 2000's 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 23,734 25,052 27,350 28,969 25,710 2010's 26,124 26,180 22,171 22,358 22,091 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to

  2. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 262,483 1990's 269,790 276,987 276,014 282,152 291,773 298,541 301,811 310,971 316,929 302,421 2000's 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 406,147 425,887 440,516 452,945 476,652 493,100 2010's 487,627 514,637 482,822 484,994 514,786 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  3. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 49,014 71,281 2000's 75,826 64,052 62,738 62,698 57,672 59,773 58,760 2010's 63,611 64,749 67,551 69,164 69,953 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 08/31/2016 Next Release Date:

  4. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Sales (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 47,710,444 48,474,449 49,309,593 1990's 50,187,178 51,593,206 52,331,397 52,535,411 53,392,557 54,322,179 55,263,673 56,186,958 57,321,746 58,223,229 2000's 59,252,728 60,286,364 61,107,254 61,871,450 62,496,134 63,616,827 64,166,280 64,964,769 65,073,996 65,329,582 2010's 65,542,345 65,940,522 66,375,134 66,812,393

  5. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported (Number of

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Elements) Transported (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers - Transported (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 252,783 801,264 2,199,519 2000's 2,978,319 3,576,181 3,839,809 4,055,781 3,971,337 3,829,303 4,037,233 2010's 5,274,697 5,531,680 6,364,411 6,934,929 7,005,081 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data.

  6. Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 2,830 1990's 2,952 2,780 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 3,700 3,900 3,650 2000's 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 3,462 3,814 4,773 5,592 6,314 2010's 7,397 8,388 8,538 9,843 10,150 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid

  7. California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,214 1990's 1,162 1,377 1,126 1,092 1,261 997 978 930 847 1,152 2000's 1,169 1,244 1,232 1,249 1,272 1,356 1,451 1,540 1,645 1,643 2010's 1,580 1,308 1,423 1,335 1,118 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of

  8. Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 5,125 1990's 5,741 5,562 5,912 6,372 7,056 7,017 8,251 12,433 13,838 13,838 2000's 22,442 22,117 23,554 18,774 16,718 22,691 20,568 22,949 25,716 27,021 2010's 28,813 30,101 32,000 32,468 38,346 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld

  9. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 11 14,683 11,370 11,354 1990's 11,322 11,318 11,206 11,133 11,132 11,089 10,952 10,874 10,658 12,108 2000's 11,106 10,816 10,870 10,565 10,406 10,381 10,410 9,915 10,024 10,288 2010's 9,879 10,050 9,771 9,963 10,049 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  10. District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) District of Columbia Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 134 130,748 134,758 134,837 1990's 136,183 136,629 136,438 135,986 135,119 135,299 135,215 134,807 132,867 137,206 2000's 138,252 138,412 143,874 136,258 138,134 141,012 141,953 142,384 142,819 143,436 2010's 144,151 145,524 145,938 146,712 147,877 - = No Data Reported; --

  11. Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 48,609 1990's 50,867 47,615 46,298 47,101 48,654 54,635 53,816 56,747 58,736 58,712 2000's 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 74,827 74,265 76,436 87,556 93,507 2010's 95,014 100,966 96,617 97,618 98,279 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W =

  12. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 4,013,040 4,124,745 4,168,048 1990's 4,236,280 4,357,252 4,409,699 4,464,906 4,533,905 4,636,500 4,720,227 4,761,409 5,044,497 5,010,189 2000's 5,010,817 4,996,446 5,064,384 5,152,177 5,139,949 5,198,028 5,273,379 5,308,785 5,444,335 5,322,332 2010's 5,301,576 5,319,817 5,356,397 5,372,522 5,418,986 - =

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Elements) Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 262,483 1990's 269,790 276,987 276,014 282,152 291,773 298,541 301,811 310,971 316,929 302,421 2000's 341,678 373,304 387,772 393,327 406,147 425,887 440,516 452,945 476,652 493,100 2010's 487,627 514,637 482,822 484,994 514,786 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 195,544 199,041 225,346 1990's 218,341 216,529 209,616 209,666 202,940 209,398 206,049 234,855 226,191 228,331 2000's 220,251 217,026 205,915 205,514 209,058 206,223 193,830 198,289 225,044 207,624 2010's 192,730 189,301 189,372 192,288 192,135 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not

  15. U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 47,710,444 48,474,449 49,309,593 1990's 50,187,178 51,593,206 52,331,397 52,535,411 53,392,557 54,322,179 55,263,673 56,186,958 57,321,746 58,223,229 2000's 59,252,728 60,286,364 61,107,254 61,871,450 62,496,134 63,616,827 64,166,280 64,964,769 65,073,996 65,329,582 2010's 65,542,345 65,940,522

  16. Energy Density Functional Study of Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless {beta}{beta} Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Tomas R. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64259 Darmstadt (Germany); Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); CEA, Irfu, SPhN, Centre de Saclay, F-911191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, D-64259 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-12-17

    We present an extensive study of nuclear matrix elements (NME) for the neutrinoless double-beta decay of the nuclei {sup 48}Ca, {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 124}Sn, {sup 128}Te, {sup 130}Te, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 150}Nd based on state-of-the-art energy density functional methods using the Gogny D1S functional. Beyond-mean-field effects are included within the generating coordinate method with particle number and angular momentum projection for both initial and final ground states. We obtain a rather constant value for the NMEs around 4.7 with the exception of {sup 48}Ca and {sup 150}Nd, where smaller values are found. We analyze the role of deformation and pairing in the evaluation of the NME and present detailed results for the decay of {sup 150}Nd.

