Sample records for matrix aq batch

  1. Isotopic Fractionation of Mg2+(aq), Ca2+(aq), and Fe2+(aq) with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fractionation of Mg2+(aq), Ca2+(aq), and Fe2+(aq) with Carbonate Minerals. Isotopic Fractionation of Mg2+(aq), Ca2+(aq), and Fe2+(aq) with Carbonate Minerals. Abstract: Density...

  2. PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Batch Jobs Running Interactive Batch Jobs You cannot login to the PDSF batch nodes directly but you can run an interactive session on a batch node using either qlogin...

  3. Final Exam/Fall 1998 Math 351 Name (10) 1. Find a 2 × 2 matrix A ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-10-62T23:59:59.000Z

    ... be a 2 × 2 matrix, Q1 = [1, -1]t and Q2 = [3, -2]t. Assume that. AQ1 = 4Q1 , AQ2 = 9Q2. (i) Find an invertible matrix Q and a diagonal matrix D such that A = QDQ.

  4. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION ­ EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1 The experimental verification of the operation of a multivessel batch distillation column, operated under total vessels, provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. We propose a simple

  5. Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pacific Time, 256 nodes are reserved for debugging and interactive use. See also, running Interactive Jobs. Sample Batch Scripts The following batch script requests 8 cores on...

  6. INSTALLATIONAND OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS FOR AQ-1 POWER VENT KIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    HEATERS AQUASTAR 125B WATER HEATERS INCLUDING AQUASTAR MODELS: 125HX · 125BS · 125X · 125BL TABLE supplied with the water heater. 2. Before mounting water heater to wall, check its minimum clearance requirements. 3. When using an AQ-1 the maximum horizontal distance from the water heater to the power vent

  7. Example Hopper Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /Email Announcements12:25Sequedex:Example Batch

  8. NDA BATCH 2009-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The testing facility is LLNL plutonium facility segmented gamma scanner. 100% of the radioassay data in the batch data report is reviewed.

  9. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  10. TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA SØRENSEN in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback been built and the experiments verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation

  11. Multivessel Batch Distillation Potential Energy Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Multivessel Batch Distillation ­ Potential Energy Savings Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT ­ A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  12. Multivessel Batch Distillation -Potential Energy Savings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Multivessel Batch Distillation - Potential Energy Savings Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT - A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  13. NDA BATCH 2002-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    QC sample results (daily background checks, 20-gram and 100-gram SGS drum checks) were within acceptable criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on 5 drums with IDs LL85101099TRU, LL85801147TRU, LL85801109TRU, LL85300999TRU and LL85500979TRU. All replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. Note that the batch covered 5 weeks of SGS measurements from 23-Jan-2002 through 22-Feb-2002. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-02 generated using gamma spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with established control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable. An Expert Review was performed on the data packet between 28-Feb-02 and 09-Jul-02 to check for potential U-235, Np-237 and Am-241 interferences and address drum cases where specific scan segments showed Se gamma ray transmissions for the 136-keV gamma to be below 0.1 %. Two drums in the batch showed Pu-238 at a relative mass ratio more than 2% of all the Pu isotopes.

  14. Transferring Data from Batch Jobs at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (see HPSS Passwords) you can access HPSS within batch scripts. You can add the following lines at the end of your batch script. HSI will accept one-line commands on the HSI...

  15. POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT ­ A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  16. POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    POTENTIAL ENERGY SAVINGS OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad 1, Norway ABSTRACT - A conventional batch distillation column operated under feedback control applying the proposed policy is compared to the multivessel batch distillation column. In some cases we found

  17. TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    TOTAL REFLUX OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION BERND WITTGENS, RAJAB LITTO, EVA S RENSEN a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for total re verify the simulations. INTRODUCTION Although batch distillation generally is less energy e cient than

  18. NDA Batch 2002-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollister, R

    2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    QC sample results (daily background check drum and 100-gram SGS check drum) were within acceptance criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on drum LL85501243TRU. Replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. HWM NCAR No. 02-1000168 issued on 17-Oct-2002 regarding a partially dislodged Cd sheet filter on the HPGe coaxial detector. This physical geometry occurred on 01-Oct-2002 and was not corrected until 10-Oct-2002, during which period is inclusive of the present batch run of drums. Per discussions among the Independent Technical Reviewer, Expert Reviewer and the Technical QA Supervisor, as well as in consultation with John Fleissner, Technical Point of Contact from Canberra, the analytical results are technically reliable. All QC standard runs during this period were in control. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-13 generated using passive gamma-ray spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with establiShed control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable.

  19. 2002 Dog Island Lease Area, Levy County Quality Assurance/Quality Control (AQ/QC) Log

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    the month. This includes information on fouling, equipment failures and whether post-deployment checks were or a lack of standardization between the two sondes). Notes regarding reliability of data (whether/Quality Control (AQ/QC) Log General Notes on Reliability of Data: 1) In general, measurements of temperature

  20. Adding coal dust to coal batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

  1. Analysis and Control of Heteroazeotropic Batch Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Analysis and Control of Heteroazeotropic Batch Distillation S. Skouras and S. Skogestad Dept.interscience.wiley.com). The separation of close-boiling and azeotropic mixtures by heterogeneous azeotropic distillation is addressed. The results show that heteroazeotropic batch distillation exhibits substantial flexibility. The column profile

  2. CASCADE OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF BATCH REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jutan, Arthur

    CASCADE OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF BATCH REACTORS Xiangming Hua, Sohrab Rohani and Arthur Jutan ajutan@uwo.ca Abstract: In this study, a cascade closed-loop optimization and control strategy for batch reactor. Using model reduction a cascade system is developed, which can effectively combine optimization

  3. Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches: Effect of Batch Makeup on Gas-Evolving Reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose

    2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Batches made with a variety of precursors were subjected to thermo-gravimetric analysis. The baseline modifications included all-nitrate batch with sucrose addition, all-carbonate batch, and batches with different sources of alumina. All batches were formulated for a single glass composition (a vitrified simulated high-alumina high-level waste). Batch samples were heated from the ambient temperature to 1200°C at constant heating rates ranging from 1 K/min to 50 K/min. Major gas evolving reactions began at temperatures just above 100°C and were virtually complete by 650°C. Activation energies for major reactions were obtained with the Kissinger’s method. A rough model for the overall kinetics of the batch-conversion was developed to be eventually applied to a mathematical model of the cold cap.

  4. Optimization of a fed-batch fermentation process control competition ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Keywords: optimal control, fed-batch process, network enabled optimization. 1 INTRODUCTION ... input, the output for each batch would not be the problem is ...

  5. Heteroazeotropic Batch Distillation Feasibility and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Heteroazeotropic Batch Distillation Feasibility and Operation by Efstathios Skouras and distillation is the dominating unit operation for such separations. However, the presence of azeotropes and non distillation as the best suited process. Among, various techniques to enhance distillation, heterogeneous

  6. CLOSED OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION -EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    1 CLOSED OPERATION OF MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION - EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION Submitted to AICheÆcient operation, multicomponent distillation, batch distillation, total re ux operation ABSTRACT. The multivessel batch distillation column, as well as conven- tional batch distillation, may be operated in a closed

  7. How to batch upload video files with Unison How to batch upload video files with Unison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benos, Panayiotis "Takis"

    How to batch upload video files with Unison How to batch upload video files with Unison There are two different ways to upload already existing video files into Unison: Upload from the New Session page (only allows one video file to be uploaded at a time) Launching the editor in Composer (allows

  8. AFTER: Batch jobs on the Apollo ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofstadler, P.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes AFTER, a system that allows users of an Apollo ring to submit batch jobs to run without leaving themselves logged in to the ring. Jobs may be submitted to run at a later time or on a different node. Results from the batch job are mailed to the user through some designated mail system. AFTER features an understandable user interface, good on line help, and site customization. This manual serves primarily as a user's guide to AFTER although administration and installation are covered for completeness.

  9. Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryder, Barbara G.

    Remote Batch Invocation for Compositional Object Services Ali Ibrahim2 , Yang Jiao1 , Eli Tilevich1 Remote Procedure Calls do not compose efficiently, design- ers of distributed object systems use Data Transfer and Remote Fac¸ade patterns to create large-granularity interfaces, hard-coded for particular

  10. Your Unanswered Questions…. Answered- Batch 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu hosted an online town hall to discuss President Obama's clean energy innovation agenda -- and while he was able to answer about 10 questions submitted online during the event, we received more than 200! Here is our second batch of questions and answers.

  11. Batch” Kinetics in Flow: Online IR Analysis and Continuous Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason S.

    Currently, kinetic data is either collected under steady-state conditions in flow or by generating time-series data in batch. Batch experiments are generally considered to be more suitable for the generation of kinetic ...

  12. Batch load anaerobic digestion of dairy manure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egg, Richard P

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and resource recovery. Anaerobic digestion of manure has re- ceived much attention as a method to reduce the pollution threat to the environment while reclaiming energy in the form of methane gas from the biomass. Currently there is one commercial anaerobic... production than the conventional process used in most studies to date. The objective of this research was to evaluate a batch load digestion process for methane production from dairy manure to determine the optimum influent total solids concentration...

  13. SLUDGE BATCH 5 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; David Best, D; David Koopman, D

    2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing to Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing in early fiscal year 2009. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB5 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processes. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2007-0007, Rev. 1 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB5 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB5 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the washing plan to prepare SB5 and the estimated SB4 heel mass. Nine DWPF process simulations were completed in 4-L laboratory-scale equipment using both a batch simulant (Tank 51 simulant after washing is complete) and a blend simulant (Tank 40 simulant after Tank 51 transfer is complete). Each simulant had a set of four SRAT and SME simulations at varying acid stoichiometry levels (115%, 130%, 145% and 160%). One additional run was made using blend simulant at 130% acid that included additions of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) waste prior to acid addition and the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) Unit (MCU) waste following SRAT dewatering. There are several parameters that are noteworthy concerning SB5 sludge: (1) This is the first batch DWPF will be processing that contains sludge that has had a significant fraction of aluminum removed through aluminum dissolution. (2) The sludge is high in mercury. (3) The sludge is high in noble metals. (4) The sludge is high in U and Pu--components that are not added in sludge simulants. Two SB5 processing issues were noted during testing. First, high hydrogen generation rates were measured during experiments with both the blend and batch simulant at high acid stoichiometry. Also, the reflux time was extended due to the high mercury concentration in both the batch and blend simulant. Adding ARP will extend processing times in DWPF. The ARP caustic boil took approximately six hours. The boiling time during the experiment with added MCU was 14 hours at the maximum DWPF steam flux rate. This is comparable to the DWPF processing time for dewatering plus reflux without MCU at a 5000 lbs/hr boil-up rate, but would require significantly more time at boiling at 2000-2500 lbs/hr boil-up rate. The addition of ARP and MCU did not cause any other processing issues, since foaming, rheology and hydrogen generation were less of an issue while processing with ARP/MCU.

  14. Conversion of batch to molten glass, I: Volume expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Samuel H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Marcial, Jose; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Batches designed to simulate nuclear high-level waste glass were compressed into pellets that were heated at a rate of 5°C/min and photographed to obtain the profile area as a function of temperature. Three types of batches were prepared with different nitrate-carbonate ratios. To determine the impact of the heat supply by an exothermic reaction and the batch expansion, the nitrated batches were prepared with varying addition of sucrose. To obtain the impact of the grain size of the quartz component, the mixed nitrate-carbonate batches were prepared with silica particles ranging in size from 5 µm to 195 µm. One batch containing only carbonates was also tested. Sucrose addition had little effect on the batch expansion, while the size of silica was very influential. The 5-?m grains had a strongest effect, causing the generation of both primary and secondary foam, whereas only secondary foam was produced in batches with grains of 45 µm and larger. The retention of gases evolved as the batch melts creates primary foam. Gases evolved from oxidation-reduction reactions once the batch has melted produce secondary foam. We suggest that the viscosity of the melt and the amount of gas evolved are the main influences on foam production. As more gas is produced in the melt and as the glass becomes less viscous, the bubbles of gas coalesce into larger and larger cavities, until the glass can no longer contain the bubbles and they burst, causing the foam to collapse.

  15. Evaluation of vitrification factors from DWPF's macro-batch 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.B.

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is evaluating new sampling and analytical methods that may be used to support future Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) batch acceptability decisions. This report uses data acquired during DWPF's processing of macro-batch 1 to determine a set of vitrification factors covering several SME and Melter Feed Tank (MFT) batches. Such values are needed for converting the cation measurements derived from the new methods to a ``glass'' basis. The available data from macro-batch 1 were used to examine the stability of these vitrification factors, to estimate their uncertainty over the course of a macro-batch, and to provide a recommendation on the use of a single factor for an entire macro-batch. The report is in response to Technical Task Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-980015.

  16. aerobic batch fermentations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    motivating application we try to optimize the power output of nano-enhanced Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). MFCsHybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi...

  17. Elink Batch Upload Instructions | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    includes reporting for contract proposals, funding status, routine construction or inventory, and similar products. AN 241.1 Submission Options Batch Upload allows you to upload...

  18. Optimization of A Fed-batch Fermentation Process Control ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jinsong Liang

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 1, 2003 ... Optimization of A Fed-batch Fermentation Process Control Competition Problem Using NEOS. Jinsong Liang (jinsongliang ***at*** cc.usu.edu)

  19. Reducing variance in batch partitioning measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul E.

    2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The partitioning experiment is commonly performed with little or no attention to reducing measurement variance. Batch test procedures such as those used to measure K{sub d} values (e.g., ASTM D 4646 and EPA402 -R-99-004A) do not explain how to evaluate measurement uncertainty nor how to minimize measurement variance. In fact, ASTM D 4646 prescribes a sorbent:water ratio that prevents variance minimization. Consequently, the variance of a set of partitioning measurements can be extreme and even absurd. Such data sets, which are commonplace, hamper probabilistic modeling efforts. An error-savvy design requires adjustment of the solution:sorbent ratio so that approximately half of the sorbate partitions to the sorbent. Results of Monte Carlo simulations indicate that this simple step can markedly improve the precision and statistical characterization of partitioning uncertainty.

  20. Materials selection for kraft batch digesters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wensley, A. [Bacon Donaldson Consulting Engineers, Richmond, British Columbia (Canada); Moskal, M. [Stone Container Corp., Burr Ridge, IL (United States); Wilton, W. [Stone-Consolidated Corp., Fort Frances, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several candidate materials were evaluated by corrosion testing in autoclaves containing white and black liquors for batch digesters. The relationship between corrosion rate and corrosion potential was determined for ASTM SA516-Grade 70 carbon steel, UNS S30403 (Type 304L) austenitic stainless steel, UNS S31803 (2205) and UNS S32550 (2605) duplex stainless steels, and two stainless steel weld overlays, applied by the GMAW (gas metal arc welding) and SAW (submerged arc welding) processes. The tests revealed that SA516-Grade 70 carbon steel and type 304L stainless steel can experience high rates of corrosion. For the duplex stainless steels and weld overlays, corrosion resistance improved with chromium content. A chromium content of at least 25% was found to be necessary for good corrosion resistance.

  1. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA S RENSEN 3 and RAJAB distillation schemes, including the inverted column and the middle vessel column. The total re ux operation of the multivessel batch distillation column was presented recently, and the main contribution of this paper

  2. Analysis of Closed Multivessel Batch Distillation of Ternary Azeotropic Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Analysis of Closed Multivessel Batch Distillation of Ternary Azeotropic Mixtures using Elementary) diagrams like distillation lines and isotherms maps may be used in analysis of the closed (total reflux) multivessel batch distillation column. An indirect level control strategy is implemented that eliminates

  3. Separation of Azeotropic Mixtures in Closed Batch Distillation Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Separation of Azeotropic Mixtures in Closed Batch Distillation Arrangements S. Skouras and S, Norway SCOPE OF THE PROJECT ·How can we separate ternary mixtures in closed batch distillation-up period is required, followed by a heteroazeotropic distillation step (Figure 3) Modified: The separation

  4. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA SØRENSEN 3 and RAJAB distillation schemes, including the inverted column and the middle vessel column. The total reflux operation of the multivessel batch distillation column was presented recently, and the main contribution of this paper

  5. Effect of glass-batch makeup on the melting process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Humrickhouse, Carissa J.; Moody, J. Adam; Tate, Rachel M.; Rainsdon, Timothy T.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.; Arrigoni, Benjamin M.; Marcial, Jose; Rodriguez, Carmen P.; Tincher, Benjamin

    2010-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5-?m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800°C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass-forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, ?75 ?m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800°C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160°C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B2O3, CaO, Li2O, MgO, and Na2O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  6. EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON THE MELTING PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRUGER AA; HRMA P

    2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of a glass batch to heating is determined by the batch makeup and in turn determines the rate of melting. Batches formulated for a high-alumina nuclear waste to be vitrified in an all-electric melter were heated at a constant temperature-increase rate to determine changes in melting behavior in response to the selection of batch chemicals and silica grain-size as well as the addition of heat-generating reactants. The type of batch materials and the size of silica grains determine how much, if any, primary foam occurs during melting. Small quartz grains, 5 {micro}m in size, caused extensive foaming because their major portion dissolved at temperatures <800 C, contributing to the formation of viscous glass forming melt that trapped evolving batch gases. Primary foam did not occur in batches with larger quartz grains, {+-}75 {micro}m in size, because their major portion dissolved at temperatures >800 C when batch gases no longer evolved. The exothermal reaction of nitrates with sucrose was ignited at a temperature as low as 160 C and caused a temporary jump in temperature of several hundred degrees. Secondary foam, the source of which is oxygen from redox reactions, occurred in all batches of a limited composition variation involving five oxides, B{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, Li{sub 2}O, MgO, and Na{sub 2}O. The foam volume at the maximum volume-increase rate was a weak function of temperature and melt basicity. Neither the batch makeup nor the change in glass composition had a significant impact on the dissolution of silica grains. The impacts of primary foam generation on glass homogeneity and the rate of melting in large-scale continuous furnaces have yet to be established via mathematical modeling and melter experiments.

  7. DISCOVER-AQ Outlook for Monday, July 4, 2011 Strong thunderstorms rolled through the study area early this morning in response to the passage of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    visibility. · Light / variable winds with overcast. · Front that will push through this afternoon · Sfc with light and variable surface winds may begin an AQ stagnation scenario. · Scattered low to mid pressure remains in place producing light and variable winds · Cloud cover at multiple levels. #12;NAM

  8. DISCOVER-AQ Outlook for Friday, July 21, 2011 High surface temperatures of near 100 F today in the study region have led to substantial ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orange for PM2.5 today, which is the first time that has occurred during DISCOVER-AQ. South and SW winds expected. Southerly winds continue to bring moisture into our region. 500 mb NAM at 2 PM. #12;Tomorrow Saturday: Heat and humidity sticks around. Sunday: Hot, sticky, and cloud coverage > 50%. Light Winds Juicy

  9. Temperature effects on seawater batch activated sludge systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wigley, Henry Albert

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON SEAMATER BATCH ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by HENRY ALBERT WIGLEY, JR. Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1972 Major Subject: Civil Engineerinq TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON SEAWATER BATCH ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by HENRY ALBERT WIGLEY, JR. Approved as to style and content by: C ai rman o ommi ttee Head of D partmen Member Member May 1972...

  10. Mechanism of Phase Formation in the Batch Mixtures for Slag-Bearing Glass Ceramics - 12207

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanovsky, Sergey V.; Stefanovsky, Olga I.; Malinina, Galina A. [SIA Radon, 7th Rostovskii lane 2/14, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slag surrogate was produced from chemicals by heating to 900 deg. C and keeping at this temperature for 1 hr. The product obtained was intermixed with either sodium di-silicate (75 wt.% waste loading) or borax (85 wt.% slag loading). The mixtures were heat-treated within a temperature range of 25 to 1300 deg. C. The products were examined by X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The products prepared at temperatures of up to 1000 deg. C contained both phase typical of the source slag and intermediate phases as well as phases typical of the materials melted at 1350 deg. C such as nepheline, britholite, magnetite and matrix vitreous phase. Vitrification process in batch mixtures consisting of slag surrogate and either sodium di-silicate or sodium tetraborate runs through formation of intermediate phases mainly silico-phosphates capable to incorporate Sm as trivalent actinides surrogate. Reactions in the batch mixtures are in the whole completed by ?1000 deg. C but higher temperatures are required to homogenize the products. If in the borate-based system the mechanism is close to simple dissolution of slag constituents in the low viscous borate melt, then in the silicate-based system the mechanism was found to be much complicated and includes re-crystallization during melting with segregation of newly-formed nepheline type phase. (authors)

  11. SLUDGE BATCH 7B GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b). In support of the upcoming processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frits 418 with a 6% Na{sub 2}O addition (26 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) and 702 with a 4% Na{sub 2}O addition (24 wt% Na{sub 2}O in sludge) to process SB7b. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB7b available at the time from the Savannah River Remediation (SRR). To support qualification of SB7b, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB7b. The durability models were assessed over the expected composition range of SB7b, including potential caustic additions, combined with Frits 702 and 418 over a 32-40% waste loading (WL) range. Thirty four glasses were selected based on Frits 418 and 702 coupled with the sludge projections with an additional 4-6% Na{sub 2}O to reflect the potential caustic addition. Six of these glasses, based on average nominal sludge compositions including the appropriate caustic addition, were developed for both Frit 418 and Frit 702 at 32, 36 and 40% WL to provide coverage in the center of the anticipated SB7b glass region. All glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To comply with the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, a total of thirty four glasses were fabricated to assess the applicability of the current DWPF PCCS durability models. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) benchmark glass regardless of thermal history. The NL[B] values of the SB7b variability study glasses were less than 1.99 g/L as compared to 16.695 g/L for EA. A small number of the D-optimally selected 'outer layer' extreme vertices (EV) glasses were not predictable using the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, but were acceptable compared to the EA glass when tested. These glasses fell outside of the lower 95% confidence band, which demonstrates conservatism in the model. A few of the glasses fell outside of the upper 95% confidence band; however, these particular glasses have normalized release values that were much lower than the values of EA and should be of no practical concern. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable to the SB7b sludge system with a range of Na{sub 2}O concentrations blended with Frits 418 or 702. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable by the current DWPF PCCS models and/or acceptable with respect to the EA benchmark glass regardless of thermal history or compositional view.

  12. Power/Performance Trade-offs of Small Batched LU Based Solvers on GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Oreste; Fatica, Massimiliano; Gawande, Nitin A.; Tumeo, Antonino

    2013-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose and analyze a set of batched linear solvers for small matrices on Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), evaluating the various alternatives depending on the size of the systems to solve. We discuss three different solutions that operate with different level of parallelization and GPU features. The first, exploiting the CUBLAS library, manages matrices of size up to 32x32 and employs Warp level (one matrix, one Warp) parallelism and shared memory. The second works at Thread-block level parallelism (one matrix, one Thread-block), still exploiting shared memory but managing matrices up to 76x76. The third is Thread level parallel (one matrix, one thread) and can reach sizes up to 128x128, but it does not exploit shared memory and only relies on the high memory bandwidth of the GPU. The first and second solution only support partial pivoting, the third one easily supports partial and full pivoting, making it attractive to problems that require greater numerical stability. We analyze the trade-offs in terms of performance and power consumption as function of the size of the linear systems that are simultaneously solved. We execute the three implementations on a Tesla M2090 (Fermi) and on a Tesla K20 (Kepler).

  13. Spin dynamics simulation of electron spin relaxation in Ni{sup 2+}(aq)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rantaharju, Jyrki, E-mail: jjrantaharju@gmail.com; Mareš, Ji?í, E-mail: jiri.mares@oulu.fi; Vaara, Juha, E-mail: juha.vaara@iki.fi [NMR Research Group, Department of Physics, University of Oulu, P.O. Box 3000, Oulu, FIN-90014 (Finland)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to quantitatively predict and analyze the rate of electron spin relaxation of open-shell systems is important for electron paramagnetic resonance and paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. We present a combined molecular dynamics (MD), quantum chemistry (QC), and spin dynamics simulation method for calculating such spin relaxation rates. The method is based on the sampling of a MD trajectory by QC calculations, to produce instantaneous parameters of the spin Hamiltonian used, in turn, to numerically solve the Liouville-von Neumann equation for the time evolution of the spin density matrix. We demonstrate the approach by simulating the relaxation of electron spin in an aqueous solution of Ni{sup 2+} ion. The spin-lattice (T{sub 1}) and spin-spin (T{sub 2}) relaxation rates are extracted directly from the simulations of the time dependence of the longitudinal and transverse magnetization, respectively. Good agreement with the available, indirectly obtained experimental data is obtained by our method.

  14. Dissolution retardation of solid silica during glass batch-melting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During glass-batch melting, solid silica (quartz) usually dissolves last. A retardation function was defined as a measure of the progressive inhibition of silica dissolution that occurs during batch melting. This function is based on the comparison of the measured rate of dissolution of silica particles with the hypothetical diffusion-controlled volume flux from regularly distributed particles with uniform concentration layers around them. The severe inhibition of silica dissolution has been attributed to the irregular spatial distribution of silica particles that is associated with the formation of nearly saturated melt at a portion of their surfaces. Irregular shapes and unequal sizes of particles also contribute to their extended lifetime.

  15. Separation of Azeotropic Mixtures in Closed Batch Distillation Arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Separation of Azeotropic Mixtures in Closed Batch Distillation Arrangements S. Skouras and S to obtain a light and a heavy fraction simultaneously from the top and the bottom of the column, while an intermediate fraction may also be recovered in the middle vessel. Two modifications of the multivessel

  16. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA SØRENSEN 3 and RAJAB distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for the total reflux operation of a multivessel column distillation generally is less energy efficient than continuous distillation, it has received increased

  17. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION 1 SIGURD SKOGESTAD 2 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA S RENSEN 3 and RAJAB distillation schemes. A simple feedback control strategy for the total re ux operation of a multivessel column distillation generally is less energy e cient than continuous distillation, it has received increased attention

  18. On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators Philippe Camacho Dept@dcc.uchile.cl December 15, 2009 Abstract A cryptographic accumulator is a scheme where a set of elements is represented into the set. In their survey on accumulators [FN02], Fazzio and Nicolisi noted that the Camenisch

  19. On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hevia, Alejandro

    On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators Philippe Camacho and Alejandro. {pcamacho,ahevia}@dcc.uchile.cl Abstract. A cryptographic accumulator is a scheme where a set of elements membership into the set. If new values are added or existent values are deleted from the accumulator

  20. Improving SSL Handshake Performance via Batching Hovav Shacham Dan Boneh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boneh, Dan

    Improving SSL Handshake Performance via Batching Hovav Shacham Dan Boneh hovav@cs.stanford.edu dabo@cs.stanford.edu Abstract We present an algorithmic approach for speeding up SSL's performance on a web server. Our approach improves the performance of SSL's handshake protocol by up to a factor of 2.5 for 1024-bit RSA keys

  1. HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

  2. Feedback Stabilization of Fed-Batch Bioreactors: Non-Monotonic Growth Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    Feedback Stabilization of Fed-Batch Bioreactors: Non-Monotonic Growth Kinetics Ilse Y. Smets's yeast, food additives, and recom- binant proteins), optimization and control of fed-batch bioreactors

  3. Minimal time problem for a fed-batch bioreactor with saturating singular control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Minimal time problem for a fed-batch bioreactor with saturating singular control T´erence Bayen in the present work is a fed-batch bioreactor with one species and one substrate. Our aim is to find an optimal

  4. Control of Job Arrivals with Processing Time Windows into Batch Processor Buffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tajan, John Benedict Cheng

    Consider a two-stage manufacturing system composed of a batch processor and its upstream feeder processor. Jobs exit the feeder processor and join a queue in front of the batch processor, where they wait to be processed. ...

