National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for matrix aq batch

  1. 2 --October 12, 2007 2 2CO (g) CO (aq) (1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 1 . (, ) , , (5 ). 3. Fugacity fugacity (mole fraction) - x(CO2)·p 3 3HCO (aq) H (aq) CO (aq)+ - + (4) (g), (l), (aq) , , . CO2(aq) H2CO3(aq) . CO2(aq) H2CO3(aq) CO2 * (aq) ( CO2 * (aq) H2CO3 * ). #12;October 12, 2007 2 -- 6 (1), (2) (3

  2. Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics BasicsBasilBatch

  3. ILENR/RE-AQ-ON-ROAD CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROCARBON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    #12;ILENR/RE-AQ- Printed: Contract: Project: ON-ROAD CARBON MONOXIDE AND HYDROCARBON REMOTE SENSING. Repeat Measurements of the Same Vehicle. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 F

  4. Example Hopper Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    batch system must wait for the desired big memory nodes to become available. Running Hybrid MPIOpenMP Applications Hybrid MPIOpenMP Example: New Recommendations (recommended)...

  5. Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches: Effect of Batch Makeup...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Book: Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches: Effect of Batch Makeup on Gas-Evolving Reactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Analysis of Waste Glass Batches:...

  6. Transferring Data from Batch Jobs at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Batch Jobs Transferring Data from Batch Jobs Examples Once you are set up for automatic authentication (see HPSS Passwords) you can access HPSS within batch scripts. You...

  7. Submitting Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructureStudentsSubmitting Batch Jobs

  8. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence Example Batch

  9. Balance the reaction MnO4 (aq) MnO2(s) + SO4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Kirk A.

    Balance the reaction MnO4 Ð (aq) + SO3 2Ð (aq) MnO2(s) + SO4 2Ð (aq) in basic solution Oxidation 2Ð SO4 2Ð (b) 2) These are already balanced in Mn and S 3) Balance O in (a) by adding H2OÕs to the right-hand-side MnO4 Ð MnO2 + 2H2O 4) Balance H by adding H + to the left-hand-side MnO4 Ð + 4H + MnO2

  10. NDA BATCH 2009-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-10-30

    The testing facility is LLNL plutonium facility segmented gamma scanner. 100% of the radioassay data in the batch data report is reviewed.

  11. Progressing batch hydrolysis process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wright, J.D.

    1985-01-10

    A progressive batch hydrolysis process is disclosed for producing sugar from a lignocellulosic feedstock. It comprises passing a stream of dilute acid serially through a plurality of percolation hydrolysis reactors charged with feed stock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the cellulose component of the feed stock to glucose. The cooled dilute acid stream containing glucose, after exiting the last percolation hydrolysis reactor, serially fed through a plurality of pre-hydrolysis percolation reactors, charged with said feedstock, at a flow rate, temperature and pressure sufficient to substantially convert all the hemicellulose component of said feedstock to glucose. The dilute acid stream containing glucose is cooled after it exits the last prehydrolysis reactor.

  12. Data-driven batch schuduling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bent, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denehy, Tim [GOOGLE; Arpaci - Dusseau, Remzi [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Livny, Miron [UNIV OF WISCONSIN; Arpaci - Dusseau, Andrea C [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we develop data-driven strategies for batch computing schedulers. Current CPU-centric batch schedulers ignore the data needs within workloads and execute them by linking them transparently and directly to their needed data. When scheduled on remote computational resources, this elegant solution of direct data access can incur an order of magnitude performance penalty for data-intensive workloads. Adding data-awareness to batch schedulers allows a careful coordination of data and CPU allocation thereby reducing the cost of remote execution. We offer here new techniques by which batch schedulers can become data-driven. Such systems can use our analytical predictive models to select one of the four data-driven scheduling policies that we have created. Through simulation, we demonstrate the accuracy of our predictive models and show how they can reduce time to completion for some workloads by as much as 80%.

  13. Batch compositions for cordierite ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickman, David L. (Big Flats, NY)

    1994-07-26

    Ceramic products consisting principally of cordierite and a method for making them are provided, the method employing batches comprising a mineral component and a chemical component, the mineral component comprising clay and talc and the chemical component consisting essentially of a combination of the powdered oxides, hydroxides, or hydrous oxides of magnesium, aluminum and silicon. Ceramics made by extrusion and firing of the batches can exhibit low porosity, high strength and low thermal expansion coefficients.

  14. NDA BATCH 2002-02

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2009-12-09

    QC sample results (daily background checks, 20-gram and 100-gram SGS drum checks) were within acceptable criteria established by WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives for TRU Waste Characterization. Replicate runs were performed on 5 drums with IDs LL85101099TRU, LL85801147TRU, LL85801109TRU, LL85300999TRU and LL85500979TRU. All replicate measurement results are identical at the 95% confidence level as established by WIPP criteria. Note that the batch covered 5 weeks of SGS measurements from 23-Jan-2002 through 22-Feb-2002. Data packet for SGS Batch 2002-02 generated using gamma spectroscopy with the Pu Facility SGS unit is technically reasonable. All QC samples are in compliance with established control limits. The batch data packet has been reviewed for correctness, completeness, consistency and compliance with WIPP's Quality Assurance Objectives and determined to be acceptable. An Expert Review was performed on the data packet between 28-Feb-02 and 09-Jul-02 to check for potential U-235, Np-237 and Am-241 interferences and address drum cases where specific scan segments showed Se gamma ray transmissions for the 136-keV gamma to be below 0.1 %. Two drums in the batch showed Pu-238 at a relative mass ratio more than 2% of all the Pu isotopes.

  15. EFFECT OF GLASS-BATCH MAKEUP ON...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rate of heat-transfer from molten glass to the batch blanket and the kinetics of various chemical reactions and phase transitions jointly control the batch- to-glass conversion...

  16. Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression Applied inductive learning - Lecture 3 Louis (& Pierre Geurts)AIA... (1/19) #12;Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression Batch-mode Supervised Learning Linear regression Least mean square error solution Regularization and algorithmics Residual

  17. Adding coal dust to coal batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V.S. Shved; A.V.Berezin [OAO Koks, Kemerovo (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    The granulometric composition of coke dust from the dry-slaking machine is determined. The influence of additions of 3-7% coke dust on the quality of industrial coking batch and the coke obtained by box coking is estimated. Adding 1% coke dust to coking batch does not markedly change the coke quality. Industrial equipment for the supply of dry-slaking dust to the batch is described.

  18. CASCADE OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF BATCH REACTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jutan, Arthur

    CASCADE OPTIMIZATION AND CONTROL OF BATCH REACTORS Xiangming Hua, Sohrab Rohani and Arthur Jutan ajutan@uwo.ca Abstract: In this study, a cascade closed-loop optimization and control strategy for batch reactor. Using model reduction a cascade system is developed, which can effectively combine optimization

  19. Method and apparatus for melting glass batch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fassbender, Alexander G. (Kennewick, WA); Walkup, Paul C. (Richland, WA); Mudge, Lyle K. (Richland, WA)

    1988-01-01

    A glass melting system involving preheating, precalcining, and prefluxing of batch materials prior to injection into a glass furnace. The precursors are heated by convection rather than by radiation in present furnaces. Upon injection into the furnace, batch materials are intimately coated with molten flux so as to undergo or at least begin the process of dissolution reaction prior to entering the melt pool.

  20. Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biological Hydrogen Production Measured in Batch Anaerobic Respirometers B R U C E E . L O G A N The biological production of hydrogen from the fermentation of different substrates was examined in batch tests product for a sugar (4). The accumulation of hydrogen and other degradation byproducts during fermen

  1. Analysis and Control of Heteroazeotropic Batch Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    , called an entrainer, has to be added to facilitate separation and enhance distillation. When a heavy entrainer is added continuously in the top section of the batch column the process is called extractive batch distillation. When an entrainer is added batchwise to the original mixture we simply call

  2. Matrix Factorization and Matrix Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Lester

    2012-01-01

    PCA 3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization 3.15.2 Matrix concentration3.3 Mixed Membership Matrix Factorization . . . 3.4

  3. Google matrix 1 Google matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Google matrix 1 Google matrix Fig.1. Google matrix of Wikipedia articles network, written in the bases of PageRank index; fragment of top 200 X 200 matrix elements is shown, total size N=3282257 (from [19]) A Google matrix is a particular stochastic matrix that is used by Google's PageRank algorithm

  4. Google matrix 1 Google matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Google matrix 1 Google matrix A Google matrix is a particular stochastic matrix that is used by Google's PageRank algorithm. The matrix represents a graph with edges representing links between pages. The rank of each page can be generated iteratively from the Google matrix using the power method. However

  5. Dynamic Control of Serial-batch Processing Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerekci, Abdullah

    2010-01-14

    ......................... 133 APPENDIX C: PAIRED-T TEST RESULTS FOR CHAPTER V .......................... 144 VITA ......................................................................................................................... 154 ix LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE... processor?s queue to improve the performance of the batch processor. 6 The assumptions relating to the serial-batch processor system are as follows: There are N incompatible product types being processed by the serial-batch processor system. Batch...

  6. Your Unanswered Questions…. Answered- Batch 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Chu hosted an online town hall to discuss President Obama's clean energy innovation agenda -- and while he was able to answer about 10 questions submitted online during the event, we received more than 200! Here is our second batch of questions and answers.

  7. Batch” Kinetics in Flow: Online IR Analysis and Continuous Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason S.

    Currently, kinetic data is either collected under steady-state conditions in flow or by generating time-series data in batch. Batch experiments are generally considered to be more suitable for the generation of kinetic ...

  8. Influences of emission sources and meteorology on aerosol chemistry in a polluted urban environment: results from DISCOVER-AQ California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Young, D. E.; Kim, H.; Parworth, C.; Zhou, S.; Zhang, X.; Cappa, C. D.; Seco, R.; Kim, S.; Zhang, Q.

    2015-12-15

    The San Joaquin Valley (SJV) in California experiences persistent air quality problems associated with elevated particulate matter (PM) concentrations due to anthropogenic emissions, topography, and meteorological conditions. Thus it is important to unravel the various sources and processes that affect the physico-chemical properties of PM in order to better inform pollution abatement strategies and improve parameterizations in air quality models. more »Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) and an Ionicon Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) as part of the NASA Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) campaign. The average submicron aerosol (PM1) concentration was 31.0 ?g m?3 and the total mass was dominated by organic aerosols (OA, 55 %), followed by ammonium nitrate (35 %). High PM pollution events were commonly associated with elevated OA concentrations, mostly from primary sources. Organic aerosols had average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C), hydrogen-to-carbon (H / C), and nitrogen-to-carbon (N / C) ratios of 0.42, 1.70, and 0.017, respectively. Six distinct sources of organic aerosol were identified from positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis of the AMS data: hydrocarbon-like OA (HOA; 9 % of total OA; O / C = 0.09) associated with local traffic, cooking OA (COA; 28 % of total OA; O / C = 0.19) associated with food cooking activities, two biomass burning OAs (BBOA1; 13 % of total OA; O / C = 0.33 and BBOA2; 20 % of total OA; O / C = 0.60) most likely associated with residential space heating from wood combustion, and semi-volatile oxygenated OA (SV-OOA; 16 % of total OA; O / C = 0.63) and low volatility oxygenated OA (LV-OOA; 24 % of total OA; O / C = 0.90) formed via chemical reactions in the atmosphere. Large differences in aerosol chemistry at Fresno were observed between the current campaign (winter 2013) and a~previous wintertime campaign (winter 2010), most notably that PM1 concentrations were nearly three times higher in 2013 than in 2010. These variations were attributed to differences in the meteorological conditions, which influenced primary emissions and secondary aerosol formation. In particular, COA and BBOA concentrations were greater in 2013 than 2010, where colder temperatures in 2013 likely resulted in increased biomass burning activities. The influence from a nighttime formed residual layer that mixed down in the morning was found to be much more intense in 2013 than 2010, leading to sharp increases in ground-level concentrations of secondary aerosol species including nitrate, sulfate, and OOA, in the morning between 08:00 to 12:00 PST. This is an indication that nighttime chemistry might also be higher in 2013. As solar radiation was stronger in 2013 the higher nitrate and OOA concentrations in 2013 could also be partly due to greater photochemical production of secondary aerosol species. The greater solar radiation and larger range in temperature in 2013 also likely led to both SV-OOA and LV-OOA being observed in 2013 whereas only a single OOA factor was identified in 2010.« less

  9. Batch load anaerobic digestion of dairy manure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egg, Richard P

    1979-01-01

    and medium size dairy operations unless the pro- cess can be made more efficient or some other economic benefit can be derived from the manure. A recent study indicated that a batch load process might be more efficient in waste stabilization and biogas... rate of biogas production was 0. 69 liters biogas/liter digester/ day. This volumetric biogas production increased with increasing influent total solids concentration. Influent concentration had little effect on other biogas production parameters...

  10. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  11. TANK 50 BATCH 0 SALTSTONE FORMULATION CONFIRMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C.

    2006-06-05

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel were requested to confirm the Tank 50 Batch 0 grout formulation per Technical Task Request, SSF-TTR-2006-0001 (task 1 of 2) [1]. Earlier Batch 0 formulation testing used a Tank 50 sample collected in September 2005 and is described elsewhere [2]. The current testing was performed using a sample of Tank 50 waste collected in May 2006. This work was performed according to the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TT/QAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00594 [3]. The salt solution collected from Tank 50 in May 2006 contained approximately 3 weight percent more solids than the sample collected in September 2005. The insoluble solids took longer to settle in the new sample which was interpreted as indicating finer particles in the current sample. The saltstone formulation developed for the September 2005 Tank 50 Batch 0 sample was confirmed for the May 2006 sample with one minor exception. Saltstone prepared with the Tank 50 sample collected in May 2006 required 1.5 times more Daratard 17 set retarding admixture than the saltstone prepared with the September In addition, a sample prepared with lower shear mixing (stirring with a spatula) had a higher plastic viscosity (57 cP) than samples made with higher shear mixing in a blender (23cP). The static gel times of the saltstone slurries made with low shear mixing were also shorter ({approx}32 minutes) than those for comparable samples made in the blender ({approx}47 minutes). The addition of the various waste streams (ETP, HEU-HCAN, and GPE-HCAN) to Tank 50 from September 2005 to May 2006 has increased the amount of set retarder, Daratard 17, required for processing saltstone slurries through the Saltstone facility. If these streams are continued to be added to Tank 50, the quantity of admixtures required to maintain the same processing conditions for the Saltstone facility will probably change and additional testing is recommended to reconfirm the Tank 50 Saltstone formulation.

  12. Real-time Dynamic Optimization of Batch Crystallization Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    process. The seeded fed-batch crystallizer is represented by a nonlinear moment model. An optimal controlReal-time Dynamic Optimization of Batch Crystallization Processes Ali Mesbah, , Alex N. Kalbasenka-time implementations of the proposed strategy reveal the effectiveness of closed-loop optimal control

  13. MODEL-BASED OPTIMAL OPERATION OF SEEDED BATCH CRYSTALLISATION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    .mesbah@tudelft.nl Dynamic optimization is applied for optimal control of a semi-industrial batch crystallisation process of the open-loop optimal control due to plant-model mismatch, unmeasured process disturbances, irreproducibleMODEL-BASED OPTIMAL OPERATION OF SEEDED BATCH CRYSTALLISATION PROCESSES A. Mesbah1, 2 , J. Landlust

  14. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 ×more »109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.« less

  15. MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE OVERLAPPING GAS-EVOLVING REACTIONS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: MELTING OF GLASS BATCH: MODEL FOR MULTIPLE...

  16. CHOP: Performance Optimization for Batched Schema Evolution 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claypool, Kajal

    of schema evolution primitives as well as for the merging of database modifications of primitivesCHOP: Performance Optimization for Batched Schema Evolution 1 Kajal T. Claypool, Elke A on Schema Evolution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Our Proposed

  17. Dynamic Control for Batch Process Systems Using Stochastic Utility Evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Hongsuk

    2012-10-19

    Most research studies in the batch process control problem are focused on optimizing system performance. The methods address the problem by minimizing single criterion such as cycle time and tardiness, or bi-criteria such ...

  18. Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by alkyl lithiums 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Rashmi R

    1970-01-01

    BATCH POLYYIERIZATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY ALKYL LITHIUMS A Thesis by RASHMI R. DESAI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIFNCE May 1970 Major... Subject: Chemical Fngineering BATCH POLYMERI2ATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY ALKYL LITHIUMS A Thesis by RASHMI R. DESAI Approved as to style and content by: / . I ?ii' (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar tment) ( ember) (Member) May 1970 111...

  19. Temperature effects on seawater batch activated sludge systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wigley, Henry Albert

    1972-01-01

    TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON SEAMATER BATCH ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by HENRY ALBERT WIGLEY, JR. Submitted to the Graduate Colleqe of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the deqree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1972 Major Subject: Civil Engineerinq TEMPERATURE EFFECTS ON SEAWATER BATCH ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS A Thesis by HENRY ALBERT WIGLEY, JR. Approved as to style and content by: C ai rman o ommi ttee Head of D partmen Member Member May 1972...

  20. Analyzing source apportioned methane in northern California during Discover-AQ-CA using airborne measurements and model simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew S.; Yates, Emma L.; Iraci, Laura T.; Loewenstein, Max; Tadi?, Jovan M.; Wecht, Kevin J.; Jeong, Seongeun; Fischer, Marc L.

    2014-12-01

    This study analyzes source apportioned methane (CH4) emissions and atmospheric mixing ratios in northern California during the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign using airborne measurement data and model simulations. Source apportioned CH4 emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) version 4.2 were applied in the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem and analyzed using airborne measurements taken as part of the Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment over the San Francisco Bay Area (SFBA) and northern San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During the time period of the Discover-AQ-CA field campaign EDGAR inventory CH4 emissions were ~5.30 Gg day –1 (Gg = 1.0 × 109 g) (equating to ~1.90 × 103 Gg yr–1) for all of California. According to EDGAR, the SFBA and northern SJV region contributes ~30% of total CH4 emissions from California. Source apportionment analysis during this study shows that CH4 mixing ratios over this area of northern California are largely influenced by global emissions from wetlands and local/global emissions from gas and oil production and distribution, waste treatment processes, and livestock management. Model simulations, using EDGAR emissions, suggest that the model under-estimates CH4 mixing ratios in northern California (average normalized mean bias (NMB) = –5.2% and linear regression slope = 0.20). The largest negative biases in the model were calculated on days when large amounts of CH4 were measured over local emission sources and atmospheric CH4 mixing ratios reached values >2.5 parts per million. Sensitivity emission studies conducted during this research suggest that local emissions of CH4 from livestock management processes are likely the primary source of the negative model bias. These results indicate that a variety, and larger quantity, of measurement data needs to be obtained and additional research is necessary to better quantify source apportioned CH4 emissions in California.

  1. Matrices 1. Matrix Algebra Matrix algebra.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Culpepper, Martin L.

    Matrices 1. Matrix Algebra Matrix algebra. Previously we calculated the determinants of square rows and n columns is called an m Ã? n matrix. The number in the i-th row and j-th column (where 1 i m, 1 j n) is called the ij-entry, and denoted aij; the matrix itself is denoted by A, or sometimes

  2. SLUDGE BATCH VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Edwards, T.

    2010-11-29

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) initiated processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) in the summer of 2010. In support of processing, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 418 to process SB6. This recommendation was based on assessments of the compositional projections for SB6 available at the time from the Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) and SRNL (using a model-based approach). To support qualification of SB6, SRNL executed a variability study to assess the applicability of the current durability models for SB6. The durability models were assessed over the expected Frit 418-SB6 composition range. Seventeen glasses were selected for the variability study based on the sludge projections used in the frit recommendation. Five of the glasses are based on the centroid of the compositional region, spanning a waste loading (WL) range of 32 to 40%. The remaining twelve glasses are extreme vertices (EVs) of the sludge region of interest for SB6 combined with Frit 418 and are all at 36% WL. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the Product Consistency Test (PCT). After initiating the SB6 variability study, the measured composition of the SB6 Tank 51 qualification glass produced at the SRNL Shielded Cells Facility indicated that thorium was present in the glass at an appreciable concentration (1.03 wt%), which made it a reportable element for SB6. This concentration of ThO{sub 2} resulted in a second phase of experimental studies. Five glasses were formulated that were based on the centroid of the new sludge compositional region combined with Frit 418, spanning a WL range of 32 to 40%. These glasses were fabricated and characterized using chemical composition analysis and the PCT. Based on the measured PCT response, all of the glasses (with and without thorium) were acceptable with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) reference glass regardless of thermal history. All of the normalized boron releases were less than 1 g/L. While all of the targeted glass compositions were predictable with respect to the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) models for durability, a small number of the measured glass compositions were located outside of the lower prediction limit indicating poorer durability than what was actually measured. These unpredictable glasses were in the same lithium metaborate (LM) preparation block during the chemical analyses, which resulted in measured compositions that were not representative of the target compositions. A review of the data did not indicate a clear cause for the problem. Re-digestion and re-measurement of three glasses from this preparation block yielded glass compositions closer to the target values and predicted PCT responses within the PCCS model uncertainty. Therefore, it is believed that the glasses were correctly fabricated and the targeted compositions are closer representations of the true compositions. Per the requirements of the DWPF Glass Product Control Program, the PCCS durability models have been shown to be applicable for the SB6/Frit 418 glass system. PCT results from the glasses fabricated as part of the variability study were shown to be predictable and/or acceptable with respect to the DWPF PCCS models. In addition, the inclusion of ThO{sub 2} was shown to have minimal impact on the acceptability and predictability of the variability study glasses.

  3. Power/Performance Trade-offs of Small Batched LU Based Solvers on GPUs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Oreste; Fatica, Massimiliano; Gawande, Nitin A.; Tumeo, Antonino

    2013-08-26

    In this paper we propose and analyze a set of batched linear solvers for small matrices on Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), evaluating the various alternatives depending on the size of the systems to solve. We discuss three different solutions that operate with different level of parallelization and GPU features. The first, exploiting the CUBLAS library, manages matrices of size up to 32x32 and employs Warp level (one matrix, one Warp) parallelism and shared memory. The second works at Thread-block level parallelism (one matrix, one Thread-block), still exploiting shared memory but managing matrices up to 76x76. The third is Thread level parallel (one matrix, one thread) and can reach sizes up to 128x128, but it does not exploit shared memory and only relies on the high memory bandwidth of the GPU. The first and second solution only support partial pivoting, the third one easily supports partial and full pivoting, making it attractive to problems that require greater numerical stability. We analyze the trade-offs in terms of performance and power consumption as function of the size of the linear systems that are simultaneously solved. We execute the three implementations on a Tesla M2090 (Fermi) and on a Tesla K20 (Kepler).

  4. Batch Mode Stochastic-Based Robust Dynamic Resource Allocation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    Batch Mode Stochastic-Based Robust Dynamic Resource Allocation in a Heterogeneous Computing System in system parameters is common. Robustness can be defined as the degree to which a system can function in data size and content. Determining a resource allocation that accounts for this uncertainty

  5. U.S. NO2 trends (2005–2013): EPA Air Quality System (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO2 levels have decreased by 30-40% in the last decade. We quantify NO2 trends (2005-2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite.We demonstrate that the current OMI NO2 algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trendsmore »and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO2 concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO2 standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO2 reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO2 VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly correlate with those estimated from surface concentrations (r -- 0.83, N -- 355). We then explore the observed correspondence of trends estimated from OMI and AQS data. We find a significant, but slightly weaker, correspondence (i.e., r -- 0.68, N -- 208) than predicted by the model and discuss some of the important factors affecting the relationship, including known problems (e.g., NOz interferents) associated with the AQS data. This significant correspondence gives confidence in trend and surface concentration estimates from OMI VCDs for locations, such as the majority of the U.S. and globe, that are not covered by surface monitoring networks. Using our improved trend model and our enhanced OMI data product, we find that both OMI and AQS data show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 38% for each over the U.S. The annual reduction rates inferred from OMI and AQS measurements are larger (#3;-4.8 ± 1.9%/yr, #3;-3.7 ± 1.5%/yr) from 2005 to 2008 than 2010 to 2013 (-#3;1.2 ± 1.2%/yr, #3;-2.1 ± 1.4%/yr). We quantify NO2 trends for major U.S. cities and power plants; the latter suggest larger negative trend (#3;-4.0 ± 1.5%/yr) between 2005 and 2008 and smaller or insignificant changes (-#3;0.5 ± 1.2%/yr) during 2010-2013.« less

  6. U.S. NO? trends (2005–2013): EPA air quality system (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO?) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO? levels have decreased by 30–40% in the last decade. We quantify NO? trends (2005–2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO? vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite.We demonstrate that the current OMI NO? algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trendsmore »and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO? concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO? standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO? reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO? VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly correlate with those estimated from surface concentrations (r = 0.83, N = 355). We then explore the observed correspondence of trends estimated from OMI and AQS data. We find a significant, but slightly weaker, correspondence (i.e., r = 0.68, N = 208) than predicted by the model and discuss some of the important factors affecting the relationship, including known problems (e.g., NOz interferents) associated with the AQS data. This significant correspondence gives confidence in trend and surface concentration estimates from OMI VCDs for locations, such as the majority of the U.S. and globe, that are not covered by surface monitoring networks. Using our improved trend model and our enhanced OMI data product, we find that both OMI and AQS data show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 38% for each over the U.S. The annual reduction rates inferred from OMI and AQS measurements are larger (–4.8 ± 1.9%/yr, –3.7 ± 1.5%/yr) from 2005 to 2008 than 2010 to 2013 (–1.2 ± 1.2%/yr, –2.1 ± 1.4%/yr). We quantify NO? trends for major U.S. cities and power plants; the latter suggest larger negative trend (–4.0 ± 1.5%/yr) between 2005 and 2008 and smaller or insignificant changes (–0.5 ± 1.2%/yr) during 2010-2013.« less

  7. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  8. HIGH LEVEL WASTE SLUDGE BATCH 4 VARIABILITY STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K; Tommy Edwards, T; David Peeler, D; David Best, D; Irene Reamer, I; Phyllis Workman, P

    2006-10-02

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing for vitrification of High Level Waste (HLW) Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) in early FY2007. To support this process, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has provided a recommendation to utilize Frit 503 for vitrifying this sludge batch, based on the composition projection provided by the Liquid Waste Organization on June 22, 2006. Frit 418 was also recommended for possible use during the transition from SB3 to SB4. A critical step in the SB4 qualification process is to demonstrate the applicability of the durability models, which are used as part of the DWPF's process control strategy, to the glass system of interest via a variability study. A variability study is an experimentally-driven assessment of the predictability and acceptability of the quality of the vitrified waste product that is anticipated from the processing of a sludge batch. At the DWPF, the durability of the vitrified waste product is not directly measured. Instead, the durability is predicted using a set of models that relate the Product Consistency Test (PCT) response of a glass to the chemical composition of that glass. In addition, a glass sample is taken during the processing of that sludge batch, the sample is transmitted to SRNL, and the durability is measured to confirm acceptance. The objective of a variability study is to demonstrate that these models are applicable to the glass composition region anticipated during the processing of the sludge batch - in this case the Frit 503 - SB4 compositional region. The success of this demonstration allows the DWPF to confidently rely on the predictions of the durability/composition models as they are used in the control of the DWPF process.

  9. A batch reactor heat recovery challenge problem Johannes Jschke, Sigurd Skogestad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    A batch reactor heat recovery challenge problem Johannes Jäschke, Sigurd Skogestad Department a challenge problem for maximizing the heat recovery in a heat exchanger network connected to a set of batch

  10. Matrix Groups Max Neunhffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St Andrews, University of

    Matrix Groups Max Neunhöffer Introduction GAP examples Matrix groups in GAP Schreier-Sims Problems Group algebras SLPs Constructive recognition The problem Troubles Matrix Groups Max Neunhöffer University of St Andrews GAC 2010, Allahabad #12;Matrix Groups Max Neunhöffer Introduction GAP examples

  11. pV3 Batch User's Reference Manual for use with the following workstations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    pV3 Batch User's Reference Manual Rev. 2.05 for use with the following workstations: Compaq ALPHAs. 2 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 4 2 pV3 Batch Server 5 2.1 Batch Server Startup.4 Advanced Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 pV3 Post

  12. Batch drilling program cuts time, costs for Liuhua development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, G.E.; Hall, K.H.; Mu, H.C.

    1996-08-12

    The efficiency of batch drilling operations and the appropriate use of technology, teamwork, and thorough planning helped cut several days off the time to drill each of 10 subsea wells for the Liuhua 11-1 development project in the South China Sea. The overall development program calls for drilling and completing 20 subsea horizontal wells. The rig-of-opportunity phase was the initial phase of this development and used a contract rig to establish the subsea wellhead array and initiate drilling of the development wells. The wellhead array was the first critical step. It was the foundation for the building block construction process used to create Liuhua`s subsea production system on the seabed. The paper discusses conductor operations, batch drilling operations, surface hole section, intermediate and production hole sections, the ten wells, application of technology, and overall results.

  13. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  14. Fast matrix multiplication is stable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demmel, James; Holtz, Olga; Kleinberg, Robert; Dumitriu, Ioana

    2007-01-01

    Raz. On the complexity of matrix product. SIAM J. Comput. ,of fast algorithms for matrix multiplication. Num. Math. ,and Shmuel Winograd. Matrix multiplication via arithmetic

  15. Microsoft Word - FINAL Rocky Flats LBNL report Batch #1.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R EH2 UMTRCAthe First Batch of

  16. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parce, J. Wallace (Palo Alto, CA); Bernatis, Paul (Sunnyvale, CA); Dubrow, Robert (San Carlos, CA); Freeman, William P. (San Mateo, CA); Gamoras, Joel (Vallejo, CA); Kan, Shihai (San Jose, CA); Meisel, Andreas (Redwood City, CA); Qian, Baixin (Sunnyvale, CA); Whiteford, Jeffery A. (Belmont, CA); Ziebarth, Jonathan (Palo Alto, CA)

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  17. Increased CPC batch size study for Tank 42 sludge in the Defense Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, W.E.

    2000-01-06

    A series of experiments have been completed at TNX for the sludge-only REDOX adjusted flowsheet using Tank 42 sludge simulant in response to the Technical Task Request HLW/DWPT/TTR-980013 to increase CPC batch sizes. By increasing the initial SRAT batch size, a melter feed batch at greater waste solids concentration can be prepared and thus increase melter output per batch by about one canister. The increased throughput would allow DWPF to dispose of more waste in a given time period thus shortening the overall campaign.

  18. Matrix product operator representations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Murg; J. I. Cirac; B. Pirvu; F. Verstraete

    2008-04-24

    We show how to construct relevant families of matrix product operators in one and higher dimensions. Those form the building blocks for the numerical simulation methods based on matrix product states and projected entangled pair states. In particular, we construct translational invariant matrix product operators suitable for time evolution, and show how such descriptions are possible for Hamiltonians with long-range interactions. We illustrate how those tools can be exploited for constructing new algorithms for simulating quantum spin systems.

  19. Automatic switching matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlecht, Martin F. (Cambridge, MA); Kassakian, John G. (Newton, MA); Caloggero, Anthony J. (Lynn, MA); Rhodes, Bruce (Dorchester, MA); Otten, David (Newton, MA); Rasmussen, Neil (Sudbury, MA)

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  20. FLOWSHEET FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL FROM SLUDGE BATCH 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pike, J; Jeffrey Gillam, J

    2008-12-17

    Samples of Tank 12 sludge slurry show a substantially larger fraction of aluminum than originally identified in sludge batch planning. The Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) plans to formulate Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) with about one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 12 and one half of the sludge slurry in Tank 4. LWO identified aluminum dissolution as a method to mitigate the effect of having about 50% more solids in High Level Waste (HLW) sludge than previously planned. Previous aluminum dissolution performed in a HLW tank in 1982 was performed at approximately 85 C for 5 days and dissolved nearly 80% of the aluminum in the sludge slurry. In 2008, LWO successfully dissolved 64% of the aluminum at approximately 60 C in 46 days with minimal tank modifications and using only slurry pumps as a heat source. This report establishes the technical basis and flowsheet for performing an aluminum removal process in Tank 51 for SB6 that incorporates the lessons learned from previous aluminum dissolution evolutions. For SB6, aluminum dissolution process temperature will be held at a minimum of 65 C for at least 24 days, but as long as practical or until as much as 80% of the aluminum is dissolved. As planned, an aluminum removal process can reduce the aluminum in SB6 from about 84,500 kg to as little as 17,900 kg with a corresponding reduction of total insoluble solids in the batch from 246,000 kg to 131,000 kg. The extent of the reduction may be limited by the time available to maintain Tank 51 at dissolution temperature. The range of dissolution in four weeks based on the known variability in dissolution kinetics can range from 44 to more than 80%. At 44% of the aluminum dissolved, the mass reduction is approximately 1/2 of the mass noted above, i.e., 33,300 kg of aluminum instead of 66,600 kg. Planning to reach 80% of the aluminum dissolved should allow a maximum of 81 days for dissolution and reduce the allowance if test data shows faster kinetics. 47,800 kg of the dissolved aluminum will be stored in Tank 8 and 21,000 kg will be stored in saltcake via evaporation. Up to 77% of the total aluminum planned for SB6 may be removed via aluminum dissolution. Storage of the aluminum-laden supernate in Tank 8 will require routine evaluation of the free hydroxide concentration in order to maintain aluminum in solution. Periodic evaluation will be established on concurrent frequency with corrosion program samples as previously established for aluminum-laden supernate from SB5 that is stored in Tank 11.

