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1

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Aq Dryers Sector Geothermal energy Type Agricultural Drying Location Vale, Oregon Coordinates 43.9821055°, -117.2382311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

2

Example Hopper Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Sample Batch Scripts One of the most noted differences between the Hopper system and other NERSC systems is the number of cores per node...

3

Edison Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system,"...

4

Edison Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Overview Batch jobs are jobs that run non-interactively under the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system," where they are queued awaiting free resources on Edison. The batch system on Edison is known as "Torque." Bare-Bones Batch Script The simplest Edison batch script will look something like this. #PBS -q regular #PBS -l mppwidth=48 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 48 ./my_executable This example illustrates the basic parts of a script: Job directive lines begin with #PBS. These "Torque Directives" tell the batch system how many nodes to reserve for your job and how long to

5

Hopper Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Overview Batch jobs are jobs that run non-interactively under the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system," where they are queued awaiting free resources on Hopper. The batch system on Hopper is known as "Torque." Bare-Bones Batch Script The simplest Hopper batch script will look something like this. #PBS -q regular #PBS -l mppwidth=48 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 48 ./my_executable This example illustrates the basic parts of a script: Job directive lines begin with #PBS. These "Torque Directives" tell the batch system how many nodes to reserve for your job and how long to

6

Edison Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Batch Jobs Overview Batch jobs are jobs that run non-interactively under the control of a "batch script," which is a text file containing a number of job directives and LINUX commands or utilities. Batch scripts are submitted to the "batch system," where they are queued awaiting free resources on Edison. The batch system on Edison is known as "Torque." Bare-Bones Batch Script The simplest Edison batch script will look something like this. #PBS -q regular #PBS -l mppwidth=32 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 32 ./my_executable This example illustrates the basic parts of a script: Job directive lines begin with #PBS. These "Torque Directives" tell the batch system how many nodes to reserve for your job and how long to

7

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading...

8

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin or qsh. This can be useful if you are doing something that is potentially disruptive or if the interactive nodes are overloaded. qlogin will give you an interactive session in the same window as your original session on PDSF, however, you must have your ssh keys in place. Due to system limitations there is a small (but important) difference in the user environment you get when you use qlogin. When you receive a shell prompt with qlogin, your CHOS environment is not set up for you. In order to set up the CHOS environment of your choice you will need to manually chos into the chos environment of your choice:

9

PDSF Batch Job Example  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example PDSF Batch Job Example On this page we show an example of how to run a simple batch job, monitor it, check its output, and look at the SGE accounting information about it. We start with a simple script named hello.csh, which just sleeps a bit and then writes some output: pdsf4 72% cat hello.csh #!/bin/csh sleep 600 echo "Hello, World" The simplest way to submit it is to just use qsub without any options: pdsf4 74% qsub hello.csh Your job 1787239 ("hello.csh") has been submitted We can check on its status with qstat. Use the -u option to get only your jobs: pdsf4 75% qstat -u hjort job-ID prior name user state submit/start at queue slots ja-task-ID -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

10

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Edison has 24 cores (physical cores) per node, so the default "mppnppn" value is set to 24 for all queues. If you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison has 48 logical cores per node, and the mppnppn value can be set to 48. However, this is not required. The "-j 2" option of the "aprun" command allows you to use all 48 logical cores on the nodes. In most of the following example batch scripts, we assume that jobs are run without Hyperthreading unless explicitly mentioned, therefore the default mppnppn value, 24, is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 24 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1536 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1536 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

11

Batch Script Examples  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples Batch Script Examples My First Script This is a simple example that you can use to make sure that your settings are correct before submitting more complicated jobs. First, copy the contents of hello.sh into a file. genepool% cat hello.sh #!/bin/bash sleep 120 echo "Hello World" Then submit your job with the qsub command genepool% qsub hello.sh Monitor your job with the qstat command: genepool% qstat -u You can also get more detailed information about your job using: genepool% qstat -j The job id can be found using the qstat -u command. Basic Batch Script Here is an example of a basic script that specifies the working directory, the shell and the queue. The #$ must be used to specify the grid engine

12

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts Example Batch Scripts The default number of cores per node on Edison is 16, and the default "mppnppn" setting is 16. However, if you run with hyperthreading (HT), Edison compute nodes have 32 cores per node, and the mppnppn value needs to be set to 32. In addition, the "-j 2" option needs to be added to the "aprun" command. In most of the following example batch scripts, the default number of 16 cores per node is used. Basic Scripts Sample Job script This script uses the default 16 cores per node. This job will run on 64 nodes, with 1024 cores. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=1024 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -N my_job #PBS -j oe #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 1024 ./my_executable Sample job script to run with Hyperthreading (HT)

13

Submitting Batch Jobs on Carver  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Overview A batch job is the most common way users run production applications on NERSC machines. Carver's batch system is based on the PBS model, implemented with the Moab scheduler and Torque resource manager. Typically, the user submits a batch script to the batch system. This script specifies, at the very least, how many nodes and cores the job will use, how long the job will run, and the name of the application to run. The job will advance in the queue until it has reached the top. At this point, Torque will allocate the requested number of nodes to the batch job. The batch script itself will execute on the "head node" (sometimes known as the "MOM" node). See Queues and Policies for details of batch queues, limits,

14

Parallel Batch Scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parallel Batch Scripts Parallel Batch Scripts Parallel Batch Scripts Parallel Environments on Genepool You can run parallel jobs that use MPI or OpenMP on Genepool as long as you make the appropriate changes to your submission script! To investigate the parallel environments that are available on Genepool, you can use Command Description qconf -sp Show the configuration for the specified parallel environment. qconf -spl Show a list of all currently configured parallel environments. Basic Parallel Example If your job requires the default 5GB of memory per slot, you can do the following: #!/bin/bash # # == Set SGE options: # # -- ensure BASH is used # -- run the job in the current working directory (where qsub is called) #$ -cwd # -- run with the environment variables from the User's environment

15

PDSF Batch Statistics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summaries PDSF Group Batch Summary Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2013 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 SGE62 Partial SGE62 2012 SGE62 SGE62...

16

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From...

17

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From 5am-6pm Pacific Time, 256 nodes are reserved for debugging and interactive use. See also, running Interactive Jobs. Sample Batch Scripts The following batch script requests 8 cores on 2 nodes with a 10 minute wall clock limit in the debug queue. Torque directive lines tell the batch system how to run a job and begin with #PBS. #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=8 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00 #PBS -j eo #PBS -V cd $PBS_O_WORKDIR aprun -n 8 ./a.out Here is another example requesting 8 processors using 4 nodes with only 2 cores per node: #PBS -q debug #PBS -l mppwidth=8 #PBS -l mppnppn=2 #PBS -l walltime=00:10:00

18

NDA BATCH 2009-7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The testing facility is LLNL plutonium facility segmented gamma scanner. 100% of the radioassay data in the batch data report is reviewed.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

19

Progressing batch hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

Wright, John D. (Denver, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Progressing batch hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

Wright, J.D.

1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Using the PDSF Batch System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System System Using the PDSF Batch System Submitting PDSF Jobs UGE (Univa Grid Engine) is the batch system used at PDSF. Read More » Scratch Space Use on Compute Nodes Use $TMPDIR and not /scratch or /tmp directly. Read More » I/O Resources I/O resources are in important tool at PDSF and this page describes how to use them. Read More » Running Interactive Batch Jobs This page describes when you should consider working in an interactive batch session and how to do it. Read More » Monitoring and Managing Jobs This page is about what you can do with your jobs after you have submitted them. Read More » Getting Info about Completed Jobs UGE accounting information about all jobs is available and this page describes how to access it. Read More » PDSF Batch Job Example

22

Comparison between the TOPAZ Airborne Ozone Lidar and In Situ Measurements during TexAQS 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NOAA airborne ozone lidar system [Tunable Optical Profiler for Aerosol and Ozone (TOPAZ)] is compared with the fast-response chemiluminescence sensor flown aboard the NOAA WP-3D during the 2006 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS). TOPAZ ...

A. O. Langford; C. J. Senff; R. J. Alvarez II; R. M. Banta; R. M. Hardesty; D. D. Parrish; T. B. Ryerson

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Edison batch system is up and running  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

batch system is up and running Edison batch system is up and running July 25, 2013 (0 Comments) Edison batch system is up and running. Cray benchmark team and NERSC staff have...

24

Data-driven batch schuduling  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

Bent, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denehy, Tim [GOOGLE; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Livny, Miron [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C [NON LANL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Defining the broader, medium and narrow autism phenotype among parents using the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) parent group. 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 28 30 32 34 36 38 40 42 44 46 48 50 AQ score Pe rc en t o f p ar tic ip an ts ASC fathers ASC mothers Figure 2 Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ) scores in the control parent group. 0 1 2 3 4... with normal adults, and adults with Asperger Syndrome or High-Functioning autism. J Child Psychol Psychiatry 2001, 42:241-252. 37. Golan O, Baron-Cohen S, Hill J: The Cambridge Mindreading (CAM) Face- Voice Battery: Testing complex emotion recognition...

Wheelwright, Sally; Auyeung, Bonnie; Allison, Carrie; Baron-Cohen, Simon

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

Standard Seawater Comparison of Some Recent Batches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparison experiment results of the standard seawater (SSW) were presented for batches P90, P100, P104, P106, P108 P111, and P112. This work shows that the SSW batch-to-batch agreement was recently improved. The adjusted mean differences ...

Yasushi Takatsuki; Michio Aoyama; Toshiya Nakano; Haruo Miyagi; Toshihiro Ishihara; Toshiya Tsutsumida

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Batch-oriented software appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents AppPot, a system for creating Linux software appliances. AppPot can be run as a regular batch or grid job and executed in user space, and requires no special virtualization support in the infrastructure. The main design goal of AppPot is to bring the benefits of a virtualization-based IaaS cloud to existing batch-oriented computing infrastructures. In particular, AppPot addresses the application deployment and configuration on large heterogeneous computing infrastructures: users are enabled to prepare their own customized virtual appliance for providing a safe execution environment for their applications. These appliances can then be executed on virtually any computing infrastructure being in a private or public cloud as well as any batch-controlled computing clusters the user may have access to. We give an overview of AppPot and its features, the technology that makes it possible, and report on experiences running it in production use within the Swiss National Grid infrastructure SMSCG.

Murri, Riccardo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Google matrix 1 Google matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google matrix 1 Google matrix Fig.1. Google matrix of Wikipedia articles network, written [19]) A Google matrix is a particular stochastic matrix that is used by Google's PageRank algorithm be generated iteratively from the Google matrix using the power method. However, in order for the power method

Shepelyansky, Dima

29

Google matrix 1 Google matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google matrix 1 Google matrix A Google matrix is a particular stochastic matrix that is used by Google's PageRank algorithm. The matrix represents a graph with edges representing links between pages. The rank of each page can be generated iteratively from the Google matrix using the power method. However

Shepelyansky, Dima

30

Adding coal dust to coal batch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

New Precision Measurements of Deuteron Structure Function A(Q) at Low Momentum Transfer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differences between previous measurements of low momentum transfer electron-deuteron elastic scattering prevent a clean determination of even the sign of the leading low momentum transfer relativistic corrections, or of the convergence of chiral perturbation theory. We have attempted to resolve this issue with a new high-precision measurement in Jefferson Lab Hall A. Elastic electron scattering was measured on targets of tantalum, carbon, hydrogen, and deuterium at beam energy of 685 MeV. The four-momentum transfer covered the range of 0.15 - 0.7 GeV. The experiment included a new beam calorimeter, to better calibrate the low beam currents used in the experiment, and new collimators to better define the spectrometer solid angles. We obtained cross sections of deuteron as ratios to hydrogen cross sections. A fit function of B(Q) world data is newly made and subtracted from cross sections to find values of A(Q).

Byungwuek Lee

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Pulping lignocellulose in continuous pressurized batch digesters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A batch process to produce kraft pulp is described, in which a combination of black and white liquor is used for cooking of wood chips. In the process, the steam consumption to produce 357 tons/day pulp at 50% yield was approximately 1600 lb/ton pulp, compared with 4000 lb/ton for a batch digester of conventional type.

Green, F.B.

1980-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

33

Scheduling a capacitated batch-processing machine to minimize makespan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims at improving the utilization of a single batch-processing machine. The batch-processing machine can process a batch of jobs, as long as the number of jobs and the total size of all the jobs in a batch do not violate the machine's capacity. ... Keywords: Batch processing, Mathematical modeling, Scheduling, Simulated annealing

Purushothaman Damodaran; Krishnaswami Srihari; Sarah S. Lam

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Melting of foaming batches: Nuclear waste glass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model is presented for the rate of melting of a batch blanket in an electric glassmelting furnace. The melting process is assumed to be jointly controlled by the heat transfer from the pool of molten glass and the batch-to-glass conversion kinetics. Factors affecting the melting rate in the conversion-controlled regime are discussed. Attention is paid to gas evolution from redox reactions in waste glass batches and component accumulation within the blanket. It is suggested that the high rate of the blanket-free melting in a mechanically agitated furnace is made possible by increasing the rate of melt surface renewal. 27 refs.

Hrma, P.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Temporary camps at drill hole U19aq on Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office, has proposed a nuclear test at drill hole U19aq (902100N/585000E, Nevada Coordinate System, Central Zone) on Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the DOE/NV had the Quatenary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute, identify and evaluate the potential effects of this activity on cultural resources. To determine the nature of cultural resources in the area, DRI conducted a Class III intensive archaeological survey of an approximately 1-km{sup 2} area around the drill hole. That survey, conducted in June 1985, located and recorded 20 archaeological sites. Two of those sites, interpreted as temporary camps of ancient hunters and gatherers, covered an extensive portion of the area proposed for nuclear testing. Half the sites were small concentrations of artifacts or isolated artifacts and were collected at the time of their discovery and 10 sites were left in place. Those sites were in danger of being adversely affected by the land-disturbing activities proposed at the drill hole. In August and September 1985, DRI conducted limited test excavations (15 test units) at those sites to further evaluate their scientific significance and to provide information that could be used in designing a plan for data recovery.

Pippin, L.C.; Reno, R.L.; Henton, G.H.; Hemphill, M.; Lockett, C.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Temporary camps at drill hole U19aq on Pahute Mesa, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Nevada Field Office, has proposed a nuclear test at drill hole U19aq (902100N/585000E, Nevada Coordinate System, Central Zone) on Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. In compliance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act, the DOE/NV had the Quatenary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute, identify and evaluate the potential effects of this activity on cultural resources. To determine the nature of cultural resources in the area, DRI conducted a Class III intensive archaeological survey of an approximately 1-km[sup 2] area around the drill hole. That survey, conducted in June 1985, located and recorded 20 archaeological sites. Two of those sites, interpreted as temporary camps of ancient hunters and gatherers, covered an extensive portion of the area proposed for nuclear testing. Half the sites were small concentrations of artifacts or isolated artifacts and were collected at the time of their discovery and 10 sites were left in place. Those sites were in danger of being adversely affected by the land-disturbing activities proposed at the drill hole. In August and September 1985, DRI conducted limited test excavations (15 test units) at those sites to further evaluate their scientific significance and to provide information that could be used in designing a plan for data recovery.

Pippin, L.C.; Reno, R.L.; Henton, G.H.; Hemphill, M.; Lockett, C.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Batch Upload | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Notices » Automated Protocols Notices » Automated Protocols Batch Upload Print page Print page Email page Email page One option for electronically submitting AN 241.1 data is Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI). This method allows sites to upload metadata in a batch XML file at any time. The uploaded XML file is formatted according to the requirements of OSTI's XML. The Batch Upload process allows sites to export data from existing databases and upload it to OSTI. The process is customized for the submitting site. Full text documents can also be uploaded. Sites choose how often and how many records each file will contain. Sites also choose whether to include in the metadata a URL to the site-hosted full text or an uploaded full text. Unclassified documents with CUI access limitations MUST be input to E-Link via the Web Announcement Notice 241.1.

38

Running Jobs with the UGE Batch System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jobs Jobs Running Jobs Submitting Jobs How to submit your job to the UGE. Read More » Running with Java Solutions to some of the common problems users have with running on Genepool when the JVM is part of their workflow. Read More » Batch Script Examples Sample batch scripts for Genepool/Phoebe highlighting queue selection, setting the run time and requesting large amounts of memory. Read More » Interactive Jobs How to run your workflow on the interactive nodes. Read More » Job Arrays Job arrays are a way to efficiently submit large numbers of jobs. Read More » Parallel Batch Scripts This page has examples of how to run parallel jobs on Genepool. Read More » Best Practices - and Practices to Avoid Things users should do to run jobs efficiently using UGE. Read More »

39

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We would like to encourage you to use...

40

A SEARCH FOR OB ASSOCIATIONS NEAR SOUTHERN LONG-PERIOD CEPHEIDS. V. AQ PUPPIS AND V620 PUPPIS  

SciTech Connect

A photometric UBV survey is presented for 610 stars in a region surrounding the Cepheid AQ Puppis and centered southwest of the variable, based upon photoelectric measures for 14 stars and calibrated iris photometry of photographic plates of the field for 596 stars. An analysis of reddening and distance for program stars indicates that the major dust complex in this direction is {approx}1.8 kpc distant, producing differential extinction described by a ratio of total-to-selective extinction of R = A{sub V} /E{sub B-V} = 3.10 {+-} 0.20. Zero-age main-sequence fitting for the main group of B-type stars along the line of sight yields a distance of 3.21 {+-} 0.19 kpc (V{sub 0} - M{sub V} = 12.53 {+-} 0.13 s.e.). The 29fd97 Cepheid AQ Pup, of field reddening E{sub B-V} = 0.47 {+-} 0.07 (E{sub B-V}(B0) = 0.51 {+-} 0.07), appears to be associated with B-type stars lying within 5' of it as well as with a sparse group of stars, designated Turner 14, centered south of it at J2000.0 = 07:58:37, -29:25:00, with a mean reddening of E{sub B-V} = 0.81 {+-} 0.01. AQ Pup has an inferred luminosity as a cluster member of (M{sub V} ) = -5.40 {+-} 0.25 and an evolutionary age of 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} yr. Its observed rate of period increase of +300.1 {+-} 1.2 s yr{sup -1} is an order of magnitude larger than what is observed for Cepheids of comparable period in the third crossing of the instability strip, and may be indicative of a high rate of mass loss or a putative fifth crossing. Another sparse cluster, designated Turner 13, surrounds the newly recognized 2fd59 Cepheid V620 Pup, of space reddening E{sub B-V} = 0.64 {+-} 0.02 (E{sub B-V}(B0) = 0.68 {+-} 0.02), distance 2.88 {+-} 0.11 kpc (V{sub 0} - M{sub V} 12.30 {+-} 0.08 s.e.), evolutionary age 10{sup 8} yr, and an inferred luminosity as a likely cluster member of (M{sub V}) = -2.74 {+-} 0.11. V620 Pup is tentatively identified as a first crosser, pending additional observations.

Turner, D. G.; Majaess, D. J. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, Saint Mary's University, Halifax, NS B3H 3C3 (Canada); Van den Bergh, S.; Younger, P. F. [Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC V8X 4M6 (Canada); Pedreros, M. H. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Tarapaca, Casilla 7-D, Arica (Chile); Berdnikov, L. N., E-mail: turner@ap.smu.ca [Moscow M. V. Lomonosov State University, Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Classification of Weather Patterns and Associated Trajectories of High-Ozone Episodes in the HoustonGalvestonBrazoria Area during the 2005/06 TexAQS-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 850-hPa synoptic flow patterns over eastern Texas and adjacent states during the 2005/06 Second Texas Air Quality Studies (TexAQS-II) period were classified into six groups using a two-stage clustering method. This study identifies synoptic ...

Fong Ngan; Daewon Byun

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Effect Of Batch Charging Equipment On Glass Furnace Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effects of batch pattern in the melt space caused by charging equipment on the energy efficiency of the furnace focusing on the...

43

Exploration of supercritical water gasification of biomass using batch reactor .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this study is on gasification of a biomass in supercritical water. Vapor mass yield in a batch reactor after 20 minutes in (more)

Venkitasamy, Chandrasekar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Better Mini-Batch Algorithms via Accelerated Gradient Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Better Mini-Batch Algorithms via Accelerated Gradient Methods Andrew Cotter Toyota Technological Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago nati@ttic.edu Karthik Sridharan Toyota Technological Institute

45

Batch Queue Configuration and Policies on Franklin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Policies Queues and Job Scheduling Jobs must be submitted to a valid Submit Queue. Upon submission the job is routed to the appropriate Torque execution class. Users can not directly access the Torque execution classes. Submit Queue Execution Queue (Do not use in batch script) Nodes Available Processors Max Wallclock Relative Priority (1 being the highest) Run Limit Queued Limit (eligible to run limit) Queue Charge Factor xfer xfer 1 4 6 hrs 3 3 2 1 interactive interactive 1-128 1-512 30 mins 1 1 1 1 debug debug 1-512 1-2,048 30 mins 2 1 1 1 premium premium 1-4,096 1-16,384 24 hrs 4 2 2 2 regular reg_short 1-511 1-2,044 6 hrs 7 12 8 1 reg_small 1-255 1-1,020 48 hrs 7 7 3 1

46

Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements  

SciTech Connect

The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

Mariner, Paul E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

47

Explicit control a batch-aware distributed file system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the design, implementation, and evaluation of the Batch-Aware Distributed File System (BAD-FS), a system designed to orchestrate large, I/O-intensive batch workloads on remote computing clusters distributed across the wide area. BAD-FS consists ...

John Bent; Douglas Thain; Andrea C. Arpaci-Dusseau; Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau; Miron Livny

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Heuristic batching policies for video-on-demand services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A video-on-demand (VOD) service imposes extremely severe resource requirement in terms of bandwidth and storage. Batching policies that use a single channel to serve multiple active clients for the same video program can reduce system resource requirement ... Keywords: Batching policy, Channel allocation, Instantaneous MFQL, Maximum factored queue length, Rate-based, Regular-interval, Statistical MFQL

J.-K Chen; J. -L. C Wu

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

GALEX AND PAN-STARRS1 DISCOVERY OF SN IIP 2010aq: THE FIRST FEW DAYS AFTER SHOCK BREAKOUT IN A RED SUPERGIANT STAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the early UV and optical light curve of Type IIP supernova (SN) 2010aq at z = 0.0862, and compare it to analytical models for thermal emission following SN shock breakout in a red supergiant star. SN 2010aq was discovered in joint monitoring between the Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) Time Domain Survey (TDS) in the NUV and the Pan-STARRS1 Medium Deep Survey (PS1 MDS) in the g, r, i, and z bands. The GALEX and Pan-STARRS1 observations detect the SN less than 1 day after the shock breakout, measure a diluted blackbody temperature of 31, 000 {+-} 6000 K 1 day later, and follow the rise in the UV/optical light curve over the next 2 days caused by the expansion and cooling of the SN ejecta. The high signal-to-noise ratio of the simultaneous UV and optical photometry allows us to fit for a progenitor star radius of 700 {+-} 200R {sub sun}, the size of a red supergiant star. An excess in UV emission two weeks after shock breakout compared with SNe well fitted by model atmosphere-code synthetic spectra with solar metallicity is best explained by suppressed line blanketing due to a lower metallicity progenitor star in SN 2010aq. Continued monitoring of PS1 MDS fields by the GALEX TDS will increase the sample of early UV detections of Type II SNe by an order of magnitude and probe the diversity of SN progenitor star properties.

Gezari, S.; Huber, M. E.; Grav, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Rest, A.; Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 20138 (United States); Forster, K.; Neill, J. D.; Martin, D. C. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Valenti, S.; Smartt, S. J. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Maths and Physics, Queen's University, BT7 1NN, Belfast (United Kingdom); Chornock, R.; Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mattila, S.; Kankare, E. [Tuorla Observatory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Turku, Fl-21500, Piikkioe (Finland); Burgett, W. S.; Chambers, K. C.; Dombeck, T.; Heasley, J. N.; Hodapp, K. W., E-mail: suvi@pha.jhu.ed [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Simulated Annealing For The Optimization Of Chemical Batch Production Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Batch distillation processes are widely used in chemical industry. In this work, we consider the optimization of such processes by simulated annealing. Although this method is stochastically in nature, it has two evitable advantages: it can be readily connected to highly sophisticated simulation codes and it converges towards a global optimum. According to the characteristics of batch distillation operation we propose to use a two-step computation approach. A feasible strategy (admissible control) will be searched for in the first step and it will be optimized in the second step. The approach has been applied to three models of batch distillation ranging from a simple test example to a real production system. These results show the potential of the method for developing optimal operation strategies for batch chemical processes. Keywords: batch distillation, simulated annealing, dynamic optimization. 1 Introduction The determination of optimal control strategies for chemical processe...

Michael Hanke; Pu Li

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

KRUGER AA; HRMA P

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tabu search heuristic for two-machine flowshop with batch processing machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch processing machines are frequently encountered in many industrial environments. A batch processing machine is one which can process several jobs simultaneously as a batch. The processing time of a batch is equal to the largest processing time of ... Keywords: Batch processing machines, Flowshop, MILP model, Tabu search

Li-Man Liao; Ching-Jen Huang

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

FRIT DEVELOPMENT FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) evaluated a large number of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) composition projections to support frit optimization for SB6 vitrification at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The evaluations discussed in this report occurred over a period of about 4 months, and included about 40 composition projections, developed by both Savannah River Remediation (SRR) and SRNL. Paper study assessments were used to evaluate the sludge composition projections with arrays of potential frit compositions using the predictive models in the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Both nominal sludge compositions and sludge compositions with anticipated compositional variation were considered. The model predictions were used to identify candidate frit compositions for each SB6 projection and to provide some guidance to SRR on washing and blending strategies for SB6 preparation. This report presents a chronological review of this process and summarizes the findings at each stage. Following initial feedback from this work, the number of washes in Tank 51 was reduced to increase the projected sodium concentration in SB6. Analyses of predicted frit performance before and after a potential decant of Tank 40 showed that the post-decant SB6 composition would be difficult to process with any frit composition and that this scenario should be avoided. Based on the most recent SB6 projections (February 2010 SB6 composition projections developed at SRNL using the measured SB6 qualification sample composition and the revised Tank Farm washing plan), Frit 418 appears to be viable for SB6 processing at a target waste loading of 36%. A Nominal Stage PCCS Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) assessment gave projected operating windows of 25-41% waste loading, limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization. The projected operating window is reduced to 25-38% waste loading when anticipated compositional variation is considered, again limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization. Blend points between 62 and 40 inches of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) heel in Tank 40 had no practical impact on the projected performance of Frit 418. This assessment is made from a paper study approach only and assumes that no decant of Tank 40 will occur during SB6 processing. A decant of Tank 40 would reduce the Na2O concentration in Tank 40 to a point where it would be very difficult to target a waste loading of 36% for SB6 with Frit 418. The performance of Frit 418 with SB6 is limited by predictions of nepheline crystallization, which is a durability limiting constraint. Alternatives to Frit 418 are available that can provide equivalent projected operating windows and are limited by process related constraints (i.e., liquidus temperature predictions) rather than durability limiting constraints. A separate memorandum has recently been issued that discusses the use of Frit 418 for SB6 vitrification.1 potential differences in melt rate among these alternative frits will be discussed in a forthcoming technical report.

Fox, K.; Edwards, T.; Zamecnik, J.

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 Your Unanswered Questions.... Answered - Batch 2 February 28, 2011 - 2:46pm Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs Last month, Secretary Chu hosted an online town hall to discuss President Obama's clean energy innovation agenda -- and while he was able to answer about 10 questions submitted online during the event, we received more than 200! For the next fews days, we're answering some of the ones Secretary Chu wasn't able to get to that day. Below is our second batch of questions and answers. From John Fahey over Facebook: How can we create a predictable investment environment for the renewable sector? President Obama's proposal to generate 80 percent of electricity from

55

Effect of Batch Initial Velocity on the Glass Furnace Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a direct coloration between the batch distribution techniques and the furnace ... A Review: Solar Thermal Reactors for Materials Production ... Cellulose Acetate Membranes for CO2 Separation from Water-gas-shift Reaction Products.

