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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

E-Print Network 3.0 - aq hot aq Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

P4... (s) + O2(g)(excess) f) Na(s) + H2O(l) g) Li2O(s) + H2O(l) h) Zn(s) + HCl(aq) i) CaCl2(aq) + NaF(aq) j... solution (propanol is converted ... Source: Hitchcock, Adam P. -...

2

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin...

3

Final Exam/Fall 1998 Math 351 Name (10) 1. Find a 2 × 2 matrix A ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

... be a 2 × 2 matrix, Q1 = [1, -1]t and Q2 = [3, -2]t. Assume that. AQ1 = 4Q1 , AQ2 = 9Q2. (i) Find an invertible matrix Q and a diagonal matrix D such that A = QDQ.

1910-10-62T23:59:59.000Z

4

INSTALLATIONAND OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR AQ-1 POWER VENT KIT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEATERS AQUASTAR 125B WATER HEATERS INCLUDING AQUASTAR MODELS: 125HX · 125BS · 125X · 125BL TABLE supplied with the water heater. 2. Before mounting water heater to wall, check its minimum clearance requirements. 3. When using an AQ-1 the maximum horizontal distance from the water heater to the power vent

Kostic, Milivoje M.

5

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Submitting Batch Jobs Submitting Batch Jobs Debug Jobs Short jobs requesting less than 30 minutes and requiring 512 nodes (2,048 cores) or fewer can run in the debug queue. From...

6

Transferring Data from Batch Jobs at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Examples Once you are set up for automatic authentication (see HPSS Passwords) you can access HPSS within batch...

7

Example Edison Batch Scripts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvan FelixExperimentsExample Batch Scripts

8

Example Hopper Batch Scripts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial Thin Film XRDEvan FelixExperimentsExample Batch

9

Batch Script Examples  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6 M. Babzien, I. Ben-Zvi, P. Study ofJ UBasicsQueues andBatch

10

PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-GlycoproteinInteractive Batch Jobs Running

11

NDA BATCH 2009-7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The testing facility is LLNL plutonium facility segmented gamma scanner. 100% of the radioassay data in the batch data report is reviewed.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

12

Progressing batch hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

Wright, J.D.

1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

Progressing batch hydrolysis process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A progressive batch hydrolysis process for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock, comprising passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feedstock to glucose; cooling said dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, then feeding said dilute acid stream serially through a plurality of prehydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose; and cooling the dilute acid stream containing glucose after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

Wright, John D. (Denver, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Batch compositions for cordierite ceramics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic products consisting principally of cordierite and a method for making them are provided, the method employing batches comprising a mineral component and a chemical component, the mineral component comprising clay and talc and the chemical component consisting essentially of a combination of the powdered oxides, hydroxides, or hydrous oxides of magnesium, aluminum and silicon. Ceramics made by extrusion and firing of the batches can exhibit low porosity, high strength and low thermal expansion coefficients.

Hickman, David L. (Big Flats, NY)

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

NDA BATCH 2002-02  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

QC sample results (daily background checks, 20-gram and 100-gram SGS drum checks) were within acceptable criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on 5 drums with IDs LL85101099TRU, LL85801147TRU, LL85801109TRU, LL85300999TRU and LL85500979TRU. All replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. Note that the batch covered 5 weeks of SGS measurements from 23-Jan-2002 through 22-Feb-2002. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-02 generated using gamma spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with established control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable. An Expert Review was performed on the data packet between 28-Feb-02 and 09-Jul-02 to check for potential U-235, Np-237 and Am-241 interferences and address drum cases where specific scan segments showed Se gamma ray transmissions for the 136-keV gamma to be below 0.1 %. Two drums in the batch showed Pu-238 at a relative mass ratio more than 2% of all the Pu isotopes.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

A Fast Batched Cholesky Factorization on a GPU Tingxing Dong, Azzam Haidar, Stanimire Tomov, and Jack Dongarra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the three algorithms described above, along with the comparison to an optimized par- allel batched Cholesky algorithms ­ non- blocked, blocked, and recursive blocked ­ were examined. The left-looking version to update the trailing matrix in the recursive blocked algorithm. Our batched Cholesky achieves up to 1

Dongarra, Jack

17

NASA's DISCOVER-AQ and UMD's RAMMPP: Policy relevant science for improving air quality in Maryland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NASA's DISCOVER-AQ and UMD's RAMMPP: Policy relevant science for improving air quality in Maryland's air? · Krotkov (11 am) Using OMI (and OMPS) for SO2 emissions. · Kollonige ­ Model sensitivity & O3 In 2010, Maryland implemented the "Healthy Air Act" 4 #12;Power Plant Emissions in Maryland. The following

Jacob, Daniel J.

18

Batch Scheduling with Deadlines on Parallel Machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Batch Scheduling with Deadlines on Parallel Machines Peter Brucker Mikhail Y. Kovalyov, Yakov M of scheduling G groups of jobs on m parallel machines is considered. Each group consists of several identical) and to schedule the batches on the machines. It is possible for different batches of the same group

Magdeburg, Universität

19

NDA Batch 2002-13  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

QC sample results (daily background check drum and 100-gram SGS check drum) were within acceptance criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on drum LL85501243TRU. Replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. HWM NCAR No. 02-1000168 issued on 17-Oct-2002 regarding a partially dislodged Cd sheet filter on the HPGe coaxial detector. This physical geometry occurred on 01-Oct-2002 and was not corrected until 10-Oct-2002, during which period is inclusive of the present batch run of drums. Per discussions among the Independent Technical Reviewer, Expert Reviewer and the Technical QA Supervisor, as well as in consultation with John Fleissner, Technical Point of Contact from Canberra, the analytical results are technically reliable. All QC standard runs during this period were in control. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-13 generated using passive gamma-ray spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with establiShed control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable.

Hollister, R

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

20

Adding coal dust to coal batch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the energy balance of a global economy (1, 2). Low-cost hydrogen based fuel cells, which have been expensiveBiological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic Respirometers B R U C E E . L O G A N The biological production of hydrogen from the fermentation of different substrates was examined in batch tests

22

CASCADE OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF BATCH REACTORS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CASCADE OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF BATCH REACTORS Xiangming Hua, Sohrab Rohani and Arthur Jutan ajutan@uwo.ca Abstract: In this study, a cascade closed-loop optimization and control strategy for batch reactor. Using model reduction a cascade system is developed, which can effectively combine optimization

Jutan, Arthur

23

EERE Program Management Guide - Appendices A-Q | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirantPartners, Inc. |MoneyDoug Hollett,Appendices A-Q EERE Program

24

Optimization of a fed-batch fermentation process control competition ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: optimal control, fed-batch process, network enabled optimization. 1 INTRODUCTION ... input, the output for each batch would not be the problem is ...

2003-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

ja_post_advisors_batch Page 1 Posting Advisors in Batch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ja_post_advisors_batch Page 1 Posting Advisors in Batch Validate that the student does not have the `new' advisor posted. For example, this student currently has one advisor (Advisor Type = ADVR) Alice Turner. Navigation Path: Records and Enrollment ­ Student Background Information ­ Student Advisor Upload

26

How to batch upload video files with Unison How to batch upload video files with Unison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How to batch upload video files with Unison How to batch upload video files with Unison There are two different ways to upload already existing video files into Unison: Upload from the New Session page (only allows one video file to be uploaded at a time) Launching the editor in Composer (allows

Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

27

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atlas Sodium Automated Batch Synthesis System (Syrris) June 2013 #12;Introduction to the system · The Atlas Sodium system consists of an Atlas base equipped with a 400ºC hotplate, a stacking dry bath systemL) for automated addition and/or removal of solution. · The system is computer controlled by the Atlas software

Subramanian, Venkat

28

Batch load anaerobic digestion of dairy manure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and resource recovery. Anaerobic digestion of manure has re- ceived much attention as a method to reduce the pollution threat to the environment while reclaiming energy in the form of methane gas from the biomass. Currently there is one commercial anaerobic... production than the conventional process used in most studies to date. The objective of this research was to evaluate a batch load digestion process for methane production from dairy manure to determine the optimum influent total solids concentration...

Egg, Richard P

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

SLUDGE BATCH 5 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing to Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in early fiscal year 2009. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB5 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2007-0007, Rev. 1 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB5 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB5 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the washing plan to prepare SB5 and the estimated SB4 heel mass. Nine DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using both a batch simulant (Tank 51 simulant after washing is complete) and a blend simulant (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). Each simulant had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (115%, 130%, 145% and 160%). One additional run was made using blend simulant at 130% acid that included additions of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) waste prior to acid addition and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) waste following SRAT dewatering. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB5 sludge: (1) This is the first batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution. (2) The sludge is high in mercury. (3) The sludge is high in noble metals. (4) The sludge is high in U and Pu--components that are not added in sludge simulants. Two SB5 processing issues were noted during testing. First, high hydrogen generation rates were measured during experiments with both the blend and batch simulant at high acid stoichiometry. Also, the reflux time was extended due to the high mercury concentration in both the batch and blend simulant. Adding ARP will extend processing times in DWPF. The ARP caustic boil took approximately six hours. The boiling time during the experiment with added MCU was 14 hours at the maximum DWPF steam flux rate. This is comparable to the DWPF processing time for dewatering plus reflux without MCU at a 5000 lbs/hr boil-up rate, but would require significantly more time at boiling at 2000-2500 lbs/hr boil-up rate. The addition of ARP and MCU did not cause any other processing issues, since foaming, rheology and hydrogen generation were less of an issue while processing with ARP/MCU.

Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; David Best, D; David Koopman, D

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

30

Conversion of batch to molten glass, I: Volume expansion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Batches designed to simulate nuclear high-level waste glass were compressed into pellets that were heated at a rate of 5°C/min and photographed to obtain the profile area as a function of temperature. Three types of batches were prepared with different nitrate-carbonate ratios. To determine the impact of the heat supply by an exothermic reaction and the batch expansion, the nitrated batches were prepared with varying addition of sucrose. To obtain the impact of the grain size of the quartz component, the mixed nitrate-carbonate batches were prepared with silica particles ranging in size from 5 µm to 195 µm. One batch containing only carbonates was also tested. Sucrose addition had little effect on the batch expansion, while the size of silica was very influential. The 5-?m grains had a strongest effect, causing the generation of both primary and secondary foam, whereas only secondary foam was produced in batches with grains of 45 µm and larger. The retention of gases evolved as the batch melts creates primary foam. Gases evolved from oxidation-reduction reactions once the batch has melted produce secondary foam. We suggest that the viscosity of the melt and the amount of gas evolved are the main influences on foam production. As more gas is produced in the melt and as the glass becomes less viscous, the bubbles of gas coalesce into larger and larger cavities, until the glass can no longer contain the bubbles and they burst, causing the foam to collapse.

Henager, Samuel H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marcial, Jose; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Dynamic Control for Batch Process Systems Using Stochastic Utility Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

single turn; 3. once in operation, it is not possible to shut down a furnace, e.g., to take corrective measures; and 4. batching takes approximately 5 to 10 times longer than serial processing. Products can be processed either as a full batch (the... maximum number of products, i.e. the full capacity of the processor) or as a partial batch. The full batch condition poses fewer decision-making problems since management is needed only to determine which product type has priority in processing...

Park, Hongsuk

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

32

Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

33

Elink Batch Upload Instructions | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

includes reporting for contract proposals, funding status, routine construction or inventory, and similar products. AN 241.1 Submission Options Batch Upload allows you to upload...

34

Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

Mariner, Paul E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

35

Materials selection for kraft batch digesters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several candidate materials were evaluated by corrosion testing in autoclaves containing white and black liquors for batch digesters. The relationship between corrosion rate and corrosion potential was determined for ASTM SA516-Grade 70 carbon steel, UNS S30403 (Type 304L) austenitic stainless steel, UNS S31803 (2205) and UNS S32550 (2605) duplex stainless steels, and two stainless steel weld overlays, applied by the GMAW (gas metal arc welding) and SAW (submerged arc welding) processes. The tests revealed that SA516-Grade 70 carbon steel and type 304L stainless steel can experience high rates of corrosion. For the duplex stainless steels and weld overlays, corrosion resistance improved with chromium content. A chromium content of at least 25% was found to be necessary for good corrosion resistance.

Wensley, A. [Bacon Donaldson Consulting Engineers, Richmond, British Columbia (Canada); Moskal, M. [Stone Container Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Wilton, W. [Stone-Consolidated Corp., Fort Frances, Ontario (Canada)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

KRUGER AA; HRMA P

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Radionuclide migration laboratory studies for validation of batch sorption data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advective and diffusive migration experiments (within the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project) involve utilizing crushed material, intact, and fractured tuff in order to test and improve (if necessary) transport models by experimentally observing the migration of sorbing and non-sorbing radionuclides on a laboratory scale. Performing a validation of the sorption data obtained with batch techniques (within the Batch Sorption Study) is an integral part of the mission of the Dynamic Transport Column Experiments and Diffusion Studies. In this paper the work scope of the radionuclide migration laboratory experiments (as they apply to validation of batch sorption data) is reviewed.

Triay, I.R.; Mitchell, A.J.; Ott, M.A.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerated fed-batch reactor Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Very High Ethanol Performance in Saccha- romyces cereVisiae Fed-Batch Process... ARTICLES Optimization of Fed-Batch Saccharomyces cereWisiae Fermentation Using Dynamic Flux...

39

Spin dynamics simulation of electron spin relaxation in Ni{sup 2+}(aq)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ability to quantitatively predict and analyze the rate of electron spin relaxation of open-shell systems is important for electron paramagnetic resonance and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. We present a combined molecular dynamics (MD), quantum chemistry (QC), and spin dynamics simulation method for calculating such spin relaxation rates. The method is based on the sampling of a MD trajectory by QC calculations, to produce instantaneous parameters of the spin Hamiltonian used, in turn, to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by simulating the relaxation of electron spin in an aqueous solution of Ni{sup 2+} ion. The spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates are extracted directly from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available, indirectly obtained experimental data is obtained by our method.

Rantaharju, Jyrki, E-mail: jjrantaharju@gmail.com; Mareš, Ji?í, E-mail: jiri.mares@oulu.fi; Vaara, Juha, E-mail: juha.vaara@iki.fi [NMR Research Group, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, Oulu, FIN-90014 (Finland)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

40

SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mechanism of Phase Formation in the Batch Mixtures for Slag-Bearing Glass Ceramics - 12207  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Slag surrogate was produced from chemicals by heating to 900 deg. C and keeping at this temperature for 1 hr. The product obtained was intermixed with either sodium di-silicate (75 wt.% waste loading) or borax (85 wt.% slag loading). The mixtures were heat-treated within a temperature range of 25 to 1300 deg. C. The products were examined by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The products prepared at temperatures of up to 1000 deg. C contained both phase typical of the source slag and intermediate phases as well as phases typical of the materials melted at 1350 deg. C such as nepheline, britholite, magnetite and matrix vitreous phase. Vitrification process in batch mixtures consisting of slag surrogate and either sodium di-silicate or sodium tetraborate runs through formation of intermediate phases mainly silico-phosphates capable to incorporate Sm as trivalent actinides surrogate. Reactions in the batch mixtures are in the whole completed by ?1000 deg. C but higher temperatures are required to homogenize the products. If in the borate-based system the mechanism is close to simple dissolution of slag constituents in the low viscous borate melt, then in the silicate-based system the mechanism was found to be much complicated and includes re-crystallization during melting with segregation of newly-formed nepheline type phase. (authors)

Stefanovsky, Sergey V.; Stefanovsky, Olga I.; Malinina, Galina A. [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Power/Performance Trade-offs of Small Batched LU Based Solvers on GPUs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we propose and analyze a set of batched linear solvers for small matrices on Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), evaluating the various alternatives depending on the size of the systems to solve. We discuss three different solutions that operate with different level of parallelization and GPU features. The first, exploiting the CUBLAS library, manages matrices of size up to 32x32 and employs Warp level (one matrix, one Warp) parallelism and shared memory. The second works at Thread-block level parallelism (one matrix, one Thread-block), still exploiting shared memory but managing matrices up to 76x76. The third is Thread level parallel (one matrix, one thread) and can reach sizes up to 128x128, but it does not exploit shared memory and only relies on the high memory bandwidth of the GPU. The first and second solution only support partial pivoting, the third one easily supports partial and full pivoting, making it attractive to problems that require greater numerical stability. We analyze the trade-offs in terms of performance and power consumption as function of the size of the linear systems that are simultaneously solved. We execute the three implementations on a Tesla M2090 (Fermi) and on a Tesla K20 (Kepler).

Villa, Oreste; Fatica, Massimiliano; Gawande, Nitin A.; Tumeo, Antonino

2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

List of Accepted Summer Interns (2013) May-June Batch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Dr. Tung-Yuan Ho CBMB Nid** Pash*** (INDIA) Dr. Keng-Hui Lin ESS Pong*** Polsom**** (THAILAND) Dr 14 Interns 12 PIs June-July Batch Program Intern Mentor ESS SOU*** KUM** SAH** (INDIA) Dr. Wu* (MALAYSIA) Ko** Yeo** Kha* (MALAYSIA) Dr. Yun-Ru Ruby Chen ESS Yu** Cél** Kita**** (JAPAN) Dr. Danie Mao

44

Improving SSL Handshake Performance via Batching Hovav Shacham Dan Boneh  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving SSL Handshake Performance via Batching Hovav Shacham Dan Boneh hovav@cs.stanford.edu dabo@cs.stanford.edu Abstract We present an algorithmic approach for speeding up SSL's performance on a web server. Our approach improves the performance of SSL's handshake protocol by up to a factor of 2.5 for 1024-bit RSA keys

Boneh, Dan

45

Batching Work and Rework Processes with Limited Deterioration of Reworkables  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be reworked such that a given number of good quality items is produced and total setup, rework, inventory, all items of a batch are manufactured and good quality items go to the inventory to satisfy given reworked item has the required good quality. During waiting for rework, defective items deteriorate

Magdeburg, Universität

46

Separation of Azeotropic Mixtures in Closed Batch Distillation Arrangements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Separation of Azeotropic Mixtures in Closed Batch Distillation Arrangements S. Skouras and S to obtain a light and a heavy fraction simultaneously from the top and the bottom of the column, while an intermediate fraction may also be recovered in the middle vessel. Two modifications of the multivessel

Skogestad, Sigurd

47

VSched: Mixing Batch And Interactive Virtual Machines Using  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the user in direct control of scheduling #12;4 Virtuoso: VM-based Distributed Computing User Orders a raw work · Putting the user in direct control of scheduling #12;12 Periodic Real-time Scheduling ModelVSched: Mixing Batch And Interactive Virtual Machines Using Periodic Real-time Scheduling Bin Lin

Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

48

pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a , Y. Creff a , N. Petit b,* a IFP of controlling the pH, in a fed batch reactor where precipitation occurs, is con- sidered. Due to the batch Keywords: pH control Fed batch process Precipitation a b s t r a c t In this paper, the problem

49

Hybrid matrix fiber composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

50

A batch reactor heat recovery challenge problem Johannes Jschke, Sigurd Skogestad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A batch reactor heat recovery challenge problem Johannes Jäschke, Sigurd Skogestad Department a challenge problem for maximizing the heat recovery in a heat exchanger network connected to a set of batch periods of the batch reactors, the reactor effluents are fed into the secondary sides of the heat

Skogestad, Sigurd

51

A Conceptual Model for Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in Batch Production Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Conceptual Model for Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in Batch Production Systems for batch production system. The main structure of this model is grounded on three constructs: traditional developed for batch production systems. Then, case study guidelines were applied to define an appropriate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by alkyl lithiums  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-butyl lithium using cyclohexane as the solvent, The polymerization is carried out in an isothermal batch reactor at a temperature of. 5D C. The proposed reaction proceeds by a homogenous anionic mechanism. The mathematical model developed by Edgar (6.... Bottles for Polymerization Reaction The reaction bottles used were twenty-six ounce coke bottles. The following procedure was adopted: First, clean the bottles thoroughly with soap and water. Then, rinse them with distilled water. Dry them overnight...

Desai, Rashmi R

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dynamic Control of Serial-batch Processing Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measures are selected over other possible measures due to their prevalent use by semiconductor manufacturing management as production performance indicators in the long-run (month/quarter) (Pfund et al. (2006)). The research domain... of incompatible product types and different batch process times. The static problem has been shown NP-hard for total completion time (Chandru et al. (1993a)), makespan (Uzsoy (1994)) and total tardiness (Mehta and Uzsoy (1998)) criteria. The dynamic problem has...

Cerekci, Abdullah

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

54

SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

Stone, M; David Best, D

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Using The Batch System: Univa Grid Engine (UGE)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEMUsedUserUsingelectronEnergyThe Batch

56

Mixing Up a Batch of Stronger Metals | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0StatementsMixing Up a Batch of Stronger

57

Microsoft Word - U(VI)andSr(II)BatchSorption bh  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

C and D point towards some of the precipitates. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Important reactive phenomena that affect the...

58

Bosonic Matrix Theory and Matrix Dbranes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop new tools for an in-depth study of our recent proposal for Matrix Theory. We construct the anomaly-free and finite planar continuum limit of the ground state with SO(2^{13}) symmetry matching with the tadpole and tachyon free IR stable high temperature ground state of the open and closed bosonic string. The correspondence between large N limits and spacetime effective actions is demonstrated more generally for an arbitrary D25brane ground state which might include brane-antibrane pairs or NS-branes and which need not have an action formulation. Closure of the finite N matrix Lorentz algebra nevertheless requires that such a ground state is simultaneously charged under all even rank antisymmetric matrix potentials. Additional invariance under the gauge symmetry mediated by the one-form matrix potential requires a ground state charged under the full spectrum of antisymmetric (p+1)-form matrix potentials with p taking any integer value less than 26. Matrix Dbrane democracy has a beautiful large N remnant in the form of mixed Chern-Simons couplings in the effective Lagrangian whenever the one-form gauge symmetry is nonabelian.

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

60

Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Waste-heat recovery in batch processes using heat storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The waste-heat recovery in batch processes has been studied using the pinch-point method. The aim of the work has been to investigate theoretical and practical approaches to the design of heat-exchanger networks, including heat storage, for waste-heat recovery in batch processes. The study is limited to the incorporation of energy-storage systems based on fixed-temperature variable-mass stores. The background for preferring this to the alternatives (variable-temperature fixed-mass and constant-mass constant-temperature (latent-heat) stores) is given. It is shown that the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method (time average model, TAM) can be achieved by locating energy stores at either end of each process stream. This theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. A simple procedure for determining a number of heat-storage tanks sufficient to achieve the maximum energy-saving targets as calculated by the pinch-point method is described. This procedure relies on combinatorial considerations, and could therefore be labeled the combinatorial method for incorporation of heat storage in heat-exchanger networks. Qualitative arguments justifying the procedure are presented. For simple systems, waste-heat recovery systems with only three heat-storage temperatures (a hot storage, a cold storage, and a heat store at the pinch temperature) often can achieve the maximum energy-saving targets. Through case studies, six of which are presented, it is found that a theoretically large number of heat-storage tanks (twice the number of process streams) can be reduced to just a few tanks. The description of these six cases is intended to be sufficiently detailed to serve as benchmark cases for development of alternative methods.

Stoltze, S.; Mikkelsen, J.; Lorentzen, B.; Petersen, P.M.; Qvale, B. [Technical Univ. of Denmark, Lyngby (Denmark). Lab. for Energetics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industry’s energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Robust controller design for temperature tracking problems in jacketed batch reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust controller design for temperature tracking problems in jacketed batch reactors Vishak for temperature tracking problems in batch reactors in the presence of parametric uncertainty. The controller has]. Control is achieved by manipulating the heat content from the jacket to the reactor. In the past

Palanki, Srinivas

64

APPLIED MICROBIAL AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY Electricity production from xylose in fed-batch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-batch and continuous-flow microbial fuel cells Liping Huang & Bruce E. Logan Received: 23 March 2008 /Revised: 30 May-scale (0.77 l) air-cathode, brush- anode microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated in fed-batch mode using xylose vary with xylose loading. Keywords Microbial fuel cell . Xylose . Degradation . Power production

65

Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in a Batch Production System: a Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in a Batch Production System: a Case Study Luciano a case study of an implementation of a new method for Production Leveling designed for batch production. It includes prioritizing criteria of products and level production plan. Moreover, it was applied

Boyer, Edmond

66

Optimal Production Planning Models for Parallel Batch Reactors with Sequence-dependent Changeovers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimal Production Planning Models for Parallel Batch Reactors with Sequence planning of parallel multi-product batch reactors with sequence-dependent changeovers, a challenging of number of products, reactors or length of the time horizon, we propose a decomposition technique based

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

67

Integrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into a number of product fractions in a single batch column whereas, in continuous distillation several columnsIntegrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel E. K distillation for separating homogeneous minimum-boiling azeotropic mixtures, where the extractive agent

Skogestad, Sigurd

68

Optimization of Fed-Batch Saccharomyces cereWisiae Fermentation Using Dynamic Flux Balance Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ARTICLES Optimization of Fed-Batch Saccharomyces cereWisiae Fermentation Using Dynamic Flux Balance metabolism with dynamic mass balances on key extracellular species. Model-based dynamic optimization concentration profiles, and the final batch time are treated as decision variables in the dynamic optimization

Mountziaris, T. J.

69

Production of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

saccharification to sugars for ethanol production. In the past decade, enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose hasProduction of Cellulase on Mixtures of Xylose and Cellulose in a Fed-Batch Process Ali Mohagheghi was studied in a fed-batch system. An initial mixture of 30 g/L xylose and 20 g/L cellulose

California at Riverside, University of

70

Intelligent monitoring system for long-term control of Sequencing Batch Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instruments Italy to test the potentials of monitoring systems applied to biological wastewater treatment Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBRs) are widely used as a flexible and low-cost process for biological wastewater-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) treating nitrogen-rich wastewater (sanitary landfill leachate). The paper

71

Design, implementation, and operation of a class based batch queue scheduler for VAX/VMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fermilab found that the standard VMS batch configuration options were inadequate for the job mix that exists on the Fermilab central computer facility VAX cluster. Accordingly, Fermilab designed and implemented a class based batch queue scheduler. This scheduler makes use of the standard VMS job controller and batch system. Users interact with the scheduler at job submission time by specification of CPU time limits and batch job characteristics. This scheduler allows Fermilab to make efficient use of our large heterogeneous VAX cluster which contains machines ranging from a VAX 780 to a VAX 8800. The scheduler was implemented using the VMS system services $GETQUI and $SNDJBC, without changes to the existing VMS job scheduler. As a result, the scheduler should remain compatible with future VMS versions. This session will discuss the design goals, implementation, and operational experience with Fermilab's class based batch queue scheduler.