  5. pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    pH control of a fed batch reactor with precipitation J. Barraud a , Y. Creff a , N. Petit b,* a IFP of controlling the pH, in a fed batch reactor where precipitation occurs, is con- sidered. Due to the batch Keywords: pH control Fed batch process Precipitation a b s t r a c t In this paper, the problem

  6. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION SIGURD SKOGESTAD 1 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA S RENSEN 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION SIGURD SKOGESTAD 1 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA S RENSEN 2 and RAJAB LITTO column presented in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. The economic potential of the multivessel batch distillation under total re ux is demon- strated

  7. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on the Start-Up Operation of a Multivessel Batch Distillation Column

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Experimental and Theoretical Studies on the Start-Up Operation of a Multivessel Batch DistillationVersity of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway Multivessel batch distillation is a promising alternative to conventional batch distillation. Earlier studies proved the feasibility of temperature control in a closed

  8. On the Dynamics of Batch Distillation : A Study of Parametric Sensitivity in Ideal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    On the Dynamics of Batch Distillation : A Study of Parametric Sensitivity in Ideal Binary Columns sensitivity in batch distillation processes. By considering the effect of small changes in the operating #12; 1 Introduction Batch distillation has become of increasing importance in industry during the last

  9. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION -EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION -EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION Bernd Wittgens and Sigurd Skogestad1 The experimental veri cation of the operation of a multivessel batch distillation column, operated under total re vessels, provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. We propose a simple

  10. MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION SIGURD SKOGESTAD 1 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA SRENSEN 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION SIGURD SKOGESTAD 1 , BERND WITTGENS, EVA SØRENSEN 2 and RAJAB LITTO column presented in this paper provides a generalization of previously proposed batch distillation schemes. The economic potential of the multivessel batch distillation under total reflux is demon­ strated

  11. Minimal time control of fed-batch bioreactor with product Terence Bayen Francis Mairet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Minimal time control of fed-batch bioreactor with product inhibition T´erence Bayen · Francis-batch bioreactors, in presence of an inhibitory product, which is released by the biomass proportionally to its Introduction Fed-batch operation of bioreactor is a popular operating mode used in industry as the limiting

  12. Effect of Alumina Source on the Rate of Melting Demonstrated with Nuclear Waste Glass Batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, David A.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose; Riley, Brian J.; Schweiger, Michael J.

    2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The melting behaviors of three glass batches formulated to vitrify high-level waste were compared. These batches, otherwise identical, differed in the alumina source: one was prepared with corundum (Al2O3), another with gibbsite [Al(OH)3], and the other with boehmite [AlO(OH)]. Batch samples, in the form of loose batches or pressed pellets, were heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The expansion of pellets was monitored photographically. Quenched samples of batches, heated in crucibles, were thin-sectioned, investigated with optical microscopy, and analyzed with X-ray diffraction to quantify crystalline phases. Finally, batch-to-glass conversion was investigated with thermal analysis. Corundum was still present in one batch up to 900°C whereas gibbsite and boehmite dissolved below 500°C. In the batch with corundum, quartz, the source of silica, dissolved marginally earlier than in the batches with gibbsite and boehmite. Unlike the batch with corundum that exhibited considerable foaming, the batches with gibbsite and boehmite did not produce primary foam and made a more homogeneous glass. The occurrence of primary foam in the batch with corundum is a likely cause of a low rate of melting within the cold cap of a large-scale electric melter.

  13. Optimisation of sanitary landfill leachate treatment in a sequencing batch reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimisation of sanitary landfill leachate treatment in a sequencing batch reactor A. Spagni, S al. 1988; Kjeldsen et al. 2002). Among several technologies, sequen- cing batch reactors (SBRs) haveH and oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) have been frequently used for monitoring and control of batch reactors

  14. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  15. Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by alkyl lithiums

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Rashmi R

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -butyl lithium using cyclohexane as the solvent, The polymerization is carried out in an isothermal batch reactor at a temperature of. 5D C. The proposed reaction proceeds by a homogenous anionic mechanism. The mathematical model developed by Edgar (6..., propagat)on and their kinetics, In this work the experimentally detersnined molecu]ar weight distribution and monomer conversions are compared with the results predicted by a mathematical model developed by Edgar (11). Rate constants determined by Hsieh...

  16. Dynamic Control for Batch Process Systems Using Stochastic Utility Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hongsuk

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Amarnath Banerjee Committee Members, César O. Malavé James A. Wall Yoonsuck Choe Head of Department, Brett A. Peters August 2011 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering...: Dr. Amarnath Banerjee Most research studies in the batch process control problem are focused on optimizing system performance. The methods address the problem by minimizing single criterion such as cycle time and tardiness, or bi...

  17. SLUDGE BATCH 4 SIMULANT FLOWSHEET STUDIES: PHASE II RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M; David Best, D

    2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will transition from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) processing to Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) processing in early fiscal year 2007. Tests were conducted using non-radioactive simulants of the expected SB4 composition to determine the impact of varying the acid stoichiometry during the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) process. The work was conducted to meet the Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW/DWPF/TTR-2004-0031 and followed the guidelines of a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TT&QAP). The flowsheet studies are performed to evaluate the potential chemical processing issues, hydrogen generation rates, and process slurry rheological properties as a function of acid stoichiometry. Initial SB4 flowsheet studies were conducted to guide decisions during the sludge batch preparation process. These studies were conducted with the estimated SB4 composition at the time of the study. The composition has changed slightly since these studies were completed due to changes in the sludges blended to prepare SB4 and the estimated SB3 heel mass. The following TTR requirements were addressed in this testing: (1) Hydrogen and nitrous oxide generation rates as a function of acid stoichiometry; (2) Acid quantities and processing times required for mercury removal; (3) Acid quantities and processing times required for nitrite destruction; and (4) Impact of SB4 composition (in particular, oxalate, manganese, nickel, mercury, and aluminum) on DWPF processing (i.e. acid addition strategy, foaming, hydrogen generation, REDOX control, rheology, etc.).

  18. REAL WASTE TESTING OF SLUDGE BATCH 5 MELTER FEED RHEOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Stone, M.

    2010-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Clogging of the melter feed loop at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) has reduced the throughput of Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) processing. After completing a data review, DWPF attributed the clogging to the rheological properties of the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) project. The yield stress of the SB5 melter feed material was expected to be high, based on the relatively high pH of the SME product and the rheological results of a previous Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  19. Increased CPC batch size study for Tank 42 sludge in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of experiments have been completed at TNX for the sludge-only REDOX adjusted flowsheet using Tank 42 sludge simulant in response to the Technical Task Request HLW/DWPT/TTR-980013 to increase CPC batch sizes. By increasing the initial SRAT batch size, a melter feed batch at greater waste solids concentration can be prepared and thus increase melter output per batch by about one canister. The increased throughput would allow DWPF to dispose of more waste in a given time period thus shortening the overall campaign.

  20. Bosonic Matrix Theory and Matrix Dbranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop new tools for an in-depth study of our recent proposal for Matrix Theory. We construct the anomaly-free and finite planar continuum limit of the ground state with SO(2^{13}) symmetry matching with the tadpole and tachyon free IR stable high temperature ground state of the open and closed bosonic string. The correspondence between large N limits and spacetime effective actions is demonstrated more generally for an arbitrary D25brane ground state which might include brane-antibrane pairs or NS-branes and which need not have an action formulation. Closure of the finite N matrix Lorentz algebra nevertheless requires that such a ground state is simultaneously charged under all even rank antisymmetric matrix potentials. Additional invariance under the gauge symmetry mediated by the one-form matrix potential requires a ground state charged under the full spectrum of antisymmetric (p+1)-form matrix potentials with p taking any integer value less than 26. Matrix Dbrane democracy has a beautiful large N remnant in the form of mixed Chern-Simons couplings in the effective Lagrangian whenever the one-form gauge symmetry is nonabelian.

  1. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

  2. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  3. On the Dynamics of Batch Distillation : A Study of Parametric Sensitivity in Ideal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    On the Dynamics of Batch Distillation : A Study of Parametric Sensitivity in Ideal Binary Columns distillation processes. By considering the e ect of small changes in the operating parameters, e.g., initial-mail: jacobsen@elixir.e.kth.se 1 #12;1 Introduction Batch distillation has become of increasing importance

  4. Integrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Integrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel E. K distillation for separating homogeneous minimum-boiling azeotropic mixtures, where the extractive agent and a control structure for the batch extractive middle vessel distillation is proposed. In extractive

  5. Integrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Integrated Design, Operation and Control of Batch Extractive Distillation with a Middle Vessel E. K distillation for separating homogeneous minimum­boiling azeotropic mixtures, where the extractive agent and a control structure for the batch extractive middle vessel distillation is proposed. In extractive

  6. SEPARATION OF TERNARY HETEROAZEOTROPIC MIXTURES IN A CLOSED MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION-DECANTER HYBRID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    SEPARATION OF TERNARY HETEROAZEOTROPIC MIXTURES IN A CLOSED MULTIVESSEL BATCH DISTILLATION, Trondheim, Norway The feasibility of a novel multivessel batch distillation-decanter hybrid for simultaneous enables us to make direct use of the distillation line (or residue curve) map. Simple rules for predicting

  7. THE TEMPERATURE-LIMITED FED-BATCH TECHNIQUE FOR CONTROL OF ESCHERICHIA COLI CULTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enfors, Sven-Olof

    from 18 to 37 °C. A dynamic simulation model of the TLFB technique was developed and the results wereTHE TEMPERATURE-LIMITED FED-BATCH TECHNIQUE FOR CONTROL OF ESCHERICHIA COLI CULTURES MARIE SVENSSON with emphasis on the temperature-limited fed-batch (TLFB) culture. The TLFB technique controls the oxygen

  8. Robust controller design for temperature tracking problems in jacketed batch reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palanki, Srinivas

    Robust controller design for temperature tracking problems in jacketed batch reactors Vishak for temperature tracking problems in batch reactors in the presence of parametric uncertainty. The controller has]. Control is achieved by manipulating the heat content from the jacket to the reactor. In the past

  9. APPLIED MICROBIAL AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY Electricity production from xylose in fed-batch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -batch and continuous-flow microbial fuel cells Liping Huang & Bruce E. Logan Received: 23 March 2008 /Revised: 30 May-scale (0.77 l) air-cathode, brush- anode microbial fuel cell (MFC) operated in fed-batch mode using xylose vary with xylose loading. Keywords Microbial fuel cell . Xylose . Degradation . Power production

  10. Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in a Batch Production System: a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in a Batch Production System: a Case Study Luciano a case study of an implementation of a new method for Production Leveling designed for batch production. It includes prioritizing criteria of products and level production plan. Moreover, it was applied

  11. Design of Batch Tube Reactor 377 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 9193, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Design of Batch Tube Reactor 377 Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology Vol. 91­93, 2001 Copyright unparalleled environmental, economic, and strategic benefits. However, low-cost, high-yield technologies for varying reaction con- ditions. In this article, heat transfer for batch tubes is analyzed to derive

  12. Integrated Scheduling and Dynamic Optimization of Batch Processes Using State Equipment Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Integrated Scheduling and Dynamic Optimization of Batch Processes Using State Equipment Networks value to existing assets Improving plant reliability 1 J.M. Wassick and J. Ferrio. Extending A batch plant with existing equipment A time horizon to make products Dynamic models of process operations

  13. Optimization of Fed-Batch Saccharomyces cereWisiae Fermentation Using Dynamic Flux Balance Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    ARTICLES Optimization of Fed-Batch Saccharomyces cereWisiae Fermentation Using Dynamic Flux Balance metabolism with dynamic mass balances on key extracellular species. Model-based dynamic optimization concentration profiles, and the final batch time are treated as decision variables in the dynamic optimization

  14. A batch reactor heat recovery challenge problem Johannes Jschke, Sigurd Skogestad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    A batch reactor heat recovery challenge problem Johannes Jäschke, Sigurd Skogestad Department reactors, which are discharged periodically. A cold process stream is to be used as a utility, and is split periods of the batch reactors, the reactor effluents are fed into the secondary sides of the heat

  15. Intelligent monitoring system for long-term control of Sequencing Batch Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instruments Italy to test the potentials of monitoring systems applied to biological wastewater treatment Sequencing Batch Reactors (SBRs) are widely used as a flexible and low-cost process for biological wastewater-scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) treating nitrogen-rich wastewater (sanitary landfill leachate). The paper

  16. Neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, E.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the many conflicting experimental results, examination is made of the neutrino mass matrix in order to determine possible masses and mixings. It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the electron, muon, and tau neutrinos is similar in form to those of the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed neutrino masses results from the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism. Analysis of masses and mixings for the neutrinos is performed using general structures for the Majorana mass matrix. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the neutrino masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. A very recent experimental neutrino mass result and its implications are discussed. Some general properties of matrices with structure similar to the Dirac mass matrices are discussed.

  17. Design, implementation, and operation of a class based batch queue scheduler for VAX/VMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, K.

    1988-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermilab found that the standard VMS batch configuration options were inadequate for the job mix that exists on the Fermilab central computer facility VAX cluster. Accordingly, Fermilab designed and implemented a class based batch queue scheduler. This scheduler makes use of the standard VMS job controller and batch system. Users interact with the scheduler at job submission time by specification of CPU time limits and batch job characteristics. This scheduler allows Fermilab to make efficient use of our large heterogeneous VAX cluster which contains machines ranging from a VAX 780 to a VAX 8800. The scheduler was implemented using the VMS system services $GETQUI and $SNDJBC, without changes to the existing VMS job scheduler. As a result, the scheduler should remain compatible with future VMS versions. This session will discuss the design goals, implementation, and operational experience with Fermilab's class based batch queue scheduler.

  18. Neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capps, R.H.; Strobel, E.L.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is assumed that the Dirac mass matrix for the neutrinos (..nu../sub e/,..nu../sub ..mu../,..nu../sub tau/) is similar in form to those for the quarks and charged leptons, and that the smallness of the observed ..nu.. masses results from the Gell-Mann--Ramond--Slansky mechanism. It is shown that if certain tentative experimental results concerning the ..nu.. masses and mixing angles are confirmed, significant limitations may be placed on the Majorana mass matrix. The most satisfactory simple assumption concerning the Majorana mass matrix is that it is approximately proportional to the Dirac mass matrix. Some general properties of the Dirac matrices are discussed.

  19. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

  20. SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.; Pareizs, J.

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank 12 samples were pulled on February 9, 2010 following slurry operations by H-Tank Farm. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 4 and two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 12 were received in the SRNL Shielded Cells. Each tank's samples were composited into clean 500 mL polyethylene storage bottles and weighed. The composited Tank 4 sample was 428.27 g and the composited Tank 12 sample was 502.15 g. As expected there are distinct compositional differences between Tank 4 and Tank 12 sludges. The Tank 12 slurry is much higher in Al, Hg, Mn, and Th, and much lower in Fe, Ni, S, and U than the Tank 4 slurry. The Tank 4 sludge definitely makes the more significant contribution of S to any sludge batch blend. This S, like that observed during SB6 washing, is best monitored by looking at the total S measured by digesting the sample and analyzing by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Alternatively, one can measure the soluble S by ICP-AES and adjust the value upward by approximately 15% to have a pretty good estimate of the total S in the slurry. Soluble sulfate measurements by ion chromatography (IC) will be biased considerably lower than the actual total S, the difference being due to the non-sulfate soluble S and the undissolved S. Tank 12 sludge is enriched in U-235, and hence samples transferred into SRNL from the Tank Farm will need to be placed on the reportable special nuclear material inventory and tracked for total U per SRNL procedure requirements.

  1. Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industry’s energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

  2. Statistical Review of Data from DWPF's Process Samples for Batches 19 Through 30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.B.

    1999-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements derived from samples taken during the processing of batches 19 through 30 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) affords an opportunity for review and comparisons. This report has looked at some of the statistics from these data. Only the data reported by the DWPF lab (that is, the data provided by the lab as representative of the samples taken) are available for this analysis. In some cases, the sample results reported may be a subset of the sample results generated by the analytical procedures. A thorough assessment of the DWPF lab's analytical procedures would require the complete set of data. Thus, the statistics reported here, specifically, as they relate to analytical uncertainties, are limited to the reported data for these samples, A fell for the consistency of the incoming slurry is the estimation of the components of variation for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipts. In general, for all of the vessels, the data from batches after 21 show smaller batch-to-batch variation than the data from all the batches. The relative contributions of batch-to-batch versus residual, which includes analytical, are presented in these analyses.

  3. Conversion of batch to molten glass, II: Dissolution of quartz particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Marcial, Jose; Swearingen, Kevin J.; Henager, Samuel H.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E.

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Quartz dissolution during the batch-to-glass conversion influences the melt viscosity and ultimately the temperature at which the glass forms. Batches to make a high-alumina borosilicate glass (formulated for the vitrification of nuclear waste) were heated as 5°C min-1 and quenched from the temperatures of 400-1200°C at 100°C intervals. As a silica source, the batches contained quartz with particles ranging from 5 to 195 µm. The content of unreacted quartz in the samples was determined with x-ray diffraction. Most of fine quartz has dissolved during the early batch reactions (at temperatures <800°C), whereas coarser quartz dissolved mostly in a continuous glass phase via diffusion. The mass-transfer coefficients were assessed from the data as functions of the initial particle sizes and the temperature. A series of batch was also tested that contained nitrated components and additions of sucrose known to accelerate melting. While sucrose addition had no discernible impact on quartz dissolution, nitrate batches melted somewhat more slowly than batches containing carbonates and hydroxides in addition to nitrates.

  4. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Trowbridge, Frank R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  5. Multi-batch slip stacking in the Main Injector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiya, K.; Berenc, T.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Main Injector (MI) at Fermilab is planning to use multi-batch slip stacking scheme in order to increase the proton intensity at the NuMI target by about a factor of 1.5.[1] [2] By using multi-batch slip stacking, a total of 11 Booster batches are merged into 6, 5 double ones and one single. We have successfully demonstrated the multibatch slip stacking in MI and accelerated a record intensity of 4.6E13 particle per cycle to 120 GeV. The technical issues and beam loss mechanisms for multibatch slip stacking scheme are discussed.

  6. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  7. Progress in Multi-Batch Slip Stacking in the Fermilab Main Injector and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiya, K.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-batch slip stacking has been used for operations since January, 2008 and effectively increased proton intensity to the NuMI target by 50% in a Main Injector (MI) cycle. The MI accepts 11 batches at injection energy from the Booster, and sends two batches to antiproton production and nine to the NuMI beam line. The total beam power in a cycle was increased to 340 kW on average. We have been doing beam studies in order to increase the beam power to 400 kW and to control the beam loss. We will also discuss 12 batch slip stacking scheme which is going to be used for future neutrino experiments.

  8. OVERVIEW OF TESTING TO SUPPORT PROCESSING OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 IN THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C

    2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site began processing of its third sludge batch in March 2004. To avoid a feed outage in the facility, the next sludge batch will have to be prepared and ready for transfer to the DWPF by the end of 2006. The next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), will consist of a significant volume of HM-type sludge. HM-type sludge is very high in aluminum compared to the mostly Purex-type sludges that have been processed to date. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with Liquid Waste Operations to define the sludge preparation plans and to perform testing to support qualification and processing of SB4. Significant challenges have arisen during SB4 preparation and testing to include poor sludge settling behavior and lower than desired projected melt rates. An overview of the testing activities is provided.

  9. Countercurrent Enzymatic Saccharification of Lignocellulosic Biomass and Improvements Over Batch Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zentay, Agustin Nicholas

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of starchy biomass (e.g., corn), which competes with food. Using lignocellulose avoids competition with food; however, it is difficult to digest using traditional batch saccharification. This work investigates countercurrent saccharification as an alternative...

  10. Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch experiments and field comparison

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Nitrate and sulphate dynamics in peat subjected to different hydrological conditions: Batch concentrations were investigated in bioreactors, using peat samples from field sites influenced by different hydrologic regimes. In this experiment, peat samples were subjected to similar conditions to address

  11. Design and Optimization of Condenser and Centrifuge Units for Enhancement of a Batch Vacuum Frying System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A batch vacuum frying system, which processes fruits and vegetables, includes a frying pan, a surface-condenser, and a vacuum pump. With health and safety issues in mind, this research focused on developing a modified ...

  12. Tank 40 Final Sludge Batch 8 Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon(r) vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

  13. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  14. SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 40 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, David

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase III simulant flowsheet testing was completed using the latest composition estimates for SB6/Tank 40 feed to DWPF. The goals of the testing were to determine reasonable operating conditions and assumptions for the startup of SB6 processing in the DWPF. Testing covered the region from 102-159% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. Nitrite ion concentration was reduced to 90 mg/kg in the SRAT product of the lowest acid run. The 159% acid run reached 60% of the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) limit of 0.65 lb H2/hr, and then sporadically exceeded the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) limit of 0.223 lb H2/hr. Hydrogen generation rates peaked at 112% of the SME limit, but higher than targeted wt% total solids levels may have been partially responsible for rates seen. A stoichiometric factor of 120% met both objectives. A processing window for SB6 exists from 102% to something close to 159% based on the simulant results. An initial recommendation for SB6 processing is at 115-120% of the current DWPF stoichiometric acid equation. The addition of simulated Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) streams to the SRAT cycle had no apparent impact on the preferred stoichiometric factor. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 120%, 118.4% with ARP/MCU, and 159% stoichiometry were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 36 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 120% acid run reached 23% of the SRAT limit and 37% of the SME limit. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 29 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two processing issues, identified during SB6 Phase II flowsheet testing and qualification simulant testing, were monitored during Phase III. Mercury material balance closure was impacted by acid stoichiometry, and significant mercury was not accounted for in the highest acid run. Coalescence of elemental mercury droplets in the mercury water wash tank (MWWT) appeared to degrade with increasing stoichiometry. Observations were made of mercury scale formation in the SRAT condenser and MWWT. A tacky mercury amalgam with Rh, Pd, and Cu, plus some Ru and Ca formed on the impeller at 159% acid. It contained a significant fraction of the available Pd, Cu, and Rh as well as about 25% of the total mercury charged. Free (elemental) mercury was found in all of the SME products. Ammonia scrubbers were used during the tests to capture off-gas ammonia for material balance purposes. Significant ammonium ion formation was again observed during the SRAT cycle, and ammonia gas entered the off-gas as the pH rose during boiling. Ammonium ion production was lower than in the SB6 Phase II and the qualification simulant testing. Similar ammonium ion formation was seen in the ARP/MCU simulation as in the 120% flowsheet run. A slightly higher pH caused most of the ammonium to vaporize and collect in the ammonia scrubber reflux solution. Two periods of foaminess were noted. Neither required additional antifoam to control the foam growth. A steady foam layer formed during reflux in the 120% acid run. It was about an inch thick, but was 2-3 times more volume of bubbles than is typically seen during reflux. A similar foam layer also was seen during caustic boiling of the simulant during the ARP addition. While frequently seen with the radioactive sludge, foaminess during caustic boiling with simulants has been relatively rare. Two further flowsheet tests were performed and will be documented separately. One test was to evaluate the impact of process conditions that match current DWPF operation (lower rates). The second test was to evaluate the impact of SRAT/SME processing on the rheology of a modified Phase III simulant that had been made five times more viscous using ultrasonication.

  15. Design and Optimization of Condenser and Centrifuge Units for Enhancement of a Batch Vacuum Frying System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    of vacuum frying can be a feasible alternative method to produce chips with lower oil content and high quality color and texture (Garayo and Moreira, 2002). 7 Figure 2-1 displays the use of different deep-fat fryers in the commercial food industry.... Countertops are generally used in homes, while high efficiency batch fryers are employed in commercial (McDonalds, KFC, etc.) food services as well as industries (Frito Lay, Pringles, etc.). Application of a batch fryer is limited to frying small loads...

  16. aq ybt aq: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observing long-term trends detecting unrecognized sources (paper mills, fracking, natural gas Need easy-to-use data formats Improve emission inventories of:...

  17. aq ybs aq: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observing long-term trends detecting unrecognized sources (paper mills, fracking, natural gas Need easy-to-use data formats Improve emission inventories of:...

  18. aq hot aq: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    observing long-term trends detecting unrecognized sources (paper mills, fracking, natural gas Need easy-to-use data formats Improve emission inventories of:...

  19. Density Matrix Topological Insulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rivas; O. Viyuela; M. A. Martin-Delgado

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal noise can destroy topological insulators (TI). However we demonstrate how TIs can be made stable in dissipative systems. To that aim, we introduce the notion of band Liouvillian as the dissipative counterpart of band Hamiltonian, and show a method to evaluate the topological order of its steady state. This is based on a generalization of the Chern number valid for general mixed states (referred to as density matrix Chern value), which witnesses topological order in a system coupled to external noise. Additionally, we study its relation with the electrical conductivity at finite temperature, which is not a topological property. Nonetheless, the density matrix Chern value represents the part of the conductivity which is topological due to the presence of quantum mixed edge states at finite temperature. To make our formalism concrete, we apply these concepts to the two-dimensional Haldane model in the presence of thermal dissipation, but our results hold for arbitrary dimensions and density matrices.

  20. Optimal feeding strategy for the minimal time problem of a fed-batch bioreactor with mortality rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimal feeding strategy for the minimal time problem of a fed-batch bioreactor with mortality rate of finding an optimal feedback control for feeding a fed-batch bioreactor with one species and one substrate, Bioreactor. 1 Introduction This work is devoted to the study of a bioreactor which is operated in fed

  1. Utilizing Green Energy Prediction to Schedule Mixed Batch and Service Jobs in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Utilizing Green Energy Prediction to Schedule Mixed Batch and Service Jobs in Data Centers Baris on using immediately available green energy to supplement the non- renewable, or brown energy at the cost of canceling and rescheduling jobs whenever the green energy availability is too low [16]. In this paper we

  2. Precision vertical mixer processes 30,000 pound batch of solid rocket propellants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The world's largest solid rocket propellant mixer has been singled out for Honors in the mixers and blenders category of the 1986 Chemical Processing Vaaler Awards competition. The mixer, which is four times larger than any heretofore used, was specially designed and built for one of the nations' foremost manufacturers of rocket propellants. Developments in the fields of metallurgy, material handling, computerization and electronics permitted the giant step of manufacturing propellants in batch sizes up to 30,000 pounds. Until this time, 7000 pounds was considered the maximum size batch within the scope of hazards analysis. The vertical design of the mixer lends itself to an effective fire protection system. Infra-red detectors are used to sense a sudden heat rise. Should an emergency situation arise once the bowl is in the mix position and under vacuum, the protection system will activate within twelve seconds, deluge the product zone with water, rapidly drop the bowl and simultaneously disconnect the electric power. The design encompasses remote operation and emphasizes safety and reliability. The mixer permits propellant manufacturers to safely produce more uniform, even burning products. Its large batch size simplifies the problems with multiple batches within a simple engine. By reducing labor costs and affording other manufacturing economies, it increases productivity while cutting costs.