56

Jordan Matrix Decomposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which states that an arbitrary square matrix M over an algebraically closed field can be decomposed into the form M = SJS ?1 where S is an invertible matrix and J is a matrix in a Jordan canonical form, i.e. a special type of block diagonal matrix in which each block consists of Jordan blocks (see [13]).

Karol P?k

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass regardless of thermal history. All of the normalized boron releases were less than 1 g/L. While all of the targeted glass compositions were predictable with respect to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, a small number of the measured glass compositions were located outside of the lower prediction limit indicating poorer durability than what was actually measured. These unpredictable glasses were in the same lithium metaborate (LM) preparation block during the chemical analyses, which resulted in measured compositions that were not representative of the target compositions. A review of the data did not indicate a clear cause for the problem. Re-digestion and re-measurement of three glasses from this preparation block yielded glass compositions closer to the target values and predicted PCT responses within the PCCS model uncertainty. Therefore, it is believed that the glasses were correctly fabricated and the targeted compositions are closer representations of the true compositions. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable for the SB6/Frit 418 glass system. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable and/or acceptable with respect to the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the inclusion of ThO{sub 2} was shown to have minimal impact on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

59

Selenite Reduction by a Denitrifying Culture: Batch- and Packed-Bed- Reactor Studies  

SciTech Connect

Selenite reduction by a bacterial consortium enriched from an oil refinery waste sludge was studied under denitrifying conditions using acetate as the electron donor. Fed-batch studies with nitrate as the primary electron acceptor showed that accumulation of nitrite led to a decrease in the extent of selenite reduction. Also, when nitrite was added as the primary electron acceptor, rapid selenite reduction was observed only after nitrite was significantly depleted from the medium. These results indicate that selenite reduction was inhibited at high nitrite concentrations. In addition to batch experiments, continuous flow selenite reduction experiments were performed in packed-bed columns using immobilized enrichment cultures. These experiments were carried out in three phases: In phase-I, a continuous nitrate feed with different inlet selenite concentration was applied; in phase-II, nitrate was fed in a pulsed fashion; and in phase-III, nitrate was fed in a continuous mode but at much lower concentrations than the other two phases. During the phase-I experiments, little selenite was removed from the influent. However, when the column was operated in the pulse feed strategy (phase II), or in the continuous mode with low nitrate levels (phase-III), significant quantities of selenium was removed from solution and retained in the immobilization matrix in the column. Thus, immobilized denitrifying cultures can be effective in removing selenium from waste streams, but nitrate-limited operating conditions might be required.

William A. Apel; Sridhar Viamajala; Yared Bereded-Samuel; James N. Petersen

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Scheduling a hybrid flowshop with batch production at the last stage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the problem of scheduling n jobs in an s-stage hybrid flowshop with batch production at the last stage with the objective of minimizing a given criterion with respect to the completion time. The batch production at stage s is ... Keywords: Batch decoupling, Batch production, Hybrid flowshop scheduling, Improved dynamic programming, Lagrangian relaxation

Hua Xuan; Lixin Tang

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Evaluation of neural networks-based controllers in batch polymerisation of methyl methacrylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of batch reactors in today's process industries cannot be overstated. Thus said, it is important to optimise their operation in order to consistently achieve products of high quality while minimising the production of undesirables. In ... Keywords: Batch polymerisation, Batch reactor control, Batch reactor optimisation

E. E. Ekpo; I. M. Mujtaba

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hybrid matrix geometric algebra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structures of matrix algebra and geometric algebra are completely compatible and in many ways complimentary, each having their own advantages and disadvantages. We present a detailed study of the hybrid 2 2 matrix geometric algebra M(2,IG) ...

Garret Sobczyk; Gordon Erlebacher

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Carbonate fuel cell matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

Farooque, Mohammad (Huntington, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fuzzy logic control of batch-feeding refuse incineration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The municipal solid waste (MSW) or refuse incineration plant is designated to reduce the volume of the refuse and recover energy from it. The steam generated from a boiler heated by burning refuse is sent to a turbine to generate the electricity. Batch-feeding ... Keywords: Singapore, Ulu Pandan refuse incineration plant, batch-feeding refuse incineration, boiler, boilers, combustion, complete combustion, electricity generation, energy recovery, flow control, fuzzy control, fuzzy logic control, grate rotating rates, incomplete combustion, municipal solid waste plant, rule-base fuzzy logic control algorithms, steam flow rate, steam power stations, uncertain fluctuation, waste disposal, waste-to-energy power plants

Desong Chen

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Nanocrystal doped matrixes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

Parce, J. Wallace (Palo Alto, CA); Bernatis, Paul (Sunnyvale, CA); Dubrow, Robert (San Carlos, CA); Freeman, William P. (San Mateo, CA); Gamoras, Joel (Vallejo, CA); Kan, Shihai (San Jose, CA); Meisel, Andreas (Redwood City, CA); Qian, Baixin (Sunnyvale, CA); Whiteford, Jeffery A. (Belmont, CA); Ziebarth, Jonathan (Palo Alto, CA)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

An Evaluation of Some Recent Batches of IAPSO Standard Seawater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine changes in the salinity of the International Association for the Physical Sciences of the Ocean standard seawater (SSW) as used in seven cruises between 1991 and 1997. Ten batches of SSW were used during this timeseveral more ...

Sheldon Bacon; Helen M. Snaith; Margaret J. Yelland

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

69

Metal Matrix Composites - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

METAL- MATRIX COMPOSITES UNDER MULTI- AXIAL LOADINGS: M. V. S. Ravisankar ... including the values of the stress exponent and the activation energy.

70

Rapid Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Batch Characterization Batch Characterization of Coal Utilization By-Products Peter A. Hesbach 1 *, Alexander S. P. Abel 2 Ann G. Kim 3 , and Steven C. Lamey 4 1 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, P.O. Box 880, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 USA; 2 NETL Site Support Contractor, Parsons, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26505 USA; 3 U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory Post-Doctoral Fellow, 626 Cochrans Mill Road, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 USA; 4 retired, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV USA (* author for correspondence, phone: 304-285-4443, fax: 304-285-4487, e-mail: peter.hesbach@netl.doe.gov) KEYWORDS: leaching methods, ash characterization, coal utilization by-products

71

Dynamic scheduling II: look-ahead strategies for controlling batch operations in industry an overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batching jobs in a manufacturing system is a very common policy in most industries. Main reasons for batching are avoidance of set ups and/or facilitation of material handling. Examples of batch-wise production systems are ovens found in aircraft industry ...

Durk-Jouke van der Zee

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

Stone, M; David Best, D

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Modelling and optimisation of batch distillation involving esterification and hydrolysis reaction systems. Modelling and optimisation of conventional and unconventional batch distillation process: Application to esterification of methanol and ethanol using acetic acid and hydrolysis of methyl lactate system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Batch distillation with chemical reaction when takes place in the same unit is referred to as batch reactive distillation process. The combination reduces the capital (more)

Edreder, Elmahboub A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industrys energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

75

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

SciTech Connect

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industrys energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

76

Batch Preheat for glass and related furnace processing operations  

SciTech Connect

The objectives that our development work addressed are: (1) Establish through lab tests a salt eutectic with a melting point of about 250 F and a working range of 250 to 1800 F. (2) Establish the most economical material of construction for the screened salt eutectics identified in the first objective. (3) Establish the material of construction for the salt heater liner. Objectives 2 and 3 were determined through corrosion tests using selected metallurgical samples. Successful completion of the above-stated goals will be incorporated in a heat recovery design that can be used in high temperature processes and furnaces, typical of which is the glass melting process. The process design incorporates the following unit operations: a vertical batch heater (whereby the batch flows down through tubes in a shell and tube exchanger; a molten salt eutectic is circulated on the shell side); a molten salt heater utilizing furnace flue gas in a radiation type heater (molten salt is circulated in the annular space between the inner and outer shells of the vertical heater, and flue gas passes from the furnace exhaust through the inner shell of the heater); a cantilever type molten salt circulating pump; and a jacketed mixer/conveyor to drive off moisture from the batch prior to feeding the batch to the vertical batch heater. Historically, radiation heaters, when applied to glass or fiberglass furnace recuperation, have experienced failures due to uneven heat flux rates, which increases internal stresses and spot overheating conditions. Low heat transfer coefficients result in requirements for large heat transfer surface areas in gas to gas or gas to air exchangers. Fouling is another factor that results in lower unit availability and reduced performance. These factors are accommodated in this process by the incorporation of several design features. The salt heater will be a vertical double wall radiation design, similar to radiation air heaters used in high temperature heat recovery. The unit utilizes an inner shell that the furnace exhaust gas passes through: this provides essentially a self-cleaning surface. Utilization of radiation air heaters in fiberglass furnaces has demonstrated that the inner shell provides a surface from which molten ash can drain down. The molten salt eutectic will be pumped through the annulus between this inner wall and the outer wall of the unit. The annular space tempering via the molten salt will promote more uniform expansion for the unit, and thereby promote more uniform heat flux rates. Heat transfer would be via radiation mainly, with a minor convective contributor.

Energy & Environmental Resources, Inc

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hybrid matrix amplifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Matrix DWT 869  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The model is shown below. ... MatrixMarket format file: dwt__869.mtx.gz (7134 bytes); Compressed Harwell-Boeing format file: dwt__869.psa.gz (6672 ...

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

79

Matrix DWT 59  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The model is shown below. ... MatrixMarket format file: dwt___59.mtx.gz (417 bytes); Compressed Harwell-Boeing format file: dwt___59.psa.gz (500 ...

2004-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

80

Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 29, 2013... of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir Casting Route: Anne Zulfia1; Maman Ajiriyanto1; 1University of Indonesia

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Efficient Sparse Matrix-Matrix Products Using Colorings | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient Sparse Matrix-Matrix Products Using Colorings Efficient Sparse Matrix-Matrix Products Using Colorings Title Efficient Sparse Matrix-Matrix Products Using Colorings Publication Type Journal Year of Publication 2013 Authors McCourt, M, Smith, BF, Zhang, H Other Numbers ANL/MCS-P5007-0813 Abstract Sparse matrix-matrix products appear in multigrid solvers and computational methods for graph theory. Some formulations of these products require the inner product of two sparse vectors, which have inefficient use of cache memory. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for computing sparse matrix-matrix products by exploiting matrix nonzero structure through the process of graph coloring. We prove the validity of this technique in general and demonstrate its viability for multigrid methods used to solve three-dimensional boundary value problems.

82

TQP Qualifying Official Training Approaches Matrix | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Matrix TQP Qualifying Official Training Approaches Matrix Matrix of DOE Technical Qualification Program Qualifying Official Approaches DOE Qualifying Official Approach Matrix More...

83

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

84

An Abstract Model of VHS Case Study 1 (Experimental Batch Plant)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we describe the verification of safety properties for the experimental batch plant of case study 1 using the model checker SMV.

Ur Informatik; Und Praktische Mathematik; Lehrstuhl F; Ben Lukoschus; Ben Lukoschus

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

WRF/Chem-MADRID: Incorporation of an Improved Aerosol Module into WRF/Chem and Its Initial Application to the TexAQS2000 Episode  

SciTech Connect

The Model of Aerosol Dynamics, Reaction, Ionization and Dissolution (MADRID) with three improved gas/particle mass transfer approaches (i.e., bulk equilibrium (EQUI), hybrid (HYBR), and kinetic (KINE)) has been incorporated into the Weather Research and Forecast/Chemistry Model (WRF/Chem) (referred to as WRF/Chem-MADRID) and evaluated with a 5-day episode from the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study (TexAQS2000). WRF/Chem-MADRID demonstrates an overall good skill in simulating surface/aloft meteorological parameters and chemical concentrations, tropospheric O3 residuals, and aerosol optical depths. The discrepancies can be attributed to inaccuracies in meteorological predictions (e.g., overprediction in mid-day boundary layer height), inaccurate total emissions or their hourly variations (e.g., HCHO, olefins, other inorganic aerosols), and uncertainties in initial and boundary conditions for some species (e.g., other inorganic aerosols and O3) at surface and aloft. Major differences in the results among the three gas/particle mass transfer approaches occur over coastal areas, where EQUI predicts higher PM2.5 than HYBR and KINE due to improperly redistributing condensed nitrate from chloride depletion process to fine PM mode. The net direct, semi-direct, and indirect effects of PM2.5 decreased domain wide shortwave radiation by 11.2-14.4 W m-2 (or 4.1-5.6%), decreased near-surface temperature by 0.06-0.14 C (or 0.2-0.4%), led to 125 to 796 cm-3 cloud condensation nuclei at a supersaturation of 0.1%, produced cloud droplet numbers as high as 2064 cm-3, and reduced domain wide mean precipitation by 0.22-0.59 mm day-1.

Zhang, Yang; Pan, Ying; Wang, K.; Fast, Jerome D.; Grell, G. A.

2010-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

86

EFFICIENT SPARSE MATRIX-MATRIX PRODUCTS USING COLORINGS MICHAEL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EFFICIENT EFFICIENT SPARSE MATRIX-MATRIX PRODUCTS USING COLORINGS MICHAEL MCCOURT ∗ , BARRY SMITH ∗ , AND HONG ZHANG ∗ Abstract. Sparse matrix-matrix products appear in multigrid solvers and computational methods for graph theory. Some formulations of these products require the inner product of two sparse vectors, which have inefficient use of cache memory. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm for computing sparse matrix-matrix products by exploiting matrix nonzero structure through the process of graph coloring. We prove the validity of this technique in general and demonstrate its viability for multigrid methods used to solve three-dimensional boundary value problems. 1. Introduction. Matrix-matrix multiplication is a fundamental linear algebra operation [4]. The operation of concern in this work is C = AB T , which arises in algebraic multigrid and certain graph algorithms.

87

A real-time warehouse operations planning system for small batch replenishment problems in production environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A factory consists of numerous production workstations, multiple production lines and many production floors. Due to the characteristics of just-in-time and make-to-order mode manufacturing, small batches of production materials are required for production ... Keywords: Genetic algorithm (GA), Radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, Small batch replenishment problem

T. C. Poon; K. L. Choy; F. T. S. Chan; G. T. S. Ho; A. Gunasekaran; H. C. W. Lau; H. K. H. Chow

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Single-machine batch delivery scheduling with an assignable common due date and controllable processing times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider single-machine batch delivery scheduling with an assignable common due date and controllable processing times, which vary as a convex function of the amounts of a continuously divisible common resource allocated to individual jobs. Finished ... Keywords: Batch delivery, Common due date, Resource allocation, Scheduling

Yunqiang Yin, T. C. E. Cheng, Shuenn-Ren Cheng, Chin-Chia Wu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Clause Matrix Part 1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

23 23 K Clause Matrix for Department Of Energy Management and Operating Contracts Part I - FAR Clauses (Thru FAC 05-08 and DEAR Final Rule dated November 25, 2005) (1/10/2006) KEY: R = Required A = Required when applicable O = Optional M&O = Management and Operating contract UCF = Uniform Contract Format General instruction: Set forth below are clauses prescribed in FAR Part 52 (identified in the FAR Matrix for use in CR R&D, CR SVC, or CR CON contracts) which are to be used in DOE M&O contracts. This listing does not include solicitation provisions. FAR Clause Number Title Secondary DEAR Clause Citation M&O For Profit M&O Non- Profit UCF Prescribed In FAR Prescription/Notes 52.202-1 Definitions

90

REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), high sulfate concentrations in the feed are a concern to DWPF as it can lead to the formation of a detrimental, sulfate-rich, molten salt phase on the surface of the glass melt pool. To avoid these issues, a sulfate concentration limit was implemented into the Product Composition Control System (PCCS). Related to SB7a frit development efforts, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) assessed the viability of using the current 0.6 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit set for SB6 (in glass) and the possibility of increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} solubility limit in PCCS to account for anticipated sulfur concentrations, targeted waste loadings, and inclusion of secondary streams (e.g., Actinide Removal Process (ARP)) with two recommended frits (Frit 418 and Frit 702) for SB7a processing. For a nominal SB7a blend with a 63 inch SB6 heel remaining in Tank 40 (projection SB7a-63), a 0.60 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass limit was determined for waste loadings of 34 wt% up to 40 wt% with Frit 418 based on crucible melts with batched chemicals. SRNL also examined the inclusion of ARP for the same blending scenario (SB7a-63-ARP) with Frit 418 and at least a 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} level, and waste loadings of 34 wt% to 40 wt% were also acceptable. When a visible yellow and/or white sulfate salt layer was visible on the surface of any cooled glass, it was assumed to have surpassed the solubility limit of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for that particular composition. All of the glasses fabricated at these concentrations did not exhibit a sulfate rich salt layer on the surface of the glass melt and retained the majority of the batched SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. At higher levels of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} 'spiked' into the projected sludge compositions over the aforementioned interval of waste loadings, with Frit 418, low viscosity sulfur layers were observed on the surface of glass melts which confirm exceeding the solubility limit. The same sludge scenarios were also tested with Frit 702 and all glasses did not exhibit sulfur layers on the surfaces of the glass melts at spiking levels up to 0.80 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. An ultimate SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit was not defined with Frit 702, but if projected SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations are expected to increase with the onset of SB7a processing, a higher limit is achievable with Frit 702 than is achievable with Frit 418. Given the anticipated concentration of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} for SB7a, a SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} limit of 0.6 wt % SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} is recommended for processing using Frit 418. Once the confirmed SB7a composition is known and should a higher limit be needed, SRNL can re-evaluate the limit based on the actual composition and provide an updated recommendation. It has been observed that higher levels of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass can be retained with compositional changes to the frit, as was demonstrated by the glasses fabricated using Frit 702. SRNL also recommends the continuation of studies to define a more 'global' sulfate concentration limit to account for future sludge batch composition uncertainties.

Billings, A.

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

92

Design, implementation, and operation of a class based batch queue scheduler for VAX/VMS  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab found that the standard VMS batch configuration options were inadequate for the job mix that exists on the Fermilab central computer facility VAX cluster. Accordingly, Fermilab designed and implemented a class based batch queue scheduler. This scheduler makes use of the standard VMS job controller and batch system. Users interact with the scheduler at job submission time by specification of CPU time limits and batch job characteristics. This scheduler allows Fermilab to make efficient use of our large heterogeneous VAX cluster which contains machines ranging from a VAX 780 to a VAX 8800. The scheduler was implemented using the VMS system services $GETQUI and $SNDJBC, without changes to the existing VMS job scheduler. As a result, the scheduler should remain compatible with future VMS versions. This session will discuss the design goals, implementation, and operational experience with Fermilab's class based batch queue scheduler.

Chadwick, K.

1988-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

93

Batch leaching tests: Colloid release and PAH leachability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to assess leaching potential of contaminants from waste, and to provide a test to classify, hazardous waste. It is a batch leaching test where a waste (such as contaminated soil) and an extraction fluid are agitated for a predetermined time. Since TCLP employs an aggressive mixing technique, it is possible that hydrophobic contaminant-laden colloidal fractions may appear as 'dissolved' constituents. In this study, TCLP was employed to determine the leachability of PAH contamination from a coal tar contaminated site. Generated colloids and the apparent aqueous concentrations of naphthalene and phenanthrene were measured at various mixing times in the extraction fluid. A mathematical model was developed that predicted the apparent aqueous contaminant concentration in the filtrate. This model accounted for the presence of colloids in the filtrate, and quantified contaminant desorption from colloids. The fraction of colloid-bound contaminant was predicted to be negligible for naphthalene. However, phenanthrene was predicted to have a significant fraction of the total contaminant in the colloidal phase, while naphthalene was primarily dissolved. The desorption model and PAH desorption data are presented here to determine the extent of colloid-facilitated desorption during leaching tests.

Bergendahl, J. [Worcester Polytechnique Institute, Worcester, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil & Environmental Engineering

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Optimal production and rationing policies of a make-to-stock production system with batch demand and backordering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we consider the stock rationing problem of a single-item make-to-stock production/inventory system with multiple demand classes. Demand arrives as a Poisson process with a randomly distributed batch size. It is assumed that the batch demand ... Keywords: Batch demand, Inventory, Markov decision process, Production, Rationing

Jianjun Xu; Shaoxiang Chen; Bing Lin; Rohit Bhatnagar

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 g/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 C, 27 C, and 32 C there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 51 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Qualification simulant testing was completed to determine appropriate processing conditions and assumptions for the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) Shielded Cells demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet using the qualification sample from Tank 51 for SB6 after SRNL washing. It was found that an acid addition window of 105-139% of the DWPF acid equation (100-133% of the Koopman minimum acid equation) gave acceptable Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) results for nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 117%, 133%, and 150% stoichiometry (Koopman) were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 42 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 150% acid run reached 110% of the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lb H{sub 2}/hr, and the 133% acid run reached 75% of the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lb H{sub 2}/hr. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 25 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two other processing issues were noted. First, incomplete mercury suspension impacted mercury stripping from the SRAT slurry. This led to higher SRAT product mercury concentrations than targeted (>0.45 wt% in the total solids). Associated with this issue was a general difficulty in quantifying the mass of mercury in the SRAT vessel as a function of time, especially as acid stoichiometry increased. About ten times more mercury was found after drying the 150% acid SME product to powder than was indicated by the SME product sample results. Significantly more mercury was also found in the 133% acid SME product samples than was found during the SRAT cycle sampling. It appears that mercury is segregating from the bulk slurry in the SRAT vessel, as mercury amalgam deposits for example, and is not being resuspended by the agitators. The second processing issue was significant ammonium ion formation as the acid stoichiometry was increased due to the high noble metal-high mercury feed conditions. Ammonium ion was found partitioned between the SRAT product slurry and the condensate from the lab-scale off-gas chiller downstream of the SRAT condenser. The ammonium ion was produced from nitrate ion by formic acid. Formate losses increased with increasing acid stoichiometry reaching 40% at the highest stoichiometry tested. About a third of the formate loss at higher acid stoichiometries appeared to be due to ammonia formation. The full extent of ammonia formation was not determined in these tests, since uncondensed ammonia vapor was not quantified; but total formation was bounded by the combined loss of nitrite and nitrate. Nitrate losses during ammonia formation led to nitrite-to-nitrate conversion values that were negative in three of the four tests. The negative results were an artifact of the calculation that assumes negligible SRAT nitrate losses. The sample data after acid addition indicated that some of the initial nitrite was converted to nitrate, so the amount of nitrate destroyed included nitrite converted to nitrate plus some of the added nitrate from the sludge and nitric acid. It is recommended that DWPF investigate the impact of SME product ammonium salts on melter performance (hydrogen, redox). It was recommended that the SB6 Shielded Cells qualification run be performed at 115% acid stoichiometry and allow about 35 hours of boiling for mercury stripping at the equivalent of a 5,000 lb/hr boil-up rate.

Koopman, David; Best, David

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

97

Multi-batch slip stacking in the Main Injector at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The Main Injector (MI) at Fermilab is planning to use multi-batch slip stacking scheme in order to increase the proton intensity at the NuMI target by about a factor of 1.5.[1] [2] By using multi-batch slip stacking, a total of 11 Booster batches are merged into 6, 5 double ones and one single. We have successfully demonstrated the multibatch slip stacking in MI and accelerated a record intensity of 4.6E13 particle per cycle to 120 GeV. The technical issues and beam loss mechanisms for multibatch slip stacking scheme are discussed.

Seiya, K.; Berenc, T.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nano Aluminium and Magnesium Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites ... Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy Application.

99

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts Please use "gres" settings in your batch scripts September 4, 2012 by Helen He (0 Comments) We would like to encourage you to use the generic resources ("gres") setting for various file systems that your batch jobs use. This feature is currently available on Hopper and Carver. The advantage of this setting is that your jobs won't start (thus won't fail) during a scheduled file system maintenance. The syntax for the "gres" setting is: #PBS -l gres=filesystem1[%filesystem2%filesystem3...] (new recommendation) or #PBS -l gres=filesystem1:1[%filesystem2:1%filesystem3:1...] (as announced before) Note that the "%" character means "and". Therefore, if multiple file

100

Analysis of batching strategies for multi-item production with yield uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigate the batch sizing problem for a custom-job production facility. More specifically, given a production system that has been assigned several different types of custom jobs, we try to derive ...

Siow, Christopher (Christopher Shun Yi)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Site Selection for Concrete Batch Plant to Support Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WSRC conducted a site selection study to identify, assess, and rank candidate sites for an onsite concrete batch plant at the Savannah River Site in the vicinity of F-Area.

Wike, L.D.

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Original papers EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures 800C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B 2O 3, CaO, Li 2O, MgO, and Na 2O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

Pavel Hrma; Michael J. Schweiger; Carissa J. Humrickhouse; J. Adam Moody; Rachel M. Tate; Timothy T. Rainsdon; Nathan E. Tegrotenhuis; Benjamin M. Arrigoni; Jos Marcial; Carmen P. Rodriguez; Benjamin H. Tincher

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Technology Deployment Matrix Improvements - Updates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory September 15, 2011 2 | Interagency Technology Deployment Working Group eere.energy.gov Technology Deployment Matrix Improvement Efforts 1. Develop criteria for...

104

Advances in Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon Nanofiber Reinforced Polymer Derived Ceramic Nanocomposites ... Crack Growth, Modeling of Fracture Resistance, and Designing Ceramic Matrix ... Electromagnetic Mechanical Apparatus for Non-contact High Temperature...

105

TANK 40 FINAL SLUDGE BATCH 8 CHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon? vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass ? 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma ? atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma ? mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

Bannochie, C.

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-02_Rios-Armstrong_SRS Experience Preparing Salt Batches.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience Savannah River Site (SRS) Experience with Preparing Salt Batches Presentation to: EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Date: November 17 th , 2010 Author: Maria A. Rios-Armstrong Position: Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Process Engineering Lead Savannah River Remediation SRR-SPT-2010-00222 Print Close 2 Agenda * SRS Composite Inventory * Salt Processing * SRS Liquid Waste System * Background * Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batches - ISDP Salt Batch 1 - ISDP Salt Batch 2 - ISDP Salt Batch 3 - ISDP Salt Batch 4 * Future Salt Batches * Summary * Questions Print Close 3 SRS Composite Inventory Saltcake Sludge Volume 37.1 Million Gallons (Mgal) Curies 183 MCi (52%) 169 MCi (48%) 352 Million Curies (MCi) 171 MCi (49%) Sludge 34.2 Mgal (92%) 2.9 Mgal (8%) 18.4 Mgal (49%) Inventory values as of 2010-06-30

107

SULFATE SOLUBILITY LIMIT VERIFICATION FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to determine a sulfate solubility limit in glass for Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). The SB7b composition projection provided by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) on May 25, 2011 was used as the basis for formulating glass compositions to determine the sulfate limit. Additions of Na{sub 2}O to the projected sludge composition were made by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) due to uncertainty in the final concentration of Na{sub 2}O for SB7b, which is dependent on washing effectiveness and the potential need to add NaOH to ensure an acceptable projected operating window. Additions of 4, 6, and 8 wt % Na{sub 2}O were made to the nominal May 25, 2011 composition projection. An updated SB7b composition projection was received from SRR on August 4, 2011. Due to compositional similarities, no additional experimental work using the August 4, 2011 compositions was considered to be necessary for this study. Both Frit 418 and Frit 702 were included in this study. The targeted sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) concentrations of the study glasses were selected within the range of 0.6 to 0.9 wt % in glass. A total of 52 glass compositions were selected based on the compositional variables of Na{sub 2}O addition, Actinide Removal Process (ARP) stream addition, waste loading, frit composition, and sulfate concentration. The glasses were batched, melted, and characterized following SRNL procedures. Visual observations were recorded for each glass after it cooled and used as in indicator of sulfur retention. Representative samples of each of the glasses fabricated were subjected to chemical analysis to determine whether the targeted compositions were met, as well as to determine the quantity of sulfate that was retained after melting. In general, the measured composition data showed that there were only minor issues in meeting the targeted compositions for the study glasses, and the measured sulfate concentrations for each study glass were within 10% of the targeted values. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 418 showed an apparent trend of increasing sulfate retention with increasing Na{sub 2}O additions to the 5/25/11 sludge projection. This trend appears contradictory to other recent studies of sulfate retention in Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) type glasses. Additional apparent contradictions to this trend were found in the data collected in the present study. Overall, the results for the SB7b sulfate study glasses with Frit 418 and the 5/25/11 projection with Na{sub 2}O additions showed that subtle changes in this complex glass composition impacted the degree of sulfate retention. These results do however provide confidence that a 0.6 wt % sulfate limit in glass is warranted for Frit 418 with the SB7b compositions evaluated in this study. The results for the SB7b glasses fabricated with Frit 702 are consistent with those of the previous SB7a study in that Frit 702 allowed for higher sulfate retention as compared to Frit 418 for the same sludge compositions. It is recommended that the DWPF implement a sulfate concentration limit of 0.6 wt % in glass for SB7b processing with Frit 418. If a higher than projected sulfate concentration is measured when SB7b processing begins (i.e., if a sulfate concentration higher than 0.6 wt % becomes necessary to achieve targeted waste loadings), DWPF should consider a transition to Frit 702. The sulfate limit could likely be raised to 0.8 wt % by transitioning to this frit. However, if DWPF considers transitioning from Frit 418 to Frit 702, additional glasses should be fabricated to confirm this higher limit due to the issues with incorrect B{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations for some of the glasses made with Frit 702 in this study. There are several factors other than sulfate retention that must also be carefully considered prior to changing frit compositions.