  17. Small-energy analysis for the selfadjoint matrix Schrdinger operator on the half line. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aktosun, Tuncay; Klaus, Martin; Weder, Ricardo

    2014-03-15

    The matrix Schrdinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a second moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is differentiable at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the derivative of the scattering matrix at zero energy. The previously established results when the potential has only the first moment are improved when the second moment exists, by presenting the small-energy asymptotics for the related Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevant to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayuti, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Malikussaleh University of Lhokseumawe, 24300 Aceh (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  19. Taxel-addressable matrix of vertical nanowire piezotronic transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhong Lin; Wu, Wenzhuo; Wen, Xiaonan

    2015-05-05

    A tactile sensing matrix includes a substrate, a first plurality of elongated electrode structures, a plurality of vertically aligned piezoelectric members, an insulating layer infused into the piezoelectric members and a second plurality of elongated electrode structures. The first plurality of elongated electrode structures is disposed on the substrate along a first orientation. The vertically aligned piezoelectric members is disposed on the first plurality of elongated electrode structures and form a matrix having columns of piezoelectric members disposed along the first orientation and rows of piezoelectric members disposed along a second orientation that is transverse to the first orientation. The second plurality of elongated electrode structures is disposed on the insulating layer along the second orientation. The elongated electrode structures form a Schottky contact with the piezoelectric members. When pressure is applied to the piezoelectric members, current flow therethrough is modulated.

  20. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  1. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornie, James A.; Kattamis, Theodoulos; Chambers, Brent V.; Bond, Bruce E.; Varela, Raul H.

    1989-01-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  2. Non-stochastic matrix Schrdinger equation for open systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joubert-Doriol, Loc; Ryabinkin, Ilya G.; Izmaylov, Artur F.

    2014-12-21

    We propose an extension of the Schrdinger equation for a quantum system interacting with environment. This extension describes dynamics of a collection of auxiliary wavefunctions organized as a matrix m, from which the system density matrix can be reconstructed as ?{sup ^}=mm{sup }. We formulate a compatibility condition, which ensures that the reconstructed density satisfies a given quantum master equation for the system density. The resulting non-stochastic evolution equation preserves positive-definiteness of the system density and is applicable to both Markovian and non-Markovian system-bath treatments. Our formalism also resolves a long-standing problem of energy loss in the time-dependent variational principle applied to mixed states of closed systems.

  3. Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2007-01-23

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

  4. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  5. Pauli blocking in the nuclear medium π N transition matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moniz, Ernest J.; Sevgen, A.

    1981-07-01

    We give an analytic expression for the in-medium nonstatic πN transition matrix in nuclear matter. Pauli blocking and spreading effects are included explicitly. Spin-flip terms are retained. We discuss the modifications of the free-space amplitude as a function of energy and density and show that large dynamical isospin effects are expected in pion scattering on heavy nuclei.

  6. Engineered metal matrix composites for improved thermal fatigue and wear

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Runkle, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    A new class of patented, steel/carbide metal matrix composites, engineered and developed by UltraClad Corporation, has been applied in concert with HIP cladding to solve several specific real world manufacturing problems, including: improved thermal fatigue performance and wear resistance of metal hot working rolls and related tooling; and improved resistance of tooling to attack by molten aluminum. The thought, science, and engineering behind the evolution and development of these products will be reviewed.

  7. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W.; Roybal, Herman E.

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  8. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  9. Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 ...

  10. Property:OutagePhoneNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OutagePhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name OutagePhoneNumber Property Type String Description An outage hotline or 24-hour customer service number Note: uses...

  11. Property:NEPA SerialNumber | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SerialNumber Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA SerialNumber Property Type String This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "NEPA SerialNumber"...

  12. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  13. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Kirby Goertzen

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  14. Constructing the S-matrix With Complex Factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Philip C.; Toro, Natalia; /Stanford U., ITP

    2009-06-19

    A remarkable connection between BCFW recursion relations and constraints on the S-matrix was made by Benincasa and Cachazo in 0705.4305, who noted that mutual consistency of different BCFW constructions of four-particle amplitudes generates nontrivial (but familiar) constraints on three-particle coupling constants - these include gauge invariance, the equivalence principle, and the lack of non-trivial couplings for spins > 2. These constraints can also be derived with weaker assumptions, by demanding the existence of four-point amplitudes that factorize properly in all unitarity limits with complex momenta. From this starting point, we show that the BCFW prescription can be interpreted as an algorithm for fully constructing a tree-level S-matrix, and that complex factorization of general BCFW amplitudes follows from the factorization of four-particle amplitudes. The allowed set of BCFW deformations is identified, formulated entirely as a statement on the three-particle sector, and using only complex factorization as a guide. Consequently, our analysis based on the physical consistency of the S-matrix is entirely independent of field theory. We analyze the case of pure Yang-Mills, and outline a proof for gravity. For Yang-Mills, we also show that the well-known scaling behavior of BCFW-deformed amplitudes at large z is a simple consequence of factorization. For gravity, factorization in certain channels requires asymptotic behavior {approx} 1/z{sup 2}.

