Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Transition-metal silicides as materials for magnet-semiconductor heterostructures*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transition-metal silicides as materials for magnet-semiconductor heterostructures* Peter Kratzer as of binary late transition metal monosilicides, in contact with the Si surface. For the Heusler alloy Co2MnSi, we could show that the 001 surface retains the half-metallic character of the bulk if a fully Mn

2

Superatoms and Metal-Semiconductor Motifs for Cluster Materials  

SciTech Connect

A molecular understanding of catalysis and catalytically active materials is of fundamental importance in designing new substances for applications in energy and fuels. We have performed reactivity studies and ultrafast ionization and coulomb explosion studies on a variety of catalytically-relevant materials, including transition metal oxides of Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ti, V, Nb, and Ta. We demonstrate that differences in charge state, geometry, and elemental composition of clusters of such materials determine chemical reactivity and ionization behavior, crucial steps in improving performance of catalysts.

Castleman, A. W.

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

3

Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Semiconductor assisted metal deposition for nanolithography applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article of manufacture and method of forming nanoparticle sized material components. A semiconductor oxide substrate includes nanoparticles of semiconductor oxide. A modifier is deposited onto the nanoparticles, and a source of metal ions are deposited in association with the semiconductor and the modifier, the modifier enabling electronic hole scavenging and chelation of the metal ions. The metal ions and modifier are illuminated to cause reduction of the metal ions to metal onto the semiconductor nanoparticles.

Rajh, Tijana (Naperville, IL); Meshkov, Natalia (Downers Grove, IL); Nedelijkovic, Jovan M. (Belgrade, YU); Skubal, Laura R. (West Brooklyn, IL); Tiede, David M. (Elmhurst, IL); Thurnauer, Marion (Downers Grove, IL)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sharma, Ashwani K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Silicon metal-semiconductor-metal photodetector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Silicon MSM photodiodes sensitive to radiation in the visible to near infrared spectral range are produced by altering the absorption characteristics of crystalline Si by ion implantation. The implantation produces a defected region below the surface of the silicon with the highest concentration of defects at its base which acts to reduce the contribution of charge carriers formed below the defected layer. The charge carriers generated by the radiation in the upper regions of the defected layer are very quickly collected between biased Schottky barrier electrodes which form a metal-semiconductor-metal structure for the photodiode.

Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Myers, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sharma, Ashwani K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Hydrogenated Graphene Nanoflakes: Semiconductor to Half-Metal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogenated Graphene Nanoflakes: Semiconductor to Half-Metal Transition and Remarkable Large Magnetism. Hydrogenated Graphene Nanoflakes: Semiconductor to Half-Metal Transition...

8

Semiconductor device PN junction fabrication using optical processing of amorphous semiconductor material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems and methods for semiconductor device PN junction fabrication are provided. In one embodiment, a method for fabricating an electrical device having a P-N junction comprises: depositing a layer of amorphous semiconductor material onto a crystalline semiconductor base, wherein the crystalline semiconductor base comprises a crystalline phase of a same semiconductor as the amorphous layer; and growing the layer of amorphous semiconductor material into a layer of crystalline semiconductor material that is epitaxially matched to the lattice structure of the crystalline semiconductor base by applying an optical energy that penetrates at least the amorphous semiconductor material.

Sopori, Bhushan; Rangappan, Anikara

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

9

Contacts Between Metals and Between a Metal and a Semiconductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of contacts between metals and between a metal and a semiconductor is treated classically with the help of the results of wave mechanical theory of electron energy states in solids. The potential and electron density distributions in the two bodies near the contact are discussed. The bodies are assumed to be in immediate contact. The problem of a body in vacuum and the problem of two bodies separated by a gap are discussed qualitatively.

H. Y. Fan

1942-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Method of physical vapor deposition of metal oxides on semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for growing a metal oxide thin film upon a semiconductor surface with a physical vapor deposition technique in a high-vacuum environment and a structure formed with the process involves the steps of heating the semiconductor surface and introducing hydrogen gas into the high-vacuum environment to develop conditions at the semiconductor surface which are favorable for growing the desired metal oxide upon the semiconductor surface yet is unfavorable for the formation of any native oxides upon the semiconductor. More specifically, the temperature of the semiconductor surface and the ratio of hydrogen partial pressure to water pressure within the vacuum environment are high enough to render the formation of native oxides on the semiconductor surface thermodynamically unstable yet are not so high that the formation of the desired metal oxide on the semiconductor surface is thermodynamically unstable. Having established these conditions, constituent atoms of the metal oxide to be deposited upon the semiconductor surface are directed toward the surface of the semiconductor by a physical vapor deposition technique so that the atoms come to rest upon the semiconductor surface as a thin film of metal oxide with no native oxide at the semiconductor surface/thin film interface. An example of a structure formed by this method includes an epitaxial thin film of (001)-oriented CeO.sub.2 overlying a substrate of (001) Ge.