  1. Integration of the Mini-Sulfide Sulfite Anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) Pulping Process and Black Liquor Gasification in a Pulp Mill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan Jameel, North Carolina State University; Adrianna Kirkman, North Carolina State University; Ravi Chandran,Thermochem Recovery International Brian Turk Research Triangle Institute; Brian Green, Research Triangle Institute

    2010-01-27

    As many of the recovery boilers and other pieces of large capital equipment of U.S. pulp mills are nearing the end of their useful life, the pulp and paper industry will soon need to make long-term investments in new technologies. The ability to install integrated, complete systems that are highly efficient will impact the industry’s energy use for decades to come. Developing a process for these new systems is key to the adoption of state-of-the-art technologies in the Forest Products industry. This project defined an integrated process model that combines mini-sulfide sulfite anthraquinone (MSS-AQ) pulping and black liquor gasification with a proprietary desulfurization process developed by the Research Triangle Institute. Black liquor gasification is an emerging technology that enables the use of MSS-AQ pulping, which results in higher yield, lower bleaching cost, lower sulfur emissions, and the elimination of causticization requirements. The recently developed gas cleanup/absorber technology can clean the product gas to a state suitable for use in a gas turbine and also regenerate the pulping chemicals needed to for the MSS-AQ pulping process. The combination of three advanced technologies into an integrated design will enable the pulping industry to achieve a new level of efficiency, environmental performance, and cost savings. Because the three technologies are complimentary, their adoption as a streamlined package will ensure their ability to deliver maximum energy and cost savings benefits. The process models developed by this project will enable the successful integration of new technologies into the next generation of chemical pulping mills. When compared to the Kraft reference pulp, the MSS-AQ procedures produced pulps with a 10-15 % yield benefit and the ISO brightness was 1.5-2 times greater. The pulp refined little easier and had a slightly lower apparent sheet density (In both the cases). At similar levels of tear index the MSS-AQ pulps also produced a comparable tensile and burst index pulps. Product gas composition determined using computer simulations The results demonstrate that RVS-1 can effectively remove > 99.8% of the H2S present in simulated synthesis gas generated from the gasification of black liquor. This level of sulfur removal was consistent over simulated synthesis gas mixtures that contained from 6 to 9.5 vol % H2S.A significant amount of the sulfur in the simulated syngas was recovered as SO2 during regeneration. The average recovery of sulfur as SO2 was about 75%. Because these are first cycle results, this sulfur recovery is expected to improve. Developed WINGems model of the process.The total decrease in variable operating costs for the BLG process compared to the HERB was in excess of $6,200,000 per year for a mill producing 350,000 tons of pulp per year. This represents a decrease in operating cost of about $17.7/ton of oven dry pulp produced. There will be additional savings in labor and maintenance cost that has not been taken into account. The capital cost for the MSSAQ based gasifier system was estimated at $164,000,000, which is comparable to a High Efficiency Recovery Boiler. The return on investment was estimated at 4%. A gasifier replacement cannot be justified on its own, however if the recovery boiler needs to be replaced the MSSAQ gasifier system shows significantly higher savings. Before black liquor based gasifer technology can be commercialized more work is necessary. The recovery of the absorbed sulfur in the absorbent as sulfur dioxide is only 75%. This needs to be greater than 90% for economical operation. It has been suggested that as the number of cycles is increased the sulfur dioxide recovery might improve. Further research is necessary. Even though a significant amount of work has been done on a pilot scale gasifiers using liquors containing sulfur, both at low and high temperatures the lack of a commercial unit is an impediment to the implementation of the MSSAQ technology. The implementation of a commercial unit needs to be facilated before the benefits of

  2. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  3. Constructive Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Rivasseau

    2007-06-08

    We extend the technique of constructive expansions to compute the connected functions of matrix models in a uniform way as the size of the matrix increases. This provides the main missing ingredient for a non-perturbative construction of the $\\phi^{\\star 4}_4$ field theory on the Moyal four dimensional space.

  4. Grassmann Matrix Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dionysios Anninos; Frederik Denef; Ruben Monten

    2015-12-11

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kahler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. We discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  5. Grassmann Matrix Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anninos, Dionysios; Monten, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kahler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit. We discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.

  6. Admission Control and Pricing in a Queue with Batch Arrivals Utku Yildirim John J. Hasenbein1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasenbein, John

    , for example, setting the price high enough such that it is not advantageous for the incoming batch to enter for a revenue maximizing controller. Keywords: batch queues, pricing, admission control, Markov decision and that paper lists various real life examples where pricing might be helpful to control a queue. Naor [15

  7. REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES IN DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Diprete, D.; Click, D.; Bannochie, C.

    2011-12-20

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that the waste producer 'shall report the curie inventory of radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115.' As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type all radionuclides that have half-lives longer than 10 years and contribute greater than 0.01 percent of the total curie inventory from the time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial list of radionuclides to be reported is based on the design-basis glass identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report. However, it is required that the list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that meet the 'greater than 0.01% of the curie inventory' criterion. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, and U-238; and Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete list of reportable radionuclides must also include these sets of U and Pu isotopes - and the U and Pu isotopic mass distributions must be identified. The DWPF receives HLW sludge slurry from Savannah River Site (SRS) Tank 40. For Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), the waste in Tank 40 contained a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) material transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. This sludge blend is also referred to as Macrobatch 8. Laboratory analyses of a Tank 40 sludge sample were performed to quantify the concentrations of pertinent radionuclides in the SB7a waste. Subsequently, radiological decay and in-growth were calculated over the time period from 2015 to 3115. This provided a basis for characterizing the radionuclide content of SB7a over time and for identifying the 'reportable radionuclides.' Details of the characterization methodology and the analytical results are the focus of this report. This work was performed at the request of the Waste Solidification Engineering Department of Savannah River Remediation, initiated via Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. A minor revision in the reporting requirements was requested via a subsequent email communication. The work was conducted in accordance with the protocols identified in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01218 and Analytical Study Plan SRNL-RP-2010-01219. All of the raw data related to this scope have been recorded in laboratory notebook SRNL-NB-2011-00061. The overall goal of this task was to characterize the radionuclide content of the SB7a waste sufficiently to meet the WAPS and DWPF reporting requirements. The specific objectives were: (1) Quantify the current concentrations of all radionuclides impacting (or potentially-impacting) the total curie content between calendar years 2011 and 3115. Also quantify the current concentrations of other radionuclides specifically requested in the TTR or required by the WAPS. (2) Calculate future concentrations of decayed and in-grown radionuclides impacting the total curie content between calendar years 2015 and 3115; (3) Identify as 'reportable' all radionuclides contributing {ge} 0.01% of the total curie content from 2015 to 3115 and having half-lives {ge} 10 years.

  8. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  9. SLUDGE BATCH 7 PREPARATION TANK 4 AND 12 CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Click, D.; Pareizs, J.

    2010-05-21

    Samples of PUREX sludge from Tank 4 and HM sludge from Tank 12 were characterized in preparation for Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) formulation in Tank 51. SRNL analyses on Tank 4 and Tank 12 were requested in separate Technical Assistance Requests (TAR). The Tank 4 samples were pulled on January 19, 2010 following slurry operations by F-Tank Farm. The Tank 12 samples were pulled on February 9, 2010 following slurry operations by H-Tank Farm. At the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 4 and two 200 mL dip samples of Tank 12 were received in the SRNL Shielded Cells. Each tank's samples were composited into clean 500 mL polyethylene storage bottles and weighed. The composited Tank 4 sample was 428.27 g and the composited Tank 12 sample was 502.15 g. As expected there are distinct compositional differences between Tank 4 and Tank 12 sludges. The Tank 12 slurry is much higher in Al, Hg, Mn, and Th, and much lower in Fe, Ni, S, and U than the Tank 4 slurry. The Tank 4 sludge definitely makes the more significant contribution of S to any sludge batch blend. This S, like that observed during SB6 washing, is best monitored by looking at the total S measured by digesting the sample and analyzing by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Alternatively, one can measure the soluble S by ICP-AES and adjust the value upward by approximately 15% to have a pretty good estimate of the total S in the slurry. Soluble sulfate measurements by ion chromatography (IC) will be biased considerably lower than the actual total S, the difference being due to the non-sulfate soluble S and the undissolved S. Tank 12 sludge is enriched in U-235, and hence samples transferred into SRNL from the Tank Farm will need to be placed on the reportable special nuclear material inventory and tracked for total U per SRNL procedure requirements.

  10. Matrix theory of gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Koehler

    2011-03-23

    A new classical theory of gravitation within the framework of general relativity is presented. It is based on a matrix formulation of four-dimensional Riemann-spaces and uses no artificial fields or adjustable parameters. The geometrical stress-energy tensor is derived from a matrix-trace Lagrangian, which is not equivalent to the curvature scalar R. To enable a direct comparison with the Einstein-theory a tetrad formalism is utilized, which shows similarities to teleparallel gravitation theories, but uses complex tetrads. Matrix theory might solve a 27-year-old, fundamental problem of those theories (sec. 4.1). For the standard test cases (PPN scheme, Schwarzschild-solution) no differences to the Einstein-theory are found. However, the matrix theory exhibits novel, interesting vacuum solutions.

  11. Low rank matrix completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan, Feng, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of recovering a low rank matrix given a sampling of its entries. Such problems are of considerable interest in a diverse set of fields including control, system identification, statistics and signal ...

  12. Sample Results from Routine Salt Batch 7 Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-05-13

    Strip Effluent Hold Tank (SEHT) and Decontaminated Salt Solution Hold Tank (DSSHT) samples from several of the “microbatches” of Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt Batch (“Macrobatch”) 7B have been analyzed for 238Pu, 90Sr, 137Cs, Inductively Coupled Plasma Emission Spectroscopy (ICPES), and Ion Chromatography Anions (IC-A). The results from the current microbatch samples are similar to those from earlier samples from this and previous macrobatches. The Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) continue to show more than adequate Pu and Sr removal, and there is a distinct positive trend in Cs removal, due to the use of the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) notes that historically, most measured Concentration Factor (CF) values during salt processing have been in the 12-14 range. However, recent processing gives CF values closer to 11. This observation does not indicate that the solvent performance is suffering, as the Decontamination Factor (DF) has still maintained consistently high values. Nevertheless, SRNL will continue to monitor for indications of process upsets. The bulk chemistry of the DSSHT and SEHT samples do not show any signs of unusual behavior.

  13. Methods for batch fabrication of cold cathode vacuum switch tubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Charles A. (Albuquerque, NM); Trowbridge, Frank R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-05-10

    Methods are disclosed for batch fabrication of vacuum switch tubes that reduce manufacturing costs and improve tube to tube uniformity. The disclosed methods comprise creating a stacked assembly of layers containing a plurality of adjacently spaced switch tube sub-assemblies aligned and registered through common layers. The layers include trigger electrode layer, cathode layer including a metallic support/contact with graphite cathode inserts, trigger probe sub-assembly layer, ceramic (e.g. tube body) insulator layer, and metallic anode sub-assembly layer. Braze alloy layers are incorporated into the stacked assembly of layers, and can include active metal braze alloys or direct braze alloys, to eliminate costs associated with traditional metallization of the ceramic insulator layers. The entire stacked assembly is then heated to braze/join/bond the stack-up into a cohesive body, after which individual switch tubes are singulated by methods such as sawing. The inventive methods provide for simultaneously fabricating a plurality of devices as opposed to traditional methods that rely on skilled craftsman to essentially hand build individual devices.

  14. Characterisation of matrix entropies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank Hansen; Zhihua Zhang

    2015-03-16

    The notion of matrix entropy was introduced by Tropp and Chen with the aim of measuring the fluctuations of random matrices. It is a certain entropy functional constructed from a representing function with prescribed properties, and Tropp and Chen gave some examples. We give several abstract characterisations of matrix entropies together with a sufficient condition in terms of the second derivative of their representing function.

  15. Fast methods for resumming matrix polynomials and Chebyshev matrix polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Roi

    Fast methods for resumming matrix polynomials and Chebyshev matrix polynomials WanZhen Liang a,b,1; accepted 28 August 2003 Abstract Fast and effective algorithms are discussed for resumming matrix expansions can be preferable when the matrix is sparse and these fast resummation algorithms are employed. Ó

  16. SLUDGE BATCH 6/TANK 51 SIMULANT CHEMICAL PROCESS CELL SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koopman, David; Best, David

    2010-04-28

    Qualification simulant testing was completed to determine appropriate processing conditions and assumptions for the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) Shielded Cells demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet using the qualification sample from Tank 51 for SB6 after SRNL washing. It was found that an acid addition window of 105-139% of the DWPF acid equation (100-133% of the Koopman minimum acid equation) gave acceptable Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) results for nitrite destruction and hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation occurred continuously after acid addition in three of the four tests. The three runs at 117%, 133%, and 150% stoichiometry (Koopman) were all still producing around 0.1 lb hydrogen/hr at DWPF scale after 42 hours of boiling in the SRAT. The 150% acid run reached 110% of the DWPF SRAT limit of 0.65 lb H{sub 2}/hr, and the 133% acid run reached 75% of the DWPF SME limit of 0.223 lb H{sub 2}/hr. Conversely, nitrous oxide generation was subdued compared to previous sludge batches, staying below 25 lb/hr in all four tests or about a fourth as much as in comparable SB4 testing. Two other processing issues were noted. First, incomplete mercury suspension impacted mercury stripping from the SRAT slurry. This led to higher SRAT product mercury concentrations than targeted (>0.45 wt% in the total solids). Associated with this issue was a general difficulty in quantifying the mass of mercury in the SRAT vessel as a function of time, especially as acid stoichiometry increased. About ten times more mercury was found after drying the 150% acid SME product to powder than was indicated by the SME product sample results. Significantly more mercury was also found in the 133% acid SME product samples than was found during the SRAT cycle sampling. It appears that mercury is segregating from the bulk slurry in the SRAT vessel, as mercury amalgam deposits for example, and is not being resuspended by the agitators. The second processing issue was significant ammonium ion formation as the acid stoichiometry was increased due to the high noble metal-high mercury feed conditions. Ammonium ion was found partitioned between the SRAT product slurry and the condensate from the lab-scale off-gas chiller downstream of the SRAT condenser. The ammonium ion was produced from nitrate ion by formic acid. Formate losses increased with increasing acid stoichiometry reaching 40% at the highest stoichiometry tested. About a third of the formate loss at higher acid stoichiometries appeared to be due to ammonia formation. The full extent of ammonia formation was not determined in these tests, since uncondensed ammonia vapor was not quantified; but total formation was bounded by the combined loss of nitrite and nitrate. Nitrate losses during ammonia formation led to nitrite-to-nitrate conversion values that were negative in three of the four tests. The negative results were an artifact of the calculation that assumes negligible SRAT nitrate losses. The sample data after acid addition indicated that some of the initial nitrite was converted to nitrate, so the amount of nitrate destroyed included nitrite converted to nitrate plus some of the added nitrate from the sludge and nitric acid. It is recommended that DWPF investigate the impact of SME product ammonium salts on melter performance (hydrogen, redox). It was recommended that the SB6 Shielded Cells qualification run be performed at 115% acid stoichiometry and allow about 35 hours of boiling for mercury stripping at the equivalent of a 5,000 lb/hr boil-up rate.

  17. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  18. Unit I-5 Matrix representations 1 Matrix representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit I-5 Matrix representations 1 Unit I-5 Matrix representation of linear maps Unit I-5 Matrix in U · if v = a1v1 + ... + anvn then T(v) = a1T(v1) + ... + anT(vn) Unit I-5 Matrix representations 3 Example. Find the unique linear map T: R2 R2 so that T(1,2) = (2,3) and T(0,1) = (1,4). Unit I-5 Matrix

  19. Leslie Matrix I Formal Demography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leslie Matrix I Formal Demography Stanford Summer Short Course 2006 James Holland Jones Department of Anthropological Sciences Stanford University August 8, 2006 1 #12;Outline 1. Matrix Dynamics 2. Matrix Powers 3 and Eigenvectors Stanford Summer Short Course: Leslie Matrix I 2 #12;A Simple Example Assume 2 Age

  20. Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cichocki, Andrzej

    Nonnegative matrix factorization with -divergence Andrzej Cichocki a , Hyekyoung Lee b , Yong of Science and Technology San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang 790-784, Korea Abstract Nonnegative matrix reduction, the goal of which is to decompose nonnegative data matrix X into a product of basis matrix

  1. Batch Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Corn Stover and Improvements with Countercurrent Saccharification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Chao

    2015-07-29

    Enzymatic saccharification of non-food biomass, such as lignocellulose, can produce sugars. Sugars are the common feedstock for bioethanol, which can be substituted for transportation fuel and address the shortage of fossil fuels. Traditional batch...

  2. Progress in Multi-Batch Slip Stacking in the Fermilab Main Injector and Future Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiya, K.; Chase, B.; Dey, J.; Joireman, P.; Kourbanis, I.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-04-01

    The multi-batch slip stacking has been used for operations since January, 2008 and effectively increased proton intensity to the NuMI target by 50% in a Main Injector (MI) cycle. The MI accepts 11 batches at injection energy from the Booster, and sends two batches to antiproton production and nine to the NuMI beam line. The total beam power in a cycle was increased to 340 kW on average. We have been doing beam studies in order to increase the beam power to 400 kW and to control the beam loss. We will also discuss 12 batch slip stacking scheme which is going to be used for future neutrino experiments.

  3. Site Selection for Concrete Batch Plant to Support Plutonium Disposition Facilities at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L.D.

    2001-06-15

    WSRC conducted a site selection study to identify, assess, and rank candidate sites for an onsite concrete batch plant at the Savannah River Site in the vicinity of F-Area.

  4. Complex matrix model duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Brown

    2011-10-10

    The same complex matrix model calculates both tachyon scattering for the c=1 non-critical string at the self-dual radius and certain correlation functions of half-BPS operators in N=4 super-Yang-Mills. It is dual to another complex matrix model where the couplings of the first model are encoded in the Kontsevich-like variables of the second. The duality between the theories is mirrored by the duality of their Feynman diagrams. Analogously to the Hermitian Kontsevich-Penner model, the correlation functions of the second model can be written as sums over discrete points in subspaces of the moduli space of punctured Riemann surfaces.

  5. Tank 40 Final Sludge Batch 8 Chemical Characterization Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, Christopher J.

    2013-09-19

    A sample of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) was pulled from Tank 40 in order to obtain radionuclide inventory analyses necessary for compliance with the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS). The SB8 WAPS sample was also analyzed for chemical composition, including noble metals, and fissile constituents, and these results are reported here. These analyses along with the WAPS radionuclide analyses will help define the composition of the sludge in Tank 40 that is currently being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) as SB8. At SRNL, the 3-L Tank 40 SB8 sample was transferred from the shipping container into a 4-L high density polyethylene bottle and solids were allowed to settle. Supernate was then siphoned off and circulated through the shipping container to complete the transfer of the sample. Following thorough mixing of the 3-L sample, a 553 g sub-sample was removed. This sub-sample was then utilized for all subsequent slurry sample preparations. Eight separate aliquots of the slurry were digested, four with HNO{sub 3}/HCl (aqua regia) in sealed Teflon(r) vessels and four with NaOH/Na{sub 2}O{sub 2} (alkali or peroxide fusion) using Zr crucibles. Two Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1) standards were digested along with a blank for each preparation. Each aqua regia digestion and blank was diluted to 1:100 mL with deionized water and submitted to Analytical Development (AD) for inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis, inductively coupled plasma - mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AA) for As and Se, and cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CV-AA) for Hg. Equivalent dilutions of the alkali fusion digestions and blank were submitted to AD for ICP-AES analysis. Tank 40 SB8 supernate was collected from a mixed slurry sample in the SRNL Shielded Cells and submitted to AD for ICP-AES, ion chromatography (IC), total base/free OH-/other base, total inorganic carbon/total organic carbon (TIC/TOC) analyses. Weighted dilutions of slurry were submitted for IC, TIC/TOC, and total base/free OH-/other base analyses. Activities for U-233, U-235, and Pu-239 were determined from the ICP-MS data for the aqua regia digestions of the Tank 40 WAPS slurry using the specific activity of each isotope. The Pu-241 value was determined from a Pu-238/-241 method developed by SRNL AD and previously described.

  6. Uranium Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins - Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01

    The uranium adsorption performance of five resins (Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 [fresh], Dowex 21K 16-30 [regenerated], Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200) were tested using unspiked, nitrate-spiked, and nitrate-spiked/pH adjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests were conducted in support of a resin selection process in which the best resin to use for uranium treatment in the 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system will be identified. The results from these tests are as follows: • The data from the high-nitrate (1331 mg/L) tests indicated that Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 all adsorbed uranium similarly well with Kd values ranging from ~15,000 to 95,000 ml/g. All four resins would be considered suitable for use in the treatment system based on uranium adsorption characteristics. • Lowering the pH of the high nitrate test conditions from 8.2 to 7.5 did not significantly change the uranium adsorption isotherms for the four tested resins. The Kd values for these four resins under high nitrate (1338 mg/L), lower pH (7.5) ranged from ~15,000 to 80,000 ml/g. • Higher nitrate concentrations greatly reduced the uranium adsorption on all four resins. Tests conducted with unspiked (no amendments; nitrate at 337 mg/L and pH at 8.2) source water yielded Kd values for Dowex 1, Dowex 21K 16-30 (fresh), Purofine PFA600/4740, and ResinTech SIR-1200 resins ranging from ~800,000 to >3,000,000 ml/g. These values are about two orders of magnitude higher than the Kd values noted from tests conducted using amended source water. • Compared to the fresh resin, the regenerated Dowex 21K 16-30 resin exhibited significantly lower uranium-adsorption performance under all test conditions. The calculated Kd values for the regenerated resin were typically an order of magnitude lower than the values calculated for the fresh resin. • Additional testing using laboratory columns is recommended to better resolve differences between the adsorption abilities of the resins and to develop estimates of uranium loading on the resins. By determining the quantity of uranium that each resin can adsorb and the time required to reach various levels of loading, resin lifetime in the treatment system can be estimated.

  7. The Matrix of Linear Mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleks Kleyn

    2010-01-27

    On the set of mappings of the given set, we define the product of mappings. If A is associative algebra, then we consider the set of matrices, whose elements are linear mappings of algebra A. In algebra of matrices of linear mappings we define the operation of product. The operation is based on the product of mappings. If the matrix a of linear mappings has an inverse matrix, then the quasideterminant of the matrix a and the inverse matrix are matrices of linear mappings. In the paper, I consider conditions when a matrix of linear mappings has inverse matrix, as well methods of solving a system of linear equations in an associative algebra.

  8. Production of branched-chain alcohols by recombinant Ralstonia eutropha in fed-batch cultivation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, Q; Brigham, CJ; Lu, JN; Fu, RZ; Sinskey, AJ

    2013-09-01

    Branched-chain alcohols are considered promising green energy sources due to their compatibility with existing infrastructure and their high energy density. We utilized a strain of Ralstonia eutropha capable of producing branched-chain alcohols and examined its production in flask cultures. In order to increase isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (isoamyl alcohol) productivity in the engineered strain, batch, fed-batch, and two-stage fed-batch cultures were carried out in this work. The effects of nitrogen source concentration on branched-chain alcohol production were investigated under four different initial concentrations in fermenters. A maximum 380 g m(-3) of branched-chain alcohol production was observed with 2 kg m(-3) initial NH4Cl concentration in batch cultures. A pH-stat control strategy was utilized to investigate the optimum carbon source amount fed during fed-batch cultures for higher cell density. In cultures of R. eutropha strains that did not produce polyhydroxyalkanoate or branched-chain alcohols, a maximum cell dry weight of 36 kg m(-3) was observed using a fed-batch strategy, when 10 kg m(-3) carbon source was fed into culture medium. Finally, a total branched-chain alcohol titer of 790 g m(-3), the highest branched-chain alcohol yield of 0.03 g g(-1), and the maximum branched-chain alcohol productivity of 8.23 g m(-3) h(-1) were obtained from the engineered strain Re2410/pJL26 in a two-stage fed-batch culture system with pH-stat control. Isobutanol made up over 95% (mass fraction) of the total branched-chain alcohols titer produced in this study. (C) 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Matrix polynomials and structured linearizations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Matrix polynomials and structured linearizations. Advisor: Maria Isabel Bueno Cachadina Let P() = Akk + Ak-1k-1 + · · · + A0 (1) be a matrix polynomial of degree k 2, where the coefficients Ai are n × n matrices with entries in a field F. A matrix pencil L() = L1 - L0, with L1, L0 Mkn

  10. Results Of Initial Analyses Of The Salt (Macro) Batch 9 Tank 21H Qualification Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-10-08

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt (Macro) Batch 9 for processing through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Analysis of the Tank 21H Salt (Macro) Batch 9 composite sample indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics. Further results on the chemistry and other tests will be issued in the future.

  11. Results of initial analyses of the salt (macro) batch 9 tank 21H qualification samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-10-01

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP) Salt (Macro) Batch 9 for processing through the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). This document reports the initial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. Analysis of the Tank 21H Salt (Macro) Batch 9 composite sample indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics or observations, such as floating solids, the presence of large amount of solids, or unusual colors. Further results on the chemistry and other tests will be issued in the future.

  12. Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by n-butyl lithium in a cyclohexane solvent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landon, Thomas Rodman

    1971-01-01

    Committee ea Depa tment Mem er Mem er em er August 1971 ABSTRACT Batch Polymerization of Styrene Initiated by N-Butyl Lithium in Cyclohexane Solvent. (August 19 71) Thomas Rodman Landon, B, S. , Te x as A (&M Un i ve rs i ty Directed by: Dr.... Rayford G. Anthony Styrene is polymerized by n-butyl lithium with cyclo- hexane as the solvent. The polymerization is carried out in an isothermal batch reactors at three temperature 30, 40, and 50'C. The proposed reaction proceeds by a homo- geneous...

  13. Batch polymerization of styrene initiated by n-butyllithium in benzene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanlak, Tayfun

    1975-01-01

    BATCH POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY n-BUTYLLITHIUM IN BENZENE A Thesis by TAYFUN TANLAK Submitted to the Graduate Co'l1ege of Texas Anil University in partial fu1fi11ment of the requirement for the degree cf MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1975 Major Subject: Chemica1 Engineering BATCH POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE INITIATED BY n-BUTYLLITHIUM IN BENZENE A Thesis by TAYFUN TANLAK Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee Head Department Member ~ /z'1tup Member...

  14. Matrix Algebra September 1, 2015 1 / 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laison, Josh

    Matrix Algebra September 1, 2015 1 / 4 #12;Matrix Algebra Four different ways of computing the matrix product AB: September 1, 2015 1 / 4 #12;Matrix Algebra Four different ways of computing the matrix row of A with the jth column of B. September 1, 2015 1 / 4 #12;Matrix Algebra Four different ways

  15. The Matrix Exponential Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    The Matrix Exponential Gordon K. Smyth March 17, 1997 One of the most frequently occurring matrix functions is the matrix exponential, defined for a square matrix A by e At = 1 X j=0 (At) j j! : The matrix chain is in state j at time t, and A is the matrix of instantaneous transition rates. Another

  16. Directed batch assembly of three-dimensional helical nanobelts through angular winding and electroplating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yu

    and electroplating This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article of three-dimensional helical nanobelts through angular winding and electroplating D J Bell1 , T E Bauert1. In a subsequent Au electroplating step, contacts are electroformed and the batch assembly is completed, while

  17. Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehenkel, Louis

    Batch-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN-mode vs Online-mode Supervised Learning Motivations for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models for Artificial Neural Networks Linear ANN Models Single neuron models Single layer models Nonlinear ANN Models

  18. Transfer-Free Batch Fabrication of Large-Area Suspended Graphene Membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    heightened for the preparation of sus- pended graphene structures to ascertain graphene's fundamentalTransfer-Free Batch Fabrication of Large- Area Suspended Graphene Membranes Benjami´n Alema of the predicted properties arising from the two-dimensional nature of graphene1 4 can be obscured or altered

  19. NESTED BATCH MODE LEARNING AND STOCHASTIC OPTIMIZATION WITH AN APPLICATION TO SEQUENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powell, Warren B.

    . optimal learning, materials science, sequential design of experiments, decision making, dynamicNESTED BATCH MODE LEARNING AND STOCHASTIC OPTIMIZATION WITH AN APPLICATION TO SEQUENTIAL MULTI-STAGE TESTING IN MATERIALS SCIENCE YINGFEI WANG, KRISTOFER G. REYES, KEITH A. BROWN§, CHAD A. MIRKIN

  20. Design and Optimization of Condenser and Centrifuge Units for Enhancement of a Batch Vacuum Frying System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Akhilesh

    2011-02-22

    A batch vacuum frying system, which processes fruits and vegetables, includes a frying pan, a surface-condenser, and a vacuum pump. With health and safety issues in mind, this research focused on developing a modified surface-condenser to prevent...

  1. Microbial Fuel Cells In this experiment, a batch mixed culture microbial fuel cell with Shewanella

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Microbial Fuel Cells Abstract In this experiment, a batch mixed culture microbial fuel cell conditions under nitrogen gas. In the microbial fuel cell with Shewanella putrefaciens sp. 200 as catalysisM at pH=7. Introduction Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are systems that take advantage of certain

  2. APPLIED MICROBIAL AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY Electricity production from xylose in fed-batch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to ethanol production from pentoses is energy production using a microbial fuel cell (MFC). An MFCAPPLIED MICROBIAL AND CELL PHYSIOLOGY Electricity production from xylose in fed-batch and continuous-flow microbial fuel cells Liping Huang & Bruce E. Logan Received: 23 March 2008 /Revised: 30 May

  3. On the Social Welfare of Mechanisms for Repeated Batch Matching Elliot Anshelevich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anshelevich, Elliot

    in the market for the next round. This setting models several scenarios of interest, includ- ing many job of work on analyzing single rounds of markets that clear in batches as well as on designing and an compatibility dominate. There is now a signifi- cant literature on market design for achieving various differ

  4. Control of incident irradiance on a batch operated flat-plate photobioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    microalgae growth rate. Then, the feed-forward inversion control scheme adjusted the incident irradiance biomass and lipid productivity in microalgae cultivation. The present approach can rapidly identify and productivity of microalgae. This was illustrated with Nannochloropsis oculata batch grown in a flat-plate PBR

  5. Production Leveling (Heijunka) Implementation in a Batch Production System: a Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of Production Leveling outside automotive networks. Additionally, one can question whether Lean Manufacturing, Department of Manufacturing, GETEQ Research Group, Caixa Postal 476, Campus Universitário, Trindade, 88040 on a subsidiary of a multinational enterprise located on Brazil, which manufacturing processes comprise batch

  6. Hybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi AZIMI@EECS.OREGONSTATE.EDU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fern, Xiaoli Zhang

    motivating application we try to optimize the power output of nano-enhanced Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs). MFCsHybrid Batch Bayesian Optimization Javad Azimi AZIMI@EECS.OREGONSTATE.EDU Oregon State University Abstract Bayesian Optimization (BO) aims at optimizing an unknown function that is costly to evaluate. We

  7. Supplementary Analysis For: The sva package for removing batch effects and other unwanted variation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leek, Jeffrey

    Storey3 1 Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health 2 Boston University 3 Princeton University the data from an ExpressionSet 1 2 Applying the fsva function to remove batch effects for prediction 2 1) > library(sva) > library(bladderbatch) 1 #12;> library(RColorBrewer) > data(bladderdata) > library

  8. Greedy Algorithm for Scheduling Batch Plants with Sequence-Dependent Changeovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    of multistage batch plants with a large number of orders and sequence-dependent changeovers. Such problems marketplace can only be ensured if companies optimize the various functions within their supply chain with many related optimization problems, such as maintenance planning, energy and inventory optimization

  9. Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nitrogen removal via nitrite in a sequencing batch reactor treating sanitary landfill leachate, for the automation of a bench-scale SBR treating leachate generated in old landfills. Attention was given confirm the effectiveness of the nitrite route for nitrogen removal optimisation in leachate treatment

  10. Intelligent monitoring system for long-term control of Sequencing Batch Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -scale Sequencing Batch Reactor (SBR) treating nitrogen-rich wastewater (sanitary landfill leachate). The paper). Leachate generated in old landfills is a high-strength wastewater and is characterized by a low COD monitoring tool for adjusting the phase length and COD addition in SBRs treating sanitary landfill leachate

  11. Optimisation of sanitary landfill leachate treatment in a sequencing batch reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimisation of sanitary landfill leachate treatment in a sequencing batch reactor A. Spagni, S was operated for almost three years in an attempt to optimise the treatment of leachates generated in old and N removal were usually higher than 98% and 90%, respectively, whereas COD (of the leachate) removal

  12. Utilizing Green Energy Prediction to Schedule Mixed Batch and Service Jobs in Data Centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Utilizing Green Energy Prediction to Schedule Mixed Batch and Service Jobs in Data Centers Baris on using immediately available green energy to supplement the non- renewable, or brown energy at the cost of canceling and rescheduling jobs whenever the green energy availability is too low [16]. In this paper we

  13. Matrix Representation of Special Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Koehler

    2007-03-08

    I compare the matrix representation of the basic statements of Special Relativity with the conventional vector space representation. It is shown, that the matrix form reproduces all equations in a very concise and elegant form, namely: Maxwell equations, Lorentz-force, energy-momentum tensor, Dirac-equation and Lagrangians. The main thesis is, however, that both forms are nevertheless not equivalent, but matrix representation is superior and gives a deeper insight into physical reality, because it is based on much less assumptions. It allows a better understanding of Minkowski spacetime on the basis of matrix algebra. An escpecially remarkable result of the consequent usage of this alge- braic concept is the formulation of Diracs equation in a novel matrix form. This equation can be generalized to include a new variant of Yang-Mills gauge fields, which possibly express unified electro-weak interactions in a new way.

  14. PARALLEL MATRIX MULTIPLICATION: A SYSTEMATIC JOURNEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batory, Don

    PARALLEL MATRIX MULTIPLICATION: A SYSTEMATIC JOURNEY MARTIN D. SCHATZ, ROBERT A. VAN DE GEIJN- trix matrix multiplication algorithms. The journey starts with a description of how matrices implementation of matrix-vector multiplication and rank-1 update, continues on to reveal a fam- ily of matrix-matrix

  15. The Matrix Exponential Gordon K. Smyth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smyth, Gordon K.

    The Matrix Exponential Gordon K. Smyth Department of Mathematics University of Queensland 17 March 1997 One of the most frequently occurring matrix functions is the matrix exponential, defined for a square matrix A by eAt = j=0 (At)j j! . The matrix exponential arises from the differential equation x

  16. Characterization Of The As-Received Sludge Batch 9 Qualification Sample (Htf-51-15-81)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.