Fox, K.

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

Materials - Recycling - Polymer Matrix Composites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recycling of Polymer Matrix Composites Recycling of Polymer Matrix Composites Polymer matrix composites Carbon fibers recovered from a epoxy-based polymer matrix composite. Carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites (PMCs) are materials with superior strength-to-weight ratios. Finding increased applications in the aerospace industry, PMCs are now being evaluated for possible use in automobile construction. The material’s high cost, however, along with concerns about whether the PMCs will be recyclable when the vehicles reach the end of their useful lives, are barriers to its widespread use. With funding provided by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Vehicle Technologies Program (formerly called the Office of Advanced Transportation Technologies), Argonne is developing an efficient and cost-effective

109

Approximation of Matrix Rank Function and Its Application to Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frobenius norm, nuclear norm for matrix, the Euclidean norm for vector, the ... for (1.1) are based on the idea of the nuclear norm heuristic, i.e., to replace.

110

Optimal design and operation of multivessel batch distillation with fixed product demand. Modelling, simulation and optimisation of design and operation parameters in multivessel batch distillation under fixed product demand scenario and strict product specifications using simple dynamic model in gPROMS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increased interest in unconventional batch distillation column configurations offers new opportunities for increasing the flexibility and energy efficiency of batch distillation. One configuration of particular (more)

Mahmud, Mohamed Taher Mustafa

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 40 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Phase III simulant flowsheet testing was completed using the latest composition estimates for SB6/Tank 40 feed to DWPF. The goals of the testing were to determine reasonable operating conditions and assumptions for the startup of SB6 processing in the DWPF. Testing covered the region from 102-159% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. Nitrite ion concentration was reduced to 90 mg/kg in the SRAT product of the lowest acid run. The 159% acid run reached 60% of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) limit of 0.65 lb H2/hr, and then sporadically exceeded the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) limit of 0.223 lb H2/hr. Hydrogen generation rates peaked at 112% of the SME limit, but higher than targeted wt% total solids levels may have been partially responsible for rates seen. A stoichiometric factor of 120% met both objectives. A processing window for SB6 exists from 102% to something close to 159% based on the simulant results. An initial recommendation for SB6 processing is at 115-120% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. The addition of simulated Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) streams to the SRAT cycle had no apparent impact on the preferred stoichiometric factor. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 120%, 118.4% with ARP/MCU, and 159% stoichiometry were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 36 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 120% acid run reached 23% of the SRAT limit and 37% of the SME limit. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 29 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two processing issues, identified during SB6 Phase II flowsheet testing and qualification simulant testing, were monitored during Phase III. Mercury material balance closure was impacted by acid stoichiometry, and significant mercury was not accounted for in the highest acid run. Coalescence of elemental mercury droplets in the mercury water wash tank (MWWT) appeared to degrade with increasing stoichiometry. Observations were made of mercury scale formation in the SRAT condenser and MWWT. A tacky mercury amalgam with Rh, Pd, and Cu, plus some Ru and Ca formed on the impeller at 159% acid. It contained a significant fraction of the available Pd, Cu, and Rh as well as about 25% of the total mercury charged. Free (elemental) mercury was found in all of the SME products. Ammonia scrubbers were used during the tests to capture off-gas ammonia for material balance purposes. Significant ammonium ion formation was again observed during the SRAT cycle, and ammonia gas entered the off-gas as the pH rose during boiling. Ammonium ion production was lower than in the SB6 Phase II and the qualification simulant testing. Similar ammonium ion formation was seen in the ARP/MCU simulation as in the 120% flowsheet run. A slightly higher pH caused most of the ammonium to vaporize and collect in the ammonia scrubber reflux solution. Two periods of foaminess were noted. Neither required additional antifoam to control the foam growth. A steady foam layer formed during reflux in the 120% acid run. It was about an inch thick, but was 2-3 times more volume of bubbles than is typically seen during reflux. A similar foam layer also was seen during caustic boiling of the simulant during the ARP addition. While frequently seen with the radioactive sludge, foaminess during caustic boiling with simulants has been relatively rare. Two further flowsheet tests were performed and will be documented separately. One test was to evaluate the impact of process conditions that match current DWPF operation (lower rates). The second test was to evaluate the impact of SRAT/SME processing on the rheology of a modified Phase III simulant that had been made five times more viscous using ultrasonication.

Koopman, David

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

112

The R-matrix theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The different facets of the $R$-matrix method are presented pedagogically in a general framework. Two variants have been developed over the years: $(i)$ The "calculable" $R$-matrix method is a calculational tool to derive scattering properties from the Schr\\"odinger equation in a large variety of physical problems. It was developed rather independently in atomic and nuclear physics with too little mutual influence. $(ii)$ The "phenomenological" $R$-matrix method is a technique to parametrize various types of cross sections. It was mainly (or uniquely) used in nuclear physics. Both directions are explained by starting from the simple problem of scattering by a potential. They are illustrated by simple examples in nuclear and atomic physics. In addition to elastic scattering, the $R$-matrix formalism is applied to transfer and radiative-capture reactions. We also present more recent and more ambitious applications of the theory in nuclear physics.

P. Descouvemont; D. Baye

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aluminum-fly Ash Composites Produced by Powder Metallurgy Processing Characterisation of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites Produced by Stir...

114

Massless Flavor in Geometry and Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the planar free energy of this matrix model. Using ?eldgiven by the free energy of the matrix model built with thethe part of the free energy of the matrix model arising from

Roiban, Radu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

6 Batch Injection and Slipped Beam Tune Measurements in Fermilab's Main Injector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During Nova operations it is planned to run the Fermilab Recycler in a 12 batch slip stacking mode. In preparation for this, measurements of the tune during a six batch injection and then as the beam is slipped by changing the RF frequency, but without a 7th injection, have been carried out in the Main Injector. The coherent tune shifts due to the changing beam intensity were measured and compared well with the theoretically expected tune shift. The tune shifts due to changing RF frequency, required for slip stacking, also compare well with the linear theory, although some nonlinear affects are apparent at large frequency changes. These results give us confidence that the expected tunes shifts during 12 batch slip stacking Recycler operations can be accommodated.

Scott, D J; Kourbanis, I; Seiya, K; Yan, M -J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

6 Batch Injection and Slipped Beam Tune Measurements in Fermilab?s Main Injector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During NOVA operations it is planned to run the Fermilab Recycler in a 12 batch slip stacking mode. In preparation for this, measurements of the tune during a six batch injection and then as the beam is decelerated by changing the RF frequency have been carried out in the Main Injector. The coherent tune shifts due to the changing beam intensity were measured and compared well with the theoretically expected tune shift. The tune shifts due to changing RF frequency, required for slip stacking, also compare well with the linear theory, although some nonlinear affects are apparent at large frequency changes. These results give us confidence that the expected tunes shifts during 12 batch slip stacking Recycler operations can be accommodated.

Scott, D.J.; Capista, D.; Kourbanis, I.; Seiya, K.; Yan, M.-J.; /Fermilab

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Particle Production in Matrix Cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider cosmological particle production in 1+1 dimensional string theory. The process is described most efficiently in terms of anomalies, but we also discuss the explicit mode expansions. In matrix cosmology the usual vacuum ambiguity of quantum fields in time-dependent backgrounds is resolved by the underlying matrix model. This leads to a finite energy density for the "in" state which cancels the effect of anomalous particle production.

Sumit R. Das; Joshua L. Davis; Finn Larsen; Partha Mukhopadhyay

2004-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

118

Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. the silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of the VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figs.

Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

Carbonate fuel cell matrix strengthening  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present baseline electrolyte matrix is a porous ceramic powder bed impregnated with alkali carbonate electrolyte. The matrix provides both ionic conduction and gas sealing. During fuel cell stack operation, the matrix experiences both mechanical and thermal stresses. Different mechanical characteristics of active and wet seal areas generate stress. Thermal stress is generated by nonuniform temperature distribution and thermal cycling. A carbonate fuel cell generally may experience planned and unplanned thermal cycles between 650 C and room temperature during its 40,000h life. During the cycling, the electrolyte matrix expands and contracts at a different rate from other cell components. Furthermore, the change in electrolyte volume associated with freezing/melting may generate additional thermal stress. Strengthening of the matrix may be beneficial for longer-term stability of the carbonate fuel cell with respect to repeated thermal cycling. Several promising strengtheners with improved chemical and mechanical stabilities were identified. Fibers provide the highest strengthening effect, followed by particulates. Matrix fabrication technique was successfully modified for uniformly incorporating the advanced strengtheners, maintaining the desired aspect ratio. Enhanced gas sealing demonstrated using the advanced matrices.

Yuh, C.Y.; Haung, C.M.; Johnsen, R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Matrix of Nickel-Base Superalloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MC2 matrix has a tensile strength 15 % higher than that of the. AM3 matrix. ..... use the concept of diffuse antiphase boundary energy, &APB, left between...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Zinc Matrix Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zinc Matrix Power Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Zinc Matrix Power Inc Place Santa Barbara, California Zip 93101 Product Develops high-performance rechargeable alkaline...

122

Ceramic Matrix Composites - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 31, 2013 ... Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy ... and Delayed Fracture at Various Length Scales in Ceramic Matrix Composites.

123

The Problem with the Linpack Benchmark Matrix Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We characterize the matrix sizes for which the Linpack Benchmark matrix generator constructs a matrix with identical columns.

Dongarra, Jack

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Use of Batch and Column Methodologies to Assess Utility Waste Leaching and Subsurface Chemical Attenuation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Often, a combination of batch and column methods is used in the laboratory to test wastes for leaching and attenuation potentials. This literature review addresses the strengths and limitations of using these two methods to predict leachate generation and subsequent attenuation at coal combustion waste management sites.

1991-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of Fe2+ on the Anaerobic Digestion of Chicken Manure: A Batch Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trace elements are considered to be essential for anaerobic process. Laboratory-scale batch studies were undertaken to evaluate the effect of Fe2+on the biogas production from chicken manure at mesophilic condition (37 1C). The biogas production ... Keywords: anaerobic digestion, chicken manure, dynamics, iron, stimulation and inhibition

Zhang Wanqin; Guo Jianbin; Wu Shubiao; Dong Renjie; Zhou Jie; Lang Qianqian; Li Xin; Lv Tao; Pang Changle; Chen Li; Wang Baozhi

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bid Prices When Demand Is a Mix of Individual and Batch Bookings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industries such as aviation, hospitality, and package tours often face both individual and batch bookings, requiring one unit and multiple units of capacity, respectively. Using bid prices is a common practice in accepting or rejecting an incoming booking ... Keywords: air cargo, bid prices, nonlinear programming formulation, revenue management

Andreea Popescu, Earl Barnes, Ellis Johnson, Pinar Keskinocak

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Batch fabrication of cantilever array aperture probes for scanning near-field optical microscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel batch fabrication process for cantilever array aperture probes used in scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). The array probes, consisting of 16 parallel cantilevers with each tip having an identical aperture, are proposed ... Keywords: Cantilever probes, Nanofabrication, Scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM)

Y. Zhang; K. E. Docherty; J. M. R. Weaver

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Restructuring Batch View Maintenance Efficiently Bin Liu, Elke A. Rundensteiner and David Finkel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with existing batch algorithms. Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.2.4 [Database Management]: Systems maintenance strategies within the TxnWrap system [3]. The experiments are conducted on four Pentium III 500MHz Systems (TODS), 2004, to appear. [4] A. Gupta and I. Mumick. Maintenance of Materialized Views: Problems

129

Neural network based controller for Cr6+-Fe2+ batch reduction process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated pilot plant has been designed and commissioned to carry out online/real-time data acquisition and control for the Cr^6^+-Fe^2^+ reduction process. Simulated data from the Cr^6^+-Fe^2^+ model derived are validated with online data and laboratory ... Keywords: Batch system, Neural Networks, ORP, Redox process

Chew Chun Ming; M. A. Hussain; M. K. Aroua

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques Q.H. FAN,, , X.L. TAN, , J.X. LI , X.K. WANG* , W.S. WU* , G. Montavon&* Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, the sorption of Eu(III) at the solid-water interface is important for the performance assessment of nuclear

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

131

Machine-Generated Algorithms, Proofs and Software for the Batch Verification of Digital Signature Schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expand upon an extended abstract on AutoBatch appearing in ACM CCS 2012 in a number of ways. We add a new Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) under contract FA (DARPA) and the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) under contract FA8750-11-2-0211, the Office of Naval

132

Enhanced genetic algorithm-based fuzzy multiobjective strategy to multiproduct batch plant design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper addresses the problem of the optimal design of batch plants with imprecise demands in product amounts. The design of such plants necessary involves how equipment may be utilized, which means that plant scheduling and production must constitute ... Keywords: Fuzzy numbers, Genetic algorithms, Imprecise demand, Multiobjective optimization, Net present value, Plant design, Production scheduling

A. A. Aguilar-Lasserre; L. Pibouleau; C. Azzaro-Pantel; S. Domenech

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

134

Removal of aqueous rinsable flux residues in a batch spray dishwater  

SciTech Connect

An alkaline detergent solution used in an industrial dishwasher was evaluated to remove aqueous rinsable flux residues on printed wiring boards (PWBs) after hot air solder leveling and hot oil solder dip and leveling. The dishwasher, a batch cleaning process, was compared to an existing conveyorized aqueous cleaning process. The aqueous soluble flux residues from both soldering processes were removed with a solution of a mild alkaline detergent dissolved in hot deionized (DI) water.

Slanina, J.T.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's Batch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF runManySections.py - Easy Interface to CMSLPC Condor CAF and CERN's LSF Batch System Introduction Quick Overview Setup Basic Idea Including a Tarball Using runManySections.py to Create Command File Running Compiled Root Macros Debugging Jobs Locally CERN (LSF) versus FNAL (Condor) Differences Introduction runManySections.py is designed to make it easy to run many different sections (or jobs) at once on the CMSLPC CAF or CERN's batch system. It is designed to complement CRAB as runManySections.py is designed to be used with non-cmsRun executables. The general idea is that you pass in a list of commands you would like run and you get the output of these commands back. It is currently configured to run for the Condor system at CMSLPC CAF and CERN's LSF batch system. It is very easy to configure to run on other

136

Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

137

User_Sup_ViewEmpMatrix  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

an Employee Matrix (Supervisor) an Employee Matrix (Supervisor) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Viewing an Employee Matrix (Supervisor) Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning. Task A. View an Employee Matrix From the Home page, click the My Employees tab. Click the Employee Matrix supervisor link. Click the Change Measures expand arrow ( ) to select criteria for comparison. View an Employee Matrix 8 Steps Task A 3 3 1 1 2 2 SuccessFactors Learning v 6.4 User Job Aid Viewing an Employee Matrix (Supervisor) © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 2 - SuccessFactors Learning Select a measure for the

138

Scattering and mesons; P-matrix theory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??We present the P-matrix, an alternative method to parameterize the S-matrix, which is particularly useful for low energy meson-meson scattering. We discuss its basic properties (more)

Ramazano?lu, Feth Mbn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

A Transilient Matrix for Moist Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z? for the ...

David M. Romps; Zhiming Kuang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Graphene Reinforced Glass and Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Graphene Reinforced Glass...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF SMALL SCALE MIXING DEMONSTRATION SAMPLING AND BATCH TRANSFER PERFORMANCE - 12093  

SciTech Connect

The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has previously presented the results of mixing performance in two different sizes of small scale DSTs to support scale up estimates of full scale DST mixing performance. Currently, sufficient sampling of DSTs is one of the largest programmatic risks that could prevent timely delivery of high level waste to the WTP. WRPS has performed small scale mixing and sampling demonstrations to study the ability to sufficiently sample the tanks. The statistical evaluation of the demonstration results which lead to the conclusion that the two scales of small DST are behaving similarly and that full scale performance is predictable will be presented. This work is essential to reduce the risk of requiring a new dedicated feed sampling facility and will guide future optimization work to ensure the waste feed delivery mission will be accomplished successfully. This paper will focus on the analytical data collected from mixing, sampling, and batch transfer testing from the small scale mixing demonstration tanks and how those data are being interpreted to begin to understand the relationship between samples taken prior to transfer and samples from the subsequent batches transferred. An overview of the types of data collected and examples of typical raw data will be provided. The paper will then discuss the processing and manipulation of the data which is necessary to begin evaluating sampling and batch transfer performance. This discussion will also include the evaluation of the analytical measurement capability with regard to the simulant material used in the demonstration tests. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the analysis results illustrating the relationship between the pre-transfer samples and the batch transfers, which support the recommendation regarding the need for a dedicated feed sampling facility.

GREER DA; THIEN MG

2012-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

142

SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Influence of the batch's coke-ore ratio and distribution on the porosity of the melting zone  

SciTech Connect

The variation in gas permeability in the melting zone is considered as a function of the height and configuration of the coke packing and the ore component of the batch.

V.P. Tarasov; L.V. Bykov; P.V. Tarasov [Priazovsk State Technical University, Mariupol (Ukraine)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

Shafer, A.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More...

146

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc More Documents &...

147

Scattering arrays for matrix computations  

SciTech Connect

Several new mesh connected multiprocessor architectures are adapted to execute highly parallel algorithms for matrix algebra and signal processing, such as triangular- and eigen-decomposition, inversion and low-rank updating of general matrices, as well as Toeplitz and Hankel related matrices. These algorithms are based on scattering theory concepts and information preserving transformations hence they exhibit local communication, and simple control and memory management, ideal for VLSI implementation. The architectures are based on two-dimensional scattering arrays that can be folded into linear arrays either through time-sharing or due to simple computation wavefronts, or due to special structures of the matrices involved, such as Toeplitz. 21 references.

Delosme, J.M.; Morf, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev [OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK)(Russian Federation)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Metadata Provided to OSTI via Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI) | Scientific and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI) Batch Upload (Site-to-OSTI) Print page Print page Email page Email page STI Metadata Elements Required (R), Required, but allows for default value (RWD), or Optional (O). Element Description Requirements Author(s) Include all author names; the primary author should be listed first. Allows for "Not Available" as an option for few cases where necessary. R E-mail Address(es) Provide in same order as author names. Will not be available to the end-user. This data is used by OSTI to automate author notification. O Country of Publication Include if country of publication is not United States; defaults to United States RWD Description/ Abstract Defined as the abstract for STI Products. Provide if available (it can be excerpted from the technical report). Text should be publicly releasable information (not personal, financial, or sensitive). Text should be spell-checked, limited in length to 5000 characters, and follow input standards for special characters.

151

Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)  

SciTech Connect

The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

152

RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

153

FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

Fox, K.

2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Structural analysis of magnetic fusion energy systems in a combined interactive/batch computer environment  

SciTech Connect

A system of computer programs has been developed to aid in the preparation of input data for and the evaluation of output data from finite element structural analyses of magnetic fusion energy devices. The system utilizes the NASTRAN structural analysis computer program and a special set of interactive pre- and post-processor computer programs, and has been designed for use in an environment wherein a time-share computer system is linked to a batch computer system. In such an environment, the analyst must only enter, review and/or manipulate data through interactive terminals linked to the time-share computer system. The primary pre-processor programs include NASDAT, NASERR and TORMAC. NASDAT and TORMAC are used to generate NASTRAN input data. NASERR performs routine error checks on this data. The NASTRAN program is run on a batch computer system using data generated by NASDAT and TORMAC. The primary post-processing programs include NASCMP and NASPOP. NASCMP is used to compress the data initially stored on magnetic tape by NASTRAN so as to facilitate interactive use of the data. NASPOP reads the data stored by NASCMP and reproduces NASTRAN output for selected grid points, elements and/or data types.

Johnson, N.E.; Singhal, M.K.; Walls, J.C.; Gray, W.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Shock Waves and Cosmological Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find the shock wave solutions in a class of cosmological backgrounds with a null singularity, each of these backgrounds admits a matrix description. A shock wave solution breaks all supersymmetry meanwhile indicates that the interaction between two static D0-branes cancel, thus provides basic evidence for the matrix description. The probe action of a D0-brane in the background of another suggests that the usual perturbative expansion of matrix model breaks down.

Miao Li; Wei Song

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

156

Nanotube Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Nanotube Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites II. Sponsorship, MS&T Organization. Organizer(s), Indrajit Charit, University of Idaho Sudipta Seal ...

157

Light-metal Matrix (Nano)-composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a regaining interest in these metal-matrix composites, amongst others triggered by the use of nano-particle additions (oxides, carbides, nitrides,)...

158

NANOPHOSPHOR COMPOSITE SCINTILLATORS COMPRISING A POLYMER MATRIX ...  

An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ...

159

Testing Ceramic Matrix Composites Challenges, Pitfalls ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings for Gas Turbine Applications Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy Crack Propagation in SiC...

160

Integration and Joining of Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy Crack Propagation in SiC Bicrystals Containing Intergranular Graphene Creep Behavior of a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Formal and Physical R-matrix parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Notes from 11 October 2004 lecture presented at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics R-Matrix School at Notre Dame University.

Carl R. Brune

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Geometry of Jordan Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We elucidate the geometry of matrix models based on simple formally real Jordan algebras. Such Jordan algebras give rise to a nonassociative geometry that is a generalization of Lorentzian geometry. We emphasize constructions for the exceptional Jordan algebra and the exceptional Jordan C*-algebra and describe the projective spaces related to the exceptional cubic matrix model and the E_6 matrix model. The resulting projective spaces are shown to be exceptional versions of projective twistor space, thus revealing the existence of exceptional twistor string theories that are dual to octonionic matrix models.

Michael Rios

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

163

Green's Matrix for a Second Order Self-Adjoint Matrix Differential Operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic construction of the Green's matrix for a second order, self-adjoint matrix differential operator from the linearly independent solutions of the corresponding homogeneous differential equation set is carried out. We follow the general approach of extracting the Green's matrix from the Green's matrix of the corresponding first order system. This construction is required in the cases where the differential equation set cannot be turned to an algebraic equation set via transform techniques.

Tahsin Cagri Sisman; Bayram Tekin

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

Microsoft PowerPoint - S08-06_Peters_Result of Salt Batch Qualifications.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Salt Batch Qualification Testing Salt Batch Qualification Testing Tom Peters, Samuel Fink; E&CPT Research Programs, Savannah River National Laboratory Mark Geeting, Steven Brown, David Martin, Brent Gifford; Tank Farm Engineering, Savannah River Remediation November 17, 2010 SRNL-MS-2010-00250 Print Close 2 This presentation..... Results of Salt Batch Qualification Testing * Describes the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP), the newest operating facilities at the Savannah River Site for treating stored radioactive waste. * Reviews the past campaigns of salt disposition (Macrobatch 1 and 2). * Reviews current operations (Macrobatch 3) * Outlines the next qualification (Macrobatch 4) * Discusses the limiters in operations. Print Close 3 Introduction In 2001, the Department of Energy (DOE) identified Caustic-Side Solvent

165

Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

Johnson, F.

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

167

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

Johnson, F.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed of two stages, and at both the intermediate and the final content levels in the digestion vessel the rings were present. The rings had not been seen previously during glass digestions and were not present in the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) standard samples digested, in separate vessels, along with the DWPF glass. What follows in this report are the results and analyses from various scoping experiments done in order to explain the anomalous behavior observed with DWPF glass S02244, along with a comparison with tests on sample S02247 where the anomalous wetting behavior was not observed.

Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Differential coefficients of orthogonal matrix polynomials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We find explicit formulas for raising and lowering first order differential operators for orthogonal matrix polynomials. We derive recurrence relations for the coefficients in the raising and lowering operators. Some examples are given. Keywords: Annihilation operators, Creation operators, Orthogonal matrix polynomials, primary 33E30, secondary 42C05

Antonio J. Duran; Mourad E. H. Ismail

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL WELLS BY GAS PRECONDITIONING M. A. Aggour, M. Al, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Experience has shown that for sandstone formations, oil wells respond to matrix acidizing in a different manner as compared to gas wells. For oil wells, the improvement

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

171

HYGROTHERMAL AGING OF POLYIMIDE MATRIX COMPOSITE LAMINATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HYGROTHERMAL AGING OF POLYIMIDE MATRIX COMPOSITE LAMINATES John A. Nairn and Man-Hee Han Materials-0560, USA SUMMARY: Two polyimide-matrix systems were subjected to a series of hygrothermal aging experiments at various temperatures and relative humidities. For each aging condition, we measured the microcracking

Nairn, John A.

172

An algorithm for underdetermined mixing matrix estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of mixing matrix estimation in underdetermined blind source separation (UBSS). We propose a simple and effective detection algorithm which detects the time-frequency (TF) points occupied by only a single source for each ... Keywords: Mixing matrix estimation, Robust clustering, Sparse component analysis, Underdetermined blind source separation

Tianbao Dong; Yingke Lei; Jingshu Yang

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Nonnegative matrix factorization with quadratic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) solves the following problem: find such nonnegative matrices A@?R"+^I^x^J and X@?R"+^J^x^K that Y@?AX, given only Y@?R^I^x^K and the assigned index J (K@?I>=J). Basically, the factorization is achieved by alternating ... Keywords: Blind source separation, Nonnegative matrix factorization, Quadratic programming

Rafal Zdunek; Andrzej Cichocki

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C. [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

STAR-Scheduler: A Batch Job Scheduler for Distributed I/O Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the implementation of a batch job scheduler designed for single-point management of distributed tasks on a multi-node compute farm. The scheduler uses the notion of a meta-job to launch large computing tasks simultaneously on many nodes from a single user command. Job scheduling on specific computing nodes is predicated on the availability of user specified data files co-located with the CPUs where the analysis is meant to take place. Large I/O intensive data analyses may thus be efficiently conducted on multiple CPUs without the limitations implied by finite LAN or WAN bandwidths. Although this Scheduler was developed specifically for the STAR Collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory, its design is sufficiently general, it can be adapted to virtually any other data analysis tasks carried out by large scientific collaborations.

V. Mandapaka; C. Pruneau; J. Lauret; S. Zeadally

2004-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

176

STAR-Scheduler: A Batch Job Scheduler for Distributed I/O Intensive Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the implementation of a batch job scheduler designed for single-point management of distributed tasks on a multi-node compute farm. The scheduler uses the notion of a meta-job to launch large computing tasks simultaneously on many nodes from a single user command. Job scheduling on specific computing nodes is predicated on the availability of user specified data files co-located with the CPUs where the analysis is meant to take place. Large I/O intensive data analyses may thus be efficiently conducted on multiple CPUs without the limitations implied by finite LAN or WAN bandwidths. Although this Scheduler was developed specifically for the STAR Collaboration at Brookhaven National Laboratory, its design is sufficiently general, it can be adapted to virtually any other data analysis tasks carried out by large scientific collaborations.