  15. Mathematical investigation of one-way transform matrix options.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, James Arlin

    2006-01-01

    One-way transforms have been used in weapon systems processors since the mid- to late-1970s in order to help recognize insertion of correct pre-arm information while maintaining abnormal-environment safety. Level-One, Level-Two, and Level-Three transforms have been designed. The Level-One and Level-Two transforms have been implemented in weapon systems, and both of these transforms are equivalent to matrix multiplication applied to the inserted information. The Level-Two transform, utilizing a 6 x 6 matrix, provided the basis for the ''System 2'' interface definition for Unique-Signal digital communication between aircraft and attached weapons. The investigation described in this report was carried out to find out if there were other size matrices that would be equivalent to the 6 x 6 Level-Two matrix. One reason for the investigation was to find out whether or not other dimensions were possible, and if so, to derive implementation options. Another important reason was to more fully explore the potential for inadvertent inversion. The results were that additional implementation methods were discovered, but no inversion weaknesses were revealed.

  16. Property:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExample | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    issionDevelopmentStrategiesExample Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExample&oldid326472...

  17. Property:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    sionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfLowEmissionDevelopmentStrategiesExamples&oldid323715...

  18. Property:NumberOfResourceAssessments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:NumberOfResourceAssessments&oldid31439...

  19. Property:Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plants included in Capacity Estimate Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Number of Plants included in Capacity Estimate Property Type Number Retrieved from "http:...

  20. Local Energy Assurance Planning: Map of States with Number of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    States with Number of Cities Selected Local Energy Assurance Planning: Map of States with Number of Cities Selected Map of the United States identifying the States with cities ...

  1. West Valley Demonstration Project Site Cleanup By the Numbers...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project Site Cleanup By the Numbers West Valley Demonstration Project Site Cleanup By the Numbers West Valley Demonstration Project Site Cleanup By the ...

  2. Fact #857 January 26, 2015 Number of Partner Workplaces Offering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Number of Partner Workplaces with Electric Vehicle Charging Stations, November 2014 Graph showing number of partner workplaces with electric vehicle charging stations from the ...

  3. Production and Elliptic Flow of Dileptons and Photons in a Matrix...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Production and Elliptic Flow of Dileptons and Photons in a Matrix Model of the Quark-Gluon Plasma Title: Production and Elliptic Flow of Dileptons and Photons in a Matrix Model of ...

  4. Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Active) Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) As of: May 2016 Provides a table of Project Registration Number Assignments (Active) Project Registration Number Assignment (Active) (511.76 KB) More Documents & Publications All Active DOE Technical Standards Document Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed

  5. Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Completed) Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) As of: May 2016 Provides a table of Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) Project Registration Number Assignments (Completed) (406.85 KB) More Documents & Publications All Active DOE Technical Standards Document Project Registration Number Assignments (Active

  6. In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G.; Wilcoxon, Jess P.; Abrams, Billie L.

    2008-06-10

    A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

  7. Updated users' guide for SAMMY: multilevel R-matrix fits to neutron data using Bayes' equations. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, N.M.

    1985-04-01

    In 1980 the multilevel multichannel R-matrix code SAMMY was released for use in analysis of neutron data at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator. Since that time, SAMMY has undergone significant modifications: (1) User-friendly options have been incorporated to streamline common operations and to protect a run from common user errors. (2) The Reich-Moore formalism has been extended to include an optional logarithmic parameterization of the external R-matrix, for which any or all parameters may be varied. (3) The ability to vary sample thickness, effective temperature, matching radius, and/or resolution-broadening parameters has been incorporated. (4) To avoid loss of information (i.e., computer round-off errors) between runs, the ''covariance file'' now includes precise values for all variables. (5) Unused but correlated variables may be included in the analysis. Because of these and earlier changes, the 1980 SAMMY manual is now obsolete. This report is intended to be complete documentation for the current version of SAMMY. In August of 1984 the users' guide for version P of the multilevel multichannel R-matrix code SAMMY was published. Recently, major changes within SAMMY have led to the creation of version O, which is documented in this report. Among these changes are: (1) an alternative matrix-manipulation method for use in certain special cases; (2) division of theoretical cross-section generation and broadening operations into separate segments of the code; (3) an option to use the multilevel Breit-Wigner approximation to generate theoretical cross sections; (4) new input options; (5) renaming all temporary files as SAM...DAT; (6) more sophisticated use of temporary files to maximize the number of data points that may be analyzed in a single run; and (7) significant internal restructing of the code in preparation for changes described here and for planned future changes.

  8. Atomic Scale Modelling of the Primary Damage State of Irradiated UO{sub 2} Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Brutzel, Laurent

    2008-07-01

    Large scale classical molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out to study the primary damage state due to a-decay self irradiation in UO{sub 2} matrix. Simulations of energetic displacement cascades up to the realistic energy of the recoil nucleus at 80 keV provide new informations on defect production, their spatial distribution and their clustering. The discrepancy with the classical linear theory NRT (Norton-Robinson-Torrens) law on the creation of the number of point defects is discussed. Study of cascade overlap sequence shows a saturation of the number of point defects created as the dose increases. Toward the end of the overlap sequence, large stable clusters of vacancies are observed. The values of athermal diffusion coefficients coming from the ballistic collisions and the additional point defects created during the cascades are estimated from these simulations to be, in all the cases, less than 10-26 m{sup 2}/s. Finally, the influence of a grain boundary of type Sigma 5 is analysed. It has been found that the energy of the cascades are dissipated along the interface and that most of the point defects are created at the grain boundary. (authors)

  9. Source Apportionment of Stack Emissions from Research and Development Facilities Using Positive Matrix Factorization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballinger, Marcel Y.; Larson, Timothy V.