    2015-09-30

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel have been requested to qualify the next sludge batch (Sludge Batch 9 – SB9) for processing at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). To accomplish this task, Savannah River Remediation (SRR) has sent SRNL a 3-L slurried sample of Tank 51H (HTF-51-15-81) to be characterized, washed, and then used in a lab-scale demonstration of the DWPF flowsheet (potentially after combining with Tank 40H sludge). This report documents the first steps of the qualification process – characterization of the as-received Tank 51H qualification sample. These results will be used to support a reprojection of SB9 by SRR from which final Tank 51H washing, frit development, and Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) activities will be based.

  17. SRS SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION AND PROCESSING; HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVE AND LESSONS LEARNED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cercy, M.; Peeler, D.; Stone, M.

    2013-09-25

    This report provides a historical overview and lessons learned associated with the SRS sludge batch (SB) qualification and processing programs. The report covers the framework of the requirements for waste form acceptance, the DWPF Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), waste feed acceptance, examples of how the program complies with the specifications, an overview of the Startup Program, and a summary of continuous improvements and lessons learned. The report includes a bibliography of previous reports and briefings on the topic.

  18. Evaluation of methods of mixing lime in bituminous paving mixtures in batch and drum plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Button, Joseph Wade

    1984-01-01

    . Lime was added in the pugmill of the batch plant, on the cold feed belt, and through the fines feeder of the drum mix plant. The asphalt and aggregates used were characterized in the laboratory. Asphalt concrete mixture tests included laboratory... Maria Road 14 3 Laboratory Test Program for All Mixtures 17 Process by which Lime Slurry was Added to the Individual Aggregates on the Cold Feed Belt Overall Average Air Void Content of Laboratory Mixed and Compacted Samples 19 27 Resilient...

  19. Removal of aqueous rinsable flux residues in a batch spray dishwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slanina, J.T.

    1992-02-01

    An alkaline detergent solution used in an industrial dishwasher was evaluated to remove aqueous rinsable flux residues on printed wiring boards (PWBs) after hot air solder leveling and hot oil solder dip and leveling. The dishwasher, a batch cleaning process, was compared to an existing conveyorized aqueous cleaning process. The aqueous soluble flux residues from both soldering processes were removed with a solution of a mild alkaline detergent dissolved in hot deionized (DI) water.

  20. Analysis Of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2012-10-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed.

  1. Cosmology and the S-matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bousso, Raphael

    2009-01-01

    56710 Cosmology and the S-matrix Raphael Bousso Center for04/36 Cosmology and the S-matrix Raphael Bousso ? Center forassociated with an S-matrix. arXiv:hep-th/0412197v2 25 Jan

  2. Small Scale Mixing Demonstration Batch Transfer and Sampling Performance of Simulated HLW - 12307

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Jesse; Townson, Paul; Vanatta, Matt

    2012-07-01

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste treatment Plant (WTP) has been recognized as a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. At the end of 2009 DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), awarded a contract to EnergySolutions to design, fabricate and operate a demonstration platform called the Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) to establish pre-transfer sampling capacity, and batch transfer performance data at two different scales. This data will be used to examine the baseline capacity for a tank mixed via rotational jet mixers to transfer consistent or bounding batches, and provide scale up information to predict full scale operational performance. This information will then in turn be used to define the baseline capacity of such a system to transfer and sample batches sent to WTP. The Small Scale Mixing Demonstration (SSMD) platform consists of 43'' and 120'' diameter clear acrylic test vessels, each equipped with two scaled jet mixer pump assemblies, and all supporting vessels, controls, services, and simulant make up facilities. All tank internals have been modeled including the air lift circulators (ALCs), the steam heating coil, and the radius between the wall and floor. The test vessels are set up to simulate the transfer of HLW out of a mixed tank, and collect a pre-transfer sample in a manner similar to the proposed baseline configuration. The collected material is submitted to an NQA-1 laboratory for chemical analysis. Previous work has been done to assess tank mixing performance at both scales. This work involved a combination of unique instruments to understand the three dimensional distribution of solids using a combination of Coriolis meter measurements, in situ chord length distribution measurements, and electro-resistive tomography. This current work utilized the same instruments to monitor simulated waste transfers. This paper will discuss some of the scaling compromises when it came to the scaled sampling system design, handling of large quantities of material for sampling, and present data for the discuss of likely behavior of the full scale DST based on scaling correlations using a scale ratio exponent (SRE) from 0.25 to 0.45 and the behavior observed in the SSMD platform. This does not establish a scaling factor for DST mixing using paired jet mixers but is an attempt to envelope the likely performance ranges in terms of certification sampling bias, certification sample root-mean-square-deviation, and bath to batch relative standard deviation. (authors)

  3. STATISTICAL EVALUATION OF SMALL SCALE MIXING DEMONSTRATION SAMPLING AND BATCH TRANSFER PERFORMANCE - 12093

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GREER DA; THIEN MG

    2012-01-12

    The ability to effectively mix, sample, certify, and deliver consistent batches of High Level Waste (HLW) feed from the Hanford Double Shell Tanks (DST) to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) presents a significant mission risk with potential to impact mission length and the quantity of HLW glass produced. DOE's Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) has previously presented the results of mixing performance in two different sizes of small scale DSTs to support scale up estimates of full scale DST mixing performance. Currently, sufficient sampling of DSTs is one of the largest programmatic risks that could prevent timely delivery of high level waste to the WTP. WRPS has performed small scale mixing and sampling demonstrations to study the ability to sufficiently sample the tanks. The statistical evaluation of the demonstration results which lead to the conclusion that the two scales of small DST are behaving similarly and that full scale performance is predictable will be presented. This work is essential to reduce the risk of requiring a new dedicated feed sampling facility and will guide future optimization work to ensure the waste feed delivery mission will be accomplished successfully. This paper will focus on the analytical data collected from mixing, sampling, and batch transfer testing from the small scale mixing demonstration tanks and how those data are being interpreted to begin to understand the relationship between samples taken prior to transfer and samples from the subsequent batches transferred. An overview of the types of data collected and examples of typical raw data will be provided. The paper will then discuss the processing and manipulation of the data which is necessary to begin evaluating sampling and batch transfer performance. This discussion will also include the evaluation of the analytical measurement capability with regard to the simulant material used in the demonstration tests. The paper will conclude with a discussion of the analysis results illustrating the relationship between the pre-transfer samples and the batch transfers, which support the recommendation regarding the need for a dedicated feed sampling facility.

  4. Molybdenum disilicide alloy matrix composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrovic, John J. (Los Alamos, NM); Honnell, Richard E. (Los Alamos, NM); Gibbs, W. Scott (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01

    Compositions of matter consisting of matrix matrials having silicon carbide dispersed throughout them and methods of making the compositions. A matrix material is an alloy of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, and at least one secondary component which is a refractory silicide. The silicon carbide dispersant may be in the form of VLS whiskers, VS whiskers, or submicron powder or a mixture of these forms.

  5. Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics BasicsBasil Lalli

  6. Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics BasicsBasil

  7. SLUDGE BATCH 7B QUALIFICATION ACTIVITIES WITH SRS TANK FARM SLUDGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.; Reboul, S.

    2011-11-16

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry - Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) - be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). With the tight schedule constraints for SB7b and the potential need for caustic addition to allow for an acceptable glass processing window, the qualification for SB7b was approached differently than past batches. For SB7b, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 and a Tank 40 sample for qualification. SRNL did not receive the qualification sample from Tank 51 nor did it simulate all of the Tank Farm washing and decanting operations. Instead, SRNL prepared a Tank 51 SB7b sample from samples of Tank 7 and Tank 51, along with a wash solution to adjust the supernatant composition to the final SB7b Tank 51 Tank Farm projections. SRNL then prepared a sample to represent SB7b in Tank 40 by combining portions of the SRNL-prepared Tank 51 SB7b sample and a Tank 40 Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) sample. The blended sample was 71% Tank 40 (SB7a) and 29% Tank 7/Tank 51 on an insoluble solids basis. This sample is referred to as the SB7b Qualification Sample. The blend represented the highest projected Tank 40 heel (as of May 25, 2011), and thus, the highest projected noble metals content for SB7b. Characterization was performed on the Tank 51 SB7b samples and SRNL performed DWPF simulations using the Tank 40 SB7b material. This report documents: (1) The preparation and characterization of the Tank 51 SB7b and Tank 40 SB7b samples. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the SB7b Tank 40 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a nonradioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the SRAT receipt, SRAT product, and SME product. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7b related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7b processing.

  8. Evaluation of ISDP Batch 2 Qualification Compliance to 512-S, DWPF, Tank Farm, and Saltstone Waste Acceptance Criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, A.

    2010-05-05

    The purpose of this report is to document the acceptability of the second macrobatch (Salt Batch 2) of Tank 49H waste to H Tank Farm, DWPF, and Saltstone for operation of the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). Tank 49 feed meets the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) requirements specified by References 11, 12, and 13. Salt Batch 2 material is qualified and ready to be processed through ARP/MCU to the final disposal facilities.

  9. Matrix Analysis, CAAM 335, Spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matrix Analysis, CAAM 335, Spring 2012 Steven J Cox #12;Preface Bellman has called matrix theory and scientists have found in matrix theory a language for repre- senting and analyzing multivariable systems. Our and the power of matrix theory in the analysis and synthesis of such systems. Beginning with modeling

  10. LOCH: Open Access Implementation Responsibility Matrix 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krzak, Anna

    2015-02-05

    Draft Responsibility Matrix for College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine for REF Open Access requirements implementation.

  11. Batch methods for enriching trace impurities in hydrogen gas for their further analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H.D.; Kumar, Romesh; Papdias, Dionissios D.

    2014-07-15

    Provided herein are batch methods and devices for enriching trace quantities of impurities in gaseous mixtures, such as hydrogen fuel. The methods and devices rely on concentrating impurities using hydrogen transport membranes wherein the time period for concentrating the sample is calculated on the basis of optimized membrane characteristics, comprising its thickness and permeance, with optimization of temperature, and wherein the enrichment of trace impurities is proportional to the pressure ratio P.sub.hi/P.sub.lo and the volume ratio V.sub.1/V.sub.2, with following detection of the impurities using commonly-available detection methods.

  12. Batch polymerization of styrene and isoprene by n-butyl lithium initiator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Sayeed

    1970-01-01

    BATCN ?OLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE AND ISO?RENE BY n-BUTYL LITHIUM INITIATOR A Thesis SAYEED IIASAV Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the d pre of IJASTER OF SCIFNCE... ler) CP3 MV gse P . January 1970 9&ZS&8 ABSTRACT Batch Polymerization of Styrene and Isoprene By n-Butyl Lithium Initiator. (January 1970) Sayeed 1Iasan, B. Sc. , East Pakistan University of Engineering and Technology, Dacca Directed by: Dr...

  13. Selective batch crushing in the coal-preparation shop at OAO NTMK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.A. Berkutov; Yu.V. Stepanov; P.V. Shtark; L.A. Makhortova; N.K. Popova; D.A. Koshkarov; N.V. Tsarev [OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK)(Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    In September 2004, after reconstruction at OAO Nizhnetagil'skii Metallurgicheskii Kombinat (NTMK), blast furnace 6 went into operation for the production of vanadium from hot metal. At the startup of furnace 6, besides optimising its composition; it was decided to restore selective crushing of the coal batch using pneumatic and mechanical separation in the third unit of the coal preparation shop. Additional increase in the mechanical strength of coke by 1.5-2.0% was predicted with a 0.5-1.0% decrease in wear.

  14. QCD Matrix Elements + Parton Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Catani; F. Krauss; R. Kuhn; B. R. Webber

    2001-09-25

    We propose a method for combining QCD matrix elements and parton showers in Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic final states in $e^+e^-$ annihilation. The matrix element and parton shower domains are separated at some value $y_{ini}$ of the jet resolution, defined according to the $k_T$-clustering algorithm. The matrix elements are modified by Sudakov form factors and the parton showers are subjected to a veto procedure to cancel dependence on $y_{ini}$ to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy. The method provides a leading-order description of hard multi-jet configurations together with jet fragmentation, while avoiding the most serious problems of double counting. We present first results of an approximate implementation using the event generator APACIC++.

  15. The Matrix Unwinding Function, with an Application to Computing the Matrix Exponential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higham, Nicholas J.

    The Matrix Unwinding Function, with an Application to Computing the Matrix Exponential Mary. MATRIX ANAL. APPL. c 2014 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 35, No. 1, pp. 88­109 THE MATRIX UNWINDING FUNCTION, WITH AN APPLICATION TO COMPUTING THE MATRIX EXPONENTIAL MARY APRAHAMIAN

  16. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2012-12-17

    The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. Twenty-seven radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b. Each of these radionuclides has a half-life greater than ten years and contributes more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis at some point from production through the 1100 year period between 2015 and 3115. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are the most extensive conducted to date. Some method development/refinement occurred during the conduct of these measurements, leading to lower detection limits and more accurate measurement of some isotopes than was previously possible.

  17. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-07-24

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter.

  18. INTERPRETATION OF AT-LINE SPECTRA FROM AFS-2 BATCH #3 FERROUS SULFAMATE TREATMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.; O'Rourke, P.

    2013-12-10

    Spectra from the “at-line” spectrometer were obtained during the ferrous sulfamate (FS) valence adjustment step of AFS-2 Batch #3 on 9/18/2013. These spectra were analyzed by mathematical principal component regression (PCR) techniques to evaluate the effectiveness of this treatment. Despite the complications from Pu(IV), we conclude that all Pu(VI) was consumed during the FS treatment, and that by the end of the treatment, about 85% was as Pu(IV) and about 15% was as Pu(III). Due to the concerns about the “odd” shape of the Pu(IV) peak and the possibility of this behavior being observed in the future, a follow-up sample was sent to SRNL to investigate this further. Analysis of this sample confirmed the previous results and concluded that it “odd” shape was due to an intermediate acid concentration. Since the spectral evidence shows complete reduction of Pu(VI) we conclude that it is appropriate to proceed with processing of this the batch of feed solution for HB-Line including the complexation of the fluoride with aluminum nitrate.

  19. Supersymmetry in Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Guhr

    2010-05-06

    Supersymmetry is nowadays indispensable for many problems in Random Matrix Theory. It is presented here with an emphasis on conceptual and structural issues. An introduction to supermathematics is given. The Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation as well as its generalization and superbosonization are explained. The supersymmetric non-linear sigma model, Brownian motion in superspace and the color-flavor transformation are discussed.

  20. Verification Of The Defense Waste Processing Facility's (DWPF) Process Digestion Methods For The Sludge Batch 8 Qualification Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D. R.; Edwards, T. B.; Wiedenman, B. J.; Brown, L. W.

    2013-03-18

    This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from inductively coupled plasma – atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium Peroxide/Sodium Hydroxide Fusion Dissolution (PF) and Cold Chem (CC) method digestions and Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption analysis of Hg digestions from the DWPF Hg digestion method of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples. The SB8 SRAT Receipt and SB8 SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constitutes the SB8 Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), to form the SB8 Blend composition.

  1. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) POUR STREAM SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-05-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a), also referred to as Macrobatch 8 (MB8), in June 2011. SB7a is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) and the SB7a material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7a was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Three pour stream glass samples and two Melter Feed Tank (MFT) slurry samples were collected while processing SB7a. These additional samples were taken during SB7a to understand the impact of antifoam and the melter bubblers on glass redox chemistry. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where they were analyzed. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: (1) The sum of oxides for the official SB7a pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%). (2) The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7a is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7a pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7a Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample. (3) As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the official SB7a pour stream sample. (4) The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7a pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.64 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass. (5) The measured density of the SB7a pour stream glass was 2.7 g/cm{sup 3}. (6) The Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe ratios of the SB7a pour stream samples were in the range of 0.04-0.13, while the MFT sample glasses prepared by SRNL were in the range of 0.02-0.04.

  2. ANALYSIS OF DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-20

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7), in June 2010. SB6 is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5), H-Canyon Np transfers and SB6 that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51.1 SB6 was processed using Frit 418. Sludge is received into the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) and is processed through the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Tank (SME). The treated sludge slurry is then transferred to the Melter Feed Tank (MFT) and fed to the melter. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP) and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. The DWPF requested various analyses of radioactive glass samples obtained from the melter pour stream during processing of SB6 as well as reduction/oxidation (REDOX) analysis of MFT samples to determine the impact of Argon bubbling. Sample analysis followed the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) and an Analytical Study Plan (ASP). Four Pour Stream (PS) glass samples and two MFT slurry samples were delivered to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) from the DWPF. Table 1-1 lists the sample information for each pour stream glass sample. SB6 PS3 (S03472) was selected as the official pour stream sample for SB6 and full analysis was requested. This report details the visual observations of the as-received SB6 PS No.3 glass sample as well as results for the chemical composition, Product Consistency Test (PCT), radionuclide content, noble metals, and glass density. REDOX results will be provided for all four pour stream samples and vitrified samples of MFT-558 and MFT-568A. Where appropriate, data from other pour stream samples will be provided.

  3. Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.; Crawford, C. L.; Pareizs, J. M.

    2013-11-18

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) began processing Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b), also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9), in January 2012. SB7b is a blend of the heel of Tank 40 from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and the SB7b material that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. SB7b was processed using Frit 418. During processing of each sludge batch, the DWPF is required to take at least one glass sample to meet the objectives of the Glass Product Control Program (GPCP), which is governed by the DWPF Waste Form Compliance Plan, and to complete the necessary Production Records so that the final glass product may be disposed of at a Federal Repository. Two pour stream glass samples were collected while processing SB7b. The samples were transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) where one was analyzed and the other was archived. The following conclusions were drawn from the analytical results provided in this report: The sum of oxides for the official SB7b pour stream glass is within the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) limits (95-105 wt%); The average calculated Waste Dilution Factor (WDF) for SB7b is 2.3. In general, the measured radionuclide content of the official SB7b pour stream glass is in good agreement with the calculated values from the Tank 40 dried sludge results from the SB7b Waste Acceptance Program Specification (WAPS) sample; As in previous pour stream samples, ruthenium and rhodium inclusions were detected by Scanning Electron Microscopy-Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) in the SB7b pour stream sample; The Product Consistency Test (PCT) results indicate that the official SB7b pour stream glass meets the waste acceptance criteria for durability with a normalized boron release of 0.8 g/L, which is an order of magnitude less than the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass; The measured density of the SB7b pour stream glass was 2.70 g/cm{sup 3}; The Fe{sup 2+}/?Fe ratio of the SB7b pour stream samples was 0.07.

  4. An experimental system for the n-butyl-lithium initiated polymerization of styrene in a multi-sampled batch reactor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, James Harvey

    1974-01-01

    AN EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM FOR THE n-BUTYLLITHIUM INITIATED POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE IN A MULTI-SAMPLED BATCH REACTOR A Thesis by JAMES HARVEY COX, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1974 Ma]or Subject: Chemical Engineering AN EXPERIMENTAL SYSTEM FOR THE n-BUTYLLITHIUM INITIATED POLYMERIZATION OF STYRENE IN A MULTI-SAMPLED BATCH REACTOR A Thesis by JAMES HARVEY COX, JR. Approved...

  5. Nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vadim Rodin

    2009-10-30

    The present status of calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. A proposal which allows in principle to measure the neutrinoless double beta decay Fermi matrix element is briefly described.

  6. Analysis of tank 23H samples in support of salt batch planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M. S.; Coleman, C. J.; Diprete, D. P.

    2015-08-14

    Savannah River Remediation obtained three samples from different heights within Tank 23H. The samples were analyzed by Savannah River National Laboratory to support salt batch planning. The results from the analysis indicate the top two samples from the tank appear similar in composition. The lowest sample from the tank contained significantly more solids and a more concentrated salt solution. The filtered supernate from the bottom sample showed ~60% lower Sr-90 and Pu-238 concentrations than the decanted (unfiltered) supernate results which may indicate the presence of some small amount of entrained solid particles in the decanted sample. The mercury concentrations measured in the filtered supernate were fairly low for all three samples ranging from 11.2 to 42.3 mg/L.

  7. Numerical model for the vacuum pyrolysis of scrap tires in batch reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, J.; Tanguy, P.A.; Roy, C.

    1995-06-01

    A quantitative model for scrap tire pyrolysis in a batch scale reactor developed comprises the following basic phenomena: conduction inside tire particles; conduction, convection, and radiation between the feedstock particles or between the fluids and the particles; tire pyrolysis reaction; exothermicity and endothermicity caused by tire decomposition and volatilization; and the variation of the composition and the thermal properties of tire particles. This model was used to predict the transient temperature and density distributions in the bed of particles, the volatile product evolution rate, the mass change, the energy consumption during the pyrolysis process, and the pressure history in a tire pyrolysis reactor with a load of 1 kg. The model predictions agree well with independent experimental data.

  8. DWPF coupled feed flowsheet material balance with batch one sludge and copper nitrate catalyst

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, A.S.

    1993-09-28

    The SRTC has formally transmitted a recommendation to DWPF to replace copper formate with copper nitrate as the catalyst form during precipitate hydrolysis [1]. The SRTC was subsequently requested to formally document the technical bases for the recommendation. A memorandum was issued on August 23, 1993 detailing the activities (and responsible individuals) necessary to address the impact of this change in catalyst form on process compatibility, safety, processibility environmental impact and product glass quality [2]. One of the activities identified was the preparation of a material balance in which copper nitrate is substituted for copper formate and the identification of key comparisons between this material balance and the current Batch 1 sludge -- Late Wash material balance [3].

  9. AUTOMATED BATCH CHARACTERIZATION OF ICF SHELLS WITH VISION-ENABLED OPTICAL MICROSCOPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUANG,H; STEPHENS,R.B; HILL,D.W; LYON,C; NIKROO,A; STEINMAN,D.A

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) shells are mesoscale objects with nano-scale dimensional and nano-surface finish requirements. Currently, the shell dimensions are measured by white-light interferometry and an image analysis method. These two methods complement each other and give a rather complete data set on a single shell. The process is, however, labor intensive. They have developed an automation routine to fully characterize a shell in one shot and perform unattended batch measurements. The method is useful to the ICF program both for production screening and for full characterization. It also has potential for Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) power plant where half a million shells need to be processed daily.

  10. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  11. Matrix Completion with Queries Natali Ruchansky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crovella, Mark

    Matrix Completion with Queries Natali Ruchansky Boston University natalir@cs.bu.edu Mark Crovella applications, e.g., recommender systems and traffic monitoring, the data comes in the form of a matrix that is only partially observed and low rank. A fundamental data- analysis task for these datasets is matrix

  12. Short Papers___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Estimating the Fundamental Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    ___________________________________________________________________________________________________ Estimating the Fundamental Matrix via Constrained Least-Squares: A Convex Approach Graziano Chesi, AndreaÐIn this paper, a new method for the estimation of the fundamental matrix from point correspondences is presented on the fundamental matrix. It is shown how this nonconvex optimization problem can be solved avoiding local minima

  13. Matrix Analysis Unit code: MATH36001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    MATH36001 Matrix Analysis Unit code: MATH36001 Credit Rating: 10 Unit level: Level 3 Teaching). Familiarity with Matlab is helpful but not essential. Aims To introduce students to matrix analysis through decomposition, and matrix functions. This is archived information. Please visit http

  14. Matrix Operations Recall that an matrix A is a rectangular array of scalars arranged in rows and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Matrix Operations Recall that an matrix A is a rectangular array of scalars arranged in rows and columns: We will also denote the matrix A by . In the case we call a square matrix. If all the entries of the matrix A are zero, we call A the zero matrix and denote it by . The term matrix was first used in 1850

  15. Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer-matrix composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Electromagnetic interference shielding using continuous carbon-fiber carbon-matrix and polymer of polymer-matrix composites with continuous carbon-fibers was less and that of polymer-matrix composites the shielding effectiveness. The dominant mechanism of EMI shielding for both carbon-matrix and polymer

  16. JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 10, NO. 1, MARCH 2001 25 Batch Transfer of LIGA Microstructures by Selective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Liwei

    Microstructures by Selective Electroplating and Bonding Li-Wei Pan and Liwei Lin Abstract--A flip-chip, batch demonstrated by selective electroplating and bonding. Single layer LIGA microstructures with thickness of 200 m of bonding via electroplating. After the selective bonding process, the originally fixed microstructures

  17. A mathematical model for batch and continuous thickening of flocculated suspensions in vessels with varying cross-section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsen, Kenneth Hvistendahl

    A mathematical model for batch and continuous thickening of flocculated suspensions in vessels of continuous thickening of flocculated suspensions in an ideal cylindrical thickener is extended to vessels having varying cross-section, including divergent or convergent conical vessels. The purpose

  18. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and Bubbles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and thermal structure in glass melting furnaces with a throat. The effects of the following parameters This is a second part of a study concerned with the three-dimensional natural circulation in glass melting furnaces

  19. 1. Batch reaction experiment Cu, Ni and Zn show increased concentrations with the addition of CO2,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capacity by pressure relief, or from CO2-Enhanced Oil Recovery. Currently, produced waters from oil and gas sandstone shows that total concen- trations of the eight metals of interest are low ( 30 g/g), with leached%) are also low. Figure 2. Batch experiment metal concentrations through time for Captain, Cormorant

  20. VERIFICATION OF THE DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY'S (DWPF) PROCESS DIGESTION METHOD FOR THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Click, D.; Edwards, T.; Jones, M.; Wiedenman, B.

    2011-03-14

    For each sludge batch that is processed in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performs confirmation of the applicability of the digestion method to be used by the DWPF lab for elemental analysis of Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) receipt samples and SRAT product process control samples. DWPF SRAT samples are typically dissolved using a room temperature HF-HNO{sub 3} acid dissolution (i.e., DWPF Cold Chem Method, see DWPF Procedure SW4-15.201) and then analyzed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). This report contains the results and comparison of data generated from performing the Aqua Regia (AR), Sodium peroxide/Hydroxide Fusion (PF) and DWPF Cold Chem (CC) method digestions of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples. The SB7a SRAT Receipt and SB7a SRAT Product samples were prepared in the SRNL Shielded Cells, and the SRAT Receipt material is representative of the sludge that constituates the SB7a Batch or qualification composition. This is the sludge in Tank 51 that is to be transferred into Tank 40, which will contain the heel of Sludge Batch 6 (SB6), to form the Sb7a Blend composition.

  1. Pipeline and Batch Sharing in Grid Workloads Douglas Thain, John Bent, Andrea C. Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi H. Arpaci-Dusseau, and Miron Livny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi

    Pipeline and Batch Sharing in Grid Workloads Douglas Thain, John Bent, Andrea C. Arpaci Abstract We present a study of six batch-pipelined scientific workloads that are candidates for execution characterizes workloads composed of pipelines of sequential processes that use file storage for communication

  2. SJSU Information Support Services Run Batch Contracts for Temporary Faculty info-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date: (optional data that exists in the system for the temporary faculty will appear on the Contract Appointment letter/Terms. 2. Click Batch Contracts for T. Faculty. The Batch Process for TF Contract search page displays. 3

  3. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 4 MACROBATCH 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-05-30

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS)1 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to meet WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP)2 and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR)3. However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the previous contents of Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 3) and the sludge that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge from Tank 51 and Tank 40 defines Sludge Batch 4 (also referred to as Macrobatch 5 (MB5)). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Task Technical Request HLW/DWPF/TTR-2005-0034; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 4 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing4. Specifically, this report details results from performing, in part, Subtask 3 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Technical Task and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2006-00310, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2006-00458, Rev. 16. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) (Macro Batch 5 (MB5)), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-nine radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB4 (MB5) as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 29 reportable nuclides are: Ni-59; Ni-63; Se-79; Sr-90; Zr-93; Nb-93m; Tc-99; Sn-126; Cs-137; Sm-151; U-233; U-234; Np-237; U-238; Pu-238; Pu-239; Pu-240; Am-241; Pu-241; Pu-242; Am-242m; Am-243; Cm-244; Cm-245; Cm-246; Cm-247; Bk-247; Cm-248; and Cf-251. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB4 (MB5), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the calendar year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes and other U isoto

  4. Uniform-burning matrix burner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohn, Mark S. (Golden, CO); Anselmo, Mark (Arvada, CO)

    2001-01-01

    Computer simulation was used in the development of an inward-burning, radial matrix gas burner and heat pipe heat exchanger. The burner and exchanger can be used to heat a Stirling engine on cloudy days when a solar dish, the normal source of heat, cannot be used. Geometrical requirements of the application forced the use of the inward burning approach, which presents difficulty in achieving a good flow distribution and air/fuel mixing. The present invention solved the problem by providing a plenum with just the right properties, which include good flow distribution and good air/fuel mixing with minimum residence time. CFD simulations were also used to help design the primary heat exchanger needed for this application which includes a plurality of pins emanating from the heat pipe. The system uses multiple inlet ports, an extended distance from the fuel inlet to the burner matrix, flow divider vanes, and a ring-shaped, porous grid to obtain a high-temperature uniform-heat radial burner. Ideal applications include dish/Stirling engines, steam reforming of hydrocarbons, glass working, and any process requiring high temperature heating of the outside surface of a cylindrical surface.

  5. THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A GLASS VARIABILITY STUDY WITH FRIT 418 AND FRIT 702

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2011-03-24

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is preparing to initiate processing of Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) in May 2011. To support qualification of SB7a, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to execute a variability study (VS) to assess the applicability of the current Product Composition Control System (PCCS) durability models for the Frit 418-SB7a compositional region of interest. The objective of this study was to demonstrate applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a compositional region of interest and acceptability of the SB7a glasses with respect to the Environmental Assessment (EA) glass in terms of durability as defined by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). To support programmatic objectives, twenty-eight SB7a glasses were selected based on the nominal sludge projections used to support the frit recommendation. Twenty-three of the SB7a VS glasses were based on the use of Frit 418, while 5 glasses were based on the use of Frit 702. Frit 702 was also identified as a viable candidate for SB7a, especially if SO{sub 4} concentrations are found to be higher than anticipated. Frit 702 has shown a higher SO{sub 4} retention capability as compared to Frit 418. With respect to acceptability, the PCT results of the SB7a-VS glasses are acceptable relative to the EA glass regardless of thermal history (quenched or canister centerline cooled) or compositional view (target or measured). More specifically, all of the SB7a glasses have normalized boron release values (NL [B]) less than 0.9 g/L as compared to the benchmark NL [B] value for EA of 16.695 g/L. With respect to the applicability of the current durability models to the SB7a VS compositional region of interest, all of the study glasses (based on target compositions) lie within the 95% confidence intervals of the model predictions. When model applicability is based on the measured compositions, all of the SB7a VS glasses are predictable with the exception of SB7aVS-02 and SB7aVS-06. Although the NL [B] values of these two glasses range from 0.66 to 0.73 g/L (considered very acceptable), the PCT responses are not considered predictable by the current durability models. The current durability models are conservative for these glasses since they are more durable than predicted by the models. These two glasses are extreme vertices (EV) based compositions coupled with Frit 418 at 36% WL and target the maximum Na{sub 2}O content (15.01 wt% Na{sub 2}O) of the SB7a VS glasses. Higher alkali glasses for which the model overpredicts the PCT response have been observed previously in the Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) Phase 1 VS and the Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) VS.

  6. The Neighbor Matrix: Generalizing the Degree Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan W. Roginski; Ralucca M. Gera; Erik C. Rye

    2015-10-19

    The newly introduced neighborhood matrix extends the power of adjacency and distance matrices to describe the topology of graphs. The adjacency matrix enumerates which pairs of vertices share an edge and it may be summarized by the degree sequence, a list of the adjacency matrix row sums. The distance matrix shows more information, namely the length of shortest paths between vertex pairs. We introduce and explore the neighborhood matrix, which we have found to be an analog to the distance matrix what the degree sequence is to the adjacency matrix. The neighbor matrix includes the degree sequence as its first column and the sequence of all other distances in the graph up to the graph's diameter, enumerating the number of neighbors each vertex has at every distance present in the graph. We prove this matrix to contain eleven oft-used graph statistics and topological descriptors. We also provide proofs of concept for two applications that show potential utility of the neighbor matrix in comparing graphs and identifying topologically significant vertices in a graph.

  7. Universality of Quark-Lepton Mass Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeshi Fukuyama; Hiroyuki Nishiura

    2013-01-22

    The recently observed lepton mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ of the MNS mixing matrix is well incorporated in a universal mixing hypothesis between quark and lepton sectors. This hypothesis asserts that, in the charged lepton diagonal base, all other mass matrices for up- and down-type quarks and light neutrinos are diagonalized by the same unitary matrix except for the phase elements. It is expressed as $V_{CKM}= U_{MNS}(\\delta^\\prime)^\\dagger P U_{MNS}(\\delta)$ for quark mixing matrix $V_{CKM}$ and lepton mixing matrix $U_{MNS}(\\delta)$ in the phenomenological level. Here $P$ is a diagonal phase mass matrix. $\\delta^\\prime$ is a slightly different phase parameter from the Dirac CP violating phase $\\delta=1.1\\pi$ (best fit) in the MNS lepton mixing matrix.

  8. Completing Pre-Pilot Tasks To Scale Up Biomass Fractionation Pretreatment Apparatus From Batch To Continuous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick Wingerson

    2004-12-15

    PureVision Technology, Inc. (PureVision) was the recipient of a $200,000 Invention and Innovations (I&I) grant from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) to complete prepilot tasks in order to scale up its patented biomass fractionation pretreatment apparatus from batch to continuous processing. The initial goal of the I&I program, as detailed in PureVision's original application to the DOE, was to develop the design criteria to build a small continuous biomass fractionation pilot apparatus utilizing a retrofitted extruder with a novel screw configuration to create multiple reaction zones, separated by dynamic plugs within the reaction chamber that support the continuous counter-flow of liquids and solids at elevated temperature and pressure. Although the ultimate results of this 27-month I&I program exceeded the initial expectations, some of the originally planned tasks were not completed due to a modification of direction in the program. PureVision achieved its primary milestone by establishing the design criteria for a continuous process development unit (PDU). In addition, PureVision was able to complete the procurement, assembly, and initiate shake down of the PDU at Western Research Institute (WRI) in Laramie, WY during August 2003 to February 2004. During the month of March 2004, PureVision and WRI performed initial testing of the continuous PDU at WRI.