Norton, David P. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International SEMI | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International SEMI Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International SEMI Jump to: navigation, search Name Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI) Place San Jose, California Zip 95134 2127 Product Global trade association, publisher and conference organiser representing the semiconductor and flat panel display equipment manufacturers. References Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI) is a company located in San Jose, California . References ↑ "Semiconductor Equipment and Materials International (SEMI)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Semiconductor_Equipment_and_Materials_International_SEMI&oldid=350739

12

Semiconductor-To-Metal Transitions in Transition-Metal Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory presented in a previous paper is applied to the transition-metal compounds which are known to exhibit semiconductor-to-metal transitions. In particular, the predictions of the theory are compared with the experimental results of Feinleib and Paul on V2O3. Very good agreement is obtained for the magnitude of the energy gap and for its pressure and stress coefficients. The theory appears to be consistent with the available data on the other oxides of vanadium and titanium as well. Band models for all of these compounds are suggested. The effects of spin-disorder scattering and broadening, polaron formation, and non-stoichiometry are considered quantitatively.

David Adler; Julius Feinleib; Harvey Brooks; William Paul

1967-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Neutron detection using boron gallium nitride semiconductor material  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we developed a new neutron-detection device using a boron gallium nitride (BGaN) semiconductor in which the B atom acts as a neutron converter. BGaN and gallium nitride (GaN) samples were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy, and their radiation detection properties were evaluated. GaN exhibited good sensitivity to ?-rays but poor sensitivity to ?-rays. Moreover, we confirmed that electrons were generated in the depletion layer under neutron irradiation. This resulted in a neutron-detection signal after ?-rays were generated by the capture of neutrons by the B atoms. These results prove that BGaN is useful as a neutron-detecting semiconductor material.

Atsumi, Katsuhiro [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Inoue, Yoku; Nakano, Takayuki, E-mail: ttnakan@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Department of Electrical and Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8561 (Japan); Mimura, Hidenori; Aoki, Toru [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Semiconductor and Materials Company Inc SAMCO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Materials Company Inc SAMCO and Materials Company Inc SAMCO Jump to: navigation, search Name Semiconductor and Materials Company Inc (SAMCO) Place Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan Zip 612-8443 Sector Solar Product Japanese manufactruer of semiconductor and solar manufacturing equipment such as etching, deposition and cleaning systems. References Semiconductor and Materials Company Inc (SAMCO)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Semiconductor and Materials Company Inc (SAMCO) is a company located in Kyoto, Kyoto, Japan . References ↑ "Semiconductor and Materials Company Inc (SAMCO)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Semiconductor_and_Materials_Company_Inc_SAMCO&oldid=350738

15

Method for depositing high-quality microcrystalline semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the plasma deposition of a layer of a microcrystalline semiconductor material is carried out by energizing a process gas which includes a precursor of the semiconductor material and a diluent with electromagnetic energy so as to create a plasma therefrom. The plasma deposits a layer of the microcrystalline semiconductor material onto the substrate. The concentration of the diluent in the process gas is varied as a function of the thickness of the layer of microcrystalline semiconductor material which has been deposited. Also disclosed is the use of the process for the preparation of an N-I-P type photovoltaic device.

Guha, Subhendu (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Yang, Chi C. (Troy, MI); Yan, Baojie (Rochester Hills, MI)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

16

Low resistance barrier layer for isolating, adhering, and passivating copper metal in semiconductor fabrication  

SciTech Connect

Cubic or metastable cubic refractory metal carbides act as barrier layers to isolate, adhere, and passivate copper in semiconductor fabrication. One or more barrier layers of the metal carbide are deposited in conjunction with copper metallizations to form a multilayer characterized by a cubic crystal structure with a strong (100) texture. Suitable barrier layer materials include refractory transition metal carbides such as vanadium carbide (VC), niobium carbide (NbC), tantalum carbide (TaC), chromium carbide (Cr.sub.3 C.sub.2), tungsten carbide (WC), and molybdenum carbide (MoC).