    2014-08-19

    Emissions from research and development (R&D) facilities are difficult to characterize due to the wide variety of processes used, changing nature of research, and large number of chemicals. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) was applied to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) concentrations measured in the main exhaust stacks of four different R&D buildings to identify the number and composition of major contributing sources. PMF identified from 9-11 source-related factors contributing to the stack emissions depending on the building. The factors that were similar between buildings were major contributors to trichloroethylene (TCE), acetone, and ethanol emissions. Several other factors had similar profiles for two or more buildings but not for all four. One factor for each building was a combination of p/m-xylene, o-xylene and ethylbenzene. At least one factor for each building was identified that contained a broad mix of many species and constraints were used in PMF to modify the factors to resemble more closely the off-shift concentration profiles. PMF accepted the constraints with little decrease in model fit. Although the PMF model predicted the profiles of the off-shift samples, the percent of total emissions was under-predicted by the model versus the measured data.

  10. Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoen, C.; Hammerer, K.; Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

  11. Analysis of damage and failure in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brust, F.W.; Majumdar, B.S.; Newaz, G.M.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents the results of the analysis of the constitutive response of a model Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) system. The model is described first, followed by some direct comparison of predicted response to corresponding experimental data. An important result discussed here is that when model verification is made, it is important to compare load direction response to the experimental data, but also, comparisons to the out of load direction response must be made, or the model may not be performing as desired. Some discussion of failure predictions using simple models is also made here.

  12. Efficient double beta decay nuclear matrix elements computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neacsu, Andrei [Horia Hulubei Foundation (FHH) 407 Atomistilor, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) 30 Reactorului, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

    2012-11-20

    We have developed a shell model code for the accurate computation of the two-body matrix elements of the transition operators involved in the neutrinoless double beta decay. This code features coupled cluster method short-range correlations with Jastrow-like functions, finite nucleon size effect and higher order nucleon current corrections. We present the results obtained for {sup 48}Ca and {sup 82}Se, then we compare them with other results in the literature. In the case of {sup 48}Ca, we also study the contributions of the included effects and find good agreement with other published results.

  13. The nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2007-10-12

    The status of calculation of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) nuclear matrix elements (NME's) is reviewed. The spread of published values of NME's is discussed. The main attention is paid to the recent progress achieved in the evaluation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). The obtained results are compared with those of the nuclear shell model. The problem of reliable determination of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's is addressed. The uncertainty in NME's are analyzed and further progress in calculation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's is outlined.

  14. Quarkonium correlators in the QGP: a T-matrix approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabrera, D.; Rapp, R.

    2011-05-23

    We study the evolution of heavy quarkonium states with temperature in a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in terms of the in-medium QQ-bar T-matrix obtained from a reduced Bethe-Salpeter equation. The interaction potential is extracted from finite-temperature lattice QCD calculations of the QQ-bar internal energy. The quarkonium spectral functions and Euclidean correlators are sensitive to the interplay of bound states and the (non-perturbative) continuum, and to heavy-quark in-medium single-particle properties. Further applications in the heavy-light quark and pure gauge sectors are addressed.

  15. TRAC-P validation test matrix. Revision 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, E.D.; Boyack, B.E.

    1997-09-05

    This document briefly describes the elements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) software quality assurance program leading to software (code) qualification and identifies a test matrix for qualifying Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-Pressurized Water Reactor Version (-P), or TRAC-P, to the NRC`s software quality assurance requirements. Code qualification is the outcome of several software life-cycle activities, specifically, (1) Requirements Definition, (2) Design, (3) Implementation, and (4) Qualification Testing. The major objective of this document is to define the TRAC-P Qualification Testing effort.

  16. Enzyme system comprising an enzyme bonded in a porous matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ackerman, Eric [Richland, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2010-12-07

    A protein system is described in which a protein is bound within a matrix material that has pores that are sized to achieve excellent properties such as: activity, protein density, and stability. In a preferred embodiment, the pore sizes range from 50 to 400 .ANG.. One protein that has demonstrated surprisingly good results in this system is OPH. This protein is known to degrade organophosphorus compounds such as are found in chemical weapons and pesticides. Novel methods of forming the protein system and methods of making OPH are also described.

  17. The CKM matrix and the unitarity triangle. Proceedings, workshop, Geneva, Switzerland, February 13-16, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Battaglia et al.

    2004-04-02

    This report contains the results of the Workshop on the CKM Unitarity Triangle that was held at CERN on 13-16 February 2002. There had been several Workshops on B physics that concentrated on studies at e{sup +}e{sup -} machines, at the Tevatron, or at LHC separately. Here we brought together experts of different fields, both theorists and experimentalists, to study the determination of the CKM matrix from all the available data of K, D, and B physics. The analysis of LEP data for B physics is reaching its end, and one of the goals of the Workshop was to underline the results that have been achieved at LEP, SLC, and CESR. Another goal was to prepare for the transfer of responsibility for averaging B physics properties, that has developed within the LEP community, to the present main actors of these studies, from the B factory and the Tevatron experiments. The optimal way to combine the various experimental and theoretical inputs and to fit for the apex of the Unitarity Triangle has been a contentious issue. A further goal of the Workshop was to bring together the proponents of different fitting strategies, and to compare their approaches when applied to the same inputs. Since lattice QCD plays a very important role in the determination of the non-perturbative parameters needed to constrain the CKM unitarity triangle, the first Workshop was seen as an excellent opportunity to bring together lattice theorists with the aim of establishing a working group to compile averages for phenomenologically relevant quantities. Representatives from lattice collaborations around the world were invited to attend a meeting during the Workshop. A consensus was reached to set up three test working groups, collectively known as the ''CKM Lattice Working Group'', to review a number of well-studied quantities: quark masses, the kaon B-parameter, and the matrix elements relevant for neutral B-meson mixing. This report is organized as a coherent document with chapters covering the domains