  9. Batch Microreactor Studies of Lignin Depolymerization by Bases. 1. Alcohol Solvents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MILLER, JAMES E.; EVANS, LINDSEY; LITTLEWOLF, ALICIA; TRUDELL, DANIEL E.

    2002-05-01

    Biomass feedstocks contain roughly 10-30% lignin, a substance that can not be converted to fermentable sugars. Hence, most schemes for producing biofuels (ethanol) assume that the lignin coproduct will be utilized as boiler fuel to provide heat and power to the process. However, the chemical structure of lignin suggests that it will make an excellent high value fuel additive, if it can be broken down into smaller molecular units. From fiscal year 1997 through fiscal year 2001, Sandia National Laboratories was a participant in a cooperative effort with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the University of Utah to develop and scale a base catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) process for lignin conversion. SNL's primary role in the effort was to utilize rapidly heated batch microreactors to perform kinetic studies, examine the reaction chemistry, and to develop alternate catalyst systems for the BCD process. This report summarizes the work performed at Sandia during FY97 and FY98 with alcohol based systems. More recent work with aqueous based systems will be summarized in a second report.

  10. Method for automatically evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivezic, Nenad; Potok, Thomas E.

    2003-09-30

    A method for automatically evaluating a manufacturing technique comprises the steps of: receiving from a user manufacturing process step parameters characterizing a manufacturing process; accepting from the user a selection for an analysis of a particular lean manufacturing technique; automatically compiling process step data for each process step in the manufacturing process; automatically calculating process metrics from a summation of the compiled process step data for each process step; and, presenting the automatically calculated process metrics to the user. A method for evaluating a transition from a batch manufacturing technique to a lean manufacturing technique can comprise the steps of: collecting manufacturing process step characterization parameters; selecting a lean manufacturing technique for analysis; communicating the selected lean manufacturing technique and the manufacturing process step characterization parameters to an automatic manufacturing technique evaluation engine having a mathematical model for generating manufacturing technique evaluation data; and, using the lean manufacturing technique evaluation data to determine whether to transition from an existing manufacturing technique to the selected lean manufacturing technique.

  11. Determination of actinides in environmental samples with ICP-MS and automated batch preconcentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crain, J.S.; Smith, L.L.; Alvaradao, J.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, IL (United States)] [and others

    1994-12-31

    Thorium, uranium, and uranium progeny (e.g., {sup 226}Ra) were isolated from a variety of natural water matrices (well, spring, lake, river, and tap waters) using automated batch separation and a proprietary chelating resin. Minimal sample treatment was required in advance of the chemical separation procedure, i.e., samples were acidified, enriched isotopes were added and equilibrated, and, in certain cases, samples were filtered to remove biomass and other particulate matter. Major elemental constituents (e.g., Mg and Ca) were removed by the chemical separation. The isolated actinides and their detectable progeny were then determined using isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry combined with ultrasonic nebulization; flow injection was also used to improve sample utilization efficiency and increase the practical limit of preconcentration. Preconcentration factors of ca. 50 were achievable, thereby allowing determination of the isotopes TA interest at concentrations below 1 pg/L (i.e., 1 pCi/L of {sup 226}Ra). The internal and external reproducibility of these measurements will be described, as will their comparability to results obtained by radiochemical means. The authors will also discuss the utility of this procedure for environmental surveillance and the examination of uranium series disequilibria in natural aqueous systems.

  12. Matrix-valued Quantum Lattice Boltzmann Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian B. Mendl

    2015-02-23

    We devise a lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) for a matrix-valued quantum Boltzmann equation, with the classical Maxwell distribution replaced by Fermi-Dirac functions. To accommodate the spin density matrix, the distribution functions become 2 x 2 matrix-valued. From an analytic perspective, the efficient, commonly used BGK approximation of the collision operator is valid in the present setting. The numerical scheme could leverage the principles of LBM for simulating complex spin systems, with applications to spintronics.

  13. Commuting Matrix Solutions of PQCD Evolution Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehrdad Goshtasbpour; Seyed Ali Shafiei

    2013-03-16

    A method of obtaining parton distributions directly from data is revealed in this series. In the process, the first step would be developing appropriate matrix solutions of the evolution equations in $x$ space. A division into commuting and non-commuting matrix solutions has been made. Here, well-developed commuting matrix solutions are presented. Results for finite LO evolution match those of standard LO sets. There is a real potential of doing non-parametric data analysis.

  14. Optimal Online Learning with Matrix Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nie, Jiazhong

    2015-01-01

    Learning Problem: the Expert Setting 1.2 Learning Matrixwith Dense Instance Matrices . . . . . . . . .Optimal Online Learning with Matrix Parameters by Jiazhong

  15. Finding Nonoverlapping Substructures of a Sparse Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinar, Ali; Vassilevska, Virginia

    2005-08-11

    Many applications of scientific computing rely on computations on sparse matrices. The design of efficient implementations of sparse matrix kernels is crucial for the overall efficiency of these applications. Due to the high compute-to-memory ratio and irregular memory access patterns, the performance of sparse matrix kernels is often far away from the peak performance on a modern processor. Alternative data structures have been proposed, which split the original matrix A into A{sub d} and A{sub s}, so that A{sub d} contains all dense blocks of a specified size in the matrix, and A{sub s} contains the remaining entries. This enables the use of dense matrix kernels on the entries of A{sub d} producing better memory performance. In this work, we study the problem of finding a maximum number of nonoverlapping dense blocks in a sparse matrix, which is previously not studied in the sparse matrix community. We show that the maximum nonoverlapping dense blocks problem is NP-complete by using a reduction from the maximum independent set problem on cubic planar graphs. We also propose a 2/3-approximation algorithm that runs in linear time in the number of nonzeros in the matrix. This extended abstract focuses on our results for 2x2 dense blocks. However we show that our results can be generalized to arbitrary sized dense blocks, and many other oriented substructures, which can be exploited to improve the memory performance of sparse matrix operations.

  16. Emergent geometry from random multitrace matrix models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ydri; A. Rouag; K. Ramda

    2015-09-11

    A novel scenario for the emergence of geometry in random multitrace matrix models of a single hermitian matrix $M$ with unitary $U(N) $ invariance, i.e. without a kinetic term, is presented. In particular, the dimension of the emergent geometry is determined from the critical exponents of the disorder-to-uniform-ordered transition whereas the metric is determined from the Wigner semicircle law behavior of the eigenvalues distribution of the matrix $M$. If the uniform ordered phase is not sustained in the phase diagram then there is no emergent geometry in the multitrace matrix model.

  17. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; Shukla, Maulik; Thomason, III, James A.; Stevens, Rick; Vonstein, Veronika; Wattam, Alice R.; Xia, Fangfang

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offers a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.

  18. RASTtk: A modular and extensible implementation of the RAST algorithm for building custom annotation pipelines and annotating batches of genomes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brettin, Thomas; Davis, James J.; Disz, Terry; Edwards, Robert A.; Gerdes, Svetlana; Olsen, Gary J.; Olson, Robert; Overbeek, Ross; Parrello, Bruce; Pusch, Gordon D.; et al

    2015-02-10

    The RAST (Rapid Annotation using Subsystem Technology) annotation engine was built in 2008 to annotate bacterial and archaeal genomes. It works by offering a standard software pipeline for identifying genomic features (i.e., protein-encoding genes and RNA) and annotating their functions. Recently, in order to make RAST a more useful research tool and to keep pace with advancements in bioinformatics, it has become desirable to build a version of RAST that is both customizable and extensible. In this paper, we describe the RAST tool kit (RASTtk), a modular version of RAST that enables researchers to build custom annotation pipelines. RASTtk offersmore »a choice of software for identifying and annotating genomic features as well as the ability to add custom features to an annotation job. RASTtk also accommodates the batch submission of genomes and the ability to customize annotation protocols for batch submissions. This is the first major software restructuring of RAST since its inception.« less

  19. ENGI 9420 Lecture Notes 2 -Matrix Algebra Page 2.01 2. Matrix Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Glyn

    ENGI 9420 Lecture Notes 2 - Matrix Algebra Page 2.01 2. Matrix Algebra A linear system of m in this Chapter 2.01 Gaussian Elimination 2.02 Summary of Matrix Algebra 2.03 Determinants and Inverse Matrices 2 - ×- - - - There is now a "leading one" in the top left corner. #12;ENGI 9420 2.01 - Gaussian Elimination Page 2

  20. Large batch dimensional metrology demonstrated in the example of a LIGA fabricated spring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aigeldinger, Georg; Skala, Dawn M.; Ceremuga, Joseph T.

    2004-04-01

    Deep x-ray lithography in combination with electroforming is capable of producing high precision metal parts in small lot series. This study deals with a high aspect ratio structure with overall dimensions on the order of 10 mm x 7 mm x 1.5 mm, with the smallest line width being 150 {micro}m. The lateral deviation from the design is to be kept to a minimum, preferably below 5 {micro}m. To ensure adequate quality control, a semi-automated metrology technique has been established to measure all parts. While the paper will give a brief overview of all involved techniques, it focuses on the method to measure the top and bottom of the parts and the top of geometries following the process. The instrument used is a View Engineering Voyager V6x12 microscope, which is fully programmable. The microscope allows direct measurement of geometries but also is capable of saving all captured data as point clouds. These point clouds play a central role when evaluating part geometry. After measuring the part, the point cloud is compared to the computer aided design (CAD) contour of the part, using a commercially available software package. The challenge of proper edge lighting on a nickel alloy part is evaluated by varying lighting conditions systematically. Results of two conditions are presented along with a set of optimized parameters. With the introduced set of tools, process flow can be monitored by measuring geometries, e.g. linewidths in every step of the process line. An example for such analysis is given. After delivery of a large batch of parts, extensive numbers of datasets were available allowing the evaluation of the variation of part geometries. Discussed in detail is the deviation from part top to part bottom geometries indicating swelling of the PMMA mold in the electroplating bath.

  1. NEPHELINE FORMATION STUDY FOR SLUDGE BATCH 4: PHASE 3 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, K

    2006-05-01

    This Phase 3 study was undertaken to complement the previous phases of the nepheline formation studies1, 2 by continuing the investigation into the ability of the nepheline discriminator to predict the occurrence of nepheline crystallization in Sludge Batch 4 (SB4) glasses and into the impact of such phases on the durability of the SB4 glasses. The Phase 3 study had two primary objectives. The first was to continue to demonstrate the ability of the discriminator value to adequately predict the nepheline formation potential for specific glass systems of interest. The second was to generate additional data that have a high probability of supporting the SB4 variability study. To support these two objectives, sixteen glasses were selected based on the most recent SB4 compositional projection, Case 15C Blend 1.3 Four different frits were included, based on previous assessments of projected operating windows and melt rate,4, 5 with four WLs selected for each frit. Eight of these frit-sludge combinations covered WLs which tightly bound the nepheline discriminator value of 0.62, with the intent of refining this value to a level of confidence where it can be incorporated into offline administrative controls and/or the Process Composition Control System (PCCS) to support Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) acceptability decisions. The remaining eight frit-sludge combinations targeted lower WLs (35 and 40%) and were prepared and analyzed to contribute needed data to the ComPro database6 to support a potential variability study for SB4.

  2. IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

    IMPROVING SANDSTONE MATRIX STIMULATION OF OIL WELLS BY GAS PRECONDITIONING M. A. Aggour, M. Al, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia ABSTRACT Experience has shown that for sandstone formations, oil wells respond to matrix acidizing in a different manner as compared to gas wells. For oil wells, the improvement

  3. Transfer Matrix for Partially Quenched QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claude Bernard; Maarten Golterman

    2010-10-31

    We construct the transfer matrix for the ghost sector of partially quenched QCD. This transfer matrix is not hermitian, but we show that it is still bounded. We thus expect that all euclidean correlation functions will decay exponentially with distance (up to possible powers), and demonstrate that this is indeed the case for free ghost quarks.

  4. Renewal Credit Matrix CERTIFICATE RENEWAL PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Renewal Credit Matrix CERTIFICATE RENEWAL PLAN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OPTIONS FOR SOUTH CAROLINA are restricted to Options 1 and 2 in the matrix. CERTIFICATE RENEWAL OPTION ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA RENEWAL CREDITS to 120 renewal credits may be earned via this option during the five-year validity period

  5. HYGROTHERMAL AGING OF POLYIMIDE MATRIX COMPOSITE LAMINATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    HYGROTHERMAL AGING OF POLYIMIDE MATRIX COMPOSITE LAMINATES John A. Nairn and Man-Hee Han Materials-0560, USA SUMMARY: Two polyimide-matrix systems were subjected to a series of hygrothermal aging experiments at various temperatures and relative humidities. For each aging condition, we measured the microcracking

  6. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 5 (MACROBATCH 6)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-02-04

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that ''The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115''. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Tank 40 (Sludge Batch 4 (SB4)), Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51, and H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 6 (MB6). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities and determines the radionuclide activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to the radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 5 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, 5 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), WSRC-RP-2008-00137, Rev. 2 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), WSRC-RP-2008-00138, Rev. 2. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB5 (MB6), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, twenty-six radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB5 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The 26 reportable radionuclides are: Cl-36, Ni-59, Ni-63, Sr-90, Zr-93, Nb-93m, Tc-99, Sn-126, Cs-137, Sm-151, U-233, U-234, Np-237, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Am-241, Pu-241, Pu-242, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, Cm-246, Cf-251. Chlorine-36 is reported for the first time based on the upper bounding activity determined from the aqua regia digested sludge slurry. The WCP and WQR require that all of radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB5 (MB6), all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for four radionuclides: Se-79, Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time through the year 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to

  7. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Diprete, D.

    2011-06-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that 'The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115'. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) with H-Canyon Np transfers completed after the start of processing SB5, and Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 7 (MB7). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014; Rev. 2 entitled Sludge Batch 6 SRNL Shielded Cells Testing. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask III, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 7 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2009-00473, Rev. 15 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2009-00474, Rev. 1. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB6 (MB7), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy's (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 30 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB6 as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB6, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB6 to 32. The radionuclide measurements made for SB6 are the most extensive condu

  8. Determination Of Reportable Radionuclides For DWPF Sludge Batch 7B (Macrobatch 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; DiPrete, D. P.

    2013-08-22

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu-242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U-235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100-year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/refine

  9. DETERMINATION OF REPORTABLE RADIONUCLIDES FOR DWPF SLUDGE BATCH 7B (MACROBATCH 9)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, C. L.; Diprete, D. P.

    2014-05-01

    The Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) 1.2 require that “The Producer shall report the inventory of radionuclides (in Curies) that have half-lives longer than 10 years and that are, or will be, present in concentrations greater than 0.05 percent of the total inventory for each waste type indexed to the years 2015 and 3115”. As part of the strategy to comply with WAPS 1.2, the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) will report for each waste type, all radionuclides (with half-lives greater than 10 years) that have concentrations greater than 0.01 percent of the total inventory from time of production through the 1100 year period from 2015 through 3115. The initial listing of radionuclides to be included is based on the design-basis glass as identified in the Waste Form Compliance Plan (WCP) and Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR). However, it is required that this list be expanded if other radionuclides with half-lives greater than 10 years are identified that may meet the greater than 0.01% criterion for Curie content. Specification 1.6 of the WAPS, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards Reporting for High Level Waste (HLW), requires that the ratio by weights of the following uranium and plutonium isotopes be reported: U-233, U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, and Pu- 242. Therefore, the complete set of reportable radionuclides must also include this set of U and Pu isotopes. The DWPF is receiving radioactive sludge slurry from HLW Tank 40. The radioactive sludge slurry in Tank 40 is a blend of the heel from Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) and Sludge Batch 7b (SB7b) that was transferred to Tank 40 from Tank 51. The blend of sludge in Tank 40 is also referred to as Macrobatch 9 (MB9). This report develops the list of reportable radionuclides and associated activities as a function of time. The DWPF will use this list and the activities as one of the inputs for the development of the Production Records that relate to radionuclide inventory. This work was initiated through Technical Task Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2011-0004; Rev. 0 entitled Sludge Batch 7b Qualification Studies. Specifically, this report details results from performing Subtask II, Item 2 of the TTR and, in part, meets Deliverable 6 of the TTR. The work was performed following the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00247, Rev. 0 and Analytical Study Plan (ASP), SRNL-RP-2011-00248, Rev. 0. In order to determine the reportable radionuclides for SB7b (MB9), a list of radioisotopes that may meet the criteria as specified by the Department of Energy’s (DOE) WAPS was developed. All radioactive U- 235 fission products and all radioactive activation products that could be in the SRS HLW were considered. In addition, all U and Pu isotopes identified in WAPS 1.6 were included in the list. This list was then evaluated and some isotopes were excluded from the projection calculations. Based on measurements and analytical detection limits, 27 radionuclides have been identified as reportable for DWPF SB7b as specified by WAPS 1.2. The WCP and WQR require that all of the radionuclides present in the Design Basis glass be considered as the initial set of reportable radionuclides. For SB7b, all of the radionuclides in the Design Basis glass are reportable except for three radionuclides: Pd-107, Cs-135, and Th-230. At no time during the 1100- year period between 2015 and 3115 did any of these three radionuclides contribute to more than 0.01% of the radioactivity on a Curie basis. Two additional uranium isotopes (U-235 and -236) must be added to the list of reportable radionuclides in order to meet WAPS 1.6. All of the Pu isotopes (Pu-238, -239, -240, -241, and -242) and other U isotopes (U-233, -234, and -238) identified in WAPS 1.6 were already determined to be reportable according to WAPS 1.2 This brings the total number of reportable radionuclides for SB7b to 29. The radionuclide measurements made for SB7b are similar to those performed in the previous SB7a MB8 work. Some method development/ref

  10. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non-radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and characterization and durability testing (as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT)) of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This program was controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), and analyses were guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF. It should be noted that much of the data in this document has been published in interoffice memoranda. The intent of this technical report is bring all of the SB7a related data together in a single permanent record and to discuss the overall aspects of SB7a processing.

  11. Problem 13.2 From our output below, we can see that the batch factor is significant with p-value .004.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzban, Caren

    (x, y, pch = 1, cex = 2, col = "red", lwd = 2) 2 #12;STAT 421 Homework 10 -2 -1 0 1 2 -0.100.000.10 13$fitted.values[model$residuals > 0.05] y = model$residuals[model$residuals > 0.05] points(x, y, pch = 1, cex = 2, col = "red", lwd.05] points(x, y, pch = 1, cex = 2, col = "red", lwd = 2) 1 2 3 4 5 -0.100.000.10 Fitted Values vs batch Batch

  12. Density Matrix in Quantum Mechanics and Distinctness of Ensembles Having the Same Compressed Density Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui Lu Long; Yi-Fan Zhou; Jia-Qi Jin; Yang Sun; Hai-Woong Lee

    2006-04-20

    We clarify different definitions of the density matrix by proposing the use of different names, the full density matrix for a single-closed quantum system, the compressed density matrix for the averaged single molecule state from an ensemble of molecules, and the reduced density matrix for a part of an entangled quantum system, respectively. We show that ensembles with the same compressed density matrix can be physically distinguished by observing fluctuations of various observables. This is in contrast to a general belief that ensembles with the same compressed density matrix are identical. Explicit expression for the fluctuation of an observable in a specified ensemble is given. We have discussed the nature of nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computing. We show that the conclusion that there is no quantum entanglement in the current nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computing experiment is based on the unjustified belief that ensembles having the same compressed density matrix are identical physically. Related issues in quantum communication are also discussed.

  13. Computing matrix inversion with optical Cesare Soci,1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Computing matrix inversion with optical networks Kan Wu,1 Cesare Soci,1,* Perry Ping Shum,1 as an analog processor to calculate matrix inversion. A 3x3 matrix is inverted as a proof- ofN matrix, the overall solving time (including setting time of the matrix elements and calculation time

  14. Visual Matrix Clustering of Social Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; May, Richard A.

    2013-07-01

    The prevailing choices to graphically represent a social network in today’s literature are a node-link graph layout and an adjacency matrix. Both visualization techniques have unique strengths and weaknesses when applied to different domain applications. In this article, we focus our discussion on adjacency matrix and how to turn the matrix-based visualization technique from merely showing pairwise associations among network actors (or graph nodes) to depicting clusters of a social network. We also use node-link layouts to supplement the discussion.

  15. Matrix Suppression as a Guideline for Reliable Quantification of Peptides by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Myung Soo

    Matrix Suppression as a Guideline for Reliable Quantification of Peptides by Matrix-Assisted Laser, Daejeon 305-806, Korea ABSTRACT: We propose to divide matrix suppression in matrix- assisted laser can be accounted for by constructing the calibration curve in the form of peptide-to-matrix ion

  16. Cell matrix remodeling ability shown by image spatial correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiu, CL; Digman, MA; Gratton, E

    2013-01-01

    and myosin-dependent matrix deformation enables protease-H. Yu, L. Kass et al. , “Matrix crosslinking forces tumorWerb and J. R. Chin, “Extracellular matrix remodeling during

  17. Can one factor the classical adjoint of a generic matrix?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergman, George M

    2006-01-01

    ADJOINT OF A GENERIC MATRIX? GEORGE M. BERGMAN ? Departmentn a positive integer, X a generic n×n matrix over k (i.e. ,the matrix (x ij ) over a polynomial ring k[x ij ] in n 2

  18. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajan, VP; Zok, FW

    2014-01-01

    laminated 0/90 ceramic/matrix composite. J. Am. Ceram. Soc.unidirectional ceramic matrix composites. J. Am. Ceram. Soc.properties of 2-D ceramic matrix composites. J. Am. Ceram.

  19. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooney, Paul

    2010-01-01

    We present results for the matrix elements relevant for proton decay in Grand Unified Theories (GUTs), using two methods. In the indirect method, we rely on an effective field theory description of proton decay, where ...

  20. Overview: Tradi'onally matrix assisted laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overview: · Tradi'onally matrix assisted laser desorp'on/ioniza'on mass'des and organo-phosphate esters. ·NiO laser ioniza'on is a rapid and robust ioniza

  1. Integrated optic vector-matrix multiplier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-09-27

    A vector-matrix multiplier is disclosed which uses N different wavelengths of light that are modulated with amplitudes representing elements of an N.times.1 vector and combined to form an input wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) light stream. The input WDM light stream is split into N streamlets from which each wavelength of the light is individually coupled out and modulated for a second time using an input signal representing elements of an M.times.N matrix, and is then coupled into an output waveguide for each streamlet to form an output WDM light stream which is detected to generate a product of the vector and matrix. The vector-matrix multiplier can be formed as an integrated optical circuit using either waveguide amplitude modulators or ring resonator amplitude modulators.

  2. Transition Matrix Elements for Pion Photoproduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed E. Kelabi

    2007-03-20

    We have obtained the transition matrix elements for pion photoproduction by considering the number of gamma matrices involved. The approach based on the most general conditions of gauge invariance, current conservation and transversality. The approach is fairly consistent with literatures.

  3. JOBAID-VIEWING AN EMPLOYEE MATRIX (SUPERVISOR)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this job aid is to guide supervisor users through the step-by-step process of viewing an employee matrix within SuccessFactors Learning.

  4. Molecular Adhesion between Cartilage Extracellular Matrix Macromolecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojas, Fredrick P.

    In this study, we investigated the molecular adhesion between the major constituents of cartilage extracellular matrix, namely, the highly negatively charged proteoglycan aggrecan and the type II/IX/XI fibrillar collagen ...

  5. Quantum Chaos in Multi-Matrix Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Vinteler

    1995-07-17

    We propose a possible resolution for the problem of why the semicircular law is not observed, whilst the random matrix hypothesis describes well the fluctuation of energy spectra. We show in the random 2-matrix model that the interactions between the quantum subsystems alter the semicircular law of level density. We consider also other types of interactions in the chain- and star-multimatrix models. The connection with the Calogero-Sutherland models is briefly discussed.

  6. Nanophosphor composite scintillator with a liquid matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Burrell, Anthony Keiran (Los Alamos, NM); Bennett, Bryan L. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooke, David Wayne (Santa Fe, NM); Ott, Kevin Curtis (Los Alamos, NM); Bacrania, Minesh Kantilal (Los Alamos, NM); Del Sesto, Rico Emilio (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM); Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); McCleskey, Thomas Mark (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-03-16

    An improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid comprises nanophosphor particles in a liquid matrix. The nanophosphor particles are optionally surface modified with an organic ligand. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially surface charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during dispersion in a liquid scintillator matrix. The improved nanophosphor scintillator liquid may be used in any conventional liquid scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  7. Fuel cell with electrolyte matrix assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Arthur (West Orange, NJ); Pudick, Sheldon (Sayreville, NJ); Wang, Chiu L. (Edison, NJ)

    1988-01-01

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell employing a substantially immobilized electrolyte imbedded therein and having a laminated matrix assembly disposed between the electrodes of the cell for holding and distributing the electrolyte. The matrix assembly comprises a non-conducting fibrous material such as silicon carbide whiskers having a relatively large void-fraction and a layer of material having a relatively small void-fraction.

  8. Matrix-valued Quantum Lattice Boltzmann Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendl, Christian B

    2013-01-01

    We develop a numerical framework for the quantum analogue of the "classical" lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), with the Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution replaced by the Fermi-Dirac function. To accommodate the spin density matrix, the distribution functions become 2x2-matrix valued. We show that the efficient, commonly used BGK approximation of the collision operator is valid in the present setting. The framework could leverage the principles of LBM for simulating complex spin systems, with applications to spintronics.

  9. Introducing the target-matrix paradigm for mesh optimization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Introducing the target-matrix paradigm for mesh optimization via node-movement. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Introducing the target-matrix paradigm for...

  10. Introducing the Target-Matrix Paradigm for Mesh Optimization...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Introducing the Target-Matrix Paradigm for Mesh Optimization via Node-movement. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Introducing the Target-Matrix Paradigm for Mesh...

  11. Method of producing a hybrid matrix fiber composite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deteresa, Steven J. (Livermore, CA); Lyon, Richard E. (Absecon, NJ); Groves, Scott E. (Brentwood, CA)

    2006-03-28

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites comprised of two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  12. Report for Batch Leach Analyses on Sediments at 100-HR-3 Operable Unit, Boreholes C7620, C7621, C7622, C7623, C7626, C7627, C7628, C7629, C7630, and C7866. Revision 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.

    2012-04-25

    This is a revision to a previously released report. This revision contains additional analytical results for the sample with HEIS number B2H4X7. Between November 4, 2010 and October 26, 2011 sediment samples were received from 100-HR-3 Operable Unit for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL. Samples were received with a chain of custody (COC) and were analyzed according to the sample identification numbers supplied by the client. All Samples were refrigerated upon receipt until prepared for analysis. All samples were received with custody seals intact unless noted in the Case Narrative. Holding time is defined as the time from sample preparation to the time of analyses. The prescribed holding times were met for all analytes unless noted in the Case Narrative. All reported analytical results meet the requirements of the CAW or client specified SOW unless noted in the case narrative. Due to the requirements of the statement of work and sampling events in the field, the 28 day and the 48 hr requirements cannot be met. The statement of work requires samples to be selected at the completion of the borehole. It is not always possible to complete a borehole and have the samples shipped to the laboratory within the hold time requirements. Duplicate RPD for Uranium 238 (38.9%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 1E05003-DUP1 for ICPMS-Tc-U-WE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Duplicate RPD for Silver 107 (68.2%) was above the acceptance limit (35) in 2C06004-DUP1 for ICPMS-RCRA-AE The sample result is less than 10 times the detection limits. Duplicate recoveries are not applicable to this analyte. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (48.8%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 1E23001-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported. Matrix Spike Recovery for Chromium, Hexavalent (50.2%) was outside acceptance limits (75-125) in 2B22010-MS1 for Hexavalent Chromium/Soil. Potential Matrix interference. Sample results associated with this batch are below the EQL. There should be no impact to the data as reported.

  13. A Possible Relation between the Neutrino Mass Matrix and the Neutrino Mapping Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Friedberg; T. D. Lee

    2006-06-07

    we explore the consequences of assuming a simple 3-parameter form, first without T-violation, for the neutrino mass matrix M in the basis $\

  14. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  15. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to below the DWPF target with 750 g of steam per g of mercury. However, rheological properties did not improve and were above the design basis. Hydrogen generation rates did not exceed DWPF limits during the SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles. However, hydrogen generation during the SRAT cycle approached the DWPF limit. The glass fabricated with the Tank 51 SB6 SME product and Frit 418 was acceptable with respect to chemical durability as measured by the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The PCT response was also predictable by the current durability models of the DWPF Product Composition Control System (PCCS). It should be noted, however, that in the first attempt to make glass from the SME product, the contents of the fabrication crucible foamed over. This may be a result of the SME product's REDOX (Reduction/Oxidation - Fe{sup 2+}/{Sigma}Fe) of 0.08 (calculated from SME product analytical results). The following are recommendations drawn from this demonstration. In this demonstration, at the request of DWPF, SRNL caustic boiled the SRAT contents prior to acid addition to remove water (to increase solids concentration). During the nearly five hours of caustic boiling, 700 ppm of antifoam was required to control foaming. SRNL recommends that DWPF not caustic boil/concentrate SRAT receipt prior to acid addition until further studies can be performed to provide a better foaming control strategy or a new antifoam is developed for caustic boiling. Based on this set of runs and a recently completed demonstration with the SB6 Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (WAPS) sample, it is recommended that DWPF not add formic acid at the design addition rate of two gallons per minute for this sludge batch. A longer acid addition time appears to be helpful in allowing slower reaction of formic acid with the sludge and possibly decreases the chance of a foam over during acid addition.

  16. Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account the effects of matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical study on optimal Stirling engine regenerator matrix designs taking into account matrix design that improves the efficiency of a Stirling engine has been developed in a numerical study of the existing SM5 Stirling engine. A new, detailed, one-dimensional Stirling engine model that delivers results

  17. Matrix Functions and Weighted Centers for Semidefinite Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuzhong

    Matrix Functions and Weighted Centers for Semidefinite Programming Jan Brinkhuis Zhi-Quan Luo smooth matrix-valued functions, and for the class of matrix convex (or concave) functions first introduced by L¨owner and Kraus in the 1930s. For a matrix monotone function, we present formulas for its

  18. Study of the vacuum matrix element of products of parafields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. W. Greenberg; A. K. Mishra

    2009-09-30

    We study the vacuum matrix elements of products of parafields using graphical and combinatorial methods.

  19. Google matrix analysis of directed networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonardo Ermann; Klaus M. Frahm; Dima L. Shepelyansky

    2015-06-19

    In past ten years, modern societies developed enormous communication and social networks. Their classification and information retrieval processing become a formidable task for the society. Due to the rapid growth of World Wide Web, social and communication networks, new mathematical methods have been invented to characterize the properties of these networks on a more detailed and precise level. Various search engines are essentially using such methods. It is highly important to develop new tools to classify and rank enormous amount of network information in a way adapted to internal network structures and characteristics. This review describes the Google matrix analysis of directed complex networks demonstrating its efficiency on various examples including World Wide Web, Wikipedia, software architecture, world trade, social and citation networks, brain neural networks, DNA sequences and Ulam networks. The analytical and numerical matrix methods used in this analysis originate from the fields of Markov chains, quantum chaos and Random Matrix theory.

  20. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, C.M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1999-02-09

    A matrix is described for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 {micro}m to 20 {micro}m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling. 5 figs.

  1. Electrolyte matrix for molten carbonate fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Chao M. (Danbury, CT); Yuh, Chao-Yi (New Milford, CT)

    1999-01-01

    A matrix for a carbonate electrolyte including a support material and an additive constituent having a relatively low melting temperature and a relatively high coefficient of thermal expansion. The additive constituent is from 3 to 45 weight percent of the matrix and is formed from raw particles whose diameter is in a range of 0.1 .mu.m to 20 .mu.m and whose aspect ratio is in a range of 1 to 50. High energy intensive milling is used to mix the support material and additive constituent during matrix formation. Also disclosed is the use of a further additive constituent comprising an alkaline earth containing material. The further additive is mixed with the support material using high energy intensive milling.

  2. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhan, T. R. Chui, S. T.

    2014-04-14

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures.

  3. Parallel implementation of sparse matrix solvers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pujari, Sushant Kumar

    1992-01-01

    is an upper triangular matrix Ii. The backward substitution step consists of inverting the matrix U such that we obtain z = U-'La. The computations are performed using a finite precision length storage for numbers, round-off errors are introduced. In order...'orks, where each computing element executes its own programmed seq?e?ce of instructions, and can function indcpe?de?tly. nCI BL' computing elements feature a high speed hardwarr ?message routing?nii. This tccloiiq?e 18 reduces communication overhead...

  4. More on Rotations as Spin Matrix Polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas L. Curtright

    2015-07-11

    Any nonsingular function of spin j matrices always reduces to a matrix polynomial of order 2j. The challenge is to find a convenient form for the coefficients of the matrix polynomial. The theory of biorthogonal systems is a useful framework to meet this challenge. Central factorial numbers play a key role in the theoretical development. Explicit polynomial coefficients for rotations expressed either as exponentials or as rational Cayley transforms are considered here. Structural features of the results are discussed and compared, and large j limits of the coefficients are examined.

  5. Polymeric matrix materials for infrared metamaterials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dirk, Shawn M; Rasberry, Roger D; Rahimian, Kamyar

    2014-04-22

    A polymeric matrix material exhibits low loss at optical frequencies and facilitates the fabrication of all-dielectric metamaterials. The low-loss polymeric matrix material can be synthesized by providing an unsaturated polymer, comprising double or triple bonds; partially hydrogenating the unsaturated polymer; depositing a film of the partially hydrogenated polymer and a crosslinker on a substrate; and photopatterning the film by exposing the film to ultraviolet light through a patterning mask, thereby cross-linking at least some of the remaining unsaturated groups of the partially hydrogenated polymer in the exposed portions.