Weihs, Timothy P. (Baltimore, MD); Barbee, Jr., Troy W. (Palto Alto, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Single-photon imaging in complementary metal oxide semiconductor processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...integrated in new materials, e.g. germanium-on-silicon...implemented as an active or as passive...bias of the cathode or the anode...A review of active and passive...voltage at the cathode to follow an...semiconductor material with decreasing...region. The cathode (in this case...whereas active quenching is...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Designing Semiconductor Metal Oxides for Photoelectrochemical Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Innovative materials hold the key for renewable energy conversion. In this talk, we will introduce our recent progress in semiconducting metal oxides, which underpin a number of...

Wang, Lianzhou

19

Chemical Tuning of Metal-Semiconductor Interfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report a study of the Schottky barrier for Pb films grown on Si surfaces terminated by various metals (Ag, In, Au, and Pb) to explore the atomic-scale physics of the interface barrier and a means to control the barrier height. Electronic confinement by the Schottky barrier results in quantum well states in the Pb films, which are measured by angle-resolved photoemission. The barrier height is determined from the atomic-layer-resolved energy levels and the line widths. A calculation based on the known interface chemistry and the electronegativity yields predicted barrier heights in good agreement with the experiment.

D. A. Ricci; T. Miller; T.-C. Chiang

2004-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

20

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to recovery of metals. More specifically, the present invention relates to the recovery of plutonium and other metals from porous materials using microwaves. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Sturcken, E.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds.

Buchheit, Rudolph G. (Albuquerque, NM); Martinez, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Corrosion protective coating for metallic materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Corrosion protective coatings for metallic materials, particularly aluminum and aluminum alloys, produced with simple, low-cost equipment and materials other than toxic metals or metal salts, or metal cyanides is disclosed. The metallic material is cleaned, degreased, and deoxidized, the surface is converted to a substantially alkaline condition, and the surface is chemically sealed with inorganic metal compounds. 1 fig.

Buchheit, R.G.; Martinez, M.A.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

23

A 75 GHz silicon metal-semiconductor-metal Schottky photodiode Sotiris Alexandrou, Chia-Chi Wang, and Thomas Y. Hsiang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 75 GHz silicon metal-semiconductor-metal Schottky photodiode Sotiris Alexandrou, Chia-Chi Wang-semiconductor-metal (MSM) photodiodes with 300 nm finger width and spacing were measured with a subpicosecond electro of silicon MSM photodiodes. A configuration is suggested to improve the speed of these detectors at long

24

E-Print Network 3.0 - active complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ion-implanted p and n dopants in germanium Summary: wavelength spectrum allowing optoelectronic integra- tion to enhance complementary-metal-oxide- semiconductor... lim- its in...

25

E-Print Network 3.0 - area metal-oxide-semiconductor electron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

inversion layer mobility Joo-Hiuk Son,a) Seongtae... measured absorption of terahertz radiation pulses by metal-oxide-semiconductor MOS inversion layers... of the...

26

Recent progress in transparent oxide semiconductors: Materials and device application  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews our recent research progress on new transparent conductive oxide (TCO) materials and electronic and optoelectronic devices based on these materials. First, described are the materials including p-type materials, deep-UV transparent TCO(?-Ga2O3), epitaxially grown ITO with atomically flat surface, transparent electrochromic oxide (NbO2F), amorphous TCOs, and nanoporous semiconductor 12CaO7Al2O3. Second, presented are TCO-based electronic/optoelectronic devices realized to date, UV/blue LED and UV-sensors based on transparent pn junction and high performance transparent TFT using n-type TCO as an n-channel. Finally, unique optoelectronic properties (p-type degenerate conduction, transfer doping of carriers, RT-stable exciton, and large optical nonlinearity) originating from 2D-electronic nature in p-type layered oxychalcogenides are summarized along with the fabrication method of epitaxial thin films of these materials.

Hideo Hosono

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby.

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Allen, Larry C. (Arvada, CO); Marshall, Craig (Littleton, CO); Murphy, Robert C. (Golden, CO); Marshall, Todd (Littleton, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby. 44 figs.