  3. Microbial Fuel Cells In this experiment, a batch mixed culture microbial fuel cell with Shewanella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Microbial Fuel Cells Abstract In this experiment, a batch mixed culture microbial fuel cell conditions under nitrogen gas. In the microbial fuel cell with Shewanella putrefaciens sp. 200 as catalysisM at pH=7. Introduction Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are systems that take advantage of certain

  4. Control strategies for reactive batch distillation Eva Swensen and Sigurd Skogestad"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Control strategies for reactive batch distillation Eva Swensen and Sigurd Skogestad" Department be combined directly with a distillation column by distilling off the light component product in order a maximum value in order to avoid break-through of an intermediate component in the distillate. This maximum

  5. Transfer-Free Batch Fabrication of Large-Area Suspended Graphene Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    heightened for the preparation of sus- pended graphene structures to ascertain graphene's fundamentalTransfer-Free Batch Fabrication of Large- Area Suspended Graphene Membranes Benjami´n Alema of the predicted properties arising from the two-dimensional nature of graphene1 4 can be obscured or altered

  6. Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Effect of Xylan and Lignin Removal by Batch and Flowthrough Pretreatment on the Enzymatic for pretreating cellulosic biomass, including higher hemicellulose sugar yields, enhanced cellulose digestibility understand these trade-offs, comparative data are reported on xylan and lignin removal and enzymatic

  7. Batch self-organizing maps based on city-block distances for interval variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    methods [14, 18]. K-means algorithm and fuzzy c-means are the most famous partitional approaches learning strategy which has both clustering and visualization properties. Different from K-means, SOM uses interval-valued data sets, in comparison with batch SOM algorithms based on adaptive and non

  8. Research article A modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    the characteristics of batch experiments and provides complete control over the reaction time; in addition, the setup-reactor SER experiments to investigate arsenic adsorption and transport on iron-oxide coated sand to column experiments and allows better control over system parameters such as pH, reaction time, and solid

  9. Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models Single neuron models Single layer models Nonlinear ANN Models

  10. On the Practical and Security Issues of Batch Content Distribution Via Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, John C.S.

    On the Practical and Security Issues of Batch Content Distribution Via Network Coding Qiming Li distribution via network coding has received a lot of attention lately. However, direct application of network distribution process to slow down the information dispersal or even deplete the network resource. Therefore

  11. Modeling of batch operations in the Defense Waste Processing Facility at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.G.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer model is in development to provide a dynamic simulation of batch operations within the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The DWPF will chemically treat high level waste materials from the site tank farm and vitrify the resulting slurry into a borosilicate glass for permanent disposal. The DWPF consists of three major processing areas: Salt Processing Cell (SPC), Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and the Melt Cell. Separate models have been developed for each of these process units using the SPEEDUP{trademark} software from Aspen Technology. Except for glass production in the Melt Cell, all of the chemical operations within DWPF are batch processes. Since the SPEEDUP software is designed for dynamic modeling of continuous processes, considerable effort was required to devise batch process algorithms. This effort was successful and the models are able to simulate batch operations and the dynamic behavior of the process. In this paper, we will describe the SPC model in some detail and present preliminary results from a few simulation studies.

  12. Elucidating the solid, liquid and gaseous products from batch pyrolysis of cotton-gin trash.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aquino, Froilan Ludana

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Cotton-gin trash (CGT) was pyrolyzed at different temperatures and reaction times using an externally-heated batch reactor. The average yields of output products (solid/char, liquid/bio-oil, and gaseous) were determined. The heating value (HV...

  13. Hybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi AZIMI@EECS.OREGONSTATE.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fern, Xiaoli Zhang

    motivating application we try to optimize the power output of nano-enhanced Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). MFCsHybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi AZIMI@EECS.OREGONSTATE.EDU Oregon State University Abstract Bayesian Optimization (BO) aims at optimizing an unknown function that is costly to evaluate. We

  14. Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammonium rich wastewater Fuzzy logic Biological nutrient removal a b s t r a c t The present paper reports and biological pro- cesses (Lema et al., 1988). Among several biological treatment sys- tems, sequencing batch confirm the effectiveness of the nitrite route for nitrogen removal optimisation in leachate treatment

  15. Clause Matrix Part 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the White Flag" | DepartmentCladding12-00123 K Clause Matrix

  16. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hastings, Matthew B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  17. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  18. Linearized supergravity from Matrix theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Kabat; W. Taylor

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the linearized supergravity potential between two objects arising from the exchange of quanta with zero longitudinal momentum is reproduced to all orders in 1/r by terms in the one-loop Matrix theory potential. The essential ingredient in the proof is the identification of the Matrix theory quantities corresponding to moments of the stress tensor and membrane current. We also point out that finite-N Matrix theory violates the equivalence principle.

  19. ANALYSIS OF SLUDGE BATCH 4 (MACROBATCH 5) FOR CANISTER S02902 AND SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6) FOR CANISTER S03317 DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reigel, M.; Bibler, N.

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 4 (SB4), Macrobatch 5 (MB5) on May 29, 2007. Sludge Batch 4 was a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) and SB4 material qualified in Tank 51. On November 28, 2008, DWPF began processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40 which is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from SB4, SB5 material qualified in Tank 51 and H-Canyon Pu and Np transfers. SB4 was processed using Frit 510 and SB5 used Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. During the processing of SB4 and SB5, glass samples were obtained during the pouring of canisters S02902 and S03317, respectively. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed (durability, chemical and radionuclide composition). The following observations and conclusions are drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of the oxides for the chemical composition of both the SB4 and SB5 pour stream glasses is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) acceptance limits (95 {le} sum of oxides {le} 105). (2) The calculated Sludge Dilution Factor (SDF) for SB4 is 2.52. The measured radionuclide content is in good agreement with the calculated values from the dried sludge results from the SB4 Waste Acceptance Production Specification (WAPS) sample (References 1 and 19). (3) The calculated SDF for SB5 is 2.60. The measured radionuclide content is in good agreement with the calculated values from the dried sludge results from the SB5 WAPS sample (References 2 and 20). (4) Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) analysis shows there are noble metal inclusions, primarily ruthenium, present in both pour stream samples. (5) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results show that the SB4 pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.67 g/L which is an order of magnitude lower than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (6) The PCT results show that the SB5 pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.72 g/ which is an order of magnitude lower than the EA glass. (7) The density of the SB4 glass is 2.5 g/cm{sup 3}. (8) The density of the SB5 glass is 2.6 g/cm{sup 3}.

  20. SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

  1. Batch polymerization of styrene and isoprene by n-butyl lithium initiator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Sayeed

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on these mechanisms Edgar (12) developed a mathema- tical model for polymerization of the above systems. In the present work polymerization reactions of styrene and isoprene via n-butyl lithium were studied at 80'C in n-hexane and cyclohexane solvents. Both... on the mechanisms proposed by Hsieh (18, 19, 20) Edgar (12) obtained an anlytical solution for calculating molecular weight di. stributions, monomer concentrations, initi. ator concentrations, and polymer species concentrations at any time, t, in a batch reactor...

  2. MODELING CST ION EXCHANGE FOR CESIUM REMOVAL FROM SCIX BATCHES 1 - 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is, through modeling, to predict the performance of Crystalline Silicotitinate (CST) for the removal of cesium from Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) Batches 1-4 (as proposed in Revision 16 of the Liquid Waste System Plan). The scope of this task is specified in Technical Task Request (TTR) 'SCIX Feed Modeling', HLE-TTR-2011-003, which specified using the Zheng, Anthony, Miller (ZAM) code to predict CST isotherms for six given SCIX feed compositions and the VErsatile Reaction and SEparation simulator for Liquid Chromatography (VERSE-LC) code to predict ion-exchange column behavior. The six SCIX feed compositions provided in the TTR represent SCIX Batches 1-4 and Batches 1 and 2 without caustic addition. The study also investigated the sensitivity in column performance to: (1) Flow rates of 5, 10, and 20 gpm with 10 gpm as the nominal flow; and (2) Temperatures of 25, 35, and 45 C with 35 C as the nominal temperature. The isotherms and column predictions presented in this report reflect the expected performance of engineered CST IE-911. This form of CST was used in experiments conducted at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that formed the basis for estimating model parameters (Hamm et al., 2002). As has been done previously, the engineered resin capacity is estimated to be 68% of the capacity of particulate CST without binder.

  3. Evaluation of batch leaching procedures for estimating metal mobility in glaciated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackovic, J.A.; Nikolaidis, N.P.; Chheda, P.; Carley, R.J.; Patton, E.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Batch leaching methods have been used for several decades to estimate the potential release of contaminants from soils. Four batch leaching procedures (toxicity characteristic leaching procedure, synthetic precipitation leaching procedure, deionized water leaching procedure, and California waste extraction test) were evaluated for their ability to realistically quantify the mobility of metals from previously contaminated glaciated soils. The study was conducted using soils from four different sites (three in Connecticut and one in Maine). The results of the batch leaching procedures were compared with a set of continuous column leaching experiments performed at two different flowrates and two influent pH values. The results suggested that the synthetic precipitation leaching procedure (SPLP) was more realistic than the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP), but still a conservative leaching estimate for evaluating the potential for metal mobility in glaciated soils. This study suggests that using SPLP as a test for estimating metal cleanup levels will result in lower remediation costs relative to TCLP or waste extraction test (WET), but still maintain a high level of confidence in the protection of ground water quality.

  4. Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

  5. Over Batch Analysis for the LLNL DOE-STD-3013 Packaging System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, D C; Dodson, K

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This document addresses the concern raised in the Savannah River Site (SRS) Acceptance Criteria about receiving an item that is over batched by 1.0 kg of fissile materials. This document shows that the occurrence of this is incredible. Some of the Department of Energy Standard 3013 (DOE-STD-3013) requirements are described in Section 2.1. The SRS requirement is discussed in Section 2.2. Section 2.3 describes the way fissile materials are handled in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Plutonium Facility (B332). Based on the material handling discussed in Section 2.3, there are only three errors that could result in a shipping container being over batched. These are: incorrect measurement of the item, selecting the wrong item to package, and packaging two items into a single shipping container. The analysis in Section 3 shows that the first two events are incredible because of the controls that exist at LLNL. The third event is physically impossible. Therefore, it is incredible for an item to be shipped to SRS that is more than 1.0 kg of fissile materials over batched.

  6. Glass matrix armor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Calkins, Noel C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An armor system which utilizes glass. A plurality of constraint cells are mounted on a surface of a substrate, which is metal armor plate or a similar tough material, such that the cells almost completely cover the surface of the substrate. Each constraint cell has a projectile-receiving wall parallel to the substrate surface and has sides which are perpendicular to and surround the perimeter of the receiving wall. The cells are mounted such that, in one embodiment, the substrate surface serves as a sixth side or closure for each cell. Each cell has inside of it a plate, termed the front plate, which is parallel to and in contact with substantially all of the inside surface of the receiving wall. The balance of each cell is completely filled with a projectile-abrading material consisting of glass and a ceramic material and, in certain embodiments, a polymeric material. The glass may be in monolithic form or particles of ceramic may be dispersed in a glass matrix. The ceramic material may be in monolithic form or may be in the form of particles dispersed in glass or dispersed in said polymer.

  7. Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, A.

    2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

  8. SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

  9. Analysis of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch4) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample for Canister s02312

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 3 (SB3), Macrobatch 4 (MB4) in March 2004 as part of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Batch 272. Sludge Batch 3 is a blend of the contents Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 2 (SB2), the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51 and Canyon Np solution additions made directly to Tank 40. The sludge transferred from Tank 51 contained sludges from Tanks 7, 18 and 19 along with precipitated solutions of U, Pu/Gd and Am/Cm from the F and H Canyons. The blend of sludge from Tank 51, Tank 40, and the Canyon additions defines SB3 (or MB4). The sludge slurry is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Tank and fed to the melter. During the processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample. This glass sample is taken to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program and complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two glass samples were obtained while pouring Canisters S02312 and S02315 which were sent to the Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility. Sample S02312 was designated for analysis, while sample S02315 was designated for archival storage. This report contains the visual observations of the as-received glass sample, results for the density, chemical composition, the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and the calculated and measured radionuclide results needed for the Production Record for Canister S02312. The following conclusions were drawn from the examination of this DWPF pour stream glass sample: (1) The glass sample taken during the filling of DWPF Canister S02312 weighed 41.69 g and was generally dark and reflective. (2) Minor inclusions, on the order of 1 {micro}m in size, of noble metals were seen in the glass via contained scanning electron microscopy and confirmed from their x-ray fluorescence spectra. (3) The results for the composition of glass sample S02312, except for U, are in reasonable agreement (15% or better) with the DWPF SME Batch 319 results, the SME batch being fed to the melter when the sample was collected. (4) The calculated waste dilution factor (WDF) was 2.19. The measured values of the radionuclides and noble metals in the glass sample generally corresponded well with the calculated values determined using sludge slurry results from Reference 9 and the WDF. (5) The noble metal content of the glass indicates that the noble metals are largely swept from the melter with the glass based upon the noble metals analyzed in the glass and those predicted in the sludge from the WDF. (6) Comparison of the noble metal results for the two digestion methods (mixed acid and alkali fusion) indicates that the alkali fusion method is preferred for the determination of noble metals in glass. (7) The PCT results for the glass (normalized release of B: 1.09 g/L, Na: 1.03 g/L, and Li: 0.94 g/L) indicate that it meets the waste acceptance criterion for durability. (8) The normalized release rates for the measured radionuclides were less than those for the major soluble elements in the waste (B, Na, and Li) with the exception of Tc-99 which was released at a rate similar to that the soluble elements in the leachate. (9) The measured density of the glass was 2.58 {+-} 0.11 g/cm{sup 3}.

  10. activated carbon-sequencing batch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    allows you to automatically compensate and analyze a group of files with one analysis template and compensation matrix. Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: the output...

  11. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock or Kohn-Sham density functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large non-metallic materials and metals at high temperatures.

  12. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.; Gibbs, W.S.

    1991-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix materials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions are disclosed. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms. 3 figures.

  13. Plasma enhanced atomic layer batch processing of aluminum doped titanium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehnert, Wolfgang; Ruhl, Guenther; Gschwandtner, Alexander [Infineon Technologies AG, Wernerwerkstrasse 2, Regensburg, 93049 (Germany); R3T GmbH, Hochstrasse 1, Taufkirchen, 82024 (Germany)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among many promising high-k dielectrics, TiO{sub 2} is an interesting candidate because of its relatively high k value of over 40 and its easy integration into existing semiconductor manufacturing schemes. The most critical issues of TiO{sub 2} are its low electrical stability and its high leakage current density. However, doping TiO{sub 2} with Al has shown to yield significant improvement of layer quality on Ru electrodes [S. K. Kim et al., Adv. Mater. 20, 1429 (2008)]. In this work we investigated if atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Al doped TiO{sub 2} is feasible in a batch system. Electrical characterizations were done using common electrode materials like TiN, TaN, or W. Additionally, the effect of plasma enhanced processing in this reactor was studied. For this investigation a production batch ALD furnace has been retrofitted with a plasma source which can be used for post deposition anneals with oxygen radicals as well as for directly plasma enhanced ALD. After evaluation of several Ti precursors a deposition process for AlTiO{sub x} with excellent film thickness and composition uniformity was developed. The effects of post deposition anneals, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} interlayers between electrode and TiO{sub 2}, Al doping concentration, plasma enhanced deposition and electrode material type on leakage current density are shown. An optimized AlTiO{sub x} deposition process on TaN electrodes yields to leakage current density of 5 x 10{sup -7} A/cm{sup 2} at 2 V and k values of about 35. Thus, it could be demonstrated that a plasma enhanced batch ALD process for Al doped TiO{sub 2} is feasible with acceptable leakage current density on a standard electrode material.

  14. Investigation of Rheological Impacts on Sludge Batch 3 as Insoluble Solids and Wash Endpoints are Adjusted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellinger, T. L.

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing and immobilizing radioactive sludge slurry into a durable borosilicate glass. The DWPF has already processed three sludge batches (Sludge Batch 1A, Sludge Batch 1B, and Sludge Batch 2) and is currently processing the fourth sludge batch (Sludge Batch 3). A sludge batch is defined as a single tank of sludge slurry or a combination of sludge slurries from different tanks that has been or will be qualified before being transferred to DWPF. As a part of the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) qualification task, rheology measurements of the sludge slurry were requested at different insoluble solids loadings. These measurements were requested in order to gain insight into potential processing problems that may occur as the insoluble solids are adjusted up or down (by concentration or dilution) during the process. As a part of this study, a portion of the ''as received'' SB3 sample was washed with inhibited water (0.015 M NaOH and 0.015 M NaNO2) to target 0.5M Na versus a measured 1M Na in the supernate. The purpose of the ''washing'' step was to allow a comparison of the SB3 rheological data to the rheological data collected for Sludge Batch 2 (SB2) and to determine if there was a dependence of the yield stress and consistency as a function of washing. The ''as received'' SB3 rheology data was also compared to SB3 simulants prepared by the Simulant Development Program in order to provide guidance for selecting a simulant that is more representative of the rheological properties of the radioactive sludge slurry. A summary of the observations, conclusions are: (1) The yield stress and plastic viscosity increased as the weight percent insoluble solids were increased for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples, at a fixed pH. (2) For the same insoluble solids loading, the yield stress for the SB2 sample is approximately a factor of three higher than the ''as received'' SB3 sample. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. This difference is probably due to the different Na concentrations of the slurries. (3) The yield stress for the SB2 sample at 17.5 wt. % insoluble solids loading is four times higher than the ''washed'' SB3 sample at 16.5 wt. % insoluble solids. There also appears to be small difference in the plastic viscosity. The differences for the yield stress and consistency can be explained by the differences in the Fe and Na concentrations of the sludge slurry and the anion concentrations of the resulting supernates. (4) The rheological properties (i.e. yield stress and plastic viscosity), as the insoluble solids are adjusted, for the ''as received'' and ''washed'' SB3 samples are different. The plastic viscosity curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample was higher than the plastic viscosity curve for SB3 ''washed'' sample. The yield stress curve for the ''washed'' SB3 sample is slightly lower than the ''as received'' SB3 sample up until {approx}19 wt. % insoluble solids. The ''washed'' SB3 sample then exceeds the yield stress curve for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. This rheological behavior is probably due to the difference in the Na concentration of the supernate for the samples. (5) No unusual behavior, such as air entrainment, was noted for the ''as received'' SB3 sample. (6) The observed physical properties of the SB3 sample changed after washing. The ''washed'' SB3 sample entrained air readily at higher insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 14.1, 16.5, 19.5 wt. %) as it did for SB2. The air entrainment appeared to dissipate for the SB3 sample at the lower insoluble solids loadings (i.e. 9.7 and 11.7 wt. %). (7) The physical behavior of SB3 can be influenced by controlling the Na concentration in the supernate and the wt. % insoluble solids. The cause for the air entrainment in the ''washed'' SB3 sample could be due to a change in the particle size during the washing step. (8) The SB3 simulants prepared for the Simulant Development Program were approximately a factor of 1.6 to 4 times higher for yield stress and 2.6 to 4 times higher

  15. Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev [OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK)(Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

  16. A Batch Wafer Scale LIGA Assembly and Packaging Technique vai Diffusion Bonding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

    1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique using diffusion bonding (or solid-state welding) has been used to achieve batch fabrication of two- level nickel LIGA structures. Interlayer alignment accuracy of less than 1 micron is achieved using press-fit gauge pins. A mini-scale torsion tester was built to measure the diffusion bond strength of LIGA formed specimens that has shown successful bonding at temperatures of 450"C at 7 ksi pressure with bond strength greater than 100 Mpa. Extensions to this basic process to allow for additional layers and thereby more complex assemblies as well as commensurate packaging are discussed.

  17. Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  18. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Joseph Wade Button, B. S. , Texas ASM University Co-Chairmen of Advisory Committee: Mr. Bob M. Gallaway and Dr. Dallas N. Little A field test was conducted to evaluate the use of hydrated lime as an antistrip additive in hot mix asphalt concrete.... Lime was added in the pugmill of the batch plant, on the cold feed belt, and through the fines feeder of the drum mix plant. The asphalt and aggregates used were characterized in the laboratory. Asphalt concrete mixture tests included laboratory...

  19. FRIT OPTIMIZATION FOR SLUDGE BATCH PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K.

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

  20. RECOMMENDED FRIT COMPOSITION FOR INITIAL SLUDGE BATCH 5 PROCESSING AT THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Frit Development Team recommends that the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) utilize Frit 418 for initial processing of high level waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The extended SB5 preparation time and need for DWPF feed have necessitated the use of a frit that is already included on the DWPF procurement specification. Frit 418 has been used previously in vitrification of Sludge Batches 3 and 4. Paper study assessments predict that Frit 418 will form an acceptable glass when combined with SB5 over a range of waste loadings (WLs), typically 30-41% based on nominal projected SB5 compositions. Frit 418 has a relatively high degree of robustness with regard to variation in the projected SB5 composition, particularly when the Na{sub 2}O concentration is varied. The acceptability (chemical durability) and model applicability of the Frit 418-SB5 system will be verified experimentally through a variability study, to be documented separately. Frit 418 has not been designed to provide an optimal melt rate with SB5, but is recommended for initial processing of SB5 until experimental testing to optimize a frit composition for melt rate can be completed. Melt rate performance can not be predicted at this time and must be determined experimentally. Note that melt rate testing may either identify an improved frit for SB5 processing (one which produces an acceptable glass at a faster rate than Frit 418) or confirm that Frit 418 is the best option.

  1. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter.

  2. SULFATE RETENTION IN HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 GLASSES: A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D

    2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Early projections of the Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) composition predicted relatively high concentrations of alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, 23.5 wt%) and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, 1.2 wt%) in the sludge. A high concentration of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the sludge, combined with Na{sub 2}O additions in the frit, raises the potential for nepheline crystallization in the glass. However, strategic frit development efforts at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have shown that frits containing a relatively high concentration of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} can both suppress nepheline crystallization and improve melt rates. A high sulfate concentration is a concern to the DWPF as it can lead to the formation of sulfate inclusions in the glass and/or the formation of a molten, sulfate-rich phase atop the melt pool. To avoid these issues, a sulfate concentration limit of 0.4 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass was originally set in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) used at DWPF. It was later shown that this limit could be increased to 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} in glass for the Frit 418, Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) system.

  3. INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectra from the “at-line” spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the “odd” shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it “odd” shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

  4. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

  5. Determination of Reportable Radionuclides for DWPF Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, IAEA Safeguards Reporting for HLW, requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from High Level Waste Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 2) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Macrobatch 4 (also referred to as Sludge Batch 3). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Task Technical Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-03-0005, Revision 1 entitled Sludge Batch 3 SRTC Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing, in part, Subtask 3 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2003-00249, Rev. 1 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2004-00262. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for Sludge Batch 3 (Macro Batch 4), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations.

  6. DARS BATCH PROCESSING O F F I C E O F T H E R E G I S T R A R

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    DARS BATCH PROCESSING O F F I C E O F T H E R E G I S T R A R UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. About DARS Batch a. History b. Capabilities 2. Quick Reference Guide 3. The DARS of Batches a. Monitoring the status of a request b. Viewing and printing 6. FAQs 7. DARS Analysis Tables 8

  7. Matrix adaptation in discriminative vector quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachmann, Gabriel

    . Gabriel Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix adaptation in discriminative vector quantization Petra

  8. Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biehl, Michael

    Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;Matrix Learning in Learning Vector Quantization Michael Biehl1 , Barbara

  9. LOCH: Open Access Implementation Responsibility Matrix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzak, Anna

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Draft Responsibility Matrix for College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine for REF Open Access requirements implementation.

  10. Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

    2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

  11. Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed of two stages, and at both the intermediate and the final content levels in the digestion vessel the rings were present. The rings had not been seen previously during glass digestions and were not present in the Analytical Reference Glass (ARG) standard samples digested, in separate vessels, along with the DWPF glass. What follows in this report are the results and analyses from various scoping experiments done in order to explain the anomalous behavior observed with DWPF glass S02244, along with a comparison with tests on sample S02247 where the anomalous wetting behavior was not observed.

  12. Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/?Fe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

  14. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

  15. Matrix subdivision schemes Albert Cohen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Albert

    in the analysis of multivariate scalar schemes, in subdivision processes corresponding to shift­invariant spaces extension of the well studied case of subdivision schemes with scalar masks. Such schemes arise of \\Phi. 1 #12; 1.Introduction Matrix subdivision schemes play an important role in the analysis of mul

  16. Supersymmetry in Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Guhr

    2010-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Supersymmetry is nowadays indispensable for many problems in Random Matrix Theory. It is presented here with an emphasis on conceptual and structural issues. An introduction to supermathematics is given. The Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation as well as its generalization and superbosonization are explained. The supersymmetric non-linear sigma model, Brownian motion in superspace and the color-flavor transformation are discussed.

  17. UO{sub 2} corrosion in high surface-area-to-volume batch experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J. K.; Finch, R. J.; Hanchar, J. M.; Wolf, S. F.

    1997-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsaturated drip tests have been used to investigate the alteration of unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent UO{sub 2} fuel in an unsaturated environment such as may be expected in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. In these tests, simulated groundwater is periodically injected onto a sample at 90 C in a steel vessel. The solids react with the dripping groundwater and water condensed on surfaces to form a suite of U(VI) alteration phases. Solution chemistry is determined from leachate at the bottom of each vessel after the leachate stops interacting with the solids. A more detailed knowledge of the compositional evolution of the leachate is desirable. By providing just enough water to maintain a thin film of water on a small quantity of fuel in batch experiments, we can more closely monitor the compositional changes to the water as it reacts to form alteration phases.

  18. UO2 CORROSION IN HIGH SURFACE-AREA-TO-VOLUME BATCH EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finch, Robert J.; Wolf, Stephen F.; Hanchar, John M.; Bates, John K.

    1998-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Unsaturated drip tests have been used to investigate the alteration of unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent UO{sub 2} fuel in an unsaturated environment, such as may be expected in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain. In these tests, simulated groundwater is periodically injected onto a sample at 90 C in a steel vessel. The solids react with the dripping groundwater and water condensed on surfaces to form a suite of U(VI) alteration phases. Solution chemistry is determined from leachate at the bottom of each vessel after the leachate stops interacting with the solids. A more detailed knowledge of the compositional evolution of the leachate is desirable. By providing just enough water to maintain a thin film of water on a small quantity of fuel in batch experiments, we can more closely monitor the compositional changes to the water as it reacts to form alteration phases.

  19. A Proposed Algorithm to improve security & Efficiency of SSL-TLS servers using Batch RSA decryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pateriya, R K; Shrivastava, S C; Patel, Jaideep

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, Internet becomes the essential part of our lives. Over 90 percent of the ecommerce is developed on the Internet. A security algorithm became very necessary for producer client transactions assurance and the financial applications safety. The rsa algorithm applicability derives from algorithm properties like confidentiality, safe authentication, data safety and integrity on the internet. Thus, this kind of networks can have a more easy utilization by practical accessing from short, medium, even long distance and from different public places. Rsa encryption in the client side is relatively cheap, whereas, the corresponding decryption in the server side is expensive because its private exponent is much larger. Thus ssl tls servers become swamped to perform public key decryption operations when the simultaneous requests increase quickly .The batch rsa method is useful for such highly loaded web server .In our proposed algorithm by reducing the response time and clients tolerable waiting time an improvement...

  20. A STATISTICAL REVIEW OF DWPF LABORATORY MEASUREMENTS GENERATED DURING THE PROCESSING OF BATCHES 300 THROUGH 356

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T

    2006-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the Statistical Consulting Section (SCS) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provides summaries and comparisons of composition measurements for glass samples that were generated during the processing of batches 300 through 356 at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). These analyses, which include measurements of samples from the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) as well as samples of glass standards, were provided to SCS by the DWPF Laboratory (DWPF Lab) of Waste Laboratory Services. The comparisons made by SCS were extensive given that these data allowed for contrasts between preparation methods and between the two spectrometers that are currently in use at the DWPF Lab. In addition to general comparisons, specific questions that were posed in the Technical Task Request (TTR) behind this effort were addressed in this report.