Chadwick, K.

1988-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

72

REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank 12 samples were pulled on February 9, 2010 following slurry operations by H-Tank Farm. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 4 and two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 12 were received in the SRNL Shielded Cells. Each tank's samples were composited into clean 500 mL polyethylene storage bottles and weighed. The composited Tank 4 sample was 428.27 g and the composited Tank 12 sample was 502.15 g. As expected there are distinct compositional differences between Tank 4 and Tank 12 sludges. The Tank 12 slurry is much higher in Al, Hg, Mn, and Th, and much lower in Fe, Ni, S, and U than the Tank 4 slurry. The Tank 4 sludge definitely makes the more significant contribution of S to any sludge batch blend. This S, like that observed during SB6 washing, is best monitored by looking at the total S measured by digesting the sample and analyzing by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Alternatively, one can measure the soluble S by ICP-AES and adjust the value upward by approximately 15% to have a pretty good estimate of the total S in the slurry. Soluble sulfate measurements by ion chromatography (IC) will be biased considerably lower than the actual total S, the difference being due to the non-sulfate soluble S and the undissolved S. Tank 12 sludge is enriched in U-235, and hence samples transferred into SRNL from the Tank Farm will need to be placed on the reportable special nuclear material inventory and tracked for total U per SRNL procedure requirements.

Bannochie, C.; Click, D.; Pareizs, J.

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Vulvosensation Matrix INTRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Vulvosensation Matrix 0000 OHBM 2013 INTRODUCTION · The existence of a pain "matrix" has been. With the exception of the lowest resolution, ROI sizes were roughly equal. B) Graph metrics were calculated from using the Sporns connectivity toolbox for Matlab, at different spatial resolutions and link densities

Apkarian, A. Vania

75

Fast methods for resumming matrix polynomials and Chebyshev matrix polynomials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fast methods for resumming matrix polynomials and Chebyshev matrix polynomials WanZhen Liang a,b,1; accepted 28 August 2003 Abstract Fast and effective algorithms are discussed for resumming matrix for resumming matrix polynomials with fewer matrix multiplications [12­16]. Perhaps the most effective algorithm

Baer, Roi

76

Statistical Review of Data from DWPF's Process Samples for Batches 19 Through 30  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The measurements derived from samples taken during the processing of batches 19 through 30 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) affords an opportunity for review and comparisons. This report has looked at some of the statistics from these data. Only the data reported by the DWPF lab (that is, the data provided by the lab as representative of the samples taken) are available for this analysis. In some cases, the sample results reported may be a subset of the sample results generated by the analytical procedures. A thorough assessment of the DWPF lab's analytical procedures would require the complete set of data. Thus, the statistics reported here, specifically, as they relate to analytical uncertainties, are limited to the reported data for these samples, A fell for the consistency of the incoming slurry is the estimation of the components of variation for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipts. In general, for all of the vessels, the data from batches after 21 show smaller batch-to-batch variation than the data from all the batches. The relative contributions of batch-to-batch versus residual, which includes analytical, are presented in these analyses.

Edwards, T.B.

1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Hybrid matrix amplifier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

1995-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hybrid matrix amplifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Plut, Thomas A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Low rank matrix completion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of recovering a low rank matrix given a sampling of its entries. Such problems are of considerable interest in a diverse set of fields including control, system identification, statistics and signal ...

Nan, Feng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Countercurrent Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Improvements Over Batch Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of starchy biomass (e.g., corn), which competes with food. Using lignocellulose avoids competition with food; however, it is difficult to digest using traditional batch saccharification. This work investigates countercurrent saccharification as an alternative...

Zentay, Agustin Nicholas

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

COTS FPGA/SRAM Irradiations Using a Dedicated Testing Infrastructure for Characterization of Large Component Batches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper introduces a new testing platform for irradiation of large batches of COTS FPGA and SRAMs. The main objective is measurement of component radiation response and assessment of component-to-component variability within one batch. The first validation and test results using the testing platform are presented for 150nm TFT SRAM (Renesas) and different sizes of the 130nm ProASIC3 FPGA (Microsemi).

Slawosz, Uznanski; Johannes, Walter; Andrea, Vilar-Villanueva

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Isotopic Fractionation of Mg2+(aq), Ca2+(aq), and Fe2+(aq) with Carbonate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-Testing SignIon Mobility Spectrometry

85

SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 40 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase III simulant flowsheet testing was completed using the latest composition estimates for SB6/Tank 40 feed to DWPF. The goals of the testing were to determine reasonable operating conditions and assumptions for the startup of SB6 processing in the DWPF. Testing covered the region from 102-159% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. Nitrite ion concentration was reduced to 90 mg/kg in the SRAT product of the lowest acid run. The 159% acid run reached 60% of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) limit of 0.65 lb H2/hr, and then sporadically exceeded the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) limit of 0.223 lb H2/hr. Hydrogen generation rates peaked at 112% of the SME limit, but higher than targeted wt% total solids levels may have been partially responsible for rates seen. A stoichiometric factor of 120% met both objectives. A processing window for SB6 exists from 102% to something close to 159% based on the simulant results. An initial recommendation for SB6 processing is at 115-120% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. The addition of simulated Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) streams to the SRAT cycle had no apparent impact on the preferred stoichiometric factor. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 120%, 118.4% with ARP/MCU, and 159% stoichiometry were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 36 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 120% acid run reached 23% of the SRAT limit and 37% of the SME limit. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 29 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two processing issues, identified during SB6 Phase II flowsheet testing and qualification simulant testing, were monitored during Phase III. Mercury material balance closure was impacted by acid stoichiometry, and significant mercury was not accounted for in the highest acid run. Coalescence of elemental mercury droplets in the mercury water wash tank (MWWT) appeared to degrade with increasing stoichiometry. Observations were made of mercury scale formation in the SRAT condenser and MWWT. A tacky mercury amalgam with Rh, Pd, and Cu, plus some Ru and Ca formed on the impeller at 159% acid. It contained a significant fraction of the available Pd, Cu, and Rh as well as about 25% of the total mercury charged. Free (elemental) mercury was found in all of the SME products. Ammonia scrubbers were used during the tests to capture off-gas ammonia for material balance purposes. Significant ammonium ion formation was again observed during the SRAT cycle, and ammonia gas entered the off-gas as the pH rose during boiling. Ammonium ion production was lower than in the SB6 Phase II and the qualification simulant testing. Similar ammonium ion formation was seen in the ARP/MCU simulation as in the 120% flowsheet run. A slightly higher pH caused most of the ammonium to vaporize and collect in the ammonia scrubber reflux solution. Two periods of foaminess were noted. Neither required additional antifoam to control the foam growth. A steady foam layer formed during reflux in the 120% acid run. It was about an inch thick, but was 2-3 times more volume of bubbles than is typically seen during reflux. A similar foam layer also was seen during caustic boiling of the simulant during the ARP addition. While frequently seen with the radioactive sludge, foaminess during caustic boiling with simulants has been relatively rare. Two further flowsheet tests were performed and will be documented separately. One test was to evaluate the impact of process conditions that match current DWPF operation (lower rates). The second test was to evaluate the impact of SRAT/SME processing on the rheology of a modified Phase III simulant that had been made five times more viscous using ultrasonication.

Koopman, David

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Density Matrix Topological Insulators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal noise can destroy topological insulators (TI). However we demonstrate how TIs can be made stable in dissipative systems. To that aim, we introduce the notion of band Liouvillian as the dissipative counterpart of band Hamiltonian, and show a method to evaluate the topological order of its steady state. This is based on a generalization of the Chern number valid for general mixed states (referred to as density matrix Chern value), which witnesses topological order in a system coupled to external noise. Additionally, we study its relation with the electrical conductivity at finite temperature, which is not a topological property. Nonetheless, the density matrix Chern value represents the part of the conductivity which is topological due to the presence of quantum mixed edge states at finite temperature. To make our formalism concrete, we apply these concepts to the two-dimensional Haldane model in the presence of thermal dissipation, but our results hold for arbitrary dimensions and density matrices.

A. Rivas; O. Viyuela; M. A. Martin-Delgado

2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Design and Optimization of Condenser and Centrifuge Units for Enhancement of a Batch Vacuum Frying System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of vacuum frying can be a feasible alternative method to produce chips with lower oil content and high quality color and texture (Garayo and Moreira, 2002). 7 Figure 2-1 displays the use of different deep-fat fryers in the commercial food industry.... Countertops are generally used in homes, while high efficiency batch fryers are employed in commercial (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) food services as well as industries (Frito Lay, Pringles, etc.). Application of a batch fryer is limited to frying small loads...

Pandey, Akhilesh

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

88

Chemical Reduction of PCE by Zero Valent Iron Colloids Batch and Column Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Reduction of PCE by Zero Valent Iron Colloids ­ Batch and Column Experiments Motivation nm NAPASAN Particle - nZVI / PCE-Solution 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 22 24H[-] PCE - Inflow PCE - Outflow TCE - Inflow TCE - Outflow Chloride - Outflow Blank Value Chloride pH Value

Cirpka, Olaf Arie

89

Hybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi AZIMI@EECS.OREGONSTATE.EDU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

motivating application we try to optimize the power output of nano-enhanced Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). MFCsHybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi AZIMI@EECS.OREGONSTATE.EDU Oregon State University Abstract Bayesian Optimization (BO) aims at optimizing an unknown function that is costly to evaluate. We

Fern, Xiaoli Zhang

90

Microbial Fuel Cells In this experiment, a batch mixed culture microbial fuel cell with Shewanella  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microbial Fuel Cells Abstract In this experiment, a batch mixed culture microbial fuel cell conditions under nitrogen gas. In the microbial fuel cell with Shewanella putrefaciens sp. 200 as catalysisM at pH=7. Introduction Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are systems that take advantage of certain

Fay, Noah

91

HIGH YIELD BATCH PACKAGING OF MICRO DEVICES WITH UNIQUELY ORIENTING SELF-ASSEMBLY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HIGH YIELD BATCH PACKAGING OF MICRO DEVICES WITH UNIQUELY ORIENTING SELF-ASSEMBLY Jiandong Fang of uniquely orienting self-assembly with 2mm square diced silicon parts. Each silicon part has one hydrophobic shape-directed self-assembly assigns parts to complementary trenches in parallel [2]; (3) capillary

92

Utilizing Green Energy Prediction to Schedule Mixed Batch and Service Jobs in Data Centers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Utilizing Green Energy Prediction to Schedule Mixed Batch and Service Jobs in Data Centers Baris on using immediately available green energy to supplement the non- renewable, or brown energy at the cost of canceling and rescheduling jobs whenever the green energy availability is too low [16]. In this paper we

Simunic, Tajana

93

Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment on the Enzymatic understand these trade-offs, comparative data are reported on xylan and lignin removal and enzymatic with just water enhanced the xylan dissolution rate, more than doubled total lignin removal, and increased

California at Riverside, University of

94

Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ammonium rich wastewater Fuzzy logic Biological nutrient removal a b s t r a c t The present paper reports and biological pro- cesses (Lema et al., 1988). Among several biological treatment sys- tems, sequencing batch confirm the effectiveness of the nitrite route for nitrogen removal optimisation in leachate treatment

95

Light cone matrix product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

C000008A BATCH1 DAILY LISTING C100018D SSN CHANGE UPDATE RPT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUAL CHRAGE ACCOUNT LISTING C18DB C100648A COMPUTER UTILLIZATION C100668A C18DB SEGMENT CLEAN-UP CC000008A BATCH1 DAILY LISTING C100018D SSN CHANGE UPDATE RPT C100028D SSN CHANGE ERROR RPT C100038A CAI.CA7 PAN UPDATES C602028D PRODUCTION JCL C700008D TMS RPT 25 - PICKING LIST C700018D TMS RPT 24

Almor, Amit

97

SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

98

Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by n-butyllithium in benzene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

weight distribution. In order to be able to maintain isothermal conditions, and have adequate m1x1ng, the size of the reactor must be kept small. Since a considerable amount of polymer is required for molecular weight determination, only one sample... have used multi-sampled batch reactors 1n the form of sealed, capped soft drink bottles. The procedure followed by these authors was as follows: The bottles were charged with monomer, solvent and initiator. Temperature control and mixing were...

Tanlak, Tayfun

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

MODELING CST ION EXCHANGE FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM SCIX BATCHES 1 - 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work is, through modeling, to predict the performance of Crystalline Silicotitinate (CST) for the removal of cesium from Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Batches 1-4 (as proposed in Revision 16 of the Liquid Waste System Plan). The scope of this task is specified in Technical Task Request (TTR) 'SCIX Feed Modeling', HLE-TTR-2011-003, which specified using the Zheng, Anthony, Miller (ZAM) code to predict CST isotherms for six given SCIX feed compositions and the VErsatile Reaction and SEparation simulator for Liquid Chromatography (VERSE-LC) code to predict ion-exchange column behavior. The six SCIX feed compositions provided in the TTR represent SCIX Batches 1-4 and Batches 1 and 2 without caustic addition. The study also investigated the sensitivity in column performance to: (1) Flow rates of 5, 10, and 20 gpm with 10 gpm as the nominal flow; and (2) Temperatures of 25, 35, and 45 C with 35 C as the nominal temperature. The isotherms and column predictions presented in this report reflect the expected performance of engineered CST IE-911. This form of CST was used in experiments conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that formed the basis for estimating model parameters (Hamm et al., 2002). As has been done previously, the engineered resin capacity is estimated to be 68% of the capacity of particulate CST without binder.

Smith, F.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

Johnson, F. C.; Pareizs, J. M.

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Glass matrix armor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

Calkins, Noel C. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

Shafer, A.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

activated carbon-sequencing batch: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

allows you to automatically compensate and analyze a group of files with one analysis template and compensation matrix. Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: the output...

105

Canonical density matrix perturbation theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham density functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large non-metallic materials and metals at high temperatures.

Niklasson, Anders M N; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Honnell, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gibbs, W. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Honnell, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gibbs, W. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev [OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK)(Russian Federation)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

Investigation of Rheological Impacts on Sludge Batch 3 as Insoluble Solids and Wash Endpoints are Adjusted  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing and immobilizing radioactive sludge slurry into a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF has already processed three sludge batches (Sludge Batch 1A, Sludge Batch 1B, and Sludge Batch 2) and is currently processing the fourth sludge batch (Sludge Batch 3). A sludge batch is defined as a single tank of sludge slurry or a combination of sludge slurries from different tanks that has been or will be qualified before being transferred to DWPF. As a part of the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) qualification task, rheology measurements of the sludge slurry were requested at different insoluble solids loadings. These measurements were requested in order to gain insight into potential processing problems that may occur as the insoluble solids are adjusted up or down (by concentration or dilution) during the process. As a part of this study, a portion of the ''as received'' SB3 sample was washed with inhibited water (0.015 M NaOH and 0.015 M NaNO2) to target 0.5M Na versus a measured 1M Na in the supernate. The purpose of the ''washing'' step was to allow a comparison of the SB3 rheological data to the rheological data collected for Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and to determine if there was a dependence of the yield stress and consistency as a function of washing. The ''as received'' SB3 rheology data was also compared to SB3 simulants prepared by the Simulant Development Program in order to provide guidance for selecting a simulant that is more representative of the rheological properties of the radioactive sludge slurry. A summary of the observations, conclusions are: (1) The yield stress and plastic viscosity increased as the weight percent insoluble solids were increased for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples, at a fixed pH. (2) For the same insoluble solids loading, the yield stress for the SB2 sample is approximately a factor of three higher than the ''as received'' SB3 sample. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. This difference is probably due to the different Na concentrations of the slurries. (3) The yield stress for the SB2 sample at 17.5 wt. % insoluble solids loading is four times higher than the ''washed'' SB3 sample at 16.5 wt. % insoluble solids. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. The differences for the yield stress and consistency can be explained by the differences in the Fe and Na concentrations of the sludge slurry and the anion concentrations of the resulting supernates. (4) The rheological properties (i.e. yield stress and plastic viscosity), as the insoluble solids are adjusted, for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples are different. The plastic viscosity curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample was higher than the plastic viscosity curve for SB3 ''washed'' sample. The yield stress curve for the ''washed'' SB3 sample is slightly lower than the ''as received'' SB3 sample up until {approx}19 wt. % insoluble solids. The ''washed'' SB3 sample then exceeds the yield stress curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. This rheological behavior is probably due to the difference in the Na concentration of the supernate for the samples. (5) No unusual behavior, such as air entrainment, was noted for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. (6) The observed physical properties of the SB3 sample changed after washing. The ''washed'' SB3 sample entrained air readily at higher insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 14.1, 16.5, 19.5 wt. %) as it did for SB2. The air entrainment appeared to dissipate for the SB3 sample at the lower insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 9.7 and 11.7 wt. %). (7) The physical behavior of SB3 can be influenced by controlling the Na concentration in the supernate and the wt. % insoluble solids. The cause for the air entrainment in the ''washed'' SB3 sample could be due to a change in the particle size during the washing step. (8) The SB3 simulants prepared for the Simulant Development Program were approximately a factor of 1.6 to 4 times higher for yield stress and 2.6 to 4 times higher

Fellinger, T. L.

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

A Batch Wafer Scale LIGA Assembly and Packaging Technique vai Diffusion Bonding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technique using diffusion bonding (or solid-state welding) has been used to achieve batch fabrication of two- level nickel LIGA structures. Interlayer alignment accuracy of less than 1 micron is achieved using press-fit gauge pins. A mini-scale torsion tester was built to measure the diffusion bond strength of LIGA formed specimens that has shown successful bonding at temperatures of 450"C at 7 ksi pressure with bond strength greater than 100 Mpa. Extensions to this basic process to allow for additional layers and thereby more complex assemblies as well as commensurate packaging are discussed.

Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

112

Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spectra from the “at-line” spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the “odd” shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it “odd” shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Rank-Sparsity Incoherence for Matrix Decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Suppose we are given a matrix that is formed by adding an unknown sparse matrix to an unknown low-rank matrix. Our goal is to decompose the given matrix into its sparse and low-rank components. Such a problem arises in a ...

Chandrasekaran, Venkat

116

Matrix adaptation in discriminative vector quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix adaptation in discriminative vector quantization Petra

Zachmann, Gabriel

117

Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization Michael Biehl1 , Barbara

Biehl, Michael

118

DARS BATCH PROCESSING O F F I C E O F T H E R E G I S T R A R  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DARS BATCH PROCESSING O F F I C E O F T H E R E G I S T R A R UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. About DARS Batch a. History b. Capabilities 2. Quick Reference Guide 3. The DARS of Batches a. Monitoring the status of a request b. Viewing and printing 6. FAQs 7. DARS Analysis Tables 8

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

119

Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

Johnson, F.

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

Johnson, F.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/?Fe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

Matrix Computations (4th Edition)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computation of Low-Rank Matrix Approximations," JACM 54(2), Article No. 9. G.E. Adams, A.W. Bojanczyk, and F­905. G.S. Ammar, W.B. Gragg, and L. Reichel (1985). "On the Eigenproblem for Orthogonal Matrices," Proc. Blackford, J. Demmel, J. Dongarra, J. Du Croz, A. Greenbaum, S. Hammarling, A. McKenney, and D. Sorensen

Van Loan, Charles F.

124

Matrix subdivision schemes Albert Cohen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the analysis of multivariate scalar schemes, in subdivision processes corresponding to shift­invariant spaces extension of the well studied case of subdivision schemes with scalar masks. Such schemes arise of \\Phi. 1 #12; 1.Introduction Matrix subdivision schemes play an important role in the analysis of mul

Cohen, Albert

125

Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C. [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique] [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Documentation of toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 2700 gallons/batch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, Reactor Materials increased the rate of supernate treatment in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF) from 1800 gallons to [approximately]2700 gallons of supernate per 36,000 gallon dilute wastewater batch. The first release of the treated effluent began on March 3, 1991. A series of whole effluent toxicity tests was conducted on the DETF effluent to determine if the increased supernate concentration would result in any chronic toxicity affects in the receiving stream (Tims Branch). The toxicity tests were conducted at instream concentrations equivalent to DETF release rates of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 gallons/min. The test results, based on 7-day Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity, indicated no toxicity effects at any concentration tested. Supernate treatment in DETF continued at the higher concentration.

Pickett, J.B.

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

127

UO{sub 2} corrosion in high surface-area-to-volume batch experiments.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unsaturated drip tests have been used to investigate the alteration of unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent UO{sub 2} fuel in an unsaturated environment such as may be expected in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. In these tests, simulated groundwater is periodically injected onto a sample at 90 C in a steel vessel. The solids react with the dripping groundwater and water condensed on surfaces to form a suite of U(VI) alteration phases. Solution chemistry is determined from leachate at the bottom of each vessel after the leachate stops interacting with the solids. A more detailed knowledge of the compositional evolution of the leachate is desirable. By providing just enough water to maintain a thin film of water on a small quantity of fuel in batch experiments, we can more closely monitor the compositional changes to the water as it reacts to form alteration phases.

Bates, J. K.; Finch, R. J.; Hanchar, J. M.; Wolf, S. F.

1997-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

UO2 CORROSION IN HIGH SURFACE-AREA-TO-VOLUME BATCH EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unsaturated drip tests have been used to investigate the alteration of unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent UO{sub 2} fuel in an unsaturated environment, such as may be expected in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. In these tests, simulated groundwater is periodically injected onto a sample at 90 C in a steel vessel. The solids react with the dripping groundwater and water condensed on surfaces to form a suite of U(VI) alteration phases. Solution chemistry is determined from leachate at the bottom of each vessel after the leachate stops interacting with the solids. A more detailed knowledge of the compositional evolution of the leachate is desirable. By providing just enough water to maintain a thin film of water on a small quantity of fuel in batch experiments, we can more closely monitor the compositional changes to the water as it reacts to form alteration phases.

Finch, Robert J.; Wolf, Stephen F.; Hanchar, John M.; Bates, John K.

1998-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Indiana New Albany shale in batch and continuous units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is being conducted at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) to develop a pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for the production of oil from Eastern oil shales. The PFH process, using smaller particle sizes than the moving-bed hydroretorting process, offers higher oil yields and greater reactor mass fluxes through higher selectivity of organic carbon to oil and shorter residence times, respectively. Batch PFH tests have been conducted to study the effects of shale preheat time (15 to 30 min) and temperature (25{degree} to 320{degree}C), retorting temperature (450{degree} to 710{degree}C), hydrogen pressure (2.8 to 7.0 MPa), particle size (65 to 330 microns), and residence time (5 to 30 min) on the product yields from Indiana New Albany shale. Oil yield has been found to increase with increasing hydrogen pressure. Results are discussed. 10 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA)); Roosmagi, C. (USDOE Laramie Energy Technology Center, WY (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

A Proposed Algorithm to improve security & Efficiency of SSL-TLS servers using Batch RSA decryption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Today, Internet becomes the essential part of our lives. Over 90 percent of the ecommerce is developed on the Internet. A security algorithm became very necessary for producer client transactions assurance and the financial applications safety. The rsa algorithm applicability derives from algorithm properties like confidentiality, safe authentication, data safety and integrity on the internet. Thus, this kind of networks can have a more easy utilization by practical accessing from short, medium, even long distance and from different public places. Rsa encryption in the client side is relatively cheap, whereas, the corresponding decryption in the server side is expensive because its private exponent is much larger. Thus ssl tls servers become swamped to perform public key decryption operations when the simultaneous requests increase quickly .The batch rsa method is useful for such highly loaded web server .In our proposed algorithm by reducing the response time and clients tolerable waiting time an improvement...

Pateriya, R K; Shrivastava, S C; Patel, Jaideep

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Characterisation and Evaluation of Wastes for Treatment in the Batch Pyrolysis Plant in Studsvik, Sweden - 13586  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The new batch pyrolysis plant in Studsvik is built primarily for treatment of uranium containing dry active waste, 'DAW'. Several other waste types have been identified that are considered or assumed suitable for treatment in the pyrolysis plant because of the possibility to carefully control the atmosphere and temperature of the thermal treatment. These waste types must be characterised and an evaluation must be made with a BAT perspective. Studsvik have performed or plan to perform lab scale pyrolysis tests on a number of different waste types. These include: - Pyrophoric materials (uranium shavings), - Uranium chemicals that must be oxidised prior to being deposited in repository, - Sludges and oil soaks (this category includes NORM-materials), - Ion exchange resins (both 'free' and solidified/stabilised), - Bitumen solidified waste. Methodology and assessment criteria for various waste types, together with results obtained for the lab scale tests that have been performed, are described. (authors)

Lindberg, Maria; Oesterberg, Carl; Vernersson, Thomas [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)] [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Studsvik Nuclear AB, 611 82 Nykoeping (Sweden)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Validity of batch sorption data to describe selenium transport through unsaturated tuff  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of project for characterizing Yucca Mt. as a potential site for high-level nuclear waste respository, we used UFA {trademark} technology (centifuge-induced flow) to directly measure selenite retardation coefficients and hydraulic conductivity under unsaturated conditions on two tuff samples from Yucca Mt. Retardation factor for the selenite species was 2.5 in both Yucca Mt. vitric tuff at 62.6% saturation and zeolitic nonwelded tuff from G-tunnel at 52.8% saturation. For these column experiments, we prepared a solution, using J-13 well water from NTS, with a Se conc. of 1.31 mg/L(ppM). The retardation factor of 2.5 measured for both tuffs translates into a sorption distribution coefficient K{sub d} of 0.9 mL/g for the vitric tuff and 0.8 mL/g for the zeolitic tuff. For batch sorption experiments, using the same zeolitic tuff as for the column experiments and solutions of J-13 well water with a Se conc. of 1.1 mg/L(ppM), the average K{sub d} was determined to be 0.1{+-}0.2 mL/g. Given the small K{sub d} values for Se sorption, general agreement between batch and column measurements (obtained under unsaturated conditions) was observed. Unsaturated hydraulic conductivities during the experiments were 2.5x10{sup -8} cm/s for the Yucca Mt. vitric tuff and 1.2x10{sup -8} cm/s for the zeolitic nonwelded tuff from G- tunnel.