Sopori, B.L.; Allen, L.C.; Marshall, C.; Murphy, R.C.; Marshall, T.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Picosecond response of gallium-nitride metalsemiconductormetal photodetectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metalsemiconductormetal ultraviolet photodiodes fabricated on GaN were tested in the picosecond regime with an electro-optic sampling system. A device with a feature size of 1 ?m showed a response with 1.4 ps rise time and 3.5 ps full width at half maximum. The derived electron velocity 1.4310 7 ? cm/s is in good agreement with independent photoexcitation measurements. A slower impulse response was observed in a device with smaller feature size of 0.5?? m .

Jianliang Li; Ying Xu; T. Y. Hsiang; W. R. Donaldson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

ECE 344--Semiconductor Devices & Materials ECE Department, UMass Amherst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Topics: Fundamentals of Semiconductors; Theory of Electrical Conduction; Device Operations (See "Class

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

31

DOE/BES/NSET annual report on growth of metal and semiconductor nanostructures using localized photocatalysts.  

SciTech Connect

Our overall goal is to understand and develop a novel light-driven approach to the controlled growth of unique metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials. In this photochemical process, bio-inspired porphyrin-based photocatalysts reduce metal salts in aqueous solutions at ambient temperatures to provide metal nucleation and growth centers. Photocatalyst molecules are pre-positioned at the nanoscale to control the location and morphology of the metal nanostructures grown. Self-assembly, chemical confinement, and molecular templating are some of the methods used for nanoscale positioning of the photocatalyst molecules. When exposed to light, the photocatalyst molecule repeatedly reduces metal ions from solution, leading to deposition and the synthesis of the new nanostructures and nanostructured materials. Studies of the photocatalytic growth process and the resulting nanostructures address a number of fundamental biological, chemical, and environmental issues and draw on the combined nanoscience characterization and multi-scale simulation capabilities of the new DOE Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, the University of New Mexico, and Sandia National Laboratories. Our main goals are to elucidate the processes involved in the photocatalytic growth of metal nanomaterials and provide the scientific basis for controlled synthesis. The nanomaterials resulting from these studies have applications in nanoelectronics, photonics, sensors, catalysis, and micromechanical systems. The proposed nanoscience concentrates on three thematic research areas: (1) the creation of nanoscale structures for realizing novel phenomena and quantum control, (2) understanding nanoscale processes in the environment, and (3) the development and use of multi-scale, multi-phenomena theory and simulation. Our goals for FY03 have been to understand the role of photocatalysis in the synthesis of dendritic platinum nanostructures grown from aqueous surfactant solutions under ambient conditions. The research is expected to lead to highly nanoengineered materials for catalysis mediated by platinum, palladium, and potentially other catalytically important metals. The nanostructures made also have potential applications in nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, and nanomagnetic systems. We also expect to develop a fundamental understanding of the uses and limitations of biomimetic photocatalysis as a means of producing metal and semiconductor nanostructures and nanomaterials. The work has already led to a relationship with InfraSUR LLC, a small business that is developing our photocatalytic metal reduction processes for environmental remediation. This work also contributes to science education at a predominantly Hispanic and Native American university.

Haddad, Raid Edward; Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Shelnutt, John Allen; Yang, Yi; Nuttall, H. Eric; Watt, Richard K.; Singl, Anup K.; Challa, Sivakumar R.; Wang, Zhongchun; van Swol, Frank B.; Pereira, Eulalia; Qiu, Yan; Jiang, Ying-Bing; Xu, Huifang; Medforth, Craig J.; Song, Yujiang

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials  

SciTech Connect

Nanocomposite materials comprising a metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene material. The nanocomposite materials exhibit a specific capacity of at least twice that of the metal oxide material without the graphene at a charge/discharge rate greater than about 10C.

Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

33

Metal-to-Semiconductor Transition in Hexagonal NiS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent electrical resistivity measurements have shown that the hexagonal form of stoichiometric NiS exhibits an abrupt metal-to-semiconductor transition at 264K. Neutron diffraction studies have shown that a first-order paramagnetic-to-antiferromagnetic transition also occurs at 264K. No crystal lattice distortion is observed at the transition nor detected at 4.2K, suggesting that this may be a transition of the kind considered by Adler and Brooks. The measured magnetic moment at 4.2K is 1.660.08 ?? and at 260K it is 150.0.10 ?? indicating that the sublattice magnetization is within 10% of saturation immediately upon ordering. The neutron data also shown that no more than about 1% of the Ni atoms migrate to tetragonal interstitial sites on warming from 4.2K to room temperature. Thus, Ni atom migration apparently plays no part in this transition. The powder magnetic susceptibility is 2.2410-6 emu/g at 300K and is virtually temperature-independent above the transition. ? increases abruptly at 264K by about 15% and exhibits some field-cooling effects. Studies on the compounds NiXS, for X=1.01,0.99,0.97,and0.94 show that excess sulfur lowers the transition temperature.

JOSEPH T. SPARKS and TED KOMOTO

1968-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures on p-type GaAs with low interface state density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-insulator-semiconductor structures on p-type GaAs with low interface state density Zhi Chen properties of in situ deposited Si3N4 /Si/p-GaAs metal-insulator-semiconductor structures have been offered by a low gate leakage technology in GaAs, such as metal insulator structures, func- tional Ga

Chen, Zhi

35

Metal-semiconductor hybrid thin films in field-effect transistors  

SciTech Connect

Metal-semiconductor hybrid thin films consisting of an amorphous oxide semiconductor and a number of aluminum dots in different diameters and arrangements are formed by electron beam lithography and employed for thin-film transistors (TFTs). Experimental and computational demonstrations systematically reveal that the field-effect mobility of the TFTs enhances but levels off as the dot density increases, which originates from variations of the effective channel length that strongly depends on the electric field distribution in a transistor channel.

Okamura, Koshi, E-mail: koshi.okamura@kit.edu; Dehm, Simone [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)] [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hahn, Horst [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany) [Institute of Nanotechnology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); KIT-TUD Joint Research Laboratory Nanomaterials, Technische Universitt Darmstadt, Petersenstr. 32, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

36

Block Copolymer Templated Chemistry for the Formation of Metallic Nanoparticle Arrays on Semiconductor Surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of key ingredients for many future applications is the ability to precisely pattern nanoscale features on technologically relevant semiconductor surfaces such as silicon and germanium, as well as compound semiconductors such as gallium arsenide and indium phosphide. ... Deposition of these metals is possible presumably due to the water solubility of their oxides:? Ge oxide,14c As oxide,24 and P oxide25 are soluble in water. ...

Masato Aizawa; Jillian M. Buriak

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Mechanistic Studies of Charge Injection from Metallic Electrodes into Organic Semiconductors Mediated by Ionic Functionalities: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Metal-organic semiconductor interfaces are important because of their ubiquitous role in determining the performance of modern electronics such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), fuel cells, batteries, field effect transistors (FETs), and organic solar cells. Interfaces between metal electrodes required for external wiring to the device and underlying organic structures directly affect the charge carrier injection/collection efficiency in organic-based electronic devices primarily due to the mismatch between energy levels in the metal and organic semiconductor. Environmentally stable and cost-effective electrode materials, such as aluminum and gold typically exhibit high potential barriers for charge carriers injection into organic devices leading to increased operational voltages in OLEDs and FETs and reduced charge extraction in photovoltaic devices. This leads to increased power consumption by the device, reduced overall efficiency, and decreased operational lifetime. These factors represent a significant obstacle for development of next generation of cheap and energy-efficient components based on organic semiconductors. It has been noticed that introduction of organic materials with conjugated backbone and ionic pendant groups known as conjugated poly- and oligoelectrolytes (CPEs and COEs), enables one to reduce the potential barriers at the metal-organic interface and achieve more efficient operation of a device, however exact mechanisms of the phenomenon have not been understood. The goal of this project was to delineate the function of organic semiconductors with ionic groups as electron injection layers. The research incorporated a multidisciplinary approach that encompassed the creation of new materials, novel processing techniques, examination of fundamental electronic properties and the incorporation of the resulting knowledgebase into development of novel organic electronic devices with increased efficiency, environmental stability, and reduced cost. During the execution of the project, main efforts were focused on the synthesis of new charge-bearing organic materials, such as CPEs and COEs, and block copolymers with neutral and ionic segments, studies of mechanisms responsible for the charge injection modulation in devices with ionic interlayers, and use of naturally occurring charged molecules for creation of enhanced devices. The studies allowed PIs to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach for the improvement of operational parameters in model OLED and FET systems resulting in increased efficiency, decreased contact resistance, and possibility to use stable metals for fabrication of device electrodes. The successful proof-of-the-principle results potentially promise development of light-weight, low fabrication cost devices which can be used in consumer applications such as displays, solar cells, and printed electronic devices. Fundamental mechanisms responsible for the phenomena observed have been identified thus advancing the fundamental knowledgebase.