  1. Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C. [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique] [Univ. Laval, Quebec, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Genie Chimique

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

  2. SJSU Information Support Services Run Batch Contracts for Temporary Faculty info-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date: (optional data that exists in the system for the temporary faculty will appear on the Contract Appointment letter/Terms. 2. Click Batch Contracts for T. Faculty. The Batch Process for TF Contract search page displays. 3

  3. DARS BATCH QUICK REFERENCE 1. Log on to http://dars.services.wisc.edu using your NetID and password

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    DARS BATCH QUICK REFERENCE 1. Log on to http://dars.services.wisc.edu using your NetID and password. #12;5. You can monitor the status of your request on the DARS Batch Recent Requests Summary page. a. Contact the DARS administrator if the request is pending their approval. b. Click View Requested Reports

  4. Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electrochemical study of multi-electrode microbial fuel cells under fed-batch and continuous flow November 2013 Available online 18 December 2013 Keywords: Multi-electrode Microbial fuel cells Hydraulic connected microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was compared with the reactors operated using individual electrical

  5. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 10, NO. 1, MARCH 2001 25 Batch Transfer of LIGA Microstructures by Selective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    polymer bumps [6], and diffusion bonding [7]. These processes aim to provide reliable electro of polymer bumps, and high temperature processing requirement for the diffusion bonding. Other processes have Microstructures by Selective Electroplating and Bonding Li-Wei Pan and Liwei Lin Abstract--A flip-chip, batch

  6. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

  7. Batch Logo --A Strategy for Introducin g PL/1 and Structured Programming to Gifted High School Student s

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Mark S.

    Batch Logo -- A Strategy for Introducin g PL/1 and Structured Programming to Gifted High School of the use of ideas borrowed fro m LOGO . We felt that the concepts from a program such as LOGO, even t success graphically . 2. The Teaching Strategy : LOGO in PL 1 The main objective was to gauge th e

  8. Naturalness and the neutrino matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, J. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Wiesenfeldt, S. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Institut fur Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Universitaet Karlsruhe, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed pattern of neutrino mass splittings and mixing angles indicates that their family structure is significantly different from that of the charged fermions. We investigate the implications of these data for the fermion mass matrices in grand-unified theories with a type-I seesaw mechanism. We show that, with simple assumptions, naturalness leads to a strongly hierarchical Majorana mass matrix for heavy right-handed neutrinos and a partially cascade form for the Dirac neutrino matrix. We consider various model building scenarios which could alter this conclusion, and discuss their consequences for the construction of a natural model. We find that including partially lopsided matrices can aid us in generating a satisfying model.

  9. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  10. Rank-Sparsity Incoherence for Matrix Decomposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkat Chandrasekaran

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 11, 2009 ... Keywords: matrix decomposition, convex relaxation, L1 norm minimization, nuclear norm minimization, uncertainty principle, semidefinite ...

  11. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 4 MACROBATCH 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS)1 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP)2 and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR)3. However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 3) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Sludge Batch 4 (also referred to as Macrobatch 5 (MB5)). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Task Technical Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-2005-0034; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 4 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing4. Specifically, this report details results from performing, in part, Subtask 3 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00310, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2006-00458, Rev. 16. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) (Macro Batch 5 (MB5)), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-nine radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB4 (MB5) as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 29 reportable nuclides are: Ni-59; Ni-63; Se-79; Sr-90; Zr-93; Nb-93m; Tc-99; Sn-126; Cs-137; Sm-151; U-233; U-234; Np-237; U-238; Pu-238; Pu-239; Pu-240; Am-241; Pu-241; Pu-242; Am-242m; Am-243; Cm-244; Cm-245; Cm-246; Cm-247; Bk-247; Cm-248; and Cf-251. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB4 (MB5), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the calendar year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes and other U isoto

  12. Simplex Method in Matrix Form Sensitivity Analysis in Matrix Form Math 364: Principles of Optimization, Lectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Haijun

    Simplex Method in Matrix Form Sensitivity Analysis in Matrix Form Math 364: Principles Spring 2012 Haijun Li Math 364: Principles of Optimization, Lectures 14-15 Spring 2012 1 / 24 #12;Simplex, Lectures 14-15 Spring 2012 2 / 24 #12;Simplex Method in Matrix Form Sensitivity Analysis in Matrix Form

  13. Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer-matrix composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    of polymer-matrix composites have also been conducted in relation to the laminate properties, the fib of polymer-matrix composites with continuous carbon-fibers was less and that of polymer-matrix composites. Carbon-fiber; A. Carbon-carbon composites (CCCs); A. Polymer-matrix composites (PMCs); Electromagnetic

  14. The Theory of Quaternion Matrix Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dongpo Xu; Danilo P. Mandic

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic theory is introduced for calculating the derivatives of quaternion matrix function with respect to quaternion matrix variables. The proposed methodology is equipped with the matrix product rule and chain rule and it is able to handle both analytic and nonanalytic functions. This corrects a flaw in the existing methods, that is, the incorrect use of the traditional product rule. In the framework introduced, the derivatives of quaternion matrix functions can be calculated directly without the differential of this function. Key results are summarized in tables. Several examples show how the quaternion matrix derivatives can be used as an important tool for solving problems related to signal processing.

  15. Alchemical attention: Shaw's transformational matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Gary Richard

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION: SHAW AS ALCHEMIST II THE PLAY OF IDEAS 12 III THE ENIGMATIC SPHINX 43 IV THE MICROCOSMIC MIRROR: BRUTE, GOD, AND FEMALE . . 54 V THE ALCHEMICAL OVERMAN VI NIETZSCHE'S FATEFUL ERROR 64 . 88 VII CHRISTIANITY AND THE MATRIX... of being as dramatized in two of his pivotal early plays, Caesar and ~Cl t dC did. 6 gth 9 t t 6 i tigtd th fit g. What is the nature of this change? What categories, ideas, symbols does Shaw use to communicate the nature of this change? How does...

  16. Organic and nitrogen removal from landfill leachate in aerobic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Yanjie [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Protection in Water Transport Engineering Ministry of Communications, Tianjin Research Institute of Water Transport Engineering, Tianjin 300456 (China); Ji Min, E-mail: jmtju@yahoo.cn [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Li Ruying [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Qin Feifei [Tianjin Tanggu Sino French Water Supply Co. Ltd., Tianjin 300450 (China)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aerobic granular sludge SBR was used to treat real landfill leachate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different ammonium inputs were explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DO variations were consistent with the GSBR performances at low ammonium inputs. - Abstract: Granule sequencing batch reactors (GSBR) were established for landfill leachate treatment, and the COD removal was analyzed kinetically using a modified model. Results showed that COD removal rate decreased as influent ammonium concentration increasing. Characteristics of nitrogen removal at different influent ammonium levels were also studied. When the ammonium concentration in the landfill leachate was 366 mg L{sup -1}, the dominant nitrogen removal process in the GSBR was simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). Under the ammonium concentration of 788 mg L{sup -1}, nitrite accumulation occurred and the accumulated nitrite was reduced to nitrogen gas by the shortcut denitrification process. When the influent ammonium increased to a higher level of 1105 mg L{sup -1}, accumulation of nitrite and nitrate lasted in the whole cycle, and the removal efficiencies of total nitrogen and ammonium decreased to only 35.0% and 39.3%, respectively. Results also showed that DO was a useful process controlling parameter for the organics and nitrogen removal at low ammonium input.

  17. Long-lived oscillations in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid reaction in batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noszticzius, Z.; Ouyang, Qi; McCormick, W.D.; Swinney, H.L. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1992-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The title reaction is the subject of current interest because the first experimental Turing patterns were observed recently in this system. Here, the authors report the first observation of oscillations that are long lived (over 1 h) in this system in a batch reactor; even after cessation the oscillations can be restarted several times by adding ClO{sub 2} to the exhausted system. These low-frequency low-amplitude (LL) oscillations were detected with both platinum and iodide-selective electrodes in the chlorite-iodide-malonic acid (original CIMA) reaction and in the closely related chlorine dioxide-iodide-malonic acid (minimal CIMA) system. The LL oscillations follow after the already known high frequency oscillations, sometimes separated by a second induction period. LL oscillations can appear without any induction period if appropriate concentrations of chlorine dioxide, iodomalonic acid, and chloride (CIMA-Cl system) are established in a dilute sulfuric acid medium. In this case neither iodine, iodide, nor malonic acid is needed. Some suggestions are made regarding the mechanism of these newly discovered oscillations. 33 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Method for automatically evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Nenad; Potok, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for automatically evaluating a manufacturing technique comprises the steps of: receiving from a user manufacturing process step parameters characterizing a manufacturing process; accepting from the user a selection for an analysis of a particular lean manufacturing technique; automatically compiling process step data for each process step in the manufacturing process; automatically calculating process metrics from a summation of the compiled process step data for each process step; and, presenting the automatically calculated process metrics to the user. A method for evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique can comprise the steps of: collecting manufacturing process step characterization parameters; selecting a lean manufacturing technique for analysis; communicating the selected lean manufacturing technique and the manufacturing process step characterization parameters to an automatic manufacturing technique evaluation engine having a mathematical model for generating manufacturing technique evaluation data; and, using the lean manufacturing technique evaluation data to determine whether to transition from an existing manufacturing technique to the selected lean manufacturing technique.

  19. A novel proportional--integral-derivative control configuration with application to the control of batch distillation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvarez-Ramirez, J.; Monroy-Loperena, R.; Cervantes, I.; Morales, A.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to propose a novel proportional-integral-derivative (PID) control configuration based on an observer structure. Batch distillation is used as the base case study where the regulated output is the distillate composition. The proposed PID control law is derived in the framework of robust nonlinear control with modeling error compensation techniques. A reduced-order observer is proposed to estimate both the derivative of the regulated output and the underlying modeling error. These observations are subsequently used in a control loop to feedback variations of distillate composition (derivative feedback) and to counteract the effects of modeling errors. It is shown that, under certain conditions, the resulting control law is equivalent to a classical PID controller with an antireset windup scheme. Moreover, the tuning of the controller is performed very easily in terms of a prescribed closed-loop time constant and an estimation time constant. Numerical results are provided for binary and multicomponent separations. Sampled/delayed measurements and several sources of uncertainties are considered in order to provide a realistic test scenario for the proposed control design procedure.

  20. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  1. Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 1. Alcohol Solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; LITTLEWOLF, ALICIA; TRUDELL, DANIEL E.

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 10-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels (ethanol) assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel to provide heat and power to the process. However, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller molecular units. From fiscal year 1997 through fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories was a participant in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to utilize rapidly heated batch microreactors to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate catalyst systems for the BCD process. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during FY97 and FY98 with alcohol based systems. More recent work with aqueous based systems will be summarized in a second report.

  2. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  3. A New Proposal for Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We explain the motivation and main ideas underlying our proposal for a Lagrangian for Matrix Theory based on sixteen supercharges. Starting with the pedagogical example of a bosonic matrix theory we describe the appearance of a continuum spacetime geometry from a discrete, and noncommutative, spacetime with both Lorentz and Yang-Mills invariances. We explain the appearance of large N ground states with Dbranes and elucidate the principle of matrix Dbrane democracy at finite N. Based on the underlying symmetry algebras that hold at both finite and infinite N, we show why the supersymmetric matrix Lagrangian we propose does not belong to the class of supermatrix models which includes the BFSS and IKKT Matrix Models. We end with a preliminary discussion of a path integral prescription for the Hartle-Hawking wavefunction of the Universe derived from Matrix Theory.

  4. NEPHELINE FORMATION STUDY FOR SLUDGE BATCH 4: PHASE 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Phase 3 study was undertaken to complement the previous phases of the nepheline formation studies1, 2 by continuing the investigation into the ability of the nepheline discriminator to predict the occurrence of nepheline crystallization in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. The Phase 3 study had two primary objectives. The first was to continue to demonstrate the ability of the discriminator value to adequately predict the nepheline formation potential for specific glass systems of interest. The second was to generate additional data that have a high probability of supporting the SB4 variability study. To support these two objectives, sixteen glasses were selected based on the most recent SB4 compositional projection, Case 15C Blend 1.3 Four different frits were included, based on previous assessments of projected operating windows and melt rate,4, 5 with four WLs selected for each frit. Eight of these frit-sludge combinations covered WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the Process Composition Control System (PCCS) to support Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The remaining eight frit-sludge combinations targeted lower WLs (35 and 40%) and were prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro database6 to support a potential variability study for SB4.

  5. Large batch dimensional metrology demonstrated in the example of a LIGA fabricated spring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep x-ray lithography in combination with electroforming is capable of producing high precision metal parts in small lot series. This study deals with a high aspect ratio structure with overall dimensions on the order of 10 mm x 7 mm x 1.5 mm, with the smallest line width being 150 {micro}m. The lateral deviation from the design is to be kept to a minimum, preferably below 5 {micro}m. To ensure adequate quality control, a semi-automated metrology technique has been established to measure all parts. While the paper will give a brief overview of all involved techniques, it focuses on the method to measure the top and bottom of the parts and the top of geometries following the process. The instrument used is a View Engineering Voyager V6x12 microscope, which is fully programmable. The microscope allows direct measurement of geometries but also is capable of saving all captured data as point clouds. These point clouds play a central role when evaluating part geometry. After measuring the part, the point cloud is compared to the computer aided design (CAD) contour of the part, using a commercially available software package. The challenge of proper edge lighting on a nickel alloy part is evaluated by varying lighting conditions systematically. Results of two conditions are presented along with a set of optimized parameters. With the introduced set of tools, process flow can be monitored by measuring geometries, e.g. linewidths in every step of the process line. An example for such analysis is given. After delivery of a large batch of parts, extensive numbers of datasets were available allowing the evaluation of the variation of part geometries. Discussed in detail is the deviation from part top to part bottom geometries indicating swelling of the PMMA mold in the electroplating bath.

  6. Dirac oscillators and the relativistic R matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grineviciute; Dean Halderson

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dirac oscillators are shown to be an excellent expansion basis for solutions of the Dirac equation by $R$-matrix techniques. The combination of the Dirac oscillator and the $R$-matrix approach provides a convenient formalism for reactions as well as bound state problems. The utility of the $R$-matrix approach is demonstrated in relativistic impulse approximation calculations where exchange terms can be calculated exactly, and scattering waves made orthogonal to bound state wave functions.

  7. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; DiPrete, D. P.

    2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refine

  8. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu- 242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U- 235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/ref

  9. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) with H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing SB5, and Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 6 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask III, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2009-00473, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2009-00474, Rev. 1. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB6 (MB7), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 30 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB6 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB6, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB6 to 32. The radionuclide measurements made for SB6 are the most extensive condu

  10. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)), Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51, and H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 6 (MB6). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 5 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, 5 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2008-00137, Rev. 2 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2008-00138, Rev. 2. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB5 (MB6), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-six radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB5 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 26 reportable radionuclides are: Cl-36, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Tc-99, Sn-126, Cs-137, Sm-151, U-233, U-234, Np-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Am-241, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, Cm-246, Cf-251. Chlorine-36 is reported for the first time based on the upper bounding activity determined from the aqua regia digested sludge slurry. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB5 (MB6), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for four radionuclides: Se-79, Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to

  11. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  12. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

  13. Green's Matrix for a Second Order Self-Adjoint Matrix Differential Operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tahsin Cagri Sisman; Bayram Tekin

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic construction of the Green's matrix for a second order, self-adjoint matrix differential operator from the linearly independent solutions of the corresponding homogeneous differential equation set is carried out. We follow the general approach of extracting the Green's matrix from the Green's matrix of the corresponding first order system. This construction is required in the cases where the differential equation set cannot be turned to an algebraic equation set via transform techniques.

  14. An algorithm for recognising the exterior square of a matrix Keywords: matrix, exterior square, algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenhill, Catherine

    vector space, with respect to a canonical basis, is called the exterior square of X. Note that all vectorAn algorithm for recognising the exterior square of a matrix Keywords: matrix, exterior square the exterior square of a matrix. The approach involves manipulation of the equations which relate the entries

  15. The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    “The Matrix is a computer-generated dreamworld built to keep us under control” Morpheus, early in The Matrix. “ In dreaming, you are not only out of control, you don’t even know it…I was completely duped again and again ...

  16. SLUDGE BATCH 4: MODEL BASED ASSESSMENTS OF THE FEBRUARY 2007 SLUDGE PROJECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D; Tommy Edwards, T; Kevin Fox, K

    2007-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has developed, and continues to enhance, its integrated capability to evaluate the impact of proposed sludge preparation plans on the Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF's) operation. One of the components of this integrated capability focuses on frit development which identifies a viable frit or frits for each sludge option being contemplated for DWPF processing. A frit is considered viable if its composition allows for economic fabrication and if, when it is combined with the sludge option under consideration, the DWPF property/composition models (the models of DWPF's Product Composition Control System (PCCS)) indicate that the combination has the potential for an operating window (a waste loading (WL) interval over which the sludge/frit glass system satisfies processability and durability constraints) that would allow DWPF to meet its goals for waste loading and canister production. This report documents the results of SRNL's efforts to identify candidate frit compositions and corresponding predicted operating windows (defined in terms of WL intervals) for the February 2007 compositional projection of Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) developed by the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO). The nominal compositional projection was used to assess projected operating windows (in terms of a waste loading interval over which all predicted properties were classified as acceptable) for various frits, evaluate the applicability of the 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} PCCS limit to the glass systems of interest, and determine the impact (or lack thereof) to the previous SB4 variability studies. It should be mentioned that the information from this report will be coupled with assessments of melt rate to recommend a frit for SB4 processing. The results of this paper study suggest that candidate frits are available to process the nominal SB4 composition over attractive waste loadings of interest to DWPF. Specifically, two primary candidate frits for SB4 processing, Frit 510 and Frit 418, have projected operating windows that should allow for successful processing at DWPF. While Frit 418 has been utilized at DWPF, Frit 510 is a higher B{sub 2}O{sub 3} based frit which could lead to improvements in melt rate. These frits provide relatively large operating windows and demonstrate robustness to possible sludge compositional variation while avoiding potential nepheline formation issues. In addition, assessments of SO{sub 4}{sup =} solubility indicate that the 0.6 wt% SO{sub 4}{sup =} limit in PCCS is applicable for the Frit 418 and the Frit 510 based SB4 glass systems.

  17. Cycle-to-cycle extraction synchronization of the Fermilab Booster for multiple batch injection to the Main Injector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwaska, R.; Kopp, S.; /Texas U.; Pellico, W.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a system to ensure cycle-to-cycle synchronization of beam extraction from the Fermilab Booster accelerator to the Main Injector. Such synchronization is necessary for multiple batch operation of the Main Injector for the Run II upgrade of anti-proton production using slip-stacking in the Main Injector, and for the NuMI (Neutrinos at the Main Injector) neutrino beam. To perform this task a system of fast measurements and feedback controls the longitudinal progress of the Booster beam throughout its acceleration period by manipulation of the transverse position maintained by the LLRF (Low-level Radio Frequency) system.

  18. A transilient matrix for moist convection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romps, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is introduced for diagnosing a transilient matrix for moist convection. This transilient matrix quantifies the nonlocal transport of air by convective eddies: for every height z, it gives the distribution of starting heights z{prime} for the eddies that arrive at z. In a cloud-resolving simulation of deep convection, the transilient matrix shows that two-thirds of the subcloud air convecting into the free troposphere originates from within 100 m of the surface. This finding clarifies which initial height to use when calculating convective available potential energy from soundings of the tropical troposphere.

  19. Visual Matrix Clustering of Social Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; May, Richard A.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevailing choices to graphically represent a social network in today’s literature are a node-link graph layout and an adjacency matrix. Both visualization techniques have unique strengths and weaknesses when applied to different domain applications. In this article, we focus our discussion on adjacency matrix and how to turn the matrix-based visualization technique from merely showing pairwise associations among network actors (or graph nodes) to depicting clusters of a social network. We also use node-link layouts to supplement the discussion.

  20. Recent Developments on the CKM Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Wang

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In Standard Model, CP violation arises from an irreducible complex phase in the quark mixing matrix, now under the name Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. This description has shown remarkably overall agreement with various experimental measurements. In this review, we discuss recent experimental data and theoretical developments on three quantities of CKM matrix that are most uncertain: the $V_{ub}$, including its magnitude and the phase $\\gamma$ in standard parametrization, and the $B_s-\\bar B_s$ mixing phase $\\beta_s$.

  1. The Impact Of The MCU Life Extension Solvent On Sludge Batch 8 Projected Operating Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D. K.; Edwards, T. B.; Stone, M. E.

    2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP)/Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) Life Extension Project, a next generation solvent (NGS) and a new strip acid will be deployed. The strip acid will be changed from dilute nitric acid to dilute boric acid (0.01 M). Because of these changes, experimental testing or evaluations with the next generation solvent are required to determine the impact of these changes (if any) to Chemical Process Cell (CPC) activities, glass formulation strategies, and melter operations at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The introduction of the dilute (0.01M) boric acid stream into the DWPF flowsheet has a potential impact on glass formulation and frit development efforts since B2O3 is a major oxide in frits developed for DWPF. Prior knowledge of this stream can be accounted for during frit development efforts but that was not the case for Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). Frit 803 has already been recommended and procured for SB8 processing; altering the frit to account for the incoming boron from the strip effluent (SE) is not an option for SB8. Therefore, the operational robustness of Frit 803 to the introduction of SE including its compositional tolerances (i.e., up to 0.0125M boric acid) is of interest and was the focus of this study. The primary question to be addressed in the current study was: What is the impact (if any) on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 flowsheet to additions of B2O3 from the SE in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)? More specifically, will Frit 803 be robust to the potential compositional changes occurring in the SRAT due to sludge variation, varying additions of ARP and/or the introduction of SE by providing access to waste loadings (WLs) of interest to DWPF? The Measurement Acceptability Region (MAR) results indicate there is very little, if any, impact on the projected operating windows for the Frit 803 – SB8 system regardless of the presence or absence of ARP and SE (up to 2 wt% B2O3 contained in the SRAT and up to 2000 gallons of ARP). It should be noted that 0.95 wt% B2O3 is the nominal projected concentration in the SRAT based on a 0.0125M boric acid flowsheet with 70,000 liters of SE being added to the SRAT. The impact on CPC processing of a 0.01M boric acid solution for elution of cesium during Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) processing has previously been evaluated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). Increasing the acid strength to 0.0125M boric acid to account for variations in the boric acid strength has been reviewed versus the previous evaluation. The amount of acid from the boric acid represented approximately 5% of the total acid during the previous evaluation. An increase from 0.01 to 0.0125M boric acid represents a change of approximately 1.3% which is well within the error of the acid calculation. Therefore, no significant changes to CPC processing (hydrogen generation, metal solubilities, rheological properties, REDOX control, etc.) are expected from an increase in allowable boric acid concentration from 0.01M to 0.0125M.

  2. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  3. Chemical Additive Selection in Matrix Acidizing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jason 1981-

    2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes to survey new chemical knowledge, developed since 1984, on fluid additives used in matrix stimulation treatments of carbonate and sandstone petroleum reservoirs and describes one method of organizing this new knowledge in a...

  4. The Jones Matrix of a birefringent plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Xiaoke

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . We work in the PS polarization system (polarization parallel and perpendicular to the plane of incidence), and the boundary conditions of refraction are satisfied when we apply Fresnel's equations. The theory for the Jones Matrix is in agreement...

  5. Transition Matrix Elements for Pion Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed E. Kelabi

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained the transition matrix elements for pion photoproduction by considering the number of gamma matrices involved. The approach based on the most general conditions of gauge invariance, current conservation and transversality. The approach is fairly consistent with literatures.

  6. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  7. JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning.

  8. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

  9. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony Keiran (Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooke, David Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Ott, Kevin Curtis (Los Alamos, NM); Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal (Los Alamos, NM); Del Sesto, Rico Emilio (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  10. al alloy matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dislocation structure of both Al matrix and precipitates Gubicza, Jen 3 Elevated temperature wear of an aluminum matrix composite Al6061-20 percent aluminum(2) oxygen(3)...

  11. aluminium matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  12. aluminium matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  13. alumina matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  14. alloy matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  15. aluminum matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites Materials Science Websites Summary: ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle...

  16. affect polymer matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  17. aluminide matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  18. alloy matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: -matrix composites Xiangcheng Luo, D.D.L. Chung* Composite Materials Research Laboratory, State University of New Abstract A carbon-matrix...

  19. Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Absecon, NJ); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  20. Inner approximations for polynomial matrix inequalities and robust ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 26, 2011 ... is modelled by parametrized polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI). ... Given a parametrized PMI set, we provide a hierarchy of linear matrix ...

  1. SciTech Connect: Matrix multiplication operations with datapre...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Matrix multiplication operations...

  2. SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03619

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03619. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides, and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples,' SRNL-STI-2012-00017.

  3. SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03472

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel performed characterization analyses on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03472. This report summarizes results of the characterization, which indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7) Pour Stream Glass Samples,' SRNL-STI-2011-00555.

  4. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 8 AND 9 CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wilson

    2001-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 8 and 9 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  5. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, 3, AND 1X OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, 3, and 1X of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A rodded assembly is one that contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) for some period of time during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H calculated isotopic compositions of depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison for each fuel assembly to be used in subsequent CRC reactivity calculations containing the fuel assemblies.

  6. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results

  7. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

  8. Google matrix analysis of directed networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Ermann; Klaus M. Frahm; Dima L. Shepelyansky

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In past ten years, modern societies developed enormous communication and social networks. Their classification and information retrieval processing become a formidable task for the society. Due to the rapid growth of World Wide Web, social and communication networks, new mathematical methods have been invented to characterize the properties of these networks on a more detailed and precise level. Various search engines are essentially using such methods. It is highly important to develop new tools to classify and rank enormous amount of network information in a way adapted to internal network structures and characteristics. This review describes the Google matrix analysis of directed complex networks demonstrating its efficiency on various examples including World Wide Web, Wikipedia, software architecture, world trade, social and citation networks, brain neural networks, DNA sequences and Ulam networks. The analytical and numerical matrix methods used in this analysis originate from the fields of Markov chains, quantum chaos and Random Matrix theory.

  9. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Chao M. (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

  10. Google matrix analysis of directed networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Ermann; Klaus M. Frahm; Dima L. Shepelyansky

    2015-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In past ten years, modern societies developed enormous communication and social networks. Their classification and information retrieval processing become a formidable task for the society. Due to the rapid growth of World Wide Web, social and communication networks, new mathematical methods have been invented to characterize the properties of these networks on a more detailed and precise level. Various search engines are essentially using such methods. It is highly important to develop new tools to classify and rank enormous amount of network information in a way adapted to internal network structures and characteristics. This review describes the Google matrix analysis of directed complex networks demonstrating its efficiency on various examples including World Wide Web, Wikipedia, software architecture, world trade, social and citation networks, brain neural networks, DNA sequences and Ulam networks. The analytical and numerical matrix methods used in this analysis originate from the fields of Markov chains, quantum chaos and Random Matrix theory.

  11. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1999-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

  12. Density matrix of black hole radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lasma Alberte; Ram Brustein; Andrei Khmelnitsky; A. J. M. Medved

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Hawking's model of black hole evaporation is not unitary and leads to a mixed density matrix for the emitted radiation, while the Page model describes a unitary evaporation process in which the density matrix evolves from an almost thermal state to a pure state. We compare a recently proposed model of semiclassical black hole evaporation to the two established models. In particular, we study the density matrix of the outgoing radiation and determine how the magnitude of the off-diagonal corrections differs for the three frameworks. For Hawking's model, we find power-law corrections to the two-point functions that induce exponentially suppressed corrections to the off-diagonal elements of the full density matrix. This verifies that the Hawking result is correct to all orders in perturbation theory and also allows one to express the full density matrix in terms of the single-particle density matrix. We then consider the semiclassical theory for which the corrections, being non-perturbative from an effective field-theory perspective, are much less suppressed and grow monotonically in time. In this case, the R\\'enyi entropy for the outgoing radiation is shown to grow linearly at early times; but this growth slows down and the entropy eventually starts to decrease at the Page time. In addition to comparing models, we emphasize the distinction between the state of the radiation emitted from a black hole, which is highly quantum, and that of the radiation emitted from a typical classical black body at the same temperature.