  18. Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource Phone Numbers for Beam Lines and Other Services The local area code for SSRL is 650. All numbers listed below should be dialed as 650-926-xxxx from other area codes. When calling an onsite location from within SSRL simply dial the 4-digit extension. When calling an offsite number within the 650 area code dial, dial 9 plus the 7-digit number. To call a number in another area code dial 9-1-area code - phone number. Beam Lines Beam Line Extension 1-4 5214 1-5 5215 2-1 5221

  19. Matrix isolation apparatus with extended sample collection capability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, Gerald T.

    1987-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides for the matrix isolation of increased amounts of a sample material for spectrographic analysis from a gas chromatographic separation. The device includes an evacuated sample collection chamber containing a disc-like specular carousel having a generally circular lateral surface upon which the sample is deposited in an inert gas matrix for infrared (IR) spectral analysis. The evacuated sample chamber is mounted in a fixed manner and is coupled to and supports a rotating cryostatic coupler which, in turn, supports the specular carousel within the collection chamber. A rotational drive system connected to the cryostatic coupler provides for its rotational displacement as well as that of the sample collecting carousel. In addition, rotation of the cryostatic coupler effects vertical displacement of the carousel to permit the collection of an extended sample band in a helical configuration on the entire lateral surface of the carousel. The various components of the carousel's angular/linear displacement drive system are located exterior to the cryostatic coupler for easy access and improved operation. The cryostatic coupler includes a 360.degree. rotary union assembly for permitting the delivery of a high pressure working fluid to the cryostatic coupler in a continuous flow manner for maintaining the specular carousel at a low temperature, e.g., 10.degree.-20.degree. K., for improved uninterrupted gas sample collection and analysis.

  20. Laser photolysis of fluorone dyes in a chitosan matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slyusareva, E A; Sizykh, A G; Gerasimova, M A; Slabko, V V; Myslivets, S A

    2012-08-31

    Kinetics of laser-induced photobleaching of fluorone dyes (fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, erythrosin B, Rose Bengal) is studied in a chitosan matrix. For all dyes the bleaching kinetics at the intensities of laser radiation 0.7 - 11.9 W cm{sup -2} demonstrates quasi-monomolecular behaviour. The results are analysed using a kinetic model, based on the four-level (S{sub 0}, S{sub 1}, T{sub 1}, T{sub n}) scheme of the dye with chemically active triplet states taken into account. It is shown that the rate constants of the chemical reaction involving higher triplet states in the dyes studied amount to (3.9 - 18.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and exceed the analogous values for the reaction involving the first lower triplet states by nine orders of magnitude. The rate of reaction involving the first triplet states appeared to be higher by one - two orders of magnitude than that in the case of higher triplet states involved because of low population of the latter. The possible mechanism of dye bleaching with participation of chitosan that consists in reduction of the dye to the leuco form by transfer of hydrogen from the chitosan matrix is discussed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

  1. Export support of renewable energy industries. Task number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on task coordination and effectiveness.

  2. Export support of renewable energy industries, grant number 1, deliverable number 3. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-14

    The United States Export Council for Renewable Energy (US/ECRE), a consortium of six industry associations, promotes the interests of the renewable energy and energy efficiency member companies which provide goods and services in biomass, geothermal, hydropower, passive solar, photovoltaics, solar thermal, wind, wood energy, and energy efficiency technologies. US/ECRE`s mission is to catalyze export markets for renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies worldwide. Under this grant, US/ECRE has conducted a number of in-house activities, as well as to manage activities by member trade associations, affiliate organizations and non-member contractors and consultants. The purpose of this document is to report on grant coordination and effectiveness.

  3. Property:ASHRAE 169 Climate Zone Number | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5 + Adair County, Oklahoma ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 3 + Adams County, Colorado ASHRAE 169-2006 Climate Zone + Climate Zone Number 5 + Adams County,...

  4. Social Security Number Reduction Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Social Security Number Reduction Project Social Security Number Reduction Project The document below provides information regarding acceptable uses of the Social Security Number (SSN). Baseline Inventory.pdf (23.65 KB) More Documents & Publications DOE Guidance on the Use of the SSN Manchester Software 1099 Reporting PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory

  5. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) chemical substances inventory: PMN number to EPA accession number link (for microcomputers). Data file

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The PMN Number to EPA Accession Number Link Diskette provides a cross-reference of these numbers for commenced PMNs on the confidential portion of the TSCA Master Inventory File. Neither this cross-reference nor the additional information included is TSCA Confidential Business Information. Provided on the diskette for each confidential commenced PMN are the PMN Case Number, EPA Accession Number, Generic Name, and EPA special flags. The sequence of the file is in ascending PMN Case Number order with `P` case numbers sorted first, followed by `Y` case numbers. For more detailed information on the confidential portion of the TSCA Inventory, including generic names, users can consult the introductory material of the printed TSCA Inventory: 1985 Edition and its 1990 Supplement. New versions of this file may be issued in the future. No search software is provided with this DOS formatted diskette.