Mandapaka, V; Lauret, J; Zeadally, S

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

SLUDGE BATCH 4 FOLLOW-UP QUALIFICATION STUDIES TO EVALUATE HYDROGEN GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Follow-up testing was conducted to better understand the excessive hydrogen generation seen in the initial Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) qualification Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank/Slurry Mix Evaporator (SRAT/SME) simulation in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells. This effort included both radioactive and simulant work. The initial SB4 qualification test produced 0.59 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SRAT, which was just below the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lbs/hr, and the test produced over 0.5 lbs/hr hydrogen in the SME cycle on two separate occasions, which were over the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lbs/hr.

Pareizs, J; David Koopman, D; Dan Lambert, D; Cj Bannochie, C

2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Effect of lactose concentration on batch production of ethanol from cheese whey using Candida pseudotropicalis  

SciTech Connect

The effect of lactose concentration on growth of Candida pseudotropicalis and ethanol production from cheese whey under batch conditions was investigated. Four initial lactose concentrations ranging from 50 to 200 g/L (5 to 20% wt/vol) were used. High concentration of lactose had an inhibitory effect on the specific growth rate, lactose utilization rate, and ethanol production rate. The maximum cell concentration was influenced by the initial substrate concentration as well as ethanol concentration. Inhibition of ethanol production was more pronounced at higher initial lactose concentrations. The maximum ethanol yield (96.6% of the theoretical yield) was achieved with the 100 g/L initial substrate concentration. The results indicated that pH control during alcohol fermentation of cheese whey is not necessary. 41 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Ghaly, A.E.; El-Taweel, A.A. [Technical Univ. of Nova Scotia, Halifax (Canada)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Kinetics and dynamic modelling of batch anaerobic digestion of municipal solid waste in a stirred reactor  

SciTech Connect

A series of batch, slurry anaerobic digestion experiments were performed where the soluble and insoluble fractions, and unwashed MSW were separately digested in a 200 l stirred stainless steel vessel at a pH of 7.2 and a temperature of 38 deg. C. It was found that 7% of the total MSW COD was readily soluble, of which 80% was converted to biogas; 50% of the insoluble fraction was solubilised, of this only 80% was converted to biogas. The rate of digesting the insoluble fraction was about four times slower than the rate of digesting the soluble fraction; 48% of the total COD was converted to biogas and 40% of the total nitrogen was converted to ammonia. Soluble and insoluble fractions were broken down simultaneously. The minimum time to convert 95% of the degradable fraction to biogas was 20 days. The lag phase for the degradation of insoluble fraction of MSW can be overcome by acclimatising the culture with the soluble fraction. The rate of digestion and the methane yield was not affected by particle size (within the range of 2-50 mm). A dynamic model was developed to describe batch digestion of MSW. The parameters of the model were estimated using data from the separate digestion of soluble and insoluble fractions and validated against data from the digestion of unwashed MSW. Trends in the specific aceticlastic and formate-utilising methanogenic activity were used to estimate initial methanogenic biomass concentration and bacterial death rate coefficient. The kinetics of hydrolysis of insoluble fraction could be adequately described by a Contois equation and the kinetics of acidogenesis, and aceticlastic and hydrogen utilising methanogenesis by Monod equations.

Nopharatana, Annop [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Pilot Plant Development and Training Institute, King Mongkut's University of Technology, Thonburi, Bangkok 10150 (Thailand); Pullammanappallil, Pratap C. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Department of Agricultural and Biological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Clarke, William P. [Division of Environmental of Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: billc@cheque.uq.edu.au

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

SLUDGE BATCH SUPPLEMENTAL SRAT RUNS EFFECTS OF YIELD STRESS AND CYCLE TIME INCREASE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has transitioned from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing to Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) processing. Phase III-Tank 40 Chemical Process Cell (CPC) flowsheet simulations have been completed to determine the initial processing conditions for the DWPF transition. The impact of higher yield stress (SB-25) and cycle time extension (SB6-26) on the physical and chemical effects of SB6 processing during the SRAT (Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank) cycle were evaluated. No significant impacts on the SRAT chemistry were noted during the higher yield stress run. In particular, no impact on mercury stripping was noted, indicating that settling of elemental mercury was not the primary factor in the low mercury recovery noted in the flowsheet testing. The SRAT product from this run retained the higher yield stress of the starting sludge. The run indicated that ultrasonication is an effective tool to increase the yield stress of simulants to targeted values and the chemistry of downstream processing is not impacted. Significant differences were noted in the cycle time extension test compared to the Phase III flowsheet baseline runs. Large decreases in the ammonia and hydrogen generation rates were noted along with reduced mercury stripping efficiency. The latter effect is similar to that of operating under a high acid stoichiometry. It is conceivable that, under the distinctly different conditions of high formic acid concentration (high acid run) or slow formic acid addition (extended run), that mercury could form amalgams with noble metals, possibly rendering both inert. Thus, the removal of free mercury and noble metals could decrease the rate of catalytic formic acid reactions which would decrease generation of ammonium and hydrogen. The potential underlying reasons for the behavior noted during this run would require additional testing.

Fernandez, A.

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

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181

A transilient matrix for moist convection  

SciTech Connect

A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

183

Exact Evaluation of Batch-Ordering Inventory Policies in Two-Echelon Supply Chains with Periodic Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies a two-echelon supply chain with stochastic and discrete consumer demand, batch order quantities, periodic inventory review, and deterministic transportation times. Reorder point policies manage inventories at every location. Average ... Keywords: Inventory/production: multi-echelon, Periodic review heuristic., Stochastic demand

Grard P. Cachon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Effect of organic loading rate on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This present study reported the effect of 4 organic loading rates (OLR) varied from 25-40 g hexose/L-d on bio-hydrogen production from sweet sorghum syrup by anaerobic mixed cultures in anaerobic sequencing batch reactor. The optimum OLR was found to ... Keywords: anaerobic mixed cultures, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor, organic loading rate, sweet sorghum syrup

Piyawadee Saraphirom; Alissara Reungsang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

SJSU Information Support Services Run Batch Contracts for Temporary TAs and GAs info-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 4 The TF Batch Contract page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date: (Optional.) Enter due date. 7. Dean's Name: Enter your Dean's name. 8. Enter Batch Contract page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date

Su, Xiao

186

Axial grading of inert matrix fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Burning actinides in an inert matrix fuel to 750 MWd/kg IHM results in a significant reduction in transuranic isotopes. However, achieving this level of burnup in a standard light water reactor would require residence times that are twice that of uranium dioxide fuels. The reactivity of an inert matrix assembly at the end of life is less than 1/3 of its beginning of life reactivity leading to undesirable radial and axial power peaking in the reactor core. Here we show that axial grading of the inert matrix fuel rods can reduce peaking significantly. Monte Carlo simulations are used to model the assembly level power distributions in both ungraded and graded fuel rods. The results show that an axial grading of uranium dioxide and inert matrix fuels with erbium can reduces power peaking by more than 50% in the axial direction. The reduction in power peaking enables the core to operate at significantly higher power. (authors)

Recktenwald, G. D.; Deinert, M. R. [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Minimizing communication in sparse matrix solvers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data communication within the memory system of a single processor node and between multiple nodes in a system is the bottleneck in many iterative sparse matrix solvers like CG and GMRES. Here k iterations of a conventional implementation perform ...

Marghoob Mohiyuddin; Mark Hoemmen; James Demmel; Katherine Yelick

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Measuring strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are proposed to measure various strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon. Examples are electro- and neutrino- production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering from isospin zero targets, e.g., deuterons.

Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States)); Krein, G. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States) Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)); Williams, A.G. (Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States) Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Measuring strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon  

SciTech Connect

Experiments are proposed to measure various strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon. Examples are electro- and neutrino- production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering from isospin zero targets, e.g., deuterons.

Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Krein, G. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Williams, A.G. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States)]|[Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

International Symposium on Ceramic Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Session Topics Oxide, Non-oxide, Carbon-Carbon and Glass-Ceramic Composites ... Strength, Toughness and Wear Resistance Similar to that of Silicon Nitride Carbon Fiber Reinforced Ultra-High-Temperature Ceramic Matrix Composites.

191

Logarithmic barriers for sparse matrix cones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a result they are simpler to implement and more readily combined with ..... The matrix Vj can be discarded after cycle j, and SIj j and Sjj can overwrite LIj j and...

192

EPRI Maintenance Excellence Matrix Revision Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the progress in revising the Electric Power Research Institute EPRI 2002 Report 1004705, Maintenance Excellence Matrix Assessment Guideline for Fossil Power Plants, which provides utilities a comprehensive self-assessment guideline for improving maintenance processes.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

193

Development of Low Cost Titanium Matrix Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2004... excellent wear resistance for an alpha-beta Ti-6A1-4V matrix MMC comparable to that for Stellite No.6 a well known wear-resistant material.

194

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls&0; More Documents & Publications Attachment 6 Volume V...

195

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix for Optional Enhancements.xls&0; Attachment 6 Volume V Pricing Matrix...

196

The Impact of the Source of Alkali on Sludge Batch 3 Melt Rate (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) melt rate tests in support of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) have indicated that improvements in melt rate can be achieved through an increase in the total alkali of the melter feed. Higher alkali can be attained by the use of an ''underwashed'' sludge, a high alkali frit, or a combination of the two. Although the general trend between melt rate and total alkali (in particular Na{sub 2}O content) has been demonstrated, the question of ''does the source of alkali (SOA) matter?'' still exists. Therefore the purpose of this set of tests was to determine if the source of alkali (frit versus sludge) can impact melt rate. The general test concept was to transition from a Na{sub 2}O-rich frit to a Na{sub 2}O-deficient frit while compensating the Na{sub 2}O content in the sludge to maintain the same overall Na{sub 2}O content in the melter feed. Specifically, the strategy was to vary the amount of alkali in frits and in the sludge batch 3 (SB3) sludge simulant (midpoint or baseline feed was SB3/Frit 418 at 35% waste loading) so that the resultant feeds had the same final glass composition when vitrified. A set of SOA feeds using frits ranging from 0 to 16 weight % Na{sub 2}O (in 4% increments) was first tested in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) to determine if indeed there was an impact. The dry-fed MRF tests indicated that if the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge (16% Na{sub 2}O feed) or the frit (the 0% Na{sub 2}O feed), then melt rate was negatively impacted when compared to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed currently being processed at DWPF. The MRF melt rates for the 4 and 12% SOA feeds were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 (8% SOA) feed. Due to this finding, a smaller subset of SOA feeds that could be processed in the DWPF (4 and 12% SOA feeds) was then tested in the Slurry-fed Melt Rate Furnace (SMRF). The results from a previous SMRF test with SB3/Frit 418 (Smith et al. 2004) were used as the SMRF melt rate of the baseline feed. The SOA SMRF test results agreed with those of the MRF tests for these two feeds as the melt rates were similar to the baseline SB3/Frit 418 feed. In other words, the source of alkali was close enough to the baseline feed as to not negatively impact melt rate. Based on these results, there appears to be an acceptable range of the source of alkali that results in the highest melt rate for a particular sludge batch. If, however, the alkali is too depleted from either the sludge or the frit, then melt rate will be lower. Although SB3 simulant sludge and Frit 418 were used for these tests, it was not the intent of these tests to determine an optimum source of alkali range for SB3. Rather, the findings of these tests should be used to help in the decision process for future sludge batch washing and/or blending strategies. The results, however, do confirm that the current processing of SB3 is being performed in the proper source of alkali range. Because all of this testing was performed on small-scale equipment with slurried, non-radioactive simulant, the exact impact of the source of alkali with SB3 in the DWPF melter could not be fully evaluated.

Smith, M

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418 AND FRIT 702  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) in May 2011. To support qualification of SB7a, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to execute a variability study (VS) to assess the applicability of the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models for the Frit 418-SB7a compositional region of interest. The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a compositional region of interest and acceptability of the SB7a glasses with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass in terms of durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To support programmatic objectives, twenty-eight SB7a glasses were selected based on the nominal sludge projections used to support the frit recommendation. Twenty-three of the SB7a VS glasses were based on the use of Frit 418, while 5 glasses were based on the use of Frit 702. Frit 702 was also identified as a viable candidate for SB7a, especially if SO{sub 4} concentrations are found to be higher than anticipated. Frit 702 has shown a higher SO{sub 4} retention capability as compared to Frit 418. With respect to acceptability, the PCT results of the SB7a-VS glasses are acceptable relative to the EA glass regardless of thermal history (quenched or canister centerline cooled) or compositional view (target or measured). More specifically, all of the SB7a glasses have normalized boron release values (NL [B]) less than 0.9 g/L as compared to the benchmark NL [B] value for EA of 16.695 g/L. With respect to the applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a VS compositional region of interest, all of the study glasses (based on target compositions) lie within the 95% confidence intervals of the model predictions. When model applicability is based on the measured compositions, all of the SB7a VS glasses are predictable with the exception of SB7aVS-02 and SB7aVS-06. Although the NL [B] values of these two glasses range from 0.66 to 0.73 g/L (considered very acceptable), the PCT responses are not considered predictable by the current durability models. The current durability models are conservative for these glasses since they are more durable than predicted by the models. These two glasses are extreme vertices (EV) based compositions coupled with Frit 418 at 36% WL and target the maximum Na{sub 2}O content (15.01 wt% Na{sub 2}O) of the SB7a VS glasses. Higher alkali glasses for which the model overpredicts the PCT response have been observed previously in the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) Phase 1 VS and the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) VS.

Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fuel cell with electrolyte matrix assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a fuel cell employing a substantially immobilized electrolyte imbedded therein and having a laminated matrix assembly disposed between the electrodes of the cell for holding and distributing the electrolyte. The matrix assembly comprises a non-conducting fibrous material such as silicon carbide whiskers having a relatively large void-fraction and a layer of material having a relatively small void-fraction.

Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Pudick, Sheldon (Sayreville, NJ); Wang, Chiu L. (Edison, NJ)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Matrix for Algal Cultivation - Oak Ridge National Laboratory | ORNL  

Green algae colonize and grow on a matrix, and remained on the surface of the matrix, allowing easy removal of spent medium and faster algal growth.

200

Crosslinkable mixed matrix membranes for the purification of natural gas .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Mixed matrix nanocomposite membranes composed of a crosslinkable polyimide matrix and high-silica molecular sieve particles were developed for purifying natural gas. It was shown that (more)

Ward, Jason Keith

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large variety of polymer and metal matrix composites have an overlapping ... of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy...

202

A Fabrication Technique for Metal Matrix Composites with Shape ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Advanced metal matrix composites reinforced with shape memory ... of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy...

203

Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Absecon, NJ); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

DOE EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix DOE EVMS Risk Assessment Matrix DOEEVMSRISKMATRIX.docx More Documents & Publications Earned Value (EV) Analysis and Project Assessment & Reporting...

205

Health Monitoring of Ceramic Matrix Composites from Waveform ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ceramic matrix composites are anticipated for use in the hot section of aircraft ... Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy.

206

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 1. Alcohol Solvents  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 10-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels (ethanol) assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel to provide heat and power to the process. However, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller molecular units. From fiscal year 1997 through fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories was a participant in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to utilize rapidly heated batch microreactors to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate catalyst systems for the BCD process. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during FY97 and FY98 with alcohol based systems. More recent work with aqueous based systems will be summarized in a second report.

MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; LITTLEWOLF, ALICIA; TRUDELL, DANIEL E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Utilisation of single added fatty acids by consortia of digester sludge in batch culture  

SciTech Connect

Inocula derived from an anaerobic digester were used to study (i) their potential for methane production and (ii) the utilisation rates of different short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) by the microbial community in defined media with mono-carbon sources (formic-, acetetic-, propionic-, butyric acid) in batch culture. It could be demonstrated that the microbial reactor population could be transferred successfully to the lab, and its ability to build up methane was present even with deteriorating biogas plant performance. Therefore, this reduction in performance of the biogas plant was not due to a decrease in abundance, but due to an inactivity of the microbial community. Generally, the physico-chemical properties of the biogas plant seemed to favour hydrogenotrophic methanogens, as seen by the high metabolisation rates of formate compared with all other carbon sources. In contrast, acetoclastic methanogenesis could be shown to play a minor role in the methane production of the investigated biogas plant, although the origin of up to 66% of methane is generally suggested to be generated through acetoclastic pathway.

Wagner, Andreas Otto, E-mail: Andreas.Wagner@uibk.ac.a [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Gstrauntaler, Gudrun [Abfallbeseitigungsverband Westtirol, Breite Mure, A-6426 Roppen (Austria); Illmer, Paul [University of Innsbruck, Institute of Microbiology, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

SciTech Connect

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Error matrix in quantum process tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss characterization of experimental quantum gates by the error matrix, which is similar to the standard process matrix $\\chi$ in the Pauli basis, except the desired unitary operation is factored out, by formally placing it either before or after the error process. The error matrix has only one large element, which is equal to the process fidelity, while other elements are small and indicate imperfections. The imaginary parts of the elements along the left column and/or top row directly indicate the unitary imperfection and can be used to find the needed correction. We discuss a relatively simple way to calculate the error matrix for a composition of quantum gates. Similarly, it is rather straightforward to find the first-order contribution to the error matrix due to the Lindblad-form decoherence. We also discuss a way to identify and subtract the tomography procedure errors due to imperfect state preparation and measurement. In appendices we consider several simple examples of the process tomography and also discuss an intuitive physical interpretation of the Lindblad-form decoherence.

Alexander N. Korotkov

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

212

Fast approximation of matrix coherence and statistical leverage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The statistical leverage scores of a matrix A are the squared row-norms of the matrix containing its (top) left singular vectors and the coherence is the largest leverage score. These quantities are of interest in recently-popular problems such as matrix ... Keywords: matrix coherence, randomized algorithm, statistical leverage

Petros Drineas; Malik Magdon-Ismail; Michael W. Mahoney; David P. Woodruff

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

Huang, Chao M. (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

UTILIZING STATISTICS TO DETERMINE HOW MUCH SAMPLING AND ANALYSISIS WARRANTED TO SUPPORT SAVANNAH RIVER SITEHIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH PREPARATION  

SciTech Connect

Accelerated cleanup initiatives at the SRS include expediting radioactive sludge processing. Sludge is the highest risk component of waste since it contains the highest concentrations of long-lived radionuclides. The sludge is staged into ''batches'' that are then the feed material to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) which vitrifies the waste into a safe form for permanent disposal. The preparation of each batch includes sampling and analysis of the slurried material. The results of the characterization are used as the bases for batch blending and processing decisions. Uncertainty is inherent in the information used for planning. There is uncertainty in the quantity of sludge contained in a tank, the waste composition, and the waste physical properties. The goal of this analysis is to develop the basis for the number of physical samples that should be taken from the slurried waste tank and the number of replicates of laboratory measurements that should be performed in order to achieve a specified uncertainty level. Recommendations for sampling and analysis strategies are made based on the results of the analysis.

Hamm, B

2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

216

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) with H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing SB5, and Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 6 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask III, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2009-00473, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2009-00474, Rev. 1. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB6 (MB7), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 30 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB6 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB6, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB6 to 32. The radionuclide measurements made for SB6 are the most extensive condu

Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energys (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refine

Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

218

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6)  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)), Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51, and H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 6 (MB6). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 5 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, 5 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2008-00137, Rev. 2 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2008-00138, Rev. 2. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB5 (MB6), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-six radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB5 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 26 reportable radionuclides are: Cl-36, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Tc-99, Sn-126, Cs-137, Sm-151, U-233, U-234, Np-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Am-241, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, Cm-246, Cf-251. Chlorine-36 is reported for the first time based on the upper bounding activity determined from the aqua regia digested sludge slurry. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB5 (MB6), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for four radionuclides: Se-79, Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to

Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Usability analysis and design structure matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computer-based user interfaces are incorporated in important parts of many electronics products. Recently, new systematic approaches have been presented for analysing the usability of user interfaces. These approaches include simulation and time ... Keywords: Apple iPod, DSM, Sendo mobile phones, cell phones, design structure matrix, music players, usability analysis, user interfaces, web sales configuration

Petri Helo; Tauno Kekale; Satu Lautamaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

MetaMatrix Groupe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MetaMatrix Groupe MetaMatrix Groupe Jump to: navigation, search Name MetaMatrix Groupe Address 3206 Lamond Ct Place San Jose, California Zip 95148 Region Bay Area Number of employees 1-10 Year founded 2004 Phone number 408-705-1010 Website http://www.MetaMatrixGroupe.co Coordinates 37.317661°, -121.787292° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.317661,"lon":-121.787292,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Grassmann Variables in Jordan Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here we demonstrate the emergence of Grassmann variables in matrix models based on the exceptional Jordan algebra. The Grassmann algebras are built naturally using the octonion algebra. We argue the appearance of Grassmann variables solidifies the relationship between supersymmetry and triality.

Michael Rios

2005-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

User interface design with matrix algebra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is usually very hard, both for designers and users, to reason reliably about user interfaces. This article shows that 'push button' and 'point and click' user interfaces are algebraic structures. Users effectively do algebra when they interact, and ... Keywords: Matrix algebra, feature interaction, usability analysis, user interface design

Harold Thimbleby

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Matrix Recipes for Hard Thresholding Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Matrix Recipes for Hard Thresholding Methods Anastasios Kyrillidis and Volkan Cevher Abstract a new set of sparse and low-rank recovery algorithms within the class of hard thresholding methods. We complexity. Index Terms Affine rank minimization, compressed sensing, sparse approximation algorithms, hard

Diggavi, Suhas

224

Polymer matrix electroluminescent materials and devices  

SciTech Connect

Photoluminescent and electroluminescent compositions are provided which comprise a matrix comprising aromatic repeat units covalently coordinated to a phosphorescent or luminescent metal ion or metal ion complexes. Methods for producing such compositions, and the electroluminescent devices formed therefrom, are also disclosed.

Marrocco, III, Matthew L. (Fontana, CA); Motamedi, Farshad J. (Claremont, CA); Abdelrazzaq, Feras Bashir (Covina, CA); Abdelrazzaq, legal representative, Bashir Twfiq (Aman, JO)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Community discovery using nonnegative matrix factorization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Complex networks exist in a wide range of real world systems, such as social networks, technological networks, and biological networks. During the last decades, many researchers have concentrated on exploring some common things contained in those large ... Keywords: Community discovery, Nonnegative matrix factorization

Fei Wang; Tao Li; Xin Wang; Shenghuo Zhu; Chris Ding

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Zero Energy States In Supersymmetric Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Symmetry reductions of bosonic matrix models, along with some subtleties, are pointed out; the asymptotic form of $SU(2)$ zero-energy wavefunctions is mentioned, and a nonperturbative approach to the solution of the full equations is described.CER 2140141 BASE L 13

Hoppe, J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A Simpler Approach to Matrix Completion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oh [18] to show that one could, in special cases, reconstruct a low-rank matrix by ..... are duplicates in ?. Nonetheless, this does not adversely affect the argument, and ..... Proceedings of the 11th Symposium on Mathematical Foundations of ... Decoupling inequalities for the tail probabilities of multivariate U-statistics.

228

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

229

Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1608, VTT, FI-02044 (Finland)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Design and Optimization of Condenser and Centrifuge Units for Enhancement of a Batch Vacuum Frying System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A batch vacuum frying system, which processes fruits and vegetables, includes a frying pan, a surface-condenser, and a vacuum pump. With health and safety issues in mind, this research focused on developing a modified surface-condenser to prevent cavitation of the vacuum pump. The final oil-content was reduced by centrifugal de- oiling of the product under vacuum, which make the product healthier than what is currently available. The de-oiling mechanism consists of a centrifuge with a motor attached to the basket shaft, rotating up to 750 rpm (63 g units). The condenser consists of a (counter- flow) spiral-coil heat exchanger (SHE) connected to a refrigeration system that uses R404a refrigerant. De-oiling for 40 s at 300 and 750 RPM removed up to 67% and 72% of the chips surface oil, respectively. At 750 RPM for 10 s, 40 s, and 60 s the oil-content was reduced by 38%, 44%, and 51%, respectively. The convective heat transfer coefficient (h) of the frying oil was determined at 120C and 140C using the lumped capacitance method. The h-values were 21713 W/m2K (120C) and 25837 W/m2K (140C) using a copper-ball thermocouple. The h- values increased to 3.6 times during the boiling period. COMSOLTM Multiphysics was used to model the heat transfer in the vacuum fryer pan. Based on the simulation results, a 1.5 cm thick insulation material was installed in the fryer to reduce the energy losses. The refrigeration system operates at Tevap = -26C and Tcond = 50C with 26C sub-cooling. Sensitivity analysis showed that the system Coefficient of Performance (COP) was about 3.87 at these conditions and compressor power requirement (CPR) was 74 W (85% efficiency) when frying 30 g of potatoes slices. The best results were obtained at Tevap = -10C and Tcond = 40C with 26C sub-cooling and superheat of 5C. The predicted COP was 4 and the CPR 70 W. The ice-formation on coils reduced the condensation rate. Reducing the refrigerant temperature to -10C (from -26C) reduced the condensation rate by 30%. These results show a more effective vacuum frying system for high-quality fruits and vegetables than the system previously used.

Pandey, Akhilesh

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV) of CGT was measured to be around 15-16 MJ kg- 1 (6500-7000 Btu lb-1). In the first set of tests, CGT was pyrolyzed at 600, 700, and 800C and at 30, 45, and 60 min reaction period. The maximum char yield of 40% by weight (wt.%) was determined at 600C and 30 min settings, however, the HV of char was low and almost similar to the HV of CGT. A maximum gas yield of 40 wt.% was measured at 800C and 60 min and the highest liquid yield of 30 wt.% was determined at 800C and 30 min. In the modified pyrolysis test, the effects of temperature (500, 600, 700, and 800C) on the product yield and other properties were investigated. The experiment was performed using the same reactor purged with nitrogen at a rate of 1000 cm3 min-1. Gas yield increased as temperature was increased while the effect was opposite on char yield. The maximum char yield of 38 wt.% was determined at 500C and 30 min. The char had the largest fraction in the energy output (70-83%) followed by gas (10-20%) and bio-oil (7- 9%). Maximum gas yield of 35 wt.% was determined at 800C. The average yield of CO, H2 and total hydrocarbons (THC) generally increased with increased temperature but CO2 production decreased. Methane, ethane, and propane dominated the THC. The bio-oil yield at 600C was the highest at about 30 wt.% among the temperature settings. The HV of bio-oil was low (2-5 MJ kg-1) due to minimal non-HC compounds and high moisture content (MC). A simple energy balance of the process was performed. The process was considered energy intensive due to the high amount of energy input (6100 kJ) while generating a maximum energy output of only 10%. After disregarding the energy used for preparation and pyrolysis, the energy losses ranged from 30-46% while the energy of the output represent between 55-70% of the input energy from CGT.

Aquino, Froilan Ludana

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Universality in SRG-Evolved Potential Matrix Elements and T-Matrix Equivalence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine how the universality of two-nucleon interactions evolved using similarity renormalization group (SRG) transformations correlates with T-matrix equivalence, with the ultimate goal of gaining insight into universality for three-nucleon forces. With sufficient running of the SRG flow equations, the low-energy matrix elements of different realistic potentials evolve to a universal form. Because these potentials are fit to low-energy data, they are (approximately) phase equivalent only up to a certain energy, and we find universality in evolved potentials up to the corresponding momentum. More generally we find universality in local energy regions, reflecting a local decoupling by the SRG. The further requirements for universality in evolved potential matrix elements are explored using two simple alternative potentials. We see evidence that in addition to predicting the same observables, common long-range potentials (i.e., explicit pion physics) is required for universality in the potential matrix eleme...

Dainton, B; Perry, R J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optimizing Tpetra%3CU%2B2019%3Es sparse matrix-matrix multiplication routine.  