  13. Polymeric matrix materials for infrared metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dirk, Shawn M; Rasberry, Roger D; Rahimian, Kamyar

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymeric matrix material exhibits low loss at optical frequencies and facilitates the fabrication of all-dielectric metamaterials. The low-loss polymeric matrix material can be synthesized by providing an unsaturated polymer, comprising double or triple bonds; partially hydrogenating the unsaturated polymer; depositing a film of the partially hydrogenated polymer and a crosslinker on a substrate; and photopatterning the film by exposing the film to ultraviolet light through a patterning mask, thereby cross-linking at least some of the remaining unsaturated groups of the partially hydrogenated polymer in the exposed portions.

  14. General Polarization Matrix of Electromagnetic Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhammet Ali Can; Alexander S. Shumovsky

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A general form of the polarization matrix valid for any type of electromagnetic radiation (plane waves, multipole radiation etc.) is defined in terms of a certain bilinear form in the field-strength tensor. The quantum counterpart is determined as an operator matrix with normal-ordered elements with respect to the creation and annihilation operators. The zero-point oscillations (ZPO) of polarization are defined via difference between the anti-normal and normal ordered operator polarization matrices. It is shown that ZPO of the multipole field are stronger than those described by the model of plane waves and are concentrated in a certain neighborhood of a local source.

  15. Determinant Formulas for Matrix Model Free Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Vasiliev

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper contains a new non-perturbative representation for subleading contribution to the free energy of multicut solution for hermitian matrix model. This representation is a generalisation of the formula, proposed by Klemm, Marino and Theisen for two cut solution, which was obtained by comparing the cubic matrix model with the topological B-model on the local Calabi-Yau geometry $\\hat {II}$ and was checked perturbatively. In this paper we give a direct proof of their formula and generalise it to the general multicut solution.

  16. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kekäläinen, Pekka, E-mail: pekka.kekalainen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  17. CP violation in neutrino mass matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utpal Sarkar; Santosh K. Singh

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed rephasing invariant measures of CP violation with elements of the neutrino mass matrix, in the basis in which the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal. We discuss some examples of neutrino mass matrices with texture zeroes, where the present approach is applicable and demonstrate how it simplifies an analysis of CP violation. We applied our approach to study CP violation in all the phenomenologically acceptable 3-generation two-zero texture neutrino mass matrices and shown that in any of these cases there is only one CP phase which contributes to the neutrino oscillation experiment and there are no Majorana phases.

  18. More on Rotations as Spin Matrix Polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas L. Curtright

    2015-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Any nonsingular function of spin j matrices always reduces to a matrix polynomial of order 2j. The challenge is to find a convenient form for the coefficients of the matrix polynomial. The theory of biorthogonal systems is a useful framework to meet this challenge. Central factorial numbers play a key role in the theoretical development. Explicit polynomial coefficients for rotations expressed either as exponentials or as rational Cayley transforms are considered here. Structural features of the results are discussed and compared, and large j limits of the coefficients are examined.

  19. Parallel implementation of sparse matrix solvers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pujari, Sushant Kumar

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is an upper triangular matrix Ii. The backward substitution step consists of inverting the matrix U such that we obtain z = U-'La. The computations are performed using a finite precision length storage for numbers, round-off errors are introduced. In order...'orks, where each computing element executes its own programmed seq?e?ce of instructions, and can function indcpe?de?tly. nCI BL' computing elements feature a high speed hardwarr ?message routing?nii. This tccloiiq?e 18 reduces communication overhead...

  20. Conveying Cycle-Time Analysis in Pneumatic Conveying: A Study of Relationship between Batching & Convey Cycles in Powder & Bulk Handling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aghdaie, Bahman

    2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineering Management Field Project Conveying Cycle-Time Analysis in Pneumatic Conveying: A Study of Relationship between Batching & Convey Cycles in Powder & Bulk Handling Systems By Bahman Aghdaie Fall Semester, 2008...:_________________ Bahman Aghdaie EMGT-835 Field Project 2 Table of Contents Page Acknowledgements 4 Executive Summary 5 Chapter 1 - Introduction 7 Chapter 2 - Literature Review 9 Chapter 3 – Research Procedure 12...

  1. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

  2. Strange matrix elements of the nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, R; Woloshyn, R M; Lewis, Randy

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results for the disconnected contributions to matrix elements of the vector current and scalar density have been obtained for the nucleon from the Wilson action at beta=6 using a stochastic estimator technique and 2000 quenched configurations. Various methods for analysis are employed and chiral extrapolations are discussed.

  3. Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    June 2013 Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training Course Required Class Mode Training Course Prerequisite Security Access Form Required Contact for Additional Information Complete Electronic I-9 Forms REC001: I-9 /E-Verify Web Training OR Online OR None Electronic I-9 Security Access Form

  4. IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    products and the oil that otherwise would be contacted. This paper pre- sents the resultsIMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL WELLS BY GAS PRECONDITIONING M. A. Aggour, M. Al, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Experience has shown that for sandstone formations, oil wells respond

  5. Polymer matrix electroluminescent materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marrocco, III, Matthew L. (Fontana, CA); Motamedi, Farshad J. (Claremont, CA); Abdelrazzaq, Feras Bashir (Covina, CA); Abdelrazzaq, legal representative, Bashir Twfiq (Aman, JO)

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Photoluminescent and electroluminescent compositions are provided which comprise a matrix comprising aromatic repeat units covalently coordinated to a phosphorescent or luminescent metal ion or metal ion complexes. Methods for producing such compositions, and the electroluminescent devices formed therefrom, are also disclosed.

  6. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  7. Determination of Matrix Diffusion Properties of Granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holtta, Pirkko; Siitari-Kauppi, Marja; Huittinen, Nina [Laboratory of Radiochemistry, P.O. Box 55, University of Helsinki, FI-00014 (Finland); Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1608, VTT, FI-02044 (Finland)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock-core column experiments were introduced to estimate the diffusion and sorption properties of Kuru Grey granite used in block-scale experiments. The objective was to examine the processes causing retention in solute transport through rock fractures, especially matrix diffusion. The objective was also to estimate the importance of retention processes during transport in different scales and flow conditions. Rock-core columns were constructed from cores drilled into the fracture and were placed inside tubes to form flow channels in the 0.5 mm gap between the cores and the tube walls. Tracer experiments were performed using uranin, HTO, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 131}I, {sup 22}Na and {sup 85}Sr at flow rates of 1-50 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. Rock matrix was characterized using {sup 14}C-PMMA method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray micro analysis (EDX) and the B.E.T. method. Solute mass flux through a column was modelled by applying the assumption of a linear velocity profile and molecular diffusion. Coupling of the advection and diffusion processes was based on the model of generalised Taylor dispersion in the linear velocity profile. Experiments could be modelled applying a consistent parameterization and transport processes. The results provide evidence that it is possible to investigate matrix diffusion at the laboratory scale. The effects of matrix diffusion were demonstrated on the slightly-sorbing tracer breakthrough curves. Based on scoping calculations matrix diffusion begins to be clearly observable for non-sorbing tracer when the flow rate is 0.1 {mu}L.min{sup -1}. The experimental results presented here cannot be transferred directly to the spatial and temporal scales that prevail in an underground repository. However, the knowledge and understanding of transport and retention processes gained from this study is transferable to different scales from laboratory to in-situ conditions. (authors)

  8. On the Unification of Random Matrix Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert A Small

    2015-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method involving particle diagrams is introduced and developed into a rigorous framework for carrying out embedded random matrix calculations. Using particle diagrams and the attendant methodology including loop counting it becomes possible to calculate the fourth, sixth and eighth moments of embedded ensembles in a straightforward way. The method, which will be called the method of particle diagrams, proves useful firstly by providing a means of classifying the components of moments into particle paths, or loops, and secondly by giving a simple algorithm for calculating the magnitude of combinatorial expressions prior to calculating them explicitly. By confining calculations to the limit case $m \\ll l\\to\\infty$ this in many cases provides a sufficient excuse not to calculate certain terms at all, since it can be foretold using the method of particle diagrams that they will not survive in this asymptotic regime. Applying the method of particle diagrams washes out a great deal of the complexity intrinsic to the problem, with sufficient mathematical structure remaining to yield limiting statistics for the unified phase space of random matrix theories. Finally, since the unified form of random matrix theory is essentially the set of all randomised k-body potentials, it should be no surprise that the early statistics calculated for the unified random matrix theories in some instances resemble the statistics currently being discovered for quantum spin hypergraphs and other randomised potentials on graphs [HMH05,ES14,KLW14]. This is just the beginning for studies into the field of unified random matrix theories, or embedded ensembles, and the applicability of the method of particle diagrams to a wide range of questions as well as to the more exotic symmetry classes, such as the symplectic ensembles, is still an area of open-ended research.

  9. SLURRY MIX EVAPORATOR BATCH ACCEPTABILITY AND TEST CASES OF THE PRODUCT COMPOSITION CONTROL SYSTEM WITH THORIUM AS A REPORTABLE ELEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.

    2010-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), which is operated by Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR), has recently begun processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) by combining it with Frit 418 at a nominal waste loading (WL) of 36%. A unique feature of the SB6/Frit 418 glass system, as compared to the previous glass systems processed in DWPF, is that thorium will be a reportable element (i.e., concentrations of elemental thorium in the final glass product greater than 0.5 weight percent (wt%)) for the resulting wasteform. Several activities were initiated based upon this unique aspect of SB6. One of these was an investigation into the impact of thorium on the models utilized in DWPF's Product Composition and Control System (PCCS). While the PCCS is described in more detail below, for now note that it is utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) to evaluate the acceptability of each batch of material in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) before this material is passed on to the melter. The evaluation employs models that predict properties associated with processability and product quality from the composition of vitrified samples of the SME material. The investigation of the impact of thorium on these models was conducted by Peeler and Edwards [1] and led to a recommendation that DWPF can process the SB6/Frit 418 glass system with ThO{sub 2} concentrations up to 1.8 wt% in glass. Questions also arose regarding the handling of thorium in the SME batch acceptability process as documented by Brown, Postles, and Edwards [2]. Specifically, that document is the technical bases of PCCS, and while Peeler and Edwards confirmed the reliability of the models, there is a need to confirm that the current implementation of DWPF's PCCS appropriately handles thorium as a reportable element. Realization of this need led to a Technical Task Request (TTR) prepared by Bricker [3] that identified some specific SME-related activities that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to conduct. SRNL issued a Task Technical and Quality Assurance (TT&QA) plan [4] in response to the SRR request. The conclusions provided in this report are that no changes need to be made to the SME acceptability process (i.e., no modifications to WSRC-TR-95-00364, Revision 5, are needed) and no changes need to be made to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) itself (i.e. the spreadsheet utilized by Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) for acceptability decisions does not require modification) in response to thorium becoming a reportable element for DWPF operations. In addition, the inputs and results for the two test cases requested by WSE for use in confirming the successful activation of thorium as a reportable element for DWPF operations during the processing of SB6 are presented in this report.

  10. Matrix product states for gauge field theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boye Buyens; Jutho Haegeman; Karel Van Acoleyen; Henri Verschelde; Frank Verstraete

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study 1+1 dimensional one flavour quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study non-equilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field.

  11. Automation of the matrix element reweighting method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artoisenet; V. Lemaître; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

  12. RESORCINOL-FORMALDEHYDE ADSORPTION OF CESIUM (Cs+) FROM HANFORD WASTE SOLUTIONS-PART I: BATCH EQUILIBRIUM STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HASSAN, NEGUIBM

    2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Batch equilibrium measurements were conducted with a granular Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (RF) resin to determine the distribution coefficients (Kds) for cesium. In the tests, Hanford Site actual waste sample containing radioactive cesium and a pretreated waste sample that was spiked with non-radioactive cesium were used. Initial concentrations of non-radioactive cesium in the waste sample were varied to generate an equilibrium isotherm for cesium. Two additional tests were conducted using a liquid to solid phase ratio of 10 and a contact time of 120 hours. The measured distribution coefficient (Kd) for radioactive cesium (137Cs) was 948 mL/g; the Kd for non-radioactive cesium (133Cs) was 1039 mL/g. The Kd for non-radioactive cesium decreased from 1039 to 691 mL/g as the initial cesium concentration increased. Very little change of the Kd was observed at initial cesium concentrations above 64 mg/mL. The maximum sorption capacity for cesium on granular RF resin was 1.17 mmole/g dry resin. T his value was calculated from the fit of the equilibrium isotherm data to the Dubinin-Radushkevich equation. Previously, a total capacity of 2.84 mmole/g was calculated by Bibler and Wallace for air-dried RF resin.

  13. Analytical Plans Supporting The Sludge Batch 8 Glass Variability Study Being Conducted By Energysolutions And Cua's Vitreous State Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.; Peeler, D. K.

    2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    EnergySolutions (ES) and its partner, the Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) of The Catholic University of America (CUA), are to provide engineering and technical services support to Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) for ongoing operation of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) flowsheet as well as for modifications to improve overall plant performance. SRR has requested via a statement of work that ES/VSL conduct a glass variability study (VS) for Sludge Batch 8. SRR issued a technical task request (TTR) asking that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provide planning and data reduction support for the ES/VSL effort. This document provides two analytical plans for use by ES/VSL: one plan is to guide the measurement of the chemical composition of the study glasses while the second is to guide the measurement of the durability of the study glasses. The measurements generated by ES/VSL are to be provided to SRNL for data reduction and evaluation. SRNL is to review the results of its evaluation with ES/VSL and SRR. The results will subsequently be incorporated into a joint report with ES/VSL as a deliverable to SRR to support the processing of SB8 at DWPF.

  14. Sequence and batch language programs and alarm-related ``C`` programs for the 242-A MCS. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berger, J.F.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Distributive Process Control system was purchased by Project B-534, ``242-A Evaporator/Crystallizer Upgrades``. This control system, called the Monitor and Control System (MCS), was installed in the 242-A Evaporator located in the 200 East Area. The purpose of the MCS is to monitor and control the Evaporator and monitor a number of alarms and other signals from various Tank Farm facilities. Applications software for the MCS was developed by the Waste Treatment Systems Engineering (WTSE) group of Westinghouse. The standard displays and alarm scheme provide for control and monitoring, but do not directly indicate the signal location or depict the overall process. To do this, WTSE developed a second alarm scheme which uses special programs, annunciator keys, and process graphics. The special programs are written in two languages; Sequence and Batch Language (SABL), and ``C`` language. The WTSE-developed alarm scheme works as described below: SABL relates signals and alarms to the annunciator keys, called SKID keys. When an alarm occurs, a SABL program causes a SKID key to flash, and if the alarm is of yellow or white priority then a ``C`` program turns on an audible horn (the D/3 system uses a different audible horn for the red priority alarms). The horn and flashing key draws the attention of the operator.

  15. Matrix-free Interior Point Method for Compressed Sensing Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    the measurement matrix A is used only as an operator to produce results of matrix-vector products Ax ...... S. Becker, J. Bobin, and E. J. Candés. Nesta: A fast and ...

  16. Analyticity and the Holographic S-Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a simple relation between the Mellin amplitude for AdS/CFT correlation functions and the bulk S-Matrix in the flat spacetime limit, proving a conjecture of Penedones. As a consequence of the Operator Product Expansion, the Mellin amplitude for any unitary CFT must be a meromorphic function with simple poles on the real axis. This provides a powerful and suggestive handle on the locality vis-a-vis analyticity properties of the S-Matrix. We begin to explore analyticity by showing how the familiar poles and branch cuts of scattering amplitudes arise from the holographic description. For this purpose we compute examples of Mellin amplitudes corresponding to 1-loop and 2-loop Witten diagrams in AdS. We also examine the flat spacetime limit of conformal blocks, implicitly relating the S-Matrix program to the Bootstrap program for CFTs. We use this connection to show how the existence of small black holes in AdS leads to a universal prediction for the conformal block decomposition of the dual CFT.

  17. Relativistic R matrix and continuum shell model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Grineviciute; Dean Halderson

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The $R$ matrix formalism of Lane and Thomas has proven to be a convenient reaction theory for solving many-coupled channel systems. The theory provides solutions to bound states, scattering states, and resonances for microscopic models in one formalism. Purpose: The first purpose is to extend this formalism to the relativistic case so that the many-coupled channels problem may be solved for systems in which binary breakup channels satisfy a relative Dirac equation. The second purpose is to employ this formalism in a relativistic continuum shell model. Methods: Expressions for the collision matrix and the scattering amplitude, from which observables may be calculated, are derived. The formalism is applied to the 1p-1h relativistic continuum shell model with an interaction extracted from relativistic mean-field theory. Results: The simplest of the $\\sigma +\\omega +\\rho$ exchange interactions produces a good description of the single-particle energies in $^{16}$O and $^{90}$Zr and a reasonable description of proton scattering from $^{15}$N. Conclusions: The development of a calculable, relativistic $R$ matrix and its implementation in a $1p-1h$ relativistic continuum shell model provide a simple relatively self-consist, physically justifiable model for use in knockout reactions.

  18. Full CKM matrix with lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Masataka; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors show that it is now possible to fully determine the CKM matrix, for the first time, using lattice QCD. |V{sub cd}|, |V{sub cs}|, |V{sub ub}|, |V{sub cb}| and |V{sub us}| are, respectively, directly determined with the lattice results for form factors of semileptonic D {yields} {pi}lv, D {yields} Klv, B {yields} {pi}lv, B {yields} Dlv and K {yields} {pi}lv decays. The error from the quenched approximation is removed by using the MILC unquenced lattice gauge configurations, where the effect of u, d and s quarks is included. The error from the ''chiral'' extrapolation (m{sub l} {yields} m{sub ud}) is greatly reduced by using improved staggered quarks. The accuracy is comparable to that of the Particle Data Group averages. In addition, |V{sub ud}|, |V{sub ts}|, |V{sub ts}| and |V{sub td}| are determined by using unitarity of the CKM matrix and the experimental result for sin (2{beta}). In this way, they obtain all 9 CKM matrix elements, where the only theoretical input is lattice QCD. They also obtain all the Wolfenstein parameters, for the first time, using lattice QCD.

  19. Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Casbon.

    1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

  20. Optimization Online - A Simpler Approach to Matrix Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Recht

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 4, 2009 ... Keywords: Matrix completion, low-rank matrices, convex optimization, nuclear norm minimization, random matrices, operator Chernoff bound, ...

  1. Some Noncommutative Matrix Algebras Arising in the Bispectral Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Alberto Grünbaum

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    I revisit the so called "bispectral problem" introduced in a joint paper with Hans Duistermaat a long time ago, allowing now for the differential operators to have matrix coefficients and for the eigenfunctions, and one of the eigenvalues, to be matrix valued too. In the last example we go beyond this and allow both eigenvalues to be matrix valued.

  2. Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method -A study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - A study Julian Hall School of Mathematics University of Edinburgh June 15th 2006 Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - a study #12;Overview · Nature of the challenge of matrix inversion for the revised simplex method #12

  3. Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method -A study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Julian

    Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - A study Julian Hall School of Mathematics University of Edinburgh June 15th 2006 Parallel matrix inversion for the revised simplex method - a study #12;Overview · Nature of the challenge of matrix inversion for the revised simplex method

  4. Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEWS Mechanical Properties of Porous- Matrix Ceramic Composites** By Frank W. Zok* and Carlos G/Mechanical Properties of Porous-Matrix Ceramic Composites REVIEWS The porous matrix concept has been developed primarily. Levi 1. Introduction Damage tolerance can be enabled in continuous fiber-rein- forced ceramic

  5. Constraints of mixing matrix elements in the sequential fourthgeneration model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. J. Huo

    2002-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We review our works on the sequential fourth generation model and focus on the constriants of $4\\times 4$ quark mixing matrix elements. We investigate the quark mixing matrix elements from the rare $K,B$ meson decays. We talk about the $ hierarchy$ of the $4\\times 4$ matrix and the existence of fourth generation.

  6. Root cause analysis for waste area grouping 1, Batch I, Series 1 Tank T-30 project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four inactive liquid low-level waste (LLLW) tanks were scheduled for remedial actions as the Batch L Series I Tank Project during fiscal year (FY) 1995. These tanks are 3001-B, 3004-B, T-30, and 3013. The initial tank remediation project was conducted as a maintenance action. One project objective was to gain experience in remediation efforts (under maintenance actions) to assist in conducting remedial action projects for the 33 remaining inactive LLLW tanks. Batch I, Series 1 project activities resulted in the successful remediation of tanks 3001-B, 3004-B, and 3013. Tank T-30 remedial actions were halted as a result of information obtained during waste characterization activities. The conditions discovered on tank T-30 would not allow completion of tank removal and smelting as originally planned. A decision was made to conduct a root cause analysis of Tank T-30 events to identify and, where possible, correct weaknesses that, if uncorrected, could result in similar delays for completion of future inactive tank remediation projects. The objective of the analysis was to determine why a portion of expected project end results for Tank T-30 were not fully achieved. The root cause analysis evaluates project events and recommends beneficial improvements for application to future projects. This report presents the results of the Batch I, Series root cause analysis results and makes recommendations based on that analysis.

  7. Integration of the Uncertainties of Anion and TOC Measurements into the Flammability Control Strategy for Sludge Batch 8 at the DWPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of a flammability control strategy for DWPF’s melter operation during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). SRNL’s support has been in response to technical task requests that have been made by SRR’s Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) organization. The flammability control strategy relies on measurements that are performed on Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples by the DWPF Laboratory. Measurements of nitrate, oxalate, formate, and total organic carbon (TOC) standards generated by the DWPF Laboratory are presented in this report, and an evaluation of the uncertainties of these measurements is provided. The impact of the uncertainties of these measurements on DWPF’s strategy for controlling melter flammability also is evaluated. The strategy includes monitoring each SME batch for its nitrate content and its TOC content relative to the nitrate content and relative to the antifoam additions made during the preparation of the SME batch. A linearized approach for monitoring the relationship between TOC and nitrate is developed, equations are provided that integrate the measurement uncertainties into the flammability control strategy, and sample calculations for these equations are shown to illustrate the impact of the uncertainties on the flammability control strategy.

  8. The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid? to appear in C. Grau (ed) Philosophical Essays on the Matrix (Oxford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    ³The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid?² to appear in C. Grau (ed) Philosophical Essays://whatisthematrix.warnerbros.com/rl_cmp/phi.html The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid1? 1. Ambivalence "The Matrix is a computer in a world of persisting, external, independent people, cities, cars and objects, and you yourself

  9. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  10. SALTSTONE MATRIX CHARACTERIZATION AND STADIUM SIMULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    SIMCO Technologies, Inc. was contracted to evaluate the durability of the saltstone matrix material and to measure saltstone transport properties. This information will be used to: (1) Parameterize the STADIUM{reg_sign} service life code, (2) Predict the leach rate (degradation rate) for the saltstone matrix over 10,000 years using the STADIUM{reg_sign} concrete service life code, and (3) Validate the modeled results by conducting leaching (water immersion) tests. Saltstone durability for this evaluation is limited to changes in the matrix itself and does not include changes in the chemical speciation of the contaminants in the saltstone. This report summarized results obtained to date which include: characterization data for saltstone cured up to 365 days and characterization of saltstone cured for 137 days and immersed in water for 31 days. Chemicals for preparing simulated non-radioactive salt solution were obtained from chemical suppliers. The saltstone slurry was mixed according to directions provided by SRNL. However SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel made a mistake in the premix proportions. The formulation SIMCO personnel used to prepare saltstone premix was not the reference mix proportions: 45 wt% slag, 45 wt% fly ash, and 10 wt% cement. SIMCO Technologies Inc. personnel used the following proportions: 21 wt% slag, 65 wt% fly ash, and 14 wt% cement. The mistake was acknowledged and new mixes have been prepared and are curing. The results presented in this report are assumed to be conservative since the excessive fly ash was used in the SIMCO saltstone. The SIMCO mixes are low in slag which is very reactive in the caustic salt solution. The impact is that the results presented in this report are expected to be conservative since the samples prepared were deficient in slag and contained excess fly ash. The hydraulic reactivity of slag is about four times that of fly ash so the amount of hydrated binder formed per unit volume in the SIMCO saltstone samples is less than that expected for saltstone containing the reference amount of slag (45 wt.% of the total cementitious mixture versus 21 wt.% used in the SIMCO samples). Consequently the SIMCO saltstone samples are expected to have lower strengths, and tortuosity and higher porosity, water diffusivity, and intrinsic permeability compared to the reference case MCU saltstone. MCU reference saltstone contains nonradioactive salt solution with a composition designed to simulate the product of the Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (MCU) Unit [Harbour, 2009]. The SIMCO saltstone samples were cast in molds and cured for three days under plastic with a source of water to prevent drying. Details of the sample preparation process are presented in Attachment 2. The molds were then removed and the samples were cured at a constant temperature (76 F, 24 C) and 100 percent relative humidity for up to one year. Selected samples were periodically removed and characterized the evolution of the matrix as a function of age. In order to preserve the age dependent microstructure at the specified curing times it is necessary to stop hydration. This was accomplished by immersing the samples in isopropanol for 5 days to replace water with alcohol. The microstructure of the matrix material was also characterized as a function of aging. This information was used as a base line for comparison with leached microstructures. After curing for 137 days, specimens were cut into 20 mm disks and exposed to deionized water with a pH maintained at 10.5. Microstructure and calcium sulfur leaching results for samples leached for 31 days are presented in this report. Insufficient leached material was generated during the testing to date to obtain physical and mineralogical properties for leached saltstone. Longer term experiments are required because the matrix alteration rate due to immersion in deionized water is slow.

  11. Analyses by the Defense Waste Processing Facility Laboratory of Thorium Glasses from the Sludge Batch 6 Variability Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Click, D.; Feller, M.

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with Frit 418. At times during the processing of this glass system, thorium is expected to be at concentrations in the final wasteform that make it a reportable element for the first time since startup of radioactive operations at the DWPF. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) supported the qualification of the processing of this glass system at the DWPF. A recommendation from the SRNL studies was the need for the DWPF Laboratory to establish a method to measure thorium by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICPAES). This recommendation led to the set of thorium-bearing glasses from the SB6 Variability Study (VS) being submitted to the DWPF Laboratory for chemical composition measurement. The measurements were conducted by the DWPF Laboratory using the sodium peroxide fusion preparation method routinely employed for analysis of samples from the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). These measurements are presented and reviewed in this report. The review indicates that the measurements provided by the DWPF Laboratory are comparable to those provided by Analytical Development's laboratory at SRNL for these same glasses. As a result, the authors of this report recommend that the DWPF Laboratory begin using its routine peroxide fusion dissolution method for the measurement of thorium in SME samples of SB6. The purpose of this technical report is to present the measurements generated by the DWPF Laboratory for the SB6 VS glasses and to compare the measurements to the targeted compositions for these VS glasses as well as to SRNL's measurements (both sets, targeted and measured, of compositional values were reported by SRNL in [2]). The goal of these comparisons is to provide information that will lead to the qualification of peroxide fusion dissolution as a method for the measurement by the DWPF Laboratory of thorium in SME glass samples.