Conca, J.L. [Tri-Cities Univ. Center, Richland, WA (United States); Triay, I.R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow November 2013 Available online 18 December 2013 Keywords: Multi-electrode Microbial fuel cells Hydraulic connected microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was compared with the reactors operated using individual electrical

134

VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 10, NO. 1, MARCH 2001 25 Batch Transfer of LIGA Microstructures by Selective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymer bumps [6], and diffusion bonding [7]. These processes aim to provide reliable electro of polymer bumps, and high temperature processing requirement for the diffusion bonding. Other processes have Microstructures by Selective Electroplating and Bonding Li-Wei Pan and Liwei Lin Abstract--A flip-chip, batch

Lin, Liwei

136

Query PreExecution and Batching in Paradise: ATwoPronged Approach to the Efficient Processing of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Queries on Tape­Resident Raster Images 1 JieBing Yu David J. DeWitt Department of Computer Sciences­ structured organization for tape volumes. Second, the Paradise query processing engine was modified to in tape scheduling, and query batching. A per­ formance evaluation on a working prototype demon­ strates

Liblit, Ben

137

Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

2002-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Matrix Model for QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gribov's observation that global gauge fixing is impossible has led to suggestions that there may be a deep connection between gauge-fixing and confinement. We find an unexpected relation between the topological non-triviality of the gauge bundle and coloured states in $SU(N)$ Yang-Mills theory, and show that such states are necessarily impure. We approximate QCD by a rectangular matrix model that captures the essential topological features of the gauge bundle, and demonstrate the impure nature of coloured states explicitly. Our matrix model also allows the inclusion of the QCD $\\theta$-term, as well as to perform explicit computations of low-lying glueball masses. This mass spectrum is gapped. Since an impure state cannot evolve to a pure one by a unitary transformation, our result shows that the solution to the confinement problem in pure QCD is fundamentally quantum information-theoretic.

Balachandran, A P; de Queiroz, Amilcar R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

SJSU Information Support Services Run Batch Contracts for Temporary Faculty info-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date: (optional data that exists in the system for the temporary faculty will appear on the Contract Appointment letter/Terms. 2. Click Batch Contracts for T. Faculty. The Batch Process for TF Contract search page displays. 3

Su, Xiao

140

DARS BATCH QUICK REFERENCE 1. Log on to http://dars.services.wisc.edu using your NetID and password  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DARS BATCH QUICK REFERENCE 1. Log on to http://dars.services.wisc.edu using your NetID and password. #12;5. You can monitor the status of your request on the DARS Batch Recent Requests Summary page. a. Contact the DARS administrator if the request is pending their approval. b. Click View Requested Reports

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

A Simpler Approach to Matrix Completion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix completion, low-rank matrices, convex optimization, nuclear norm ... The nuclear norm is equal to the sum of the singular values of a matrix and is the best

2009-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

142

Rank-Sparsity Incoherence for Matrix Decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 11, 2009 ... Keywords: matrix decomposition, convex relaxation, L1 norm minimization, nuclear norm minimization, uncertainty principle, semidefinite ...

Venkat Chandrasekaran

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 4 MACROBATCH 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS)1 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP)2 and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR)3. However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 3) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Sludge Batch 4 (also referred to as Macrobatch 5 (MB5)). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Task Technical Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-2005-0034; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 4 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing4. Specifically, this report details results from performing, in part, Subtask 3 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00310, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2006-00458, Rev. 16. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) (Macro Batch 5 (MB5)), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-nine radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB4 (MB5) as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 29 reportable nuclides are: Ni-59; Ni-63; Se-79; Sr-90; Zr-93; Nb-93m; Tc-99; Sn-126; Cs-137; Sm-151; U-233; U-234; Np-237; U-238; Pu-238; Pu-239; Pu-240; Am-241; Pu-241; Pu-242; Am-242m; Am-243; Cm-244; Cm-245; Cm-246; Cm-247; Bk-247; Cm-248; and Cf-251. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB4 (MB5), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the calendar year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes and other U isoto

Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Random Matrix Theory, Numerical Computation and Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a precursor to a book on Random Matrix Theory that will be forthcoming. We reserve the right to reuseRandom Matrix Theory, Numerical Computation and Applications Alan Edelman, Brian D. Sutton new approaches to theory. We illustrate by describing such random matrix techniques as the stochastic

Edelman, Alan

145

THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418 AND FRIT 702  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) in May 2011. To support qualification of SB7a, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to execute a variability study (VS) to assess the applicability of the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models for the Frit 418-SB7a compositional region of interest. The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a compositional region of interest and acceptability of the SB7a glasses with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass in terms of durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To support programmatic objectives, twenty-eight SB7a glasses were selected based on the nominal sludge projections used to support the frit recommendation. Twenty-three of the SB7a VS glasses were based on the use of Frit 418, while 5 glasses were based on the use of Frit 702. Frit 702 was also identified as a viable candidate for SB7a, especially if SO{sub 4} concentrations are found to be higher than anticipated. Frit 702 has shown a higher SO{sub 4} retention capability as compared to Frit 418. With respect to acceptability, the PCT results of the SB7a-VS glasses are acceptable relative to the EA glass regardless of thermal history (quenched or canister centerline cooled) or compositional view (target or measured). More specifically, all of the SB7a glasses have normalized boron release values (NL [B]) less than 0.9 g/L as compared to the benchmark NL [B] value for EA of 16.695 g/L. With respect to the applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a VS compositional region of interest, all of the study glasses (based on target compositions) lie within the 95% confidence intervals of the model predictions. When model applicability is based on the measured compositions, all of the SB7a VS glasses are predictable with the exception of SB7aVS-02 and SB7aVS-06. Although the NL [B] values of these two glasses range from 0.66 to 0.73 g/L (considered very acceptable), the PCT responses are not considered predictable by the current durability models. The current durability models are conservative for these glasses since they are more durable than predicted by the models. These two glasses are extreme vertices (EV) based compositions coupled with Frit 418 at 36% WL and target the maximum Na{sub 2}O content (15.01 wt% Na{sub 2}O) of the SB7a VS glasses. Higher alkali glasses for which the model overpredicts the PCT response have been observed previously in the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) Phase 1 VS and the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) VS.

Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

PRELIMINARY FRIT DEVELOPMENT AND MELT RATE TESTING FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 (SB6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) with a Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) composition projection in March 2009. Based on this projection, frit development efforts were undertaken to gain insight into compositional effects on the predicted and measured properties of the glass waste form and to gain insight into frit components that may lead to improved melt rate for SB6-like compositions. A series of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) based glasses was selected, fabricated and characterized in this study to better understand the ability of frit compositions to accommodate uncertainty in the projected SB6 composition. Acceptable glasses (compositions where the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) predicted acceptable properties, good chemical durability was measured, and no detrimental nepheline crystallization was observed) can be made using Frit 418 with SB6 over a range of Na{sub 2}O and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations. However, the ability to accommodate variation in the sludge composition limits the ability to utilize alternative frits for potential improvements in melt rate. Frit 535, which may offer improvements in melt rate due to its increased B2O3 concentration, produced acceptable glasses with the baseline SB6 composition at waste loadings of 34 and 42%. However, the PCCS MAR results showed that it is not as robust as Frit 418 in accommodating variation in the sludge composition. Preliminary melt rate testing was completed in the Melt Rate Furnace (MRF) with four candidate frits for SB6. These four frits were selected to evaluate the impacts of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Na{sub 2}O concentrations in the frit relative to those of Frit 418, although they are not necessarily candidates for SB6 vitrification. Higher concentrations of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the frit relative to that of Frit 418 appeared to improve melt rate. However, when a higher concentration of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} was coupled with a lower concentration of Na{sub 2}O relative to Frit 418, melt rate did not appear to improve. It is expected that a SB6 composition projection with less uncertainty will be received during analysis of the Tank 51 E-1 sample, which will be pulled after the completion of aluminum dissolution in August 2009. At that time, additional frit development work will be performed to seek improved melt rates while maintaining viable projected operating windows. This later work will ultimately lead to a frit recommendation for SB6.

Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Edwards, T.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Refined matrix models from BPS counting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a free fermion and matrix model representation of refined BPS generating functions of D2 and D0 branes bound to a single D6 brane, in a class of toric manifolds without compact four-cycles. In appropriate limit we obtain a matrix model representation of refined topological string amplitudes. We consider a few explicit examples which include a matrix model for the refined resolved conifold, or equivalently five-dimensional U(1) gauge theory, as well as a matrix representation of the refined MacMahon function. Matrix models which we construct have ordinary unitary measure, while their potentials are modified to incorporate the effect of the refinement.

Piotr Su?kowski

2011-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

The Theory of Quaternion Matrix Derivatives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic theory is introduced for calculating the derivatives of quaternion matrix function with respect to quaternion matrix variables. The proposed methodology is equipped with the matrix product rule and chain rule and it is able to handle both analytic and nonanalytic functions. This corrects a flaw in the existing methods, that is, the incorrect use of the traditional product rule. In the framework introduced, the derivatives of quaternion matrix functions can be calculated directly without the differential of this function. Key results are summarized in tables. Several examples show how the quaternion matrix derivatives can be used as an important tool for solving problems related to signal processing.

Dongpo Xu; Danilo P. Mandic

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Alchemical attention: Shaw's transformational matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: SHAW AS ALCHEMIST II THE PLAY OF IDEAS 12 III THE ENIGMATIC SPHINX 43 IV THE MICROCOSMIC MIRROR: BRUTE, GOD, AND FEMALE . . 54 V THE ALCHEMICAL OVERMAN VI NIETZSCHE'S FATEFUL ERROR 64 . 88 VII CHRISTIANITY AND THE MATRIX... of being as dramatized in two of his pivotal early plays, Caesar and ~Cl t dC did. 6 gth 9 t t 6 i tigtd th fit g. What is the nature of this change? What categories, ideas, symbols does Shaw use to communicate the nature of this change? How does...

Bryant, Gary Richard

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Long-lived oscillations in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid reaction in batch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The title reaction is the subject of current interest because the first experimental Turing patterns were observed recently in this system. Here, the authors report the first observation of oscillations that are long lived (over 1 h) in this system in a batch reactor; even after cessation the oscillations can be restarted several times by adding ClO{sub 2} to the exhausted system. These low-frequency low-amplitude (LL) oscillations were detected with both platinum and iodide-selective electrodes in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (original CIMA) reaction and in the closely related chlorine dioxide-iodide-malonic acid (minimal CIMA) system. The LL oscillations follow after the already known high frequency oscillations, sometimes separated by a second induction period. LL oscillations can appear without any induction period if appropriate concentrations of chlorine dioxide, iodomalonic acid, and chloride (CIMA-Cl system) are established in a dilute sulfuric acid medium. In this case neither iodine, iodide, nor malonic acid is needed. Some suggestions are made regarding the mechanism of these newly discovered oscillations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Noszticzius, Z.; Ouyang, Qi; McCormick, W.D.; Swinney, H.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

A novel proportional--integral-derivative control configuration with application to the control of batch distillation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to propose a novel proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control configuration based on an observer structure. Batch distillation is used as the base case study where the regulated output is the distillate composition. The proposed PID control law is derived in the framework of robust nonlinear control with modeling error compensation techniques. A reduced-order observer is proposed to estimate both the derivative of the regulated output and the underlying modeling error. These observations are subsequently used in a control loop to feedback variations of distillate composition (derivative feedback) and to counteract the effects of modeling errors. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the resulting control law is equivalent to a classical PID controller with an antireset windup scheme. Moreover, the tuning of the controller is performed very easily in terms of a prescribed closed-loop time constant and an estimation time constant. Numerical results are provided for binary and multicomponent separations. Sampled/delayed measurements and several sources of uncertainties are considered in order to provide a realistic test scenario for the proposed control design procedure.

Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Monroy-Loperena, R.; Cervantes, I.; Morales, A.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

Dick Wingerson

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 1. Alcohol Solvents  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 10-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels (ethanol) assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel to provide heat and power to the process. However, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller molecular units. From fiscal year 1997 through fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories was a participant in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to utilize rapidly heated batch microreactors to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate catalyst systems for the BCD process. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during FY97 and FY98 with alcohol based systems. More recent work with aqueous based systems will be summarized in a second report.

MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; LITTLEWOLF, ALICIA; TRUDELL, DANIEL E.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Uniform-burning matrix burner  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A New Proposal for Matrix Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explain the motivation and main ideas underlying our proposal for a Lagrangian for Matrix Theory based on sixteen supercharges. Starting with the pedagogical example of a bosonic matrix theory we describe the appearance of a continuum spacetime geometry from a discrete, and noncommutative, spacetime with both Lorentz and Yang-Mills invariances. We explain the appearance of large N ground states with Dbranes and elucidate the principle of matrix Dbrane democracy at finite N. Based on the underlying symmetry algebras that hold at both finite and infinite N, we show why the supersymmetric matrix Lagrangian we propose does not belong to the class of supermatrix models which includes the BFSS and IKKT Matrix Models. We end with a preliminary discussion of a path integral prescription for the Hartle-Hawking wavefunction of the Universe derived from Matrix Theory.

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

156

Large batch dimensional metrology demonstrated in the example of a LIGA fabricated spring.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep x-ray lithography in combination with electroforming is capable of producing high precision metal parts in small lot series. This study deals with a high aspect ratio structure with overall dimensions on the order of 10 mm x 7 mm x 1.5 mm, with the smallest line width being 150 {micro}m. The lateral deviation from the design is to be kept to a minimum, preferably below 5 {micro}m. To ensure adequate quality control, a semi-automated metrology technique has been established to measure all parts. While the paper will give a brief overview of all involved techniques, it focuses on the method to measure the top and bottom of the parts and the top of geometries following the process. The instrument used is a View Engineering Voyager V6x12 microscope, which is fully programmable. The microscope allows direct measurement of geometries but also is capable of saving all captured data as point clouds. These point clouds play a central role when evaluating part geometry. After measuring the part, the point cloud is compared to the computer aided design (CAD) contour of the part, using a commercially available software package. The challenge of proper edge lighting on a nickel alloy part is evaluated by varying lighting conditions systematically. Results of two conditions are presented along with a set of optimized parameters. With the introduced set of tools, process flow can be monitored by measuring geometries, e.g. linewidths in every step of the process line. An example for such analysis is given. After delivery of a large batch of parts, extensive numbers of datasets were available allowing the evaluation of the variation of part geometries. Discussed in detail is the deviation from part top to part bottom geometries indicating swelling of the PMMA mold in the electroplating bath.

Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

NEPHELINE FORMATION STUDY FOR SLUDGE BATCH 4: PHASE 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase 3 study was undertaken to complement the previous phases of the nepheline formation studies1, 2 by continuing the investigation into the ability of the nepheline discriminator to predict the occurrence of nepheline crystallization in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. The Phase 3 study had two primary objectives. The first was to continue to demonstrate the ability of the discriminator value to adequately predict the nepheline formation potential for specific glass systems of interest. The second was to generate additional data that have a high probability of supporting the SB4 variability study. To support these two objectives, sixteen glasses were selected based on the most recent SB4 compositional projection, Case 15C Blend 1.3 Four different frits were included, based on previous assessments of projected operating windows and melt rate,4, 5 with four WLs selected for each frit. Eight of these frit-sludge combinations covered WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the Process Composition Control System (PCCS) to support Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The remaining eight frit-sludge combinations targeted lower WLs (35 and 40%) and were prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro database6 to support a potential variability study for SB4.

Fox, K

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refine

Crawford, C. L.; DiPrete, D. P.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

159

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu- 242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U- 235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/ref

Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)), Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51, and H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 6 (MB6). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 5 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, 5 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2008-00137, Rev. 2 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2008-00138, Rev. 2. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB5 (MB6), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-six radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB5 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 26 reportable radionuclides are: Cl-36, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Tc-99, Sn-126, Cs-137, Sm-151, U-233, U-234, Np-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Am-241, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, Cm-246, Cf-251. Chlorine-36 is reported for the first time based on the upper bounding activity determined from the aqua regia digested sludge slurry. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB5 (MB6), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for four radionuclides: Se-79, Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to

Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) with H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing SB5, and Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 6 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask III, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2009-00473, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2009-00474, Rev. 1. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB6 (MB7), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 30 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB6 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB6, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB6 to 32. The radionuclide measurements made for SB6 are the most extensive condu

Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Dirac oscillators and the relativistic R matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Dirac oscillators are shown to be an excellent expansion basis for solutions of the Dirac equation by $R$-matrix techniques. The combination of the Dirac oscillator and the $R$-matrix approach provides a convenient formalism for reactions as well as bound state problems. The utility of the $R$-matrix approach is demonstrated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations where exchange terms can be calculated exactly, and scattering waves made orthogonal to bound state wave functions.

J. Grineviciute; Dean Halderson

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

163

Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

164

A matrix generation approach for eigenvalue optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1: Graph of the maximum eigenvalue of the affine combination of. symmetric ...... “C++” to compute the Gram matrix and then imported it to MATLAB by.

165

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

166

Green's Matrix for a Second Order Self-Adjoint Matrix Differential Operator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A systematic construction of the Green's matrix for a second order, self-adjoint matrix differential operator from the linearly independent solutions of the corresponding homogeneous differential equation set is carried out. We follow the general approach of extracting the Green's matrix from the Green's matrix of the corresponding first order system. This construction is required in the cases where the differential equation set cannot be turned to an algebraic equation set via transform techniques.

Tahsin Cagri Sisman; Bayram Tekin

2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

167

Every invertible matrix is diagonally equivalent to a matrix with distinct eigenvalues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Every invertible matrix is diagonally equivalent to a matrix with distinct eigenvalues Man-Duen Choi , Zejun Huang , Chi-Kwong Li , and Nung-Sing Sze§ Abstract We show that for every invertible n�n complex matrix A there is an n�n diagonal invertible D such that AD has distinct eigenvalues. Using

Li, Chi-Kwong

168

IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL WELLS BY GAS PRECONDITIONING M. A. Aggour, M. Al, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Experience has shown that for sandstone formations, oil wells respond to matrix acidizing in a different manner as compared to gas wells. For oil wells, the improvement

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

169

Renewal Credit Matrix CERTIFICATE RENEWAL PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewal Credit Matrix CERTIFICATE RENEWAL PLAN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS FOR SOUTH CAROLINA are restricted to Options 1 and 2 in the matrix. CERTIFICATE RENEWAL OPTION ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA RENEWAL CREDITS to 120 renewal credits may be earned via this option during the five-year validity period

Kunkle, Tom

170

Phenomenological studies in the matrix models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix models are a promising candidate for a nonperturbative formulation of the superstring theory. It is possible to study how the standard model and other phenomenological models appear from the matrix model, and estimate the probability distribution of their appearance. This article mainly addresses studies in toroidal compactifications with magnetic fluxes.

Hajime Aoki

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid?   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

“The Matrix is a computer-generated dreamworld built to keep us under control” Morpheus, early in The Matrix. “ In dreaming, you are not only out of control, you don’t even know it…I was completely duped again and again ...

Clark, Andy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.

Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866. Revision 1.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a revision to a previously released report. This revision contains additional analytical results for the sample with HEIS number B2H4X7. Between November 4, 2010 and October 26, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL. Samples were received with a chain of custody (COC) and were analyzed according to the sample identification numbers supplied by the client. All Samples were refrigerated upon receipt until prepared for analysis. All samples were received with custody seals intact unless noted in the Case Narrative. Holding time is defined as the time from sample preparation to the time of analyses. The prescribed holding times were met for all analytes unless noted in the Case Narrative. All reported analytical results meet the requirements of the CAW or client specified SOW unless noted in the case narrative. Due to the requirements of the statement of work and sampling events in the field, the 28 day and the 48 hr requirements cannot be met. The statement of work requires samples to be selected at the completion of the borehole. It is not always possible to complete a borehole and have the samples shipped to the laboratory within the hold time requirements. Duplicate RPD for Uranium 238 (38.9%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 1E05003-DUP1 for ICPMS-Tc-U-WE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Duplicate RPD for Silver 107 (68.2%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 2C06004-DUP1 for ICPMS-RCRA-AE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (48.8%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 1E23001-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (50.2%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 2B22010-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported.

Lindberg, Michael J.

2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

174

Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

175

Integrated optic vector-matrix multiplier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A vector-matrix multiplier is disclosed which uses N different wavelengths of light that are modulated with amplitudes representing elements of an N.times.1 vector and combined to form an input wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) light stream. The input WDM light stream is split into N streamlets from which each wavelength of the light is individually coupled out and modulated for a second time using an input signal representing elements of an M.times.N matrix, and is then coupled into an output waveguide for each streamlet to form an output WDM light stream which is detected to generate a product of the vector and matrix. The vector-matrix multiplier can be formed as an integrated optical circuit using either waveguide amplitude modulators or ring resonator amplitude modulators.

Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

176

JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning.

177

Numerical block diagonalization of matrix ?-algebras with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

try, where the SDP data matrices are contained in a low-dimensional matrix ... kissing numbers [2], bounds on crossing numbers in graphs [12, 13], bounds ...... the outline of the proof of Theorem 4, and for making his Matlab implementation.

2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

178

RANK-SPARSITY INCOHERENCE FOR MATRIX DECOMPOSITION ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 11, 2009 ... uncertainty principle between the sparsity pattern of a matrix and its row and column spaces, and use it to ..... to some graph). ...... [31] YALMIP: A Toolbox for Modeling and Optimization in MATLAB, Proceedings of the. CACSD ...

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Jones Matrix of a birefringent plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. We work in the PS polarization system (polarization parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence), and the boundary conditions of refraction are satisfied when we apply Fresnel's equations. The theory for the Jones Matrix is in agreement...

Wan, Xiaoke

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work proposes to survey new chemical knowledge, developed since 1984, on fluid additives used in matrix stimulation treatments of carbonate and sandstone petroleum reservoirs and describes one method of organizing this new knowledge in a...

Weidner, Jason 1981-

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Commodity/Vendor Purchasing Matrix Vendor Location  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commodity/Vendor Purchasing Matrix Commodity Vendor N am e and A ddress Vendor N am e in eVA Vendor sheets of paper and bring to business office for payment. Vendor Purchasing Matrix 090413 Page 1 of 4 #12;Commodity Vendor N am e and A ddress Vendor N am e in eVA Vendor Location in eVA PO C ategory eVA PO needed

Swaddle, John

182

Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

McKigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony Keiran (Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooke, David Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Ott, Kevin Curtis (Los Alamos, NM); Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal (Los Alamos, NM); Del Sesto, Rico Emilio (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

183

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - aq ybt aq Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Michalski, Ryszard S. - School of Computational Sciences, George Mason University Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 96 1. Constituents of rainwater...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - aq ybs aq Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Michalski, Ryszard S. - School of Computational Sciences, George Mason University Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 98 1. Constituents of rainwater...

186

Ab Initio Calculation of Isotopic Fractionation in B(OH)(aq) and BOH(aq). |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of GlobalASCR UserProgramICarbide. |

187

aluminium matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

188

aluminium matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

189

alumina matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

190

alloy matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

191

aluminum matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Topic Index 1 Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites Materials Science Websites Summary: ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle...

192

aluminide matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

193

alloy matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

194

On Low Rank Matrix Approximations with Applications to Synthesis ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a given matrix by a matrix of specified (low rank) in the uniform norm. ... Note that in the existing literature on low rank approximation of matrices the empha-.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Absecon, NJ); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

196

Inner approximations for polynomial matrix inequalities and robust ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 26, 2011 ... is modelled by parametrized polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI). ... Given a parametrized PMI set, we provide a hierarchy of linear matrix ...

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

197

Automation of Nested Matrix and Derivative Operations Robert Kalaba  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automation of Nested Matrix and Derivative Operations Robert Kalaba Departments of Electrical of expressions involving nested matrix and derivative operations. The need to differentiate such expressions

Tesfatsion, Leigh

198

al alloy matrix: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

dislocation structure of both Al matrix and precipitates Gubicza, Jen 3 Elevated temperature wear of an aluminum matrix composite Al6061-20 percent aluminum(2) oxygen(3)...

199

Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results

200

Documentation of toxicity testing results on increased supernate treatment rate of 2700 gallons/batch. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In February 1991, Reactor Materials increased the rate of supernate treatment in the M-Area Dilute Effluent Treatment Facility (DETF) from 1800 gallons to {approximately}2700 gallons of supernate per 36,000 gallon dilute wastewater batch. The first release of the treated effluent began on March 3, 1991. A series of whole effluent toxicity tests was conducted on the DETF effluent to determine if the increased supernate concentration would result in any chronic toxicity affects in the receiving stream (Tims Branch). The toxicity tests were conducted at instream concentrations equivalent to DETF release rates of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 gallons/min. The test results, based on 7-day Ceriodaphnia dubia chronic toxicity, indicated no toxicity effects at any concentration tested. Supernate treatment in DETF continued at the higher concentration.

Pickett, J.B.

1992-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 8 AND 9 CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 8 and 9 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

Michael L. Wilson

2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

202

Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

Huang, Chao M. (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Google matrix analysis of directed networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In past ten years, modern societies developed enormous communication and social networks. Their classification and information retrieval processing become a formidable task for the society. Due to the rapid growth of World Wide Web, social and communication networks, new mathematical methods have been invented to characterize the properties of these networks on a more detailed and precise level. Various search engines are essentially using such methods. It is highly important to develop new tools to classify and rank enormous amount of network information in a way adapted to internal network structures and characteristics. This review describes the Google matrix analysis of directed complex networks demonstrating its efficiency on various examples including World Wide Web, Wikipedia, software architecture, world trade, social and citation networks, brain neural networks, DNA sequences and Ulam networks. The analytical and numerical matrix methods used in this analysis originate from the fields of Markov chains, quantum chaos and Random Matrix theory.