SciTech Connect

Over the course of the last year, a sparse matrix-matrix multiplication routine has been developed for the Tpetra package. This routine is based on the same algorithm that is used in EpetraExt with heavy modifications. Since it achieved a working state, several major optimizations have been made in an effort to speed up the routine. This report will discuss the optimizations made to the routine, its current state, and where future work needs to be done.

Nusbaum, Kurtis Lee

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Universality in SRG-Evolved Potential Matrix Elements and T-Matrix Equivalence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine how the universality of two-nucleon interactions evolved using similarity renormalization group (SRG) transformations correlates with T-matrix equivalence, with the ultimate goal of gaining insight into universality for three-nucleon forces. With sufficient running of the SRG flow equations, the low-energy matrix elements of different realistic potentials evolve to a universal form. Because these potentials are fit to low-energy data, they are (approximately) phase equivalent only up to a certain energy, and we find universality in evolved potentials up to the corresponding momentum. More generally we find universality in local energy regions, reflecting a local decoupling by the SRG. The further requirements for universality in evolved potential matrix elements are explored using two simple alternative potentials. We see evidence that in addition to predicting the same observables, common long-range potentials (i.e., explicit pion physics) is required for universality in the potential matrix elements after SRG flow. In agreement with observations made previously for Vlowk evolution, regions of universal potential matrix elements are restricted to where half-on-shell T-matrix equivalence holds.

B. Dainton; R. J. Furnstahl; R. J. Perry

2013-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866. Revision 1.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a revision to a previously released report. This revision contains additional analytical results for the sample with HEIS number B2H4X7. Between November 4, 2010 and October 26, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL. Samples were received with a chain of custody (COC) and were analyzed according to the sample identification numbers supplied by the client. All Samples were refrigerated upon receipt until prepared for analysis. All samples were received with custody seals intact unless noted in the Case Narrative. Holding time is defined as the time from sample preparation to the time of analyses. The prescribed holding times were met for all analytes unless noted in the Case Narrative. All reported analytical results meet the requirements of the CAW or client specified SOW unless noted in the case narrative. Due to the requirements of the statement of work and sampling events in the field, the 28 day and the 48 hr requirements cannot be met. The statement of work requires samples to be selected at the completion of the borehole. It is not always possible to complete a borehole and have the samples shipped to the laboratory within the hold time requirements. Duplicate RPD for Uranium 238 (38.9%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 1E05003-DUP1 for ICPMS-Tc-U-WE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Duplicate RPD for Silver 107 (68.2%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 2C06004-DUP1 for ICPMS-RCRA-AE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (48.8%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 1E23001-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (50.2%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 2B22010-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

236

Matrix model superpotentials and ADE singularities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use F. Ferrari's methods relating matrix models to Calabi-Yau spaces in order to explain much of Intriligator and Wecht's ADE classification of $\\N=1$ superconformal theories which arise as RG fixed points of $\\N = 1$ SQCD theories with adjoints. We find that ADE superpotentials in the Intriligator-Wecht classification exactly match matrix model superpotentials obtained from Calabi-Yaus with corresponding ADE singularities. Moreover, in the additional $\\Hat{O}, \\Hat{A}, \\Hat{D}$ and $\\Hat{E}$ cases we find new singular geometries. These `hat' geometries are closely related to their ADE counterparts, but feature non-isolated singularities. As a byproduct, we give simple descriptions for small resolutions of Gorenstein threefold singularities in terms of transition functions between just two coordinate charts.

Curto, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ceramic fiber ceramic matrix filter development  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to develop a novel type of candle filter based on a ceramic fiber-ceramic matrix composite material, and to extend the development to full-size, 60-mm OD by 1-meter-long candle filters. The goal is to develop a ceramic filter suitable for use in a variety of fossil energy system environments such as integrated coal gasification combined cycles (IGCC), pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC), and other advanced coal combustion environments. Further, the ceramic fiber ceramic matrix composite filter, hereinafter referred to as the ceramic composite filter, was to be inherently crack resistant, a property not found in conventional monolithic ceramic candle filters, such as those fabricated from clay-bonded silicon carbide. Finally, the adequacy of the filters in the fossil energy system environments is to be proven through simulated and in-plant tests.

Judkins, R.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Smith, R.G.; Fischer, E.M. [3M Company, St. Paul, MN (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Random matrix theory for underwater sound propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean acoustic propagation can be formulated as a wave guide with a weakly random medium generating multiple scattering. Twenty years ago, this was recognized as a quantum chaos problem, and yet random matrix theory, one pillar of quantum or wave chaos studies, has never been introduced into the subject. The modes of the wave guide provide a representation for the propagation, which in the parabolic approximation is unitary. Scattering induced by the ocean's internal waves leads to a power-law random banded unitary matrix ensemble for long-range deep ocean acoustic propagation. The ensemble has similarities, but differs, from those introduced for studying the Anderson metal-insulator transition. The resulting long-range propagation ensemble statistics agree well with those of full wave propagation using the parabolic equation.

Katherine C. Hegewisch; Steven Tomsovic

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

240

Matrix representation of the time operator  

SciTech Connect

In quantum mechanics the time operator {Theta} satisfies the commutation relation [{Theta}, H]=i, and thus it may be thought of as being formally canonically conjugate to the Hamiltonian H. The time operator associated with a given Hamiltonian H is not unique because one can replace {Theta} by {Theta}+{Theta}{sub hom}, where {Theta}{sub hom} satisfies the homogeneous condition [{Theta}{sub hom}, H]= 0. To study this nonuniqueness the matrix elements of {Theta} for the harmonic-oscillator Hamiltonian are calculated in the eigenstate basis. This calculation requires the summation of divergent series, and the summation is accomplished by using zeta-summation techniques. It is shown that by including appropriate homogeneous contributions, the matrix elements of {Theta} simplify dramatically. However, it is still not clear whether there is an optimally simple representation of the time operator.

Bender, Carl M. [Department of Physics, Kings College London, Strand, London WC2R 1LS (United Kingdom); Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Universita del Salento and I.N.F.N. Sezione di Lecce, Via Arnesano, I-73100 Lecce (Italy)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

NONE

1991-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

242

Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation  

SciTech Connect

At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

Morgan, W.C.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

EPRI Materials Degradation Matrix, Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Materials Degradation Matrix (MDM) identifies knowledge gaps associated with degradation phenomena that may detrimentally affect reactor operation, reactor safety, or regulatory climate. Where gaps are identified, the MDM assesses the status of research and development (R&D) needed to resolve the knowledge gap. In addition to a general update to address new operating experience and research results, specific objectives for this revision of the MDM ...

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

244

Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the calculation of the matrix elements of nucleon to pseudoscalar decay through a three quark operator, a part of the low-energy, four-fermion, baryon-number-violating operator originating from grand unified theories. The direct calculation of the form factors using domain-wall fermions on the lattice, incorporating the u, d and s sea-quarks effects yields the results with all the relevant systematic uncertainties controlled for the first time.

Aoki, Yasumichi; Shintani, Eigo [Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute for the Origin of Particles and the Universe (KMI), Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); RIKEN-BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States); Collaboration: RBC Collaboration; UKQCD Collaboration

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

245

Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); Mckigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

246

Matrix Product States for Lattice Field Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The term Tensor Network States (TNS) refers to a number of families of states that represent different ans\\"atze for the efficient description of the state of a quantum many-body system. Matrix Product States (MPS) are one particular case of TNS, and have become the most precise tool for the numerical study of one dimensional quantum many-body systems, as the basis of the Density Matrix Renormalization Group method. Lattice Gauge Theories (LGT), in their Hamiltonian version, offer a challenging scenario for these techniques. While the dimensions and sizes of the systems amenable to TNS studies are still far from those achievable by 4-dimensional LGT tools, Tensor Networks can be readily used for problems which more standard techniques, such as Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations, cannot easily tackle. Examples of such problems are the presence of a chemical potential or out-of-equilibrium dynamics. We have explored the performance of Matrix Product States in the case of the Schwinger model, as a widely used ...

Bauls, Mari Carmen; Cirac, J Ignacio; Jansen, Karl; Saito, Hana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring.

Reedy, Gerald T. (411 Francis St., Bourbonnais, IL 60914)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Analyticity and the Holographic S-Matrix  

SciTech Connect

We derive a simple relation between the Mellin amplitude for AdS/CFT correlation functions and the bulk S-Matrix in the flat spacetime limit, proving a conjecture of Penedones. As a consequence of the Operator Product Expansion, the Mellin amplitude for any unitary CFT must be a meromorphic function with simple poles on the real axis. This provides a powerful and suggestive handle on the locality vis-a-vis analyticity properties of the S-Matrix. We begin to explore analyticity by showing how the familiar poles and branch cuts of scattering amplitudes arise from the holographic description. For this purpose we compute examples of Mellin amplitudes corresponding to 1-loop and 2-loop Witten diagrams in AdS. We also examine the flat spacetime limit of conformal blocks, implicitly relating the S-Matrix program to the Bootstrap program for CFTs. We use this connection to show how the existence of small black holes in AdS leads to a universal prediction for the conformal block decomposition of the dual CFT.

Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

249

Proton decay matrix elements on the lattice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hadronic matrix elements of proton decay are essential ingredients to bridge the grand unification theory to low energy observables like proton lifetime. In this paper we non-perturbatively calculate the matrix elements, relevant for the process of a nucleon decaying into a pseudoscalar meson and an anti-lepton through generic baryon number violating four-fermi operators. Lattice QCD with 2+1 flavor dynamical domain-wall fermions with the {\\it direct} method, which is direct measurement of matrix element from three-point function without chiral perturbation theory, are used for this study to have good control over the lattice discretization error, operator renormalization, and chiral extrapolation. The relevant form factors for possible transition process from an initial proton or neutron to a final pion or kaon induced by all types of three quark operators are obtained through three-point functions of (nucleon)-(three-quark operator)-(meson) with physical kinematics. In this study all the relevant systematic uncertainties of the form factors are taken into account for the first time, and the total error is found to be the range 30%-40% for $\\pi$ and 20%-40% for $K$ final states.

Y. Aoki; E. Shintani; A. Soni

2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

250

A:\ZAPPENDA1Matrix(FAR)(REVISED).PDF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MATRIX OF REFERENCES, ROLES MATRIX OF REFERENCES, ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITIES WHAT IS APPENDIX A? On the following pages is a matrix of the roles and responsibilities associated with the references which appear previously in this Reference Book. The Reference Book's matrix is based on the matrix which was attached to Acquisition Letter (AL) 99-05, entitled, "Deviations, Local Clauses, Uniform Contract Format, & Clause Matrix." The matrix in AL 99-05 was developed to promote a more uniform application of the terms and conditions that are included in the Department's M&O contracts and serves as the primary source of guidance for DOE contracting personnel in determining the applicability of the clauses prescribed in FAR Part 52 and DEAR Parts 952 and 970. The following Reference Book matrix is

251

Involvement of extracellular matrix constituents in breast cancer  

SciTech Connect

It has recently been established that the extracellular matrix is required for normal functional differentiation of mammary epithelia not only in culture, but also in vivo. The mechanisms by which extracellular matrix affects differentiation, as well as the nature of extracellular matrix constituents which have major impacts on mammary gland function, have only now begun to be dissected. The intricate variety of extracellular matrix-mediated events and the remarkable degree of plasticity of extracellular matrix structure and composition at virtually all times during ontogeny, make such studies difficult. Similarly, during carcinogenesis, the extracellular matrix undergoes gross alterations, the consequences of which are not yet precisely understood. Nevertheless, an increasing amount of data suggests that the extracellular matrix and extracellular matrix-receptors might participate in the control of most, if not all, of the successive stages of breast tumors, from appearance to progression and metastasis.

Lochter, Andre; Bissell, Mina J

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-Term Durability of Polymeric Matrix Composites presents a comprehensive knowledge-set of matrix, fiber and interphase behavior under long-term aging conditions, theoretical modeling and experimental methods.This bookcovers long-term constituent ...

Kishore V. Pochiraju; Gyaneshwar P. Tandon; Gregory A. Schoeppner

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR) JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR) The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of...

254

Microstructure and Properties of Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy Application Hollow Particle Filled Lightweight Composites: Weight...

255

Matrix heat exchanger including a liquid, thermal couplant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tube-to-tube heat exchanger is disclosed with a thermally conductive matrix between and around the tubes to define annuli between the tubes and matrix. The annuli are filled to a level with a molten metal or alloy to provide a conductive heat transfer path from one tube through the matrix to the second tube. A matrix heat exchanger of this type is particularly useful for heat transfer between fluids which would react should one leak into the second.

Fewell, Thomas E. (Chattanooga, TN); Ward, Charles T. (Chattanooga, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Inclusion of Carbon Nanotubes into the Polystyrene Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2013. Symposium, Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Inclusion of Carbon...

257

Behaviour of Metal Matrix Syntactic Foams in Compression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Characterization of Metal Matrix Composite Materials ... They have the potential to serve as lightweight structures as energy absorbers against...

258

Work-efficient matrix inversion in polylogarithmic time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm for matrix inversion that combines the practical requirement of an optimal number of arithmetic operations and the theoretical goal of a polylogarithmic critical path length. The algorithm reduces inversion to matrix multiplication. ... Keywords: linear algebra, matrix inversion, newton approximation, numerics, parallel algorithms, polylogarithmic time, strassen's inversion algorithm

Peter Sanders, Jochen Speck, Raoul Steffen

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Constraints of mixing matrix elements in the sequential fourthgeneration model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review our works on the sequential fourth generation model and focus on the constriants of $4\\times 4$ quark mixing matrix elements. We investigate the quark mixing matrix elements from the rare $K,B$ meson decays. We talk about the $ hierarchy$ of the $4\\times 4$ matrix and the existence of fourth generation.

Huo, W J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Matrix Approximation and Projective Clustering via Iterative Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present two new results for the problem of approximating a given real m by n matrix A by a rank-k matrix D, where k < min{m, n}, so as to minimize ||A-D||_F^2. It is known that bysampling O(k/eps) rows of the matrix, ...

Rademacher, Luis

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Batch slurry photocatalytic reactors for the generation of hydrogen from sulfide and sulfite waste streams under solar irradiation  

SciTech Connect

In this study, two solar slurry photocatalytic reactors i.e., batch reactor (BR) and batch recycle reactor with continuous supply of inert gas (BRRwCG) were developed for comparing their performance. The performance of the photocatalytic reactors were evaluated based on the generation of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) from water containing sodium sulfide (Na{sub 2}S) and sodium sulfite (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 3}) ions. The photoreactor of capacity 300 mL was developed with UV-vis transparent walls. The catalytic powders ((CdS/ZnS)/Ag{sub 2}S + (RuO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2})) were kept suspended by means of magnetic stirrer in the BR and gas bubbling and recycling of the suspension in the BRRwCG. The rate constant was found to be 120.86 (einstein{sup -1}) for the BRRwCG whereas, for the BR it was found to be only 10.92 (einstein{sup -1}). The higher rate constant was due to the fast desorption of products and suppression of e{sup -}/h{sup +} recombination. (author)

Priya, R.; Kanmani, S. [Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, Chennai (India)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

262

Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification  

SciTech Connect

The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

263

An iterative algorithm to produce a positive definite correlation matrix from an approximate correlation matrix (with a program user's guide)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains an explanation of an algorithm that, when executed, will operate on any symmetric approximate correlation matrix by iteratively adjusting the eigenvalues of this matrix. The objective of this algorithm is to produce a valid, positive definite, correlation matrix. Also a description of a program (called POSDEF) which implements the algorithm is given.

Iman, R.L.; Davenport, J.M.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

create an image file of a sparse matrix # Roman Pearce, CECM/SFU ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... img; end proc: infolevel[SparseMatrixImage] := 3: # read MatrixMarket files # sources of matrices: # # University of Florida Sparse Matrix Collection (MATLAB) ...

265

Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

Ransom, Ray M.

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

266

Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring. 10 figs.

Reedy, G.T.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

267

INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 4 TANK 40 DECANT VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 510  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) is currently being processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) using Frit 510. The slurry pumps in Tank 40 are experiencing in-leakage of bearing water, which is causing the sludge slurry feed in Tank 40 to become dilute at a rapid rate. Currently, the DWPF is removing this dilution water by performing caustic boiling during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle. In order to alleviate prolonged SRAT cycle times that may eventually impact canister production rates, decant scenarios of 100, 150, and 200 kilogallons of supernate were proposed for Tank 40 during the DWPF March outage. Based on the results of the preliminary assessment issued by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) for SRNL to (1) perform a more detailed evaluation using updated SB4 compositional information and (2) assess the viability of Frit 510 and determine any potential impacts on the SB4 system. As defined in the TTR, LWO requested that SRNL validate the sludge--only SB4 flowsheet and the coupled operations flowsheet using the 100K gallon decant volume as well as the addition of 3 wt% sodium on a calcined oxide basis. Approximately 12 historical glasses were identified during a search of the ComProTM database that are located within at least one of the five glass regions defined by the proposed SB4 flowsheet options. While these glasses meet the requirements of a variability study there was some concern that the compositional coverage did not adequately bound all cases. Therefore, SRNL recommended that a supplemental experimental variability study be performed to support the various SB4 flowsheet options that may be implemented for future SB4 operations in DWPF. Eighteen glasses were selected based on nominal sludge projections representing the current as well as the proposed flowsheets over a WL interval of interest to DWPF (32-42%). The intent of the experimental portion of the variability study is to demonstrate that the glasses of the Frit 510-modified SB4 compositional region (Cases No.1-5) are both acceptable relative to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass and predictable by the current DWPF process control models for durability. Frit 510 is a viable option for the processing of SB4 after a Tank 40 decant and the addition of products from the Actinide Removal Process (ARP). The addition of ARP did not have any negative impacts on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses. The results of the variability study indicate that all of the study glasses (both quenched and centerline canister cooled (ccc)) have normalized releases for boron that are well below the reference EA glass (16.695 g/L). The durabilities of all of the study glasses are predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models with the exception of SB4VAR24ccc (Case No.2 at 41%). PCCS is not applicable to non-homogeneous glasses (i.e. glasses containing crystals such as acmite and nepheline), thus SB4VAR24ccc should not be predictable as it contains nepheline. The presence of nepheline has been confirmed in both SB4VAR13ccc and SB4VAR24ccc by X-ray diffraction (XRD). These two glasses are the first results which indicate that the current nepheline discriminator value of 0.62 is not conservative. The nepheline discriminator was implemented into PCCS for SB4 based on the fact that all of the historical glasses evaluated with nepheline values of 0.62 or greater did not contain nepheline via XRD analysis. Although these two glasses do cause some concern over the use of the 0.62 nepheline value for future DWPF glass systems, the impact to the current SB4 system is of little concern. More specifically, the formation of nepheline was observed in glasses targeting 41 or 42% WL. Current processing of the Frit 510-SB4 system in DWPF has nominally targeted 34% WL. For the SB4 variability study glasses targeting these lower WLs, nepheline formation was not observed and the minimal differe

Raszewski, F; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

FRIT DEVELOPMENT FOR HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 5: COMPOSITIONAL TRENDS FOR VARYING ALUMINUM CONCENTRATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to experimentally measure the properties and performance of a series of glasses with compositions that could represent Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) as processed at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The data was used to provide recommendations to the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) regarding blending and washing strategies in preparing SB5 based on acceptability of the glass compositions. These data were also used to guide frit optimization efforts as the SB5 composition was finalized. Glass compositions for this study were developed by combining a series of SB5 composition projections with a group of frits. Three composition projections for SB5 were developed using a model-based approach at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). These compositions, referred to as SB5 Cases B, C and D, projected removal of 25, 50 and 75% (respectively) of the aluminum in Tank 51 through the low temperature aluminum dissolution process. The frits for this study (Frits 530 through 537) were selected based on their predicted operating windows (i.e., ranges of waste loadings over which the predicted properties of the glasses were acceptable) and their potential (based on historical trends) to provide acceptable melt rates for SB5. Six additional glasses were designed to evaluate alternatives for uranium in DWPF-type glasses used for variability studies and some scoping studies. Since special measures are necessary when working with uranium-containing glasses in the laboratory, it is desirable as a cost and time saving measure to find an alternative for uranium to support frit optimization efforts. Hafnium and neodymium were investigated as potential surrogates for uranium, and other glasses were made by simply excluding the radioactive components and renormalizing the glass composition. The study glasses were fabricated and characterized at SRNL. Chemical composition analyses suggested only minor difficulties in meeting the targeted compositions for some of the oxides for some of the glasses. Although minor differences were observed, they did not have a significant impact on the conclusions made in this study. Several of the study compositions showed retention of more than 0.5 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass. Trevorite (a spinel) was the only crystalline phase that was positively identified in a few of the study glasses after the canister centerline cooled (CCC) heat treatment. Spinels are not of concern as they have been shown to have little impact on the durability of high level waste glasses. The crystallization behavior of the surrogate glasses was generally the same as that of their U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-containing counterparts. There are two pairs that were exceptions: SB5-04 (amorphous) and SB5-24 (possible trevorite), along with SB5-07 (amorphous) and SB5-25 (trevorite). In these cases, the surrogate glasses (SB5-24 and SB5-25) appear to be more conservative (more prone to crystallization) than their U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-containing counterparts. Chemical durability was quantified using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The normalized leachate (NL) values for B, Li, Na and Si for all of the study glasses were well below those of the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass, regardless of heat treatment or compositional view. This indicates that all of the glasses had very acceptable durability performance. The highest NL [B] for the study glasses was 0.914 g/L (the quenched version of glass SB5-13), normalized using the measured, bias-correct composition. There was little practical impact of the CCC heat treatment on the PCT responses of the study glasses. The measured PCT responses were predictable by the current {Delta}G{sub p} models. In general, the PCT responses for the surrogate glasses or the glasses without U{sub 3}O{sub 8} were quite similar to their U{sub 3}O{sub 8}-containing counterparts. The average percent error in NL [B] normalized by the measured, bias-corrected compositions for the surrogate glasses compared with their radioactive counterparts was 8.8%. The largest difference in NL

Fox, K; Tommy Edwards; David Best; Irene Reamer; Phyllis Workman

2008-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

269

Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

Alwall, Johan; /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Freitas, Ayres; /Pittsburgh U.; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

270

Unitarity and the Holographic S-Matrix  

SciTech Connect

The bulk S-Matrix can be given a non-perturbative definition in terms of the flat space limit of AdS/CFT. We show that the unitarity of the S-Matrix, ie the optical theorem, can be derived by studying the behavior of the OPE and the conformal block decomposition in the flat space limit. When applied to perturbation theory in AdS, this gives a holographic derivation of the cutting rules for Feynman diagrams. To demonstrate these facts we introduce some new techniques for the analysis of conformal field theories. Chief among these is a method for conglomerating local primary operators O{sub 1} and O{sub 2} to extract the contribution of an individual primary O{sub {Delta},{ell}} in their OPE. This provides a method for isolating the contribution of specific conformal blocks which we use to prove an important relation between certain conformal block coefficients and anomalous dimensions. These techniques make essential use of the simplifications that occur when CFT correlators are expressed in terms of a Mellin amplitude.

Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

271

Hydrogen Evolution and Sludge Suspension During the Preparation of the First Batch of Sludge at the Savannah River Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first batch of High Level Radioactive Sludge for the Defense Waste Processing Facility is being prepared in two 4.9 million liter waste tanks. The preparation involves removing water soluble salts by washing (water addition, sludge suspension, settling and decantation). Sludge suspension is accomplished using long shafted slurry pumps that are mounted on rotating turntables. During the sludge suspension runs in 1993 and 1994, the slurry pumps` cleaning radius was determined to be less than that expected from previous determinations using synthetic sludge in a full size waste tank mockup. Hydrogen concentrations in the tanks` vapor space were monitored during the sludge suspension activities. As expected, the initial agitation of the sludge increased the hydrogen concentration, however, with the controls in place the hydrogen concentration was maintained below seven percent of the lower flammability limit

Hay, M.S.; Lee, E.D.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Multi-resolution Modeling of the Dynamic Loading of Metal Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites ... Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy Application.

273

Titanium Based Metal-matrix Composites via In-situ Nitridation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites ... Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy Application.

274

Characterisation of Al-AC8H/Al2O3p Metal Matrix Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites ... Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy Application.

275

Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a spatially low-order kernel, the fundamental eigenvector of which should converge faster than that of continuous kernel. We can then redistribute the fission bank to match the fundamental fission matrix eigenvector, effectively eliminating all higher modes. For all computations here biasing is not used, with the intention of comparing the unaltered, conventional Monte Carlo process with the fission matrix results. The source convergence of standard Monte Carlo criticality calculations are, to some extent, always subject to the characteristics of the problem. This method seeks to partially eliminate this problem-dependence by directly calculating the spatial coupling. The primary cost of this, which has prevented widespread use since its inception [2,3,4], is the extra storage required. To account for the coupling of all N spatial regions to every other region requires storing N{sup 2} values. For realistic problems, where a fine resolution is required for the suppression of discretization error, the storage becomes inordinate. Two factors lead to a renewed interest here: the larger memory available on modern computers and the development of a better storage scheme based on physical intuition. When the distance between source and fission events is short compared with the size of the entire system, saving memory by accounting for only local coupling introduces little extra error. We can gain other information from directly tallying the fission kernel: higher eigenmodes and eigenvalues. Conventional Monte Carlo cannot calculate this data - here we have a way to get new information for multiplying systems. In Ref. [5], higher mode eigenfunctions are analyzed for a three-region 1-dimensional problem and 2-dimensional homogenous problem. We analyze higher modes for more realistic problems. There is also the question of practical use of this information; here we examine a way of using eigenmode information to address the negative confidence interval bias due to inter-cycle correlation. We apply this method mainly to four problems: 2D pressurized water reactor (PWR) [6],

Carney, Sean E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

276

Predicting structure in nonsymmetric sparse matrix factorizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many computations on sparse matrices have a phase that predicts the nonzero structure of the output, followed by a phase that actually performs the numerical computation. We study structure prediction for computations that involve nonsymmetric row and column permutations and nonsymmetric or non-square matrices. Our tools are bipartite graphs, matchings, and alternating paths. Our main new result concerns LU factorization with partial pivoting. We show that if a square matrix A has the strong Hall property (i.e., is fully indecomposable) then an upper bound due to George and Ng on the nonzero structure of L + U is as tight as possible. To show this, we prove a crucial result about alternating paths in strong Hall graphs. The alternating-paths theorem seems to be of independent interest: it can also be used to prove related results about structure prediction for QR factorization that are due to Coleman, Edenbrandt, Gilbert, Hare, Johnson, Olesky, Pothen, and van den Driessche.