  6. Self-lubricating carbon nanotube reinforced nickel matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scharf, T. W.; Neira, A.; Hwang, J. Y.; Banerjee, R.; Tiley, J.

    2009-07-01

    Nickel (Ni)--multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) composites have been processed in a monolithic form using the laser-engineered net shape (LENS) processing technique. Auger electron spectroscopy maps determined that the nanotubes were well dispersed and bonded in the nickel matrix and no interfacial chemical reaction products were determined in the as-synthesized composites. Mechanisms of solid lubrication have been investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy spatial mapping of the worn surfaces to determine the formation of tribochemical products. The Ni-CNT composites exhibit a self-lubricating behavior, forming an in situ, low interfacial shear strength graphitic film during sliding, resulting in a decrease in friction coefficient compared to pure Ni.

  7. Electrochemical Proteolytic Beacon for Detection of Matrix Metalloproteinase Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Wang, Jun; Wunschel, David S.; Lin, Yuehe

    2006-09-27

    This communication describes a novel method for detecting of matrix metalloproteinase-7 activity using a peptide substrate labeled with a ferrocene reporter. The substrate serves as a selective electrochemical proteolytic beacon (EPB) for this metalloproteinase. The EPB is immobilized on a gold electrode surface to enable on-off electrochemical signaling capability for uncleaved and cleaved events. The EPB is efficiently and selectively cleaved by MMP-7 as measured by the rate of decrease in redox current of ferrocene. Direct transduction of a signal corresponding to peptide cleavage events into an electronic signal thus provides a simple, sensitive route for detecting the MMP activity. The new method allows for identification of the activity of MMP-7 in concentrations as low as 3.4 pM. The concept can be extended to design multiple peptide substrate labeled with different electroactive reporters for assaying multiple MMPs activities.

  8. Dense and Sparse Matrix Operations on the Cell Processor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Samuel W.; Shalf, John; Oliker, Leonid; Husbands,Parry; Yelick, Katherine

    2005-05-01

    The slowing pace of commodity microprocessor performance improvements combined with ever-increasing chip power demands has become of utmost concern to computational scientists. Therefore, the high performance computing community is examining alternative architectures that address the limitations of modern superscalar designs. In this work, we examine STI's forthcoming Cell processor: a novel, low-power architecture that combines a PowerPC core with eight independent SIMD processing units coupled with a software-controlled memory to offer high FLOP/s/Watt. Since neither Cell hardware nor cycle-accurate simulators are currently publicly available, we develop an analytic framework to predict Cell performance on dense and sparse matrix operations, using a variety of algorithmic approaches. Results demonstrate Cell's potential to deliver more than an order of magnitude better GFLOP/s per watt performance, when compared with the Intel Itanium2 and Cray X1 processors.

  9. Method of manufacturing a matrix for the detection of mismatches

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ershov, Gennady Moiseevich; Mirzabekov, Andrei Darievich

    1998-01-01

    This method for preparing micromatrices consists in applying a specially-patterned intermediate layer of laser-absorbing substance on a solid support. The configuration of the sublayer fully corresponds to the topology of the manufactured matrix. The intermediate layer is further covered by a continuous layer of gel , the gel and the material of the support being transparent towards laser radiation. The gel layer is irradiated by a laser beam for a time needed to evaporate simultaneously the gel in the places immediately above the laser-absorbing sublayer and the sublayer itself. Oligonucleotides from a chosen set are then attached to the formed gel `cells`, one oligonucleotide to each cell. This method is intended for use in biotechnology, specifically for deciphering the nucleotide sequence of DNA.

  10. Training implementation matrix, Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EATON, G.L.

    2000-06-08

    This Training Implementation Matrix (TIM) describes how the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project (SNFP) implements the requirements of DOE Order 5480.20A, Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for Reactor and Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. The TIM defines the application of the selection, qualification, and training requirements in DOE Order 5480.20A at the SNFP. The TIM also describes the organization, planning, and administration of the SNFP training and qualification program(s) for which DOE Order 5480.20A applies. Also included is suitable justification for exceptions taken to any requirements contained in DOE Order 5480.20A. The goal of the SNFP training and qualification program is to ensure employees are capable of performing their jobs safely and efficiently.

  11. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, Carl A.; Maricle, Donald L.

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack.

  12. Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

    1987-04-21

    A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack. 6 figs.

  13. Sparse matrix transform for fast projection to reduced dimension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theiler, James P; Cao, Guangzhi; Bouman, Charles A

    2010-01-01

    We investigate three algorithms that use the sparse matrix transform (SMT) to produce variance-maximizing linear projections to a lower-dimensional space. The SMT expresses the projection as a sequence of Givens rotations and this enables computationally efficient implementation of the projection operator. The baseline algorithm uses the SMT to directly approximate the optimal solution that is given by principal components analysis (PCA). A variant of the baseline begins with a standard SMT solution, but prunes the sequence of Givens rotations to only include those that contribute to the variance maximization. Finally, a simpler and faster third algorithm is introduced; this also estimates the projection operator with a sequence of Givens rotations, but in this case, the rotations are chosen to optimize a criterion that more directly expresses the dimension reduction criterion.