Leonardo Ermann; Klaus M. Frahm; Dima L. Shepelyansky

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

Density matrix of black hole radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hawking's model of black hole evaporation is not unitary and leads to a mixed density matrix for the emitted radiation, while the Page model describes a unitary evaporation process in which the density matrix evolves from an almost thermal state to a pure state. We compare a recently proposed model of semiclassical black hole evaporation to the two established models. In particular, we study the density matrix of the outgoing radiation and determine how the magnitude of the off-diagonal corrections differs for the three frameworks. For Hawking's model, we find power-law corrections to the two-point functions that induce exponentially suppressed corrections to the off-diagonal elements of the full density matrix. This verifies that the Hawking result is correct to all orders in perturbation theory and also allows one to express the full density matrix in terms of the single-particle density matrix. We then consider the semiclassical theory for which the corrections, being non-perturbative from an effective field-theory perspective, are much less suppressed and grow monotonically in time. In this case, the R\\'enyi entropy for the outgoing radiation is shown to grow linearly at early times; but this growth slows down and the entropy eventually starts to decrease at the Page time. In addition to comparing models, we emphasize the distinction between the state of the radiation emitted from a black hole, which is highly quantum, and that of the radiation emitted from a typical classical black body at the same temperature.

Lasma Alberte; Ram Brustein; Andrei Khmelnitsky; A. J. M. Medved

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Polymeric matrix materials for infrared metamaterials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A polymeric matrix material exhibits low loss at optical frequencies and facilitates the fabrication of all-dielectric metamaterials. The low-loss polymeric matrix material can be synthesized by providing an unsaturated polymer, comprising double or triple bonds; partially hydrogenating the unsaturated polymer; depositing a film of the partially hydrogenated polymer and a crosslinker on a substrate; and photopatterning the film by exposing the film to ultraviolet light through a patterning mask, thereby cross-linking at least some of the remaining unsaturated groups of the partially hydrogenated polymer in the exposed portions.

Dirk, Shawn M; Rasberry, Roger D; Rahimian, Kamyar

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

208

Matrix-Free Interior Point Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 5, 2009 ... while [10] regularizes the Hessian matrix (what in our terms would correspond ...... path following algorithm in which the Newton search directions are com- ... element in DS is selected to be the next pivot to enter DL, then the ...

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

June 2013 Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training Course Required Class Mode Training Course Prerequisite Security Access Form Required Contact for Additional Information Complete Electronic I-9 Forms REC001: I-9 /E-Verify Web Training OR Online OR None Electronic I-9 Security Access Form

Wu, Shin-Tson

210

Sensor Network Localization, Euclidean Distance Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

paper is to view SNL as a (nearest) Euclidean Distance Matrix, EDM, completion problem that ... simply corresponds to a given fixed clique for the graph of the EDM problem. We next ...... The tests were done using MATLAB 7.4. The method for ...

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

The Phase of the Scattering Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vacuum polarization in external fields is treated by way of calculating - exactly and then perturbatively - the phase of the quantum scattering matrix in the Shale-Stinespring approach to field theory. The link between the Shale-Stinespring method and the Epstein-Glaser renormalization procedure is highlighted.

Gracía-Bondía, José M

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Polymer matrix electroluminescent materials and devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photoluminescent and electroluminescent compositions are provided which comprise a matrix comprising aromatic repeat units covalently coordinated to a phosphorescent or luminescent metal ion or metal ion complexes. Methods for producing such compositions, and the electroluminescent devices formed therefrom, are also disclosed.

Marrocco, III, Matthew L. (Fontana, CA); Motamedi, Farshad J. (Claremont, CA); Abdelrazzaq, Feras Bashir (Covina, CA); Abdelrazzaq, legal representative, Bashir Twfiq (Aman, JO)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

An Eigenvalue Symmetric Matrix Contractor Milan Hladik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for symmetric matrices. Given a symmetric interval matrix AS and an interval approximation of its eigen- value a contractor. Cj is able to contract the domains of the variables by eliminating values that are not consistent contractors related to linear constraints [3] or to the constraint "A is positive semi-definite" [10

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

215

An Eigenvalue Symmetric Matrix Contractor Milan Hladik  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for symmetric matrices. Given a symmetric interval matrix AS and an interval approximation of its eigen- value called a contractor. Cj is able to contract the domains of the variables by eliminating values contractors related to linear constraints [3] or to the constraint "A is positive semi-definite" [10

Kearfott, R. Baker

216

Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct. SRNL issued a Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan [4] in response to the SRR request. The conclusions provided in this report are that no changes need to be made to the SME acceptability process (i.e., no modifications to WSRC-TR-95-00364, Revision 5, are needed) and no changes need to be made to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) itself (i.e. the spreadsheet utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) for acceptability decisions does not require modification) in response to thorium becoming a reportable element for DWPF operations. In addition, the inputs and results for the two test cases requested by WSE for use in confirming the successful activation of thorium as a reportable element for DWPF operations during the processing of SB6 are presented in this report.

Edwards, T.

2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

218

Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer-matrix composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material with shielding effectiveness 124 dB, low surface impedance interference shielding 1. Introduction Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding is receiv- ing increasing

Chung, Deborah D.L.

219

Universality in Similarity Renormalization Group Evolved Potential Matrix Elements and T-Matrix Equivalence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine how the universality of two-nucleon interactions evolved using similarity renormalization group (SRG) transformations correlates with T-matrix equivalence, with the ultimate goal of gaining insight into universality for three-nucleon forces. With sufficient running of the SRG flow equations, the low-energy matrix elements of different realistic potentials evolve to a universal form. Because these potentials are fit to low-energy data, they are (approximately) phase equivalent only up to a certain energy, and we find universality in evolved potentials up to the corresponding momentum. More generally we find universality in local energy regions, reflecting a local decoupling by the SRG. The further requirements for universality in evolved potential matrix elements are explored using two simple alternative potentials. We see evidence that in addition to predicting the same observables, common long-range potentials (i.e., explicit pion physics) is required for universality in the potential matrix elements after SRG flow. In agreement with observations made previously for Vlowk evolution, regions of universal potential matrix elements are restricted to where half-on-shell T-matrix equivalence holds.

B. Dainton; R. J. Furnstahl; R. J. Perry

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Automation of the matrix element reweighting method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

P. Artoisenet; V. Lemaître; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); Mckigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

Random Matrix Theory and its Innovative Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values or eigenvalues of random matrices. (Usually it is enough to know the quarter circle law, the semi normal, then the eigen- values of the Wishart matrix AT A/m in the limit as m/n = r and m,n are almost. In one exam- ple (Figure 7), Popoff et al. [20] use the fact that the distribution of the singular values

Edelman, Alan

223

Hydrogen Generation through Indirect Biophotolysis in Batch Cultures of the Non-Heterocystous Nitrogen-Fixing Cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nitrogen-fixing non-heterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO2 to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg?day or 7.3 ?mol/mg?day) ) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 ?mol/m2?sec. The addition of photosystem II inhibitor DCMU did not reduce hydrogen production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 hours, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at photosystem II (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

Huesemann, Michael H.; Hausmann, Tom S.; Carter, Blaine M.; Gerschler, Jared J.; Benemann, John R.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

225

Sequence and batch language programs and alarm-related ``C`` programs for the 242-A MCS. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, ``242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades``. This control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme which uses special programs, annunciator keys, and process graphics. The special programs are written in two languages; Sequence and Batch Language (SABL), and ``C`` language. The WTSE-developed alarm scheme works as described below: SABL relates signals and alarms to the annunciator keys, called SKID keys. When an alarm occurs, a SABL program causes a SKID key to flash, and if the alarm is of yellow or white priority then a ``C`` program turns on an audible horn (the D/3 system uses a different audible horn for the red priority alarms). The horn and flashing key draws the attention of the operator.

Berger, J.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ADSORPTION OF CESIUM (Cs+) FROM HANFORD WASTE SOLUTIONS-PART I: BATCH EQUILIBRIUM STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Batch equilibrium measurements were conducted with a granular Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) resin to determine the distribution coefficients (Kds) for cesium. In the tests, Hanford Site actual waste sample containing radioactive cesium and a pretreated waste sample that was spiked with non-radioactive cesium were used. Initial concentrations of non-radioactive cesium in the waste sample were varied to generate an equilibrium isotherm for cesium. Two additional tests were conducted using a liquid to solid phase ratio of 10 and a contact time of 120 hours. The measured distribution coefficient (Kd) for radioactive cesium (137Cs) was 948 mL/g; the Kd for non-radioactive cesium (133Cs) was 1039 mL/g. The Kd for non-radioactive cesium decreased from 1039 to 691 mL/g as the initial cesium concentration increased. Very little change of the Kd was observed at initial cesium concentrations above 64 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacity for cesium on granular RF resin was 1.17 mmole/g dry resin. T his value was calculated from the fit of the equilibrium isotherm data to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Previously, a total capacity of 2.84 mmole/g was calculated by Bibler and Wallace for air-dried RF resin.

HASSAN, NEGUIBM

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

227

Relativistic R matrix and continuum shell model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: The $R$ matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has proven to be a convenient reaction theory for solving many-coupled channel systems. The theory provides solutions to bound states, scattering states, and resonances for microscopic models in one formalism. Purpose: The first purpose is to extend this formalism to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The second purpose is to employ this formalism in a relativistic continuum shell model. Methods: Expressions for the collision matrix and the scattering amplitude, from which observables may be calculated, are derived. The formalism is applied to the 1p-1h relativistic continuum shell model with an interaction extracted from relativistic mean-field theory. Results: The simplest of the $\\sigma +\\omega +\\rho$ exchange interactions produces a good description of the single-particle energies in $^{16}$O and $^{90}$Zr and a reasonable description of proton scattering from $^{15}$N. Conclusions: The development of a calculable, relativistic $R$ matrix and its implementation in a $1p-1h$ relativistic continuum shell model provide a simple relatively self-consist, physically justifiable model for use in knockout reactions.

J. Grineviciute; Dean Halderson

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

228

Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analyticity and the Holographic S-Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive a simple relation between the Mellin amplitude for AdS/CFT correlation functions and the bulk S-Matrix in the flat spacetime limit, proving a conjecture of Penedones. As a consequence of the Operator Product Expansion, the Mellin amplitude for any unitary CFT must be a meromorphic function with simple poles on the real axis. This provides a powerful and suggestive handle on the locality vis-a-vis analyticity properties of the S-Matrix. We begin to explore analyticity by showing how the familiar poles and branch cuts of scattering amplitudes arise from the holographic description. For this purpose we compute examples of Mellin amplitudes corresponding to 1-loop and 2-loop Witten diagrams in AdS. We also examine the flat spacetime limit of conformal blocks, implicitly relating the S-Matrix program to the Bootstrap program for CFTs. We use this connection to show how the existence of small black holes in AdS leads to a universal prediction for the conformal block decomposition of the dual CFT.

Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

230

Matrix probing, skeleton decompositions, and sparse Fourier transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, we present three different randomized algorithms that help to solve matrices, compute low rank approximations and perform the Fast Fourier Transform. Matrix probing and its conditioning When a matrix A with ...

Chiu, Jiawei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Mirror of the refined topological vertex from a matrix model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We find an explicit matrix model computing the refined topological vertex, starting from its representation in terms of plane partitions. We then find the spectral curve of that matrix model, and thus the mirror symmetry of the refined vertex. With the same method we also find a matrix model for the strip geometry, and we find its mirror curve. The fact that there is a matrix model shows that the refined topological string amplitudes also satisfy the remodeling the B-model construction.

B. Eynard; C. Kozcaz

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

M. A. Casbon.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optimization Online - A Simpler Approach to Matrix Completion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 4, 2009 ... Keywords: Matrix completion, low-rank matrices, convex optimization, nuclear norm minimization, random matrices, operator Chernoff bound, ...

Benjamin Recht

2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

234

Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REVIEWS Mechanical Properties of Porous- Matrix Ceramic Composites** By Frank W. Zok* and Carlos G/Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites REVIEWS The porous matrix concept has been developed primarily. Levi 1. Introduction Damage tolerance can be enabled in continuous fiber-rein- forced ceramic

Zok, Frank

235

Some Noncommutative Matrix Algebras Arising in the Bispectral Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I revisit the so called "bispectral problem" introduced in a joint paper with Hans Duistermaat a long time ago, allowing now for the differential operators to have matrix coefficients and for the eigenfunctions, and one of the eigenvalues, to be matrix valued too. In the last example we go beyond this and allow both eigenvalues to be matrix valued.

F. Alberto Grünbaum

2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

236

Constraints of mixing matrix elements in the sequential fourthgeneration model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review our works on the sequential fourth generation model and focus on the constriants of $4\\times 4$ quark mixing matrix elements. We investigate the quark mixing matrix elements from the rare $K,B$ meson decays. We talk about the $ hierarchy$ of the $4\\times 4$ matrix and the existence of fourth generation.

W. J. Huo

2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 15, 14]. In this approach, the #3; S.A.C. Capital Management, LLC, 540 Madison Ave, New York, NY state transition matrix and B is a n #2; d matrix with n #21; d. Let C be the p #2; n matrix whose kth develop a computationally convenient representation of the state transition matrices that arise from

238

Extracting Experimental Information from Large Matrixes. 1. A New Algorithm for the Application of Matrix Rank Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Matrix Rank Analysis Ga´bor Peintler,*, Istva´n Nagypa´l, Attila Jancso´, Irving R. Epstein algorithm for the application of matrix rank analysis to extract significant experimental information from. Introduction Matrix rank analysis (MRA) of spectroscopic data is a widely used method to determine the number

Epstein, Irving R.

239

The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid? to appear in C. Grau (ed) Philosophical Essays on the Matrix (Oxford University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

³The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid?² to appear in C. Grau (ed) Philosophical Essays://whatisthematrix.warnerbros.com/rl_cmp/phi.html The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid1? 1. Ambivalence "The Matrix is a computer in a world of persisting, external, independent people, cities, cars and objects, and you yourself

Clark, Andy

240

Integration of the Uncertainties of Anion and TOC Measurements into the Flammability Control Strategy for Sludge Batch 8 at the DWPF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of a flammability control strategy for DWPF’s melter operation during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). SRNL’s support has been in response to technical task requests that have been made by SRR’s Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) organization. The flammability control strategy relies on measurements that are performed on Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples by the DWPF Laboratory. Measurements of nitrate, oxalate, formate, and total organic carbon (TOC) standards generated by the DWPF Laboratory are presented in this report, and an evaluation of the uncertainties of these measurements is provided. The impact of the uncertainties of these measurements on DWPF’s strategy for controlling melter flammability also is evaluated. The strategy includes monitoring each SME batch for its nitrate content and its TOC content relative to the nitrate content and relative to the antifoam additions made during the preparation of the SME batch. A linearized approach for monitoring the relationship between TOC and nitrate is developed, equations are provided that integrate the measurement uncertainties into the flammability control strategy, and sample calculations for these equations are shown to illustrate the impact of the uncertainties on the flammability control strategy.

Edwards, T. B.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SALTSTONE MATRIX CHARACTERIZATION AND STADIUM SIMULATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SIMCO Technologies, Inc. was contracted to evaluate the durability of the saltstone matrix material and to measure saltstone transport properties. This information will be used to: (1) Parameterize the STADIUM{reg_sign} service life code, (2) Predict the leach rate (degradation rate) for the saltstone matrix over 10,000 years using the STADIUM{reg_sign} concrete service life code, and (3) Validate the modeled results by conducting leaching (water immersion) tests. Saltstone durability for this evaluation is limited to changes in the matrix itself and does not include changes in the chemical speciation of the contaminants in the saltstone. This report summarized results obtained to date which include: characterization data for saltstone cured up to 365 days and characterization of saltstone cured for 137 days and immersed in water for 31 days. Chemicals for preparing simulated non-radioactive salt solution were obtained from chemical suppliers. The saltstone slurry was mixed according to directions provided by SRNL. However SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel made a mistake in the premix proportions. The formulation SIMCO personnel used to prepare saltstone premix was not the reference mix proportions: 45 wt% slag, 45 wt% fly ash, and 10 wt% cement. SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel used the following proportions: 21 wt% slag, 65 wt% fly ash, and 14 wt% cement. The mistake was acknowledged and new mixes have been prepared and are curing. The results presented in this report are assumed to be conservative since the excessive fly ash was used in the SIMCO saltstone. The SIMCO mixes are low in slag which is very reactive in the caustic salt solution. The impact is that the results presented in this report are expected to be conservative since the samples prepared were deficient in slag and contained excess fly ash. The hydraulic reactivity of slag is about four times that of fly ash so the amount of hydrated binder formed per unit volume in the SIMCO saltstone samples is less than that expected for saltstone containing the reference amount of slag (45 wt.% of the total cementitious mixture versus 21 wt.% used in the SIMCO samples). Consequently the SIMCO saltstone samples are expected to have lower strengths, and tortuosity and higher porosity, water diffusivity, and intrinsic permeability compared to the reference case MCU saltstone. MCU reference saltstone contains nonradioactive salt solution with a composition designed to simulate the product of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Unit [Harbour, 2009]. The SIMCO saltstone samples were cast in molds and cured for three days under plastic with a source of water to prevent drying. Details of the sample preparation process are presented in Attachment 2. The molds were then removed and the samples were cured at a constant temperature (76 F, 24 C) and 100 percent relative humidity for up to one year. Selected samples were periodically removed and characterized the evolution of the matrix as a function of age. In order to preserve the age dependent microstructure at the specified curing times it is necessary to stop hydration. This was accomplished by immersing the samples in isopropanol for 5 days to replace water with alcohol. The microstructure of the matrix material was also characterized as a function of aging. This information was used as a base line for comparison with leached microstructures. After curing for 137 days, specimens were cut into 20 mm disks and exposed to deionized water with a pH maintained at 10.5. Microstructure and calcium sulfur leaching results for samples leached for 31 days are presented in this report. Insufficient leached material was generated during the testing to date to obtain physical and mineralogical properties for leached saltstone. Longer term experiments are required because the matrix alteration rate due to immersion in deionized water is slow.

Langton, C.

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

242

SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

243

Biodegradation of high explosives on granular activated carbon [GAC]: Enhanced desorption of high explosives from GAC -- Batch studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Adsorption to GAC is an effective method for removing high explosives (HE) compounds from water, but no permanent treatment is achieved. Bioregeneration, which treats adsorbed contaminants by desorption and biodegradation, is being developed as a method for reducing GAC usage rates and permanently degrading RDX and HMX. Because desorption is often the limiting mass transfer mechanism in bioregeneration systems, several methods for increasing the rate and extent of desorption of RDX and HMX are being studied. These include use of cosolvents (methanol and ethanol), surfactants (both anionic and nonionic), and {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Batch experiments to characterize the desorption of these HEs from GAC have been completed using Northwestern LB-830, the GAC being used at Pantex. Over a total of 11 days of desorption, about 3% of the adsorbed RDX was desorbed from the GAC using buffered water as the desorption fluid. In comparison, about 96% of the RDX was extracted from the GAC by acetonitrile over the same desorption period. Ethanol and methanol were both effective in desorbing RDX and HMX; higher alcohol concentrations were able to desorb more HE from the GAC. Surfactants varied widely in their abilities to enhance desorption of HEs. The most effective surfactant that was studied was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which desorbed 56.4% of the adsorbed RDX at a concentration of 500 mg SDS/L. The cyclodextrins that were used were marginally more effective than water. Continuous-flow column tests are underway for further testing the most promising of these methods. These results will be compared to column experiments that have been completed under baseline conditions (using buffered water as the desorption fluid). Results of this research will support modeling and design of further desorption and bioregeneration experiments.

Morley, M.C.; Speitel, G.E. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effective dynamics of the matrix big bang  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the leading quantum effects in the recently introduced matrix big bang model. This amounts to a study of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory compactified on the Milne orbifold. We find a one-loop potential that is attractive near the big bang. Surprisingly, the potential decays very rapidly at late times where it appears to be generated by D-brane effects. Usually, general covariance constrains the form of any effective action generated by renormalization group flow. However, the form of our one-loop potential seems to violate these constraints in a manner that suggests a connection between the cosmological singularity and long wavelength, late time physics.

Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rajaraman, Arvind [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Conformal Universality in Normal Matrix Ensembles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A remarkable property of Hermitian ensembles is their universal behavior, that is, once properly rescaled the eigenvalue statistics does not depend on particularities of the ensemble. Recently, normal matrix ensembles have attracted increasing attention, however, questions on universality for these ensembles still remain under debate. We analyze the universality properties of random normal ensembles. We show that the concept of universality used for Hermitian ensembles cannot be directly extrapolated to normal ensembles. Moreover, we show that the eigenvalue statistics of random normal matrices with radially symmetric potential can be made universal under a conformal transformation.

Alexei M. Veneziani; Tiago Pereira; Domingos H. U. Marchetti

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Ceramic Matrix Composites | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation SitesStanding Friedel Waves,TheoryParliament'v0, 12/9/14Ceramic Matrix

248

Zinc Matrix Power Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEditWisconsin:YBR SolarZe-gen JumpZinc Matrix Power Inc

249

Open quantum systems and Random Matrix Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with Random Matrix Theory. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the $\\Delta_3(L)$ statistic, width distribution and level spacing are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. A super-radiant transition is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and $\\Delta_3(L)$ statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

Declan Mulhall

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

250

Emissions from burning tire-derived fuel (TDF): Comparison of batch combustion of tire chips and continuous combustion of tire crumb mixed with coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This laboratory study investigated the emissions of waste automobile tire-derived fuel (TDF). This fuel was burned in two different modes, either segmented in small pieces (tire chunks) or in pulverized form (tire crumb). Tire chunks were burned in fixed beds in batch mode in a horizontal furnace. Tire crumb was burned in a continous flow mode, dispersed in air, either alone or mixed with pulverized coal, in a verical furnace. The gas flow was laminar, the gas temperature was 1000{degrees}C in all cases, and the residence times of the combustion products in the furnaces were similar. Chunks of waste tires had dimensions in the range of 3-9 {mu}m, tire crumb was size-classified to be 180-212 {mu}m and the high volatile bituminous coal, used herein, was 63-75. The fuel mass loading in the furnaces was varied. The following emissions were monitored at the exit of the furnaces: CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and particulates. Results showed that combustion of TDF in fixed beds resulted in large yields (emissions per mass of fuel burned) of CO, soot and PAHs. Such yields increased with the size of the bed. CO, soot and PAHs yields from batch combustion of fixed beds of coal were lower by more than an order of magnitude than those from fixed beds of TDF. Continuous pulverized fuel combustion of TDF (tire crumb) resulted in dramatically lower yields of CO, soot and PAHs than those from batch combustion, especially when TDF was mixed with pulverized coal. To the contrary, switching the mode of combustion of coal (from fixed beds to pulverized fuel) did not result in large differences in the aforementioned emissions. CO{sub 2}, and, especially, NO{sub x} yields from batch combustion of TDF were lower than those from coal. Emissions of NO{sub x} were somewhat lower from batch combustion than from pulverized fuel combustion of TDF and coal.

Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Carlson, J.B. [Army Natick R, Natick, MA (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hopper Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLC HistoryVeterans | National Nuclear

252

Batch Strategies for Maximizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High the cover: InvisibleBaskettBassi IBMu s

253

Batch Strategies for Maximizing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience ProgramBackground High the cover: InvisibleBaskettBassi IBMu

254

Edison Batch Jobs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4: Networking for the Future of DOEEarthAlamos NationalEd

255

PDSF Batch Statistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure

256

Parallel Batch Scripts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizingToolsto control intensePageveterans4 -

257

Analytical techniques for instrument design -- Matrix methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors take the traditional Cooper-Nathans approach, as has been applied for many years for steady-state triple-axis spectrometers, and consider its generalization to other inelastic scattering spectrometers. This involves a number of simple manipulations of exponentials of quadratic forms. In particular, they discuss a toolbox of matrix manipulations that can be performed on the 6-dimensional Cooper-Nathans matrix. They show how these tools can be combined to solve a number of important problems, within the narrow-band limit and the gaussian approximation. They will argue that a generalized program that can handle multiple different spectrometers could (and should) be written in parallel to the Monte-Carlo packages that are becoming available. They also discuss the complementarity between detailed Monte-Carlo calculations and the approach presented here. In particular, Monte-Carlo methods traditionally simulate the real experiment as performed in practice, given a model scattering law, while the Cooper-Nathans method asks the inverse question: given that a neutron turns up in a particular spectrometer configuration (e.g. angle and time of flight), what is the probability distribution of possible scattering events at the sample? The Monte-Carlo approach could be applied in the same spirit to this question.

Robinson, R.A.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Unitarity and the Holographic S-Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bulk S-Matrix can be given a non-perturbative definition in terms of the flat space limit of AdS/CFT. We show that the unitarity of the S-Matrix, ie the optical theorem, can be derived by studying the behavior of the OPE and the conformal block decomposition in the flat space limit. When applied to perturbation theory in AdS, this gives a holographic derivation of the cutting rules for Feynman diagrams. To demonstrate these facts we introduce some new techniques for the analysis of conformal field theories. Chief among these is a method for conglomerating local primary operators O{sub 1} and O{sub 2} to extract the contribution of an individual primary O{sub {Delta},{ell}} in their OPE. This provides a method for isolating the contribution of specific conformal blocks which we use to prove an important relation between certain conformal block coefficients and anomalous dimensions. These techniques make essential use of the simplifications that occur when CFT correlators are expressed in terms of a Mellin amplitude.

Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

259

Raney distributions and random matrix theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent works have shown that the family of probability distributions with moments given by the Fuss-Catalan numbers permit a simple parameterized form for their density. We extend this result to the Raney distribution which by definition has its moments given by a generalization of the Fuss-Catalan numbers. Such computations begin with an algebraic equation satisfied by the Stieltjes transform, which we show can be derived from the linear differential equation satisfied by the characteristic polynomial of random matrix realizations of the Raney distribution. For the Fuss-Catalan distribution, an equilibrium problem characterizing the density is identified. The Stieltjes transform for the limiting spectral density of the singular values squared of the matrix product formed from $q$ inverse standard Gaussian matrices, and $s$ standard Gaussian matrices, is shown to satisfy a variant of the algebraic equation relating to the Raney distribution. Supported on $(0,\\infty)$, we show that it too permits a simple functional form upon the introduction of an appropriate choice of parameterisation. As an application, the leading asymptotic form of the density as the endpoints of the support are approached is computed, and is shown to have some universal features.

Peter J. Forrester; Dang-Zheng Liu

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

260

Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

Lowden, R.A.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs. 11 figs.

Riley, B.