Gilbert, J.R. (Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)); Ng, E.G. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Fission Matrix Capability for MCNP Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect

In a Monte Carlo criticality calculation, before the tallying of quantities can begin, a converged fission source (the fundamental eigenvector of the fission kernel) is required. Tallies of interest may include powers, absorption rates, leakage rates, or the multiplication factor (the fundamental eigenvalue of the fission kernel, k{sub eff}). Just as in the power iteration method of linear algebra, if the dominance ratio (the ratio of the first and zeroth eigenvalues) is high, many iterations of neutron history simulations are required to isolate the fundamental mode of the problem. Optically large systems have large dominance ratios, and systems containing poor neutron communication between regions are also slow to converge. The fission matrix method, implemented into MCNP[1], addresses these problems. When Monte Carlo random walk from a source is executed, the fission kernel is stochastically applied to the source. Random numbers are used for: distances to collision, reaction types, scattering physics, fission reactions, etc. This method is used because the fission kernel is a complex, 7-dimensional operator that is not explicitly known. Deterministic methods use approximations/discretization in energy, space, and direction to the kernel. Consequently, they are faster. Monte Carlo directly simulates the physics, which necessitates the use of random sampling. Because of this statistical noise, common convergence acceleration methods used in deterministic methods do not work. In the fission matrix method, we are using the random walk information not only to build the next-iteration fission source, but also a spatially-averaged fission kernel. Just like in deterministic methods, this involves approximation and discretization. The approximation is the tallying of the spatially-discretized fission kernel with an incorrect fission source. We address this by making the spatial mesh fine enough that this error is negligible. As a consequence of discretization we get a spatially low-order kernel, the fundamental eigenvector of which should converge faster than that of continuous kernel. We can then redistribute the fission bank to match the fundamental fission matrix eigenvector, effectively eliminating all higher modes. For all computations here biasing is not used, with the intention of comparing the unaltered, conventional Monte Carlo process with the fission matrix results. The source convergence of standard Monte Carlo criticality calculations are, to some extent, always subject to the characteristics of the problem. This method seeks to partially eliminate this problem-dependence by directly calculating the spatial coupling. The primary cost of this, which has prevented widespread use since its inception [2,3,4], is the extra storage required. To account for the coupling of all N spatial regions to every other region requires storing N{sup 2} values. For realistic problems, where a fine resolution is required for the suppression of discretization error, the storage becomes inordinate. Two factors lead to a renewed interest here: the larger memory available on modern computers and the development of a better storage scheme based on physical intuition. When the distance between source and fission events is short compared with the size of the entire system, saving memory by accounting for only local coupling introduces little extra error. We can gain other information from directly tallying the fission kernel: higher eigenmodes and eigenvalues. Conventional Monte Carlo cannot calculate this data - here we have a way to get new information for multiplying systems. In Ref. [5], higher mode eigenfunctions are analyzed for a three-region 1-dimensional problem and 2-dimensional homogenous problem. We analyze higher modes for more realistic problems. There is also the question of practical use of this information; here we examine a way of using eigenmode information to address the negative confidence interval bias due to inter-cycle correlation. We apply this method mainly to four problems: 2D pressurized water reactor (PWR) [6],

Carney, Sean E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kiedrowski, Brian C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, William R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

BRST technique for the cosmological density matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The microcanonical density matrix in closed cosmology has a natural definition as a projector on the space of solutions of Wheeler-DeWitt equations, which is motivated by the absence of global non-vanishing charges and energy in spatially closed gravitational systems. Using the BRST/BFV formalism in relativistic phase space of gauge and ghost variables we derive the path integral representation for this projector and the relevant statistical sum. This derivation circumvents the difficulties associated with the open algebra of noncommutative quantum Dirac constraints and the construction/regularization of the physical inner product in the subspace of BRS singlets. This inner product is achieved via the Batalin-Marnelius gauge fixing in the space of BRS-invariant states, which in its turn is shown to be a result of truncation of the BRST/BFV formalism to the "matter" sector of relativistic phase space.

Andrei O. Barvinsky

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Matrix, Drug Testing for DOE Security Clearance - September 1, 2011 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Matrix, Drug Testing for DOE Security Clearance - September 1, 2011 Matrix, Drug Testing for DOE Security Clearance - September 1, 2011 Matrix, Drug Testing for DOE Security Clearance - September 1, 2011 September 1, 2011 The following matrix identifies those individuals required to have a current negative drug test as a prerequisite for being processed for a security clearance The following matrix identifies those individuals required to have a current negative drug test as a prerequisite for being processed for a security clearance. A current test is one taken within 60 calendar days of the individual's SF-86/SF-86C signature date. For those cases where no such form is collected (e.g. reciprocity) the test must have been taken within 60 calendar days of the date of the request for security clearance. Matrix, Drug Testing for DOE security clearance - September 1, 2011

280

Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Synthesis and Properties of Metal-Matrix Nano Composites (MMNCs)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Recent work on particle reinforced metal-matrix nano composites (MMNCs), Syntactic Foams, and Self-Healing Metals by solidification synthesis...

282

Mechanical Performance of Discontinuous Carbon Fiber-SiC Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Mechanical Performance of Discontinuous Carbon Fiber-SiC Matrix Composites for Wear Components of High-Speed Train Applications.

283

Rare Earth Modified Matrices for SiC Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Rare Earth Modified Matrices for SiC Matrix Composites. Author(s), David L Poerschke, Carlos G Levi. On-Site Speaker (Planned), David L

284

Joining and Integration Issues of Ceramic Matrix Composites for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials with the highest potential for these applications are fibre reinforced CMC, ... carbon fiber reinforced/carbon matrix composites (C/C) and silicon carbide...

285

AN EFFICIENT MATRIX SPLITTING METHOD FOR THE SECOND ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

general does not impose any requirement on the structure of the matrix, and (iii) when Bii is chosen properly (for example lower triangular), solving our nonlinear.

286

Matrix-free Interior Point Method for Compressed Sensing Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aug 27, 2012 ... Matrix-free Interior Point Method for Compressed Sensing Problems. Kimon Fountoulakis (K.Fountoulakis ***at*** sms.ed.ac.uk) Jacek Gondzio...

287

Matrix Element Distribution as a Signature of Entanglement Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore connections between an operator's matrix element distribution and its entanglement generation. Operators with matrix element distributions similar to those of random matrices generate states of high multi-partite entanglement. This occurs even when other statistical properties of the operators do not conincide with random matrices. Similarly, operators with some statistical properties of random matrices may not exhibit random matrix element distributions and will not produce states with high levels of multi-partite entanglement. Finally, we show that operators with similar matrix element distributions generate similar amounts of entanglement.

Yaakov S. Weinstein; C. Stephen Hellberg

2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

288

Table 4-3 Site Wide Environmental Management Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site-Wide Environmental Assessment of Table 4-3. Site-Wide Environmental Management Matrix National Renewable Energy Laboratory's South Table Mountain Complex FINAL POTENTIAL...

289

Microstructure of Aluminum Matrix in Composite Absorber Block ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), Donna Post Guillen, Jatuporn Burns. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Donna Post Guillen. Abstract Scope, Microstructure of a new metal matrix composite...

290

Faster Inversion and Other Black Box Matrix Computations Using ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the null space of such a matrix, and a certification of its. ?This material is based on ...... singular, then either the randomized conditioning or the rank estimate has ...

291

Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

May 1, 2007 ... Carbon Fiber with Ni-Coated Reinforced Aluminum Alloy Matrix Composites by Bianhua Han, Tianjiao Luo, Chunlin Liang,Guangchun Yao,...

292

Metal-Matrix Composites in Industry: A Database of Companies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This database is based on content originally developed for the Kluwer Academic Publishers volume Metal Matrix Composites in Industry: An Introduction and...

293

Variational Two-electron Reduced Density Matrix Theory for Many ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sep 16, 2005 ... Abstract: The energy and properties of a many-electron atom or ... of a two- electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) that is constrained to...

294

The Reduced Density Matrix Method for Electronic Structure ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 14, 2003 ... This suggested to Mayer that the ground state energy. and density matrix information could be economically computed by simply carrying...

295

Institute of Computer Science Band preconditioners for the matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Computer Science. Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. Band preconditioners for the matrix-free truncated Newton method. Ladislav Lukan...

296

Investigation of Powder Metallurgy Titanium Matrix Composites by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Investigation of Powder Metallurgy Titanium Matrix Composites by Planetary Ball-milling of Ti Powder Dispersed with Vapour Grown Carbon...

297

Ceramic Matrix Composites for Nuclear and Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ceramic matrix composites are considered among the key enabling materials for advanced nuclear reactors and fusion energy systems. Silicon...

298

Optimization Online - Sufficient Conditions for Low-rank Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 15, 2011 ... This class of optimization problems is $NP$-hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix...

299

SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR LOW-RANK MATRIX RECOVERY ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jun 15, 2011 ... but also provide sufficient conditions for exact and stable s-rank matrix recovery via the nuclear norm minimization under mild assumptions.

300

Fully Ceramic Matrix Micro-Encapsulated Fuel Form  

is the primary boundary and the SiC matrix is the secondary barrier to fission product (FP) and actinide diffusion and other releases of radioactivity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Application of External Fields to Technology of Metal-Matrix ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Columnar-to-Equiaxed Transition in Metal Matrix Composites ... Produced by a Combination of High Energy Mechanical Milling and Powder Consolidation.

302

Science and Engineering of Light Metal Matrix Nanocomposites and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Science and Engineering of Light Metal Matrix Nanocomposites ... Mg and Ti) can offer significantly improved energy efficiency over heavier metals.

303

Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Fabrication of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy Application. Author(s), Indrajit Charit, Jonathan A.

304

Asymptotic Expressions for Charge Matrix Elements of the Fluxonium Circuit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In charge-coupled circuit QED systems, transition amplitudes and dispersive shifts are governed by the matrix elements of the charge operator. For the fluxonium circuit, these matrix elements are not limited to nearest-neighbor energy levels and are conveniently tunable by magnetic flux. Previously, their values were largely obtained numerically. Here, we present analytical expressions for the fluxonium charge matrix elements. We show that new selection rules emerge in the asymptotic limit of large Josephson energy and small inductive energy. We illustrate the usefulness of our expressions for the qualitative understanding of charge matrix elements in the parameter regime probed by previous experiments.

Zhu, Guanyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Identification of Damage Modes in Ceramic Matrix Composites ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis and Modeling of Foreign Object Damage (FOD) in Ceramic Matrix ... and Microstructure of Alumina Composites for Energy Efficient Sliding Systems.

306

Fast implementation for semidefinite programs with positive matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 26, 2013 ... on the inverse of the variable matrix to enhance the performance of the ...... These SDPs arise from the computation for the ground-state energy...

307

Optimization Online - The Reduced Density Matrix Method for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 16, 2003 ... The Reduced Density Matrix Method for Electronic Structure Calculations ... Calculations of the ground state energy and the dipole moment are...

308

Energy Program Assessment Matrix | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Assessment Matrix Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

309

A simulated annealing approach with probability matrix for semiconductor dynamic scheduling problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic scheduling problem of semiconductor burn-in operations is studied in this paper. The burn-in oven is a batch-processing machine and the size of each job is independent of the oven's capacity. The processing time for each batch is represented ... Keywords: Deadlines, Heuristic, Simulated annealing, Total weighted completion time

Fuh-Der Chou; Hui-Mei Wang; Pei-Chann Chang

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

R E S E A R C H A R T I C L E Batch and continuous culture-based selection strategiesforacetic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Abstract Acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is crucial for the production of bioethanol concentration of the growth-limiting nutrient. Conversely, selection in batch cultures will tend to favor cells production from nonfood lignocellulosic plant biomass. However, fermentation of these pentose sugars

Wagner, Andreas

311

Exploiting Matrix Symmetries and Physical Symmetries in Matrix Product States and Tensor Trains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We focus on symmetries related to matrices and vectors appearing in the simulation of quantum many-body systems. Spin Hamiltonians have special matrix-symmetry properties such as persymmetry. Furthermore, the systems may exhibit physical symmetries translating into symmetry properties of the eigenvectors of interest. Both types of symmetry can be exploited in sparse representation formats such as Matrix Product States (MPS) for the desired eigenvectors. This paper summarizes symmetries of Hamiltonians for typical physical systems such as the Ising model and lists resulting properties of the related eigenvectors. Based on an overview of Matrix Product States (Tensor Trains or Tensor Chains) and their canonical normal forms we show how symmetry properties of the vector translate into relations between the MPS matrices and, in turn, which symmetry properties result from relations within the MPS matrices. In this context we analyze different kinds of symmetries and derive appropriate normal forms for MPS representing these symmetries. Exploiting such symmetries by using these normal forms will lead to a reduction in the number of degrees of freedom in the MPS matrices. This paper provides a uniform platform for both well-known and new results which are presented from the (multi-)linear algebra point of view.

T. Huckle; K. Waldherr; T. Schulte-Herbrueggen

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

312

SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct. SRNL issued a Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan [4] in response to the SRR request. The conclusions provided in this report are that no changes need to be made to the SME acceptability process (i.e., no modifications to WSRC-TR-95-00364, Revision 5, are needed) and no changes need to be made to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) itself (i.e. the spreadsheet utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) for acceptability decisions does not require modification) in response to thorium becoming a reportable element for DWPF operations. In addition, the inputs and results for the two test cases requested by WSE for use in confirming the successful activation of thorium as a reportable element for DWPF operations during the processing of SB6 are presented in this report.

Edwards, T.

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Analytical Model for Solute Transport in Unsaturated Flow through a Single Fracture and Porous Rock Matrix  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fracture matrix solute source rock matrix rock matrix vin fracture; b) solute source in rock matrix. Draft 8-11-04for a point source in the rock matrix are presented in

Houseworth, J.E.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Quantum discord in matrix product systems  

SciTech Connect

We consider a class of quantum systems with spin-flip symmetry and derive the quantum correlation measured by the quantum discord (QD). As an illustration, we investigate the QD in a three-body interaction model and an XYZ interaction model, whose ground states can be expressed as matrix product states, and the QD is exactly soluble. We show that the QD behaves differently than the quantum entanglement (QE) in many ways; for example, they may show opposite monotonicity and completely different finite-size effects. Furthermore, we compare the capability of the QD and the QE to detect quantum phase transitions (QPTs) and find that the QD is more reliable than the QE for signaling QPTs in these models: In the three-body interaction model, the QE is singular at the quantum critical point, however, it exhibits an additional singularity in the noncritical region, while the analyticity of the QD can be used to identify the quantum critical point perfectly; and in the XYZ interaction model, the QE vanishes in the thermodynamic limit, thus losing its ability to detect QPTs, while the QD still functions very well.

Sun Zhaoyu; Li Liang; Du Guihuan [Wuhan National High Magnetic Field Center, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yao Kailun; Liu Jiwei; Luo Bo; Li Neng; Li Haina [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Density matrix, superconductivity and molecular structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting from Yang`s offdiagonal long-range order concept and the macroscopic occupation condition for the second order density matrix as the basis for condensation phenomena the authors develop the notion that the extremal wave function (EWF), which is related to these conditions, leads to superconductivity in monatomic systems. It is proven that the BCS model and the version where it is projected onto a fixed number of particles possesses EWF properties, differs negligibly from the EWF, and conserves offdiagonal long-range order. The condition for the EWF to be energetically favored is the presence of macroscopic degenerate one-electron energy levels in the system, partial occupation of this degenerate region, and also an effective attraction among the electrons. Considerations are advanced indicating that these conditions are satisfied in the high temperature superconducting metal oxide ceramics, due to the presence of macroscopically degenerate diffusion orbitals distributed among the O{sup -} ions in the CuO{sub 2} layers, and with the effective screening of these layers by the metal-like La, Ba, Y, or O layers. 51 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Mestechkin, M.M.; Klimko, G.T.; Vaiman, G.E. [Academy of Science of the Ukrainian SSR, Donetsk (Russian Federation)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Energy-Efficient Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop new algorithms and architectures for matrix multiplication on configurable devices. These designs significantly reduce the energy dissipation and latency compared with the state-of-the-art FPGA-based designs. We derive functions to represent the impact of algorithmic level design choices on the system-wide energy dissipation, latency, and area by capturing algorithm and architecture details including features of the target FPGA. The functions are used to optimize energy performance under latency and area constraints for a family of candidate algorithms and architectures. As a result, our designs improve the energy performance of the optimized design from the recent Xilinx library by 32% to 88% without any increase in area-latency product. In terms of comprehensive metrics such as EAT (Energy-Area-Time) and E/AT (Energy/Area-Time), our designs offer superior performance compared with the Xilinx design by 50%-79% and 13%-44%, respectively. We also address how to exploit further increases in density of future FPGA devices for asymptotic improvement in latency and energy dissipation for multiplication of larger size matrices.

Ju-wook Jang; Seonil Choi; Viktor K. Prasanna

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Infiltration Processing of Metal Matrix-Fly Ash Particle Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal Matrix composites can provide improved functional properties compared to solid metal castings while saving production energy and raw material costs. Ash-derived metal matrix composites, in particular, can provide high value-added use to coal fly ash. This report describes research on use of pressure infiltration techniques to produce composites for automotive component applications.

1997-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Aluminum - Fly Ash Metal Matrix Composites as Advanced Automobile Material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Metal matrix composites such as silicon carbide-aluminum, alumina-aluminum, and graphite-aluminum represent a class of emerging materials with significant potential for commercial use in the auto and aerospace industries. In industrial foundry trials, a joint industry and Department of Energy project demonstrated a promising new process for producing a low cost aluminum metal matrix composite containing fly ash particles.

2001-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modeling of switching operations using fault matrix method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Switching operations in energy supply networks are either modeled by adding or removing artificial nodes which results in state dependent grid topology or by setting the switch impedance to high or low value. This procedure is not very accurate and can ... Keywords: admittance matrix, fault matrix method, power system, switching operation, transmission lines

Martin Wolter; Bernd R. Oswald

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the decision variable and use incremental gradient methods that operate upon ... P : Rnrnc ? R will be a matrix regularizer which will control some measure of complexity ...... indicating longer epochs (although the operating system reports 24 processors). .... The power of convex relaxation: Near-optimal matrix completion.

322

MRM: A matrix representation and mapping approach for knowledge acquisition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge acquisition plays a critical role in constructing a knowledge-based system (KBS). It is the most time-consuming phase and has been recognized as the bottleneck of KBS development. This paper presents a matrix representation and mapping (MRM) ... Keywords: General sorting, Knowledge acquisition, Knowledge-based systems, Matrix representation and mapping, Rule generation

Chun-Hsien Chen; Zhiming Rao

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Google matrix analysis of DNA sequences Vivek Kandiah1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Google matrix analysis of DNA sequences Vivek Kandiah1 , Dima L. Shepelyansky1, 1 Laboratoire de.quantware.ups-tlse.fr/dima Abstract For DNA sequences of various species we construct the Google matrix G of Markov tran- sitions their statistical similarity from the view point of Markov chains. The properties of other eigenstates of the Google

Shepelyansky, Dima

324

Free Processes via Matrix Theory Concentration week on free Probability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Processes via Matrix Theory Concentration week on free Probability Texas A&M, July 9-13. Nizar Demni Paris VI University July 10, 2007 Nizar Demni Paris VI University Free Processes via Matrix Theory Concentration week on free Pr #12;Definitions Non commutative probability space : Unital Algebra A + linear

Anshelevich, Michael

325

A Group-Theoretic Approach to Fast Matrix Multiplication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a new, group-theoretic approach to bounding the exponent of matrix multiplication. There are two components to this approach: (1) identifying groups G that admit a certain type of embedding of matrix multiplication into the group algebra \\mathbb{C}[G] ...

Henry Cohn; Christopher Umans

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Generalized admittance matrix models of OTRAs and COAs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes new admittance matrix models to approach the behavior of fully-differential Operational Transresistance Amplifiers (OTRAs) and Current Operational Amplifiers (COAs). The infinity-variables method is used in order to derive the new ... Keywords: Admittance matrix, Current operational amplifier, Nullor, Operational transresistance amplifier, Symbolic analysis

C. Snchez-Lpez; F. V. Fernndez; E. Tlelo-Cuautle

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cross Reference Matrix Introduction Cross Reference Matrix Introduction This cross-reference matrix is intended to provide NRC reviewers with an aid to show where Yucca Mountain Review Plan (YMRP) (NUREG-1804) acceptance criteria as well as 10 CFR Part 63 regulations are addressed within the Yucca Mountain Repository License Application. This matrix does not assert compliance with 10 CFR Part 63 or the YMRP; it is provided as an aid to reviewers. The information contained in this matrix is generally repeated in tables at the introduction to each chapter or section of the License Application, as appropriate. The YMRP acceptance criteria are also listed within the relevant subsections of the License Application, typically at the fourth level headings, to aid reviewers. The portions of 10 CFR Part 63 that are not required to be addressed in

328

Simulation of bilinear flow in single matrix block drainage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents modeling of bilinear flow in tight gas wells and its behavior on single matrix block drainage. The objectives of this research are to: simulate a tight gas well using matrix block drainage under constant production pwf and with a constant production rate; be able to predict the behavior of matrix block drainage; study the effect of natural fracture(s) near a well; examine the matrix block drainage in a natural fracture network; and to validate a matrix block drainage model with a hydraulic fracture analytical solution. Two different production scenarios, constant pwf and constant rate, are assigned to a tight gas well in matrix block drainage. Matrix block drainage has two distinct permeabilities; a low permeability matrix serves as the tight gas reservoir with a high permeability streak surrounding the matrix. A well only produces from the high permeability fracture. Models were run with different sensitivity cases toward fracture half length, xf, and fracture permeability kf,. The fracture half-length reflects on a/b aspect ratio. The analytical solution for hydraulic fracture developed by Cinco-Ley and Guppy serves as the validation of matrix block drainage. Analysis on the flow regimes which occurred for different geometries and properties are provided. The log-log diagnostic plot of pseudo-pressure drop/gas rates and the log-log plot of dimensionless pressure derivatives and dimensionless reciprocal production rates are presented. Finally, an attempt to normalize the late time and early time of all geometries and properties is presented to obtain one analytical solution.

Branajaya, Romi Triaji

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

ANALYTICAL PLANS SUPPORTING THE SLUDGE BATCH 8 GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY BEING CONDUCTED BY ENERGYSOLUTIONS AND CUA'S VITREOUS STATE LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

Edwards, T.; Peeler, D.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

330

Hydrogen Generation through Indirect Biophotolysis in Batch Cultures of the Non-Heterocystous Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nitrogen-fixing non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO2 to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg?day or 7.3 ?mol/mg?day) ) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 ?mol/m2?sec. The addition of photosystem II inhibitor DCMU did not reduce hydrogen production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 hours, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at photosystem II (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Carter, Blaine M.; Gerschler, Jared J.; Benemann, John R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

332

Fig.1. Google matrix of Wikipedia articles network, written in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fig.1. Google matrix of Wikipedia articles network, written in the bases of PageRank index; fragment of top 200 X 200 matrix elements is shown, total size N=3282257 (from [19]) Google matrix From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A Google matrix is a particular stochastic matrix that is used by Google

Shepelyansky, Dima

333

The nearness problems for symmetric matrix with a submatrix constraint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we first give the representation of the general solution of the following least-squares problem (LSP): given a matrix X@?R^n^x^p and symmetric matrices B@?R^p^x^p, A"0@?R^r^x^r, find an nxn symmetric matrix A such that @?X^TAX-B@?=min,s.t.A([1,r])=A"0, ... Keywords: 15A24, 15A57, 65F18, Best approximation, Model updating, Singular value decomposition, Symmetric matrix

Yongxin Yuan; Hua Dai

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Handbook Article on Applications of Random Matrix Theory to QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter of the Oxford Handbook of Random Matrix Theory we introduce chiral Random Matrix Theories with the global symmetries of QCD. In the microscopic domain, these theories reproduce the mass and chemical potential dependence of QCD. The main focus of this chapter is on the spectral properties of the QCD Dirac operator and relations between chiral Random Matrix Theories and chiral Lagrangians. Both spectra of the anti-hermitian Dirac operator and spectra of the nonhermitian Dirac operator at nonzero chemical potential are discussed.

J. J. M. Verbaarschot

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

335

Handbook Article on Applications of Random Matrix Theory to QCD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this chapter of the Oxford Handbook of Random Matrix Theory we introduce chiral Random Matrix Theories with the global symmetries of QCD. In the microscopic domain, these theories reproduce the mass and chemical potential dependence of QCD. The main focus of this chapter is on the spectral properties of the QCD Dirac operator and relations between chiral Random Matrix Theories and chiral Lagrangians. Both spectra of the anti-hermitian Dirac operator and spectra of the nonhermitian Dirac operator at nonzero chemical potential are discussed.

Verbaarschot, J J M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A new type fit for the CKM matrix elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of the paper is to propose a new type of fits in terms of invariant quantities for finding the entries of the CKM matrix from the quark sector, by using the mathematical solution to the reconstruction problem of 3 x 3 unitary matrices from experimental data, recently found. The necessity of this type of fit comes from the compatibility conditions between the data and the theoretical model formalised by the CKM matrix, which imply many strong nonlinear conditions on moduli which all have to be satisfied in order to obtain a unitary matrix.

Petre Dita

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

337

Google matrix and Ulam networks of intermittency maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the properties of the Google matrix of an Ulam network generated by intermittency maps. This network is created by the Ulam method which gives a matrix approximant for the Perron-Frobenius operator of dynamical map. The spectral properties of eigenvalues and eigenvectors of this matrix are analyzed. We show that the PageRank of the system is characterized by a power law decay with the exponent $\\beta$ dependent on map parameters and the Google damping factor $\\alpha$. Under certain conditions the PageRank is completely delocalized so that the Google search in such a situation becomes inefficient.

Leonardo Ermann; Dima D. L. Shepelyansky

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Looking for a Matrix model for ABJM theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Encouraged by the recent construction of fuzzy sphere solutions in the Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena (ABJM) theory, we re-analyze the latter from the perspective of a Matrix-like model. In particular, we argue that a vortex solution exhibits properties of a supergraviton, while a kink represents a 2-brane. Other solutions are also consistent with the Matrix-type interpretation. We study vortex scattering and compare with graviton scattering in the massive ABJM background, however our results are inconclusive. We speculate on how to extend our results to construct a Matrix theory of ABJM.

Mohammed, Asadig [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Murugan, Jeff [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nastase, Horatiu [Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Lax matrix solution of c=1 Conformal Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To a correlation function in a two-dimensional conformal field theory with the central charge c=1, we associate a matrix differential equation \\Psi'=L\\Psi, where the Lax matrix L is a matrix square root of the energy-momentum tensor. Then local conformal symmetry translates into isomonodromy of the differential equation. This provides a justification for the recently observed relation between four-point conformal blocks and solutions of the Painleve VI equation. This also provides a direct way to compute the three-point function of Runkel-Watts theory - the common c->1 limit of Minimal Models and Liouville theory.

Eynard, Bertrand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Relaxation of a Simple Quantum Random Matrix Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We will derive here the relaxation behavior of a simple quantum random matrix model. The aim is to derive the effective equations which rise when a random matrix interaction is taken in the weak coupling limit. The physical situation this model represents is that a quantum particle restricted to move on two sites, where every site has N possible energy states. The hopping from one site to another is then modeled by a random matrix. The techniques used here can be applied to many variations of the model.

Vidal, Pedro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Lax matrix solution of c=1 Conformal Field Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To a correlation function in a two-dimensional conformal field theory with the central charge c=1, we associate a matrix differential equation \\Psi'=L\\Psi, where the Lax matrix L is a matrix square root of the energy-momentum tensor. Then local conformal symmetry translates into isomonodromy of the differential equation. This provides a justification for the recently observed relation between four-point conformal blocks and solutions of the Painleve VI equation. This also provides a direct way to compute the three-point function of Runkel-Watts theory - the common c->1 limit of Minimal Models and Liouville theory.

Bertrand Eynard; Sylvain Ribault

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

342

Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations  

SciTech Connect

We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

Rajendra Bordia

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

EERE Program Management Guide - Appendices A-Q  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Appendix B Appendix B Suggested Practice Developing the Annual Operating Plan Phase II Guidance The Annual Operating Plan (AOP): * Facilitates planning, * Establishes a baseline for measuring progress, and * Identifies the program's mission, functions, and resources. The purpose of execution planning, which encompasses the Annual Operating Plan (AOP), is to facilitate program planning and communication and to establish a baseline for measuring the progress over the course of each fiscal year (FY). The AOP will identify the program mission and functions, which support the overall mission and functions of the higher-level organizations, program strategic objectives, FY tasks planned under each strategic objective, and the personnel and fiscal resources assigned for task accomplishment. The AOP will also identify

345

HLW Feed Delivery AZ101 Batch Transfer to the Private Contractor Transfer and Mixing Process Improvements [Initial Release at Rev 2  

SciTech Connect

The primary purpose of this business case is to provide Operations and Maintenance with a detailed transfer process review for the first High Level Waste (HLW) feed delivery to the Privatization Contractor (PC), AZ-101 batch transfer to PC. The Team was chartered to identify improvements that could be implemented in the field. A significant penalty can be invoked for not providing the quality, quantity, or timely delivery of HLW feed to the PC.