  12. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

  13. Biodegradation of high explosives on granular activated carbon [GAC]: Enhanced desorption of high explosives from GAC -- Batch studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morley, M.C.; Speitel, G.E. Jr. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption to GAC is an effective method for removing high explosives (HE) compounds from water, but no permanent treatment is achieved. Bioregeneration, which treats adsorbed contaminants by desorption and biodegradation, is being developed as a method for reducing GAC usage rates and permanently degrading RDX and HMX. Because desorption is often the limiting mass transfer mechanism in bioregeneration systems, several methods for increasing the rate and extent of desorption of RDX and HMX are being studied. These include use of cosolvents (methanol and ethanol), surfactants (both anionic and nonionic), and {beta}- and {gamma}-cyclodextrins. Batch experiments to characterize the desorption of these HEs from GAC have been completed using Northwestern LB-830, the GAC being used at Pantex. Over a total of 11 days of desorption, about 3% of the adsorbed RDX was desorbed from the GAC using buffered water as the desorption fluid. In comparison, about 96% of the RDX was extracted from the GAC by acetonitrile over the same desorption period. Ethanol and methanol were both effective in desorbing RDX and HMX; higher alcohol concentrations were able to desorb more HE from the GAC. Surfactants varied widely in their abilities to enhance desorption of HEs. The most effective surfactant that was studied was sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which desorbed 56.4% of the adsorbed RDX at a concentration of 500 mg SDS/L. The cyclodextrins that were used were marginally more effective than water. Continuous-flow column tests are underway for further testing the most promising of these methods. These results will be compared to column experiments that have been completed under baseline conditions (using buffered water as the desorption fluid). Results of this research will support modeling and design of further desorption and bioregeneration experiments.

  14. Effective dynamics of the matrix big bang

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craps, Ben [Theoretische Natuurkunde, Vrije Universiteit Brussel and International Solvay Institutes, Pleinlaan 2, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Instituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam, Valckenierstraat 65, 1018 XE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Rajaraman, Arvind [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Sethi, Savdeep [Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the leading quantum effects in the recently introduced matrix big bang model. This amounts to a study of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory compactified on the Milne orbifold. We find a one-loop potential that is attractive near the big bang. Surprisingly, the potential decays very rapidly at late times where it appears to be generated by D-brane effects. Usually, general covariance constrains the form of any effective action generated by renormalization group flow. However, the form of our one-loop potential seems to violate these constraints in a manner that suggests a connection between the cosmological singularity and long wavelength, late time physics.

  15. Zero minors of the neutrino mass matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lashin, E. I. [Abdus Salam ICTP, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Cairo 11566 (Egypt); Department of Physics and Astronomy, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Chamoun, N. [Abdus Salam ICTP, P.O. Box 586, 34100 Trieste (Italy); Physics Department, HIAST, P.O. Box 31983, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the possibility that a certain class of neutrino mass matrices, namely, those with two independent vanishing minors in the flavor basis, regardless of being invertible or not, is sufficient to describe current data. We compute generic formulas for the ratios of the neutrino masses and for the Majorana phases. We find that seven textures with two vanishing minors can accommodate the experimental data. We present an estimate of the mass matrix for these patterns. All of the possible textures can be dynamically generated through the seesaw mechanism augmented with a discrete Abelian symmetry.

  16. Open quantum systems and Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Declan Mulhall

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with Random Matrix Theory. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the $\\Delta_3(L)$ statistic, width distribution and level spacing are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. A super-radiant transition is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and $\\Delta_3(L)$ statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  17. Zinc Matrix Power Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcat 1 Wind Projectsource History ViewZAPZinc Matrix Power Inc Jump

  18. MetaMatrix Groupe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee Falls,MccoyMerrimac,MesoFuel Inc Jump to:MetaMatrix

  19. Emissions from burning tire-derived fuel (TDF): Comparison of batch combustion of tire chips and continuous combustion of tire crumb mixed with coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levendis, Y.A.; Atal, A. [Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States); Carlson, J.B. [Army Natick R, Natick, MA (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This laboratory study investigated the emissions of waste automobile tire-derived fuel (TDF). This fuel was burned in two different modes, either segmented in small pieces (tire chunks) or in pulverized form (tire crumb). Tire chunks were burned in fixed beds in batch mode in a horizontal furnace. Tire crumb was burned in a continous flow mode, dispersed in air, either alone or mixed with pulverized coal, in a verical furnace. The gas flow was laminar, the gas temperature was 1000{degrees}C in all cases, and the residence times of the combustion products in the furnaces were similar. Chunks of waste tires had dimensions in the range of 3-9 {mu}m, tire crumb was size-classified to be 180-212 {mu}m and the high volatile bituminous coal, used herein, was 63-75. The fuel mass loading in the furnaces was varied. The following emissions were monitored at the exit of the furnaces: CO, CO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and particulates. Results showed that combustion of TDF in fixed beds resulted in large yields (emissions per mass of fuel burned) of CO, soot and PAHs. Such yields increased with the size of the bed. CO, soot and PAHs yields from batch combustion of fixed beds of coal were lower by more than an order of magnitude than those from fixed beds of TDF. Continuous pulverized fuel combustion of TDF (tire crumb) resulted in dramatically lower yields of CO, soot and PAHs than those from batch combustion, especially when TDF was mixed with pulverized coal. To the contrary, switching the mode of combustion of coal (from fixed beds to pulverized fuel) did not result in large differences in the aforementioned emissions. CO{sub 2}, and, especially, NO{sub x} yields from batch combustion of TDF were lower than those from coal. Emissions of NO{sub x} were somewhat lower from batch combustion than from pulverized fuel combustion of TDF and coal.

  20. Batch Strategies for Maximizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIALoperatorBassi IBM POWER 5u s

  1. Batch Strategies for Maximizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugustDecade5-F,INITIALoperatorBassi IBM POWER 5u

  2. Hopper Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) HarmonicbetandEnergy 2010 A selection of

  3. PDSF Batch Statistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 J -

  4. PDSF Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTest andOptimize832 2.860 2.864 2.867039 JEmailInteractive

  5. Parallel Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeeding access toTestPhysics LabInterconnection RiskMarch

  6. Batch Script Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWP TWPAlumniComplex historian ...BESFor Users Live Status My

  7. Edison Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract ManagementDiscoveringESnet UpdateEarth WeekAlamos NationalEd

  8. Example Edison Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /Email Announcements12:25Sequedex:

  9. Raney distributions and random matrix theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter J. Forrester; Dang-Zheng Liu

    2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent works have shown that the family of probability distributions with moments given by the Fuss-Catalan numbers permit a simple parameterized form for their density. We extend this result to the Raney distribution which by definition has its moments given by a generalization of the Fuss-Catalan numbers. Such computations begin with an algebraic equation satisfied by the Stieltjes transform, which we show can be derived from the linear differential equation satisfied by the characteristic polynomial of random matrix realizations of the Raney distribution. For the Fuss-Catalan distribution, an equilibrium problem characterizing the density is identified. The Stieltjes transform for the limiting spectral density of the singular values squared of the matrix product formed from $q$ inverse standard Gaussian matrices, and $s$ standard Gaussian matrices, is shown to satisfy a variant of the algebraic equation relating to the Raney distribution. Supported on $(0,\\infty)$, we show that it too permits a simple functional form upon the introduction of an appropriate choice of parameterisation. As an application, the leading asymptotic form of the density as the endpoints of the support are approached is computed, and is shown to have some universal features.

  10. Unitarity and the Holographic S-Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzpatrick, A.Liam; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Kaplan, Jared; /SLAC

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The bulk S-Matrix can be given a non-perturbative definition in terms of the flat space limit of AdS/CFT. We show that the unitarity of the S-Matrix, ie the optical theorem, can be derived by studying the behavior of the OPE and the conformal block decomposition in the flat space limit. When applied to perturbation theory in AdS, this gives a holographic derivation of the cutting rules for Feynman diagrams. To demonstrate these facts we introduce some new techniques for the analysis of conformal field theories. Chief among these is a method for conglomerating local primary operators O{sub 1} and O{sub 2} to extract the contribution of an individual primary O{sub {Delta},{ell}} in their OPE. This provides a method for isolating the contribution of specific conformal blocks which we use to prove an important relation between certain conformal block coefficients and anomalous dimensions. These techniques make essential use of the simplifications that occur when CFT correlators are expressed in terms of a Mellin amplitude.

  11. Characterization and control of the fiber-matrix interface in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowden, R.A.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fiber-reinforced SiC composites fabricated by thermal-gradient forced-flow chemical-vapor infiltration (FCVI) have exhibited both composite (toughened) and brittle behavior during mechanical property evaluation. Detailed analysis of the fiber-matrix interface revealed that a silica layer on the surface of Nicalon Si-C-O fibers tightly bonds the fiber to the matrix. The strongly bonded fiber and matrix, combined with the reduction in the strength of the fibers that occurs during processing, resulted in the observed brittle behavior. The mechanical behavior of Nicalon/SiC composites has been improved by applying thin coatings (silicon carbide, boron, boron nitride, molybdenum, carbon) to the fibers, prior to densification, to control the interfacial bond. Varying degrees of bonding have been achieved with different coating materials and film thicknesses. Fiber-matrix bond strengths have been quantitatively evaluated using an indentation method and a simple tensile test. The effects of bonding and friction on the mechanical behavior of this composite system have been investigated. 167 refs., 59 figs., 18 tabs.

  12. SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

  13. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carney, S. E. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.

    1988-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs. 11 figs.

  15. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  16. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  17. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  18. Quantum Black Hole Formation in the BFSS Matrix Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinya Aoki; Masanori Hanada; Norihiro Iizuka

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the various head-on collisions of two bunches of D0-branes and their real-time evolution in the BFSS matrix model in classical limit. For a various matrix size N respecting the 't Hooft scaling, we find quantitative evidence for the formation of a single bound state of D0-branes at late time, which is matrix model thermalization and dual to the formation of a larger black hole.

  19. A Numerical Algorithm for Block-Diagonal Decomposition of Matrix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    orthogonal matrix Q and a partition K = K1 ?···? Kl. In general there is no guarantee that this corresponds to the decomposition into simple compo- nents, but in ...

  20. On Equivalence of Semidefinite Relaxations for Quadratic Matrix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 28, 2010 ... 2.2 Equivalence of Vector and Matrix Lifting for QMP1 .... A Schur complement argument now implies the equivalence of this relaxation to the ...

  1. IBM Research Report Efficient High-precision Dense Matrix Algebra ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 29, 2008 ... staple of high performance computing to efficiently solve discrete optimization problems on modern computational platforms. Matrix-based ...

  2. Chance–Constrained Linear Matrix Inequalities with Dependent ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 27, 2011 ... Department of Systems Engineering and Engineering Management, The ..... as systems of linear matrix inequalities. .... Observe that the quality.

  3. active matrix flat: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of semiconductor superlattice Petta, Jason 22 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

  4. active synovial matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of semiconductor superlattice Petta, Jason 14 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

  5. acrolein activates matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of semiconductor superlattice Petta, Jason 18 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

  6. active matrix liquid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of semiconductor superlattice Petta, Jason 23 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

  7. Textures with two traceless submatrices of the neutrino mass matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. A. Alhendi; E. I. Lashin; A. A. Mudlej

    2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new texture for the light neutrino mass matrix. The proposal is based upon imposing zero-trace condition on the two by two sub-matrices of the complex symmetric Majorana mass matrix in the flavor basis where the charged lepton mass matrix is diagonal. Restricting the mass matrix to have two traceless sub-matrices may be found sufficient to describe the current data. Eight out of fifteen independent possible cases are found to be compatible with current data. Numerical and some approximate analytical results are presented.

  8. Complexity of the positive semidefinite matrix completion problem ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 4, 2012 ... As a motivation recall the following basic 3D geometric result: Given a matrix X = (xij) in ...... Mathematical Tables, 9th printing. New York: Dover ...

  9. al matrix composite: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materialia 65 (2011) 288291 Extreme anelastic responses in Zn80Al20 matrix composite materials containing Materials Science Websites Summary: Scripta Materialia 65 (2011)...

  10. al matrix composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materialia 65 (2011) 288291 Extreme anelastic responses in Zn80Al20 matrix composite materials containing Materials Science Websites Summary: Scripta Materialia 65 (2011)...

  11. North African geology: exploration matrix for potential major hydrocarbon discoveries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanes, W.H.; O'Connor, T.E.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on results and models presented previously, it is possible to consider an exploration matrix that examines the 5 basic exploration parameters: source, reservoir, timing, structure, and seal. This matrix indicates that even those basins that have had marginal exploration successes, including the Paleozoic megabasin and downfaulted Triassic grabens of Morocco, the Cyrenaican platform of Libya, and the Tunisia-Sicily shelf, have untested plays. The exploration matrix also suggests these high-risk areas could change significantly, if one of the 5 basic matrix parameters is upgraded or if adjustments in political or financial risk are made. The Sirte basin and the Gulf of Suez, 2 of the more intensely explored areas, also present attractive matrix prospects, particularly with deeper Nubian beds or with the very shallow Tertiary sections. The Ghadames basin of Libya and Tunisia shows some potential, but its evaluation responds strongly to stratigraphic and external nongeologic matrix variations based on degree of risk exposure to be assumed. Of greatest risk in the matrix are the very deep Moroccan Paleozoic clastic plays and the Jurassic of Sinai. However, recent discoveries may upgrade these untested frontier areas. Based on the matrix generated by the data presented at a North African Petroleum Geology symposium, significant hydrocarbon accumulations are yet to be found. The remaining questions are: where in the matrix does each individual company wish to place its exploration capital and how much should be the risk exposure.

  12. Optimization Online - Efficient high-precision dense matrix algebra ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Gunnels

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nov 10, 2008 ... Efficient high-precision dense matrix algebra on parallel architectures for nonlinear discrete optimization. John Gunnels(gunnels ***at*** ...

  13. Optimization Online - Sufficient Conditions for Low-rank Matrix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lingchen Kong

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2011 ... This class of optimization problems is $NP$-hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix ...

  14. SOLVING A LOW-RANK FACTORIZATION MODEL FOR MATRIX ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    problem has been based on nuclear-norm minimization which requires computing singular value decompositions – a task that is increasingly costly as matrix ...

  15. SUFFICIENT CONDITIONS FOR LOW-RANK MATRIX RECOVERY ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 15, 2011 ... is -hard and a popular approach replaces the rank function with the nuclear norm of the matrix variable. In this paper, we extend the ...

  16. ON LEAST SQUARES EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE MATRIX APPROXIMATION AND COMPLETION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in biological or engineering applications, including molecular structure analysis, protein folding problem. distance geometry, least squares approximation, matrix completion, molecular structure, protein folding

  17. ON LEAST SQUARES EUCLIDEAN DISTANCE MATRIX APPROXIMATION AND COMPLETION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in biological or engineering applications, including molecular structure analysis, protein folding problem approximation, matrix completion, molecular structure, protein folding, conformational analysis. 1. Introduction

  18. Summary Report For The Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample For Canister S04023

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to comply with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Form Compliance Plan for Sluldge Batch 7b, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream (PS) glass sample collected while filling canister S04023. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass.

  19. Development Of A Macro-Batch Qualification Strategy For The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, Connie C.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

  20. NEPHELINE FORMATION POTENTIAL IN SLUDGE BATCH 4 AND ITS IMPACT ON DURABILITY: SELECTING GLASSES FOR A PHASE 3 STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K

    2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Savannah River National Laboratory's frit development effort for SB4 is being driven by the most current CBU option for this sludge, referred to as Case 15C Blend 1. Candidate frits have been identified for this option via a paper study approach developed by Peeler and Edwards with the intent of down-selecting to a set of key frits whose operating windows (i.e., WL intervals that meet PCCS MAR criteria) are robust to and/or selectively optimal for this sludge option. The primary frits that appear attractive on paper (i.e., down-selected via the paper study) are now being incorporated into this experimental study. The potential for the formation of a nepheline primary crystalline phase is an important factor in frit development for SB4, due to the high Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} content of this sludge. Based upon earlier work by Li et al., glasses that do not satisfy the constraint: (SiO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} + Na{sub 2}O + Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) > 0.62 where the oxides are expressed as mass fractions in the glass, will precipitate nepheline as their primary crystalline phase, hindering the durability of the glass. Based on the most recent compositional projection from the CBU for SB4 (Case 15C Blend 1), 16 glasses have been selected to complement the earlier work by continuing the investigation into the ability of the above constraint to predict the occurrence of a nepheline primary crystalline phase for SB4 glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. Glasses were selected to cover WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the PCCS to support SME acceptability decisions. In addition, glass specimens at WLs of 35 and 40% will be prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro{trademark} database in anticipation of a variability study for SB4. The glasses in Table 4-3 are to batched and fabricated using standard procedures. Visual observations and other analytical techniques are to be used, as needed, to assess the presence of crystals with specific interest in the nepheline primary phase. The durability of these glasses (for both quenched and centerline canister cooled versions) is to be measured using the ASTM PCT Method A. The results from these efforts are to be documented in a subsequent report. The results of this study will provide valuable input for the frit development efforts and subsequent feedback to the CBU regarding the relative viability of the current SB4 option under consideration. The refined nepheline discriminator value will provide a guideline for the avoidance of nepheline crystallization in SB4 glasses and aid in down-selection of frit compositions. These data will be combined with the results of melt rate studies and a paper study of the frits robustness with regard to variability in the sludge composition to provide an optimized frit recommendation to DWPF for immobilization of SB4.

  1. Calibration Using Matrix Completion with Application to Ultrasound Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vetterli, Martin

    1 Calibration Using Matrix Completion with Application to Ultrasound Tomography Reza Parhizkar, IEEE Abstract--We study the application of matrix completion in the process of calibrating physical devices. In particular we propose an algorithm together with reconstruction bounds for calibrating

  2. Evaluating Energy Efficiency of Floating Point Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    Evaluating Energy Efficiency of Floating Point Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs Kiran Kumar Matam, prasanna}@usc.edu Abstract--Energy efficiency has emerged as one of the key performance metrics in scientific computing. In this work, we evaluate the energy efficiency of floating point matrix multipli

  3. Complex Network Framework Based Dependency Matrix of Electric Power Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Complex Network Framework Based Dependency Matrix of Electric Power Grid A. B. M. Nasiruzzaman, H, Australian power grid operated under the National Electricity Market (NEM) is the worlds longest scale analysis of power grid using complex network framework a network matrix is formed. The elements

  4. Exploiting Matrix Symmetry to Improve FPGA-Accelerated Conjugate Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakos, Jason D.

    the Conjugate Gradient (CG) method using an FPGA co-processor. As in previous approaches, our coExploiting Matrix Symmetry to Improve FPGA- Accelerated Conjugate Gradient Jason D. Bakos, Krishna, high- performance computing, sparse matrix vector multiply, conjugate gradient I. INTRODUCTION Linear

  5. MINIMIZING THE PROFILE OF A SYMMETRIC MATRIX WILLIAM W. HAGER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hager, William

    MINIMIZING THE PROFILE OF A SYMMETRIC MATRIX WILLIAM W. HAGER SIAM J. SCI. COMPUT. c 2002 Society for minimizing the profile of a sparse, symmetric matrix. The heuristic approaches seek to minimize the profile in an initial ordering to strictly improve the profile. Comparisons with the spectral algorithm, a level

  6. ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Report Submitted;2 ABSTRACT Interporosity flow in a naturslly fractured reservoir is modelled by a new formulation of the distribution. Thus, observed pressure response from fractured reservoirs can be analysed to obtain the matrix

  7. Convergent relaxations of polynomial matrix inequalities and static output feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrion, Didier

    (LMI) relaxations to solve non-convex polynomial matrix in- equality (PMI) optimization problems minimizers that satisfy the PMI. The approach is successfully applied to PMIs arising from static output- mulated as polynomial matrix inequality (PMI) optimization problems in the controller parameters

  8. Inner approximations for polynomial matrix inequalities and robust stability regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of feasible solutions is modelled by parametrized polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI). These feasibility sets are typically nonconvex. Given a parametrized PMI set, we provide a hierarchy of linear matrix inequality (LMI.g. [5] for a software implementation and examples, and see [6] for an application to PMI problems

  9. Stable radial distortion calibration by polynomial matrix inequalities programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrion, Didier

    polynomials. Further, we show how to model these nonnegativities using polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI) and how to estimate the radial distortion parameters subject to PMI constraints using semidefinite to stabilize the shape of the distortion function. It is based on polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI

  10. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maricle, Donald L. (226 Forest La., Glastonbury, CT 06033); Putnam, Gary C. (47 Walker St., Manchester, CT 06040); Stewart, Jr., Robert C. (1230 Copper Hill Rd., West Suffield, CT 06093)

    1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  11. Matrix Models, Large N Limits and Noncommutative Solitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard J. Szabo

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A survey of the interrelationships between matrix models and field theories on the noncommutative torus is presented. The discretization of noncommutative gauge theory by twisted reduced models is described along with a rigorous definition of the large N continuum limit. The regularization of arbitrary noncommutative field theories by means of matrix quantum mechanics and its connection to noncommutative solitons is also discussed.

  12. A General Formulation for the Stiffness Matrix of Parallel Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the Cartesian stiffness matrix of parallel mechanisms. The proposed formulation is more general than any other is given in order to illustrate the correctness of this matrix. 1 Introduction A robotic manipulator is a mechanism designed to displace objects in space or in a plane. Therefore, a high precision in the position

  13. Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary Computer Science Dept that is predominantly linear algebra · Conclusions A Catalog of Matrix Factorizations c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 or oscillation · understanding Markov chains c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 University of Maryland, College Park #12

  14. Catalytic hydrolysis of urea with fly ash for generation of ammonia in a batch reactor for flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, J.N.; Gangadharan, P.; Patwardhan, A.V.; Meikap, B.C. [Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur (India). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ammonia is a highly volatile noxious material with adverse physiological effects, which become intolerable even at very low concentrations and present substantial environmental and operating hazards and risk. Yet ammonia has long been known to be used for feedstock of flue gas conditioning and NOx reduction. Urea as the source of ammonia for the production of ammonia has the obvious advantages that no ammonia shipping, handling, and storage is required. The process of this invention minimizes the risks and hazards associated with the transport, storage, and use of anhydrous and aqueous ammonia. Yet no such rapid urea conversion process is available as per requirement of high conversion in shorter time, so here we study the catalytic hydrolysis of urea for fast conversion in a batch reactor. The catalyst used in this study is fly ash, a waste material originating in great amounts in combustion processes. A number of experiments were carried out in a batch reactor at different catalytic doses, temperatures, times, and at a constant concentration of urea solution 10% by weight, and equilibrium and kinetic studies have been made.

  15. Multipole matrix elements of Green function of Laplace equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Makuch; Przemys?aw Górka

    2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Multipole matrix elements of Green function of Laplace equation are calculated. The multipole matrix elements of Green function in electrostatics describe potential on a sphere which is produced by a charge distributed on the surface of a different (possibly overlapping) sphere of the same radius. The matrix elements are defined by double convolution of two spherical harmonics with the Green function of Laplace equation. The method we use relies on the fact that in the Fourier space the double convolution has simple form. Therefore we calculate the multipole matrix from its Fourier transform. An important part of our considerations is simplification of the three dimensional Fourier transformation of general multipole matrix by its rotational symmetry to the one-dimensional Hankel transformation.

  16. Quantum spin chains and random matrix theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huw J Wells

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectral statistics and entanglement within the eigenstates of generic spin chain Hamiltonians are analysed. A class of random matrix ensembles is defined which include the most general nearest-neighbour qubit chain Hamiltonians. For these ensembles, and their generalisations, it is seen that the long chain limiting spectral density is a Gaussian and that this convergence holds on the level of individual Hamiltonians. The rate of this convergence is numerically seen to be slow. Higher eigenvalue correlation statistics are also considered, the canonical nearest-neighbour level spacing statistics being numerically observed and linked with ensemble symmetries. A heuristic argument is given for a conjectured form of the full joint probability density function for the eigenvalues of a wide class of such ensembles. This is numerically verified in a particular case. For many translationally-invariant nearest-neighbour qubit Hamiltonians it is shown that there exists a complete orthonormal set of eigenstates for which the entanglement present in a generic member, between a fixed length block of qubits and the rest of the chain, approaches its maximal value as the chain length increases. Many such Hamiltonians are seen to exhibit a simple spectrum so that their eigenstates are unique up to phase. The entanglement within the eigenstates contrasts the spectral density for such Hamiltonians, which is that seen for a non-interacting chain of qubits. For such non-interacting chains, their always exists a basis of eigenstates for which there is no entanglement present.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

  18. ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In contrast, the variability study has significantly added value to the DWPF's qualification strategy. The variability study has evolved to become the primary aspect of the DWPF's compliance strategy as it has been shown to be versatile and capable of adapting to the DWPF's various and diverse waste streams and blending strategies. The variability study, which aims to ensure durability requirements and the PCT and chemical composition correlations are valid for the compositional region to be processed at the DWPF, must continue to be performed. Due to the importance of the variability study and its place in the DWPF's qualification strategy, it will also be discussed in this report. An analysis of historical data and Production Records indicated that the recommendation of the Six Sigma team to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and PCT performed with the qualification glass does not compromise the DWPF's current compliance plan. Furthermore, the DWPF should continue to produce an acceptable waste form following the remaining elements of the Glass Product Control Program; regardless of a sludge-only or coupled operations strategy. If the DWPF does decide to eliminate the characterization of pour stream samples, pour stream samples should continue to be collected for archival reasons, which would allow testing to be performed should any issues arise or new repository test methods be developed.

  19. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  20. Approach to inherently stable interfaces for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Kupp, E.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shanmugham, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually all ceramic matrix composites require and interface coating between the fibers and matrix to achieve the desired mechanical performance. To date, the most effective interface materials for non- oxide matrix composites have been carbon and boron nitride. They are, however, susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperatures, and thus under many envisioned operating environments they will fail, possibly allowing oxidation of the fibers as well, adversely affecting mechanical behavior. Current efforts are directed toward developing stable interface coating, which include oxides and silicon carbide with appropriate thermomechanical properties.

  1. Looking for a Matrix model for ABJM theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohammed, Asadig [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); Murugan, Jeff [Astrophysics, Cosmology and Gravity Center, Department of Mathematics and Applied Mathematics, University of Cape Town, Private Bag, Rondebosch 7700 (South Africa); National Institute for Theoretical Physics (NITheP), Stellenbosch (South Africa); Nastase, Horatiu [Global Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Instituto de Fisica Teorica, UNESP-Universidade Estadual Paulista, R. Dr. Bento T. Ferraz 271, Bl. II, Sao Paulo 01140-070, SP (Brazil)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Encouraged by the recent construction of fuzzy sphere solutions in the Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena (ABJM) theory, we re-analyze the latter from the perspective of a Matrix-like model. In particular, we argue that a vortex solution exhibits properties of a supergraviton, while a kink represents a 2-brane. Other solutions are also consistent with the Matrix-type interpretation. We study vortex scattering and compare with graviton scattering in the massive ABJM background, however our results are inconclusive. We speculate on how to extend our results to construct a Matrix theory of ABJM.

  2. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan [Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Persson, Per-Olof [Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sutton, Brian D. [Department of Mathematics, Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

  3. Separation of Nuclear Fuel Surrogates from Silicon Carbide Inert Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Ronald Baney

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project has been to identify a process for separating transuranic species from silicon carbide (SiC). Silicon carbide has become one of the prime candidates for the matrix in inert matrix fuels, (IMF) being designed to reduce plutonium inventories and the long half-lives actinides through transmutation since complete reaction is not practical it become necessary to separate the non-transmuted materials from the silicon carbide matrix for ultimate reprocessing. This work reports a method for that required process.l

  4. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  5. On rational solutions of multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Tacchella

    2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive some rational solutions for the multicomponent and matrix KP hierarchies generalising an approach by Wilson. Connections with the multicomponent version of the KP/CM correspondence are discussed.

  6. Transfer matrix for spanning trees, webs and colored forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Brankov; V. S. Poghosyan; V. B. Priezzhev; P. Ruelle

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We use the transfer matrix formalism for dimers proposed by Lieb, and generalize it to address the corresponding problem for arrow configurations (or trees) associated to dimer configurations through Temperley's correspondence. On a cylinder, the arrow configurations can be partitioned into sectors according to the number of non-contractible loops they contain. We show how Lieb's transfer matrix can be adapted in order to disentangle the various sectors and to compute the corresponding partition functions. In order to address the issue of Jordan cells, we introduce a new, extended transfer matrix, which not only keeps track of the positions of the dimers, but also propagates colors along the branches of the associated trees. We argue that this new matrix contains Jordan cells.