Nguyen, Thuc-Quyen [UCSB; Bazan, Guillermo [UCSB; Mikhailovsky, Alexander [UCSB

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

39

Transition metal oxides on organic semiconductors Yongbiao Zhao a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semiconductors (OSs) structure has been widely used in inverted organic optoelectronic devices, including toward in simplifying the fabrication process of the organic optoelectronic devices. ? 2014 Elsevier B], have gained great attention because of their wide applications in optoelectronic devices composed

Demir, Hilmi Volkan

40

Compositions of doped, co-doped and tri-doped semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Semiconductor materials suitable for being used in radiation detectors are disclosed. A particular example of the semiconductor materials includes tellurium, cadmium, and zinc. Tellurium is in molar excess of cadmium and zinc. The example also includes aluminum having a concentration of about 10 to about 20,000 atomic parts per billion and erbium having a concentration of at least 10,000 atomic parts per billion.

Lynn, Kelvin (Pullman, WA); Jones, Kelly (Colfax, WA); Ciampi, Guido (Watertown, MA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Long-term research in Japan: amorphous metals, metal oxide varistors, high-power semiconductors and superconducting generators  

SciTech Connect

The review revealed that significant activity is under way in the research of amorphous metals, but that little fundamental work is being pursued on metal oxide varistors and high-power semiconductors. Also, the investigation of long-term research program plans for superconducting generators reveals that activity is at a low level, pending the recommendations of a study currently being conducted through Japan's Central Electric Power Council.

Hane, G.J.; Yorozu, M.; Sogabe, T.; Suzuki, S.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Dopant type and/or concentration selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition in the presence of a second semiconductor material which is of a composition different from said first material, said second material substantially not being etched during said method. The method comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux of an energy greater than their respective direct bandgaps and to the same gaseous chemical etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said conditions also being such that the resultant electronic structure of the first semiconductor material under said photon flux is sufficient for the first material to undergo substantial photochemical etching under said conditions and being such that the resultant electronic structure of the second semiconductor material under said photon flux is not sufficient for the second material to undergo substantial photochemical etching under said conditions. In a preferred mode, the materials are subjected to a bias voltage which suppresses etching in n- or p-type material but not in p- or n-type material, respectively; or suppresses etching in the more heavily doped of two n-type or two p-type materials.

Ashby, C.R.H.; Dishman, J.L.

1985-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dopant type and/or concentration selective dry photochemical etching of semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of selectively photochemically dry etching a first semiconductor material of a given composition in the presence of a second semiconductor material which is of a composition different from said first material, said second material substantially not being etched during said method, comprises subjecting both materials to the same photon flux of an energy greater than their respective direct bandgaps and to the same gaseous chemical etchant under conditions where said etchant would be ineffective for chemical etching of either material were the photons not present, said conditions also being such that the resultant electronic structure of the first semiconductor material under said photon flux is sufficient for the first material to undergo substantial photochemical etching under said conditions and being such that the resultant electronic structure of the second semiconductor material under said photon flux is not sufficient for the second material to undergo substantial photochemical etching under said conditions. In a preferred mode, the materials are subjected to a bias voltage which suppresses etching in n- or p- type material but not in p- or n-type material, respectively; or suppresses etching in the more heavily doped of two n-type or two p-type materials.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM); Dishman, James L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Atomization of metal (Materials Preparation Center)  

SciTech Connect

Atomization of metal requires high pressure gas and specialized chambers for cooling and collecting the powders without contamination. The critical step for morphological control is the impingement of the gas on the melt stream. The video is a color video of a liquid metal stream being atomized by high pressure gas. This material was cast at the Ames Laboratorys Materials Preparation Center http://www.mpc.ameslab.gov WARNING - AUDIO IS LOUD.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials High Metal Removal Rate Process for Machining Difficult Materials highmetalremovalprocessfactsheet.pdf More...