DUNCAN, G.P.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

346

Neutronics and Depletion Methods for Parametric Studies of Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors with Slab Fuel Geometry and Multi-Batch Fuel Management Schemes  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a 3400 MWth fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) that uses TRISO particle fuel compacted into slabs rather than spherical fuel pebbles or cylindrical fuel compacts. Simplified methods are required for parametric design studies such that analyzing the entire feasible design space for an AHTR is tractable. These simplifications include fuel homogenization techniques to increase the speed of neutron transport calculations in depletion analysis and equilibrium depletion analysis methods to analyze systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. This paper presents three elements of significant novelty. First, the reactivity-equivalent physical transformation (RPT) methodology usually applied in systems with coated particle fuel in cylindrical and spherical geometries was extended to slab geometries. Secondly, based on this newly developed RPT method for slab geometries, a methodology that uses Monte Carlo depletion approaches was further developed to search for the maximum discharge burnup in a multi-batch system by iteratively estimating the beginning of equilibrium cycle composition and sampling different discharge burnups. This iterative equilibrium depletion search (IEDS) method fully defines an equilibrium fuel cycle (keff, power, flux and composition evolutions across space and time), but is computationally demanding, although feasible on single-processor workstations. Finally, an analytical method, the non-linear reactivity model, was developed by expanding the linear reactivity model to include an arbitrary number of higher order terms to extrapolate single-batch depletion results to estimate the maximum discharge burnup and BOEC keff in systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. Results from this method were benchmarked against equilibrium depletion analysis results using the IEDS.

Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California, Berkeley; Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Neutronics and Depletion Methods for Parametric Studies of Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactors with Slab Fuel Geometry and Multi-Batch Fuel Management Schemes  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a 3400 MWth fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) that uses TRISO particle fuel compacted into slabs rather than spherical or cylindrical fuel compacts. Simplified methods are required for parametric design studies such that analyzing the entire feasible design space for an AHTR is tractable. These simplifications include fuel homogenization techniques to increase the speed of neutron transport calculations in depletion analysis and equilibrium depletion analysis methods to analyze systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. This paper presents three elements of significant novelty. First, the Reactivity-Equivalent Physical Transformation (RPT) methodology usually applied in systems with coated-particle fuel in cylindrical and spherical geometries has been extended to slab geometries. Secondly, based on this newly developed RPT method for slab geometries, a methodology that uses Monte Carlo depletion approaches was further developed to search for the maximum discharge burnup in a multi-batch system by iteratively estimating the beginning of equilibrium cycle (BOEC) composition and sampling different discharge burnups. This Iterative Equilibrium Depletion Search (IEDS) method fully defines an equilibrium fuel cycle (keff, power, flux, and composition evolutions) but is computationally demanding, although feasible on single-processor workstations. Finally, an analytical method, the Non-Linear Reactivity Model, was developed by expanding the linear reactivity model to include an arbitrary number of higher order terms so that single-batch depletion results could be extrapolated to estimate the maximum discharge burnup and BOEC keff in systems with multi-batch fuel management schemes. Results from this method were benchmarked against equilibrium depletion analysis results using the IEDS.

Cisneros, Anselmo T. [University of California, Berkeley; Ilas, Dan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

350

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

351

S-matrix and R-matrix determination of the low-energy 5 He and 5  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the low-energy 3/2 ? and 1/2 ? states of 5 He and 5 Li in a microscopic cluster model. The scattering phase shifts of Bond (? + n) and of Schwandt (? + p), respectively, are reproduced well. We determine the resonance parameters by localizing the poles of the analytically continued S-matrix at complex energies. Our results differ from conventional R-matrix resonance parameters, which were extracted from experimental data using the definition of a resonance based on the positions and widths of reaction cross section peaks. However, they nicely agree with the results of an extended R-matrix method which works at complex energies.

Li Resonance Parameters

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Early-warning process/control for anaerobic digestion and biological nitrogen transformation processes: Batch, semi-continuous, and/or chemostat experiments. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to develop and test an early-warning/process control model for anaerobic sludge digestion (AD). The approach was to use batch and semi-continuously fed systems and to assemble system parameter data on a real-time basis. Specific goals were to produce a real-time early warning control model and computer code, tested for internal and external validity; to determine the minimum rate of data collection for maximum lag time to predict failure with a prescribed accuracy and confidence in the prediction; and to determine and characterize any trends in the real-time data collected in response to particular perturbations to feedstock quality. Trends in the response of trace gases carbon monoxide and hydrogen in batch experiments, were found to depend on toxicant type. For example, these trace gases respond differently for organic substances vs. heavy metals. In both batch and semi-continuously feed experiments, increased organic loading lead to proportionate increases in gas production rates as well as increases in CO and H{sub 2} concentration. An analysis of variance of gas parameters confirmed that CO was the most sensitive indicator variable by virtue of its relatively larger variance compared to the others. The other parameters evaluated including gas production, methane production, hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane concentration. In addition, a relationship was hypothesized between gaseous CO concentration and acetate concentrations in the digester. The data from semicontinuous feed experiments were supportive.

Hickey, R. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

CellMatrix De-Adhesion Dynamics Reflect Contractile Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and extracellular matrix mechanics. Biophys. J. 90(10):3762Radmacher, M. Studying the mechanics of cellular pro- cessesD. A. Hammer. The dynamics and mechanics of endothelial cell

Sen, Shamik; Kumar, Sanjay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Worlds Beyond the Matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video (The Physics of Baseball) Science Series Video Archive Next Video (The Physics of Stock Car Racing) The Physics of Stock Car Racing Worlds Beyond the Matrix Nigel Hey -...

355

A paradigm for parallel matrix algorithms: scalable cholesky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A style for programming problems from matrix algebra is developed with a familiar example and new tools, yielding high performance with a couple of surprising exceptions. The underlying philosophy is to use block recursion as the exclusive control structure, ...

David S. Wise; Craig Citro; Joshua Hursey; Fang Liu; Michael Rainey

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Rank and inertia optimizations of two Hermitian quadratic matrix ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cCollege of Mathematics Science, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng, Shandong ... equations, have been two classes of fundamental object of study in matrix ...... rank formulas and their applications were collected in some recent handbooks for .

357

ME EET Seminar: Conductive Polymer Matrix to Enable Si Nanomaterials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conductive Polymer Matrix to Enable Si Nanomaterials for Energy Storage Speaker(s): Gao Liu Date: February 17, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: Campus TBD For more information about this...

358

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for Phase-in Period.xls&0; Attachment 4 Volume III Pricing Matrix for...

359

Blob Batch Button  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... From the first point to the right of the zero intercept ... Use the Stats Button, just to the left of the ... Input is blob stats file, a text, tab-delimited spreadsheet ...

360

Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

Smith, Don D.

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Program on Technology Innovation: EPRI Materials Management Matrix (MMM) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) Risk Priority Evaluation is the third activity supporting development of the ESBWR Materials Management Matrix (MMM). The first phase involved developing a list of in-scope components and materials of construction. The second phase focused on development of an ESBWR-specific Degradation Matrix (DM), which supplies important input into the Risk Priority Evaluation process documented in this report, and can help in understanding the opinions of material...

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Wire Brush and Alternatives Selection Matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this product is to provide maintenance personnel guidance regarding the suitability of various non-wire filament brush products for different applications in the plant. The objective of the Wire Brush and Alternatives Selection Matrix is to provide recommendations and encourage the use of products in lieu of wire brushes. The recommendations in the matrix were developed based on the testing described EPRI report 1022273, Wire Brush Testing, Procurement and Usage Guide, and recommendations ...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

AZURE: An R-matrix code for nuclear astrophysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes a multilevel, multichannel R-matrix code, AZURE, for applications in nuclear astrophysics. The code allows simultaneous analysis and extrapolation of low-energy particle scattering, capture, and reaction cross sections of relevance to stellar hydrogen, helium, and carbon burning. The paper presents a summary of R-matrix theory, code description, and a number of applications to demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AZURE.

Azuma, R. E. [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1A7 (Canada); University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Uberseder, E.; Boer, R. J. de; Goerres, J.; LeBlanc, P. J.; Ugalde, C.; Wiescher, M. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Simpson, E. C. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Brune, C. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Ohio 45701 (United States); Costantini, H. [University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare (INFN), Genova (Italy); Heil, M. [GSI Darmstadt, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

364

On global optimizations of the rank and inertia of the matrix function A1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a matrix expression can directly be used to characterize some fundamental ...... [ 26] G.A.F. Seber, A Matrix Handbook for Statisticians, John Wiley & Sons, 2008.

365

VIBRATIONAL RELAXATION AND ENERGY TRANSFER OF MATRIX ISOLATED HC1 AND DC1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RELAXATION AND ENERGY TRANSFER OF MATRIX ISOLATED HC1 ANDtemperatures in matrices, the higher energy phonon modes areGUEST The energy initially put into a matrix isolated

Wiesenfeld, J.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Laser Deposited In Situ TiC Reinforced Nickel Matrix Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, A new class of Ni-Ti-C based metal matrix composites has been ... of Metal Matrix Composites via Spark Plasma Sintering for Nuclear Energy...

367

EPRI Materials Management Matrix Project: Advanced Light-Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix - Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Light Water Reactor - Pressurized Water Reactor Degradation Matrix (ALWR PWR DM) is an integral piece of the Electric Power Research Institutes (EPRIs) Materials Management Matrix (MMM) initiative for ALWR designs. The MMM provides a tool to assist the industry in proactive identification and consideration of materials issues and mitigation/management opportunities from the design phase through component fabrication and plant construction to operations and maintenance.

2010-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR  

SciTech Connect

To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

369

SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL  

SciTech Connect

Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, G.W.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

371

Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL Jump to: navigation, search Name Matrix Agro Pvt. Ltd. (MAPL) Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Zip 500034 Sector Biomass Product Hyderabad-based biomass project developer. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

372

Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix Categorizing Threat Building and Using a Generic Threat Matrix The key piece of knowledge necessary for building defenses capable of withstanding or surviving cyber and kinetic attacks is an understanding of the capabilities posed by threats to a government, function, or system. With the number of threats continuing to increase, it is no longer feasible to enumerate the capabilities of all known threats and then build defenses based on those threats that are considered, at the time, to be the most relevant. Exacerbating the problem for critical infrastructure entities is the fact that the majority of detailed threat information for higher-level threats is held in classified status and is not available for general

373

Matrix Formulation of Pebble Circulation in the PEBBED Code  

SciTech Connect

The PEBBED technique provides a foundation for equilibrium fuel-cycle analysis and optimization in pebble-bed cores in which the fuel elements are continuously flowing and, if desired, recirculating. In addition to the modern analysis techniques used in, or being developed for, the code, PEBBED incorporates a novel nuclide-mixing algorithm that allows for sophisticated recirculation patterns using a matrix generated from basic core parameters. Derived from a simple partitioning of the pebble flow, the elements of the recirculation matrix are used to compute the spatially averaged density of each nuclide at the entry plane from the nuclide densities of pebbles emerging from the discharge conus. The order of the recirculation matrix is a function of the flexibility and sophistication of the fuel handling mechanism. This formulation for coupling pebble flow and neutronics enables core design and fuel cycle optimization to be performed by manipulating a few key core parameters. The formulation is amenable to modern optimization techniques.

Gougar, Hans D; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Enumeration of RNA complexes via random matrix theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review a derivation of the numbers of RNA complexes of an arbitrary topology. These numbers are encoded in the free energy of the hermitian matrix model with potential V(x)=x^2/2-stx/(1-tx), where s and t are respective generating parameters for the number of RNA molecules and hydrogen bonds in a given complex. The free energies of this matrix model are computed using the so-called topological recursion, which is a powerful new formalism arising from random matrix theory. These numbers of RNA complexes also have profound meaning in mathematics: they provide the number of chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones and chords as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces of fixed topological type.

Jrgen E. Andersen; Leonid O. Chekhov; R. C. Penner; Christian M. Reidys; Piotr Su?kowski

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

375

Facility Energy Assessment Matrix | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Energy Assessment Matrix Facility Energy Assessment Matrix Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

376

The curvature of branes, currents and gravity in matrix models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The curvature of brane solutions in Yang-Mills matrix models is expressed in terms of conserved currents associated with global symmetries of the model. This implies a relation between the Ricci tensor and the energy-momentum tensor due to the basic matrix model action, without invoking an Einstein-Hilbert term. The coupling is governed by the extrinsic curvature of the brane embedding, which arises naturally for compactified brane solutions. The effective gravity on the brane is thereby related to the compactification moduli, and protected from quantum corrections due to the relation with global symmetries.

Harold Steinacker

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

DEVELOPMENT OF A MACRO-BATCH QUALIFICATION STRATEGY FOR THE HANFORD TANK WASTE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION PLANT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: ? Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; ? The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; ? The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and ? The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: ? Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; ? Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; ? Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; ? Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and ? Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

Herman, C.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Matrix grain characterisation by electron backscattering diffraction of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites reinforced with MoSi{sub 2} intermetallic particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research highlights: Six extruded PM AA6061/MoSi{sub 2}/15p were processed with and without ball milling {yields} EBSD was used to characterise matrix grain size and grain orientation. {yields} Ball milling decreases matrix grain size to submicrometric level. {yields} Ball milling produces a more equiaxed microstructure and larger misorientation. {yields} Increasing milling time produces matrix texture randomization.

Corrochano, J., E-mail: javier.corrochano.flores@gmail.com; Hidalgo, P.; Lieblich, M.; Ibanez, J.

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase daylighting simulations with parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of personal computer Title Acceleration of the matrix multiplication of Radiance three phase daylighting simulations with parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of personal computer Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-6461E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Zuo, Wangda, Andrew McNeil, Michael Wetter, and Eleanor S. Lee Journal Journal of Building Performance Simulation Keywords daylighting simulation, graphics processing unit, multicore central processing unit, OpenCL, parallel computing Abstract Building designers are increasingly relying on complex fenestration systems to reduce energy consumed for lighting and HVAC in low energy buildings. Radiance, a lighting simulation program, has been used to conduct daylighting simulations for complex fenestration systems. Depending on the configurations, the simulation can take hours or even days using a personal computer. This paper describes how to accelerate the matrix multiplication portion of a Radiance three-phase daylight simulation by conducting parallel computing on heterogeneous hardware of a personal computer. The algorithm was optimized and the computational part was implemented in parallel using OpenCL. The speed of new approach was evaluated using various daylighting simulation cases on a multicore central processing unit and a graphics processing unit. Based on the measurements and analysis of the time usage for the Radiance daylighting simulation, further speedups can be achieved by using fast I/O devices and storing the data in a binary format.

380

Inner approximations for polynomial matrix inequalities and robust ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 26, 2011 ... space of m m real symmetric matrices. For a given matrix ..... by the components of the integral on complement set B\\P, and this deteriorates the inner .... proximations of P, scaled within the unit box for visualization purposes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Two modulator generalized ellipsometer for complete mueller matrix measurement  

SciTech Connect

A two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) comprising two polarizer-photoelastic modulator (PEM) pairs, an optical light source, an optical detection system, and associated data processing and control electronics, where the PEMs are free-running. The input light passes through the first polarizer-PEM pair, reflects off the sample surface or passes through the sample, passes through the second PEM-polarizer pair, and is detected. Each PEM is free running and operates at a different resonant frequency, e.g., 50 and 60 kHz. The resulting time-dependent waveform of the light intensity is a complicated function of time, and depends upon the exact operating frequency and phase of each PEM, the sample, and the azimuthal angles of the polarizer-PEM pairs, but can be resolved into a dc component and eight periodic components. In one embodiment, the waveform is analyzed using a new spectral analysis technique that is similar to Fourier analysis to determine eight sample Mueller matrix elements (normalized to the m.sub.00 Mueller matrix element). The other seven normalized elements of the general 4.times.4 Mueller matrix can be determined by changing the azimuthal angles of the PEM-polarizer pairs with respect to the plane of incidence. Since this instrument can measure all elements of the sample Mueller matrix, it is much more powerful than standard ellipsometers.

Jellison, Jr., Gerald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Modine, Frank A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An Efficient Algorithm for Out-of-Core Matrix Transposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient transposition of Out-of-core matrices has been widely studied. These efforts have focused on reducing the number of I/O operations. However, in state-of-the-art architectures, memory-memory data transfer time and index computation time are ... Keywords: matrix transpose, data transfer time, index computation time, I/O time, out-of-core, execution time

J. Suh; V. K. Prasanna

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Efficient approximate Regularized Least Squares by Toeplitz matrix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Machine Learning based on the Regularized Least Squares (RLS) model requires one to solve a system of linear equations. Direct-solution methods exhibit predictable complexity and storage, but often prove impractical for large-scale problems; iterative ... Keywords: Digital signal processor, Large-scale learning, Levinson-Trench-Zohar algorithm, Regularized Least Squares, Resources limited device, Toeplitz matrix

Sergio Decherchi; Paolo Gastaldo; Rodolfo Zunino

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Random matrix theory for modeling uncertainties in computational mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Random matrix theory for modeling uncertainties in computational mechanics C. Soize Laboratory of Engineering Mechanics, University of Marne-la-Vall´ee, 5 boulevard Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, France, e in computational mechanics. If data uncertainties can be modeled by parametric probabilistic methods, for a given

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

385

Optimizing Sparse Data Structures for Matrix-vector Multiply  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sparse matrix??vector multiply is an important operation in a wide range of problems. One of the key factors determining the performance of this operation is sustained memory bandwidth. In the IBM POWER architecture, there is a hardware component ... Keywords: data stream, prefetch, sparse matrix vector multiply, streamed blocked compressed row storage format, streamed compressed row storage format

D. Guo; W. Gropp

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Time and Energy Efficient Matrix Factorization using FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/O bandwidth independent of the problem size. High level models for energy profiling are built and the energyTime and Energy Efficient Matrix Factorization using FPGAs Seonil Choi and Viktor K. Prasanna Electrical Engineering-Systems University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA {seonilch, prasanna

Hwang, Kai

387

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

388

Comments on matrix-based secret sharing scheme for images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several attempts have been made to propose efficient secret sharing schemes for 2D images. Rey M.D (Iberoamerican Congress on Pattern Recognition, 2008) proposed a relatively fast image secret sharing scheme based on simple binary matrix operations. ... Keywords: cryptanalysis, image processing, secret sharing

Esam Elsheh; A. Ben Hamza

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The spectral density of the scattering matrix for high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the density of eigenvalues of the scattering matrix of the Schrodinger operator with a short range potential in the high energy asymptotic regime. We give an explicit formula for this density in terms of the X-ray transform of the potential.

Daniel Bulger; Alexander Pushnitski

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Studies of the Polarimetric Covariance Matrix. Part I: Calibration Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A procedure for calibration of the radar covariance matrix for the Colorado State UniversityUniversity of ChicagoIllinois State Water Survey (CSUCHILL) radar and S-Band Dual-Polarization Doppler Radar (S-Pol) systems is described. Two relative ...

J. C. Hubbert; V. N. Bringi; D. Brunkow

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The spectral density of the scattering matrix for high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We determine the density of eigenvalues of the scattering matrix of the Schrodinger operator with a short range potential in the high energy asymptotic regime. We give an explicit formula for this density in terms of the X-ray transform of the potential.

Bulger, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Uniform Dispersion of Nanoparticles in Metal Matrix Nanocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2012 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Two examples are presented in this report: (1) uniform dispersion of Al2O3 nanoparticles in A206 ... Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite via Direct Metal Laser Deposition: Processing And Mechanical Characterization ... Contact programming@

393

Qualification of the Second Batch Production 9-Cell Cavities Manufactured by AES and Validation of the First US Industrial Cavity Vendor for ILC  

SciTech Connect

One of the major goals of ILC SRF cavity R&D is to develop industrial capabilities of cavity manufacture and processing in all three regions. In the past several years, Jefferson Lab, in collaboration with Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, has processed and tested all the 9-cell cavities of the first batch (4 cavities) and second batch (6 cavities) production cavities manufactured by Advanced Energy Systems Inc. (AES). Over the course, close information feedback was maintained, resulting in changes in fabrication and processing procedures. A light buffered chemical polishing was introduced, removing the weld splatters that could not be effectively removed by heavy EP alone. An 800 Celsius 2 hour vacuum furnace heat treatment procedure replaced the original 600 Celsius 10 hour procedure. Four out of the six 9-cell cavities of the second production bath achieved a gradient of 36-41 MV/m at a Q0 of more than 8109 at 35 MV/m. This result validated AES as the first ILC certified industrial vendor in the US for ILC cavity manufacture.

Geng, R L; Golden, B A; Kushnick, P; Overton, R B; Calderaro, M; Peterson, E; Rathke, J; Champion, M S; Follkie, J

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Deriving the shape factor of a fractured rock matrix  

SciTech Connect

Fluid flow from a fractured rock matrix was investigated for accurately predicting oil recovery from fractured reservoirs. To relate the oil rate with rock geometry and average rock matrix pressure, a shape factor is used in the mathematical model of fractured reservoirs. The shape factor in the transfer function was derived by solving the three-dimensional diffusivity equation of a rock matrix block under unsteady-state production, in contrast to the quasi-steady-state condition assumed by most previous studies denoted in the literature. The diffusivity equation in the x, y, and z coordinate was solved in four cases by assuming different boundary conditions of (1) constant fracture pressure; (2) constant flow rate; (3) constant fracture pressure followed by linearly declining fracture pressure; and (4) linearly declining fracture pressure followed by constant fracture pressure. Shape factor values are high at the initial depletion stage under an unsteady-state condition. When the fracture pressure is constant, the shape factor converges to {pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, 2{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2}, and 3{pi}{sup 2}/L{sup 2} for one-, two-, and three-dimensional rock matrix, respectively, at the dimensionless time ({tau}) of about 0.1. When the flow rate between the rock matrix and the fracture is constant, the fracture pressure varies with location on the rock surface. Based on the average fracture pressure, the shape factor decreases with production time until a {tau} value of 0.1 is reached. The boundary conditions of constant fracture pressure followed by a constant decline in fracture pressure are equivalent to the condition of a constant fracture pressure followed by a period of constant flow rate.

Chang, Ming-Ming

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In contrast, the variability study has significantly added value to the DWPF's qualification strategy. The variability study has evolved to become the primary aspect of the DWPF's compliance strategy as it has been shown to be versatile and capable of adapting to the DWPF's various and diverse waste streams and blending strategies. The variability study, which aims to ensure durability requirements and the PCT and chemical composition correlations are valid for the compositional region to be processed at the DWPF, must continue to be performed. Due to the importance of the variability study and its place in the DWPF's qualification strategy, it will also be discussed in this report. An analysis of historical data and Production Records indicated that the recommendation of the Six Sigma team to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and PCT performed with the qualification glass does not compromise the DWPF's current compliance plan. Furthermore, the DWPF should continue to produce an acceptable waste form following the remaining elements of the Glass Product Control Program; regardless of a sludge-only or coupled operations strategy. If the DWPF does decide to eliminate the characterization of pour stream samples, pour stream samples should continue to be collected for archival reasons, which would allow testing to be performed should any issues arise or new repository test methods be developed.

Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

396

Small-energy analysis for the selfadjoint matrix Schroedinger operator on the half line. II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a second moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is differentiable at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the derivative of the scattering matrix at zero energy. The previously established results when the potential has only the first moment are improved when the second moment exists, by presenting the small-energy asymptotics for the related Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevantc to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

Tuncay Aktosun; Martin Klaus; Ricardo Weder

2013-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Small-Energy Analysis for the Selfadjoint Matrix Schroedinger Operator on the Half Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a first moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is continuous at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the scattering matrix at zero energy. The small-energy asymptotics are established also for the corresponding Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevant to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

Aktosun, Tuncay; Weder, Ricardo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Small-Energy Analysis for the Selfadjoint Matrix Schroedinger Operator on the Half Line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a first moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is continuous at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the scattering matrix at zero energy. The small-energy asymptotics are established also for the corresponding Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevant to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

Tuncay Aktosun; Martin Klaus; Ricardo Weder

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

399

Attachment 5 Volume II Pricing Matrix.xls  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRICE MATRIX PRICE MATRIX ATTACHMENT 5 VOLUME II SUMMARY Logistics Services A-76 Study - Service Provider Price Offer for Phase in Period, Volume III. Service Provider Name: GSA Schedule Contract Number: Expiration Date of GSA Schedule Contract: Duration Base Period: 3 Calendar Years SUMMARY FORRESTAL Term of Performance TOTAL PROPOSED COST Phase-in Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2004 $ Base Period Year One 07/01/2005 - 06/30/2006 $ Year Two 07/01/2006 - 06/30/2007 $ Period Three 07/01/2007 - 09/30/2007 $ $ Option Period Year One 10/01/2007 - 09/30/2008 $ Period Two 10/01/2008 - 09/30/2009 $ $ SUMMARY GERMANTOWN Term of Performance TOTAL PROPOSED COST Phase-in Period 10/01/2004 - 06/30/2004 $ Base Period Year One

400

DOE Order 420.1B/1C Crosswalk Matrix  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

20.1B/1C Crosswalk Matrix 20.1B/1C Crosswalk Matrix Page 1 of 90 February 26, 2013 Citation (420.1C) Original Requirement (O 420.1B, Chg 1, dated 4-19-10) Revised Requirement (O 420.1C, 12-04-2012) Comments 1. 1. OBJECTIVES. To establish facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), for- a. nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, b. fire protection, c. criticality safety, d. natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and e. the System Engineer Program. 1. OBJECTIVE. To establish facility and programmatic safety requirements for the Department of Energy(DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), for: a. Nuclear safety design criteria;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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401

A heightened radiosensitivity of stromal fibroblasts in 3D matrix  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heightened radiosensitivity of stromal fibroblasts in 3D matrix heightened radiosensitivity of stromal fibroblasts in 3D matrix X. Liu, K. McHenry & Z. Yuan. Department of Genetics and Complex Diseases, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115 Our recent study suggested that stromal fibroblasts can sensitize cocultured epithelial cells to radiation exposure. Since stromal fibroblasts exhibit highly elongated cytoplasmic extensions (pseudopodia), which as shown in our previous study are essential to guide neighboring epithelial cells to form branching ducts, we asked whether radiation could interfere with the formation of fibroblasts' pseudopodium, which would then impair their ability to structurally and functionally support the associated epithelial cells. For this, HMFs were seeded in 3D and were either mock-treated or irradiated 24 h

402

Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

Sayuti, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Malikussaleh University of Lhokseumawe, 24300 Aceh (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Universal R?matrix for esoteric quantum group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The universal R-matrix for a class of esoteric (non-standard) quantum groups Uq(gl(2N + 1)) is constructed as a twisting of the universal R-matrix RS of the Drinfeld-Jimbo quantum algebras. The main part of the twisting element F is chosen to be the canonical element of appropriate pair of separated Hopf subalgebras (quantized Borels B(N) ? Uq(gl(2N + 1))), providing the factorization property of F. As a result, the esoteric quantum group generators can be expressed Quasitriangular Hopf algebras (quantizations of universal enveloping Lie algebras U(g)) and quantum groups (deformations of algebra of functions on Lie groups Fun(G)) are the subject of active research during the last decade originated in famous Drinfelds report [1]. There are different starting points of the quantum group theory: generators

P. P. Kulish; A. I. Mudrov

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

The uses of the refined matrix model recursion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study matrix models in the {beta}-ensemble by building on the refined recursion relation proposed by Chekhov and Eynard. We present explicit results for the first {beta}-deformed corrections in the one-cut and the two-cut cases, as well as two applications to supersymmetric gauge theories: the calculation of superpotentials in N=1 gauge theories, and the calculation of vevs of surface operators in superconformal N=2 theories and their Liouville duals. Finally, we study the {beta}-deformation of the Chern-Simons matrix model. Our results indicate that this model does not provide an appropriate description of the {Omega}-deformed topological string on the resolved conifold, and therefore that the {beta}-deformation might provide a different generalization of topological string theory in toric Calabi-Yau backgrounds.