1988-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Conservation Laws of Random Matrix Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents an overview of the derivation and significance of recently derived conservation laws for the matrix moments of Hermitean random matrices with dominant exponential weights that may be either even or odd. This is based on a detailed asymptotic analysis of the partition function for these unitary ensembles and their scaling limits. As a particular application we derive closed form expressions for the coefficients of the genus expansion for the associated free energy in a particular class of dominant even weights. These coefficients are generating functions for enumerating g-maps, related to graphical combinatorics on Riemann surfaces. This generalizes and resolves a 30+ year old conjecture in the physics literature related to quantum gravity.

Nicholas M. Ercolani

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

263

High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

265

High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

Carney, S. E. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Quantum Black Hole Formation in the BFSS Matrix Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the various head-on collisions of two bunches of D0-branes and their real-time evolution in the BFSS matrix model in classical limit. For a various matrix size N respecting the 't Hooft scaling, we find quantitative evidence for the formation of a single bound state of D0-branes at late time, which is matrix model thermalization and dual to the formation of a larger black hole.

Sinya Aoki; Masanori Hanada; Norihiro Iizuka

2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

268

al matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materialia 65 (2011) 288291 Extreme anelastic responses in Zn80Al20 matrix composite materials containing Materials Science Websites Summary: Scripta Materialia 65 (2011)...

269

al matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materialia 65 (2011) 288291 Extreme anelastic responses in Zn80Al20 matrix composite materials containing Materials Science Websites Summary: Scripta Materialia 65 (2011)...

270

Uniform Boundedness of a Preconditioned Normal Matrix Used in ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dec 3, 2003 ... ... of the coefficient matrix of the scaled system under control is of paramount ... minimum cost network flow problems and was subsequently ...

2003-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

271

North African geology: exploration matrix for potential major hydrocarbon discoveries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on results and models presented previously, it is possible to consider an exploration matrix that examines the 5 basic exploration parameters: source, reservoir, timing, structure, and seal. This matrix indicates that even those basins that have had marginal exploration successes, including the Paleozoic megabasin and downfaulted Triassic grabens of Morocco, the Cyrenaican platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf, have untested plays. The exploration matrix also suggests these high-risk areas could change significantly, if one of the 5 basic matrix parameters is upgraded or if adjustments in political or financial risk are made. The Sirte basin and the Gulf of Suez, 2 of the more intensely explored areas, also present attractive matrix prospects, particularly with deeper Nubian beds or with the very shallow Tertiary sections. The Ghadames basin of Libya and Tunisia shows some potential, but its evaluation responds strongly to stratigraphic and external nongeologic matrix variations based on degree of risk exposure to be assumed. Of greatest risk in the matrix are the very deep Moroccan Paleozoic clastic plays and the Jurassic of Sinai. However, recent discoveries may upgrade these untested frontier areas. Based on the matrix generated by the data presented at a North African Petroleum Geology symposium, significant hydrocarbon accumulations are yet to be found. The remaining questions are: where in the matrix does each individual company wish to place its exploration capital and how much should be the risk exposure.

Kanes, W.H.; O'Connor, T.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

active synovial matrix: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of semiconductor superlattice Petta, Jason 14 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

273

active matrix liquid: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of semiconductor superlattice Petta, Jason 23 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

274

SPARSE AND LOW-RANK MATRIX DECOMPOSITION VIA ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MATLAB scripts for generating matrix C are as follows: ..... [41] L. G. Valiant, Graph-theoretic arguments in low-level complexity, 6th Symposium on Mathe-.

2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Optimization Online - Sufficient Conditions for Low-rank Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 15, 2011 ... This class of optimization problems is $NP$-hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix ...

Lingchen Kong

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

SOLVING A LOW-RANK FACTORIZATION MODEL FOR MATRIX ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problem has been based on nuclear-norm minimization which requires computing singular value decompositions – a task that is increasingly costly as matrix ...

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR LOW-RANK MATRIX RECOVERY ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 15, 2011 ... is -hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix variable. In this paper, we extend the ...

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

An Introduction to a Class of Matrix Cone Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

example, in nuclear norm relaxations of affine rank minimization problems. In order to make ... l?, spectral or operator, and nuclear matrix norm, respectively.

2010-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Numerical Algorithm for Block-Diagonal Decomposition of Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

orthogonal matrix Q and a partition K = K1 ?···? Kl. In general there is no guarantee that this corresponds to the decomposition into simple compo- nents, but in ...

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

280

Chance–Constrained Linear Matrix Inequalities with Dependent ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jan 27, 2011 ... Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, The ..... as systems of linear matrix inequalities. .... Observe that the quality.

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Use of Java Arrays for Matrix Computations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The timings for the sparse matrix operations where done on Linux with Sun's ..... approaches to language, compiler, and library support for multidimensional ...

282

Summary Report For The Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample For Canister S04023  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to comply with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Form Compliance Plan for Sluldge Batch 7b, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream (PS) glass sample collected while filling canister S04023. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass.

Johnson, F. C.

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Exploiting Matrix Symmetries and Physical Symmetries in Matrix Product States and Tensor Trains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We focus on symmetries related to matrices and vectors appearing in the simulation of quantum many-body systems. Spin Hamiltonians have special matrix-symmetry properties such as persymmetry. Furthermore, the systems may exhibit physical symmetries translating into symmetry properties of the eigenvectors of interest. Both types of symmetry can be exploited in sparse representation formats such as Matrix Product States (MPS) for the desired eigenvectors. This paper summarizes symmetries of Hamiltonians for typical physical systems such as the Ising model and lists resulting properties of the related eigenvectors. Based on an overview of Matrix Product States (Tensor Trains or Tensor Chains) and their canonical normal forms we show how symmetry properties of the vector translate into relations between the MPS matrices and, in turn, which symmetry properties result from relations within the MPS matrices. In this context we analyze different kinds of symmetries and derive appropriate normal forms for MPS representing these symmetries. Exploiting such symmetries by using these normal forms will lead to a reduction in the number of degrees of freedom in the MPS matrices. This paper provides a uniform platform for both well-known and new results which are presented from the (multi-)linear algebra point of view.

T. Huckle; K. Waldherr; T. Schulte-Herbrueggen

2013-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

284

Development Of A Macro-Batch Qualification Strategy For The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

Herman, Connie C.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

285

Exploiting Matrix Symmetry to Improve FPGA-Accelerated Conjugate Gradient  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Conjugate Gradient (CG) method using an FPGA co-processor. As in previous approaches, our coExploiting Matrix Symmetry to Improve FPGA- Accelerated Conjugate Gradient Jason D. Bakos, Krishna, high- performance computing, sparse matrix vector multiply, conjugate gradient I. INTRODUCTION Linear

Bakos, Jason D.

286

EVALUATING PADE APPROXIMANTS OF THE MATRIX NICHOLAS J. HIGHAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and squaring method recently proposed by Cheng, Higham, Kenney, and Laub [SIAM J. Matrix Anal. Appl., 22 (2001 on the negative real axis has a real logarithm, that is, a real matrix W such that eW = A [12, Thm. 6.4.15], [13 by Kenney and Laub [13], who suggested obtaining the square roots by computing a Schur decomposition

Higham, Nicholas J.

287

Evaluating Energy Efficiency of Floating Point Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating Energy Efficiency of Floating Point Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs Kiran Kumar Matam, prasanna}@usc.edu Abstract--Energy efficiency has emerged as one of the key performance metrics in scientific computing. In this work, we evaluate the energy efficiency of floating point matrix multipli

Prasanna, Viktor K.

288

Minimal Liouville Gravity on the Torus via Matrix Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we use recent results on resonance relations between the matrix models and the minimal Liouville gravity to compute the torus correlation numbers in (3,p) minimal Liouville gravity. Namely, we calculate the torus generating partition function of the (3,p) matrix models and use it to obtain the one- and two-point correlation numbers in the minimal Liouville gravity.

Lev Spodyneiko

2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

Free Processes via Matrix Theory Concentration week on free Probability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Free Processes via Matrix Theory Concentration week on free Probability Texas A&M, July 9-13. Nizar Demni Paris VI University July 10, 2007 Nizar Demni Paris VI University Free Processes via Matrix Theory Concentration week on free Pr #12;Definitions Non commutative probability space : Unital Algebra A + linear

Anshelevich, Michael

290

Simple neutrino mass matrix with only two free parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple form of neutrino mass matrix which has only two free parameters is proposed from a phenomenological point of view. Using this mass matrix, we succeed to reproduce all the observed values for the MNS lepton mixing angles and the neutrino mass squared difference ratio. Our model also predicts $\\delta_{\

Hiroyuki Nishiura; Takeshi Fukuyama

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

291

Convergent relaxations of polynomial matrix inequalities and static output feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(LMI) relaxations to solve non-convex polynomial matrix in- equality (PMI) optimization problems minimizers that satisfy the PMI. The approach is successfully applied to PMIs arising from static output- mulated as polynomial matrix inequality (PMI) optimization problems in the controller parameters

Henrion, Didier

292

Inner approximations for polynomial matrix inequalities and robust stability regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of feasible solutions is modelled by parametrized polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI). These feasibility sets are typically nonconvex. Given a parametrized PMI set, we provide a hierarchy of linear matrix inequality (LMI.g. [5] for a software implementation and examples, and see [6] for an application to PMI problems

293

Stable radial distortion calibration by polynomial matrix inequalities programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polynomials. Further, we show how to model these nonnegativities using polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI) and how to estimate the radial distortion parameters subject to PMI constraints using semidefinite to stabilize the shape of the distortion function. It is based on polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI

Henrion, Didier

294

Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

Maricle, Donald L. (226 Forest La., Glastonbury, CT 06033); Putnam, Gary C. (47 Walker St., Manchester, CT 06040); Stewart, Jr., Robert C. (1230 Copper Hill Rd., West Suffield, CT 06093)

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

A General Formulation for the Stiffness Matrix of Parallel Mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Cartesian stiffness matrix of parallel mechanisms. The proposed formulation is more general than any other is given in order to illustrate the correctness of this matrix. 1 Introduction A robotic manipulator is a mechanism designed to displace objects in space or in a plane. Therefore, a high precision in the position

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

296

Model Quality Control Matrix Tools for Defining Commissioning Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000 andXp. #0;?#0;? MS-Excel version is 2000 and 2002. ?The tool was developed with MS-Excel using macro program, one of the most popular software. MQC tool software _ continued Structure of MQC MatrixStructure of MQC Matrix ?CxProcess?sheet Aspects...

Nakahara, N.; Onojima, H.; Kamitani, K.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Simple neutrino mass matrix with only two free parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple form of neutrino mass matrix which has only two free parameters is proposed from a phenomenological point of view. Using this mass matrix, we succeed to reproduce all the observed values for the MNS lepton mixing angles and the neutrino mass squared difference ratio. Our model also predicts $\\delta_{\

Nishiura, Hiroyuki

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Quantum spin chains and random matrix theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The spectral statistics and entanglement within the eigenstates of generic spin chain Hamiltonians are analysed. A class of random matrix ensembles is defined which include the most general nearest-neighbour qubit chain Hamiltonians. For these ensembles, and their generalisations, it is seen that the long chain limiting spectral density is a Gaussian and that this convergence holds on the level of individual Hamiltonians. The rate of this convergence is numerically seen to be slow. Higher eigenvalue correlation statistics are also considered, the canonical nearest-neighbour level spacing statistics being numerically observed and linked with ensemble symmetries. A heuristic argument is given for a conjectured form of the full joint probability density function for the eigenvalues of a wide class of such ensembles. This is numerically verified in a particular case. For many translationally-invariant nearest-neighbour qubit Hamiltonians it is shown that there exists a complete orthonormal set of eigenstates for which the entanglement present in a generic member, between a fixed length block of qubits and the rest of the chain, approaches its maximal value as the chain length increases. Many such Hamiltonians are seen to exhibit a simple spectrum so that their eigenstates are unique up to phase. The entanglement within the eigenstates contrasts the spectral density for such Hamiltonians, which is that seen for a non-interacting chain of qubits. For such non-interacting chains, their always exists a basis of eigenstates for which there is no entanglement present.

Huw J Wells

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

299

Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Matrix Product States Algorithms and Continuous Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A generic method to investigate many-body continuous-variable systems is pedagogically presented. It is based on the notion of matrix product states (so-called MPS) and the algorithms thereof. The method is quite versatile and can be applied to a wide variety of situations. As a first test, we show how it provides reliable results in the computation of fundamental properties of a chain of quantum harmonic oscillators achieving off-critical and critical relative errors of the order of 10^(-8) and 10^(-4) respectively. Next, we use it to study the ground state properties of the quantum rotor model in one spatial dimension, a model that can be mapped to the Mott insulator limit of the 1-dimensional Bose-Hubbard model. At the quantum critical point, the central charge associated to the underlying conformal field theory can be computed with good accuracy by measuring the finite-size corrections of the ground state energy. Examples of MPS-computations both in the finite-size regime and in the thermodynamic limit are given. The precision of our results are found to be comparable to those previously encountered in the MPS studies of, for instance, quantum spin chains. Finally, we present a spin-off application: an iterative technique to efficiently get numerical solutions of partial differential equations of many variables. We illustrate this technique by solving Poisson-like equations with precisions of the order of 10^(-7).

S. Iblisdir; R. Orus; J. I. Latorre

2007-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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301

Random matrix description of decaying quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This contribution describes a statistical model for decaying quantum systems (e.g. photo-dissociation or -ionization). It takes the interference between direct and indirect decay processes explicitely into account. The resulting expressions for the partial decay amplitudes and the corresponding cross sections may be considered a many-channel many-resonance generalization of Fano's original work on resonance lineshapes [Phys. Rev 124, 1866 (1961)]. A statistical (random matrix) model is then introduced. It allows to describe chaotic scattering systems with tunable couplings to the decay channels. We focus on the autocorrelation function of the total (photo) cross section, and we find that it depends on the same combination of parameters, as the Fano-parameter distribution. These combinations are statistical variants of the one-channel Fano parameter. It is thus possible to study Fano interference (i.e. the interference between direct and indirect decay paths) on the basis of the autocorrelation function, and thereby in the regime of overlapping resonances. It allows us, to study the Fano interference in the limit of strongly overlapping resonances, where we find a persisting effect on the level of the weak localization correction.

T. Gorin

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

302

Catalytic hydrolysis of urea with fly ash for generation of ammonia in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonia is a highly volatile noxious material with adverse physiological effects, which become intolerable even at very low concentrations and present substantial environmental and operating hazards and risk. Yet ammonia has long been known to be used for feedstock of flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction. Urea as the source of ammonia for the production of ammonia has the obvious advantages that no ammonia shipping, handling, and storage is required. The process of this invention minimizes the risks and hazards associated with the transport, storage, and use of anhydrous and aqueous ammonia. Yet no such rapid urea conversion process is available as per requirement of high conversion in shorter time, so here we study the catalytic hydrolysis of urea for fast conversion in a batch reactor. The catalyst used in this study is fly ash, a waste material originating in great amounts in combustion processes. A number of experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at different catalytic doses, temperatures, times, and at a constant concentration of urea solution 10% by weight, and equilibrium and kinetic studies have been made.

Sahu, J.N.; Gangadharan, P.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In contrast, the variability study has significantly added value to the DWPF's qualification strategy. The variability study has evolved to become the primary aspect of the DWPF's compliance strategy as it has been shown to be versatile and capable of adapting to the DWPF's various and diverse waste streams and blending strategies. The variability study, which aims to ensure durability requirements and the PCT and chemical composition correlations are valid for the compositional region to be processed at the DWPF, must continue to be performed. Due to the importance of the variability study and its place in the DWPF's qualification strategy, it will also be discussed in this report. An analysis of historical data and Production Records indicated that the recommendation of the Six Sigma team to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and PCT performed with the qualification glass does not compromise the DWPF's current compliance plan. Furthermore, the DWPF should continue to produce an acceptable waste form following the remaining elements of the Glass Product Control Program; regardless of a sludge-only or coupled operations strategy. If the DWPF does decide to eliminate the characterization of pour stream samples, pour stream samples should continue to be collected for archival reasons, which would allow testing to be performed should any issues arise or new repository test methods be developed.

Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

304

The AQ18 Machine Learning and Data Mining System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examples. Acknowledgments The authors express their deep gratitude to all the researchers who were involved in the development and implementation of various components or features of STAR, in particular, Eric Bloedorn, Mark of Naval Research under Grant No. N00014-91-J-1351, in part by the Defense Advanced Research Projects

Michalski, Ryszard S.

305

ILENR/RE-AQ-90/05 February 1990  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources Office of Research and Planning 325 W. Adams, Room 300 Department of Energy and Natural Resources #12;NOTE This report has been reviewed by the Illinois Department-IP - Purple Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources Office of Research and Planning 325 W. Adams

Denver, University of

306

ILENR/RE-AQ-ON-ROAD CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROCARBON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. McVey, and Stuart P. Beaton Prepared for: Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources Office A. Witter Director State of Illinois Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources #12;NOTE This report has been reviewed by the Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources (ENR) and approved

Denver, University of

307

Califonia + Region 9 AQ managers' priorities Background ozone, also PM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 2011 meeting (original) · Transboundary pollution involving Canada and Mexico: sources, transport Nov 2011 meeting (updated) · Transboundary pollution involving Canada and Mexico: sources, transport · Improving knowledge of emissions from oil and gas exploration/recovery · Transboundary pollution transport

Jacob, Daniel J.

308

EERE Program Management Guide - Appendices A-Q  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 ClosingAInnovations in FuelJuly

309

Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300AlgoilEnergy Information the ArmyInformationFocus Technology

310

Matrix fatigue cracking in {alpha}{sub 2} titanium matrix composites for hypersonic applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to understand matrix cracking mechanisms in a unidirectional {alpha}{sub 2} titanium matrix composite (TMC) in possible hypersonic applications. A [0]{sub 8} SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb (atomic %) TMC was first subjected to a variety of simple isothermal and nonisothermal fatigue cycles to evaluate the damage mechanisms in simple conditions. A modified ascent mission cycle test was then performed to evaluate the combined effects of loading modes. This cycle mixes mechanical cycling at 150 and 483 C, sustained loads, and a slow thermal cycle to 815 C. At low cyclic stresses and strains more common in hypersonic applications, environment-assisted surface cracking limited fatigue resistance. This damage mechanism was most acute for out-of-phase nonisothermal cycles having extended cycle periods and the ascent mission cycle. A simple linear fraction damage model was employed to help understand this damage mechanism. Time-dependent environmental damage was found to strongly influence out-of-phase and mission life, with mechanical cycling damage due to the combination of external loading and CTE mismatch stresses playing a smaller role. The mechanical cycling and sustained loads in the mission cycle also had a smaller role.

Gabb, T.P.; Gayda, J. [NASA Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

“Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

Edelman, Alan [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Persson, Per-Olof [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sutton, Brian D. [Department of Mathematics, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

Dr. Ronald Baney

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Looking for a Matrix model for ABJM theory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Encouraged by the recent construction of fuzzy sphere solutions in the Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena (ABJM) theory, we re-analyze the latter from the perspective of a Matrix-like model. In particular, we argue that a vortex solution exhibits properties of a supergraviton, while a kink represents a 2-brane. Other solutions are also consistent with the Matrix-type interpretation. We study vortex scattering and compare with graviton scattering in the massive ABJM background, however our results are inconclusive. We speculate on how to extend our results to construct a Matrix theory of ABJM.

Mohammed, Asadig [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Murugan, Jeff [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nastase, Horatiu [Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Approach to inherently stable interfaces for ceramic matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Virtually all ceramic matrix composites require and interface coating between the fibers and matrix to achieve the desired mechanical performance. To date, the most effective interface materials for non- oxide matrix composites have been carbon and boron nitride. They are, however, susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperatures, and thus under many envisioned operating environments they will fail, possibly allowing oxidation of the fibers as well, adversely affecting mechanical behavior. Current efforts are directed toward developing stable interface coating, which include oxides and silicon carbide with appropriate thermomechanical properties.

Besmann, T.M.; Kupp, E.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shanmugham, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

Rajendra Bordia

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

VOICE CONVERSION BASED ON NON-NEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATION USING PHONEME-CATEGORIZED DICTIONARY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VOICE CONVERSION BASED ON NON-NEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATION USING PHONEME-CATEGORIZED DICTIONARY using Non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is employed for spectral conversion between different conversion, sparse representation, non- negative matrix factorization, sub-dictionary 1. INTRODUCTION

Takiguchi, Tetsuya

317

Implications of the KamLAND Measurement on the Lepton Flavor Mixing Matrix and the Neutrino Mass Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore some important implications of the KamLAND measurment on the lepton flavor mixing matrix $V$ and the neutrino mass matrix $M$. The model-independent constraints on nine matrix elements of $V$ are obtained to a reasonable degree of accuracy. We find that nine two-zero textures of $M$ are compatible with current experimental data, but two of them are only marginally allowed. Instructive predictions are given for the absolute neutrino masses, Majorana phases of CP violation, effective masses of the tritium beta decay and neutrinoless double beta decay.

Wan-lei Guo; Zhi-zhong Xing

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

EIGENVALUES OF AN ALIGNMENT MATRIX IN NONLINEAR MANIFOLD LEARNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This forms a theoretical basis for the LTSA (Local Tangent Space Alignment) algorithm of [11] recently for this problem [1, 3, 5, 7, 11]. The alignment matrix was first introduced in the LTSA method [11] in which

Li, Chi-Kwong

319

APPROXIMATE HARTREE TYPE WAVE FUNCTIONS AND MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

APPROXIMATE HARTREE TYPE WAVE FUNCTIONS AND MATRIX ELEMENTS FOR THE K AND L SHELLS OF ATOMS AND IONS Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Meyerott, R.E. Temp Data Storage 3:...

320

Diagnostic value of nonlinear optical signals from collagen matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2011; accepted August 2, 2011; posted August 16, 2011 (Doc. ID 150090); published September 13, 2011 and morphological alternations of the collagen matrix in different stages of carcinogen- esis are quantitatively

Qu, Jianan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Simulation of bilinear flow in single matrix block drainage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

serves as the tight gas reservoir with a high permeability streak surrounding the matrix. A well only produces from the high permeability fracture. Models were run with different sensitivity cases toward fracture half length, xf, and fracture permeability...

Branajaya, Romi Triaji

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

322

An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Mathematics Assessment Alignment Matrix for Grades 2-12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematics Assessment Alignment Matrix for Grades 2-12 California High School Exit Examination, California Standards Tests, Mathematics Diagnostic Testing Program, Entry Level Mathematics Based Effort by Orange County Department of Education, California State University, Fullerton - Mathematics

de Lijser, Peter

324

on the complexity of some hierarchical structured matrix algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tions of integral equations, PDEs, structured matrix (such as Toeplitz) .... Here, we provide a graph technique where an HSS tree is converted into a ...... implementation is in MATLAB and the flop counts, timing, and accuracies are shown.

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

325

Design, set up, and testing of a matrix acidizing apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Well stimulation techniques are applied on a regular basis to enhance productivity and maximize recovery in oil and gas wells. Among these techniques, matrix acidizing is probably the most widely performed job because of its relative low cost...

Nevito Gomez, Javier

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

326

FINITE FRACTURE MECHANICS OF MATRIX MICROCRACKING IN COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINITE FRACTURE MECHANICS OF MATRIX MICROCRACKING IN COMPOSITES JOHN A. NAIRN INTRODUCTION damage following complex loading conditions. This chapter describes a fracture mechanics approach to the microcracking problem. A complicating feature of composite fracture mechanics analysis is that laminates often

Nairn, John A.

327

Solid-supported phospholipid bilayers: separation matrix for proteomics applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matrix. As a first step towards the purification of proteins, this work showed that streptavidin proteins doubly bound to a bilayer by a biotinylated lipid can be separated from streptavidin proteins which are singly bounded....

Diaz Vazquez, Arnaldo Joel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

328

Electrodeposition of amorphous matrix Ni-W/Wp̳ composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An amorphous Ni-W alloy matrix was incorporated with W particulate through two types of electrodeposition. The plating bath for the electrodeposition contained nickel sulfate, sodium tungstate, sodium citrate, ammonium ...

Jenket, Donald R. (Donald Robert)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Clearance Access Matrix - January 19, 2012 | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Clearance Access Matrix - January 19, 2012 More Documents & Publications DOE F 470.1 DOE F 470.2 2014 Headquarters Facilities Master Security Plan - Chapter 3, Personnel Security...

330

On rational solutions of multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive some rational solutions for the multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies generalising an approach by Wilson. Connections with the multicomponent version of the KP/CM correspondence are discussed.

Alberto Tacchella

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

331

Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites by R. Kiehn and T. W................... .. ....... ... ... 3 Literature Review ......... ...... ..... ... . . 3 Conventional Aluminum Brazing ........ 4 Aluminum Composite Joining ........... 5 Aluminum Joining by Unconventional Methods

Eagar, Thomas W.

332

The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore pressure and fracture...

Keys, Ryan S.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

334

Silicide-matrix materials for high-temperature applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intermetallic-matrix composites are attractive alternatives to carbon/carbon and ceramic/ceramic composities for applications up to 1,600 C. Recent work on the intermetallic compounds MoSi2 and Ti5Si3 has included determination of their mechanical properties and deformation behavior, selection of thermodynamically compatible high-strength and ductile reinforcements, and strengthening and toughening mechanisms in silicide-matrix composites for high-temperature service. 11 refs.

Meschter, P.J.; Schwartz, D.S. (McDonnell Douglas Research Laboratories, Saint Louis, MO (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

Smith, Don D.

2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Neutrino mass matrix solutions and neutrinoless double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a determination of the neutrino mass matrix which holds for values of the neutrinoless double beta decay effective mass m_{ee} larger than the neutrino mass differences. We find eight possible solutions and discuss for each one the corresponding neutrino mass eigenvalues and zero texture. A minimal structure of the perturbations to add to these zero textures to recover the full mass matrix is also determined. Implications for neutrino hot dark matter are discussed for each solution.

Thomas Hambye

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Renormalization of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the on-shell scheme and the general linear R_xi gauge we have calculated the one-loop amplitude W+ -> u_I d_j. In agreement with previous work we have shown that the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix ought to be renormalized. We show how to renormalize the CKM matrix and, at the same time, obtain a gauge independent W decay amplitude.