46

Self-Assembled Metal/Molecule/Semiconductor Nanostructures for Electronic Device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

565 Self-Assembled Metal/Molecule/Semiconductor Nanostructures for Electronic Device and Contact 27, 1999) Special Issue Paper 565 INTRODUCTION Self-assembly techniques provide a means to real- ize itself to the assembly of specific device structures or intercon- nected devices. For self-assembled

Woodall, Jerry M.

47

Nano- sized strontium titanate metal oxide semiconductor oxygen gas sensors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The project focuses on strontium titanate (SrTiO3> material, a very important material for oxygen sensors. The advantages of the material are low cost and stability (more)

Hu, Ying.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Departments: Semiconductor and Optical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences > Semiconductor Material & Device Sciences > Advanced Materials Sciences > Lasers, Optics & Remote Sensing Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Jeff Nelson Jerry A. Simmons Sr. Manager Idabelle Idabelle Courtney Admin. Asst. Departments Semiconductor and Optical Sciences The Semiconductor and Optical Sciences Department oversees the operations of the following departments providing new scientific knowledge that can lead to technology solutions in the areas of: Compound semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices Chemical science to materials technologies, emphasizing the science and engineering of Metal Organic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) Remote sensing and detection of WMD proliferation activities

49

Definition: Semiconductor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semiconductor Semiconductor Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Semiconductor Any material that has a limited capacity for conducting an electric current. Certain semiconductors, including silicon, gallium arsenide, copper indium diselenide, and cadmium telluride, are uniquely suited to the photovoltaic conversion process.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A semiconductor is a material which has electrical conductivity to a degree between that of a metal (such as copper) and that of an insulator (such as glass). Semiconductors are the foundation of modern solid state electronics, including transistors, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), quantum dots and digital and analog integrated circuits. A semiconductor may have a number of unique properties, one of which is the

50

IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 16, NO. 6, JUNE 2001 623 MetalSemiconductorMetal Traveling-Wave  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in high-power distributed PD array or terahertz signal generation. Index Terms--Low-temperature-grown Ga­Semiconductor­Metal Traveling-Wave Photodetectors Jin-Wei Shi, Kian-Giap Gan, Yi-Jen Chiu, Yen-Hung Chen, Chi-Kuang Sun, Member-TWPD). Demonstrated devices were fabricated using low-temperature grown GaAs (LTG-GaAs). In order to achieve high

Bowers, John

51

Ultra-high vacuum fabrication and electrical characterization of environmentally sensitive metal oxide semiconductor capacitors  

SciTech Connect

We describe an integrated, ultra-high vacuum system for metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) device fabrication and characterization. Such a system is advantageous for electrical property measurements of electronic devices consisting of environmentally sensitive materials especially as device dimensions approach the nanoscale. Without exposure to atomosphere, MOS capacitors were fabricated by evaporating gate metal on molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) grown dielectrics on 3 inch-diameter substrates through a shadow mask in a UHV electrode-patterning chamber. The finished device is transferred in vacuum to an in-situ, UHV electrical characterization probe station that was designed with standard UHV coaxial feedthroughs and UHV-compatible, Kapton-insulated coaxial cable. The probe station also includes a heated sample stage that allows for annealing and measurements in a controlled ambient. We obtained excellent agreement between air-ambient ex-situ and in-situ probe station measurements utilizing a capacitor standard compatible with UHV based on single crystal sapphire as the dielectric. The measurements show less than 0.3 % dispersion for frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 MHz. We have successfully measured MOS capacitors and are sensitive to a density of interface states of 1x1010 states cm-2 eV-1. These measurements also show 0.5 % dispersion for measurement frequencies from 20 Hz to 1 kHz and less than 0.1 % from 1 kHz to 1 MHz. The integrated system presented here is one where complex, MBE-grown MOS heterostructures can be synthesized and tested rapidly to elucidate new field-effect-device physics and functionality.