  14. Charting an Inflationary Landscape with Random Matrix Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, M.C. David; McAllister, Liam; Pajer, Enrico; Wrase, Timm E-mail: mcallister@cornell.edu E-mail: timm.wrase@stanford.edu

    2013-11-01

    We construct a class of random potentials for N >> 1 scalar fields using non-equilibrium random matrix theory, and then characterize multifield inflation in this setting. By stipulating that the Hessian matrices in adjacent coordinate patches are related by Dyson Brownian motion, we define the potential in the vicinity of a trajectory. This method remains computationally efficient at large N, permitting us to study much larger systems than has been possible with other constructions. We illustrate the utility of our approach with a numerical study of inflation in systems with up to 100 coupled scalar fields. A significant finding is that eigenvalue repulsion sharply reduces the duration of inflation near a critical point of the potential: even if the curvature of the potential is fine-tuned to be small at the critical point, small cross-couplings in the Hessian cause the curvature to grow in the neighborhood of the critical point.

  15. Chemical interaction matrix between reagents in a Purex based process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brahman, R.K.; Hennessy, W.P.; Paviet-Hartmann, P.

    2008-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is the responsible entity for the disposal of the United States excess weapons grade plutonium. DOE selected a PUREX-based process to convert plutonium to low-enriched mixed oxide fuel for use in commercial nuclear power plants. To initiate this process in the United States, a Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) is under construction and will be operated by Shaw AREVA MOX Services at the Savannah River Site. This facility will be licensed and regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). A PUREX process, similar to the one used at La Hague, France, will purify plutonium feedstock through solvent extraction. MFFF employs two major process operations to manufacture MOX fuel assemblies: (1) the Aqueous Polishing (AP) process to remove gallium and other impurities from plutonium feedstock and (2) the MOX fuel fabrication process (MP), which processes the oxides into pellets and manufactures the MOX fuel assemblies. The AP process consists of three major steps, dissolution, purification, and conversion, and is the center of the primary chemical processing. A study of process hazards controls has been initiated that will provide knowledge and protection against the chemical risks associated from mixing of reagents over the life time of the process. This paper presents a comprehensive chemical interaction matrix evaluation for the reagents used in the PUREX-based process. Chemical interaction matrix supplements the process conditions by providing a checklist of any potential inadvertent chemical reactions that may take place. It also identifies the chemical compatibility/incompatibility of the reagents if mixed by failure of operations or equipment within the process itself or mixed inadvertently by a technician in the laboratories. (aut0010ho.

  16. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  17. Random Number Generation for Petascale Quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashok Srinivasan

    2010-03-16

    The quality of random number generators can affect the results of Monte Carlo computations, especially when a large number of random numbers are consumed. Furthermore, correlations present between different random number streams in a parallel computation can further affect the results. The SPRNG software, which the author had developed earlier, has pseudo-random number generators (PRNGs) capable of producing large numbers of streams with large periods. However, they had been empirically tested on only thousand streams earlier. In the work summarized here, we tested the SPRNG generators with over a hundred thousand streams, involving over 10^14 random numbers per test, on some tests. We also tested the popular Mersenne Twister. We believe that these are the largest tests of PRNGs, both in terms of the numbers of streams tested and the number of random numbers tested. We observed defects in some of these generators, including the Mersenne Twister, while a few generators appeared to perform well. We also corrected an error in the implementation of one of the SPRNG generators.

  18. Membranes having aligned 1-D nanoparticles in a matrix layer for improved fluid separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Revanur, Ravindra; Lulevich, Valentin; Roh, Il Juhn; Klare, Jennifer E.; Kim, Sangil; Noy, Aleksandr; Bakajin, Olgica

    2015-12-22

    Membranes for fluid separation are disclosed. These membranes have a matrix layer sandwiched between an active layer and a porous support layer. The matrix layer includes 1-D nanoparticles that are vertically aligned in a porous polymer matrix, and which substantially extend through the matrix layer. The active layer provides species-specific transport, while the support layer provides mechanical support. A matrix layer of this type has favorable surface morphology for forming the active layer. Furthermore, the pores that form in the matrix layer tend to be smaller and more evenly distributed as a result of the presence of aligned 1-D nanoparticles. Improved performance of separation membranes of this type is attributed to these effects.

  19. Matrix-filler interfaces and physical properties of metal matrix composites with negative thermal expansion manganese nitride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takenaka, Koshi; Kuzuoka, Kota; Sugimoto, Norihiro

    2015-08-28

    Copper matrix composites containing antiperovskite manganese nitrides with negative thermal expansion (NTE) were formed using pulsed electric current sintering. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed that the chemically reacted region extends over 10 μm around the matrix–filler interfaces. The small-size filler was chemically deteriorated during formation of composites and it lost the NTE property. Therefore, we produced the composites using only the nitride particles having diameter larger than 50 μm. The large-size filler effectively suppressed the thermal expansion of copper and improved the conductivity of the composites to the level of pure aluminum. The present composites, having high thermal conductivity and low thermal expansion, are suitable for practical applications such as a heat radiation substrate for semiconductor devices.