Brini, Andrea; Marino, Marcos; Stevan, Sebastien [Departement de Physique Theorique et Section de Mathematiques, Universite de Geneve, Geneve CH-1211 (Switzerland)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Matrix elements of the Argonne v18 potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss two approaches to the calculation of matrix elements of the Argonne v18 potential. The first approach is applicable in the case of a single-particle basis of harmonic-oscillator wave functions. In this case we use the Talmi transformation, implemented numerically using the Moshinsky transformation brackets, to separate the center-of-mass and relative coordinates degrees of freedom. Integrals involving the radial part of the potential are performed using Gauss-Hermite quadrature formulas, and convergence is achieved for sets of at least 512 points. We validate the calculation of matrix elements of the Argonne v18 potential using a second approach suitable for the case of an arbitrary functional form of the single-particle wave functions. When the model space is represented in terms of harmonic-oscillator wave functions, results obtained using these two approaches are shown to to be identical within numerical accuracy.

Bogdan Mihaila

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

406

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Cure shrinkage effects in epoxy and polycyanate matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A relatively new advanced composite matrix, polycyanate ester, was evaluated for cure shrinkage. The chemical cure shrinkage of composites is difficult to model but a number of clever experimental techniques are available to the investigator. In this work the method of curing a prepreg layup on top of a previously cured laminate of identical ply composition is utilized. The polymeric matrices used in advanced composites have been primarily epoxies and therefore a common system of this type, Fiberite 3501-6, was used as a base case material. Three polycyanate matrix systems were selected for the study. These are: Fiberite 954-2A, YLA RS-3, and Bryte Technology BTCy-1. The first three of these systems were unidirectional prepreg with carbon fiber reinforcement. The Bryte Technology material was reinforced with E-glass fabric. The technique used to evaluate cure shrinkage results in distortion of the flatness of an otherwise symmetric laminate. The first laminate is cured in a conventional fashion. An identical layup is cured on this first laminate. During the second cure all constituents are exposed to the same thermal cycles. However, only the new portion of the laminate will experience volumetric changes associate with matrix cure. The additional strain of cure shrinkage results in an unsymmetric distribution of residual stresses and an associated warpage of the laminate. The baseline material, Fiberite 3501-6, exhibited cure shrinkage that was in accordance with expectations. Cure strains were {minus}4.5E-04. The YLA RS-3 material had cure strains somewhat lower at {minus}3.2E-04. The Fiberite 954-2A cure strain was {minus}1.5E-04 that is 70% lower than the baseline material. The glass fabric material with the Bryte BTCy-1 matrix did not result in meaningful results because the processing methods were not fully compatible with the material.

Spellman, G.P.

1995-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Pauli blocking in the nuclear medium. pi. N transition matrix  

SciTech Connect

We give an analytic expression for the in-medium nonstatic ..pi..N transition matrix in nuclear matter. Pauli blocking and spreading effects are included explicitly. Spin-flip terms are retained. We discuss the modifications of the free-space amplitude as a function of energy and density and show that large dynamical isospin effects are expected in pion scattering on heavy nuclei.

Moniz, E.J.; Sevgen, A.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Integrated Job Exposure Matrix for Electric Utility Workers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies and includes all exposure factors in a prototype job-exposure matrix (JEM) to inform utility professionals, exposure assessment experts, and epidemiologists about exposures other than electric and magnetic fields that should be considered when assessing health and safety issues related to work near electric facilities. The nature of exposures to these factors, the ordinal exposure ranking for most of the factors, and the methodology for establishing such determining ordinal exposur...

2009-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

410

Neutrinoless $??$ decay nuclear matrix elements in an isotopic chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze nuclear matrix elements (NME) of neutrinoless double beta decay calculated for the Cadmium isotopes. Energy density functional methods including beyond mean field effects such as symmetry restoration and shape mixing are used. Strong shell effects are found associated to the underlying nuclear structure of the initial and final nuclei. Furthermore, we show that NME for two-neutrino double beta decay evaluated in the closure approximation, $M^{2\

Toms R. Rodrguez; Gabriel Martnez-Pinedo

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

AMEGIC++ 1.0: A Matrix element generator in C++.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indispensable. These two problems necessitate the usage of computer programs. Examples are CompHep [4], FeynArts/FeynCalc [5], Grace [6], MADGRAPH [7], and OMega/WHIZARD [8]. The new program AMEGIC++ which will be presented in this publication, proposes a... the direct recursive construction of matrix elements without taking the detour of Feynman amplitudes. These approaches are currently under further investigation and discussion. Nevertheless, we are convinced that in the light of the need for efficient...

Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Soff, G

412

Nuclear Criticality Safety Requirements Implementation Matrix for Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a detailed matrix of specific Tank Farms nuclear criticality safety program elements indexed to primary requirements documents. These requirements are collected at a higher level in HNF-SO-MP-SRID-001, ''Tank Waste Remediation System Standards/Requirements Identification Document.'' The intended use of this document is to provide a roadmap for implementing procedures and assessments.

WEISS, E.V.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

413

HTC (High-Temperature Conductor) Matrix: Version 4.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRIs HTC Matrix software is a Windows application designed to provide the user with quick and directed access to all of the information developed under several EPRI projects investigating the effects of high temperature operation of conductors. The research results have been published in several technical reports.Benefits & ValueThe user can determine whether a certain type of connectors can be used at a specific ...

2012-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Covariance Matrix Estimation for the Cryo-EM Heterogeneity Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), a microscope generates a top view of a sample of randomly-oriented copies of a molecule. The cryo-EM problem is to use the resulting set of noisy 2D projection images taken at unknown directions to reconstruct the 3D structure of the molecule. In some situations, the molecule under examination exhibits structural variability, which poses a fundamental challenge in cryo-EM. The heterogeneity problem is the task of mapping the space of conformational states of a molecule. It has been previously shown that the leading eigenvectors of the covariance matrix of the 3D molecules can be used to solve the heterogeneity problem. Estimating the covariance matrix is however challenging, since only projections of the molecules are observed, but not the molecules themselves. In this paper, we derive an estimator for the covariance matrix as a solution to a certain linear system. The linear operator to be inverted, which we term the tomographic covariance transform, is an important obj...

Katsevich, Gene; Singer, Amit

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing the damaged zone. In matrix acidizing of carbonates, there are four parameters that affect performance: the concentration of calcite present, injection rate of the acid, reaction type, and heterogeneity. Of these parameters, this paper will focus on how rock heterogeneity affects performance. To do this, a coreflood and acidizing apparatus was used to acidize heterogeneous limestone core samples. Rock characterizations and volumetric measurements were considered with the results from these experiments, which made it possible to correlate and quantify the results with rock and volume parameters. It was found that the core samples with more and larger heterogeneities generally required less acid (measured in pore volumes) to achieve breakthrough, that is, a wormhole created axially from one end of the core to the other. This value for pore volumes to breakthrough was one to two orders of magnitude less than more homogeneous samples. The general procedure and best practices for acidizing the core samples is also detailed in this thesis. This procedure was followed for preparation, coreflooding, and acidizing for all core samples.

Keys, Ryan S.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

William Kirby Goertzen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Matrix models and stochastic growth in Donaldson-Thomas theory  

SciTech Connect

We show that the partition functions which enumerate Donaldson-Thomas invariants of local toric Calabi-Yau threefolds without compact divisors can be expressed in terms of specializations of the Schur measure. We also discuss the relevance of the Hall-Littlewood and Jack measures in the context of BPS state counting and study the partition functions at arbitrary points of the Kaehler moduli space. This rewriting in terms of symmetric functions leads to a unitary one-matrix model representation for Donaldson-Thomas theory. We describe explicitly how this result is related to the unitary matrix model description of Chern-Simons gauge theory. This representation is used to show that the generating functions for Donaldson-Thomas invariants are related to tau-functions of the integrable Toda and Toeplitz lattice hierarchies. The matrix model also leads to an interpretation of Donaldson-Thomas theory in terms of non-intersecting paths in the lock-step model of vicious walkers. We further show that these generating functions can be interpreted as normalization constants of a corner growth/last-passage stochastic model.

Szabo, Richard J. [Department of Mathematics, Heriot-Watt University, Colin Maclaurin Building, Riccarton, Edinburgh EH14 4AS, United Kingdom and Maxwell Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Tierz, Miguel [Grupo de Fisica Matematica, Complexo Interdisciplinar da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, PT-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Facultad de Ciencias Matematicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de Ciencias 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Fracture toughness of carbon nanotube-reinforced metal- and ceramic-matrix composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hierarchical analysis of the fracture toughness enhancement of carbon nanotube- (CNT-) reinforced hard matrix composites is carried out on the basis of shear-lag theory and facture mechanics. It is found that stronger CNT/matrix interfaces cannot definitely ...

Y. L. Chen; B. Liu; Y. Huang; K. C. Hwang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modeling and Controller Design of a Wind Energy Conversion System Including a Matrix Converter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this thesis, a grid-connected wind-energy converter system including a matrix converter is proposed. The matrix converter, as a power electronic converter, is used to (more)

Barakati, Seyed Masoud

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

422

Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix  

SciTech Connect

A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

On the Coulomb-Sturmian matrix elements of the Coulomb Green's operator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two-body Coulomb Hamiltonian, when calculated in Coulomb-Sturmian basis, has an infinite symmetric tridiagonal form, also known as Jacobi matrix form. This Jacobi matrix structure involves a continued fraction representation for the inverse of the Green's matrix. The continued fraction can be transformed to a ratio of two $_{2}F_{1}$ hypergeometric functions. From this result we find an exact analytic formula for the matrix elements of the Green's operator of the Coulomb Hamiltonian.

F. Demir; Z. T. Hlousek; Z. Papp

2006-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

424

Determination of Mueller matrix of an optical element with Simon-Mukunda polarization gadgets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have described a novel way to determine the Mueller matrix of any optical element by using projection method. For this purpose, we have used two Simon-Mukunda gadgets to obtain projection matrix directly from experiment. Mueller matrix has been determined using the experimentally obtained projection matrix for three known elements namely free space, half wave plate and quarter wave plate. Experimental matrices are in good agreement with the corresponding standard matrices.

Reddy, Salla Gangi; Aadhi, A; Kumar, Ashok; Shah, Megh; Singh, R P; Simon, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

2.3.3.2.1. General matrix solutions to calibration designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... process at NIST. In this example, two NIST kilograms are compared with a customer's unknown kilogram. The design matrix ...

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Asymptotic distribution of Wishart matrix for block-wise dispersion of population eigenvalues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with the asymptotic distribution of Wishart matrix and its application to the estimation of the population matrix parameter when the population eigenvalues are block-wise infinitely dispersed. We show that the appropriately normalized ... Keywords: Stein's loss, 62C20, 62H10, Asymptotic risk, Covariance matrix, Quadratic loss, Wishart distribution

Yo Sheena; Akimichi Takemura

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Google Matrix Analysis of DNA Sequences Vivek Kandiah, Dima L. Shepelyansky*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Google Matrix Analysis of DNA Sequences Vivek Kandiah, Dima L. Shepelyansky* Laboratoire de sequences of various species we construct the Google matrix G of Markov transitions between nearby words from the view point of Markov chains. The properties of other eigenstates of the Google matrix are also

Shepelyansky, Dima

429

In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcoxon, Jess P. (Albuquerque, NM); Abrams, Billie L. (Albuquerque, NM)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Two-step modulus-based matrix splitting iteration method for linear complementarity problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bai has recently presented a modulus-based matrix splitting iteration method, which is a powerful alternative for solving the large sparse linear complementarity problems. In this paper, we further present a two-step modulus-based matrix splitting iteration ... Keywords: Convergence, Iteration method, Linear complementarity problem, Matrix splitting

Li-Li Zhang

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF PROCESSING DATA FROM THE RH RU HG MATRIX STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of the statistical significance of Rh, Ru, and Hg on DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle catalytic hydrogen generation and process chemistry was conducted by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) using a full-factorial experimental design. This test design can identify significant interactions between these three species in addition to individual effects. Statistical modeling of data from the Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study has been completed. Preliminary data and conclusions were given in an earlier report. This final report concludes the work on the Rh-Ru-Hg matrix study. Modeling results are summarized below. Rhodium was found to: Promote increased total hydrogen mass; Promote an increase in the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Promote an increase in the hydrogen generation rate shortly after acid addition; Shorten the elapsed time between acid addition and the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Increase formate loss; Inhibit NO{sub 2} and total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation; and Reduce nitrite-to-nitrate conversion. Ruthenium was found to: Promote increased total hydrogen mass; Promote an increase in the maximum hydrogen generation rate; Promote an increase in the hydrogen generation rate in the second half of the SRAT cycle; Promote an increase in total CO{sub 2} generated; Increase formate loss; Promote NO{sub 2} and total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation; and Reduce nitrite-to-nitrate conversion. Mercury was found to: Inhibit total hydrogen mass produced; Promote an increase in total CO{sub 2} generated; Promote NO{sub 2} off-gas species formation; and Inhibit total NO{sub x} off-gas species formation. Results confirmed qualitative observations that Rh was activating before Ru for hydrogen generation. An interaction between Rh and Ru was present in the model for the total hydrogen generated during the SRAT, perhaps because the total combined contributions from two separate episodes of hydrogen generation. The first episode was dominated by Rh and the second by Ru. Consequently, the linear statistical model was asked to explain more than one phenomenon and included more terms. Mercury did not significantly impact hydrogen generated by either Rh or Ru in models in this study (all tests had Hg {ge} 0.5 wt% in total solids), whereas tests in Sludge Batches 3 and 4 (SB3 and SB4) with and without Hg showed a very significant negative impact from adding Hg. The conclusion is that once a small quantity of Hg is present, the primary inhibiting effect of Hg is in place, and hydrogen generation is relatively insensitive to further increases in total Hg. Any secondary Hg effects were difficult to quantify and model. Mercury was found to be statistically significant, however, as an inhibiting factor for hydrogen generation when modeling was based on the logarithm of the hydrogen generation rate. Only limited statistical evidence was found for non-linearity and quadratic dependence of other SRAT process measures, such as formate loss or total NO{sub x} generation, on the three matrix variables. The interaction term for Ru with Hg, however, appeared in models for total CO{sub 2}, total NO{sub 2}, and total moles of nitrogen-derived off-gas species. A single interaction between Ru and Hg during nitrite destruction could explain all three of these effects in the observed responses. Catalytic decomposition of nitrite ion by formic acid produces CO{sub 2} plus either NO or N{sub 2}O. The vast majority of the NO produced is converted to NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub 2} is the major fraction of the total moles of nitrogen in the off-gas species. Future experimental work related to catalytic hydrogen generation control is expected with regard to minimizing formic acid use through alternative reductants as well as in pursuing mesoporous media for sequestering the catalytically active noble metals to inhibit catalytic hydrogen generation. Two alternative stoichiometric acid equations are also under development. A summary document is in draft form that provides an overview of progress made in understanding ca

Koopman, D

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

On Water Flow in Hot Fractured Rock -- A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Fracture-Matrix Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phases stored in matrix pores, the energy E M contained in VEnough energy is transmitted from the matrix to effectivelyfor energy transfer from the adjacent hot rock matrix rather

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Zhang, Yingqi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Energy- and time-efficient matrix multiplication on FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractWe develop new algorithms and architectures for matrix multiplication on configurable devices. These have reduced energy dissipation and latency compared with the state-of-the-art field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based designs. By profiling well-known designs, we identify energy hot spots, which are responsible for most of the energy dissipation. Based on this, we develop algorithms and architectures that offer tradeoffs among the number of I/O ports, the number of registers, and the number of PEs. To avoid time-consuming low-level simulations for energy profiling and performance prediction of many alternate designs, we derive functions to represent the impact of algorithm design choices on the system-wide energy dissipation, area, and latency. These functions are used to either optimize the energy performance or provide tradeoffs for a family of candidate algorithms and architectures. For selected designs, we perform extensive low-level simulations using state-of-the-art tools and target FPGA devices. We show a design space for matrix multiplication on FPGAs that results in tradeoffs among energy, area, and latency. For example, our designs improve the energy performance of state-of-the-art FPGA-based designs by 29%51% without any increase in the arealatency product. The latency of our designs is reduced one-third to one-fifteenth while area is increased 1.99.4 times. In terms of comprehensive metrics such as Energy-Area-Time, our designs exhibit superior performance compared with the state-of-the-art by 50%79%. Index TermsAlgorithm design, configurable hardware, energy-delay tradeoff, field-programmable gate array (FPGA), linear array, matrix multiplication, performance estimation. I.

Ju-wook Jang; Seonil B. Choi; Viktor K. Prasanna

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

DOE Cyber Security Role, Competency and Functional Matrix  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5/4/2011 5/4/2011 DOE Cyber Security Role, Competency and Functional Matrix DOE Cyber Security EBK: A Competency and Functional Framework for Cyber Security Workforce Development DOE Cyber Security Functional Roles Chief Information Officer (CIO) Information Owner/Steward Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) Authorizing Official (AO) AO Designated Representative (AODR) Common Control Provider Information System Owner Cyber Security Program Manager (CSPM) Information System Security Officer (ISSO) Information Security Architect Information System Security Engineer Security Control Assessor Core Competencies Data Security ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● Enterprise Continuity ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ● ●

435

A Bell pair in a generic random matrix environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two non-interacting qubits are coupled to an environment. Both coupling and environment are represented by random matrix ensembles. The initial state of the pair is a Bell state, though we also consider arbitrary pure states. Decoherence of the pair is evaluated analytically in terms of purity; Monte Carlo calculations confirm these results and also yield the concurrence of the pair. Entanglement within the pair accelerates decoherence. Numerics display the relation between concurrence and purity known for Werner states, allowing us to give a formula for concurrence decay.

Carlos Pineda; Thomas H. Seligman

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

436

Wigner surmise for mixed symmetry classes in random matrix theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the nearest-neighbor spacing distributions of mixed random matrix ensembles interpolating between different symmetry classes, or between integrable and non-integrable systems. We derive analytical formulas for the spacing distributions of 2x2 or 4x4 matrices and show numerically that they provide very good approximations for those of random matrices with large dimension. This generalizes the Wigner surmise, which is valid for pure ensembles that are recovered as limits of the mixed ensembles. We show how the coupling parameters of small and large matrices must be matched depending on the local eigenvalue density.

Sebastian Schierenberg; Falk Bruckmann; Tilo Wettig

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

437

Matrix Inversion Lemma and Information Filter Mohammad Emtiyaz Khan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Matrix Inversion Lemma and Information Filter Mohammad Emtiyaz Khan Honeywell Technology Solutions) zt+1|t = (I -JtBT t )A-T t zt|t, Zt+1|t = (I -JtBT t )St (8) where St = A-T t P-1 t|t A-1 t and Jt = StBt(BT t StBt +Q-1 t )-1. The Kalman gain is given as Kt = Zt|tCT t R-1 t . For detailed proof see

Mitchell, Ian

438

Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

Schoen, C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Hammerer, K. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Solano, E. [Physics Department, ASC, and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima (Peru)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

TRAC-P validation test matrix. Revision 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This document briefly describes the elements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) software quality assurance program leading to software (code) qualification and identifies a test matrix for qualifying Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC)-Pressurized Water Reactor Version (-P), or TRAC-P, to the NRC`s software quality assurance requirements. Code qualification is the outcome of several software life-cycle activities, specifically, (1) Requirements Definition, (2) Design, (3) Implementation, and (4) Qualification Testing. The major objective of this document is to define the TRAC-P Qualification Testing effort.

Hughes, E.D.; Boyack, B.E.

1997-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) have displayed impressive mechanical properties, but the use and dimensions of material have been limited due to critical cooling rate requirements and low ductility. The application of severe plastic deformation by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters which promote bonding between particles and b) to determine by what mechanisms the plasticity is enhanced in bulk amorphous metal matrix composites consolidated by ECAE. To accomplish the objectives BAM and AMMCs were produced via ECAE consolidation of Vitreloy 106a (Zr58.5Nb2.8Cu15.6Ni12.8Al10.3-wt%), ARLloy #1 (Hf71.3Cu16.2Ni7.6Ti2.2Al2.6 -wt%), and both of these amorphous alloys blended with crystalline phases of W, Cu and Ni. Novel instrumented extrusions and a host of postprocessing material characterizations were used to evaluate processing conditions and material properties. The results show that ECAE consolidation at temperatures within the supercooled liquid region gives near fully dense (>99%) and well bonded millimeter scale BAM and AMMCs. The mechanical properties of the ECAE processed BMG are comparable to cast material: Ï?f = 1640 MPa, ?µf = 2.3%, E = 80 GPa for consolidated Vitreloy 106a as compared to Ï?f = 1800 MPa, ?µf = 2.5%, E = 85 GPa for cast Vitreloy 106, and Ï?f = 1660 MPa, ?µf = 2.0%, E = 97 GPa for ARLloy #1 as compared to Ï?f = 2150 MPa, ?µf oxides and crystalline phase morphology and chemistry. It is demonstrated that the addition of a dispersed crystalline phase to an amorphous matrix by ECAE powder consolidation increases the plasticity of the amorphous matrix by providing locations for generation and/or arrest of adiabatic shear bands. The ability of ECAE to consolidated BAM and AMMCs with improved plasticity opens the possibility of overcoming the size and plasticity limitations of the monolithic bulk metallic glasses.

Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Enzyme system comprising an enzyme bonded in a porous matrix  

SciTech Connect

A protein system is described in which a protein is bound within a matrix material that has pores that are sized to achieve excellent properties such as: activity, protein density, and stability. In a preferred embodiment, the pore sizes range from 50 to 400 .ANG.. One protein that has demonstrated surprisingly good results in this system is OPH. This protein is known to degrade organophosphorus compounds such as are found in chemical weapons and pesticides. Novel methods of forming the protein system and methods of making OPH are also described.

Ackerman, Eric (Richland, WA); Liu, Jun (West Richland, WA)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Efficient double beta decay nuclear matrix elements computations  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a shell model code for the accurate computation of the two-body matrix elements of the transition operators involved in the neutrinoless double beta decay. This code features coupled cluster method short-range correlations with Jastrow-like functions, finite nucleon size effect and higher order nucleon current corrections. We present the results obtained for {sup 48}Ca and {sup 82}Se, then we compare them with other results in the literature. In the case of {sup 48}Ca, we also study the contributions of the included effects and find good agreement with other published results.

Neacsu, Andrei [Horia Hulubei Foundation (FHH) 407 Atomistilor, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) 30 Reactorului, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

On Water Flow in Hot Fractured Rock -- A Sensitivity Study on the Impact of Fracture-Matrix Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is related to the heat transfer between the two phasespossibly be affected. Heat transfer from the matrix can beof Fracture-Matrix Heat Transfer Jens T. Birkholzer and

Birkholzer, Jens T.; Zhang, Yingqi

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

High-Energy analysis and Levinson's theorem for the selfadjoint matrix Schroedinger operator on the half line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable, the high-energy asymptotics are established for the related Jost matrix, the inverse of the Jost matrix, and the scattering matrix. Under the additional assumption that the matrix potential has a first moment, Levinson's theorem is derived, relating the number of bound states to the change in the argument of the determinant of the scattering matrix.

Tuncay Aktosun; Ricardo Weder

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

445

A matrix description for $K_1$ of graded rings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The current paper is dedicated to the study of the classical $K$-theory of graded rings. Let $A$ be a $\\Gamma$ graded ring with identity 1, where the grading $\\Gamma$ is an abelian group. We associate a category with suspension to the $\\Gamma$ graded ring $A$, this allows us to generalize Bass' $K_1$ group to the setting of $\\Gamma$ graded rings. The generalized graded $K_1^{gr}$ is not only an abelian group but also a $\\mathbb Z[\\Gamma]$-module. Furthermore the generalization implies that there exists "locally" a matrix description for $K_1^{gr}$ of graded rings. The matrix description reveals a possibility for computing $K_1^{gr}$ of various types of graded rings. The generalized $K_1^{gr}$ satisfies the well known $K$-theory exact sequence $$ K_{1}^{gr}(A,I)\\to K_1^{gr}(A)\\to K_1^{gr}(A/I) $$ for any graded ideal $I$ of $A$. Finally, as an easy application, we compute $K^{gr}_1$ of cross products.

Zuhong Zhang

446

Evolution of project planning tools in a matrix organization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Until recently, the Corporate Construction Program at Sandia was experiencing difficulties in managing projects: poor planning and cost estimating caused schedule and budget problems. The first step taken was a Microsoft {reg_sign} Project schedule that provides a standard template for scheduling individual construction projects. It is broken down according to the life cycle of the project and prevents the project team from leaving out an important item. A WBS (work breakdown structure) dictionary was also developed that describes how capital and operating funds are used to develop, design, construct, equip, and manage projects. We also developed a matrix chart that maps the planning guide against the major types of construction projects at Sandia. The guide, dictionary, and matrix chart offer enough flexibility that the project manager can make choices about how to structure work, yet ensure that all work rolls up to the cost categories and key DOE WBS elements. As requirements change, the tools can be updated; they also serve as training tools for new project team members.

Furaus, J.P.; Figueroa-McInteer, C.; McKeever, P.S.; Wisler, D.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zavadil, J.T. [Infomatrix (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Device for collecting and analyzing matrix-isolated samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-sample collection device is disclosed for matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for presenting these distinct samples for spectrometric examination. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carrousel having a number of external, reflecting surfaces around its axis of rotation for holding samples. A gas inlet is provided for depositing sample and matrix material on the individual reflecting surfaces maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. Two optical windows or lenses are installed in the vacuum chamber walls for transmitting a beam of electromagnetic radiation, for instance infrared light, through a selected sample. Positioned within the chamber are two concave mirrors, the first aligned to receive the light beam from one of the lenses and focus it to the sample on one of the reflecting surfaces of the carrousel. The second mirror is aligned to receive reflected light from that carrousel surface and to focus it outwardly through the second lens. The light beam transmitted from the sample is received by a spectrometer for determining absorption spectra.

Reedy, Gerald T. (Lemont, IL)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Laser photolysis of fluorone dyes in a chitosan matrix  

SciTech Connect

Kinetics of laser-induced photobleaching of fluorone dyes (fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, erythrosin B, Rose Bengal) is studied in a chitosan matrix. For all dyes the bleaching kinetics at the intensities of laser radiation 0.7 - 11.9 W cm{sup -2} demonstrates quasi-monomolecular behaviour. The results are analysed using a kinetic model, based on the four-level (S{sub 0}, S{sub 1}, T{sub 1}, T{sub n}) scheme of the dye with chemically active triplet states taken into account. It is shown that the rate constants of the chemical reaction involving higher triplet states in the dyes studied amount to (3.9 - 18.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} and exceed the analogous values for the reaction involving the first lower triplet states by nine orders of magnitude. The rate of reaction involving the first triplet states appeared to be higher by one - two orders of magnitude than that in the case of higher triplet states involved because of low population of the latter. The possible mechanism of dye bleaching with participation of chitosan that consists in reduction of the dye to the leuco form by transfer of hydrogen from the chitosan matrix is discussed. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasmas)

Slyusareva, E A; Sizykh, A G; Gerasimova, M A; Slabko, V V; Myslivets, S A

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

449

Semiclassical Gaussian matrix elements for chaotic quantum wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive semiclassical expressions for spectra, weighted by matrix elements of a Gaussian observable, relevant to a range of molecular and mesoscopic systems. We apply the formalism to the particular example of the resonant tunneling diode (RTD) in tilted fields. The RTD is a new experimental realization of a mesoscopic system exhibiting a transition to chaos. It has generated much interest and several different semiclassical theories for the RTD have been proposed recently.Our formalism clarifies the relationship between the different approaches and to previous work on semiclassical theories of matrix elements. We introduce three possible levels of approximation in the application of the stationary phase approximation, depending on typical length scales of oscillations of the semiclassical Green's function, relative to the degree of localization of the observable. Different types of trajectories (periodic, normal, closed and saddle orbits) are shown to arise from such considerations. We propose a new type of trajectory (``minimal orbits'')and show they provide the best real approximation to the complex saddle points of the stationary phase approximation. We test the semiclassical formulae on quantum calculations and experimental data. We show that the new types of trajectories (saddle and minimal orbits) provide accurate results. We discuss a divergence of the contribution of saddle orbits, which suggests the existence of bifurcation-type phenomena affecting the complex and non-periodic saddle orbits.

D. S. Saraga; T. S. Monteiro

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

450

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs  

SciTech Connect

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is