  6. Determinant Formulas for Matrix Model Free Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Vasiliev

    2005-07-11

    The paper contains a new non-perturbative representation for subleading contribution to the free energy of multicut solution for hermitian matrix model. This representation is a generalisation of the formula, proposed by Klemm, Marino and Theisen for two cut solution, which was obtained by comparing the cubic matrix model with the topological B-model on the local Calabi-Yau geometry $\\hat {II}$ and was checked perturbatively. In this paper we give a direct proof of their formula and generalise it to the general multicut solution.

  7. Matrix kernels for measures on partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eugene Strahov

    2008-09-10

    We consider the problem of computation of the correlation functions for the z-measures with the deformation (Jack) parameters 2 or 1/2. Such measures on partitions are originated from the representation theory of the infinite symmetric group, and in many ways are similar to the ensembles of Random Matrix Theory of $\\beta=4$ or $\\beta=1$ symmetry types. For a certain class of such measures we show that correlation functions can be represented as Pfaffians including $2\\times 2$ matrix valued kernels, and compute these kernels explicitly. We also give contour integral representations for correlation kernels of closely connected measures on partitions.

  8. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kekäläinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  9. Ejection of matrix-polymer clusters in matrix-assisted laser evaporation: Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Ejection of matrix-polymer clusters in matrix-assisted laser evaporation: Coarse-grained molecular, as related to the matrix-assisted laser evaporation (MAPLE) technique for polymer film deposition. Coarse- grained description of molecular matrix and polymer molecules is used in the model, allowing for large

  10. SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 6 (MACROBATCH 7) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03472

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-01-23

    In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel performed characterization analyses on the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03472. This report summarizes results of the characterization, which indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 6 (Macrobatch 7) Pour Stream Glass Samples,' SRNL-STI-2011-00555.

  11. SUMMARY REPORT FOR THE ANALYSIS OF THE SLUDGE BATCH 7A (MACROBATCH 8) DWPF POUR STREAM GLASS SAMPLE FOR CANISTER S03619

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.

    2012-05-01

    In order to comply with the Waste Acceptance Specifications in Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8), Savannah River National Laboratory personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream glass sample collected while filling canister S03619. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides, and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass. Results and further details are documented in 'Analysis of DWPF Sludge Batch 7a (Macrobatch 8) Pour Stream Samples,' SRNL-STI-2012-00017.

  12. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, AND 3 OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-07-29

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, and 3 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  13. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 1, 2, 3, AND 1X OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-09-03

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain rodded fuel assemblies from batches 1, 2, 3, and 1X of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for Commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A rodded assembly is one that contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) for some period of time during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H calculated isotopic compositions of depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison for each fuel assembly to be used in subsequent CRC reactivity calculations containing the fuel assemblies.

  14. CRC DEPLETION CALCULATIONS FOR THE NON-RODDED ASSEMBLIES IN BATCHES 4 AND 5 OF CRYSTAL RIVER UNIT 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth D. Wright

    1997-07-30

    The purpose of this design analysis is to document the SAS2H depletion calculations of certain non-rodded fuel assemblies from batches 4 and 5 of the Crystal River Unit 3 pressurized water reactor (PWR) that are required for commercial Reactor Critical (CRC) evaluations to support the development of the disposal criticality methodology. A non-rodded assembly is one which never contains a control rod assembly (CRA) or an axial power shaping rod assembly (APSRA) during its irradiation history. The objective of this analysis is to provide SAS2H generated isotopic compositions for each fuel assembly's depleted fuel and depleted burnable poison materials. These SAS2H generated isotopic compositions are acceptable for use in CRC benchmark reactivity calculations containing the various fuel assemblies.

  15. The Matrix Template Library: Generic Components for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumsdaine, Andrew

    The Matrix Template Library: Generic Components for High Performance Scientific Computing Jeremy G: (219) 631­9260 1 Introduction The Standard Template Library (STL) was released in 1995 and adopted by the tremendous success of the STL for general­purpose programming. What was not so obvious at the time, however

  16. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johan Alwall; Ayres Freitas; Olivier Mattelaer

    2009-10-16

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM.

  17. Combining QCD Matrix Elements and Parton Showers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. Webber

    2000-05-04

    A new method for combining QCD matrix elements and parton showers in Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic final states is outlined. The aim is to provide at least a leading-order description of all hard multi-jet configurations together with jet fragmentation to next-to-leading logarithmic accuracy, while avoiding the most serious problems of double counting.

  18. Symmetrical parametrizations of the lepton mixing matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodejohann, W. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Postfach 103980, 69029 Heidelberg (Germany); Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apt 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2011-10-01

    Advantages of the original symmetrical form of the parametrization of the lepton mixing matrix are discussed. It provides a conceptually more transparent description of neutrino oscillations and lepton number violating processes like neutrinoless double beta decay, clarifying the significance of Dirac and Majorana phases. It is also ideal for parametrizing scenarios with light sterile neutrinos.

  19. Classical Solutions in the BMN Matrix Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Arnlind; Jens Hoppe

    2003-12-15

    Several reductions of the bosonic BMN matrix model equations to ordinary point particle Hamiltonian dynamics in the plane (or R^3) are given - as well as a few explicit solutions (some of which, as N->infinity, correspond to membranes rotating with constant angular velocity, others to higher dimensional objects).

  20. Matrix product states for quantum metrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcin Jarzyna; Rafal Demkowicz-Dobrzanski

    2013-06-15

    We demonstrate that the optimal states in lossy quantum interferometry may be efficiently simulated using low rank matrix product states. We argue that this should be expected in all realistic quantum metrological protocols with uncorrelated noise and is related to the elusive nature of the Heisenberg precision scaling in presence of decoherence.

  1. Polymer matrix electroluminescent materials and devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marrocco, III, Matthew L. (Fontana, CA); Motamedi, Farshad J. (Claremont, CA); Abdelrazzaq, Feras Bashir (Covina, CA); Abdelrazzaq, legal representative, Bashir Twfiq (Aman, JO)

    2012-06-26

    Photoluminescent and electroluminescent compositions are provided which comprise a matrix comprising aromatic repeat units covalently coordinated to a phosphorescent or luminescent metal ion or metal ion complexes. Methods for producing such compositions, and the electroluminescent devices formed therefrom, are also disclosed.

  2. Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    June 2013 Human Resources Security Access Matrix Function Training Course Required Class Mode Training Course Prerequisite Security Access Form Required Contact for Additional Information Complete Electronic I-9 Forms REC001: I-9 /E-Verify Web Training OR Online OR None Electronic I-9 Security Access Form

  3. Emergent 4D Gravity from Matrix Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harold Steinacker

    2007-12-19

    Recent progress in the understanding of gravity on noncommutative spaces is discussed. A gravity theory naturally emerges from matrix models of noncommutative gauge theory. The effective metric depends on the dynamical Poisson structure, absorbing the degrees of freedom of the would-be U(1) gauge field. The gravity action is induced upon quantization.

  4. Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

    2013-05-01

    The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

  5. Effects of Matrix Orientifolding to Two-Loop Effective Action of Bosonic IIB Matrix Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reiji Yoshioka

    2010-09-09

    We study the spacetime structures which are described by the IIB matrix model with orientifolding. Matrix orientifolding that preserves supersymmetries yields the mirror image point with respect to a four-dimensional plane for each spacetime point that corresponds to the eigenvalue of the bosonic matrix. In order to consider the upper bound on the distance between two eigenvalues in this model, we calculate the effective action for the eigenvalues up to two-loop. The eigenvalues distribute in a tubular region around the four-dimensional plane.

  6. Evaluation of Concepts for Mulitiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael A. Pope; Hans D. Gougar; John M. Ryskamp

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Originally operated primarily in support of the Offcie of Naval Reactors (NR), the mission has gradually expanded to cater to other customers, such as the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), private industry, and universities. Unforeseen circumstances may lead to the decommissioning of ATR, thus leaving the U.S. Government without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. This work can be viewed as an update to a project from the 1990’s called the Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR). In FY 2012, a survey of anticipated customer needs was performed, followed by analysis of the original BATR concepts with fuel changed to low-enriched uranium. Departing from these original BATR designs, four concepts were identified for further analysis in FY2013. The project informally adopted the acronym MATRIX (Multiple-Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation eXperiments). This report discusses analysis of the four MATRIX concepts along with a number of variations on these main concepts. Designs were evaluated based on their satisfaction of anticipated customer requirements and the “Cylindrical” variant was selected for further analysis of options. This downselection should be considered preliminary and the backup alternatives should include the other three main designs. The baseline Cylindrical MATRIX design is expected to be capable of higher burnup than the ATR (or longer cycle length given a particular batch scheme). The volume of test space in IPTs is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. In addition to the IPTs, the Cylindrical MATRIX concept features test spaces at the centers of fuel assemblies where very high fast flux can be achieved. This magnitude of fast flux is similar to that achieved in the ATR A-positions, however, the available volume having these conditions is greater in the MATRIX design than in the ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the Cylindrical MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this statement must be qualified by acknowledging that this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design matures. Also, some of the requirements were not strictly met, but are believed to be achievable once features to be added later are designed.

  7. On the Unification of Random Matrix Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupert A Small

    2015-03-31

    A new method involving particle diagrams is introduced and developed into a rigorous framework for carrying out embedded random matrix calculations. Using particle diagrams and the attendant methodology including loop counting it becomes possible to calculate the fourth, sixth and eighth moments of embedded ensembles in a straightforward way. The method, which will be called the method of particle diagrams, proves useful firstly by providing a means of classifying the components of moments into particle paths, or loops, and secondly by giving a simple algorithm for calculating the magnitude of combinatorial expressions prior to calculating them explicitly. By confining calculations to the limit case $m \\ll l\\to\\infty$ this in many cases provides a sufficient excuse not to calculate certain terms at all, since it can be foretold using the method of particle diagrams that they will not survive in this asymptotic regime. Applying the method of particle diagrams washes out a great deal of the complexity intrinsic to the problem, with sufficient mathematical structure remaining to yield limiting statistics for the unified phase space of random matrix theories. Finally, since the unified form of random matrix theory is essentially the set of all randomised k-body potentials, it should be no surprise that the early statistics calculated for the unified random matrix theories in some instances resemble the statistics currently being discovered for quantum spin hypergraphs and other randomised potentials on graphs [HMH05,ES14,KLW14]. This is just the beginning for studies into the field of unified random matrix theories, or embedded ensembles, and the applicability of the method of particle diagrams to a wide range of questions as well as to the more exotic symmetry classes, such as the symplectic ensembles, is still an area of open-ended research.

  8. High-frequency matrix converter with square wave input

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Joseph Alexander; Balda, Juan Carlos

    2015-03-31

    A device for producing an alternating current output voltage from a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage comprising, high-frequency, square-wave input a matrix converter and a control system. The matrix converter comprises a plurality of electrical switches. The high-frequency input and the matrix converter are electrically connected to each other. The control system is connected to each switch of the matrix converter. The control system is electrically connected to the input of the matrix converter. The control system is configured to operate each electrical switch of the matrix converter converting a high-frequency, square-wave input voltage across the first input port of the matrix converter and the second input port of the matrix converter to an alternating current output voltage at the output of the matrix converter.

  9. SJSU Information Support Services Run Batch Contracts for Temporary TAs and GAs info-support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    -support@sjsu.edu, 408-924-1530 Page 4 The TF Batch Contract page displays. 5. Term: Use the lookup button to search the appropriate term. 6. Due Date: (Optional.) Enter due date. 7. Dean's Name: Enter your Dean's name. 8. Enter letter/Terms and Conditions page. This section demonstrates how to generate and print the teaching

  10. Automation of the matrix element reweighting method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Artoisenet; V. Lemaître; F. Maltoni; O. Mattelaer

    2011-02-01

    Matrix element reweighting is a powerful experimental technique widely employed to maximize the amount of information that can be extracted from a collider data set. We present a procedure that allows to automatically evaluate the weights for any process of interest in the standard model and beyond. Given the initial, intermediate and final state particles, and the transfer functions for the final physics objects, such as leptons, jets, missing transverse energy, our algorithm creates a phase-space mapping designed to efficiently perform the integration of the squared matrix element and the transfer functions. The implementation builds up on MadGraph, it is completely automatized and publicly available. A few sample applications are presented that show the capabilities of the code and illustrate the possibilities for new studies that such an approach opens up.

  11. Fermi matrix element with isospin breaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. M. Guichon; A. W. Thomas; K. Saito

    2011-01-12

    Prompted by the level of accuracy now being achieved in tests of the unitarity of the CKM matrix, we consider the possible modification of the Fermi matrix element for the $\\beta$-decay of a neutron, including possible in-medium and isospin violating corrections. While the nuclear modifications lead to very small corrections once the Behrends-Sirlin-Ademollo-Gatto theorem is respected, the effect of the $u-d$ mass difference on the conclusion concerning $V_{ud}$ is no longer insignificant. Indeed, we suggest that the correction to the value of $|V_{ud}|^2 \\, + \\, |V_{us}|^2 \\, + \\, |V_{ub}|^2$ is at the level of $10^{-4}$.

  12. The Super Period Matrix With Ramond Punctures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward Witten

    2015-01-11

    We generalize the super period matrix of a super Riemann surface to the case that Ramond punctures are present. For a super Riemann surface of genus g with 2r Ramond punctures, we define, modulo certain choices that generalize those in the classical theory (and assuming a certain generic condition is satisfied), a g|r x g|r period matrix that is symmetric in the Z_2-graded sense. As an application, we analyze the genus 2 vacuum amplitude in string theory compactifications to four dimensions that are supersymmetric at tree level. We find an explanation for a result that has been found in orbifold examples in explicit computations by D'Hoker and Phong: with their integration procedure, the genus 2 vacuum amplitude always vanishes "pointwise" after summing over spin structures, and hence is given entirely by a boundary contribution.

  13. Nanophosphor composite scintillators comprising a polymer matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muenchausen, Ross Edward (Los Alamos, NM); Mckigney, Edward Allen (Los Alamos, NM); Gilbertson, Robert David (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-11-16

    An improved nanophosphor composite comprises surface modified nanophosphor particles in a solid matrix. The nanophosphor particle surface is modified with an organic ligand, or by covalently bonding a polymeric or polymeric precursor material. The surface modified nanophosphor particle is essentially charge neutral, thereby preventing agglomeration of the nanophosphor particles during formation of the composite material. The improved nanophosphor composite may be used in any conventional scintillator application, including in a radiation detector.

  14. Random matrix ensembles associated with Lax matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Bogomolny; O. Giraud; C. Schmit

    2009-04-30

    A method to generate new classes of random matrix ensembles is proposed. Random matrices from these ensembles are Lax matrices of classically integrable systems with a certain distribution of momenta and coordinates. The existence of an integrable structure permits to calculate the joint distribution of eigenvalues for these matrices analytically. Spectral statistics of these ensembles are quite unusual and in many cases give rigorously new examples of intermediate statistics.

  15. Matrix Product States and Quantum Phase Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Heshami; S. Raeisi

    2009-09-16

    We have developed a new approach based on matrix product representations of ground states to study Quantum Phase Transitions (QPT). As confirmation of the power of our approach we have analytically analyzed the XXZ spin-one chain with uniaxial single-ion-type anisotropy and our results compare favourably with previous numerical studies. In addition, our description lets to know which part of parameters space of the Hamiltonian is most likely to be exactly solvable.

  16. Graphite matrix materials for nuclear waste isolation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, W.C.

    1981-06-01

    At low temperatures, graphites are chemically inert to all but the strongest oxidizing agents. The raw materials from which artificial graphites are produced are plentiful and inexpensive. Morover, the physical properties of artificial graphites can be varied over a very wide range by the choice of raw materials and manufacturing processes. Manufacturing processes are reviewed herein, with primary emphasis on those processes which might be used to produce a graphite matrix for the waste forms. The approach, recommended herein, involves the low-temperature compaction of a finely ground powder produced from graphitized petroleum coke. The resultant compacts should have fairly good strength, low permeability to both liquids and gases, and anisotropic physical properties. In particular, the anisotropy of the thermal expansion coefficients and the thermal conductivity should be advantageous for this application. With two possible exceptions, the graphite matrix appears to be superior to the metal alloy matrices which have been recommended in prior studies. The two possible exceptions are the requirements on strength and permeability; both requirements will be strongly influenced by the containment design, including the choice of materials and the waste form, of the multibarrier package. Various methods for increasing the strength, and for decreasing the permeability of the matrix, are reviewed and discussed in the sections in Incorporation of Other Materials and Elimination of Porosity. However, it would be premature to recommend a particular process until the overall multi-barrier design is better defined. It is recommended that increased emphasis be placed on further development of the low-temperature compacted graphite matrix concept.

  17. Model Quality Control Matrix Tools for Defining Commissioning Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakahara, N.; Onojima, H.; Kamitani, K.

    2004-01-01

    to computerized documents, URLs or edocuments, URLs or e--mail addresses. mail addresses. Structure of MQC Matrix continued Structure of MQC Matrix continued Operation of MQC Two functions of MQC tool. ?One is the organized database management of commissioning...

  18. Automation of Nested Matrix and Derivative Operations Robert Kalaba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Automation of Nested Matrix and Derivative Operations Robert Kalaba Departments of Electrical of special functions a=x, b=y, c = ab, (4) a=log(c), z=a+d. #12;Automation of Matrix Derivative Operations

  19. Notes on Mayer Expansions and Matrix Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Emile Bourgine

    2014-02-03

    Mayer cluster expansion is an important tool in statistical physics to evaluate grand canonical partition functions. It has recently been applied to the Nekrasov instanton partition function of $\\mathcal{N}=2$ 4d gauge theories. The associated canonical model involves coupled integrations that take the form of a generalized matrix model. It can be studied with the standard techniques of matrix models, in particular collective field theory and loop equations. In the first part of these notes, we explain how the results of collective field theory can be derived from the cluster expansion. The equalities between free energies at first orders is explained by the discrete Laplace transform relating canonical and grand canonical models. In a second part, we study the canonical loop equations and associate them to similar relations on the grand canonical side. It leads to relate the multi-point densities, fundamental objects of the matrix model, to the generating functions of multi-rooted clusters. Finally, a method is proposed to derive loop equations directly on the grand canonical model.

  20. Gas chromatography/matrix-isolation apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reedy, Gerald T. (411 Francis St., Bourbonnais, IL 60914)

    1986-01-01

    A gas-sample collection device provides matrix isolation of individual gas bands from a gas chromatographic separation and for the spectroscopic analysis of the individual sample bands. The device includes a vacuum chamber containing a rotatably supported, specular carousel having at least one reflecting surface for holding a sample deposited thereon. A gas inlet is provided for depositing a mixture of sample and matrix material on the reflecting surface which is maintained at a sufficiently low temperature to cause solidification. A first parabolic mirror directs an incident beam of electromagnetic radiation, such as in the infrared (IR) spectrum, from a source onto the sample/matrix mixture while a second parabolic mirror directs a second beam of electromagnetic radiation reflected by the specular surface to an IR spectrometer for determining the absorption spectra of the sample material deposited on the reflecting surface. The pair of off-axis parabolic mirrors having a common focal point are positioned outside of the vacuum chamber and may be displaced in combination for improved beam positioning and alignment. The carousel is provided with an aperture for each reflecting surface to facilitate accurate positioning of the incident beam relative to the gas-samples under analysis. Improved gas-sample deposition is insured by the use of a long focal length stereomicroscope positioned outside of the vacuum chamber for monitoring sample formation through a window, while the sample collector is positioned outside of the zone bounded by the incident and reflected electromagnetic beams for improved sample access and monitoring.

  1. on the complexity of some hierarchical structured matrix algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-17

    matrix algorithms, in terms of hierarchically semiseparable (HSS) matrices. ... We perform detailed complexity analysis for some typical HSS algorithms, with.

  2. Length-Dependence of Electron Transfer Coupling Matrix in Polyene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    matrix element, VDA, for 1,3-trans- butadiene molecule calculated with the KT approach shows excellent

  3. A Matrix Characterization for MELL Heiko Mantel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreitz, Christoph

    A Matrix Characterization for MELL Heiko Mantel1 Christoph Kreitz2 1 German Research Center, LNAI 1489, pp. 169­183, c Springer Verlag, 1998. Abstract. We present a matrix characterization elaborate a methodology for proving matrix characterizations correct and complete. Our characterization

  4. MULTIPLICITY OF RESONANCES EQUALS MULTIPLICITY OF THE SCATTERING MATRIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ); #31;(x) = ~ #31;(x) = 1; ~ #31;#31; = #31;: ? Supported in part by ACI : M#19;ethodes math#19 matrix is de#12;ned just as in the usual potential scattering [4], [3]. We denote by S(#21;) the standard (relative) scattering matrix. The standard scattering matrix S(#21;) continues meromorphically in #21; from

  5. Polarization-sensitive Mueller-matrix optical coherence tomography 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Shuliang

    2004-09-30

    -of-polarization (DOP) of the backscattered light by OCT remains unity-a conclusion that validated the use of Jones calculus in OCT. A multi-channel Mueller-matrix OCT system was then built to measure the Jones-matrix, which can be transformed into a Mueller matrix...

  6. Google matrix analysis of directed networks Leonardo Ermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Google matrix analysis of directed networks Leonardo Ermann Departamento de F´isica Te´orica, GIy network structures and characteristics. This review describes the Google matrix analysis of directed and Ulam networks. The analytical and numer- ical matrix methods used in this analysis originate from

  7. Google matrix analysis of DNA sequences Vivek Kandiah1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    1 Google matrix analysis of DNA sequences Vivek Kandiah1 , Dima L. Shepelyansky1, 1 Laboratoire de.quantware.ups-tlse.fr/dima Abstract For DNA sequences of various species we construct the Google matrix G of Markov tran- sitions between nearby words composed of several letters. The statistical distribution of matrix elements

  8. MATRIX TILE ANALYSIS Inmar Givoni, Vincent Cheung, Brendan J. Frey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    MATRIX TILE ANALYSIS Inmar Givoni, Vincent Cheung, Brendan J. Frey Probabilistic and Statistical Many tasks require finding groups of ele- ments in a matrix of numbers, symbols or class likelihoods, sparse matrix factor- ization and plaid analysis. These techniques are not appropriate when addition

  9. The matrix approach for abstract argumentation frameworks Claudette CAYROL,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Marco Antonio Alba

    The matrix approach for abstract argumentation frameworks Claudette CAYROL, Yuming XU IRIT Report- tion framework can be represented by a matrix, and the basic extensions (such as admissible, stable, complete) of an argumentation framework can be determined by sub-blocks of its matrix. In particular

  10. Matrix Power S-Box Construction Eligijus Sakalauskasa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Matrix Power S-Box Construction Eligijus Sakalauskasa and Kestutis Luksysb Department of Applied.Sakalauskas@ktu.lt b Kestutis.Luksys@ktu.lt Abstract The new symmetric cipher S-box construction based on matrix power function is presented. The matrix consisting of plain data bit strings is combined with three round key

  11. Kronecker Square Roots and The Block vec Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ignacio Ojeda

    2013-11-09

    Using the block vec matrix, I give a necessary and sufficient condition for factorization of a matrix into the Kronecker product of two other matrices. As a consequence, I obtain an elementary algorithmic procedure to decide whether a matrix has a square root for the Kronecker product.

  12. Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs Andrew P. Mullhaupt #3 if and only if A is triangular and AA #3; + BB #3; = I n , where I n is the identity matrix. Input normal and A is a matrix fraction, A = M 1 N , where M and N are triangular matrices of low bandwidth. For single input

  13. Google matrix analysis of directed networks Leonardo Ermann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Google matrix analysis of directed networks Leonardo Ermann Departamento de Física Teórica, GIy structures and characteristics. This review describes the Google matrix analysis of directed complex networks networks. The analytical and numerical matrix methods used in this analysis originate from the fields

  14. Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption of *Peptidesin Transmission Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    ~~~_ Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption of *Peptidesin Transmission Geometry Akos Vertes* Laszlo, Francc The possibility of performing matrix-assisted laser &sorption experiments in trknsmission geometry large molecules. Because of the clearlv demonstrated matrix-assisted laser ionization in a homogeneous

  15. Matrix Completion with Noisy Side Information Kai-Yang Chiang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Matrix Completion with Noisy Side Information Kai-Yang Chiang Cho-Jui Hsieh Inderjit S. Dhillon@ucdavis.edu Abstract We study the matrix completion problem with side information. Side information has been considered in several matrix completion applications, and has been em- pirically shown to be useful in many cases

  16. Matrix Padd Fractions George Labahn and Stan Cabay t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labahn, George

    Matrix Padd Fractions George Labahn and Stan Cabay t Department of Computing Science, University of Alberta Edmonton, Alberta, Canada TSG 2H1 , s~p~t~ in psrt v/t~s~c #~035 ABSTRACT For matrix power series with coefficients over a field, the notion of a matrix power series remainder sequence and its corresponding

  17. Matrix-Valued Filters as Convex Programs Martin Welk1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    Matrix-Valued Filters as Convex Programs Martin Welk1 , Florian Becker2 , Christoph Schn¨orr2@uni-mannheim.de http://www.cvgpr.uni-mannheim.de Abstract. Matrix-valued images gain increasing importance both for robust and efficient filters for such images. Recently, a median filter for matrix-valued images has been

  18. MATRIX RATIONAL INTERPOLATION WITH POLES AS INTERPOLATION POINTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labahn, George

    MATRIX RATIONAL INTERPOLATION WITH POLES AS INTERPOLATION POINTS M. VAN BAREL Department, we show the equivalence between matrix rational interpolation problems with poles as interpolation points and no-pole problems. This equivalence provides an effective method for computing matrix rational

  19. Matrix Operations on the TI-83 For the examples, we will consider the matrix 2 7 6 -7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClendon, David M.

    Matrix Operations on the TI-83 For the examples, we will consider the matrix 2 7 6 -7 -3 -5 -7 -2 -2 3 8 5 A. How to type in a matrix into the TI-83 Hit [MATRX]. You will see Use the right arrow matrices. If you want to put the matrix into [A], highlight "[A]" and hit [ENTER]; if you want to put

  20. The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid? to appear in C. Grau (ed) Philosophical Essays on the Matrix (Oxford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    ³The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid?² to appear in C. Grau (ed) Philosophical Essays://whatisthematrix.warnerbros.com/rl_cmp/phi.html The Twisted Matrix: Dream, Simulation or Hybrid1? 1. Ambivalence "The Matrix is a computer in a world of persisting, external, independent people, cities, cars and objects, and you yourself

  1. CONVEX AND SEMI-NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATIONS: DING, LI AND JORDAN 1 Convex and Semi-Nonnegative Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Michael I.

    CONVEX AND SEMI-NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATIONS: DING, LI AND JORDAN 1 Convex and Semi-Nonnegative Matrix Factorizations Chris Ding, Tao Li, and Michael I. Jordan Chris Ding is with the Department of California at Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. October 24, 2008 DRAFT #12;CONVEX AND SEMI-NONNEGATIVE MATRIX

  2. CONVEX AND SEMI-NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATIONS: DING, LI AND JORDAN 1 Convex and Semi-Nonnegative Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Chris

    CONVEX AND SEMI-NONNEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATIONS: DING, LI AND JORDAN 1 Convex and Semi-Nonnegative Matrix Factorizations Chris Ding, Tao Li, and Michael I. Jordan Chris Ding is with the Department of California at Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. November 5, 2008 DRAFT #12;CONVEX AND SEMI-NONNEGATIVE MATRIX

  3. FAST SPACE-VARYING CONVOLUTION IN STRAY LIGHT REDUCTION, FAST MATRIX VECTOR MULTIPLICATION USING THE SPARSE MATRIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FAST SPACE-VARYING CONVOLUTION IN STRAY LIGHT REDUCTION, FAST MATRIX VECTOR MULTIPLICATION USING THE SPARSE MATRIX TRANSFORM, AND ACTIVATION DETECTION IN FMRI DATA ANALYSIS A Dissertation Submitted motivated me to work on the extremely interesting and impactful problem of fast matrix vector multiplication

  4. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  5. A Study of Vandermonde-like Matrix Systems With Emphasis on Preconditioning and Krylov Matrix Connection.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saraswat, Jyoti

    2009-06-11

    ) is the spectral radius of AT A: 0.2 Definitions 0.2.1 Vandermonde Matrix. A classical (n+1) (n+1) Vandermonde matrix is defined as follows ?V = 2 66 66 66 64 1 x1 ::: xn1 1 x2 ::: xn2 ... ... ... ... 1 xn+1 ::: xnn+1 3 77 77 77 75 : Vandermonde matrices generally... m+1;1 i n+1 = 2 66 66 66 64 p0(x1) p1(x1) ::: pm(x1) p0(x2) p1(x2) ::: pm(x2) ... ... ::: ... p0(xn+1) p1(xn+1) ::: pm(xn+1) 3 77 77 77 75 = vk j 1 k n+1;1 j m+1 6 where p j is a polynomial of degree j. 0.2.3 Krylov Matrices. For a given matrix A2Rn...

  6. The Matrix of Unitarity Triangle Angles for Quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. F. Harrison; S. Dallison; W. G. Scott

    2009-10-18

    In the context of quark (as for lepton) mixing, we introduce the concept of the matrix of unitarity triangle angles $\\Phi$, emphasising that it carries equivalent information to the complex mixing matrix $V$ itself. The angle matrix $\\Phi$ has the added advantage, with respect to $V$, of being both basis-and phase-convention independent and consequently observable (indeed several $\\Phi$-matrix entries, eg. $\\Phi_{cs}=\\alpha$, $\\Phi_{us}=\\beta$ etc. are already long-studied as directly measurable/measured in $B$-physics experiments). We give complete translation formulae between the mixing-matrix and angle-matrix representations. We go on to consider briefly the present state of the experimental data on the full angle matrix and some of the prospects for the future, with reference to both the quark and lepton cases.

  7. Matrix Methods for Estimating the Coherence Functions from Estimates of the Cross-Spectral Density Matrix

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smallwood, D.O.

    1996-01-01

    It is shown that the usual method for estimating the coherence functions (ordinary, partial, and multiple) for a general multiple-input! multiple-output problem can be expressed as a modified form of Cholesky decomposition of the cross-spectral density matrix of the input and output records. The results can be equivalently obtained using singular value decomposition (SVD) of the cross-spectral density matrix. Using SVD suggests a new form of fractional coherence. The formulation as a SVD problem also suggests a way to order the inputs when a natural physical order of the inputs is absent.

  8. The Matrix Element Method and QCD Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Alwall; A. Freitas; O. Mattelaer

    2011-04-22

    The matrix element method (MEM) has been extensively used for the analysis of top-quark and W-boson physics at the Tevatron, but in general without dedicated treatment of initial state QCD radiation. At the LHC, the increased center of mass energy leads to a significant increase in the amount of QCD radiation, which makes it mandatory to carefully account for its effects. We here present several methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM, and apply them to mass determination in the presence of multiple invisible particles in the final state. We demonstrate significantly improved results compared to the standard treatment.

  9. Open quantum systems and Random Matrix Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Declan Mulhall

    2015-01-09

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with Random Matrix Theory. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the $\\Delta_3(L)$ statistic, width distribution and level spacing are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. A super-radiant transition is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and $\\Delta_3(L)$ statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  10. Measuring Sparticles with the Matrix Element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwall, Johan; /SLAC /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; Freitas, Ayres; /Pittsburgh U.; Mattelaer, Olivier; /INFN, Rome3 /Rome III U. /Louvain U.

    2012-04-10

    We apply the Matrix Element Method (MEM) to mass determination of squark pair production with direct decay to quarks and LSP at the LHC, showing that simultaneous mass determination of squarks and LSP is possible. We furthermore propose methods for inclusion of QCD radiation effects in the MEM. The goal of the LHC at CERN, scheduled to start this year, is to discover new physics through deviations from the Standard Model (SM) predictions. After discovery of deviations from the SM, the next step will be classification of the new physics. An important first goal in this process will be establishing a mass spectrum of the new particles. One of the most challenging scenarios is pair-production of new particles which decay to invisible massive particles, giving missing energy signals. Many methods have been proposed for mass determination in such scenarios (for a recent list of references, see e.g. [1]). In this proceeding, we report the first steps in applying the Matrix Element Method (MEM) in the context of supersymmetric scenarios giving missing energy signals. After a quick review of the MEM, we will focus on squark pair production, a process where other mass determination techniques have difficulties to simultaneously determine the LSP and squark masses. Finally, we will introduce methods to extend the range of validity of the MEM, by taking into account initial state radiation (ISR) in the method.

  11. Validity of the Effective Fisher matrix for parameter estimation analysis: Comparing to the analytic Fisher matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hee-Suk Cho; Chang-Hwan Lee

    2013-10-11

    The effective Fisher matrix method recently introduced by Cho et al. is a semi-analytic approach to the Fisher matrix, in which a local overlap surface is fitted by using a quadratic fitting function. Mathematically, the effective Fisher matrix should be consistent with the analytic one at the infinitesimal fitting scale. In this work, using the frequency-domain waveform (TaylorF2), we give brief comparison results between the effective and analytic Fisher matrices for several non-spinning binaries consisting of binary neutron stars with masses of (1.4, 1.4)M_sun, black hole-neutron star of (1.4, 10)M_sun, and binary black holes of (5, 5) and (10, 10)M_sun for a fixed signal to noise ratio (SNR=20) and show a good consistency between two methods. We also give a comparison result for an aligned-spin black hole-neutron star binary with a black hole spin of \\chi=1, where we define new mass parameters (Mc, \\eta^-1, \\chi^7/2) to find good fitting functions to the overlap surface. The effective Fisher matrix can also be computed by using the time-domain waveforms which are generally more accurate than frequency-domain waveform. We show comparison results between the frequency-domain and time-domain waveforms (TaylorT4) for both the non-spinning aligned-spin binaries.