  7. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure. A hydrochloric acid solution is used in carbonate reservoirs, which actually dissolves the calcite rock matrix in the form of conductive channels called wormholes. These wormholes propagate from the wellbore out into the reservoir, bypassing...

  8. alternative host matrix: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the model and its extensions well suited for studying the phase diagram of QCD. James C. Osborn 2004-03-11 29 Molecular Dynamics of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption of Leucine...

  9. Implementing a fast cartesian-polar matrix interpolator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Muralidaran

    The 2009 MEMOCODE Hardware/Software Co-Design Contest assignment was the implementation of a cartesian-to-polar matrix interpolator. We discuss our hardware and software design submissions.

  10. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  11. The Impact of Extracellular Matrix Stiffness on Angiogensis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Po-Feng 1976-

    2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    of collagen matrix stiffness by inducing collagen cross-linking with microbial transglutaminase (mTG). Collagen matrices stiffen with both mTG treatment and incubation time as evidenced with biaxial mechanical test results and collagen TPF intensity increases...

  12. Precision Measurement of Transition Matrix Elements via Light Shift Cancellation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Herold; V. D. Vaidya; X. Li; S. L. Rolston; J. V. Porto; M. S. Safronova

    2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a method for accurate determination of atomic transition matrix elements at the 10^{-3} level. Measurements of the ac Stark (light) shift around "magic-zero" wavelengths, where the light shift vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the first measurement of the 5s-6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 nm and 423 nm zeros with a sequence of standing wave pulses. In conjunction with existing theoretical and experimental data, we find 0.3236(9) e a_0 and 0.5230(8) e a_0 for the 5s-6p_{1/2} and 5s-6p_{3/2} elements, respectively, an order of magnitude more accurate than the best theoretical values. This technique can provide needed, accurate matrix elements for many atoms, including those used in atomic clocks, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum information.

  13. active matrix organic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Transparent Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diode Displays Driven by Chemistry Websites Summary: and portable electronics. In...

  14. active matrix pixel: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 4.2: Design of an Improved Pixel for a Polysilicon Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diode Display Engineering Websites Summary: 4.2: Design of an Improved Pixel for a...

  15. Parallel Stochastic Gradient Algorithms for Large-Scale Matrix ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    parallel implementation that admits a speed-up nearly proportional to the ... On large-scale matrix completion tasks, Jellyfish is orders of magnitude more ...... get a consistent build of NNLS with mex optimizations at the time of this submission.

  16. EIGENVALUES OF AN ALIGNMENT MATRIX IN NONLINEAR MANIFOLD LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Chi-Kwong

    . This forms a theoretical basis for the LTSA (Local Tangent Space Alignment) algorithm of [11] recently for this problem [1, 3, 5, 7, 11]. The alignment matrix was first introduced in the LTSA method [11] in which

  17. Fabrication of amorphous metal matrix composites by severe plastic deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathaudhu, Suveen Nigel

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) for consolidation of bulk amorphous metals (BAM) and amorphous metal matrix composites (AMMC) is investigated in this dissertation. The objectives of this research are a) to better understand processing parameters...

  18. Simulation of bilinear flow in single matrix block drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branajaya, Romi Triaji

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    serves as the tight gas reservoir with a high permeability streak surrounding the matrix. A well only produces from the high permeability fracture. Models were run with different sensitivity cases toward fracture half length, xf, and fracture permeability...

  19. Model Quality Control Matrix Tools for Defining Commissioning Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakahara, N.; Onojima, H.; Kamitani, K.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    detailed information sheet includes detailed information that has the function to link to computerized that has the function to link to computerized documents, URLs or edocuments, URLs or e--mail addresses. mail addresses. Structure of MQC Matrix continued...

  20. Electrodeposition of amorphous matrix Ni-W/Wp̳ composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenket, Donald R. (Donald Robert)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An amorphous Ni-W alloy matrix was incorporated with W particulate through two types of electrodeposition. The plating bath for the electrodeposition contained nickel sulfate, sodium tungstate, sodium citrate, ammonium ...

  1. The UDUTDecomposition of Manipulator Inertia Matrix Subir Kumar Saha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    The UDUTDecomposition of Manipulator Inertia Matrix Subir Kumar Saha R&D Center, Toshiba Corporation 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210, Jalpan E-mail: sahaC3mel

  2. An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

  3. Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eagar, Thomas W.

    ) ) Joining of 6061 Aluminum Matrix-Ceramic Particle Reinforced Composites by R. Kiehn and T. W................... .. ....... ... ... 3 Literature Review ......... ...... ..... ... . . 3 Conventional Aluminum Brazing ........ 4 Aluminum Composite Joining ........... 5 Aluminum Joining by Unconventional Methods

  4. Monitoring Uranium Transformations Determined by the Evolution of Biogeochemical Processes: Design of Mixed Batch Reactor and Column Studies at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Criddle, Craig S.; Wu, Weimin

    2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    With funds provided by the US DOE, Argonne National Laboratory subcontracted the design of batch and column studies to a Stanford University team with field experience at the ORNL IFRC, Oak Ridge, TN. The contribution of the Stanford group ended in 2011 due to budget reduction in ANL. Over the funded research period, the Stanford research team characterized ORNL IFRC groundwater and sediments and set up microcosm reactors and columns at ANL to ensure that experiments were relevant to field conditions at Oak Ridge. The results of microcosm testing demonstrated that U(VI) in sediments was reduced to U(IV) with the addition of ethanol. The reduced products were not uraninite but were instead U(IV) complexes associated with Fe. Fe(III) in solid phase was only partially reduced. The Stanford team communicated with the ANL team members through email and conference calls and face to face at the annual ERSP PI meeting and national meetings.

  5. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  6. A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, David Chi Shing

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Texas A8-M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. D. H. Allen Dr. C. E. Harris A damage evolutionary relationship was developed to model the accuntulation of' intraply matrix cracks in laminated composites. This relationship was formulated... (Member) 'le=-~8 ~ W. E. Haisler (Head of Department) C. E. Harris & (Co-Clrair of Committee) / g. C. La, ' M. . Lu (Member) Itfay 1990 ABSTRACT A Matrix Damage Accumulation Model for Laminated Composites . (May 1990) David Chi Shing Lo, B, S...

  7. Neutrino mass matrix solutions and neutrinoless double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Hambye

    2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a determination of the neutrino mass matrix which holds for values of the neutrinoless double beta decay effective mass m_{ee} larger than the neutrino mass differences. We find eight possible solutions and discuss for each one the corresponding neutrino mass eigenvalues and zero texture. A minimal structure of the perturbations to add to these zero textures to recover the full mass matrix is also determined. Implications for neutrino hot dark matter are discussed for each solution.

  8. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States); Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang [Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Yebo, E-mail: li.851@osu.edu [Department of Food, Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Ohio State University, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, 1680 Madison Ave., Wooster, OH 44691 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  9. On the Equivalence of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization and K-means - Spectral Clustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Chris; He, Xiaofeng; Simon, Horst D.; Jin, Rong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    He, and H.D. Simon. On the equivalence of nonnegative matrixOn the Equivalence of Nonnegative Matrix Factorization and

  10. Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization in a Fourier Transform Ion Surface-Induced Dissociation of Ions Produced by Matrix-Assisted Laser...

  11. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nock, A., E-mail: a.nock@qmul.ac.uk; Kumar, S., E-mail: skumar.physics@gmail.com; Sommers, H.-J., E-mail: h.j.sommers@uni-due.de; Guhr, T., E-mail: thomas.guhr@uni-due.de

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  12. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  13. AQ AM Announcement Y150512 DRAFT jm-cpb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mazumder - University of Michigan Prof. Chris Tuck - University of Nottingham Dr. Kalman Migler - NIST* anticipated Workshop scope: Additive manufacturing (AM) offers distinct...

  14. MEASUREMENTS OF THE DEUTERON ELASTIC STRUCTURE FUNCTION AQ2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's continuous electron beam with energies from 3.2 to 4.4 GeV, and currents from 5 to 120 A. The beam current. CHUDAKOVa Thomas Je erson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, Va, US The deuteron elastic structure of the experimental areas Hall A of the Thomas Je erson National Accelerator Facility JLab, using the Jlab

  15. EERE Program Management Guide - Appendices A-Q

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S.ContaminationJulySavannah RiverSustainability |InnovationsDepartment of EERE

  16. AQ AM Announcement Y150512 DRAFT jm-cpb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76) (See theDoctoral20ALSNewstt^APPLIANCE STANDARDS How Los

  17. Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrim County,Delhi (NCT), India

  18. MTH221, LINEAR ALGEBRA, FINAL EXAM FALL 2006 Question 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John L Casti (Santa Fe) 1377 2003 Feb 12 15:14:22

    2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    If A = (. 1 1. 0 3 ) a) (4 points) Find all eigenvalues A b) (6 points)Find a nonsingular matrix Q and a diagonal matrix D such that. Q?1AQ = D (that it is A = QDQ?1) ...

  19. Synthesis of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforced with in situ devitrified Al-Ni-La amorphous particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhihui H; Han, B Q; Witkin, D; Ajdelsztajn, L; Laverna, E J

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites reinforcedAbstract Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composites wereamount of nanoscale aluminum oxide, nitride and carbide

  20. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part I - Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Carney, S. E. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Martin, W. R. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theory underlying the fission matrix method is derived using a rigorous Green's function approach. The method is then used to investigate fundamental properties of the transport equation for a continuous-energy physics treatment. We provide evidence that an infinite set of discrete, real eigenvalues and eigenfunctions exist for the continuous-energy problem, and that the eigenvalue spectrum converges smoothly as the spatial mesh for the fission matrix is refined. We also derive equations for the adjoint solution. We show that if the mesh is sufficiently refined so that both forward and adjoint solutions are valid, then the adjoint fission matrix is identical to the transpose of the forward matrix. While the energy-dependent transport equation is strictly bi-orthogonal, we provide surprising results that the forward modes are very nearly self-adjoint for a variety of continuous-energy problems. A companion paper (Part II - Applications) describes the initial experience and results from implementing this fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  1. Matrix-based approach to electrodynamics in media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Bogush; V. M. Red'kov; N. G. Tokarevskaya; George J. Spix

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The Riemann -- Silberstein -- Majorana -- Oppenheimer approach to the Maxwell electrodynamics in presence of electrical sources and arbitrary media is investigated within the matrix formalism. The symmetry of the matrix Maxwell equation under transformations of the complex rotation group SO(3.C) is demonstrated explicitly. In vacuum case, the matrix form includes four real $4 \\times 4$ matrices $\\alpha^{b}$. In presence of media matrix form requires two sets of $4 \\times 4$ matrices, $\\alpha^{b}$ and $\\beta^{b}$ -- simple and symmetrical realization of which is given. Relation of $\\alpha^{b}$ and $\\beta^{b}$ to the Dirac matrices in spinor basis is found. Minkowski constitutive relations in case of any linear media are given in a short algebraic form based on the use of complex 3-vector fields and complex orthogonal rotations from SO(3.C) group. The matrix complex formulation in the Esposito's form,based on the use of two electromagnetic 4-vectors, $e^{\\alpha}(x) = u_{\\beta} F^{\\alpha \\beta}(x), b^{\\alpha} (x) = u_{\\beta} \\tilde{F}^{\\alpha \\beta}(x) $ is studied and discussed. It is argued that Esposito form is achieved trough the use of a trivial identity $I=U^{-1}(u)U(u)$ in the Maxwell equation.

  2. Parallel matrix transpose algorithms on distributed memory concurrent computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, J.; Walker, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dongarra, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes parallel matrix transpose algorithms on distributed memory concurrent processors. It is assumed that the matrix is distributed over a P x Q processor template with a block scattered data distribution. P, Q, and the block size can be arbitrary, so the algorithms have wide applicability. The communication schemes of the algorithms are determined by the greatest common divisor (GCD) of P and Q. If P and Q are relatively prime, the matrix transpose algorithm involves complete exchange communication. If P and Q are not relatively prime, processors are divided into GCD groups and the communication operations are overlapped for different groups of processors. Processors transpose GCD wrapped diagonal blocks simultaneously, and the matrix can be transposed with LCM/GCD steps, where LCM is the least common multiple of P and Q. The algorithms make use of non-blocking, point-to-point communication between processors. The use of nonblocking communication allows a processor to overlap the messages that it sends to different processors, thereby avoiding unnecessary synchronization. Combined with the matrix multiplication routine, C = A{center_dot}B, the algorithms are used to compute parallel multiplications of transposed matrices, C = A{sup T}{center_dot}B{sup T}, in the PUMMA package. Details of the parallel implementation of the algorithms are given, and results are presented for runs on the Intel Touchstone Delta computer.

  3. Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  4. Computational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Michael

    Computational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix mechanical re- sponse of a ceramic matrix composite is simulated by a numerical model for a ®ber-matrix unit evolution in brittle matrix composites was developed. This modeling is based on an axisymmetric unit cell

  5. Mueller Matrix Parameters for Radio Telescopes and their Observational Determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl Heiles; Phil Perillat; Michael Nolan; Duncan Lorimer; Ramesh Bhat; Tapasi Ghosh; Murray Lewis; Karen O'Neil; Chris Salter; Snezana Stanimirovic

    2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern digital crosscorrelators permit the simultaneous measurement of all four Stokes parameters. However, the results must be calibrated to correct for the polarization transfer function of the receiving system. The transfer function for any device can be expressed by its Mueller matrix. We express the matrix elements in terms of fundamental system parameters that describe the voltage transfer functions (known as the Jones matrix) of the various system devices in physical terms and thus provide a means for comparing with engineering calculations and investigating the effects of design changes. We describe how to determine these parameters with astronomical observations. We illustrate the method by applying it to some of the receivers at the Arecibo Observatory.

  6. Enumeration of RNA complexes via random matrix theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jørgen E. Andersen; Leonid O. Chekhov; R. C. Penner; Christian M. Reidys; Piotr Su?kowski

    2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review a derivation of the numbers of RNA complexes of an arbitrary topology. These numbers are encoded in the free energy of the hermitian matrix model with potential V(x)=x^2/2-stx/(1-tx), where s and t are respective generating parameters for the number of RNA molecules and hydrogen bonds in a given complex. The free energies of this matrix model are computed using the so-called topological recursion, which is a powerful new formalism arising from random matrix theory. These numbers of RNA complexes also have profound meaning in mathematics: they provide the number of chord diagrams of fixed genus with specified numbers of backbones and chords as well as the number of cells in Riemann's moduli spaces for bordered surfaces of fixed topological type.

  7. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Brandt; Gaston Gutierrez; Michael H. L. S. Wang; Zhenyu Ye

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  8. Glueball matrix elements: a lattice calculation and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2008-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute the matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor between glueball states and the vacuum in SU(3) lattice gauge theory and extrapolate them to the continuum. These matrix elements may play an important phenomenological role in identifying glue-rich mesons. Based on a relation derived long ago by the ITEP group for J/psi radiative decays, the scalar matrix element leads to a branching ratio for the glueball that is at least three times larger than the experimentally observed branching ratio for the f_0 mesons above 1GeV. This suggests that the glueball component must be diluted quite strongly among the known scalar mesons. Finally we review the current best continuum determination of the scalar and tensor glueball masses, the deconfining temperature, the string tension and the Lambda parameter, all in units of the Sommer reference scale, using calculations based on the Wilson action.

  9. Matrix factorisations for rational boundary conditions by defect fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Behr; Stefan Fredenhagen

    2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A large class of two-dimensional $\\mathcal{N}=(2,2)$ superconformal field theories can be understood as IR fixed-points of Landau-Ginzburg models. In particular, there are rational conformal field theories that also have a Landau-Ginzburg description. To understand better the relation between the structures in the rational conformal field theory and in the Landau-Ginzburg theory, we investigate how rational B-type boundary conditions are realised as matrix factorisations in the $SU(3)/U(2)$ Grassmannian Kazama-Suzuki model. As a tool to generate the matrix factorisations we make use of a particular interface between the Kazama-Suzuki model and products of minimal models, whose fusion can be realised as a simple functor on ring modules. This allows us to formulate a proposal for all matrix factorisations corresponding to rational boundary conditions in the $SU(3)/U(2)$ model.

  10. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Oleg; Wang, Michael H L S; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by two orders of magnitude. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing e...

  11. Conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor devices with edge channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovskii, E. Yu., E-mail: danilovskii@mail.ioffe.ru; Bagraev, N. T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor structures with edge channels is proposed. The method is based on the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations based on Kirchhoff equations, made up of potential differences U{sub ij} measured at stabilized currents I{sub kl}, where i, j, k, l are terminal numbers. The matrix obtained by solving the system of equations completely describes the structure under study, reflecting its configuration and homogeneity. This method can find wide application when using the known Landauer-Buttiker formalism to analyze carrier transport in the quantum Hall effect and quantum spin Hall effect modes. Within the proposed method, the contribution of the contact area resistances R{sub c} to the formation of conductance matrix elements is taken into account. The possibilities of practical application of the results obtained in developing analog cryptographic devices are considered.

  12. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O.; Gutierrez, G.; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Z.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of themore »matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  13. Spontaneous Breaking of Diffeomorphism Invariance in Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2005-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a matrix action based on the unitary group U(N) whose large N ground states are conjectured to be in precise correspondence with the weak-strong dual effective field theory limits of M theory preserving sixteen supersymmetries. We identify a finite N matrix algebra that corresponds to the spacetime and internal symmetry algebra of the Lorentz invariant field theories obtained in the different large N limits. The manifest diffeomorphism invariance of matrix theory is spontaneously broken upon specification of the large N ground state. We verify that there exist planar limits which yield the low energy spacetime effective actions of all six supersymmetric string theories in nine spacetime dimensions and with sixteen supercharges.

  14. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O. [Physikalisches Inst, Gottingen (Germany); Univ. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Gutierrez, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Wang, M. H.L.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Ye, Z. [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  15. Dirac Lepton Angle Matrix v.s. Majorana Lepton Angle Matrix and Their Renormalization Group Running Behaviours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu Luo

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Enlightened by the idea of the 3 times 3 CKM angle matrix proposed recently by Harrison et al., we introduce the Dirac angle matrix Phi and the Majorana angle matrix Psi in the lepton sector for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos respectively. We show that in presence of the CP violation, the angle matrix Phi or Psi is entirely equivalent to the complex MNS matrix V itself, but has the advantage of being real, phase rephasing invariant, directly associated to the leptonic unitarity triangles (UTs) and do not depend on any particular parametrization of V. In this paper, we further analyzed how the angle matrices evolve with the energy scale. The one-loop Renormalization Group Equations (RGEs) of Phi, Psi and some other rephasing invariant parameters are derived and the numerical analysis is performed to compare between the case of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Different neutrino mass spectra are taken into account in our calculation. We find that apparently different from the case of Dirac neutrinos, for Majorana neutrinos the RG-evolutions of Phi, Psi and the Jarlskog strongly depend on the Majorana-type CP-violating parameters and are quite sensitive to the sign of Delta m^{2}_{31}. They may receive significant radiative corrections in the MSSM if three neutrino masses are nearly degenerate.

  16. Dirac Lepton Angle Matrix v.s. Majorana Lepton Angle Matrix and Their Renormalization Group Running Behaviours

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Shu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enlightened by the idea of the 3 times 3 CKM angle matrix proposed recently by Harrison et al., we introduce the Dirac angle matrix Phi and the Majorana angle matrix Psi in the lepton sector for Dirac and Majorana neutrinos respectively. We show that in presence of the CP violation, the angle matrix Phi or Psi is entirely equivalent to the complex MNS matrix V itself, but has the advantage of being real, phase rephasing invariant, directly associated to the leptonic unitarity triangles (UTs) and do not depend on any particular parametrization of V. In this paper, we further analyzed how the angle matrices evolve with the energy scale. The one-loop Renormalization Group Equations (RGEs) of Phi, Psi and some other rephasing invariant parameters are derived and the numerical analysis is performed to compare between the case of Dirac and Majorana neutrinos. Different neutrino mass spectra are taken into account in our calculation. We find that apparently different from the case of Dirac neutrinos, for Majorana ne...

  17. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

  18. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inverse of the background distribution.

  19. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve [ORNL; Leal, Luiz C [ORNL; Larson, Nancy M [ORNL

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  20. Electron beam evaporation for titanium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storer, J. [3M, Mendota Heights, MN (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    3M, in partnership with ARPA, is developing electron beam evaporation as a method for producing titanium metal matrix composites (TMC`s). This paper discusses some of the opportunities presented by these strong and lightweight structural materials but also points out the many challenges which must be met. The excellent mechanical properties of titanium matrix composites have been recognized for quite some time; however use of these materials has been limited by the lack of a commercially viable process to produce them. 3M is removing this logjam in processing technology by using high rate electron beam evaporation technology to manufacture these materials on a significantly large scale.

  1. Empirical Survey of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson

    2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinoless double beta decay has been the subject of intensive theoretical work as it represents the only practical approach to discovering whether neutrinos are Majorana particles or not, and whether lepton number is a conserved quantum number. Available calculations of matrix elements and phase-space factors are reviewed from the perspective of a future large-scale experimental search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Somewhat unexpectedly, a uniform inverse correlation between phase space and the square of the nuclear matrix element emerges. As a consequence, no isotope is either favored or disfavored; all have qualitatively the same decay rate per unit mass for any given value of the Majorana mass.

  2. Green-Schwarz superstring from type IIB matrix model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitazawa, Yoshihisa [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Department of Particle and Nuclear Physics, The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Tsukuba Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Nagaoka, Satoshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a Green-Schwarz (GS) light-cone closed superstring theory from the type IIB matrix model. A GS light-cone string action is derived from the two-dimensional N=8 U(n) noncommutative Yang-Mills (NCYM) theory by identifying a noncommutative scale with a string scale. The supersymmetry transformation for the light-cone gauge action is also derived from supersymmetry transformation for the IIB matrix model. By identifying the physical states and interaction vertices, string theory is perturbatively reproduced.

  3. Matrix Quantum Mechanics and Soliton Regularization of Noncommutative Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Landi; Fedele Lizzi; Richard J. Szabo

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct an approximation to field theories on the noncommutative torus based on soliton projections and partial isometries which together form a matrix algebra of functions on the sum of two circles. The matrix quantum mechanics is applied to the perturbative dynamics of scalar field theory, to tachyon dynamics in string field theory, and to the Hamiltonian dynamics of noncommutative gauge theory in two dimensions. We also describe the adiabatic dynamics of solitons on the noncommutative torus and compare various classes of noncommutative solitons on the torus and the plane.

  4. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inversemore »of the background distribution.« less

  5. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States) Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology); Vaughan, A.T.M. (Loyola Univ., Hines, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiotherapy)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  6. DNA-nuclear matrix interactions and ionizing radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Chicago Univ., IL (United States). Dept. of Radiation and Cellular Oncology; Vaughan, A.T.M. [Loyola Univ., Hines, IL (United States). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The association between inherent ionizing radiation sensitivity and DNA supercoil unwinding in mammalian cells suggests that the DNA-nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR) plays an important role in radiation response. In radioresistant cells, the MAR structure may exist in a more stable, open configuration, limiting DNA unwinding following strand break induction and maintaining DNA ends in close proximity for more rapid and accurate rejoining. In addition, the open configuration at these matrix attachment sites may serve to facilitate rapid DNA processing of breaks by providing (1) sites for repair proteins to collect and (2) energy to drive enzymatic reactions.

  7. Data-flow algorithms for parallel matrix computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, D.P.; Stewart, G.W.

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document develops some algorithms and tools for solving matrix problems on parallel-processing computers. Operations are synchronized through data-flow alone, which makes global synchronization unnecessary and enables the algorithms to be implemented on machines with very simple operating systems and communication protocols. As examples, the authors present algorithms that form the main modules for solving Liapounov matrix equations. They compare this approach to wave-front array processors and systolic arrays, and note its advantages in handling mis-sized problems, in evaluating variations of algorithms or architectures, in moving algorithms from system to system, and in debugging parallel algorithms on sequential machines.

  8. Accelerated Analyte Uptake on Single Beads in Microliter-scale Batch Separations using Acoustic Streaming: Plutonium Uptake by Anion Exchange for Analysis by Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paxton, Walter F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Peper, Shane M.; Petersen, Steven L.; Grate, Jay W.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of acoustic streaming as a non-contact mixing platform to accelerate mass transport-limited diffusion processes in small volume heterogeneous reactions has been investigated. Single bead anion exchange of plutonium at nanomolar and sub-picomolar concentrations in 20 microliter liquid volumes was used to demonstrate the effect of acoustic mixing. Pu uptake rates on individual ~760 micrometer diameter AG 1x4 anion exchange resin beads were determined using acoustic mixing and compared with Pu uptake rates achieved by static diffusion alone. An 82 MHz surface acoustic wave (SAW) device was placed in contact with the underside of a 384-well microplate containing flat-bottomed semiconical wells. Acoustic energy was coupled into the solution in the well, inducing acoustic streaming. Pu uptake rates were determined by the plutonium remaining in solution after specific elapsed time intervals, using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) for nanomolar concentrations and thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) analysis for the sub-picomolar concentration experiments. It was found that this small batch uptake reaction could be accelerated by a factor of about five-fold or more, depending on the acoustic power applied.

  9. Arguments towards the construction of a matrix model groundstate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulton, L; Restuccia, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the existence and uniqueness of wavefunctions for inhomogenoeus boundary value problems associated to x^2y^2-type matrix model on a bounded domain of R^2. Both properties involve a combination of the Cauchy-Kovalewski Theorem and a explicit calculations.

  10. On Painleve Related Functions Arising in Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard N. Choup

    2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In deriving large n probability distribution function of the rightmost eigenvalue from the classical Random Matrix Theory Ensembles, one is faced with que question of ?finding large n asymptotic of certain coupled set of functions. This paper presents some of these functions in a new light.

  11. Optimization on linear matrix inequalities for polynomial systems control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Optimization on linear matrix inequalities for polynomial systems control Didier Henrion1,2 Draft Many problems of systems control theory boil down to solving polynomial equations, polynomial conclude this part with applications to optimal control (design of a trajectory optimal w.r.t. a given

  12. Exploring matrix effects on photochemistry of organic aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nizkorodov, Sergey

    Exploring matrix effects on photochemistry of organic aerosols Hanna Lignella,b,1 , Mallory L of photochemical processes in organic aerosols will depend on both relative humidity and temperature and thus and impacts. aerosol aging | particle viscosity | organic photochemistry Aqueous droplets and aerosol

  13. TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Grantham

    1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

  14. Application of Multipole Methods to Two Matrix Eigenproblems Alex Solomonoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of Multipole Methods to Two Matrix Eigenproblems Alex Solomonoff Institute for Math that by using multipole methods to evaluate h(x) we can speed up the calculation of their eigenvalues. An improvement is seen for matrices as small as 70 \\Theta 70. In addition, multipole methods can be used to effi

  15. Application of Multipole Methods to Two Matrix Eigenproblems Alex Solomono

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of Multipole Methods to Two Matrix Eigenproblems Alex Solomono Institute for Math that by using multipole methods to evaluate h(x) we can speed up the calculation of their eigenvalues. An improvement is seen for matrices as small as 7070. In addition, multipole methods can be used to e- ciently

  16. Lecture 24: Parallel Algorithms I Topics: sort and matrix algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasubramonian, Rajeev

    1 Lecture 24: Parallel Algorithms I · Topics: sort and matrix algorithms #12;2 Processor Model a single clock (asynchronous designs will require minor modifications) · At each clock, processors receive input output #12;4 Control at Each Processor · Each processor stores the minimum number it has seen

  17. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  18. Multiphase modeling of tumor growth with matrix remodeling and fibrosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Tosin; Luigi Preziosi

    2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a multiphase mathematical model for tumor growth which incorporates the remodeling of the extracellular matrix and describes the formation of fibrotic tissue by tumor cells. We also detail a full qualitative analysis of the spatially homogeneous problem, and study the equilibria of the system in order to characterize the conditions under which fibrosis may occur.