A. Barroso; L. Brucher; R. Santos

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

338

Using conversions of chemically reacting tracers for numerical determination of temperature profiles in flowing systems and temperature histories in batch systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the mathematical bases for measuring internal temperatures within batch and flowing systems using chemically reacting tracers. This approach can obtain temperature profiles of plug-flow systems and temperature histories within batch systems. The differential equations for reactant conversion can be converted into Fredholm integral equations of the first kind. The experimental variable is the tracer-reaction activation energy. When more than one tracer is used, the reactions must have different activation energies to gain information. In systems with temperature extrema, multiple solutions for the temperature profiles or histories can exist, When a single parameter in the temperature distribution is needed, a single-tracer test may furnish this information. For multi-reaction tracer tests, three Fredholm equations are developed. Effects of tracer-reaction activation energy, number of tracers used, and error in the data are evaluated. The methods can determine temperature histories and profiles for many existing systems, and can be a basis for analysis of the more complicated dispersed-flow systems. An alternative to using the Fredholm-equation approach is the use of an assumed temperature- distribution function and incorporation of this function into the basic integral equation describing tracer behavior. The function contains adjustable parameters which are optimized to give the temperature distribution. The iterative Fredholm equation method is tested to see what is required to discriminate between two models of the temperature behavior of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal reservoirs. Experimentally, ester and amide hydrolyses are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 75-100{degrees}C. Hydrolyses of bromobenzene derivatives are valid HDR tracer reactions for measuring temperatures in the range 150-275{degrees}C.

Brown, L.F.; Chemburkar, R.M.; Robinson, B.A.; Travis, B.J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

Nock, A., E-mail: a.nock@qmul.ac.uk; Kumar, S., E-mail: skumar.physics@gmail.com; Sommers, H.-J., E-mail: h.j.sommers@uni-due.de; Guhr, T., E-mail: thomas.guhr@uni-due.de

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization in a Fourier Transform Ion Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects effective matrix Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: affects effective matrix Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 October 6, 2010 Matlab Assignments, day 5 Summary: the matrix. Discuss the effectiveness of defining the...

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - action matrix summary Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

action basis matrix... | transition matrix of a (deterministic) policy : S ... Source: Massachusetts at Amherst, University of - Department of Computer Science, Autonomous...

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - approximate matrix decompositions Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for: approximate matrix decompositions Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Predictive low-rank decomposition for kernel Francis Bach Summary: problems General purpose matrix...

344

Synthesis of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforced with in situ devitrified Al-Ni-La amorphous particles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforcedAbstract Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites wereamount of nanoscale aluminum oxide, nitride and carbide

Zhang, Zhihui H; Han, B Q; Witkin, D; Ajdelsztajn, L; Laverna, E J

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

2.3 Characterizations of Invertible Matrices Theorem 8 (The Invertible Matrix Theorem)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2.3 Characterizations of Invertible Matrices Theorem 8 (The Invertible Matrix Theorem) Let true or all false). a. A is an invertible matrix. b. A is row equivalent to In. c. A has n pivot. AT is an invertible matrix. EXAMPLE: Use the Invertible Matrix Theorem to determine if A is invertible, where A 1 3 0

Belykh, Igor

346

Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

Taylor, G.W.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

347

Combinatorial canonical form (CCF) of a layered mixed (LM-)matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combinatorial canonical form (CCF) of a layered mixed (LM-)matrix Kazuo Murota Layered mixed (LM F is called a layered mixed matrix (or an LM-matrix) with respect to K if it takes the following nonzero entries is algebraically independent over K. With an LM-matrix A we associate a submodular

Murota, Kazuo

348

A Rank-Corrected Procedure for Matrix Completion with Fixed Basis Coefficients  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Rank-Corrected Procedure for Matrix Completion with Fixed Basis Coefficients Weimin Miao, Shaohua address low-rank matrix completion problems with fixed basis coefficients, which include the low-rank correlation matrix completion in various fields such as the financial market and the low-rank density matrix

Chaudhuri, Sanjay

349

FACIAL STRUCTURES FOR UNITAL POSITIVE LINEAR MAPS IN THE TWO DIMENSIONAL MATRIX ALGEBRA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

positive linear maps between the 2 Ã? 2 matrix algebras. 1. Introduction After Stinespring's paper [10

Kye, Seung-Hyeok

350

Computational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix mechanical re- sponse of a ceramic matrix composite is simulated by a numerical model for a ®ber-matrix unit evolution in brittle matrix composites was developed. This modeling is based on an axisymmetric unit cell

Ortiz, Michael

351

Random-matrix theory and complex atomic spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Around 1950, Wigner introduced the idea of modelling physical reality with an ensemble of random matrices while studying the energy levels of heavy atomic nuclei. Since then, the field of random-matrix theory has grown tremendously, with applications ranging from fluctuations on the economic markets to complex atomic spectra. The purpose of this short article is to review several attempts to apply the basic concepts of random-matrix theory to the structure and radiative transitions of atoms and ions, using the random matrices originally introduced by Wigner in the framework of the gaussian orthogonal ensemble. Some intrinsic properties of complex-atom physics, which could be enlightened by random-matrix theory, are presented.

Pain, Jean-Christophe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Spontaneous Breaking of Diffeomorphism Invariance in Matrix Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a matrix action based on the unitary group U(N) whose large N ground states are conjectured to be in precise correspondence with the weak-strong dual effective field theory limits of M theory preserving sixteen supersymmetries. We identify a finite N matrix algebra that corresponds to the spacetime and internal symmetry algebra of the Lorentz invariant field theories obtained in the different large N limits. The manifest diffeomorphism invariance of matrix theory is spontaneously broken upon specification of the large N ground state. We verify that there exist planar limits which yield the low energy spacetime effective actions of all six supersymmetric string theories in nine spacetime dimensions and with sixteen supercharges.

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ?? decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0?/0N) for the 0{sup +} ? 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ?? decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

Rath, P. K. [Department of Physics, University of Lucknow, Lucknow-226007 (India)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

Oleg Brandt; Gaston Gutierrez; Michael H. L. S. Wang; Zhenyu Ye

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

MTH221, LINEAR ALGEBRA, FINAL EXAM FALL 2006 Question 1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If A = (. 1 1. 0 3 ) a) (4 points) Find all eigenvalues A b) (6 points)Find a nonsingular matrix Q and a diagonal matrix D such that. Q?1AQ = D (that it is A = QDQ?1) ...

John L Casti (Santa Fe) 1377 2003 Feb 12 15:14:22

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

356

DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electron beam evaporation for titanium metal matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

3M, in partnership with ARPA, is developing electron beam evaporation as a method for producing titanium metal matrix composites (TMC`s). This paper discusses some of the opportunities presented by these strong and lightweight structural materials but also points out the many challenges which must be met. The excellent mechanical properties of titanium matrix composites have been recognized for quite some time; however use of these materials has been limited by the lack of a commercially viable process to produce them. 3M is removing this logjam in processing technology by using high rate electron beam evaporation technology to manufacture these materials on a significantly large scale.

Storer, J. [3M, Mendota Heights, MN (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Empirical Survey of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinoless double beta decay has been the subject of intensive theoretical work as it represents the only practical approach to discovering whether neutrinos are Majorana particles or not, and whether lepton number is a conserved quantum number. Available calculations of matrix elements and phase-space factors are reviewed from the perspective of a future large-scale experimental search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Somewhat unexpectedly, a uniform inverse correlation between phase space and the square of the nuclear matrix element emerges. As a consequence, no isotope is either favored or disfavored; all have qualitatively the same decay rate per unit mass for any given value of the Majorana mass.

R. G. H. Robertson

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

[20] G. C. Fox, S. W. Otto, and A. J. G. Hey. Matrix algorithms on a hypercube I: Matrix multiplication. Parallel Computing, 4:17--31, 1987.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ 31 ­ [20] G. C. Fox, S. W. Otto, and A. J. G. Hey. Matrix algorithms on a hypercube I: Matrix. presentation overheads. #12; ­ 30 ­ [9] J. Choi, J. J. Dongarra, and D. W. Walker. Level 3 BLAS for distributed, J. J. Dongarra, and D. W. Walker. Parallel matrix transpose algorithms on dis­ tributed memory

Walker, David W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Accelerated Analyte Uptake on Single Beads in Microliter-scale Batch Separations using Acoustic Streaming: Plutonium Uptake by Anion Exchange for Analysis by Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of acoustic streaming as a non-contact mixing platform to accelerate mass transport-limited diffusion processes in small volume heterogeneous reactions has been investigated. Single bead anion exchange of plutonium at nanomolar and sub-picomolar concentrations in 20 microliter liquid volumes was used to demonstrate the effect of acoustic mixing. Pu uptake rates on individual ~760 micrometer diameter AG 1x4 anion exchange resin beads were determined using acoustic mixing and compared with Pu uptake rates achieved by static diffusion alone. An 82 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device was placed in contact with the underside of a 384-well microplate containing flat-bottomed semiconical wells. Acoustic energy was coupled into the solution in the well, inducing acoustic streaming. Pu uptake rates were determined by the plutonium remaining in solution after specific elapsed time intervals, using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) for nanomolar concentrations and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) analysis for the sub-picomolar concentration experiments. It was found that this small batch uptake reaction could be accelerated by a factor of about five-fold or more, depending on the acoustic power applied.

Paxton, Walter F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Peper, Shane M.; Petersen, Steven L.; Grate, Jay W.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Blind Deconvolution and Structured Matrix Computations with Applications to Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the reconstruction of high-resolution images from multiple under sam- pled images of a scene that is obtained1 Blind Deconvolution and Structured Matrix Computations with Applications to Array Imaging Michael .................................................... 21 1.7 Application: High-resolution Image Reconstruction ...................... 23 1.8 Concluding

Plemmons, Robert J.

363

Constitutive Modeling of Fiber Composites with a Soft Hyperelastic Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of unidirectional carbon fiber composites with a silicone matrix, loaded transversally to the fibers study uses a plane-strain finite element continuum model of the composite material in which the fiber (Campbell et al., 2005; Barrett et al., 2006). These composite materials are often described as memory

Pellegrino, Sergio

364

Three-Neutrino MSW Effect and the LNW Mass Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review recent work on analytical solutions to the MSW equations for three neutrino flavours, for exponential and linear potentials. An application to a particular mass matrix is also discussed. The three neutrino masses are determined, respectively, to be 0.001--0.004, and roughly 0.01 and 0.05 eV.

Per Osland; Tai Tsun Wu

2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

365

Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On large-scale matrix completion tasks, Jellyfish is orders of magnitude more efficient than ...... NNLS was written in Matlab, and some of the functions are available .... Figure 6: Low-Rank Factorization Graph on (A) Movielens1M and (B)

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

367

Exploiting Sparsity in Semide nite Programming via Matrix ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

work is basedon someresults about positive semide nite matrix completion, and it .... 2.3]), where a graph is said to be chordal if every cycle of length ...... [19] J. F. Sturm, Using SeDuMi 1.02,a MATLAB toolbox for optimization over symmetric.

368

IBM Research Report Efficient High-precision Dense Matrix Algebra ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oct 29, 2008 ... We are given an m × d design matrix P of floating point numbers and an ..... As described in the last line of the algorithm (Section 4), the right- ..... of these do incur a communications overhead, but it appears to be minimal.

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

369

Matrix Product States approach to non-Markovian processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A matrix product state approach to non-Markovian, classical and quantum processes is discussed. In the classical case, the Radon-Nikodym derivative of all processes can be embedded into quantum measurement procedure. In the both cases, quantum and classical, the master equation can be derived from a projecting a quantum Markovian process onto a lower dimensional subspace.

Descamps Benoit

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

371

Time and Energy Efficient Matrix Factorization using FPGAs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interconnects, leading to lower energy dissipation. The designs are made scalable by us- ing a fixed ITime and Energy Efficient Matrix Factorization using FPGAs Seonil Choi and Viktor K. Prasanna devices are proposed. A linear ar- ray architecture is employed to minimize the usage of long

Prasanna, Viktor K.

372

New Advances in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the matrix elements necessary to evaluate the half-life of some neutrinoless double beta decay candidates in the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM). We compare our results with those from other models and extract some simple features of the calculations.

Munoz, Jose Barea [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. Unidad Asociada al Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

373

SMITH NORMAL FORM OF A MULTIVARIATE MATRIX ASSOCIATED WITH PARTITIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SMITH NORMAL FORM OF A MULTIVARIATE MATRIX ASSOCIATED WITH PARTITIONS CHRISTINE BESSENRODT polynomials, and by determining not only the deter- minant but also the Smith normal form of these matrices. A priori the Smith form need not exist but its existence follows from the explicit computation

374

Two modulator generalized ellipsometer for complete mueller matrix measurement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) comprising two polarizer-photoelastic modulator (PEM) pairs, an optical light source, an optical detection system, and associated data processing and control electronics, where the PEMs are free-running. The input light passes through the first polarizer-PEM pair, reflects off the sample surface or passes through the sample, passes through the second PEM-polarizer pair, and is detected. Each PEM is free running and operates at a different resonant frequency, e.g., 50 and 60 kHz. The resulting time-dependent waveform of the light intensity is a complicated function of time, and depends upon the exact operating frequency and phase of each PEM, the sample, and the azimuthal angles of the polarizer-PEM pairs, but can be resolved into a dc component and eight periodic components. In one embodiment, the waveform is analyzed using a new spectral analysis technique that is similar to Fourier analysis to determine eight sample Mueller matrix elements (normalized to the m.sub.00 Mueller matrix element). The other seven normalized elements of the general 4.times.4 Mueller matrix can be determined by changing the azimuthal angles of the PEM-polarizer pairs with respect to the plane of incidence. Since this instrument can measure all elements of the sample Mueller matrix, it is much more powerful than standard ellipsometers.

Jellison, Jr., Gerald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Modine, Frank A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Arguments towards the construction of a matrix model groundstate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the existence and uniqueness of wavefunctions for inhomogenoeus boundary value problems associated to x^2y^2-type matrix model on a bounded domain of R^2. Both properties involve a combination of the Cauchy-Kovalewski Theorem and a explicit calculations.

Boulton, L; Restuccia, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

On Painleve Related Functions Arising in Random Matrix Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In deriving large n probability distribution function of the rightmost eigenvalue from the classical Random Matrix Theory Ensembles, one is faced with que question of ?finding large n asymptotic of certain coupled set of functions. This paper presents some of these functions in a new light.

Leonard N. Choup

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion , Chaoqiang Liu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion Hui Ji , Chaoqiang Liu , Zuowei Shen video denoising algorithms assume a sin- gle statistical model of image noise, e.g. additive Gaussian white noise, which often is violated in practice. In this pa- per, we present a new patch-based video

Shen, Zuowei

378

TRANSPORT INVOLVING CONDUCTING FIBERS IN A NON-CONDUCTING MATRIX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

result is a material with high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity. Transport Models,2 , J. Rozen3 Introduction Thermal and electrical transport through a low-conductivity matrix containing conversion devices high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity are preferred for superior

Walker, D. Greg

379

Scalable Matrix Inversion Using MapReduce Jingen Xiang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to implement in today's popular parallel dataflow programming systems, such as MapReduce. The reason Computing Research Institute Doha, Qatar aaboulnaga@qf.org.qa ABSTRACT Matrix operations are a fundamental dataflow programming systems like MapReduce [8] and Pregel [21] have become very popular as platforms

Aboulnaga, Ashraf

380

THE INVERSE OF A SEMI-INFINITE SYMMETRIC BANDED MATRIX  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algorithm 3]. The eigen- values and eigen-vectors for the nite symmetric tridiagonal case were obtainedTHE INVERSE OF A SEMI-INFINITE SYMMETRIC BANDED MATRIX D. A. LAVISy , B. W. SOUTHERNz and I. F a method for obtaining an analytic form for a class of sym- metric semi-in nite banded matrices, which are

Lavis, David

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Small-energy analysis for the selfadjoint matrix Schroedinger operator on the half line. II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a second moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is differentiable at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the derivative of the scattering matrix at zero energy. The previously established results when the potential has only the first moment are improved when the second moment exists, by presenting the small-energy asymptotics for the related Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevantc to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

Tuncay Aktosun; Martin Klaus; Ricardo Weder

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Batch-to-batch model improvement for cooling crystallization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massachusetts Avenue Cambridge MA 02139, USA c Albemarle Catalysts Company B.V., Nieuwendammerkade 1-3, 1030 consisting of a solute dissolved into a solvent is loaded at high temperature into a vessel called, the desired cooling profile is given as set-point to a feedback temperature control loop. However, even when

Van den Hof, Paul

383

Simultaneous Batching and Scheduling of Single Stage Batch Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Tecnologia e Inovação, 1649-038 Lisboa, Portugal Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

384

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

The uses of the refined matrix model recursion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study matrix models in the beta ensemble by building on the refined recursion relation proposed by Chekhov and Eynard. We present explicit results for the first beta-deformed corrections in the one-cut and the two-cut cases, as well as two applications to supersymmetric gauge theories: the calculation of superpotentials in N=1 gauge theories, and the calculation of vevs of surface operators in superconformal N=2 theories and their Liouville duals. Finally, we study the beta deformation of the Chern-Simons matrix model. Our results indicate that this model does not provide an appropriate description of the Omega-deformed topological string on the resolved conifold, and therefore that the beta-deformation might provide a different generalization of topological string theory in toric Calabi-Yau backgrounds.

Andrea Brini; Marcos Marino; Sebastien Stevan

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

387

Chiral Disorder and Random Matrix Theory with Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We revisit the concept of chiral disorder in QCD in the presence of a QED magnetic field |eH|. Weak magnetism corresponds to |eH| magnetism the reverse. Asymptotics (ultra-strong magnetism) is in the realm of perturbative QCD. We analyze weak magnetism using the concept of the quark return probability in the diffusive regime of chiral disorder. The result is in agreement with expectations from chiral perturbation theory. We analyze strong and ultra-strong magnetism in the ergodic regime using random matrix theory including the effects of finite temperature. The strong magnetism results are in agreement with the currently reported lattice data in the presence of a small shift of the Polyakov line. The ultra-strong magnetism results are consistent with expectations from perturbative QCD. We suggest a chiral random matrix effective action with matter and magnetism to analyze the QCD phase diagram near the critical points under the influence of magnetism.

Maciej A. Nowak; Mariusz Sadzikowski; Ismail Zahed

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Matrix elements of the Argonne v18 potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss two approaches to the calculation of matrix elements of the Argonne v18 potential. The first approach is applicable in the case of a single-particle basis of harmonic-oscillator wave functions. In this case we use the Talmi transformation, implemented numerically using the Moshinsky transformation brackets, to separate the center-of-mass and relative coordinates degrees of freedom. Integrals involving the radial part of the potential are performed using Gauss-Hermite quadrature formulas, and convergence is achieved for sets of at least 512 points. We validate the calculation of matrix elements of the Argonne v18 potential using a second approach suitable for the case of an arbitrary functional form of the single-particle wave functions. When the model space is represented in terms of harmonic-oscillator wave functions, results obtained using these two approaches are shown to to be identical within numerical accuracy.

Bogdan Mihaila

2011-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

Refined error estimates for matrix-valued radial basis functions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution: bf( ) := Z Rn f(x)e ixT d ; 8 and let the inverse Fourier transform of a function or tempered distribution be de ned by f(x) := 1 (2 )n Z Rn f( )ei T xd : If f is a matrix-valued function, we will take bf to be the matrix of Fourier transforms... use the Fourier transform to characterize H (Rn): H (Rn) := n u2L2(Rn) : bu( ) 1 + k k22 =2 2L2(Rn) o : The inner product in H (Rn) is given by hg;fiH (Rn) = Z Rn (1 + k k22) bf( )bg( )d : 2. Vector-valued Sobolev Spaces Let u : ! Rn, with uj...

Fuselier, Edward J., Jr.

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

Equilibration in low-dimensional quantum matrix models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix models play an important role in studies of quantum gravity, being candidates for a formulation of M-theory, but are notoriously difficult to solve. In this work, we present a fresh approach by introducing a novel exact model provably equivalent with low-dimensional bosonic matrix models. In this equivalent model significant local structure becomes apparent and it can serve as a simple toy model for analytical and precise numerical study. We derive a substantial part of the low energy spectrum, find a conserved charge, and are able to derive numerically the Regge trajectories. To exemplify the usefulness of the approach, we address questions of equilibration starting from a non-equilibrium situation, building upon an intuition from quantum information. We finally discuss possible generalizations of the approach.

R. Hübener; Y. Sekino; J. Eisert

2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

391

Three-Neutrino MSW Effect and the Lehmann Mass Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent work on analytical solutions to the MSW equations for three neutrino flavours is reviewed, with emphasis on the exponential density. Application to a particular mass matrix, proposed by Lehmann, Newton and Wu, is also discussed. Within this model, the experimental data allow a determination of the three neutrino masses. They are found to be 0.002-0.004, 0.01 and 0.05 eV.

Per Osland

2002-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Rotordynamic analysis with shell elements for the transfer matrix method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Committee) Al B. elazzo1o (Member) John T. Tielki g (Member) Michael J. Rabins (Head of Department) August 1989 111 ABSTRACT Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transi'er Matrix Method. (August 1989) Edward Anthony L'Antigua, B. M... Varying Bending Load with (-') = . 01, and Varying ( ? ) ratio. Table 2. Nondimensional Flexibilities (aEv ) for Cylindrical Sections (8 = 0) with Varying ( ? ) and (?-) Ratios. Table 3. Nondimensional Flexibilities (bEr = oEr ) for Cylindrical...

L'Antigua, Edward Anthony

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana David Hokanson ExxonMobil Research and Engineering May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy... Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 3Baytown Chemical / Refining Complex ExxonMobil Baytown Refining & Chemical Complex • One of world’s largest integrated, most technologically advanced petroleum/petrochemical complexes, in operation since 1919...

Hokanson, D.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Density matrix renormalization group and wave function factorization for nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We employ the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and the wave function factorization method for the numerical solution of large scale nuclear structure problems. The DMRG exhibits an improved convergence for problems with realistic interactions due to the implementation of the finite algorithm. The wave function factorization of fpg-shell nuclei yields rapidly converging approximations that are at the present frontier for large-scale shell model calculations.

T. Papenbrock; D. J. Dean

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hidden Symmetry Unmasked: Matrix Theory and E(11)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dimensional reduction of eleven-dimensional supergravity to zero spacetime dimensions is expected to give a theory characterized by the hidden symmetry algebra E(11), the end-point of the Cremmer-Julia prediction for the sequence of dimensional reductions of 11d supergravity to spacetime dimensions. In recent work, we have given a prescription for the spacetime reduction of a supergravity-Yang-Mills Lagrangian with large N flavor symmetry such that the local symmetries of the continuum Lagrangian are preserved in the resulting reduced matrix Lagrangian. This new class of reduced matrix models are the basis for a nonperturbative proposal for M theory we have described in hep-th/0408057. The matrix models are also characterized by hidden symmetry algebras in precise analogy with the Cremmer-Julia framework. The rank eleven algebra E(11) is also known as the very-extension of the finite-dimensional Lie algebra E(8). In an independent stream of work (hep-th/0402140), Peter West has provided evidence which supports the conjecture that M theory has the symmetry algebra E(11), showing that it successfully incorporates both the 11d supergravity limit, as well as the 10d type IIA and type IIB supergravities, and inclusive of the full spectrum of Neveu-Schwarz and Dirichlet pbranes. In this topical review, we give a pedagogical account of these recent developments also providing an assessment of the insights that might be gained from linking the algebraic and reduced matrix model perspectives in the search for M theory. Necessary mathematical details are covered starting from the basics in the appendices.

Shyamoli Chaudhuri

2004-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

396

Higher rank Wilson loops from a matrix model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the circular Wilson loop of N=4 SYM theory at large N in the rank k symmetric and antisymmetric tensor representations. Using a quadratic Hermitian matrix model we obtain expressions for all values of the 't Hooft coupling. At large and small couplings we give explicit formulae and reproduce supergravity results from both D3 and D5 branes within a systematic framework.

Sean A. Hartnoll; S. Prem Kumar

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Neutrinoless $??$ decay nuclear matrix elements in an isotopic chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze nuclear matrix elements (NME) of neutrinoless double beta decay calculated for the Cadmium isotopes. Energy density functional methods including beyond mean field effects such as symmetry restoration and shape mixing are used. Strong shell effects are found associated to the underlying nuclear structure of the initial and final nuclei. Furthermore, we show that NME for two-neutrino double beta decay evaluated in the closure approximation, $M^{2\

Tomás R. Rodríguez; Gabriel Martínez-Pinedo

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

398

Capacitor-Less VAR Compensator Based on a Matrix Converter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greatly contributed to the completion of this work. I owe my gratitude to them for always believing in me and helping me through my academic pursuit. vii NOMENCLATURE VAR Volt-ampere reactive MC 3-phase ac-to-3-phase ac matrix converter v1... [10] ...... 12 10 Equivalent circuit of a capacitor................................................................. 13 11 Basic layout of a 3/3 MC............................................................................ 16 12 Block diagram...

Balakrishnan, Divya Rathna

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

400

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Polarization-sensitive Mueller-matrix optical coherence tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

splitter...................................................7 Fig. 2.1. Structure of collagen fiber .................................................................................10 Fig. 4.1 Schematic of the single-channel Mueller-matrix OCT system: SLD... of the sample light as conventional OCT. Shown in Fig. 1.1 is an illustration of the basic configuration of conventional OCT. A broadband light source, either a superluminescent diode (SLD) or a femtosecond laser is used in the interferometer, whose power...

Jiao, Shuliang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Herman E. (Santa Fe, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

Drach, Vincent [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, Karl [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Alexandrou, Constantia [University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Constantinou, Marth [University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Dinter, Simon [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos [University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Renner, Dru B. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Microsoft Word - Cross Reference Matrix Introduction.doc  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |EnergyonSupport0.pdf5 OPAM SEMIANNUAL REPORTMAMayCross Reference Matrix Introduction This

405

Sparse unitary operators and repeated entries in the process matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that quantum processes of low rank are inexorably connected to the dimensions of the environmental state space that the system is in contact with. We also show that the process matrix representing such low rank processes will have only a few distinct entries which goes as O(r^2) (r is the rank) and hence the number of independent measurements needed to characterize the process is greatly reduced.