  12. Integration of the Uncertainties of Anion and TOC Measurements into the Flammability Control Strategy for Sludge Batch 8 at the DWPF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T. B.

    2013-03-14

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with the Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) in the development and implementation of a flammability control strategy for DWPF’s melter operation during the processing of Sludge Batch 8 (SB8). SRNL’s support has been in response to technical task requests that have been made by SRR’s Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) organization. The flammability control strategy relies on measurements that are performed on Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) samples by the DWPF Laboratory. Measurements of nitrate, oxalate, formate, and total organic carbon (TOC) standards generated by the DWPF Laboratory are presented in this report, and an evaluation of the uncertainties of these measurements is provided. The impact of the uncertainties of these measurements on DWPF’s strategy for controlling melter flammability also is evaluated. The strategy includes monitoring each SME batch for its nitrate content and its TOC content relative to the nitrate content and relative to the antifoam additions made during the preparation of the SME batch. A linearized approach for monitoring the relationship between TOC and nitrate is developed, equations are provided that integrate the measurement uncertainties into the flammability control strategy, and sample calculations for these equations are shown to illustrate the impact of the uncertainties on the flammability control strategy.

  13. SLUDGE BATCH 5 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB5 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C; Ned Bibler, N; David Diprete, D

    2008-07-28

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Five (SB5) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Part of this SB5 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40 to complete the formation of SB5. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB4. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry taken on March 21, 2008. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by five washes, six decants, an addition of Pu/Be from Canyon Tank 16.4, and an addition of NaNO2. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Ta Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB5 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2008-0010. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task 2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task 5) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB5 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. Data presented in this report represents the measured or estimated radionuclide concentrations obtained from several standard and special analytical methods performed by Analytical Development (AD) personnel within SRNL. The method for I-129 measurement in sludge is described in detail. Most of these methods were performed on solutions resulting from the dissolutions of the slurry samples. Concentrations are given for twenty-nine radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 98% of the Tc-99 and 92% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

  14. SLUDGE BATCH 6 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB6 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bannochie, C.; Bibler, N.; Diprete, D.

    2010-05-21

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Six (SB6) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB6 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB5. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-09-110) taken on October 8, 2009. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. Under the direction of the Liquid Waste Organization it was then modified by eight washes, nine decants, an addition of Pu from Canyon Tank 16.3, and an addition of NaNO{sub 2}. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB6 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2009-0014. The work with this qualification sample is covered by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan and an Analytical Study Plan. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task II.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB6 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB6 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. The sample is the same as that on which the chemical composition was reported. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated. Results also indicate that 99% of the Tc-99 and at least 90% of the I-129 that could have been in this sludge batch have been removed by chemical processing steps in the SRS Canyons or Tank Farm.

  15. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R&D) for the DWPF.

  16. 3MATRIX and 3MOTIF: A Protein Structure Visualization System for Conserved Sequence Bennett, Steven P.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    Title 3MATRIX and 3MOTIF: A Protein Structure Visualization System for Conserved Sequence Motifs acids without additional study. In this work, we present 3MATRIX (http://3matrix.stanford.edu) and 3-like motif. Similarly, 3MATRIX accepts any position-specific scoring matrix, such as an eMATRIX

  17. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carney, S. E.; Brown, F. B.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

  18. Fabrication and Preliminary Evaluation of Metal Matrix Microencapsulated Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terrani, Kurt A [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    The metal matrix microencapsulated (M3) fuel concept for light water reactors (LWRs), consisting of coated fuel particles dispersed in a zirconium metal matrix, is introduced. Fabrication of M3 fuels by hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, or extrusion methodologies has been demonstrated over the temperature range 800-1050 C. Various types of coated fuel particles with outermost layers of pyrocarbon, SiC, ZrC, and TiN have been incorporated into the zirconium metal matrix. Mechanical particle-particle and chemical particle-matrix interactions have been observed during the preliminary characterization of as-fabricated M3 specimens. Irradiation of three M3 rodlets with surrogate coated fuel particles was carried out at mean rod temperature of 400 C to 4.6 dpa in the zirconium metal matrix. Due to absence of texture in the metal matrix no irradiation growth strain (<0.09%) was detected during the post-irradiation examination.

  19. Batch Strategies for Maximizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura BeaneCardwell,Production1358 ApprovedImportanceBassiu

  20. Batch Strategies for Maximizing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura BeaneCardwell,Production1358 ApprovedImportanceBassiut

  1. Submitting Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveAprilPhotonStructureStudents

  2. Batch Script Examples

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits & Inspections AuditsBarbara McClintock andBasics

  3. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence Example

  4. Example Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence ExampleExample

  5. Example batch scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvan Racah Evan Racah 1517546Has Evidence ExampleExample

  6. Running Interactive Batch Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni > The Energy MaterialsRooftop SolarRoyRun

  7. Parallel Batch Scripts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhanTheoreticalSecurity Complex3

  8. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, B.

    1988-04-22

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs. 11 figs.

  9. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  10. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B.; Morrison, Jay Alan

    2004-01-13

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composition comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of various dimensions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substrates are also provided.

  11. High temperature insulation for ceramic matrix composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Merrill, Gary B. (Monroeville, PA); Morrison, Jay Alan (Orlando, FL)

    2000-01-01

    A ceramic composition is provided to insulate ceramic matrix composites under high temperature, high heat flux environments. The composite comprises a plurality of hollow oxide-based spheres of varios dimentions, a phosphate binder, and at least one oxide filler powder, whereby the phosphate binder partially fills gaps between the spheres and the filler powders. The spheres are situated in the phosphate binder and the filler powders such that each sphere is in contact with at least one other sphere. The spheres may be any combination of Mullite spheres, Alumina spheres, or stabilized Zirconia spheres. The filler powder may be any combination of Alumina, Mullite, Ceria, or Hafnia. Preferably, the phosphate binder is Aluminum Ortho-Phosphate. A method of manufacturing the ceramic insulating composition and its application to CMC substates are also provided.

  12. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Matrix multiplication operations with...

  13. Computing Rational Solutions of Linear Matrix Inequalities Qingdong Guo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safey El Din, Mohab

    Computing Rational Solutions of Linear Matrix Inequalities Qingdong Guo Key Laboratory Institut Universitaire de France Mohab.Safey@lip6.fr Lihong Zhi Key Laboratory of Mathematics Mechanization

  14. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A Mechanisms...

  15. Topography of Extracellular Matrix Mediates Vascular Morphogenesis and Migration Speeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yi

    Topography of Extracellular Matrix Mediates Vascular Morphogenesis and Migration Speeds Amy L Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 1 Corresponding author. Address: Theoretical Division

  16. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods Citation Details In-Document Search...

  17. Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal Conductivity for Next-Generation Phosphor-Converted LED-based Solid State Lighting Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion...

  18. Gas generation matrix depletion quality assurance project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide the necessary expertise, experience, equipment and instrumentation, and management structure to: Conduct the matrix depletion experiments using simulated waste for quantifying matrix depletion effects; and Conduct experiments on 60 cylinders containing simulated TRU waste to determine the effects of matrix depletion on gas generation for transportation. All work for the Gas Generation Matrix Depletion (GGMD) experiment is performed according to the quality objectives established in the test plan and under this Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP).

  19. Optimization Online - Efficient high-precision dense matrix algebra ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Gunnels

    2008-11-10

    Nov 10, 2008 ... Efficient high-precision dense matrix algebra on parallel architectures for nonlinear discrete optimization. John Gunnels(gunnels ***at*** ...

  20. Representation-transparent Matrix Algorithms with Scalable Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, David Stephen

    Representation-transparent Matrix Algorithms with Scalable Performance Peter Gottschling Indiana been suspended since the next round of Moore's-law improvements will be delivered via CMPs. Programmers

  1. P-matrix and J-matrix approaches. Coulomb asymptotics in the harmonic oscillator representation of scattering theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Bang; A. I. Mazur; A. M. Shirokov; Yu. F. Smirnov; S. A. Zaytsev

    1999-10-03

    The relation between the R- and P-matrix approaches and the harmonic oscillator representation of the quantum scattering theory (J-matrix method) is discussed. We construct a discrete analogue of the P-matrix that is shown to be equivalent to the usual P-matrix in the quasiclassical limit. A definition of the natural channel radius is introduced. As a result, it is shown to be possible to use well-developed technique of R- and P-matrix theory for calculation of resonant states characteristics, scattering phase shifts, etc., in the approaches based on harmonic oscillator expansions, e.g., in nuclear shell-model calculations. P-matrix is used also for formulation of the method of treating Coulomb asymptotics in the scattering theory in oscillator representation.

  2. Efficient Sparse Matrix-Matrix Multiplication on Heterogeneous High Performance Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, Jakob; Villa, Oreste; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Tumeo, Antonino; Li, Xiaoming

    2010-09-20

    The efficient implementation of sparse matrix-matrix multiplications on high performance parallel machines poses several challenges: large size of input matrices, compressed representation, density of the output matrices, partitioning and load balancing of matrices that present parts with large differences in density and, thus, in computation times. In this paper we show how, starting from the requirements of such application, we developed a framework that allows its efficient implementation on heterogeneous clusters. We introduce a task based programming model and a runtime supported execution model which provides dynamic load balancing on clusters composed by CPUs and GPUs, allowing better utilization of the system while easing the handling of sparse matrices. Our results show that our solution, which co-designs the application together with the programming model and the runtime system, is able to obtain significant speed-ups due to a virtually perfect load balancing with respect to other programming approaches.

  3. SLUDGE BATCH 7 ACCEPTANCE EVALUATION: RADIONUCLIDE CONCENTRATIONS IN TANK 51 SB7 QUALIFICATION SAMPLE PREPARED AT SRNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pareizs, J.; Hay, M.

    2011-02-22

    Presented in this report are radionuclide concentrations required as part of the program of qualifying Sludge Batch Seven (SB7) for processing in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The SB7 material is currently in Tank 51 being washed and prepared for transfer to Tank 40. The acceptance evaluation needs to be completed prior to the transfer of the material in Tank 51 to Tank 40. The sludge slurry in Tank 40 has already been qualified for DWPF and is currently being processed as SB6. The radionuclide concentrations were measured or estimated in the Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample prepared at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This sample was prepared from the three liter qualification sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry (HTF-51-10-125) received on September 18, 2010. The sample was delivered to SRNL where it was initially characterized in the Shielded Cells. With consultation from the Liquid Waste Organization, the qualification sample was then modified by several washes and decants, which included addition of Pu from H Canyon and sodium nitrite per the Tank Farm corrosion control program. This final slurry now has a composition expected to be similar to that of the slurry in Tank 51 after final preparations have been made for transfer of that slurry to Tank 40. Determining the radionuclide concentrations in this Tank 51 SB7 Qualification Sample is part of the work requested in Technical Task Request (TTR) No. HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0031. The radionuclides included in this report are needed for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria (TSR/WAC) Evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program (TTR Task I.2). Radionuclides required to meet the Waste Acceptance Product Specifications (TTR Task III.2.) will be measured at a later date after the slurry from Tank 51 has been transferred to Tank 40. Then a sample of the as-processed SB7 will be taken and transferred to SRNL for measurement of these radionuclides. The results presented in this report are those necessary for DWPF to assess if the Tank 51 SB7 sample prepared at SRNL meets the requirements for the DWPF Radiological Program Evaluation, the DWPF Waste Acceptance Criteria evaluation, and the DWPF Solid Waste Characterization Program. Concentrations are given for thirty-four radionuclides along with total alpha and beta activity. Values for total gamma and total gamma plus beta activities are also calculated.

  4. SLUDGE BATCH 7 (SB7) WASHING DEMONSTRATION TO DETERMINE SULFATE/OXALATE REMOVAL EFFICIENCY AND SETTLING BEHAVIOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reboul, S.; Click, D.; Lambert, D.

    2010-12-10

    To support Sludge Batch 7 (SB7) washing, a demonstration of the proposed Tank Farm washing operation was performed utilizing a real-waste test slurry generated from Tank 4, 7, and 12 samples. The purpose of the demonstration was twofold: (1) to determine the settling time requirements and washing strategy needed to bring the SB7 slurry to the desired endpoint; and (2) to determine the impact of washing on the chemical and physical characteristics of the sludge, particularly those of sulfur content, oxalate content, and rheology. Seven wash cycles were conducted over a four month period to reduce the supernatant sodium concentration to approximately one molar. The long washing duration was due to the slow settling of the sludge and the limited compaction. Approximately 90% of the sulfur was removed through washing, and the vast majority of the sulfur was determined to be soluble from the start. In contrast, only about half of the oxalate was removed through washing, as most of the oxalate was initially insoluble and did not partition to the liquid phase until the latter washes. The final sulfur concentration was 0.45 wt% of the total solids, and the final oxalate concentration was 9,900 mg/kg slurry. More oxalate could have been removed through additional washing, although the washing would have reduced the supernatant sodium concentration.The yield stress of the final washed sludge (35 Pa) was an order of magnitude higher than that of the unwashed sludge ({approx}4 Pa) and was deemed potentially problematic. The high yield stress was related to the significant increase in insoluble solids that occurred ({approx}8 wt% to {approx}18 wt%) as soluble solids and water were removed from the slurry. Reduction of the insoluble solids concentration to {approx}14 wt% was needed to reduce the yield stress to an acceptable level. However, depending on the manner that the insoluble solids adjustment was performed, the final sodium concentration and extent of oxalate removal would be prone to change. As such, the strategy for completing the final wash cycle is integral to maintaining the proper balance of chemical and physical requirements.

  5. Matrix Completion for Multi-label Image Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Instituto de Sistemas e Robotica

    Matrix Completion for Multi-label Image Classification Ricardo S. Cabral, Fernando De la Torre and browse digital images via semantic keywords. This paper for- mulates image categorization as a multi-label classification problem using recent advances in matrix completion. Under this setting, classification of testing

  6. Structural stability of polymer matrix composite panels in fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, Ming

    Structural stability of polymer matrix composite panels in fire Pei Gu a,*, Ming Dao b , R.J. Asaro Structural integrity in fire a b s t r a c t Development in advanced composite fabrication technology offers by fire. This paper addresses the compressive load-bearing capacity for polymer matrix composite panels

  7. Algorithm-Architecture Codesign for Structured Matrix Operations on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsianis, Nikos P.

    Algorithm-Architecture Codesign for Structured Matrix Operations on Reconfigurable Systems J. Kim;#12;Algorithm-Architecture Codesign for Structured Matrix Operations on Reconfigurable Systems J. Kim, P 14, 2006 Abstract This article introduces the new ideas and techniques of algorithm-architecture

  8. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maricle, Donald L. (226 Forest La., Glastonbury, CT 06033); Putnam, Gary C. (47 Walker St., Manchester, CT 06040); Stewart, Jr., Robert C. (1230 Copper Hill Rd., West Suffield, CT 06093)

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  9. DISCRETE-CONTINUUM MODELING OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES PLASTICITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devincre, Benoit

    . For this reason, the pre- diction of the plastic properties of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) is some- times for plastic properties. On the one hand, the FE code treats the boundary value problem and cares of the conDISCRETE-CONTINUUM MODELING OF METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES PLASTICITY S. Groh1, B. Devincre1, F. Feyel2

  10. Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Matrix Factorizations for Information Retrieval Dianne P. O'Leary Computer Science Dept that is predominantly linear algebra · Conclusions A Catalog of Matrix Factorizations c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 1 or oscillation · understanding Markov chains c 2006 Dianne P. O'Leary 2 University of Maryland, College Park #12

  11. Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Harold P.

    Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability Sean P. Ng* , Kate S of TNfn3. Thus, we have specifically designed a protein with in- creased mechanical stability. Our results) The extracellular matrix proteins tenascin and fibronectin experi- ence significant mechanical forces in vivo. Both

  12. Hermitian Quadratic Matrix Polynomials: Solvents and Inverse Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tisseur, Francoise

    Hermitian Quadratic Matrix Polynomials: Solvents and Inverse Problems Peter Lancaster and Fran ISSN 1749-9097 #12;Hermitian Quadratic Matrix Polynomials: Solvents and Inverse Problems$ Peter with prescribed spectral data (eigenvalues and eigenvectors) it is natural to prescribe a right solvent

  13. Evaluating Energy Efficiency of Floating Point Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    Evaluating Energy Efficiency of Floating Point Matrix Multiplication on FPGAs Kiran Kumar Matam, prasanna}@usc.edu Abstract--Energy efficiency has emerged as one of the key performance metrics in scientific computing. In this work, we evaluate the energy efficiency of floating point matrix multipli

  14. A Matrix Convexity Approach to Some Celebrated Quantum Inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward G. Effros

    2008-02-10

    Some of the important inequalities associated with quantum entropy are immediate algebraic consequences of the Hansen-Pedersen-Jensen inequality. A general argument is given using matrix perspectives of operator convex functions. A matrix analogue of Mar\\'{e}chal's extended perspectives provides additional inequalities, including a $p+q\\leq 1$ result of Lieb.

  15. Polymyxin Matrix, 25 ml Catalog Number 156-0010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    Affi-Prep® Polymyxin Matrix, 25 ml Catalog Number 156-0010 Introduction The Affi-Prep polymyxin-grade facilities, all buffers and solutions should be prepared with pyrogen-free water, and, after use, the matrix of 20 µm or less. 3. Wash column with 10-15 bed volumes of pyrogen-free water. 4. Equilibrate column

  16. Magnetorheology in an aging, yield stress matrix fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    et al. 2001), precision polishing (Kordonski and Golini 1999), and drilling fluids (Zitha 2004). MR1 Magnetorheology in an aging, yield stress matrix fluid Jason P. Rich,a Patrick S. Doyle,a Gareth) suspensions in an aging, yield stress matrix fluid composed of an aqueous dispersion of Laponite® clay. Using

  17. Applicability of Program Comprehension to Sparse Matrix Computations ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kessler, Christoph

    data flow analysis framework. Data structures for sparse matrices storing only the nonzero elements matrix computations is usually not present in sparse ones. For automatic parallelization of dense matrix algorithms tailored to the target machine. In the back--end phase, these code pieces can be replaced

  18. Model Order Selection for Boolean Matrix Factorization Pauli Miettinen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waldmann, Uwe

    Science Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium jilles.vreeken@ua.ac.be ABSTRACT Matrix factorizations--where a given data matrix is approximated by a product of two or more factor matrices--are powerful data mining the data mining community in recent years. The technique has desirable properties, such as high

  19. Entanglement classification with matrix product states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sanz; I. L. Egusquiza; R. Di Candia; H. Saberi; L. Lamata; E. Solano

    2015-04-28

    Entanglement is widely considered the cornerstone of quantum information and an essential resource for relevant quantum effects, such as quantum teleportation, quantum cryptography, or the speed-up of quantum computing, as in Shor's algorithm. However, up to now, there is no general characterization of entanglement for many-body systems. In this sense, it is encouraging that quantum states connected by stochastic local operations assisted with classical communication (SLOCC), which perform probabilistically the same quantum tasks, can be collected into entanglement classes. Nevertheless, there is an infinite number of classes for four or more parties that may be gathered, in turn, into a finite number of entanglement families. Unfortunately, we have not been able to relate all classes and families to specific properties or quantum information tasks, although a few of them have certainly raised experimental interest. Here, we present a novel entanglement classification for quantum states according to their matrix-product-state structure, exemplified for the symmetric subspace. The proposed classification relates entanglement families to the interaction length of Hamiltonians, establishing the first connection between entanglement classification and condensed matter. Additionally, we found a natural nesting property in which the families for $N$ parties carry over to the $N+1$ case. We anticipate our proposal to be a starting point for the exploration of the connection between entanglement classification properties and condensed-matter models.

  20. Solid oxide fuel cell matrix and modules

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riley, Brian (Willimantic, CT)

    1990-01-01

    Porous refractory ceramic blocks arranged in an abutting, stacked configuration and forming a three dimensional array provide a support structure and coupling means for a plurality of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Each of the blocks includes a square center channel which forms a vertical shaft when the blocks are arranged in a stacked array. Positioned within the channel is a SOFC unit cell such that a plurality of such SOFC units disposed within a vertical shaft form a string of SOFC units coupled in series. A first pair of facing inner walls of each of the blocks each include an interconnecting channel hole cut horizontally and vertically into the block walls to form gas exit channels. A second pair of facing lateral walls of each block further include a pair of inner half circular grooves which form sleeves to accommodate anode fuel and cathode air tubes. The stack of ceramic blocks is self-supporting, with a plurality of such stacked arrays forming a matrix enclosed in an insulating refractory brick structure having an outer steel layer. The necessary connections for air, fuel, burnt gas, and anode and cathode connections are provided through the brick and steel outer shell. The ceramic blocks are so designed with respect to the strings of modules that by simple and logical design the strings could be replaced by hot reloading if one should fail. The hot reloading concept has not been included in any previous designs.

  1. Matricial bridges for "Matrix algebras converge to the sphere"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc A. Rieffel

    2015-02-01

    In the high-energy quantum-physics literature one finds statements such as "matrix algebras converge to the sphere". Earlier I provided a general setting for understanding such statements, in which the matrix algebras are viewed as quantum metric spaces, and convergence is with respect to a quantum Gromov-Hausdorff-type distance. In the present paper, as preparation of discussing similar statements for convergence of "vector bundles" over matrix algebras to vector bundles over spaces, we introduce and study suitable matrix-norms for matrix algebras and spaces. Very recently Latremoliere introduced an improved quantum Gromov-Hausdorff-type distance between quantum metric spaces. We use it throughout this paper. To facilitate the calculations we introduce and develop a general notion of "bridges with conditional expectations".

  2. Multipole matrix elements of Green function of Laplace equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karol Makuch; Przemys?aw Górka

    2015-01-02

    Multipole matrix elements of Green function of Laplace equation are calculated. The multipole matrix elements of Green function in electrostatics describe potential on a sphere which is produced by a charge distributed on the surface of a different (possibly overlapping) sphere of the same radius. The matrix elements are defined by double convolution of two spherical harmonics with the Green function of Laplace equation. The method we use relies on the fact that in the Fourier space the double convolution has simple form. Therefore we calculate the multipole matrix from its Fourier transform. An important part of our considerations is simplification of the three dimensional Fourier transformation of general multipole matrix by its rotational symmetry to the one-dimensional Hankel transformation.

  3. An Innovative Carbonate Fuel Cell Matrix, Abstract #188

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Surendranath, Arun; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2015-05-28

    The electrolyte matrix in direct carbonate fuel cell (DFC) is a microporous ceramic structure sandwiched between the electrodes to isolate the fuel from the oxidant, store electrolyte and facilitate ionic transport. FCE has advanced DFC electrolyte matrix over the years and demonstrated that the matrix meets the requirements for greater than 5 year life based on accelerated tests and field stack operations. However, development of advanced designs and materials that can further increase the performance and extend cell life will enable accelerated MCFC deployment. This paper will report the progress on the development of an unique and innovative matrix design that offers numerous benefits to the carbonate fuel cell performance and durability. In addition, this paper will also review parameters that affect matrix material stability and approaches to extend cell life.

  4. Summary of Granulation Matrix Testing for the Plutonium Immobilization Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, C.C.

    2001-10-19

    In FY00, a matrix for process development testing was created to identify those items related to the ceramic process that had not been fully developed or tested and to help identify variables that needed to be tested. This matrix, NMTP/IP-99-003, was jointly created between LLNL and SRTC and was issued to all affected individuals. The matrix was also used to gauge the progress of the development activities. As part of this matrix, several series of tests were identified for the granulation process. This summary provides the data and results from the granulation testing. The results of the granulation matrix testing were used to identify the baseline process for testing in the PuCTF with cold surrogates in B241 at LLNL.

  5. Summary Report For The Analysis Of The Sludge Batch 7b (Macrobatch 9) DWPF Pour Stream Glass Sample For Canister S04023

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F. C.

    2013-11-18

    In order to comply with the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Waste Form Compliance Plan for Sluldge Batch 7b, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel characterized the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) pour stream (PS) glass sample collected while filling canister S04023. This report summarizes the results of the compositional analysis for reportable oxides and radionuclides and the normalized Product Consistency Test (PCT) results. The PCT responses indicate that the DWPF produced glass that is significantly more durable than the Environmental Assessment glass.

  6. Short contact time direct coal liquefaction using a novel batch reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, September 15, 1995--January 15, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, M.T.; Calkins, W.H.; Huang, He

    1996-01-26

    The objective of this research is to optimize the design and operation of the bench scale batch reactor (SCTBR) f or coal liquefaction at short contact times (0.01 to 10 minutes or longer). Additional objectives are to study the kinetics of direct coal liquefaction particularly at short reaction times, and to investigate the role of the organic oxygen components of coal and their reaction pathways during liquefaction. Many of those objectives have already been achieved and others are still in progress. This quarterly report covers further progress toward those objectives.

  7. Solutions to Dr. Z.'s Math 250(1), (Fall 2010, RU) REAL Quiz #9 (Dec. 2, 2010) 1. (4 points) A matrix A is given. Find, if possible, an invertible matrix P and a diagonal matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeilberger, Doron

    ) A matrix A is given. Find, if possible, an invertible matrix P and a diagonal matrix D such that A = PDP-1 equation t2 + 4 = 0 whose roots are ± -4 = ±2i. Since these are complex numbers, it means that the matrix The quickest way to find the inverse of a 2 × 2 matrix is to use the formula: a b c d -1 = 1 ad - bc d -b -c

  8. Development Of A Macro-Batch Qualification Strategy For The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment And Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman, Connie C.

    2013-09-30

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has evaluated the existing waste feed qualification strategy for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) based on experience from the Savannah River Site (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) waste qualification program. The current waste qualification programs for each of the sites are discussed in the report to provide a baseline for comparison. Recommendations on strategies are then provided that could be implemented at Hanford based on the successful Macrobatch qualification strategy utilized at SRS to reduce the risk of processing upsets or the production of a staged waste campaign that does not meet the processing requirements of the WTP. Considerations included the baseline WTP process, as well as options involving Direct High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) processing, and the potential use of a Tank Waste Characterization and Staging Facility (TWCSF). The main objectives of the Hanford waste feed qualification program are to demonstrate compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC), determine waste processability, and demonstrate unit operations at a laboratory scale. Risks to acceptability and successful implementation of this program, as compared to the DWPF Macro-Batch qualification strategy, include: Limitations of mixing/blending capability of the Hanford Tank Farm; The complexity of unit operations (i.e., multiple chemical and mechanical separations processes) involved in the WTP pretreatment qualification process; The need to account for effects of blending of LAW and HLW streams, as well as a recycle stream, within the PT unit operations; and The reliance on only a single set of unit operations demonstrations with the radioactive qualification sample. This later limitation is further complicated because of the 180-day completion requirement for all of the necessary waste feed qualification steps. The primary recommendations/changes include the following: Collection and characterization of samples for relevant process analytes from the tanks to be blended during the staging process; Initiation of qualification activities earlier in the staging process to optimize the campaign composition through evaluation from both a processing and glass composition perspective; Definition of the parameters that are important for processing in the WTP facilities (unit operations) across the anticipated range of wastes and as they relate to qualification-scale equipment; Performance of limited testing with simulants ahead of the waste feed qualification sample demonstration as needed to determine the available processing window for that campaign; and Demonstration of sufficient mixing in the staging tank to show that the waste qualification sample chemical and physical properties are representative of the transfers to be made to WTP. Potential flowcharts for derivatives of the Hanford waste feed qualification process are also provided in this report. While these recommendations are an extension of the existing WTP waste qualification program, they are more in line with the processes currently performed for SRS. The implementation of these processes at SRS has been shown to offer flexibility for processing, having identified potential processing issues ahead of the qualification or facility processing, and having provided opportunity to optimize waste loading and throughput in the DWPF.

  9. 3 3 Matrix for unitary optical systems S. T. Tang and H. S. Kwok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 Ã 3 Matrix for unitary optical systems S. T. Tang and H. S. Kwok Center for Display Research received February 27, 2001 We introduce a 3 3 matrix for the study of unitary optical systems. This 3 3 matrix is a submatrix of the 4 4 Mueller matrix. The elements of this 3 3 matrix are real, and thus

  10. Fast matrix algebra for dense matrices with rank-deficient off-diagonal blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinsson, Gunnar

    CHAPTER 2 Fast matrix algebra for dense matrices with rank-deficient off-diagonal blocks Chapter whose off diagonal blocks are of low (numerical) rank. The primary focus is on matrix inversion, but algorithms for matrix-vector and matrix-matrix multiplication are also described. 2.1. Introduction All

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 79, 055806 (2009) Relativistic entrainment matrix of a superfluid nucleon-hyperon mixture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW C 79, 055806 (2009) Relativistic entrainment matrix of a superfluid nucleon calculate the relativistic entrainment matrix Yik at zero temperature for a nucleon-hyperon mixture composed to the entrainment matrix (also termed mass-density matrix or Andreev-Bashkin matrix) of nonrelativistic theory

  12. MATRIX OPERATIONS, TRANSFORMATIONS Given a vector in and an matrix we've learned to form a new vector, the product , using the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knopf, Dan

    MATRIX OPERATIONS, TRANSFORMATIONS Given a vector in and an matrix we've learned then be expressed very compactly the terms of a matrix equation , for instance. Now we want to start with an matrix and develop the very important idea of thinking of as 'mapping' or 'transforming' any vector

  13. Matrix Pseudospectral Method for Elastic Tides Modeling of Planetary BodiesMatrix Pseudospectral Method for Elastic Tides Modeling of Planetary Bodies Eliska Zbranov, Ladislav Hanyk, Ctirad Matyska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Matrix Pseudospectral Method for Elastic Tides Modeling of Planetary BodiesMatrix Pseudospectral with continuous model parameters that makes the matrix of the algebraic system almost block diagonal (the ABD matrix). An advantage of preserving 2nd -order equations is that a half-size algebraic system

  14. ILENR/RE-AQ-90/05 February 1990

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xi I. Introduction - History of Remote Sensing Technology . . . 1 A. How it works . . . . . . . . 7 f. Determination of the exhaust %CO . . . . . 7 2. Technology Characteristics

  15. AQ AM Announcement Y150512 DRAFT jm-cpb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Natalie Rudolph - University of Wisconsin, Madison Prof. Christian Leinenbach - EMPA Switzerland Prof. Hans-Joachim Schmid - University of Paderborn, Germany Dr. Lyle Levine - NIST...

  16. LEARNING IN AN INCONSISTENT WORLD: Rule Selection in AQ18

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalski, Ryszard S.

    and data mining tasks, the learner is typically faced with a choice of many possible hypotheses Data, Natural Induction, Decision Rules, Information Theory, Data Mining, Separate and Conquer Agency under Grant No. F49620-95-1-0462 administered by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  17. AQ AM Announcement Y150512 DRAFT jm-cpb

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See EnergyCurrent : 0.0 Waiting for0 -Issue 607Logos ANumber

  18. Aq Dryers Agricultural Drying Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:AngolaEnergy ManagementGeorgia:CarloApros

  19. EERE Program Management Guide - Appendices A-Q

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|Department of5 Peer ReviewUse of He isotopesConceptModeling

  20. Generalized matrix models and AGT correspondence at all genera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulio Bonelli; Kazunobu Maruyoshi; Alessandro Tanzini; Futoshi Yagi

    2011-07-11

    We study generalized matrix models corresponding to n-point Virasoro conformal blocks on Riemann surfaces with arbitrary genus g. Upon AGT correspondence, these describe four dimensional N=2 SU(2)^{n+3g-3} gauge theories with generalized quiver diagrams. We obtain the generalized matrix models from the perturbative evaluation of the Liouville correlation functions and verify the consistency of the description with respect to degenerations of the Riemann surface. Moreover, we derive the Seiberg-Witten curve for the N=2 gauge theory as the spectral curve of the generalized matrix model, thus providing a check of AGT correspondence at all genera.

  1. Handbook Article on Applications of Random Matrix Theory to QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. J. M. Verbaarschot

    2009-10-21

    In this chapter of the Oxford Handbook of Random Matrix Theory we introduce chiral Random Matrix Theories with the global symmetries of QCD. In the microscopic domain, these theories reproduce the mass and chemical potential dependence of QCD. The main focus of this chapter is on the spectral properties of the QCD Dirac operator and relations between chiral Random Matrix Theories and chiral Lagrangians. Both spectra of the anti-hermitian Dirac operator and spectra of the nonhermitian Dirac operator at nonzero chemical potential are discussed.

  2. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  3. Estimation of covariance matrix of macroscopic quantum states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    László Ruppert; Vladyslav C. Usenko; Radim Filip

    2015-11-20

    For systems analogous to a linear harmonic oscillator, the simplest way to characterize the state is by a covariance matrix containing the symmetrically-ordered moments of position and momentum. We show that without direct access to either position or momentum, the estimation of the covariance matrix of non-classical states is still possible using interference with a classical noisy and low- intensity reference and linear detection of energy. Such a detection technique will allow to estimate macroscopic quantum states of electromagnetic radiation without a coherent high-intensity local oscillator. It can be directly applied to estimate the covariance matrix of macroscopically bright squeezed states of light.

  4. Symmetric quadratic Hamiltonians with pseudo-Hermitian matrix representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco M Fernández

    2015-09-13

    We prove that any symmetric Hamiltonian that is a quadratic function of the coordinates and momenta has a pseudo-Hermitian adjoint or regular matrix representation. The eigenvalues of the latter matrix are the natural frequencies of the Hamiltonian operator. When all the eigenvalues of the matrix are real, then the spectrum of the symmetric Hamiltonian is real and the operator is Hermitian. As illustrative examples we choose the quadratic Hamiltonians that model a pair of coupled resonators with balanced gain and loss, the electromagnetic self-force on an oscillating charged particle and an active LRC circuit.

  5. Random matrix analysis of the QCD sign problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques Bloch; Tilo Wettig

    2010-01-25

    The severity of the sign problem in lattice QCD at nonzero baryon density is measured by the average phase of the fermion determinant. Motivated by the equivalence of chiral random matrix theory and QCD to leading order in the epsilon regime, we compute the phase of the fermion determinant for general topology in random matrix theory as a function of the quark chemical potential and the quark mass. We find that the sign problem becomes milder with increasing topological charge. The analytic predictions are verified by detailed numerical random matrix simulations.