  20. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  1. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    performance computing architecture (Patent) | SciTech Connect Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Mechanisms for performing matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture are provided. A vector load operation is performed

  2. Semiclassical matrix model for quantum chaotic transport with time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novaes, Marcel

    2015-10-15

    We show that the semiclassical approach to chaotic quantum transport in the presence of time-reversal symmetry can be described by a matrix model. In other words, we construct a matrix integral whose perturbative expansion satisfies the semiclassical diagrammatic rules for the calculation of transport statistics. One of the virtues of this approach is that it leads very naturally to the semiclassical derivation of universal predictions from random matrix theory.

  3. Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) Cleanup By the Numbers |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) Cleanup By the Numbers Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) Cleanup By the Numbers Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) Cleanup By the Numbers In 2015, EM developed site infographics highlighting each sites history and important metrics including: Decontamination and demolition of facilities and waste sites Secure storage of spent fuel Retrieval of radioactive sludge and saltcake from tanks Treatment of

  4. Prediction of cloud droplet number in a general circulation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghan, S.J.; Leung, L.R.

    1996-04-01

    We have applied the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) bulk cloud microphysics parameterization to the treatment of stratiform clouds in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Climate Model (CCM2). The RAMS predicts mass concentrations of cloud water, cloud ice, rain and snow, and number concnetration of ice. We have introduced the droplet number conservation equation to predict droplet number and it`s dependence on aerosols.

  5. Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State | Department of Energy Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State Map of the United States showing the location of Workforce Training Projects, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Developing and Enhancing Workforce Training Programs: Number of Projects by State (389.21 KB) More Documents & Publications Workforce Development Wind Projects

  6. ORISE: Report shows number of health physics degrees for 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    report shows number of health physics degrees increased for graduates, decreased for undergraduates in 2010 Decreased number of B.S. degrees remains higher than levels in the early 2000 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Dec. 20, 2011 FY12-09 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The number of health physics graduate degrees increased for both master's and doctoral candidates in 2010, but decreased for bachelor's degrees, says a report released this year by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The ORISE report,

  7. Truly Random Number Generator Promises Stronger Encryption Across All

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Devices, Cloud Truly Random Number Generator Promises Stronger Encryption Across All Devices, Cloud Truly Random Number Generator Promises Stronger Encryption Across All Devices, Cloud Whitewood Encryption Systems, launched in summer 2015, introduces NetRandom, providing truly random quantum encryption. March 4, 2016 Random Number Generator Whitewood Encryption Systems, launched in summer 2015, introduces NetRandom, providing truly random quantum encryption. They were awarded a third patent

  8. Fluctuation studies in the infinite interval matrix representations of operator products and their decompositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baykara, N. A.; Guervit, Ercan; Demiralp, Metin

    2012-12-10

    In this work a study on finite dimensional matrix approximations to products of quantum mechanical operators is conducted. It is emphasized that the matrix representation of the product of two operators is equal to the product of the matrix representation of each of the operators when all the fluctuation terms are ignored. The calculation of the elements of the matrices corresponding to the matrix representation of various operators, based on three terms recursive relation is defined. Finally it is shown that the approximation quality depends on the choice of higher values of n, namely the dimension of Hilbert space.

  9. Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word - FY07AnnualReport.doc CX-005455: Categorical Exclusion Determination Microsoft Word -...

  10. Multi-resolution modeling of the dynamic loading of metal matrix...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    loading of metal matrix composites. Authors: Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel ; Robbins, Joshua ; Voth, Thomas E. Publication Date: 2012-09-01 OSTI Identifier: 1073308...

  11. New Family of Multilevel Matrix Converters for Wind Power Applications: Final Report, July 2002 - March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, R.; Angkititrakul, S.; Almazeedi, K.

    2006-12-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a new modular multilevel matrix converter for wind power applications and to demonstrate a working scale model in the laboratory.

  12. Contract Number DE-AC27-08RV14800

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    08RV14800 Modification 382 ATTACHMENT Replacement Pages DE-AC27-08RV14800, MODIFICATION 382 Total: 111 pages including this cover page  Contract Section J, List of Attachments, page J-1  Contract Section J, Attachment J.3, Hanford Site Services and Interface Requirements Matrix, pages J.3-1 thru J.3-109 Tank Operations Contract Section J Contract No. DE-RP27-07RV14800 Modification No. 382 J-1 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J -- LIST OF ATTACHMENTS

  13. GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

    2011-06-30

    Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet

  14. Savannah River Site by the Numbers August 2015

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Also built were a number of support facilities including two chemical separations plants, a heavy water extraction plant, a nuclear fuel and target fabrication facility, a tritium ...

  15. Regulation Identifier Number Title/Subject/Purpose Rule Type

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Regulation Identifier Number TitleSubjectPurpose Rule Type Status 1990-AA40 ... Amend DOE's statutory prescribed regulation, which set forth the procedural rules ...

  16. The Charge Conjugation Quantum Number in Multiquark Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stancu, Fl.

    2008-08-29

    We discuss the charge conjugation quantum number for tetraquarks or meson-meson molecules, seen as possible interpretations of the newly found XYZ charmonium-like resonances.

  17. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC02-76SF00515 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Submitted to Physical Review Letters; Journal Volume: 103; Journal Issue: 6 ...

  18. Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Dependence of Band Renormalization Effect on the Number of Copper-oxide ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  19. Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell PDF icon Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake:...

  20. Temporary EPA ID Number Request | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporary EPA ID Number RequestLegal Abstract A developer that may "generate hazardous waste only from an episodic event" may instead apply for a temporary hazardous waste...