Vinayak Jagadish; Anil Shaji

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Geometry of matrix product states: Metric, parallel transport, and curvature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the geometric properties of the manifold of states described as (uniform) matrix product states. Due to the parameter redundancy in the matrix product state representation, matrix product states have the mathematical structure of a (principal) fiber bundle. The total space or bundle space corresponds to the parameter space, i.e., the space of tensors associated to every physical site. The base manifold is embedded in Hilbert space and can be given the structure of a Kähler manifold by inducing the Hilbert space metric. Our main interest is in the states living in the tangent space to the base manifold, which have recently been shown to be interesting in relation to time dependence and elementary excitations. By lifting these tangent vectors to the (tangent space) of the bundle space using a well-chosen prescription (a principal bundle connection), we can define and efficiently compute an inverse metric, and introduce differential geometric concepts such as parallel transport (related to the Levi-Civita connection) and the Riemann curvature tensor.

Haegeman, Jutho, E-mail: jutho.haegeman@gmail.com; Verstraete, Frank [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria) [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Mariën, Michaël [Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Osborne, Tobias J. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany) [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Leibniz Universität Hannover, Riemann Center for Geometry and Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

William Kirby Goertzen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - accurate low-rank matrix Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

low-rank matrix Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accurate low-rank matrix Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Robust PCA Based Extended...

409

The Effect Of Viscoelastic Surfactants Used In Carbonate Matrix Acidizing On Wettability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonate reservoirs are heterogeneous; therefore, proper acid placement/diversion is required to make matrix acid treatments effective. Viscoelastic surfactants (VES) are used as diverting agents in carbonate matrix acidizing. However...

Adejare, Oladapo

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

ON THE USE OF DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION TO ANALYZE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BRITTLE MATRIX COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a ceramic-based braze that can be used to joint ceramics of ceramic-matrix composites. Different strategiesON THE USE OF DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION TO ANALYZE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BRITTLE MATRIX

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

411

Modeling of surface oxidation and oxidation induced damage in metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface oxidation in metal matrix composites (MMC's) is modeled by Fickian diffusion of oxygen in both the oxide layer and metal matrix. The oxidation process and the resulting immobilized oxygen at the interface is accounted for by the introduction...

Ma, Xinzheng

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Influence of embedded-carbon nanotubes on the thermal properties of copper matrix nanocomposites processed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-level mix- ing, exhibits CNTs homogeneously dispersed in the Cu matrix. Measured thermal conductivity: Metal matrix composites; Nanocomposite; Carbon and graphite; Thermal conductivity Carbon nanotubes (CNTs management applications, due to their extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expan- sion (CTE) [1

Hong, Soon Hyung

413

Using the PDSF Batch System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates byUser GuideHadoopUsingon-packageUsing

414

Supporting Multiple Workloads, Batch Systems,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium OxideSuminDepositionSupplierSupporting Multiple

415

Submitting Batch Jobs on Carver  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (Newport NewsStyle GuideResearchTodd

416

Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout »Lab (Newport NewsStyle GuideResearchToddSubmitting

417

Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

High-throughput indentational elasticity measurements of hydrogel extracellular matrix substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their surroundings, including the extracellular matrix ECM and the solid-state biopolymeric scaffold to which cells

Kumar, Sanjay

419

Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Optical microstructure and viscosity enhancement for an epoxy resin matrix containing multiwall carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical microstructure and viscosity enhancement for an epoxy resin matrix containing multiwall of multiwall carbon nanotubes MWCNTs suspended in an epoxy resin matrix. The base epoxy resin was found;pended in an essentially Newtonian epoxy matrix. The particular carbon nanotubes con- sidered

Elliott, James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CONTEST: A Controllable Test Matrix Toolbox Alan Taylor and Desmond J. Higham  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTEST: A Controllable Test Matrix Toolbox for MATLAB Alan Taylor and Desmond J. Higham June 20 a number of disciplines, giving rise to many challenging matrix computational tasks. Several random graph, preferential attachment, random graph, rewiring, sparse matrix, small-world. 1 Motivation Networks describing

Mottram, Nigel

422

BALLISTIC PROPERTIES OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES AND CERAMIC PLATES USED IN ARMOR DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BALLISTIC PROPERTIES OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES AND CERAMIC PLATES USED IN ARMOR DESIGN Mehmet from polymer matrix composites due to lightweight and good ballistic properties. The requirement for protection especially for polymer matrix composites because total back-side deformation (elastic and plastic

Soykasap, Omer

423

Effects of Matrix Cracks on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Matrix Cracks on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composite of Engineering Science, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9, Canada Effects of matrix cracks conductances coupled with a unit cell model for a fiber composite containing a periodic array of matrix cracks

Zok, Frank

424

Zirconia matrix composite dispersed with stainless steel particles: processing and oxidation behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

components in severe atmospheres at high temperature. These composites called M(p)-CMC(s) : "ceramic matrix inside the zirconia matrix. 2. Experimental procedure 2.1 Basic materials The starting ceramic powderZirconia matrix composite dispersed with stainless steel particles: processing and oxidation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

425

ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES H.K. Jung* , Y; Metal matrix composite; Elastic constants; Aspect ratio; Anisotropy 1. Introduction Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are becoming attractive materials for advanced aerospace structures because

Hong, Soon Hyung

426

Minkovskii-type inequality for arbitrary density matrix of composite and noncomposite systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New kind of matrix inequality known for bipartite system density matrix is obtained for arbitrary density matrix of composite or noncomposite qudit systems including the single qudit state. The examples of two qubit system and qudit with j=3/2 are discussed.

V. N. Chernega; O. V. Manko; V. I. Manko

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

427

Methodologies for the thermomechanical characterization of continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites: A review of test methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Requirements for thermomechanical characterization of ceramic matrix composite materials are reviewed. Feasibility of adapting existent room temperature test methods for polymer and metal matrix composites to test ceramic matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures is investigated.

Lara-Curzio, E.; Ferber, M.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Jenkins, M.G. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

High-Energy analysis and Levinson's theorem for the selfadjoint matrix Schroedinger operator on the half line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable, the high-energy asymptotics are established for the related Jost matrix, the inverse of the Jost matrix, and the scattering matrix. Under the additional assumption that the matrix potential has a first moment, Levinson's theorem is derived, relating the number of bound states to the change in the argument of the determinant of the scattering matrix.

Tuncay Aktosun; Ricardo Weder

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

Matrix effects in inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inductively coupled plasma is an electrodeless discharge in a gas (usually Ar) at atmospheric pressure. Radio frequency energy generated by a RF power source is inductively coupled to the plasma gas through a water cooled load coil. In ICP-MS the {open_quotes}Fassel{close_quotes} TAX quartz torch commonly used in emission is mounted horizontally. The sample aerosol is introduced into the central flow, where the gas kinetic temperature is about 5000 K. The aerosol is vaporized, atomized, excited and ionized in the plasma, and the ions are subsequently extracted through two metal apertures (sampler and skimmer) into the mass spectrometer. In ICP-MS, the matrix effects, or non-spectroscopic interferences, can be defined as the type of interferences caused by dissolved concomitant salt ions in the solution. Matrix effects can be divided into two categories: (1) signal drift due to the deposition of solids on the sampling apertures; and/or (2) signal suppression or enhancement by the presence of the dissolved salts. The first category is now reasonably understood. The dissolved salts, especially refractory oxides, tend to deposit on the cool tip of the sampling cone. The clogging of the orifices reduces the ion flow into the ICP-MS, lowers the pressure in the first stage of ICP-MS, and enhances the level of metal oxide ions. Because the extent of the clogging increases with the time, the signal drifts down. Even at the very early stage of the development of ICP-MS, matrix effects had been observed. Houk et al. found out that the ICP-MS was not tolerant to solutions containing significant amounts of dissolved solids.

Chen, Xiaoshan

1995-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

430

Investigations into ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix-assisted laser desorption (MALD) is a technique for converting large biomolecules into gas phase ions. Some characteristics of the commonly used uv matrices are determined. Solubilities in methanol range from 0.1 to 0.5 M. Solid phase absorption spectra are found to be similar to solution, but slightly red-shifted. Acoustic and quartz crystal microbalance signals are investigated as possible means of uv-MALD quantitation. Evidence for the existence of desorption thresholds is presented. Threshold values are determined to be in the range of 2 to 3 MW/cm{sup 2}. A transient imaging technique based on laser-excited fluorescence for monitoring MALD plumes is described. Sensitivity is well within the levels required for studying matrix-assisted laser desorption, where analyte concentrations are significantly lower than those in conventional laser desorption. Results showing the effect of film morphology, particularly film thickness, on plume dynamics are presented. In particular, MALD plumes from thicker films tend to exhibit higher axial velocities. Fluorescent labeling of protein and of DNA is used to allow imaging of their uv-MALD generated plumes. Integrated concentrations are available with respect to time, making it possible to assess the rate of fragmentation. The spatial and temporal distributions are important for the design of secondary ionization schemes to enhance ion yields and for the optimization of ion collection in time-of-flight MS instruments to maximize resolution. Such information could also provide insight into whether ionization is closely associated with the desorption step or whether it is a result of subsequent collisions with the matrix gas (e.g., proton transfer). Although the present study involves plumes in a normal atmosphere, adaptation to measurements in vacuum (e.g., inside a mass spectrometer) should be straightforward.

Heise, T.W.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Vector norms, convex bodies and subordinate matrix norms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hajor Subject: lla!hematrcs VECTOR NORMS, CONVEX BODIES AND SUBORDINATE MATRIX NORMS O i C Z A Thesis by Joe Harvey Dean IZI O C m m C+) 0 g 0 Approved as to style and content by: ( a rman o Committee) / (. (Head of Department) (Member...) (Member) (Memb er) (M er) (Member) May 1971 P BS. I'RACT Vector IIorms, Convex Bodies and Subordinate IIatrix Norms. (Hay 1971) Joe H. Dean, B. A. , Texas AVI University; Directed by: Dr. H. A. Luther It is often convenient to have a measure...

Dean, Joe Harvey

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Scattering matrix for a general gl(2) spin chain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the general L_0-regular gl(2) spin chain, i.e. a chain where the sites {i,i+L_0,i+2L_0,...} carry the same arbitrary representation (spin) of gl(2). The basic example of such chain is obtained for L_0=2, where we recover the alternating spin chain. Firstly, we review different known results about their integrability and their spectrum. Secondly, we give an interpretation in terms of particles and conjecture the scattering matrix between them.

S. Belliard; N. Crampe; E. Ragoucy

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

A Bell pair in a generic random matrix environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two non-interacting qubits are coupled to an environment. Both coupling and environment are represented by random matrix ensembles. The initial state of the pair is a Bell state, though we also consider arbitrary pure states. Decoherence of the pair is evaluated analytically in terms of purity; Monte Carlo calculations confirm these results and also yield the concurrence of the pair. Entanglement within the pair accelerates decoherence. Numerics display the relation between concurrence and purity known for Werner states, allowing us to give a formula for concurrence decay.

Carlos Pineda; Thomas H. Seligman

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the evolutionary relationship with respect to either time or the number of loa, d cycles. The damage histories f' or cross-ply laminates subjected to constant maximum stress fatigue were generated by the dart. age evolutionary relationship. These predictions... with respect to the measured damage state. . 5 Structure of FORTRAN code for the integration of the damage evolution- ary rela. tionship. 6 Matrix ' rack damage variable in the 90' plies for a. [Os/90s], AS4/3501 ? 6 laminate loaded at a maximum fatigue...

Lo, David Chi Shing

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Tutorial Note on Merging Matrix Elements with Parton Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this short note, I introduce to essential conceptual features and main building blocks of matrix element merging algorithms, operating on fixed order calculations both at leading order and next-to-leading order. The intention is purely pedagogical, i.e. to familiarize the reader with the essential basic concepts in a concise way, thus serving as an introduction to beginners and other interested readers. Unitarization is discussed briefly. The tutorial is highly biased towards transverse momentum ordered parton showers, and in particular towards merging schemes as they are implemented in the Pythia8 general purpose Monte Carlo generator.

Rössler, Thomas

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

The nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of calculation of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) nuclear matrix elements (NME's) is reviewed. The spread of published values of NME's is discussed. The main attention is paid to the recent progress achieved in the evaluation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA). The obtained results are compared with those of the nuclear shell model. The problem of reliable determination of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's is addressed. The uncertainty in NME's are analyzed and further progress in calculation of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay NME's is outlined.

Simkovic, Fedor [Department of Nuclear Physics and Biophysics, Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia)

2007-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

437

Efficient double beta decay nuclear matrix elements computations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a shell model code for the accurate computation of the two-body matrix elements of the transition operators involved in the neutrinoless double beta decay. This code features coupled cluster method short-range correlations with Jastrow-like functions, finite nucleon size effect and higher order nucleon current corrections. We present the results obtained for {sup 48}Ca and {sup 82}Se, then we compare them with other results in the literature. In the case of {sup 48}Ca, we also study the contributions of the included effects and find good agreement with other published results.

Neacsu, Andrei [Horia Hulubei Foundation (FHH) 407 Atomistilor, Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) 30 Reactorului, Magurele-Bucharest 077125 (Romania)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

438

Neutrinoless double beta decay and nuclear matrix elements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fundamental importance of searching for neutrinoless double-beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay) is widely recognized. Observation of the decay would tell us that the total lepton number is not conserved and that, consequently, neutrinos are massive Majorana fermions. The 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay is discussed in context of neutrino oscillation data. The perspectives of the experimental 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay searches are analyzed. The importance of reliable determination of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements is pointed out.

Simkovic, Fedor [BLTP, JINR Dubna, 141980 Dubna, Moscow region (Russian Federation); Comenius University, Mlynska dolina, Bratislava (Slovakia)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

439

Calculation of nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double electron capture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double electron capture on $^{152}$Gd, $^{164}$Er and $^{180}$W nuclei. Recent precise mass measurements for these nuclei have shown a large resonance enhancement factor that makes them the most promising candidates for observing this decay mode. We use an advanced energy density functional method which includes beyond mean-field effects such as symmetry restoration and shape mixing. Our calculations reproduce experimental charge radii and $B(E2)$ values predicting a large deformation for all these nuclei. This fact reduces significantly the values of the NMEs leading to half-lives larger than $10^{29}$ years for the three candidates.

Tomas R. Rodriguez; Gabriel Martinez-Pinedo

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

440

MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (1) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology using high-resolution x-ray microtomography, (2) modeling of fracture permeability in the presence of asperities and confining stress, and (3) simulation of two-phase fluid flow in a fracture and a layered matrix. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. The distribution of fracture aperture is a difficult issue that we are studying and developing methods of quantification. The difficulties are both numerical and conceptual. Numerically, the three-dimensional data sets include millions, and sometimes, billions of points, and pose a computational challenge. The conceptual difficulties derive from the rough nature of the fracture surfaces, and the heterogeneous nature of the rock matrix. However, the high-resolution obtained by the imaging system provides us a much needed measuring environment on rock samples that are subjected to simultaneous fluid flow and confining stress. Pilot multi-phase experiments have been performed, proving the ability to detect two phases in certain large fractures. The absolute permeability of a fracture depends on the behavior of the asperities that keep it open. A model is being developed that predicts the permeability and average aperture of a fracture as a function of time under steady flow of water including the pressure solution at the asperity contact points. Several two-phase flow experiments in the presence of a fracture tip were performed in the past. At the present time, we are developing an inverse process using a simulation model to understand the fluid flow patterns in the presence of a fracture, and the interactions between fluid flow in the fracture and the adjacent matrix. Preliminary results demonstrate that the flow patterns are significantly impacted by the presence of the fracture. Bypassing is quantified and we expect to be able to extract from the modeling the distribution of properties in the fracture and the adjacent matrix.

A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; H. Yasuhara; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn

2002-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Thermodynamics of protein folding: a random matrix formulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of protein folding from an unfolded state to a biologically active, folded conformation is governed by many parameters e.g the sequence of amino acids, intermolecular interactions, the solvent, temperature and chaperon molecules. Our study, based on random matrix modeling of the interactions, shows however that the evolution of the statistical measures e.g Gibbs free energy, heat capacity, entropy is single parametric. The information can explain the selection of specific folding pathways from an infinite number of possible ways as well as other folding characteristics observed in computer simulation studies.

Pragya Shukla

2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

442

Matrix Agro Pvt Ltd MAPL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429Lacey,(MonasterLowellis a townLoadingMastic, New York:Matla Solar EnergyMatrix

443

On the Hartree-Fock dynamics in wave-matrix picture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce the Hamiltonian dynamics with the Hartree-Fock energy in new {\\it wave-matrix} picture. Roughly speaking, the wave matrix is defined as the square root of the density matrix. The corresponding Hamiltonian equations are equivalent to an operator anticommutation equation. This wave-matrix picture essentially agrees with the density matrix formalism. Its main advantage is that it is Hamiltonian and allows an extension to infinite particle systems like crystals. Our main result is the existence of the global "reduced" wave-matrix dynamics for finite-particle molecular systems, and the energy and charge conservation laws. For the proof we extend known techniques, based on Hardy's and Sobolev's inequalitites, to the wave-matrix picture.

Alexander Komech

2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

444

Accelerating the Execution of Matrix Languages on the Cell Broadband Engine Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Matrix languages, including MATLAB and Octave, are established standards for applications in science and engineering. They provide interactive programming environments that are easy to use due to their script languages with matrix data types. Current implementations of matrix languages do not fully utilize high-performance, special-purpose chip architectures such as the IBM PowerXCell processor (Cell), which is currently used in the fastest computer in the world. We present a new framework that extends Octave to harvest the computational power of the Cell. With this framework the programmer is alleviated of the burden of introducing explicit notions of parallelism. Instead the programmer uses a new matrix data-type to execute matrix operations in parallel on the synergistic processing elements (SPEs) of the Cell. We employ lazy evaluation semantics for our new matrix data-type to obtain execution traces of matrix operations. Traces are converted to data dependence graphs; operations in the data dependence gra...

Khoury, Raymes; Scholz, Bernhard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

SU-E-I-02: A Framework to Perform Batch Simulations of Computational Voxel Phantoms to Study Organ Doses in Computed Tomography Using a Commercial Monte Carlo Software Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: ImpactMC (CT Imaging, Erlangen, Germany) is a Monte Carlo (MC) software package that offers a GPU enabled, user definable and validated method for 3D dose distribution calculations for radiography and Computed Tomography (CT). ImpactMC, in and of itself, offers limited capabilities to perform batch simulations. The aim of this work was to develop a framework for the batch simulation of absorbed organ dose distributions from CT scans of computational voxel phantoms. Methods: The ICRP 110 adult Reference Male and Reference Female computational voxel phantoms were formatted into compatible input volumes for MC simulations. A Matlab (The MathWorks Inc., Natick, MA) script was written to loop through a user defined set of simulation parameters and 1) generate input files required for the simulation, 2) start the MC simulation, 3) segment the absorbed dose for organs in the simulated dose volume and 4) transfer the organ doses to a database. A demonstration of the framework is made where the glandular breast dose to the adult Reference Female phantom, for a typical Chest CT examination, is investigated. Results: A batch of 48 contiguous simulations was performed with variations in the total collimation and spiral pitch. The demonstration of the framework showed that the glandular dose to the right and left breast will vary depending on the start angle of rotation, total collimation and spiral pitch. Conclusion: The developed framework provides a robust and efficient approach to performing a large number of user defined MC simulations with computational voxel phantoms in CT (minimal user interaction). The resulting organ doses from each simulation can be accessed through a database which greatly increases the ease of analyzing the resulting organ doses. The framework developed in this work provides a valuable resource when investigating different dose optimization strategies in CT.

Bujila, R; Nowik, P; Poludniowski, G [Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden)

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Evolution of project planning tools in a matrix organization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until recently, the Corporate Construction Program at Sandia was experiencing difficulties in managing projects: poor planning and cost estimating caused schedule and budget problems. The first step taken was a Microsoft {reg_sign} Project schedule that provides a standard template for scheduling individual construction projects. It is broken down according to the life cycle of the project and prevents the project team from leaving out an important item. A WBS (work breakdown structure) dictionary was also developed that describes how capital and operating funds are used to develop, design, construct, equip, and manage projects. We also developed a matrix chart that maps the planning guide against the major types of construction projects at Sandia. The guide, dictionary, and matrix chart offer enough flexibility that the project manager can make choices about how to structure work, yet ensure that all work rolls up to the cost categories and key DOE WBS elements. As requirements change, the tools can be updated; they also serve as training tools for new project team members.

Furaus, J.P.; Figueroa-McInteer, C.; McKeever, P.S.; Wisler, D.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Zavadil, J.T. [Infomatrix (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

RNA matrix models with external interactions and their asymptotic behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study a matrix model of RNA in which an external perturbation on n nucleotides is introduced in the action of the partition function of the polymer chain. The effect of the perturbation appears in the exponential generating function of the partition function as a factor exp(1-n{alpha}/L) (where {alpha} is the ratio of strengths of the original to the perturbed term and L is the length of the chain). The asymptotic behavior of the genus distribution functions as a function of length for the matrix model with interaction is analyzed numerically for all n{<=}L. It is found that as n{alpha}/L is increased from 0 to 1, the term 3{sup L} in the number of diagrams a{sub L,g,{alpha}}{sup '} at a fixed length L, genus g and {alpha}, goes to 2{sup L}[(3-(n{alpha}/L)){sup L} for any n{alpha}/L] and the total number of diagrams N{sub {alpha}}{sup '} at a fixed length L and {alpha} but independent of genus g, undergoes a change in the factor exp({radical}(L)) to 1 (exp[(1-n{alpha}/L){radical}(L)] for any n{alpha}/L). However the exponent L of the dominant length dependent term in a{sub L,g,{alpha}}{sup '} stays unchanged. Hence the universality is robust to changes in the interaction ({alpha}). The distribution functions also exhibit unusual behavior at small lengths.

Garg, I.; Deo, N. [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel neutronics performance in PWRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Metal Matrix Microencapsulated (M3) fuel consists of TRISO or BISO coated fuel particles directly dispersed in a matrix of zirconium metal to form a solid rod (Fig. 1). In this integral fuel concept the cladding tube and the failure mechanisms associated with it have been eliminated. In this manner pellet-clad-interactions (PCI), thin tube failure due to oxidation and hydriding, and tube pressurization and burst will be absent. M3 fuel, given the high stiffness of the integral rod design, could as well improve grid-to-rod wear behavior. Overall M3 fuel, compared to existing fuel designs, is expected to provide greatly improved operational performance. Multiple barriers to fission product release (ceramic coating layers in the coated fuel particle and te metal matrix) and the high thermal conductivity zirconium alloy metal matrix contribute to the enhancement in fuel behavior. The discontinuous nature of fissile material encapsulated in coated particles provides additional assistance; for instance if the M3 fuel rod is snapped into multiple pieces, only the limited number of fuel particles at the failure cross section are susceptible to release fission products. This is in contrast to the conventional oxide fuel where the presence of a small opening in the cladding provides the pathway for release of the entire inventory of fission products from the fuel rod. While conventional metal fuels (e.g. U-Zr and U-Mo) are typically expected to experience large swelling under irradiation due to the high degree of damage from fission fragments and introduction of fission gas into the lattice, this is not the case for M3 fuels. The fissile portion of the fuel is contained within the coated particle where enough room is available to accommodate fission gases and kernel swelling. The zirconium metal matrix will not be exposed to fission products and its swelling is known to be very limited when exposed solely to neutrons. Under design basis RIA and LOCA, fuel performance will be superior to the conventional oxide fuel since PCMI and rod burst, respectively, have been mitigated. Under beyond design basis accident scenarios where the fuel is exposed to high temperature steam for prolonged periods, larger inventory of zirconium metal in the core could negatively affect the accident progression. A thin steam resistant layer (e.g. alumina forming alloy steel), integrated into the solid rod during fabrication by co-extrusion or hot-isostatic-pressing, offers the potential to provide additional fuel protection from steam interaction: blanketing under a range of boiling regimes and under severe accident conditions up to high temperatures well beyond what is currently possible in the conventional fuel. A crucial aspect to the viability of M3 fuel in light water reactors is the reduced heavy metal load compared to standard pellet fuel. This study evaluated the design requirements to operate a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) with M3 fuel in order to obtain fuel cycle length, reactivity coefficients, and power peaking factors comparable to that of standard fuel.

Fratoni, Massimiliano [Pennsylvania State University] [Pennsylvania State University; Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

DATA SUMMARY REPORT SMALL SCALE MELTER TESTING OF HLW ALGORITHM GLASSES MATRIX1 TESTS VSL-07S1220-1 REV 0 7/25/07  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eight tests using different HLW feeds were conducted on the DM100-BL to determine the effect of variations in glass properties and feed composition on processing rates and melter conditions (off-gas characteristics, glass processing, foaming, cold cap, etc.) at constant bubbling rate. In over seven hundred hours of testing, the property extremes of glass viscosity, electrical conductivity, and T{sub 1%}, as well as minimum and maximum concentrations of several major and minor glass components were evaluated using glass compositions that have been tested previously at the crucible scale. Other parameters evaluated with respect to glass processing properties were +/-15% batching errors in the addition of glass forming chemicals (GFCs) to the feed, and variation in the sources of boron and sodium used in the GFCs. Tests evaluating batching errors and GFC source employed variations on the HLW98-86 formulation (a glass composition formulated for HLW C-106/AY-102 waste and processed in several previous melter tests) in order to best isolate the effect of each test variable. These tests are outlined in a Test Plan that was prepared in response to the Test Specification for this work. The present report provides summary level data for all of the tests in the first test matrix (Matrix 1) in the Test Plan. Summary results from the remaining tests, investigating minimum and maximum concentrations of major and minor glass components employing variations on the HLW98-86 formulation and glasses generated by the HLW glass formulation algorithm, will be reported separately after those tests are completed. The test data summarized herein include glass production rates, the type and amount of feed used, a variety of measured melter parameters including temperatures and electrode power, feed sample analysis, measured glass properties, and gaseous emissions rates. More detailed information and analysis from the melter tests with complete emission chemistry, glass durability, and melter operating details will be provided in the final report. A summary of the tests that were conducted is provided in Table 1. Each of the seven tests was of nominally one hundred hours in duration. Test B was conducted in two equal segments: the first with nominal additives, and the second with the replacement of borax with a mixture of boric acid and soda ash to determine the effect of alternative OPC sources on production rates and processing characteristics. Interestingly, sugar additions were required near mid points of Tests W and Z to reduce excessive foaming that severely limited feed processing rates. The sugar additions were very effective in recovering manageable processing conditions, albeit over the relatively short remainder of the test duration. Tests W and Z employed the highest melt viscosities but not by a particularly wide margin. Other tests, which did not exhibit such foaming Issues, employed higher concentrations of manganese or iron or both. These results highlight the need for the development of protocols for the a priori determination of which HLW feeds will require sugar additions and the appropriate amounts of sugar to be added in order to control foaming (and maintain throughput) without over-reduction of the melt (which could lead to molten metal formation). In total, over 8,800 kg of feed was processed to produce over 3200 kg of glass. Steady-state processing rates were achieved, and no secondary sulfate phases were observed during any of the tests. Analysis was performed on samples of the glass product taken throughout the tests to verify composition and properties. Sampling and analysis was also performed on melter exhaust to determine the effect of the feed and glass changes on melter emissions.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

450

A Matrix Model for QCD: QCD Colour is Mixed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use general arguments to show that coloured QCD states when restricted to gauge invariant local observables are mixed. This result has important implications for confinement: a pure colourless state can never evolve into two coloured states by unitary evolution. Furthermore, the mean energy in such a mixed coloured state is infinite. Our arguments are confirmed in a matrix model for QCD that we have developed using the work of Narasimhan and Ramadas and Singer. This model, a $(0+1)$-dimensional quantum mechanical model for gluons free of divergences and capturing important topological aspects of QCD, is adapted to analytical and numerical work. It is also suitable to work on large $N$ QCD. As applications, we show that the gluon spectrum is gapped and also estimate some low-lying levels for $N=2$ and 3 (colors). Incidentally the considerations here are generic and apply to any non-abelian gauge theory.