  6. Low-temperature random matrix theory at the soft edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, Alan; Persson, Per-Olof; Sutton, Brian D.

    2014-06-15

    “Low temperature” random matrix theory is the study of random eigenvalues as energy is removed. In standard notation, ? is identified with inverse temperature, and low temperatures are achieved through the limit ? ? ?. In this paper, we derive statistics for low-temperature random matrices at the “soft edge,” which describes the extreme eigenvalues for many random matrix distributions. Specifically, new asymptotics are found for the expected value and standard deviation of the general-? Tracy-Widom distribution. The new techniques utilize beta ensembles, stochastic differential operators, and Riccati diffusions. The asymptotics fit known high-temperature statistics curiously well and contribute to the larger program of general-? random matrix theory.

  7. A new simple form of quark mixing matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan Qin; Bo-Qiang Ma

    2010-11-29

    Although different parametrizations of quark mixing matrix are mathematically equivalent, the consequences of experimental analysis may be distinct. Based on the triminimal expansion of Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix around the unit matrix, we propose a new simple parametrization. Compared with the Wolfenstein parametrization, we find that the new form is not only consistent with the original one in the hierarchical structure, but also more convenient for numerical analysis and measurement of the CP-violating phase. By discussing the relation between our new form and the unitarity boomerang, we point out that along with the unitarity boomerang, this new parametrization is useful in hunting for new physics.

  8. Comment on Scattering-Matrix Method for Determining Defect Modes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Roland E.

    1971-01-01

    VOLU ME 3, NUMBER 10 15 MAY 1971 Comment on the Scattering-Matrix Method for Determining Defect Modes* R. E. Allen Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712 (Received 25 June 1970) It is pointed out that the formulation... of the scattering-matrix method given by Achar and Barsch, which was proposed and used for calculating localized modes at surfaces and other planar defects, is based on an incorrect assumption. A formulation of the scattering-matrix method for calculating...

  9. ELIMINATION OF THE CHARACTERIZATION OF DWPF POUR STREAM SAMPLE AND THE GLASS FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE DWPF SLUDGE BATCH QUALIFICATION SAMPLE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amoroso, J.; Peeler, D.; Edwards, T.

    2012-05-11

    A recommendation to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification sample was made by a Six-Sigma team chartered to eliminate non-value-added activities for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) sludge batch qualification program and is documented in the report SS-PIP-2006-00030. That recommendation was supported through a technical data review by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and is documented in the memorandums SRNL-PSE-2007-00079 and SRNL-PSE-2007-00080. At the time of writing those memorandums, the DWPF was processing sludge-only waste but, has since transitioned to a coupled operation (sludge and salt). The SRNL was recently tasked to perform a similar data review relevant to coupled operations and re-evaluate the previous recommendations. This report evaluates the validity of eliminating the characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and Product Consistency Test (PCT) of the sludge batch qualification samples based on sludge-only and coupled operations. The pour stream sample has confirmed the DWPF's ability to produce an acceptable waste form from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) blending and product composition/durability predictions for the previous sixteen years but, ultimately the pour stream analysis has added minimal value to the DWPF's waste qualification strategy. Similarly, the information gained from the glass fabrication and PCT of the sludge batch qualification sample was determined to add minimal value to the waste qualification strategy since that sample is routinely not representative of the waste composition ultimately processed at the DWPF due to blending and salt processing considerations. Moreover, the qualification process has repeatedly confirmed minimal differences in glass behavior from actual radioactive waste to glasses fabricated from simulants or batch chemicals. In contrast, the variability study has significantly added value to the DWPF's qualification strategy. The variability study has evolved to become the primary aspect of the DWPF's compliance strategy as it has been shown to be versatile and capable of adapting to the DWPF's various and diverse waste streams and blending strategies. The variability study, which aims to ensure durability requirements and the PCT and chemical composition correlations are valid for the compositional region to be processed at the DWPF, must continue to be performed. Due to the importance of the variability study and its place in the DWPF's qualification strategy, it will also be discussed in this report. An analysis of historical data and Production Records indicated that the recommendation of the Six Sigma team to eliminate all characterization of pour stream glass samples and the glass fabrication and PCT performed with the qualification glass does not compromise the DWPF's current compliance plan. Furthermore, the DWPF should continue to produce an acceptable waste form following the remaining elements of the Glass Product Control Program; regardless of a sludge-only or coupled operations strategy. If the DWPF does decide to eliminate the characterization of pour stream samples, pour stream samples should continue to be collected for archival reasons, which would allow testing to be performed should any issues arise or new repository test methods be developed.

  10. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and processing techniques for these coatings. In addition, we investigated the effect of microstructure on the mechanical properties and oxidation protection ability of the coatings. Coatings were developed to provide oxidation protection to both ferritic and austentic alloys and Ni-based alloys. The coatings that we developed are based on low viscosity pre-ceramic polymers. Thus they can be easily applied to any shape by using a variety of techniques including dip-coating, spray-coating and painting. The polymers are loaded with a variety of nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have two primary roles: control of the final composition and phases (and hence the properties); and control of the shrinkage during thermal decomposition of the polymer. Thus the selection of the nanoparticles was the most critical aspect of this project. Based on the results of the processing studies, the performance of selected coatings in oxidizing conditions (both static and cyclic) was investigated.

  11. Electrodeposition of amorphous matrix Ni-W/Wp̳ composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenket, Donald R. (Donald Robert)

    2005-01-01

    An amorphous Ni-W alloy matrix was incorporated with W particulate through two types of electrodeposition. The plating bath for the electrodeposition contained nickel sulfate, sodium tungstate, sodium citrate, ammonium ...

  12. Finite-volume matrix elements in multiboson states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detmold, William

    We derive the relations necessary for the extraction of matrix elements of multihadron systems from finite-volume lattice QCD calculations. We focus on systems of n ? 2 weakly interacting identical particles without spin. ...

  13. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Matrix Acidizing of Carbonate Rocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keys, Ryan S.

    2010-07-14

    In matrix acidizing, the goal is to dissolve minerals in the rock to increase well productivity. This is accomplished by injecting an application-specific solution of acid into the formation at a pressure between the pore ...

  14. Implementing a fast cartesian-polar matrix interpolator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Muralidaran

    The 2009 MEMOCODE Hardware/Software Co-Design Contest assignment was the implementation of a cartesian-to-polar matrix interpolator. We discuss our hardware and software design submissions.

  15. Refined error estimates for matrix-valued radial basis functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuselier, Edward J., Jr.

    2007-09-17

    Radial basis functions (RBFs) are probably best known for their applications to scattered data problems. Until the 1990s, RBF theory only involved functions that were scalar-valued. Matrix-valued RBFs were subsequently ...

  16. Dynamics of Matrix-Fracture Coupling During Shale Gas Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasaki, Asana

    2015-07-08

    In this work, a dynamic permeability model for organic-rich shale matrix is constructed and implemented into a flow simulation to investigate the impact on production. Effective stress and molecular transport effects on the permeability...

  17. Online Sparse Matrix Gaussian Process Regression and Vision Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    in learning nonlinear mappings between high dimensional data and their low dimensional representations the use of matrix downdating using hyper- bolic rotations to also learn the hyperparameters of the GP

  18. An efficient parallel algorithm for matrix-vector multiplication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.; Plimpton, S.

    1993-03-01

    The multiplication of a vector by a matrix is the kernel computation of many algorithms in scientific computation. A fast parallel algorithm for this calculation is therefore necessary if one is to make full use of the new generation of parallel supercomputers. This paper presents a high performance, parallel matrix-vector multiplication algorithm that is particularly well suited to hypercube multiprocessors. For an n x n matrix on p processors, the communication cost of this algorithm is O(n/[radical]p + log(p)), independent of the matrix sparsity pattern. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated by employing it as the kernel in the well-known NAS conjugate gradient benchmark, where a run time of 6.09 seconds was observed. This is the best published performance on this benchmark achieved to date using a massively parallel supercomputer.

  19. Cell–Matrix De-Adhesion Dynamics Reflect Contractile Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Shamik; Kumar, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    and extracellular matrix mechanics. Biophys. J. 90(10):3762–Radmacher, M. Studying the mechanics of cellular pro- cessesD. A. Hammer. The dynamics and mechanics of endothelial cell

  20. Optimal fibre architecture of soft-matrix ballistic laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karthikeyen, K.; Kazemahvazi, S.; Russell, B. P.

    2015-01-01

    Soft-matrix ballistic laminates (such as those composed of fibres of Ultra High Molecular-Weight Polyethylene, e.g. Dyneema® HB26 and Spectra Shield), find extensive use as catching type armour systems. The relationship between the lay...

  1. Nuclear norm penalized LAD estimator for low rank matrix recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Wenzhe

    2015-01-01

    In the thesis we propose a novel method for low rank matrix recovery. We study the framework using absolute deviation loss function and nuclear penalty. While nuclear norm penalty is widely utilized heuristic method for ...

  2. Effective matrix-free preconditioning for the augmented immersed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-09-05

    Sep 5, 2015 ... DMS-1522768, and an NCSU Research Innovation Seed Fund. Preprint submitted to .... Thus, the preconditioning cost is negligible as compared with the matrix- ... In addition, since a low-accuracy HSS approximation tends to ...

  3. FINITE FRACTURE MECHANICS OF MATRIX MICROCRACKING IN COMPOSITES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nairn, John A.

    FINITE FRACTURE MECHANICS OF MATRIX MICROCRACKING IN COMPOSITES JOHN A. NAIRN INTRODUCTION damage following complex loading conditions. This chapter describes a fracture mechanics approach to the microcracking problem. A complicating feature of composite fracture mechanics analysis is that laminates often

  4. AMEGIC++ 1.0: A Matrix element generator in C++.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krauss, F.; Kuhn, R.; Soff, G.

    The new matrix element generator AMEGIC++ is introduced, dedicated to describe multi–particle production in high energy particle collisions. It automatically generates helicity amplitudes for the processes under consideration and constructs...

  5. Transfer matrix for spanning trees, webs and colored forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. G. Brankov; V. S. Poghosyan; V. B. Priezzhev; P. Ruelle

    2014-05-02

    We use the transfer matrix formalism for dimers proposed by Lieb, and generalize it to address the corresponding problem for arrow configurations (or trees) associated to dimer configurations through Temperley's correspondence. On a cylinder, the arrow configurations can be partitioned into sectors according to the number of non-contractible loops they contain. We show how Lieb's transfer matrix can be adapted in order to disentangle the various sectors and to compute the corresponding partition functions. In order to address the issue of Jordan cells, we introduce a new, extended transfer matrix, which not only keeps track of the positions of the dimers, but also propagates colors along the branches of the associated trees. We argue that this new matrix contains Jordan cells.

  6. The CKM matrix and flavor physics from lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruth S. Van de Water

    2009-11-16

    I discuss the role of lattice QCD in testing the Standard Model and searching for physics beyond the Standard Model in the quark flavor sector. I first review the Standard Model CKM framework. I then present the current status of the CKM matrix, focusing on determinations of CKM matrix elements and constraints on the CKM unitarity triangle that rely on lattice QCD calculations of weak matrix elements. I also show the potential impact of improved lattice QCD calculations on the global CKM unitarity triangle fit. I then describe several hints of new physics in the quark flavor sector that rely on lattice QCD calculations of weak matrix elements, such as evidence of a ~2-3 sigma tension in the CKM unitarity triangle and the "f_{D_s} puzzle". I finish with a discussion of lattice QCD calculations of rare B- and K-decays needed to probe physics beyond the Standard Model at future experiments.

  7. The UDUTDecomposition of Manipulator Inertia Matrix Subir Kumar Saha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Subir Kumar

    The UDUTDecomposition of Manipulator Inertia Matrix Subir Kumar Saha R&D Center, Toshiba Corporation 4-1 Ukishima-cho, Kawasaki-ku, Kawasaki 210, Jalpan E-mail: sahaC3mel

  8. Seiberg-Witten curve via generalized matrix model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazunobu Maruyoshi; Futoshi Yagi

    2010-12-27

    We study the generalized matrix model which corresponds to the n-point toric Virasoro conformal block. This describes four-dimensional N=2 SU(2)^n gauge theory with circular quiver diagram by the AGT relation. We first verify that it is obtained from the perturbative calculation of the Liouville correlation function. We derive the Seiberg-Witten curve for N=2 gauge theory as a spectral curve of the generalized matrix model.

  9. Steel-SiC Metal Matrix Composite Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Don D.

    2005-07-17

    The goal of this project is to develop a method for fabricating SiC-reinforced high-strength steel. We are developing a metal-matrix composite (MMC) in which SiC fibers are be embedded within a metal matrix of steel, with adequate interfacial bonding to deliver the full benefit of the tensile strength of the SiC fibers in the composite.

  10. Proton decay matrix elements with domain-wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Aoki; C. Dawson; J. Noaki; A. Soni

    2006-09-18

    Hadronic matrix elements of operators relevant to nucleon decay in grand unified theories are calculated numerically using lattice QCD. In this context, the domain-wall fermion formulation, combined with non-perturbative renormalization, is used for the first time. These techniques bring reduction of a large fraction of the systematic error from the finite lattice spacing. Our main effort is devoted to a calculation performed in the quenched approximation, where the direct calculation of the nucleon to pseudoscalar matrix elements, as well as the indirect estimate of them from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements, are performed. First results, using two flavors of dynamical domain-wall quarks for the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are also presented to address the systematic error of quenching, which appears to be small compared to the other errors. Our results suggest that the representative value for the low energy constants from the nucleon to vacuum matrix elements are given as |alpha| simeq |beta| simeq 0.01 GeV^3. For a more reliable estimate of the physical low energy matrix elements, it is better to use the relevant form factors calculated in the direct method. The direct method tends to give smaller value of the form factors, compared to the indirect one, thus enhancing the proton life-time; indeed for the pi^0 final state the difference between the two methods is quite appreciable.

  11. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nock, A. Kumar, S. Sommers, H.-J. Guhr, T.

    2014-03-15

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  12. Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix: parameterizations and rephasing invariants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilario Pérez; P. Kielanowski; S. R. Juárez W

    2015-02-12

    The paper is devoted to a discussion of general properties of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. First we propose a general method of a recursive construction of the CKM matrix for any number of generations. This allows to set up a parameterization with desired properties. As an application we generalize the Wolfenstein parameterization to the case of 4 generations and obtain restrictions on the CKM suppression of the fourth generation. Motivated by the rephasing invariance of the CKM observables we next consider the general phase invariant monomials built out of the CKM matrix elements and their conjugates. We show, that there exist 30 fundamental phase invariant monomials and 18 of them are a product of 4 CKM matrix elements and 12 are a product of 6 CKM matrix elements. In the Main Theorem we show that all rephasing invariant monomials can be expressed as a product of at most 5 factors: 4 of them are fundamental phase invariant monomials and the fifth factor consists of powers of squares of absolute values of the CKM matrix elements.

  13. Fast Sparse Matrix and Sparse Vector Multiplication Algorithm on the GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Carl; Wang, Yangzihao; Owens, John D.

    2015-01-01

    multiplication of hypersparse matrices,” in IEEE Interna-from parallel sparse matrices,” in Applied Parallelblock for sparse matrix sparse matrix multiplication. Buluc¸

  14. Comparison of different liquid anaerobic digestion effluents as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Fuqing; Shi Jian; Lv Wen; Yu Zhongtang; Li Yebo

    2013-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Compared methane production of solid AD inoculated with different effluents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Food waste effluent (FWE) had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with FWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 4. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dairy waste effluent (DWE) was rich of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid AD inoculated with DWE produced the highest methane yield at F/E ratio of 2. - Abstract: Effluents from three liquid anaerobic digesters, fed with municipal sewage sludge, food waste, or dairy waste, were evaluated as inocula and nitrogen sources for solid-state batch anaerobic digestion of corn stover in mesophilic reactors. Three feedstock-to-effluent (F/E) ratios (i.e., 2, 4, and 6) were tested for each effluent. At an F/E ratio of 2, the reactor inoculated by dairy waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 238.5 L/kgVS{sub feed}, while at an F/E ratio of 4, the reactor inoculated by food waste effluent achieved the highest methane yield of 199.6 L/kgVS{sub feed}. The microbial population and chemical composition of the three effluents were substantially different. Food waste effluent had the largest population of acetoclastic methanogens, while dairy waste effluent had the largest populations of cellulolytic and xylanolytic bacteria. Dairy waste also had the highest C/N ratio of 8.5 and the highest alkalinity of 19.3 g CaCO{sub 3}/kg. The performance of solid-state batch anaerobic digestion reactors was closely related to the microbial status in the liquid anaerobic digestion effluents.

  15. Coupled alkai fieldspar dissolution and secondary mineral precipatation in batch systems-2: New experiments with supercritical CO2 and implications for carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Peng; Fu, Qi; Seyfried, William E. Jr.; Hedges, Sheila W. [U.S. DOE; Soong, Yee [U.S. DOE; Jones, Kyle; Zhua, Chen

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate the extent of CO{sub 2}–water–rock interactions in geological formations for C sequestration, three batch experiments were conducted on alkali feldspars–CO{sub 2}–brine interactions at 150–200 °C and 300 bars. The elevated temperatures were necessary to accelerate the reactions to facilitate attainable laboratory measurements. Temporal evolution of fluid chemistry was monitored by major element analysis of in situ fluid samples. SEM, TEM and XRD analysis of reaction products showed extensive dissolution features (etch pits, channels, kinks and steps) on feldspars and precipitation of secondary minerals (boehmite, kaolinite, muscovite and paragonite) on feldspar surfaces. Therefore, these experiments have generated both solution chemistry and secondary mineral identity. The experimental results show that partial equilibrium was not attained between secondary minerals and aqueous solutions for the feldspar hydrolysis batch systems. Evidence came from both solution chemistry (supersaturation of the secondary minerals during the entire experimental duration) and metastable co-existence of secondary minerals. The slow precipitation of secondary minerals results in a negative feedback in the dissolution–precipitation loop, reducing the overall feldspar dissolution rates by orders of magnitude. Furthermore, the experimental data indicate the form of rate laws greatly influence the steady state rates under which feldspar dissolution took place. Negligence of both the mitigating effects of secondary mineral precipitation and the sigmoidal shape of rate–?G{sub r} relationship can overestimate the extent of feldspar dissolution during CO{sub 2} storage. Finally, the literature on feldspar dissolution in CO{sub 2}-charged systems has been reviewed. The data available are insufficient and new experiments are urgently needed to establish a database on feldspar dissolution mechanism, rates and rate laws, as well as secondary mineral information at CO{sub 2} storage conditions.

  16. Matrix-based approach to electrodynamics in media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. A. Bogush; V. M. Red'kov; N. G. Tokarevskaya; George J. Spix

    2008-08-05

    The Riemann -- Silberstein -- Majorana -- Oppenheimer approach to the Maxwell electrodynamics in presence of electrical sources and arbitrary media is investigated within the matrix formalism. The symmetry of the matrix Maxwell equation under transformations of the complex rotation group SO(3.C) is demonstrated explicitly. In vacuum case, the matrix form includes four real $4 \\times 4$ matrices $\\alpha^{b}$. In presence of media matrix form requires two sets of $4 \\times 4$ matrices, $\\alpha^{b}$ and $\\beta^{b}$ -- simple and symmetrical realization of which is given. Relation of $\\alpha^{b}$ and $\\beta^{b}$ to the Dirac matrices in spinor basis is found. Minkowski constitutive relations in case of any linear media are given in a short algebraic form based on the use of complex 3-vector fields and complex orthogonal rotations from SO(3.C) group. The matrix complex formulation in the Esposito's form,based on the use of two electromagnetic 4-vectors, $e^{\\alpha}(x) = u_{\\beta} F^{\\alpha \\beta}(x), b^{\\alpha} (x) = u_{\\beta} \\tilde{F}^{\\alpha \\beta}(x) $ is studied and discussed. It is argued that Esposito form is achieved trough the use of a trivial identity $I=U^{-1}(u)U(u)$ in the Maxwell equation.

  17. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part I - Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, F. B.; Carney, S. E.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    The theory underlying the fission matrix method is derived using a rigorous Green's function approach. The method is then used to investigate fundamental properties of the transport equation for a continuous-energy physics treatment. We provide evidence that an infinite set of discrete, real eigenvalues and eigenfunctions exist for the continuous-energy problem, and that the eigenvalue spectrum converges smoothly as the spatial mesh for the fission matrix is refined. We also derive equations for the adjoint solution. We show that if the mesh is sufficiently refined so that both forward and adjoint solutions are valid, then the adjoint fission matrix is identical to the transpose of the forward matrix. While the energy-dependent transport equation is strictly bi-orthogonal, we provide surprising results that the forward modes are very nearly self-adjoint for a variety of continuous-energy problems. A companion paper (Part II - Applications) describes the initial experience and results from implementing this fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. (authors)

  18. Method of bonding diamonds in a matrix and articles thus produced

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.

    1981-01-27

    By fluorinating diamond grit, the grit may be readily bonded into a fluorocarbon resin matrix. The matrix is formed by simple hot pressing techniques. Diamond grinding wheels may advantageously be manufactured using such a matrix. Teflon fluorocarbon resins are particularly well suited for using in forming the matrix.

  19. The G-Matrix as One Piece of the Phenotypic Evolution Puzzle Sean H. Rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Sean

    COMMENTARY The G-Matrix as One Piece of the Phenotypic Evolution Puzzle Sean H. Rice Received: 5, a single term, the genetic covari- ance matrix (G-matrix), is used to encompass all important associations quantitative geneticists have argued that the G-matrix is a sufficient descriptor of the ways in which

  20. Google Matrix Analysis of DNA Sequences Vivek Kandiah, Dima L. Shepelyansky*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Google Matrix Analysis of DNA Sequences Vivek Kandiah, Dima L. Shepelyansky* Laboratoire de sequences of various species we construct the Google matrix G of Markov transitions between nearby words composed of several letters. The statistical distribution of matrix elements of this matrix is shown

  1. Exact Matrix Completion via Convex Optimization Emmanuel J. Cand`es

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Exact Matrix Completion via Convex Optimization Emmanuel J. Cand`es and Benjamin Recht Applied of a data matrix from a sampling of its entries. Suppose that we observe m entries selected uniformly at random from a matrix M. Can we complete the matrix and recover the entries that we have not seen? We show

  2. Matrix Convex Functions With Applications to Weighted Centers for Semidefinite Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Shuzhong

    Matrix Convex Functions With Applications to Weighted Centers for Semidefinite Programming Jan for general smooth matrix-valued functions and for the class of matrix convex (or concave) functions first introduced by L¨owner and Kraus in 1930s. Then we use these calculus rules and the matrix convex function

  3. THE BETA-JACOBI MATRIX MODEL, THE CS DECOMPOSITION, AND GENERALIZED SINGULAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutton, Brian

    THE BETA-JACOBI MATRIX MODEL, THE CS DECOMPOSITION, AND GENERALIZED SINGULAR VALUE PROBLEMS ALAN EDELMAN AND BRIAN D. SUTTON Abstract. We provide a solution to the -Jacobi matrix model problem posed the algorithm on a Haar-distributed random matrix to produce the -Jacobi matrix model. The Jacobi ensemble on Rn

  4. Computational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Michael

    mechanical re- sponse of a ceramic matrix composite is simulated by a numerical model for a ®ber-matrix unitComputational modeling of damage evolution in unidirectional fiber reinforced ceramic matrix evolution in brittle matrix composites was developed. This modeling is based on an axisymmetric unit cell

  5. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O.; Gutierrez, G.; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Z.

    2015-03-01

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of themore »matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  6. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  7. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, O. [Physikalisches Inst, Gottingen (Germany); Univ. Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Gutierrez, G. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Wang, M. H.L.S. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Ye, Z. [Univ. of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  8. A Low Temperature Expansion for Matrix Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Hsuan Lin; Shu-Heng Shao; Yifan Wang; Xi Yin

    2013-04-08

    We analyze solutions to loop-truncated Schwinger-Dyson equations in massless N=2 and N=4 Wess-Zumino matrix quantum mechanics at finite temperature, where conventional perturbation theory breaks down due to IR divergences. We find a rather intricate low temperature expansion that involves fractional power scaling in the temperature, based on a consistent "soft collinear" approximation. We conjecture that at least in the N=4 matrix quantum mechanics, such scaling behavior holds to all perturbative orders in the 1/N expansion. We discuss some preliminary results in analyzing the gauged supersymmetric quantum mechanics using Schwinger-Dyson equations, and comment on the connection to metastable microstates of black holes in the holographic dual of BFSS matrix quantum mechanics.

  9. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ?? decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rath, P. K.

    2013-12-30

    To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0?/0N) for the 0{sup +} ? 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ?? decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

  10. Random matrix model for QCD_3 staggered fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bialas; Z. Burda; B. Petersson

    2010-06-02

    We show that the lowest part of the eigenvalue density of the staggered fermion operator in lattice QCD_3 at small lattice coupling constant beta has exactly the same shape as in QCD_4. This observation is quite surprising, since universal properties of the QCD_3 Dirac operator are expected to be described by a non-chiral matrix model. We show that this effect is related to the specific nature of the staggered fermion discretization and that the eigenvalue density evolves towards the non-chiral random matrix prediction when beta is increased and the continuum limit is approached. We propose a two-matrix model with one free parameter which interpolates between the two limits and very well mimics the pattern of evolution with beta of the eigenvalue density of the staggered fermion operator in QCD_3.

  11. Conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor devices with edge channels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovskii, E. Yu. Bagraev, N. T.

    2014-12-15

    A method for determining the conductance matrix of multiterminal semiconductor structures with edge channels is proposed. The method is based on the solution of a system of linear algebraic equations based on Kirchhoff equations, made up of potential differences U{sub ij} measured at stabilized currents I{sub kl}, where i, j, k, l are terminal numbers. The matrix obtained by solving the system of equations completely describes the structure under study, reflecting its configuration and homogeneity. This method can find wide application when using the known Landauer-Buttiker formalism to analyze carrier transport in the quantum Hall effect and quantum spin Hall effect modes. Within the proposed method, the contribution of the contact area resistances R{sub c} to the formation of conductance matrix elements is taken into account. The possibilities of practical application of the results obtained in developing analog cryptographic devices are considered.

  12. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg Brandt; Gaston Gutierrez; Michael H. L. S. Wang; Zhenyu Ye

    2014-11-19

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the concrete example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. Second, we utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  13. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore »technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  14. Glueball matrix elements: a lattice calculation and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2008-08-22

    We compute the matrix elements of the energy-momentum tensor between glueball states and the vacuum in SU(3) lattice gauge theory and extrapolate them to the continuum. These matrix elements may play an important phenomenological role in identifying glue-rich mesons. Based on a relation derived long ago by the ITEP group for J/psi radiative decays, the scalar matrix element leads to a branching ratio for the glueball that is at least three times larger than the experimentally observed branching ratio for the f_0 mesons above 1GeV. This suggests that the glueball component must be diluted quite strongly among the known scalar mesons. Finally we review the current best continuum determination of the scalar and tensor glueball masses, the deconfining temperature, the string tension and the Lambda parameter, all in units of the Sommer reference scale, using calculations based on the Wilson action.

  15. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inversemore »of the background distribution.« less

  16. Baytown Xylene Fractionation Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hokanson, D.

    2014-01-01

    Energy Reduction using Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC) IETC 2014 New Orleans, Louisiana David Hokanson ExxonMobil Research and Engineering May 22, 2014 ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA.... May 20-23, 2014 2Outline • Baytown Chemical Complex • Xylene Fractionation Overview • Dynamic Matrix Control • Results • Benefits/Wrap-Up ESL-IE-14-05-33 Proceedings of the Thrity-Sixth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 20...

  17. Discoveries far from the lamppost with matrix elements and ranking

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Debnath, Dipsikha; Gainer, James S.; Matchev, Konstantin T.

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of null results in searches for new physics at the LHC motivates the effort to make these searches as model-independent as possible. We describe procedures for adapting the Matrix Element Method for situations where the signal hypothesis is not known a priori. We also present general and intuitive approaches for performing analyses and presenting results, which involve the flattening of background distributions using likelihood information. The first flattening method involves ranking events by background matrix element, the second involves quantile binning with respect to likelihood (and other) variables, and the third method involves reweighting histograms by the inverse of the background distribution.

  18. Data-flow algorithms for parallel matrix computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, D.P.; Stewart, G.W.

    1985-08-01

    This document develops some algorithms and tools for solving matrix problems on parallel-processing computers. Operations are synchronized through data-flow alone, which makes global synchronization unnecessary and enables the algorithms to be implemented on machines with very simple operating systems and communication protocols. As examples, the authors present algorithms that form the main modules for solving Liapounov matrix equations. They compare this approach to wave-front array processors and systolic arrays, and note its advantages in handling mis-sized problems, in evaluating variations of algorithms or architectures, in moving algorithms from system to system, and in debugging parallel algorithms on sequential machines.

  19. Empirical Survey of Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. G. H. Robertson

    2013-01-07

    Neutrinoless double beta decay has been the subject of intensive theoretical work as it represents the only practical approach to discovering whether neutrinos are Majorana particles or not, and whether lepton number is a conserved quantum number. Available calculations of matrix elements and phase-space factors are reviewed from the perspective of a future large-scale experimental search for neutrinoless double beta decay. Somewhat unexpectedly, a uniform inverse correlation between phase space and the square of the nuclear matrix element emerges. As a consequence, no isotope is either favored or disfavored; all have qualitatively the same decay rate per unit mass for any given value of the Majorana mass.

  20. Neutron Resonance Parameters and Covariance Matrix of 239Pu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derrien, Herve; Leal, Luiz C; Larson, Nancy M

    2008-08-01

    In order to obtain the resonance parameters in a single energy range and the corresponding covariance matrix, a reevaluation of 239Pu was performed with the code SAMMY. The most recent experimental data were analyzed or reanalyzed in the energy range thermal to 2.5 keV. The normalization of the fission cross section data was reconsidered by taking into account the most recent measurements of Weston et al. and Wagemans et al. A full resonance parameter covariance matrix was generated. The method used to obtain realistic uncertainties on the average cross section calculated by SAMMY or other processing codes was examined.

  1. INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE ''BURINGIN'' AND DIRECT DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodney C. Ewing; Lumin Wang

    2002-10-30

    Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am, 244 Cm and 237 Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burnup of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-cycle of burn-up. Direct disposal can considerably reduce cost, processing requirements, and radiation exposure to workers.

  2. A matrix generalization of Euler identity e^(ix) = cosx + i sinx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianluca Argentini

    2007-03-15

    In this work we present a matrix generalization of the Euler identity about exponential representation of a complex number. The concept of matrix exponential is used in a fundamental way. We define a notion of matrix imaginary unit which generalizes the usual complex imaginary unit. The Euler-like identity so obtained is compatible with the classical one. Also, we derive some exponential representation for matrix real and imaginary unit, and for the first Pauli matrix.

  3. Passive-matrix-driven field-sequential-color displays Abstract --Passive-matrix-driven field-sequential-color (FSC) displays were successfully fabricated.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Passive-matrix-driven field-sequential-color displays Y. W. Li L. Tan H. S. Kwok Abstract -- Passive-matrix-driven field-sequential-color (FSC) displays were successfully fabricated. It makes use of the display. Keywords -- Passive matrix, field-sequential color. 1 Introduction Field-sequential-color (FSC

  4. Experimental Assessment of Toughness in Ceramic Matrix Composites using the J-integral with Digital Image Correlation Part II: Application to Ceramic Matrix Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Experimental Assessment of Toughness in Ceramic Matrix Composites using the J-integral with Digital Image Correlation Part II: Application to Ceramic Matrix Composites J. Tracy, A. Waas, S. Daly AbstractCf/SiCc ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In Part I, line and area integral adaptations of the J-integral were

  5. PURE NASH EQUILIBRIA OF COORDINATION MATRIX GAMES DAVID P. ROBERTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, David P.

    PURE NASH EQUILIBRIA OF COORDINATION MATRIX GAMES DAVID P. ROBERTS DIVISION OF SCIENCE-by-n coor- dination game has exactly k pure Nash equilibria and compare the payoffs at the different equilibria. Keywords: pure Nash equilibrium, coordination game JEL classification: C72 1. Introduction

  6. Two modulator generalized ellipsometer for complete mueller matrix measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jellison, Jr., Gerald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Modine, Frank A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A two-modulator generalized ellipsometer (2-MGE) comprising two polarizer-photoelastic modulator (PEM) pairs, an optical light source, an optical detection system, and associated data processing and control electronics, where the PEMs are free-running. The input light passes through the first polarizer-PEM pair, reflects off the sample surface or passes through the sample, passes through the second PEM-polarizer pair, and is detected. Each PEM is free running and operates at a different resonant frequency, e.g., 50 and 60 kHz. The resulting time-dependent waveform of the light intensity is a complicated function of time, and depends upon the exact operating frequency and phase of each PEM, the sample, and the azimuthal angles of the polarizer-PEM pairs, but can be resolved into a dc component and eight periodic components. In one embodiment, the waveform is analyzed using a new spectral analysis technique that is similar to Fourier analysis to determine eight sample Mueller matrix elements (normalized to the m.sub.00 Mueller matrix element). The other seven normalized elements of the general 4.times.4 Mueller matrix can be determined by changing the azimuthal angles of the PEM-polarizer pairs with respect to the plane of incidence. Since this instrument can measure all elements of the sample Mueller matrix, it is much more powerful than standard ellipsometers.