  19. Blind Deconvolution and Structured Matrix Computations with Applications to Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plemmons, Robert J.

    for the reconstruction of high-resolution images from multiple under sam- pled images of a scene that is obtained1 Blind Deconvolution and Structured Matrix Computations with Applications to Array Imaging Michael .................................................... 21 1.7 Application: High-resolution Image Reconstruction ...................... 23 1.8 Concluding

  20. AT&T Labs -Research Traffic Matrix Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roughan, Matthew

    engineering (choosing OSPF weights) Reliability analysis Detecting anomalies Understanding traffic over limited availability ­ like a high zoom snap shot · special equipment needed (O&M expensive even if box to get routing matrices Gives the Routing Matrix A #12;AT&T Labs - Research Example App: reliability

  1. Constitutive Modeling of Fiber Composites with a Soft Hyperelastic Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pellegrino, Sergio

    of unidirectional carbon fiber composites with a silicone matrix, loaded transversally to the fibers study uses a plane-strain finite element continuum model of the composite material in which the fiber (Campbell et al., 2005; Barrett et al., 2006). These composite materials are often described as memory

  2. Calcium is incorporated into the calcium carbonate matrix of otoliths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    118 Calcium is incorporated into the calcium carbonate matrix of otoliths and into the calcium). In addition to calcium, trace elements, such as strontium, are also incorporated into the calcified components valence) allow strontium ions to act as replace- ments for calcium during the pro- cess of calcification

  3. Methods for transfer matrix evaluation applied to thermoacoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Methods for transfer matrix evaluation applied to thermoacoustics F. Bannwart, G. Penelet, P 2012 Nantes Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 3029 #12;The design of a thermoacoustic (TA the required thermoacoustic instability in its core to make it work. Such conditions can be calculated

  4. Two modulator generalized ellipsometer for complete mueller matrix measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jellison, Jr., Gerald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Modine, Frank A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) comprising two polarizer-photoelastic modulator (PEM) pairs, an optical light source, an optical detection system, and associated data processing and control electronics, where the PEMs are free-running. The input light passes through the first polarizer-PEM pair, reflects off the sample surface or passes through the sample, passes through the second PEM-polarizer pair, and is detected. Each PEM is free running and operates at a different resonant frequency, e.g., 50 and 60 kHz. The resulting time-dependent waveform of the light intensity is a complicated function of time, and depends upon the exact operating frequency and phase of each PEM, the sample, and the azimuthal angles of the polarizer-PEM pairs, but can be resolved into a dc component and eight periodic components. In one embodiment, the waveform is analyzed using a new spectral analysis technique that is similar to Fourier analysis to determine eight sample Mueller matrix elements (normalized to the m.sub.00 Mueller matrix element). The other seven normalized elements of the general 4.times.4 Mueller matrix can be determined by changing the azimuthal angles of the PEM-polarizer pairs with respect to the plane of incidence. Since this instrument can measure all elements of the sample Mueller matrix, it is much more powerful than standard ellipsometers.

  5. Matrix Product States approach to non-Markovian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Descamps Benoit

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A matrix product state approach to non-Markovian, classical and quantum processes is discussed. In the classical case, the Radon-Nikodym derivative of all processes can be embedded into quantum measurement procedure. In the both cases, quantum and classical, the master equation can be derived from a projecting a quantum Markovian process onto a lower dimensional subspace.

  6. The Evolution Matrix: Recovering Software Evolution using Software Visualization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    The Evolution Matrix: Recovering Software Evolution using Software Visualization Techniques Michele - ABSTRACT One of the major problems in software evolution is coping with the complexity which stems from and effective way to visualize the evolution of software systems which helps to recover the evolution of object

  7. New Advances in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, Jose Barea [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. Unidad Asociada al Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the matrix elements necessary to evaluate the half-life of some neutrinoless double beta decay candidates in the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM). We compare our results with those from other models and extract some simple features of the calculations.

  8. Matrix Modeling Methods for Spaceflight Campaign Logistics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Matrix Modeling Methods for Spaceflight Campaign Logistics Analysis Afreen Siddiqi and Olivier L-based modeling approach for analyzing spaceflight campaign logistics. A campaign is considered to be a series logistics properties. A logistics strategy index is proposed for quantifying manifesting strategies

  9. Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion , Chaoqiang Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Zuowei

    Robust video denoising using low rank matrix completion Hui Ji , Chaoqiang Liu , Zuowei Shen video denoising algorithms assume a sin- gle statistical model of image noise, e.g. additive Gaussian white noise, which often is violated in practice. In this pa- per, we present a new patch-based video

  10. Computation and Uses of the Semidiscrete Matrix Decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolda, T.G.; O'Leary, D.P.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive algorithms for computing a semidiscrete approximation to a matrix in the Frobenius and weighted norms. The approximation is formed as a weighted sum of outer products of vectors whose elements are +/=1 or 0, so the storage required by the approximation is quite small.

  11. Noncommutative Cohomological Field Theories and Topological Aspects of Matrix models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akifumi Sako

    2005-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study topological aspects of matrix models and noncommutative cohomological field theories (N.C.CohFT). N.C.CohFT have symmetry under the arbitrary infinitesimal noncommutative parameter $\\theta$ deformation. This fact implies that N.C.CohFT possess a less sensitive topological property than K-theory, but the classification of manifolds by N.C.CohFT has a possibility to give a new view point of global characterization of noncommutative manifolds. To investigate properties of N.C.CohFT, we construct some models whose fixed point loci are given by sets of projection operators. Particularly, the partition function on the Moyal plane is calculated by using a matrix model. The moduli space of the matrix model is a union of Grassman manifolds. The partition function of the matrix model is calculated using the Euler number of the Grassman manifold. Identifying the N.C.CohFT with the matrix model, we get the partition function of the N.C.CohFT. To check the independence of the noncommutative parameters, we also study the moduli space in the large $\\theta$ limit and the finite $\\theta$, for the Moyal plane case. If the partition function of N.C.CohFT is topological in the sense of the noncommutative geometry, then it should have some relation with K-theory. Therefore we investigate certain models of CohFT and N.C.CohFT from the point of view of K-theory. These observations give us an analogy between CohFT and N.C.CohFT in connection with K-theory. Furthermore, we verify it for the Moyal plane and noncommutative torus cases that our partition functions are invariant under the those deformations which do not change the K-theory. Finally, we discuss the noncommutative cohomological Yang-Mills theory.

  12. Simulating silicon area and solution time for RNS array matrix multipliers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jew, Thomas

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of recursive relations for the multiplica- tion of two 2 x 2 matrices and will be analyzed in detail in the following example. Example 9. 2: Matrix Multiplication Using the Array Matrix Multiplier Let A and B be two 2 x 2 matrices as indicated below... Sequence for Array Matrix Multiplier 28 29 V MAC Outputs for the Array Matrix Multiplier VI Multiplying Two Matrices with the Array Matrix Multiplier VII Multiplying Banded Matrices with the Array Matrix Multiplier 30 31 VIII Single Bit Full Adder...

  13. Small-energy analysis for the selfadjoint matrix Schroedinger operator on the half line. II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuncay Aktosun; Martin Klaus; Ricardo Weder

    2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The matrix Schroedinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a second moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is differentiable at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the derivative of the scattering matrix at zero energy. The previously established results when the potential has only the first moment are improved when the second moment exists, by presenting the small-energy asymptotics for the related Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevantc to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

  14. Simultaneous Batching and Scheduling of Single Stage Batch Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    , Tecnologia e Inovação, 1649-038 Lisboa, Portugal Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon

  15. Frit Development Efforts for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4): Operating Window Assessments fo Scenarios Leading Up to the Selected Preparation Plan for SB4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document technical information that has been provided to Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Closure Business Unit (CBU) personnel as part of the frit development support for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4). The information presented in this report includes projected operating windows (expressed in terms of waste loading) for various sludge blending and/or washing options coupled with candidate frits of interest. Although the Nominal Stage assessment serves as the primary tool for these evaluations, select systems were also evaluated using a Variation Stage assessment in which compositional variations were introduced. In addition, assessments of the impacts of nepheline formation potential and the SO{sub 4}{sup -} solubility limit on the projected operating windows are also provided. Although this information was used as part of the technical basis leading to CBU's development of the preferred SB4 preparation plan, none of the options presented in this report was selected as the preferred plan. Therefore, the information is presented without significant interpretation of the resulting operating windows, but the projected windows are provided so additional insight can be explored if desired. Detailed assessments of the projected operating windows (using both Nominal and Variation Stage assessments) of the preferred sludge preparation plan with candidate frits are to be documented elsewhere. The information provided in this report is focused solely on model-based projections of the operating windows for various SB4 blending strategies of interest. Although nepheline formation potential is monitored via model predictions as a part of this assessment, experimental work investigating the impact of nepheline on glass quality is also being addressed in a parallel study. The results of this paper study and the experimental assessments of melt rate, SO{sub 4} solubility, and/or nepheline formation potential are all critical components of the inputs into the frit selection process for SB4.

  16. Random matrix ensembles for $PT$-symmetric systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eva-Maria Graefe; Steve Mudute-Ndumbe; Matthew Taylor

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently much effort has been made towards the introduction of non-Hermitian random matrix models respecting PT-symmetry. Here we show that there is a one-to-one correspondence between complex $PT$-symmetric matrices and split-complex and split-quaternionic versions of Hermitian matrices. We introduce two new random matrix ensembles of (a) Gaussian split-complex Hermitian, and (b) Gaussian split-quaternionic Hermitian matrices, of arbitrary sizes. They are related to the split signature versions of the complex and the quaternionic numbers, respectively. We conjecture that these ensembles represent universality classes for PT-symmetric matrices. For the case of $2\\times2$ matrices we derive analytic expressions for the joint probability distributions of the eigenvalues, the one-level densities and the level spacings in the case of real eigenvalues.

  17. Random matrix approach to multivariate categorical data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Aashay

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlation and similarity measures are widely used in all the areas of sciences and social sciences. Often the variables are not numbers but are instead qualitative descriptors called categorical data. We define and study similarity matrix, as a measure of similarity, for the case of categorical data. This is of interest due to a deluge of categorical data, such as movie ratings, top-10 rankings and data from social media, in the public domain that require analysis. We show that the statistical properties of the spectra of similarity matrices, constructed from categorical data, follow those from random matrix theory. We demonstrate this approach by applying it to the data of Indian general elections and sea level pressures in North Atlantic ocean.

  18. A phase transition in commuting Gaussian multi-matrix models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Aharony; Sean A. Hartnoll

    2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze in detail a second order phase transition that occurs in large N Gaussian multi-matrix models in which the matrices are constrained to be commuting. The phase transition occurs as the relative masses of the matrices are varied, assuming that there are at least four matrices in the lowest mass level. We also discuss the phase structure of weakly coupled large N 3+1 dimensional gauge theories compactified on a three-sphere of radius R. We argue that these theories are well described at high temperatures (T >> 1/R) by a Gaussian multi-matrix model, and that they do not exhibit any phase transitions between the deconfinement scale (T ~ 1/R) and the scale where perturbation theory breaks down (T ~ 1 / \\lambda R, where \\lambda is the 't Hooft coupling).

  19. Correlation matrix decomposition of WIG20 intraday fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rak, R; Kwapien, J; Oswiecimka, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the correlation matrix formalism we study the temporal aspects of the Warsaw Stock Market evolution as represented by the WIG20 index. The high frequency (1 min) WIG20 recordings over the time period between January 2001 and October 2005 are used. The entries of the correlation matrix considered here connect different distinct periods of the stock market dynamics, like days or weeks. Such a methodology allows to decompose the price fluctuations into the orthogonal eigensignals that quantify different modes of the underlying dynamics. The magnitudes of the corresponding eigenvalues reflect the strengths of such modes. One observation made in this paper is that strength of the daily trend in the WIG20 dynamics systematically decreases when going from 2001 to 2005. Another is that large events in the return fluctuations are primarily associated with a few most collective eigensignals.

  20. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  1. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  2. Arbitrary Rotation Invariant Random Matrix Ensembles and Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Guhr

    2006-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize the supersymmetry method in Random Matrix Theory to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles. Our exact approach further extends a previous contribution in which we constructed a supersymmetric representation for the class of norm-dependent Random Matrix Ensembles. Here, we derive a supersymmetric formulation under very general circumstances. A projector is identified that provides the mapping of the probability density from ordinary to superspace. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that setting up the theory in Fourier superspace has considerable advantages. General and exact expressions for the correlation functions are given. We also show how the use of hyperbolic symmetry can be circumvented in the present context in which the non-linear sigma model is not used. We construct exact supersymmetric integral representations of the correlation functions for arbitrary positions of the imaginary increments in the Green functions.

  3. Merging parton showers and matrix elements -- back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavesson, Nils

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.

  4. Merging parton showers and matrix elements -- back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nils Lavesson; Leif Lonnblad

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.

  5. Google matrix of the world network of economic activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandiah, V; Shepelyansky, D L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the new data from the OECD-WTO world network of economic activities we construct the Google matrix $G$ of this directed network and perform its detailed analysis. The network contains 58 countries and 37 activity sectors for years 1995 and 2008. The construction of $G$, based on Markov chain transitions, treats all countries on equal democratic grounds while the contribution of activity sectors is proportional to their exchange monetary volume. The Google matrix analysis allows to obtain reliable ranking of countries and activity sectors and to determine the sensitivity of CheiRank-PageRank commercial balance of countries in respect to price variations and labor cost in various countries. We demonstrate that the developed approach takes into account multiplicity of network links with economy interactions between countries and activity sectors thus being more efficient compared to the usual export-import analysis. The spectrum and eigenstates of $G$ are also analyzed being related to specific activity co...

  6. Chiral Disorder and Random Matrix Theory with Magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciej A. Nowak; Mariusz Sadzikowski; Ismail Zahed

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the concept of chiral disorder in QCD in the presence of a QED magnetic field |eH|. Weak magnetism corresponds to |eH| magnetism the reverse. Asymptotics (ultra-strong magnetism) is in the realm of perturbative QCD. We analyze weak magnetism using the concept of the quark return probability in the diffusive regime of chiral disorder. The result is in agreement with expectations from chiral perturbation theory. We analyze strong and ultra-strong magnetism in the ergodic regime using random matrix theory including the effects of finite temperature. The strong magnetism results are in agreement with the currently reported lattice data in the presence of a small shift of the Polyakov line. The ultra-strong magnetism results are consistent with expectations from perturbative QCD. We suggest a chiral random matrix effective action with matter and magnetism to analyze the QCD phase diagram near the critical points under the influence of magnetism.

  7. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayuti, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Malikussaleh University of Lhokseumawe, 24300 Aceh (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  8. Equilibration in low-dimensional quantum matrix models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Hübener; Y. Sekino; J. Eisert

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Matrix models play an important role in studies of quantum gravity, being candidates for a formulation of M-theory, but are notoriously difficult to solve. In this work, we present a fresh approach by introducing a novel exact model provably equivalent with low-dimensional bosonic matrix models. In this equivalent model significant local structure becomes apparent and it can serve as a simple toy model for analytical and precise numerical study. We derive a substantial part of the low energy spectrum, find a conserved charge, and are able to derive numerically the Regge trajectories. To exemplify the usefulness of the approach, we address questions of equilibration starting from a non-equilibrium situation, building upon an intuition from quantum information. We finally discuss possible generalizations of the approach.

  9. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  10. Capacitor-Less VAR Compensator Based on a Matrix Converter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balakrishnan, Divya Rathna

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    greatly contributed to the completion of this work. I owe my gratitude to them for always believing in me and helping me through my academic pursuit. vii NOMENCLATURE VAR Volt-ampere reactive MC 3-phase ac-to-3-phase ac matrix converter v1... [10] ...... 12 10 Equivalent circuit of a capacitor................................................................. 13 11 Basic layout of a 3/3 MC............................................................................ 16 12 Block diagram...

  11. Interactive display system having a matrix optical detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T.; DeSanto, Leonard

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A display system includes a waveguide optical panel having an inlet face and an opposite outlet face. An image beam is projected across the inlet face laterally and transversely for display on the outlet face. An optical detector including a matrix of detector elements is optically aligned with the inlet face for detecting a corresponding lateral and transverse position of an inbound light spot on the outlet face.

  12. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Herman E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  13. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Drach, Vincent [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, Karl [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Alexandrou, Constantia [University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Constantinou, Martha [University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Dinter, Simon [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos [University of Cyprus, Nicosia (Cyprus); Renner, Dru B. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  14. Rotordynamic analysis with shell elements for the transfer matrix method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L'Antigua, Edward Anthony

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Committee) Al B. elazzo1o (Member) John T. Tielki g (Member) Michael J. Rabins (Head of Department) August 1989 111 ABSTRACT Rotordynamic Analysis with Shell Elements for the Transi'er Matrix Method. (August 1989) Edward Anthony L'Antigua, B. M... Varying Bending Load with (-') = . 01, and Varying ( ? ) ratio. Table 2. Nondimensional Flexibilities (aEv ) for Cylindrical Sections (8 = 0) with Varying ( ? ) and (?-) Ratios. Table 3. Nondimensional Flexibilities (bEr = oEr ) for Cylindrical...

  15. Density matrix renormalization group and wave function factorization for nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Papenbrock; D. J. Dean

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) and the wave function factorization method for the numerical solution of large scale nuclear structure problems. The DMRG exhibits an improved convergence for problems with realistic interactions due to the implementation of the finite algorithm. The wave function factorization of fpg-shell nuclei yields rapidly converging approximations that are at the present frontier for large-scale shell model calculations.

  16. Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 2Outline • Baytown Chemical Complex • Xylene Fractionation Overview • Dynamic Matrix Control • Results • Benefits/Wrap-Up ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology... Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20-23, 2014 3Baytown Chemical / Refining Complex ExxonMobil Baytown Refining & Chemical Complex • One of world’s largest integrated, most technologically advanced petroleum/petrochemical complexes, in operation since 1919...

  17. Hidden Symmetry Unmasked: Matrix Theory and E(11)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamoli Chaudhuri

    2004-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Dimensional reduction of eleven-dimensional supergravity to zero spacetime dimensions is expected to give a theory characterized by the hidden symmetry algebra E(11), the end-point of the Cremmer-Julia prediction for the sequence of dimensional reductions of 11d supergravity to spacetime dimensions. In recent work, we have given a prescription for the spacetime reduction of a supergravity-Yang-Mills Lagrangian with large N flavor symmetry such that the local symmetries of the continuum Lagrangian are preserved in the resulting reduced matrix Lagrangian. This new class of reduced matrix models are the basis for a nonperturbative proposal for M theory we have described in hep-th/0408057. The matrix models are also characterized by hidden symmetry algebras in precise analogy with the Cremmer-Julia framework. The rank eleven algebra E(11) is also known as the very-extension of the finite-dimensional Lie algebra E(8). In an independent stream of work (hep-th/0402140), Peter West has provided evidence which supports the conjecture that M theory has the symmetry algebra E(11), showing that it successfully incorporates both the 11d supergravity limit, as well as the 10d type IIA and type IIB supergravities, and inclusive of the full spectrum of Neveu-Schwarz and Dirichlet pbranes. In this topical review, we give a pedagogical account of these recent developments also providing an assessment of the insights that might be gained from linking the algebraic and reduced matrix model perspectives in the search for M theory. Necessary mathematical details are covered starting from the basics in the appendices.

  18. Sparse unitary operators and repeated entries in the process matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vinayak Jagadish; Anil Shaji

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that quantum processes of low rank are inexorably connected to the dimensions of the environmental state space that the system is in contact with. We also show that the process matrix representing such low rank processes will have only a few distinct entries which goes as O(r^2) (r is the rank) and hence the number of independent measurements needed to characterize the process is greatly reduced.

  19. loading dir (MPa) Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulino, Glaucio H.

    loading dir (MPa) Grain Boundary Decohesion and Particle-Matrix Debonding in Aluminum Alloy 7075-T - matrix debonding occur in some aluminum alloys. · To model accurately MSFC behavior in aluminum

  20. Development of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedev, Pavel

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics were developed, characterized, and evaluated as a potential matrix material for use in light water reactor inert matrix fuel intended for the disposition of plutonium and minor actinides. ...

  1. Damage initiation, progression and failure of polymer matrix composites due to manufacturing induced defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chowdhury, Khairul Alam

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -matrix debonding through cavitation induced matrix cracking. An extensive parametric study is conducted in which the roles of void shape, size and distribution relative to fiber in determining damage initiation and evolution are investigated under imposed...

  2. Linear Transformations of the Payoff Matrix and Decision Criterion Learning in Perceptual Categorization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    of payoff-matrix multiplication, payoff-matrix addition, the presence of long-run gains versus long-run losses, category discriminability, and base rate on decision criterion learning were examined in 2

  3. ON THE USE OF DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION TO ANALYZE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BRITTLE MATRIX COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for a ceramic-based braze that can be used to joint ceramics of ceramic-matrix composites. Different strategiesON THE USE OF DIGITAL IMAGE CORRELATION TO ANALYZE THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF BRITTLE MATRIX

  4. Development of dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics for light water reactor inert matrix fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medvedev, Pavel

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual phase magnesia-zirconia ceramics were developed, characterized, and evaluated as a potential matrix material for use in light water reactor inert matrix fuel intended for the disposition of plutonium and minor actinides. Ceramics were...

  5. Characterization of Zr-Fe-Cu Alloys for an Inert Matrix Fuel for Nuclear Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnhart, Brian A.

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An ultra-high burnup metallic inert matrix nuclear fuel concept is being characterized and evaluated by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory based on a metal matrix fuel concept originally developed at the Bochvar Institute in Russia. The concept...

  6. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Kirby Goertzen

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  7. Geometry of matrix product states: Metric, parallel transport, and curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haegeman, Jutho, E-mail: jutho.haegeman@gmail.com; Verstraete, Frank [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria) [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna (Austria); Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Mariën, Michaël [Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Faculty of Physics and Astronomy, University of Ghent, Krijgslaan 281 S9, 9000 Gent (Belgium); Osborne, Tobias J. [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany) [Leibniz Universität Hannover, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Leibniz Universität Hannover, Riemann Center for Geometry and Physics, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the geometric properties of the manifold of states described as (uniform) matrix product states. Due to the parameter redundancy in the matrix product state representation, matrix product states have the mathematical structure of a (principal) fiber bundle. The total space or bundle space corresponds to the parameter space, i.e., the space of tensors associated to every physical site. The base manifold is embedded in Hilbert space and can be given the structure of a Kähler manifold by inducing the Hilbert space metric. Our main interest is in the states living in the tangent space to the base manifold, which have recently been shown to be interesting in relation to time dependence and elementary excitations. By lifting these tangent vectors to the (tangent space) of the bundle space using a well-chosen prescription (a principal bundle connection), we can define and efficiently compute an inverse metric, and introduce differential geometric concepts such as parallel transport (related to the Levi-Civita connection) and the Riemann curvature tensor.

  8. Evidence of Multi-Process Matrix Diffusion in a Single Fracturefrom a Field Tracer Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui-Hai; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur; Molz, Fred J.

    2005-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Compared to values inferred from laboratory tests on matrix cores, many field tracer tests in fractured rock have shown enhanced matrix diffusion coefficient values (obtained using a single-process matrix-diffusion model with a homogeneous matrix diffusion coefficient). To investigate this phenomenon, a conceptual model of multi-process matrix diffusion in a single-fracture system was developed. In this model, three matrix diffusion processes of different diffusion rates were assumed to coexist: (1) diffusion into stagnant water and infilling materials within fractures, (2) diffusion into a degraded matrix zone, and (3) further diffusion into an intact matrix zone. The validity of the conceptual model was then demonstrated by analyzing a unique tracer test conducted using a long-time constant-concentration injection. The tracer-test analysis was conducted using a numerical model capable of tracking the multiple matrix-diffusion processes. The analysis showed that in the degraded zone, a diffusion process with an enhanced diffusion rate controlled the steep rising limb and decay-like falling limb in the observed breakthrough curve, whereas in the intact matrix zone, a process involving a lower diffusion rate affected the long-term middle platform of slowly increasing tracer concentration. The different matrix-diffusion-coefficient values revealed from the field tracer test are consistent with the variability of matrix diffusion coefficient measured for rock cores with different degrees of fracture coating at the same site. By comparing to the matrix diffusion coefficient calibrated using single-process matrix diffusion, we demonstrated that this multi-process matrix diffusion may contribute to the enhanced matrix-diffusion-coefficient values for single-fracture systems at the field scale.

  9. Wilderness threats matrix: A framework for assessing impacts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, D.N.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report includes the framework represented as a matrix of potential threats and attributes of wilderness character. Cells in the matrix represent the impacts of threats on each attribute. Potential application of the matrix are described. An application of the matrix to the wildernesses in the Forest Service's Northern Region (northern Idaho and Montana) suggests that fire management is the most significant threat to those wildernesses and that aquatic systems are the most threatened wilderness attribute.

  10. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  11. Supporting Multiple Workloads, Batch Systems,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupporting Data-Producing Facilities

  12. Using the PDSF Batch System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence mayUndergraduateAboutUserHadoopon-packageSystem Using

  13. Submitting Batch Jobs on Carver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLab (NewportStudyingArc-FaultSubmitting

  14. Submitting Batch Jobs on Franklin

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ... StrengtheningLab

  15. ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Soon Hyung

    ANALYSIS OF ANISOTROPY IN ELASTIC CONSTANTS OF SiCp/2124 Al METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES H.K. Jung* , Y; Metal matrix composite; Elastic constants; Aspect ratio; Anisotropy 1. Introduction Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are becoming attractive materials for advanced aerospace structures because

  16. DNP / DPF / DAP / DPB JOINT STUDY ON THE FUTURE OF NEUTRINO PHYSICS The Neutrino Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DNP / DPF / DAP / DPB JOINT STUDY ON THE FUTURE OF NEUTRINO PHYSICS The Neutrino Matrix #12;#12;THE The Neutrino Matrix * Please see Appendices A and B · APS American Physical Society · DNP Division of Nuclear MATRIX Contents #12;NEUTRINOS AND THE UNEXPECTED : Neutrino physics has been marked by "anomalous

  17. Uncertainties in Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    Uncertainties in Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Jonathan Engel Abstract. I briefly review calculations of the matrix elements governing neutrinoless double-beta decay;Uncertainties in Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay 2 in reducing theoretical error

  18. Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of Satya N. Majumdar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of tails Satya N. Majumdar Laboratoire de Physique Th, 2012 S.N. Majumdar Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of tails #12;First Appearence of Random Matrices S.N. Majumdar Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of tails #12;First Appearence of Random

  19. BALLISTIC PROPERTIES OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES AND CERAMIC PLATES USED IN ARMOR DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soykasap, Omer

    BALLISTIC PROPERTIES OF POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITES AND CERAMIC PLATES USED IN ARMOR DESIGN Mehmet from polymer matrix composites due to lightweight and good ballistic properties. The requirement for protection especially for polymer matrix composites because total back-side deformation (elastic and plastic

  20. Effects of Matrix Cracks on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    Effects of Matrix Cracks on the Thermal Diffusivity of a Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Composite of Engineering Science, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6A 5B9, Canada Effects of matrix cracks conductances coupled with a unit cell model for a fiber composite containing a periodic array of matrix cracks