A. P. Balachandran; Amilcar de Queiroz; Sachindeo Vaidya

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Electrolyte matrix in a molten carbonate fuel cell stack  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fuel cell stack is disclosed with modified electrolyte matrices for limiting the electrolytic pumping and electrolyte migration along the stack external surfaces. Each of the matrices includes marginal portions at the stack face of substantially greater pore size than that of the central body of the matrix. Consequently, these marginal portions have insufficient electrolyte fill to support pumping or wicking of electrolyte from the center of the stack of the face surfaces in contact with the vertical seals. Various configurations of the marginal portions include a complete perimeter, opposite edge portions corresponding to the air plenums and tab size portions corresponding to the manifold seal locations. These margins will substantially limit the migration of electrolyte to and along the porous manifold seals during operation of the electrochemical cell stack. 6 figs.

Reiser, C.A.; Maricle, D.L.

1987-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

OMC studies for the matrix elements in ?? decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy and time spectra of gamma-rays following ?-capture in natural Kr, Se, Cd and Sm, as well as isotopic enriched {sup 82}Kr, {sup 76}Se, {sup 106}Cd and {sup 150}Sm, have been measured. Total life-times of muons in different isotopes, as well as partial ?-capture rates to the excited states of {sup 48}Sc, {sup 76}As and {sup 106}Ag, were extracted. These results are discussed in the context of the double-beta decay matrix elements. The data are also compared with data from theoretical calculations and with data from charge-exchange reactions on {sup 48}Ti. It is the first time that ?-capture and charge-exchange reaction data are being compared in the context of ?? decay.

Zinatulina, D.; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Shirchenko, M.; Vasiliev, R.; Yyutlandov, I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Briançon, Ch. [Centre de Spectrometrie Nucleaire et de Spectrometrie de Masse, Universite Paris-Sud-CNRS-IN2P3, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Matrix model approach to minimal Liouville gravity revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using the connection with the Frobenius manifold structure, we study the matrix model description of minimal Liouville gravity (MLG) based on the Douglas string equation. Our goal is to find an exact discrete formulation of the (q,p) MLG model that intrinsically contains information about the conformal selection rules. We discuss how to modify the Frobenius manifold structure appropriately for this purposes. We propose a modification of the construction for Lee-Yang series involving the $A_{p-1}$ algebra instead of the previously used $A_1$ algebra. With the new prescription, we calculate correlators on the sphere up to four points and find full agreement with the continuous approach without using resonance transformations.

Belavin, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Oxidation resistant coatings for ceramic matrix composite components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion resistant Ca{sub 0.6}Mg{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CMZP) and Ca{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Zr{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6} (CS-50) coatings for fiber-reinforced SiC-matrix composite heat exchanger tubes have been developed. Aqueous slurries of both oxides were prepared with high solids loading. One coating process consisted of dipping the samples in a slip. A tape casting process has also been created that produced relatively thin and dense coatings covering a large area. A processing technique was developed, utilizing a pre-sintering step, which produced coatings with minimal cracking.

Vaubert, V.M.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hirschfeld, D.A. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Krylov subspace iteration for eigenvalue response matrix calculations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent work has revisited the eigenvalue response matrix method as an approach for reactor core analyses. In its most straightforward form, the method consists of a two-level Eigen problem. An outer Picard iteration updates the k-eigenvalue, while the inner Eigen problem imposes current continuity between coarse meshes. In this paper, several Eigen solvers are evaluated for this inner problem, using several 2-D diffusion benchmarks as test cases. The results indicate both the explicitly-restarted Arnoldi and the Krylov-Schur methods are up to an order of magnitude more efficient than power iteration. This increased efficiency makes the nested eigenvalue formulation more effective than the ILU-preconditioned Newton-Krylov formulation previously studied. (authors)

Roberts, J. A.; Forget, B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02141 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Membrane Fuzzy Sphere Dynamics in Plane-Wave Matrix Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In plane-wave matrix model, the membrane fuzzy sphere extended in the SO(3) symmetric space is allowed to have periodic motion on a sub-plane in the SO(6) symmetric space. We consider a background configuration composed of two such fuzzy spheres moving on the same sub-plane and the one-loop quantum corrections to it. The one-loop effective action describing the fuzzy sphere interaction is computed up to the sub-leading order in the limit that the mean distance $r$ between two fuzzy spheres is very large. We show that the leading order interaction is of the 1/r^7 type and thus the membrane fuzzy spheres interpreted as giant gravitons really behave as gravitons.

Hyeonjoon Shin; Kentaroh Yoshida

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

Polymer matrix composites research: A survey of federally sponsored programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report identifies research conducted by agencies of the federal government other than the Department of Energy (DOE) in the area of advanced polymer matrix composites (PMCs). DOE commissioned the report to avoid duplicating other agencies' efforts in planning its own research program for PMCs. PMC materials consist of high-strength, short or continuous fibers fused together by an organic matrix. Compared to traditional structural metals, PMCs provide greater strength and stiffness, reduced weight and increased heat resistance. The key contributors to PMC research identified by the survey are the Department of Defense (DOD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and the Department of Transportation (DOT). The survey identified a total of 778 projects. More than half of the total projects identified emphasize materials research with a goal toward developing materials with improved performance. Although an almost equal number of identified materials projects focus on thermosets and thermoplastics receive more attention because of their increased impact resistance and their easy formability and re-formability. Slightly more than one third of projects identified target structures research. Only 15 percent of the projects identified focus on manufacturing techniques, despite the need for efficient, economical methods manufacturing products constructed of PMCs--techniques required for PMCs to gain widespread acceptance. Three issues to be addressed concerning PMCs research are economy of use, improvements in processing, and education and training. Five target technologies have been identified that could benefit greatly from increased use of PMCs: aircraft fuselages, automobile frames, high-speed machinery, electronic packaging, and construction.

Not Available

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of in-service degradation. Examples include composite density, distribution of porosity, fiber-matrix bond character, uniformity of weave, physical damage, and joint quality at interface bonds.

Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Scalar products in models with GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix. Determinant representation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study quantum integrable models with the GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. We derive a determinant representation for a special case of scalar products of Bethe vectors. This representation allows one to find a determinant formula for form factor of one of the monodromy matrix entries. We also point out essential difference between form factors in the models with the Gl(3) trigonometric R-matrix and their analogs in GL(3)-invariant models.

N. A. Slavnov

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

460

Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

Horoi, Mihai [Department of Physics, Central Michigan University, Mount Pleasant, Michigan, 48859 (United States)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Basic MATLAB Programming MATLAB is a matrix-based language. Since operations may be  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHAPTER 11 Basic MATLAB Programming MATLAB is a matrix-based language. Since operations may(x,cos(x)) hold plot(x,sin(x)). (2) Plot the graph of exp(x) for x [-5, 10]. 3. Basic vector and matrix operations An n-dimensional vector u in MATLAB is a 1 Ã? n matrix, whose entries can be accessed by typing u

Lega, Joceline

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving covariance matrix Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Engineering 7 WEAK SIGNAL DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY USING SPARSE MATRIX TRANSFORM (SMT) COVARIANCE ESTIMATION Summary: WEAK SIGNAL DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY...

463

axial-vector matrix elements: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

creation model. Eef van Beveren 2006-02-28 47 Nuclear matrix elements in neutrinoless double beta decay: beyond mean-field covariant density functional theory Nuclear Experiment...

464

Process for stabilization of titanium silicide particulates within titanium aluminide containing metal matrix composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for forming a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles within a titanium aluminide containing matrix. It comprises: contacting titanium, silicon and aluminum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a reaction between the titanium and silicon to thereby form a first composite comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within an aluminum matrix; admixing the first composite with titanium and zirconium to form a mixture; heating the mixture to a temperature sufficient to convert at least a portion of the aluminum matrix to titanium aluminide; and recovering a final composite material comprising titanium silicide particles dispersed within a titanium aluminide containing matrix.

Christodoulou, L.; Williams, J.C.; Riley, M.A.

1990-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

465

E-Print Network 3.0 - acrolein activates matrix Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acrolein activates matrix Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Acrolein induces oxidative stress in...

466

Exact Low-rank Matrix Recovery via Nonconvex Mp-Minimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Apr 21, 2011 ... Abstract: The low-rank matrix recovery (LMR) arises in many fields such as signal and image processing, statistics, computer vision, system ...

Lingchen Kong

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

467

acid-soluble organic matrix: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

California at Berkeley, University of 16 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

468

New Family of Multilevel Matrix Converters for Wind Power Applications: Final Report, July 2002 - March 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a new modular multilevel matrix converter for wind power applications and to demonstrate a working scale model in the laboratory.

Erickson, R.; Angkititrakul, S.; Almazeedi, K.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Exact Low-rank Matrix Recovery via Nonconvex Mp-Minimization 1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear norm minimization. In this paper, we consider the nonconvex relaxations by introducing Mp-norm (0 matrix and establish RIP conditions for ...

2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

470

EFFECTS OF TOUGHENED MATRIX RESINS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF TOUGHENED MATRIX RESINS ON COMPOSITE MATERIALS FOR WIND TURBINE BLADES by Ricardo Orozco turbine energy project. #12;v TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES

471

E-Print Network 3.0 - acid induces matrix Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

For oil wells, the improvement... -conditioning of the damaged oil-bearing sand on permeability improvement by matrix acidizing. Experiments were conducted... displacement of the...

472

Optimization of Sparse Matrix-Vector Multiplication on Emerging Multicore Platforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Yelick, and J. Demmel. Optimization of Sparse Matrix-Vectorand R. Vuduc. Sparsity: Optimization framework for sparseYelick. Memory hierarchy optimizations and bounds for sparse

Williams, Samuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Fast Dynamics of Ionization in Ultraviolet Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization of Biomolecules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Biomolecules Eugene Moskovets and Akos Vertes* Department of Chemistry, The George Washington Uni. As long as the matrix surface temperature exceeds the sublimation temperature, there is sufficient

Vertes, Akos

474

Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions And Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Matrix diffusion and adsorption within a rock matrix are widely regarded as important mechanisms for retarding the transport of radionuclides and other solutes in fractured rock (e.g., Neretnieks, 1980; Tang et al., 1981; Maloszewski and Zuber, 1985; Novakowski and Lapcevic, 1994; Jardine et al., 1999; Zhou and Xie, 2003; Reimus et al., 2003a,b). When remediation options are being evaluated for old sources of contamination, where a large fraction of contaminants reside within the rock matrix, slow diffusion out of the matrix greatly increases the difficulty and timeframe of remediation. Estimating the rates of solute exchange between fractures and the adjacent rock matrix is a critical factor in quantifying immobilization and/or remobilization of DOE-relevant contaminants within the subsurface. In principle, the most rigorous approach to modeling solute transport with fracture-matrix interaction would be based on local-scale coupled advection-diffusion/dispersion equations for the rock matrix and in discrete fractures that comprise the fracture network (Discrete Fracture Network and Matrix approach, hereinafter referred to as DFNM approach), fully resolving aperture variability in fractures and matrix property heterogeneity. However, such approaches are computationally demanding, and thus, many predictive models rely upon simplified models. These models typically idealize fracture rock masses as a single fracture or system of parallel fractures interacting with slabs of porous matrix or as a mobile-immobile or multi-rate mass transfer system. These idealizations provide tractable approaches for interpreting tracer tests and predicting contaminant mobility, but rely upon a fitted effective matrix diffusivity or mass-transfer coefficients. However, because these fitted parameters are based upon simplified conceptual models, their effectiveness at predicting long-term transport processes remains uncertain. Evidence of scale dependence of effective matrix diffusion coefficients obtained from tracer tests highlights this point and suggests that the underlying mechanisms and relationship between rock and fracture properties are not fully understood in large complex fracture networks. In this project, we developed a high-resolution DFN model of solute transport in fracture networks to explore and quantify the mechanisms that control transport in complex fracture networks and how these may give rise to observed scale-dependent matrix diffusion coefficients. Results demonstrate that small scale heterogeneity in the flow field caused by local aperture variability within individual fractures can lead to long-tailed breakthrough curves indicative of matrix diffusion, even in the absence of interactions with the fracture matrix. Furthermore, the temporal and spatial scale dependence of these processes highlights the inability of short-term tracer tests to estimate transport parameters that will control long-term fate and transport of contaminants in fractured aquifers.

Detwiler, Russell

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

475

GLYCOLIC-FORMIC ACID FLOWSHEET SLUDGE MATRIX STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing was completed to demonstrate the viability of the newly developed glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet on processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) initiated a sludge matrix study to evaluate the impact of changing insoluble solid composition on the processing characteristics of slurries in DWPF. Four sludge simulants were prepared to cover two compositional ranges in the waste. The first was high iron/low aluminum versus low iron/high aluminum (referred to as HiFe or LoFe in this report). The second was high calcium-manganese/low nickel, chromium, and magnesium versus low calcium-manganese/high nickel, chromium, and magnesium (referred to as HiMn or LoMn in this report). These two options can be combined to form four distinct sludge compositions. The sludge matrix study called for testing each of these four simulants near the minimum acid required for nitrite destruction (100% acid stoichiometry) and at a second acid level that produced significant hydrogen by noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid (150% acid stoichiometry). Four simulants were prepared based on the four possible combinations of the Al/Fe and Mn-Ca/Mg-Ni-Cr options. Preliminary simulant preparation work has already been documented. The four simulants were used for high and low acid testing. Eight planned experiments (GF26 to GF33) were completed to demonstrate the viability of the glycolic-formic flowsheet. Composition and physical property measurements were made on the SRAT product. Composition measurements were made on the condensate from the Mercury Water Wash Tank (MWWT), Formic Acid Vent Condenser (FAVC), ammonia scrubber and on SRAT samples pulled throughout the SRAT cycle. Updated values for formate loss and nitrite-tonitrate conversion were found that can be used in the acid calculations for future sludge matrix process simulations with the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet. Preliminary results of the initial testing indicate: (1) Hydrogen generation rate was very low throughout all SRAT cycles. (2) The mercury concentration of the SRAT product was below the 0.8 wt% limit in all runs. (3) Nitrite in the SRAT product was <100 mg/kg for all runs. (4) Foaminess was not an issue using the nominal antifoam addition strategy in these tests. (5) The high aluminum sludges (LoFe, HM type sludges) were much more viscous than the Hi Fe sludges. At 100% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very viscous but at 150% acid stoichiometry, the SRAT products from the high aluminum sludges were very thin. This makes the glycolic acid/formic acid flowsheet an improvement for processing more viscous sludges. (6) The pH of the SRAT products was from 2.7-3.1 for the 150% acid stoichiometry runs and 5.1-6.1 for the 100% acid stoichiometry runs, significantly lower than is typical of the baseline nitric acid/formic acid flowsheet.

Lambert, D.; Koopman, D.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

476

Multi-Phase Fracture-Matrix Interactions Under Stress Changes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multi-phase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) counter-current fluid transport between the matrix and the fracture, (c) studying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture and two-phase flow, and (d) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress, on the nature of the rock, and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual and detailed descriptions of the process are shown in the report. Both extensional and shear fractures have been considered. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective was to understand the impact of the fracture, its topology and occupancy on the nature of mass transfer between the matrix and the fracture. Counter-current imbibition next to the fracture was observed and quantified, including the influence of formation layering. A group of Shear fractures were studied, with layers perpendicular and parallel to the main axis of the sample. The structures of the fractures as well as their impact on absolute permeability and on oil displacement by water were evaluated. Shear fractures perpendicular to the layers lead to a wide distribution of pores and to an overall increase in absolute permeability. Shear fractures parallel to the layers lead to an overall increase in absolute permeability, but a decrease in displacement efficiency. This DoE project funded or partially funded three Ph.D. and four M.Sc. students at the Pennsylvania State University. The results from the research have yielded several abstracts, presentations and papers. Much of the work is still in the process of being published.

A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarao; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

MULTI-PHASE FRACTURE-MATRIX INTERACTIONS UNDER STRESS CHANGES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this project are to quantify the changes in fracture porosity and multiphase transport properties as a function of confining stress. These changes will be integrated into conceptual and numerical models that will improve our ability to predict and optimize fluid transport in fractured system. This report details our progress on: (a) developing the direct experimental measurements of fracture aperture and topology and fluid occupancy using high-resolution x-ray micro-tomography, (b) quantifying the effect of confining stress on the distribution of fracture aperture, and (c) characterization of shear fractures and their impact on multi-phase flow. The three-dimensional surface that describes the large-scale structure of the fracture in the porous medium can be determined using x-ray micro-tomography with significant accuracy. Several fractures have been scanned and the fracture aperture maps have been extracted. The success of the mapping of fracture aperture was followed by measuring the occupancy of the fracture by two immiscible phases, water and decane, and water and kerosene. The distribution of fracture aperture depends on the effective confining stress on the nature of the rock and the type and distribution of the asperities that keep the fracture open. Fracture apertures at different confining stresses were obtained by micro-tomography covering a range of about two thousand psig. Initial analysis of the data shows a significant aperture closure with increase in effective confining stress. Visual descriptions of the process are shown in the report while detailed analysis of the behavior of the distribution of fracture aperture is in progress. Both extensional and shear fractures are being considered. The initial multi-phase flow tests were done in extensional fractures. Several rock samples with induced shear fracture are being studies, and some of the new results are presented in this report. These samples are being scanned in order to quantify the distribution of apertures and the nature of the asperities. Low resolution images of fluids in a sample with a shear fracture were performed and they provide the confidence that flow patterns and saturations could be determined in the future. A series of water imbibition tests were conducted in which water was injected into a fracture and its migration into the matrix was monitored with CT and DR x-ray techniques. The objective is to understand the impact of the fracture, its topology and occupancy on the nature of mass transfer between the matrix and the fracture. Counter-current imbibition next to the fracture was observed and quantified, including the influence of formation layering.

A.S. Grader; D. Elsworth; P.M. Halleck; F. Alvarado; A. Alajmi; Z. Karpyn; N. Mohammed; S. Al-Enezi

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

478

On the fusion matrix of the N=1 Neveu-Schwarz blocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an exact form of the fusion matrix of the Neveu-Schwarz blocks that appear in a correlation function of four super-primary fields. Orthogonality relation satisfied by this matrix is equivalent to the bootstrap equation for the four-point super-primary correlator in the N=1 supersymmetric Liouville theory.

Leszek Hadasz

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

479

Finding Meter in Music Using an Autocorrelation Phase Matrix and Shannon Douglas Eck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finding Meter in Music Using an Autocorrelation Phase Matrix and Shannon Entropy Douglas Eck. This approach yields a good model for predicting the meter of a piece of music. Finally we can use the phase information in the matrix to align a can- didate meter with music, making it possible to perform beat

Eck, Doug

480

Folding and Strain Softening of Carbon Fiber Composites with an Elastomeric Matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Folding and Strain Softening of Carbon Fiber Composites with an Elastomeric Matrix F. L´opez Jim damage. A possibility is the use of carbon fiber composites with a soft elastomeric matrix.M. Mikulas, Some micromechanics considera- tions of the folding of rigidizable composite materials, in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "matrix aq batch" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Density hysteresis of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix Yang Zhanga,b , Antonio of heavy water confined in a nanoporous silica matrix in a temperature-pressure range, from 300 to 130 K in the relevant phase region. More- over, the density data we obtained for the confined heavy water under

Chen, Sow-Hsin

482

Accelerated, energy-conserving BornOppenheimer molecular dynamics via Fock matrix extrapolation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accelerated, energy-conserving Born­Oppenheimer molecular dynamics via Fock matrix extrapolation iterations per time step, without sacrificing energy conservation. In test calculations for C2F4, (H2O)4 � , (H2O)6, and [Fe(H2O)6]21 , we demonstrate energy-conserving Fock matrix extrapolation that reduces

Herbert, John

483

Invariants and reduced matrix elements associated with the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct explicit formulae for the eigenvalues of certain invariants of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n) using characteristic identities. We discuss how such eigenvalues are related to reduced Wigner coefficients and the reduced matrix elements of generators, and thus provide a first step to a new algebraic derivation of matrix element formulae for all generators of the algebra.

Mark D. Gould; Phillip S. Isaac; Jason L. Werry

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

484

Determinant representations for form factors in quantum integrable models with GL(3)-invariant R-matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain determinant representations for the form factors of the monodromy matrix entries in quantum integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and possessing $GL(3)$-invariant $R$-matrix. These representations can be used for the calculation of correlation functions in the models of physical interest.

S. Pakuliak; E. Ragoucy; N. A. Slavnov

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

485

Form factors in quantum integrable models with GL(3)-invariant R-matrix  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and possessing GL(3)-invariant R-matrix. We obtain determinant representations for form factors of off-diagonal entries of the monodromy matrix. These representations can be used for the calculation of form factors and correlation functions of the XXX SU(3)-invariant Heisenberg chain.

S. Pakuliak; E. Ragoucy; N. A. Slavnov

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

486

The Use of EST Expression Matrixes for the Quality Control of Gene Expression Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for tissue typing and quality control of libraries as small as just a few hundred total ESTs. Furthermore, weThe Use of EST Expression Matrixes for the Quality Control of Gene Expression Data Andrew T Expression Matrixes for the Quality Control of Gene Expression Data. PLoS ONE 7(3): e32966. doi:10

Sheldon, Nathan D.

487

Minimizing Energy Dissipation of Matrix Multiplication Kernel on Virtex-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a uniprocessor architecture and a linear array architecture to develop energy-efficient designs energy-efficient designs for matrix multiplication. For example, for 6 Ã? 6 matrix multiplication, energy speciÃ?c modeling, energy efficient design, FPGAs. 1. INTRODUCTION With the advent of multi-million gate

Jang, Ju-Wook

488

On the Low Rank Solutions for Linear Matrix Inequalities Yongwei Huang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the Low Rank Solutions for Linear Matrix Inequalities Wenbao Ai Yongwei Huang Shuzhong Zhang September 2006 Abstract In this paper we present a polynomial-time procedure to find a low rank solution for a system of Linear Matrix Inequalities (LMI). The existence of such a low rank solution was shown in Au

Zhang, Shuzhong

489

ULTRASOUND-COUPLED SEMI-SUPERVISED NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORISATION FOR SPEECH ENHANCEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ULTRASOUND-COUPLED SEMI-SUPERVISED NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORISATION FOR SPEECH ENHANCEMENT Tom speech enhancement tech- nique, whereby the incorporation of easily obtained Doppler-based ultrasound enhancement re- sults. Noisy speech mixtures were enhanced using semi-supervised nonnegative matrix

Virtanen, Tuomas

490

Effects of Thermal Aging on the Mechanical Properties of a Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Thermal Aging on the Mechanical Properties of a Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composite Eric A properties of an all-oxide fiber-reinforced composite following long-term exposure (1000 h) at temperatures of 1000­1200°C in air. The composite of interest derives its damage tolerance from a highly porous matrix

Zok, Frank

491

Combining Density Functional Theory and Density Matrix Functional Theory Daniel R. Rohr1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combining Density Functional Theory and Density Matrix Functional Theory Daniel R. Rohr1 , Julien and CNRS, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France We combine density-functional theory with density cleavage is an ubiquitous process for chemistry. Density-matrix functional theory (DMFT) (see, e.g., Refs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

492

Real-Time Simulation of Matrix Converter Drives **The University of Wisconsin-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IGBT/GTO/MOSFET firing pulses from high performance I/O thus permitting matrix converter controller with diodes (except in the case of RB-IGBT). An input filter and voltage clamp circuit complete the circuit Matrix converter a b c u v w Clamp circuit Inductive load Sawp Bi-directional switch on off iu iv iw Fig

Lipo, Thomas

493

Ultrasonic ply-by-ply detection of matrix cracks in laminated composites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the internal damage state of the composite tank wall. Damage in the form of matrix cracks in the composite material of the tank is responsible for the through-the-thickness permeation of LH2. In this context, the detection of matrix cracks takes...

Ganpatye, Atul Shridatta

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

494

FINITE VOLUME APPROXIMATION OF THE EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION MATRIX: THE CASE OF INDEPENDENT BOND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FINITE VOLUME APPROXIMATION OF THE EFFECTIVE DIFFUSION MATRIX: THE CASE OF INDEPENDENT BOND with independent jump rates across nearest neighbour bonds of the lattice. We show that the infinite volume effective diffusion matrix can be almost surely recovered as the limit of finite volume periodized effective

495

A Novel MEMS LTCC Switch Matrix Bahram Yassini, Savio Choi, Andre Zybura, Ming Yu,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Novel MEMS LTCC Switch Matrix Bahram Yassini, Savio Choi, Andre Zybura, Ming Yu, Robert. E planar 4x4 switch matrix using microelectromechanical system (MEMS) switches and Low Temperature Cofired Ceramic (LTCC) substrate is presented for the first time. Together a 9-layer LTCC substrate and 32 MEMS

Yu