  7. Flow of S-matrix poles for elementary quantum potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Belchev; S. G. Neale; M. A. Walton

    2011-10-21

    The poles of the quantum scattering matrix (S-matrix) in the complex momentum plane have been studied extensively. Bound states give rise to S-matrix poles, and other poles correspond to non-normalizable anti-bound, resonance and anti-resonance states. They describe important physics, but their locations can be difficult to find. In pioneering work, Nussenzveig performed the analysis for a square well/wall, and plotted the flow of the poles as the potential depth/height varied. More than fifty years later, however, little has been done in the way of direct generalization of those results. We point out that today we can find such poles easily and efficiently, using numerical techniques and widely available software. We study the poles of the scattering matrix for the simplest piece-wise flat potentials, with one and two adjacent (non-zero) pieces. For the finite well/wall the flow of the poles as a function of the depth/height recovers the results of Nussenzveig. We then analyze the flow for a potential with two independent parts that can be attractive or repulsive, the two-piece potential. These examples provide some insight into the complicated behavior of the resonance, anti-resonance and anti-bound poles.

  8. Single-channel fits and K-matrix constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Workman

    2006-01-10

    A K-matrix formalism is used to relate single-channel and multi-channel fits. We show how the single-channel formalism changes as new hadronic channels become accessible. These relations are compared to those commonly used to fit pseudoscalar meson photoproduction data.

  9. REACTIONS IN RARE GAS MATRICES MATRIX AND SITE EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Yehuda

    ·3·2 Matrix effects 248 3·3·2·1 Tunneling 248 3·3·2·2 Thermal and infrared induced conformational of olefins by NO2 263 4·3 Long range interactions 264 4·3·1 Electron transfer and exciplex formation 264 4 and reactions involving diffusing species. Methods for simulating the structure of trapping sites

  10. Simulation of bilinear flow in single matrix block drainage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branajaya, Romi Triaji

    2005-02-17

    kf,. The fracture half-length reflects on a/b aspect ratio. The analytical solution for hydraulic fracture developed by Cinco-Ley and Guppy serves as the validation of matrix block drainage. Analysis on the flow regimes which occurred for different...

  11. Application of Matrix Completion on Water Treatment Data Sofia Savvaki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsakalides, Panagiotis

    Application of Matrix Completion on Water Treatment Data Sofia Savvaki savvaki@csd.uoc.gr Grigorios) have rev- olutionized water management in urban areas. Nevertheless, literature reports minor progress in introducing CPS-based systems at industrial water treatment plants, responsible for water purification

  12. Green's Functions in Non-hermitian Random Matrix Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romuald A. Janik; Maciej A. Nowak; Gabor Papp; Ismail Zahed

    1999-09-06

    We review some recent techniques for dealing with non-hermitian random matrix models based on generalized Green's functions. We introduce the diagrammatic methods in the hermitian case and generalize them to the non-hermitian case. The results are illustrated in terms of the eigenvalue distribution, eigenvector statistics and addition laws.

  13. The Evolution Matrix: Recovering Software Evolution using Software Visualization Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanza, Michele

    The Evolution Matrix: Recovering Software Evolution using Software Visualization Techniques Michele - ABSTRACT One of the major problems in software evolution is coping with the complexity which stems from and effective way to visualize the evolution of software systems which helps to recover the evolution of object

  14. Unitarity and the three flavour neutrino mixing matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen Parke; Mark Ross-Lonergan

    2015-08-20

    Unitarity is a fundamental property of any theory required to ensure we work in a theoretically consistent framework. In comparison with the quark sector, experimental tests of unitarity for the 3x3 neutrino mixing matrix are considerably weaker. It must be remembered that the vast majority of our information on the neutrino mixing angles originates from $\\overline{\

  15. Unitarity and the three flavour neutrino mixing matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parke, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Unitarity is a fundamental property of any theory required to ensure we work in a theoretically consistent framework. In comparison with the quark sector, experimental tests of unitarity for the 3x3 neutrino mixing matrix are considerably weaker. It must be remembered that the vast majority of our information on the neutrino mixing angles originates from $\\overline{\

  16. CODEBOOK-BASED SCALABLE MUSIC TAGGING WITH POISSON MATRIX FACTORIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Dan

    CODEBOOK-BASED SCALABLE MUSIC TAGGING WITH POISSON MATRIX FACTORIZATION Dawen Liang, John Paisley Paisley, Daniel P. W. Ellis. Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Li- cense (CC BY 4.0). Attribution: Dawen Liang, John Paisley, Daniel P. W. Ellis. "Codebook-based scalable music

  17. Matrix-based Methods for College Football Vladimir Boginski1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butenko, Sergiy

    Matrix-based Methods for College Football Rankings Vladimir Boginski1 , Sergiy Butenko2 and Panos M Introduction College football season is one of the most popular and anticipated sports competitions in the United States. Many of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I-A football games

  18. Computation and Uses of the Semidiscrete Matrix Decomposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kolda, T.G.; O'Leary, D.P.

    1999-06-01

    We derive algorithms for computing a semidiscrete approximation to a matrix in the Frobenius and weighted norms. The approximation is formed as a weighted sum of outer products of vectors whose elements are +/=1 or 0, so the storage required by the approximation is quite small.

  19. New Advances in Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz, Jose Barea [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, C.S.I.C. Unidad Asociada al Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, 41080 Sevilla (Spain)

    2010-08-04

    We present the matrix elements necessary to evaluate the half-life of some neutrinoless double beta decay candidates in the framework of the microscopic interacting boson model (IBM). We compare our results with those from other models and extract some simple features of the calculations.

  20. TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pang, Grantham

    1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

  1. RADON TRANSFORM ON SYMMETRIC MATRIX DOMAINS GENKAI ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Genkai

    RADON TRANSFORM ON SYMMETRIC MATRIX DOMAINS GENKAI ZHANG Abstract. Let K = R; C ; H be the #12;eld space. We consider the Radon transform Rf(y) for functions f 2 C 1 0 (X) de#12;ned by integration of f 0 Radon transform, namely MR t Rf = cf . This generalizes

  2. Minimizing the Communication Time for Matrix Multiplication on Multiprocessors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glowinski, Roland

    TR­23­91 September 1991 Revised August 1992 Parallel Computing Research Group Center for Research the lengths of the machine axes equal approximately to the ratio between the lengths of the three axes the number of columns of the product matrix. All our algorithms use standard communication functions. 1

  3. P MATRIX PROPERTIES, INJECTIVITY AND STABILITY IN CHEMICAL REACTION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaji,. Murad

    P MATRIX PROPERTIES, INJECTIVITY AND STABILITY IN CHEMICAL REACTION SYSTEMS MURAD BANAJI§, PETE. Chemical reactions; P matrices; Injectivity; Stability; Mass action AMS subject classifications. 80A30; 15A48; 34D30 1. Introduction. In this paper we will study chemical reaction systems, and systems derived

  4. Matrix Effects in Biological Mass Spectrometry Imaging: Identification and Compensation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lanekoff, Ingela T.; Stevens, Susan; Stenzel-Poore, Mary; Laskin, Julia

    2014-07-21

    Matrix effects in mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) may affect the observed molecular distribution in chemical and biological systems. In this study, we introduce an experimental approach that efficiently compensates for matrix effects in nanospray desorption electrospray ionization (nano-DESI) MSI without introducing any complexity into the experimental protocol. We demonstrate compensation for matrix effects in nano-DESI MSI of phosphatidylcholine (PC) in normal and ischemic mouse brain tissue by doping the nano-DESI solvent with PC standards. Specifically, we use mouse brain tissue of a middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model with an ischemic region localized to one hemisphere of the brain. Due to similar suppression in ionization of endogenous PC molecules extracted from the tissue and PC standards added to the solvent, matrix effects are eliminated by normalizing the intensity of the sodium and potassium adducts of endogenous PC to the intensity of the corresponding adduct of the PC standard. This approach efficiently compensates for signal variations resulting from differences in the local concentrations of sodium and potassium in tissue sections and from the complexity of the extracted analyte mixture derived from local variations in molecular composition.

  5. Introduction Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaidel-Bar, Ronen

    Introduction Cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays multiple roles in the regulation of cell behavior and fate. In most adhesion sites, integrin receptors mediate the binding to the ECM via; Martin et al., 2002). The intracellular domain of integrin- mediated adhesions contains a large number

  6. Matrix Product States approach to non-Markovian processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Descamps Benoit

    2014-10-31

    A matrix product state approach to non-Markovian, classical and quantum processes is discussed. In the classical case, the Radon-Nikodym derivative of all processes can be embedded into quantum measurement procedure. In the both cases, quantum and classical, the master equation can be derived from a projecting a quantum Markovian process onto a lower dimensional subspace.

  7. OSKI: A Library of Automatically Tuned Sparse Matrix Kernels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    OSKI: A Library of Automatically Tuned Sparse Matrix Kernels Richard Vuduc (LLNL), James Demmel in progress · Written in C (can call from Fortran) #12;Motivation: The Difficulty of Tuning · n = 21216 · nnz data structures ­ Step 2: Make BLAS-like kernel calls int* ptr = ..., *ind = ...; double* val

  8. Methods for transfer matrix evaluation applied to thermoacoustics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Methods for transfer matrix evaluation applied to thermoacoustics F. Bannwart, G. Penelet, P 2012 Nantes Conference 23-27 April 2012, Nantes, France 3029 #12;The design of a thermoacoustic (TA the required thermoacoustic instability in its core to make it work. Such conditions can be calculated

  9. MATH 532: Linear Algebra Chapter 3: Matrix Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fasshauer, Greg

    MATH 532: Linear Algebra Chapter 3: Matrix Algebra Greg Fasshauer Department of Applied Mathematics;Introduction Linear algebra is an old subject fasshauer@iit.edu MATH 532 5 #12;Introduction Linear algebra]. fasshauer@iit.edu MATH 532 5 #12;Introduction Linear algebra is an old subject The origins are attributed

  10. West Virginia University Institute of Technology Curriculum Matrix

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , Fall 2010 Athletic Coaching Education 025T Sport Management 026T Major Effective, Fall 2010 Technology Management BS 52.0205 Technology Management 027T Information Technology ET10 Inactive, Fall 2012 ForensicWest Virginia University Institute of Technology Curriculum Matrix Updated July 31 2014 Click

  11. Matrix Modeling Methods for Spaceflight Campaign Logistics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Matrix Modeling Methods for Spaceflight Campaign Logistics Analysis Afreen Siddiqi and Olivier L-based modeling approach for analyzing spaceflight campaign logistics. A campaign is considered to be a series logistics properties. A logistics strategy index is proposed for quantifying manifesting strategies

  12. Simple radiative neutrino mass matrix for solar and atmospheric oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, E

    1995-01-01

    A simple 3 X 3 neutrino Majorana mass matrix is proposed to accommodate both the solar and atmospheric neutrino deficits. This scenario can be realized naturally by a radiative mechanism for the generation of neutrino masses. It also goes together naturally with electroweak baryogenesis and cold dark matter in a specific model.

  13. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a result of the WAO reaction. (4) Off-gas composition was measured in the resulting gas phase from the reaction. Benzene and hydrogen were formed during the reaction, but they were reasonably low in the off-gas at 0.096 and 0.0063 vol% respectively. Considering the consistency in replicating similar test results with simulated waste and Tank 48H waste under similar test conditions, the results confirm the validity of the simulant for other WAO test conditions.

  14. Weak Matrix Elements on the Lattice --- Circa 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Soni

    1995-10-20

    Status of weak matrix elements is reviewed. In particular, $\\epspeps$, $\\bkastg$, $B_K$, $B_B$ and $B_{B_s}$ are discussed and the overall situation with respect to the lattice effort and some of its phenomenological implications are summarized. For $\\epspeps$ the need for the relevant matrix elements is stressed in view of the forthcoming improved experiments. For some of the operators, (e.g.\\ $O_6$), even bounds on their matrix elements would be very helpful. On $\\bkastg$, a constant behavior of $T_2$ appears disfavored although dependence of $T_2$ could, of course, be milder than a simple pole. Improved data is badly needed to settle this important issue firmly, especially in view of its ramification for extractions of $V_{td}$ from $B\\to\\rho\\gamma$. On $B_K$, the preliminary result from JLQCD appears to contradict Sharpe \\etal\\ JLQCD data seems to fit very well to linear $a$ dependence and leads to an appreciably lower value of $B_K$. Four studies of $B_K$ in the ``full'' ($n_f=2$) theory indicate very little quenching effects on $B_K$; the full theory value seems to be just a little less than the quenched result. Based on expectations from HQET, analysis of the $B$-parameter ($B_{h\\ell}$) for the heavy-light mesons via $B_{h\\ell}={}$constant${}+{}$constants$^\\prime/m_{h\\ell}$ is suggested. A summary of an illustrative sample of hadron matrix elements is given and constraints on CKM parameters (e.g.\\ $V_{td}/V_{ts}$), on the unitarity triangle and on $x_s/x_d$, emerging from the lattice calculations along with experimental results are briefly discussed. In quite a few cases, for the first time, some indication of quenching errors on weak matrix elements are now becoming available.

  15. Small-energy analysis for the selfadjoint matrix Schrödinger operator on the half line. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aktosun, Tuncay; Klaus, Martin; Weder, Ricardo

    2014-03-15

    The matrix Schrödinger equation with a selfadjoint matrix potential is considered on the half line with the most general selfadjoint boundary condition at the origin. When the matrix potential is integrable and has a second moment, it is shown that the corresponding scattering matrix is differentiable at zero energy. An explicit formula is provided for the derivative of the scattering matrix at zero energy. The previously established results when the potential has only the first moment are improved when the second moment exists, by presenting the small-energy asymptotics for the related Jost matrix, its inverse, and various other quantities relevant to the corresponding direct and inverse scattering problems.

  16. SIAM J. MATRIX ANAL. APPL. c 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 32, No. 4, pp. 12511274

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinsson, Gunnar

    SIAM J. MATRIX ANAL. APPL. c 2011 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics Vol. 32, No. 4, pp OF A MATRIX P. G. MARTINSSON Abstract. Randomized sampling has recently been proven a highly efficient admits algebraic operations (matrix-vector multiplications, matrix factorizations, matrix inversion, etc

  17. Algebraic-matrix calculation of vibrational levels of triatomic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sedivcova-Uhlikova, T; Manini, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    We introduce an accurate and efficient algebraic technique for the computation of the vibrational spectra of triatomic molecules, of both linear and bent equilibrium geometry. The full three-dimensional potential energy surface (PES), which can be based on entirely {\\it ab initio} data, is parameterized as a product Morse-cosine expansion, expressed in bond-angle internal coordinates, and includes explicit interactions among the local modes. We describe the stretching degrees of freedom in the framework of a Morse-type expansion on a suitable algebraic basis, which provides exact analytical expressions for the elements of a sparse Hamiltonian matrix. Likewise, we use a cosine power expansion on a spherical harmonics basis for the bending degree of freedom. The resulting matrix representation in the product space is very sparse and vibrational levels and eigenfunctions can be obtained by efficient diagonalization techniques. We apply this method to carbonyl sulfide OCS, hydrogen cyanide HCN, water H$_2$O, and ...

  18. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  19. Standard Guide for Testing Polymer Matrix Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 This guide summarizes the application of ASTM standard test methods (and other supporting standards) to continuous-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite materials. The most commonly used or most applicable ASTM standards are included, emphasizing use of standards of Committee D30 on Composite Materials. 1.2 This guide does not cover all possible standards that could apply to polymer matrix composites and restricts discussion to the documented scope. Commonly used but non-standard industry extensions of test method scopes, such as application of static test methods to fatigue testing, are not discussed. A more complete summary of general composite testing standards, including non-ASTM test methods, is included in the Composite Materials Handbook (MIL-HDBK-17). Additional specific recommendations for testing textile (fabric, braided) composites are contained in Guide D6856. 1.3 This guide does not specify a system of measurement; the systems specified within each of the referenced standards shall appl...

  20. Merging parton showers and matrix elements -- back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavesson, Nils

    2008-01-01

    We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.

  1. Merging parton showers and matrix elements -- back to basics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nils Lavesson; Leif Lonnblad

    2008-04-23

    We make a thorough comparison between different schemes of merging fixed-order tree-level matrix element generators with parton-shower models. We use the most basic benchmark of the O(alpha_S) correction to e+e- -> jets, where the simple kinematics allows us to study in detail the transition between the matrix-element and parton-shower regions. We find that the CKKW-based schemes give a reasonably smooth transition between these regions, although problems may occur if the parton shower used is not ordered in transverse momentum. However, the so-called Pseudo-Shower and MLM schemes turn out to have potentially serious problems due to different scale definitions in different regions of phase space, and due to sensitivity to the details in the initial conditions of the parton shower programs used.

  2. Arbitrary Rotation Invariant Random Matrix Ensembles and Supersymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Guhr

    2006-06-03

    We generalize the supersymmetry method in Random Matrix Theory to arbitrary rotation invariant ensembles. Our exact approach further extends a previous contribution in which we constructed a supersymmetric representation for the class of norm-dependent Random Matrix Ensembles. Here, we derive a supersymmetric formulation under very general circumstances. A projector is identified that provides the mapping of the probability density from ordinary to superspace. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that setting up the theory in Fourier superspace has considerable advantages. General and exact expressions for the correlation functions are given. We also show how the use of hyperbolic symmetry can be circumvented in the present context in which the non-linear sigma model is not used. We construct exact supersymmetric integral representations of the correlation functions for arbitrary positions of the imaginary increments in the Green functions.

  3. Multi linear formulation of differential geometry and matrix regularizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Arnlind; Jens Hoppe; Gerhard Huisken

    2010-09-24

    We prove that many aspects of the differential geometry of embedded Riemannian manifolds can be formulated in terms of multi linear algebraic structures on the space of smooth functions. In particular, we find algebraic expressions for Weingarten's formula, the Ricci curvature and the Codazzi-Mainardi equations. For matrix analogues of embedded surfaces we define discrete curvatures and Euler characteristics, and a non-commutative Gauss--Bonnet theorem is shown to follow. We derive simple expressions for the discrete Gauss curvature in terms of matrices representing the embedding coordinates, and a large class of explicit examples is provided. Furthermore, we illustrate the fact that techniques from differential geometry can carry over to matrix analogues by proving that a bound on the discrete Gauss curvature implies a bound on the eigenvalues of the discrete Laplace operator.

  4. Random matrix approach to multivariate categorical data analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patil, Aashay

    2015-01-01

    Correlation and similarity measures are widely used in all the areas of sciences and social sciences. Often the variables are not numbers but are instead qualitative descriptors called categorical data. We define and study similarity matrix, as a measure of similarity, for the case of categorical data. This is of interest due to a deluge of categorical data, such as movie ratings, top-10 rankings and data from social media, in the public domain that require analysis. We show that the statistical properties of the spectra of similarity matrices, constructed from categorical data, follow those from random matrix theory. We demonstrate this approach by applying it to the data of Indian general elections and sea level pressures in North Atlantic ocean.

  5. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayuti, M. [Faculty of Engineering, Malikussaleh University of Lhokseumawe, 24300 Aceh (Indonesia); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  6. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cornie, James A. (North Chelmsford, MA); Kattamis, Theodoulos (Watertown, MA); Chambers, Brent V. (Cambridge, MA); Bond, Bruce E. (Bedford, MA); Varela, Raul H. (Canton, MA)

    1989-01-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  7. Correlation matrix decomposition of WIG20 intraday fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rak, R; Kwapien, J; Oswiecimka, P

    2006-01-01

    Using the correlation matrix formalism we study the temporal aspects of the Warsaw Stock Market evolution as represented by the WIG20 index. The high frequency (1 min) WIG20 recordings over the time period between January 2001 and October 2005 are used. The entries of the correlation matrix considered here connect different distinct periods of the stock market dynamics, like days or weeks. Such a methodology allows to decompose the price fluctuations into the orthogonal eigensignals that quantify different modes of the underlying dynamics. The magnitudes of the corresponding eigenvalues reflect the strengths of such modes. One observation made in this paper is that strength of the daily trend in the WIG20 dynamics systematically decreases when going from 2001 to 2005. Another is that large events in the return fluctuations are primarily associated with a few most collective eigensignals.

  8. K --> pi pi matrix elements from mixed action lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jack Laiho; Ruth S. Van de Water

    2010-11-19

    We present a new method for determining K --> pi pi matrix elements from lattice simulations that is less costly than direct simulations of K --> pi pi at physical kinematics. It improves, however, upon the traditional "indirect'' approach of constructing the K --> pi pi matrix elements using NLO SU(3) ChPT, which can lead to large higher-order chiral corrections. Using the explicit example of the Delta I =3/2 (27,1) operator to illustrate the method, we obtain a value for Re(A_2) that agrees with experiment and has a total uncertainty of ~20%. Although our simulations use domain-wall valence quarks on the MILC asqtad-improved gauge configurations, this method is more general and can be applied to calculations with any fermion formulation.

  9. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Gene W. (Los Alamos, NM); Roybal, Herman E. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1985-01-01

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  10. Fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, G.W.; Roybal, H.E.

    1983-11-14

    A method of producing fluorinated diamond particles bonded in a filled fluorocarbon resin matrix. Simple hot pressing techniques permit the formation of such matrices from which diamond impregnated grinding tools and other articles of manufacture can be produced. Teflon fluorocarbon resins filled with Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ yield grinding tools with substantially improved work-to-wear ratios over grinding wheels known in the art.

  11. From Random Matrix Theory to Statistical Mechanics - Anyon Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Alonso; Sudhir R. Jain

    1996-08-28

    Motivated by numerical experiments and studies of quantum systems which are classically chaotic, we take a Random Matrix description of a Hard-sphere gas to Statistical Mechanical description. We apply this to Anyon gas and obtain a formal expression for the momentum distribution. Various limiting situations are discussed and are found in agreement with the well-known results on Hard-sphere gas in low-density regime.

  12. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  13. Complementary Vasoactivity and Matrix Remodeling in Arteries: Theoretical Foundations and Predicted Trends 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valentin, Auturo III

    2010-10-12

    experminental observations suggest that cell and matrix turnover within vasoaltered states enable arteries to adapt to sustained changes in mechanical stimuli. The goal herein is to show explicitly how altered smooth muscle contractility and matrix growth...

  14. On Nonnegative Matrix Factorization Algorithms for Signal-Dependent Noise with Application to Electromyography Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devarajan, Karthik

    Nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) by the multiplicative updates algorithm is a powerful machine learning method for decomposing a high-dimensional nonnegative matrix V into two nonnegative matrices, W and H, where V ...

  15. Matrix Elements with Vetoes in the CASCADE Monte Carlo Event Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Deak; Francesco Hautmann; Hannes Jung; Krzysztof Kutak

    2012-06-08

    We illustrate a study based on a veto technique to match parton showers and matrix elements in the Cascade Monte Carlo event generator, and present a numerical application to gluon matrix elements for jet production.

  16. Comment on 'Dirac R-matrix method for the calculation of x-ray...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Comment on 'Dirac R-matrix method for the calculation of x-ray line polarization' Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Comment on 'Dirac R-matrix method for the calculation...

  17. Graph Expansion Analysis for Communication Costs of Fast Rectangular Matrix Multiplication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Graph Expansion Analysis for Communication Costs of Fast Rectangular Matrix Multiplication Grey analysis of computational DAGs is useful for obtaining communication cost lower bounds where previous to fast algorithms for rectangular matrix multiplication, obtaining a new class of communication cost

  18. POLYPHONIC PIANO TRANSCRIPTION USING NON-NEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORISATION WITH GROUP SPARSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumbley, Mark

    POLYPHONIC PIANO TRANSCRIPTION USING NON-NEGATIVE MATRIX FACTORISATION WITH GROUP SPARSITY Ken O'Hanlon and Mark D. Plumbley Queen Mary University of London ABSTRACT Non-negative Matrix Factorisation (NMF

  19. Matrix laminate composites: Realizable approximations for the effective moduli of piezoelectric dispersions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torquato, Salvatore

    Matrix laminate composites: Realizable approximations for the effective moduli of piezoelectric of dispersions called matrix laminates composites that are known to possess extremal elastic and dielectric performance characteristics com- pared to the pure piezoelectric ceramic. Often composites are the only

  20. From Signaling to Structure: Regulation of Extracellular Matrix in C. elegans 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schultz, Robbie

    2015-04-03

    The extracellular matrix is a meshwork of molecules that reside in the microenvironment between cells. Extracellular matrix, while historically known as an inert scaffold, is critical in regulating cell communication, ...

  1. A micromechanical model of oxidation effects in SiC/Ti metal matrix composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wittig, Laurrie Ann

    1993-01-01

    Residual stresses develop in metal matrix composites (NMC) during cool down from processing temperatures and subsequent thermal fatigue loading due to a material mismatch between the fiber and the matrix. These residual stresses often initiate...

  2. Mathematical investigation of one-way transform matrix options.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, James Arlin

    2006-01-01

    One-way transforms have been used in weapon systems processors since the mid- to late-1970s in order to help recognize insertion of correct pre-arm information while maintaining abnormal-environment safety. Level-One, Level-Two, and Level-Three transforms have been designed. The Level-One and Level-Two transforms have been implemented in weapon systems, and both of these transforms are equivalent to matrix multiplication applied to the inserted information. The Level-Two transform, utilizing a 6 x 6 matrix, provided the basis for the ''System 2'' interface definition for Unique-Signal digital communication between aircraft and attached weapons. The investigation described in this report was carried out to find out if there were other size matrices that would be equivalent to the 6 x 6 Level-Two matrix. One reason for the investigation was to find out whether or not other dimensions were possible, and if so, to derive implementation options. Another important reason was to more fully explore the potential for inadvertent inversion. The results were that additional implementation methods were discovered, but no inversion weaknesses were revealed.

  3. Thermosetting Polymer-Matrix Composites for Strucutral Repair Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Kirby Goertzen

    2007-12-01

    Several classes of thermosetting polymer matrix composites were evaluated for use in structural repair applications. Initial work involved the characterization and evaluation of woven carbon fiber/epoxy matrix composites for structural pipeline repair. Cyanate ester resins were evaluated as a replacement for epoxy in composites for high-temperature pipe repair applications, and as the basis for adhesives for resin infusion repair of high-temperature composite materials. Carbon fiber/cyanate ester matrix composites and fumed silica/cyanate ester nanocomposites were evaluated for their thermal, mechanical, viscoelastic, and rheological properties as they relate to their structure, chemistry, and processing characteristics. The bisphenol E cyanate ester under investigation possesses a high glass transition temperature, excellent mechanical properties, and unique ambient temperature processability. The incorporate of fumed silica served to enhance the mechanical and rheological properties of the polymer and reduce thermal expansion without sacrificing glass transition or drastically altering curing kinetics. Characterization of the composites included dynamic mechanical analysis, thermomechanical analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, rheological and rheokinetic evaluation, and transmission electron microscopy.

  4. CP violation and Kaon weak matrix elements from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garron, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    In this short review, I present the recent lattice computations of kaon weak matrix elements relevant to $K \\to \\pi\\pi$ decays and neutral kaon mixing. These matrix elements are key to the theoretical determination of the CP violation parameters $\\epsilon$ and $\\epsilon'$ . Impressive progress have been achieved recently, in particular the first realistic computation of $\\epsilon'/\\epsilon$ with physical kinematics has been reported in [1]. The novelty is the $\\Delta I = 1/2$ channel, whereas the $\\Delta I = 3/2$ contribution is now computed at several values of the lattice spacing and extrapolated to the continuum limit. I will also present the status of $B_K$ and discuss its error budget, with a particular emphasis on the perturbative error. Finally I will review the matrix elements of neutral kaon mixing beyond the standard model and will argue that the discrepancy observed by different collaborations could be explained by the renormalisation procedure of the relevant four-quark operators.

  5. Introduction to M(atrix) theory and noncommutative geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Konechny; A. Schwarz

    2001-07-29

    Noncommutative geometry is based on an idea that an associative algebra can be regarded as "an algebra of functions on a noncommutative space". The major contribution to noncommutative geometry was made by A. Connes, who, in particular, analyzed Yang-Mills theories on noncommutative spaces, using important notions that were introduced in his papers (connection, Chern character, etc). It was found recently that Yang-Mills theories on noncommutative spaces appear naturally in string/M-theory; the notions and results of noncommutative geometry were applied very successfully to the problems of physics. In this paper we give a mostly self-contained review of some aspects of M(atrix) theory, of Connes' noncommutative geometry and of applications of noncommutative geometry to M(atrix) theory. The topics include introduction to BFSS and IKKT matrix models, compactifications on noncommutative tori, a review of basic notions of noncommutative geometry with a detailed discussion of noncommutative tori, Morita equivalence and $SO(d,d|{\\mathbb Z})$-duality, an elementary discussion of instantons and noncommutative orbifolds. The review is primarily intended for physicists who would like to learn some basic techniques of noncommutative geometry and how they can be applied in string theory and to mathematicians who would like to learn about some new problems arising in theoretical physics.

  6. Technique for information retrieval using enhanced latent semantic analysis generating rank approximation matrix by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chew, Peter A; Bader, Brett W

    2012-10-16

    A technique for information retrieval includes parsing a corpus to identify a number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. A weighted morpheme-by-document matrix is generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus and based at least in part on a weighting function. The weighted morpheme-by-document matrix separately enumerates instances of stems and affixes. Additionally or alternatively, a term-by-term alignment matrix may be generated based at least in part on the number of wordform instances within each document of the corpus. At least one lower rank approximation matrix is generated by factorizing the weighted morpheme-by-document matrix and/or the term-by-term alignment matrix.

  7. Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of Satya N. Majumdar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of tails Satya N. Majumdar Laboratoire de Physique Th, 2012 S.N. Majumdar Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of tails #12;First Appearence of Random Matrices S.N. Majumdar Top eigenvalue of a random matrix: A tale of tails #12;First Appearence of Random

  8. Nuclear matrix association of the human b-globin locus utilizing a novel approach to quantitative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draghici, Sorin

    Nuclear matrix association of the human b-globin locus utilizing a novel approach to quantitative- hypersensitive sites (HS) ~15 kb upstream of the e-globin gene. Nuclear matrix-associated regions (MARs) organize chromatin into functional domains and at least one of the HS appears bound to the nuclear matrix. We have

  9. Uncertainties in Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engel, Jonathan

    Uncertainties in Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay Jonathan Engel Abstract. I briefly review calculations of the matrix elements governing neutrinoless double-beta decay;Uncertainties in Nuclear Matrix Elements for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay 2 in reducing theoretical error

  10. In-situ formation of nanoparticles within a silicon-based matrix

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM); Wilcoxon, Jess P. (Albuquerque, NM); Abrams, Billie L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-06-10

    A method for encapsulating nanoparticles with an encapsulating matrix that minimizes aggregation and maintains favorable properties of the nanoparticles. The matrix comprises silicon-based network-forming compounds such as ormosils and polysiloxanes. The nanoparticles are synthesized from precursors directly within the silicon-based matrix.

  11. Random matrix analysis of the QCD sign problem Jacques Bloch and Tilo Wettig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloch, Jacques C.R.

    Random matrix analysis of the QCD sign problem Jacques Bloch and Tilo Wettig Institute of chiral random matrix theory and QCD to leading order in the epsilon regime, we compute the phase of the fermion determinant for general topology in random matrix theory as a function of the quark chemical

  12. PCA & Matrix Factorizations for Learning, ICML 2005 Tutorial, Chris Ding 56 Part 2. Spectral Clustering from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Chris

    PCA & Matrix Factorizations for Learning, ICML 2005 Tutorial, Chris Ding 56 Part 2. Spectral Clustering from Matrix Perspective A brief tutorial emphasizing recent developments (More detailed tutorial is given in ICML'04 ) #12;PCA & Matrix Factorizations for Learning, ICML 2005 Tutorial, Chris Ding 57 From

  13. Matrix-Vector Multiplication in Sub-Quadratic Time (Some Preprocessing Required)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boneh, Dan

    Matrix-Vector Multiplication in Sub-Quadratic Time (Some Preprocessing Required) Ryan Williams Abstract We show that any n × n matrix A over any finite semiring can be preprocessed in O(n2+ ) time applications are described. 1 Introduction Matrix-vector multiplication is an absolutely fundamental operation

  14. Google matrix and Ulam networks of intermittency maps L. Ermann and D. L. Shepelyansky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepelyansky, Dima

    Google matrix and Ulam networks of intermittency maps L. Ermann and D. L. Shepelyansky Laboratoire the properties of the Google matrix of an Ulam network generated by intermittency maps. This network is created by the Ulam method which gives a matrix approximant for the Perron-Frobenius operator of dynamical map

  15. Matrix rheology effects on reaction rim growth II: coupled diffusion and creep model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    Matrix rheology effects on reaction rim growth II: coupled diffusion and creep model D. W. SCHMID,1 of the matrix that surrounds the reaction sites where the volume change takes place. Consequently, mineral reactions and the mechanical response of the rock matrix are coupled. A companion paper in this issue

  16. Matrix Inverses Consider the ordinary algebraic equation and its solution shown below

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Carl

    Matrix Inverses Consider the ordinary algebraic equation and its solution shown below: Since the linear system can be written as where , , and , (A = coefficient matrix, x = variable vector, b = constant vector) it is reasonable to ask if the matrix equation corresponding to above system of n linear

  17. Matrix-vector computations with BETL Lars Kielhorn, Seminar for Applied Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grohs, Philipp

    Matrix-vector computations with BETL Lars Kielhorn, Seminar for Applied Mathematics November 26 focus on how linear algebra operations are incorporated into Betl and how the interfaces to matrix problems. A remedy to this drawback is the application of matrix compression algorithms like, e

  18. The matrix square root from a new functional perspective: theoretical results and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meini, Beatrice

    The matrix square root from a new functional perspective: theoretical results and computational issues Beatrice Meini #3; Abstract We give a new characterization of the matrix square root and a new algorithm for its computation. We show how the matrix square root is related to the constant block coe

  19. Sparse Matrix Multiplications for Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Calculations in an Atom-Centered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Roi

    Sparse Matrix Multiplications for Linear Scaling Electronic Structure Calculations in an Atom October 2002 Abstract: A sparse matrix multiplication scheme with multiatom blocks is reported, a tool to conventional element-by-element sparse matrix multiplication schemes, efficiency is gained by the use

  20. Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of polymeric materials: a molecular dynamics study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation of polymeric materials: a molecular dynamics study Tatiana Matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) has been recently developed to deposit high-quality thin is modeled as a solution of polymer molecules in a molecular matrix. The breathing sphere model is used