Billman, Curt [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Walker, Frederick Joseph [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Toward Photochemical Water Splitting Using Band-Gap-Narrowed Semiconductors and Transition-Metal Based Molecular Catalysts  

SciTech Connect

We are carrying out coordinated theoretical and experimental studies of toward photochemical water splitting using band-gap-narrowed semiconductors (BGNSCs) with attached multi-electron molecular water oxidation and hydrogen production catalysts. We focus on the coupling between the materials properties and the H{sub 2}O redox chemistry, with an emphasis on attaining a fundamental understanding of the individual elementary steps in the following four processes: (1) Light-harvesting and charge-separation of stable oxide or oxide-derived semiconductors for solar-driven water splitting, including the discovery and characterization of the behavior of such materials at the aqueous interface; (2) The catalysis of the four-electron water oxidation by dinuclear hydroxo transition-metal complexes with quinonoid ligands, and the rational search for improved catalysts; (3) Transfer of the design principles learned from the elucidation of the DuBois-type hydrogenase model catalysts in acetonitrile to the rational design of two-electron hydrogen production catalysts for aqueous solution; (4) Combining these three elements to examine the function of oxidation catalysts on BGNSC photoanode surfaces and hydrogen production catalysts on cathode surfaces at the aqueous interface to understand the challenges to the efficient coupling of the materials functions.

Muckerman,J.T.; Rodriguez, J.A.; Fujita, E.

2009-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

53

Selective Alcohol Dehydrogenation and Hydrogenolysis with Semiconductor-Metal Photocatalysts: Toward Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion of Biomass-Relevant Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective Alcohol Dehydrogenation and Hydrogenolysis with Semiconductor-Metal Photocatalysts: Toward Solar-to-Chemical Energy Conversion of Biomass-Relevant Substrates ... Coupled semiconductors of well-matched band energies are convenient to improve charge sepn. ...

T. Purnima A. Ruberu; Nicholas C. Nelson; Igor I. Slowing; Javier Vela

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

54

Reclaiming metallic material from an article comprising a non-metallic friable substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for reclaiming a metallic material from a article including a non-metallic friable substrate. The method comprising crushing the article into a plurality of pieces. An acidic solution capable of dissolving the metallic material is provided dissolving the metallic material in the acidic material to form an etchant effluent. The etchant effluent is separated from the friable substrate. A precipitation agent, capable of precipitating the metallic material, is added to the etchant effluent to precipitate out the metallic material from the etchant effluent. The metallic material is then recovered.

Bohland, John Raphael (Oregon, OH); Anisimov, Igor Ivanovich (Whitehouse, OH); Dapkus, Todd James (Toledo, OH); Sasala, Richard Anthony (Toledo, OH); Smigielski, Ken Alan (Toledo, OH); Kamm, Kristin Danielle (Swanton, OH)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Microporous Metal Organic Materials for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

We have examined a number of Metal Organic Framework Materials for their potential in hydrogen storage applications. Results obtained in this study may, in general, be summarized as follows: (1) We have identified a new family of porous metal organic framework materials with the compositions M (bdc) (ted){sub 0.5}, {l_brace}M = Zn or Co, bdc = biphenyl dicarboxylate and ted = triethylene diamine{r_brace} that adsorb large quantities of hydrogen ({approx}4.6 wt%) at 77 K and a hydrogen pressure of 50 atm. The modeling performed on these materials agree reasonably well with the experimental results. (2) In some instances, such as in Y{sub 2}(sdba){sub 3}, even though the modeling predicted the possibility of hydrogen adsorption (although only small quantities, {approx}1.2 wt%, 77 K, 50 atm. hydrogen), our experiments indicate that the sample does not adsorb any hydrogen. This may be related to the fact that the pores are extremely small or may be attributed to the lack of proper activation process. (3) Some samples such as Zn (tbip) (tbip = 5-tert butyl isophthalate) exhibit hysteresis characteristics in hydrogen sorption between adsorption and desorption runs. Modeling studies on this sample show good agreement with the desorption behavior. It is necessary to conduct additional studies to fully understand this behavior. (4) Molecular simulations have demonstrated the need to enhance the solid-fluid potential of interaction in order to achieve much higher adsorption amounts at room temperature. We speculate that this may be accomplished through incorporation of light transition metals, such as titanium and scandium, into the metal organic framework materials.

S. G. Sankar; Jing Li; Karl Johnson

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for detecting and mapping defects in the surfaces of polycrystalline material in a manner that distinguishes dislocation pits from grain boundaries includes a first laser of a first wavelength for illuminating a wide spot on the surface of the material, a second laser of a second relatively shorter wavelength for illuminating a relatively narrower spot on the surface of the material, a light integrating sphere with apertures for capturing light scattered by etched dislocation pits in an intermediate range away from specular reflection while allowing light scattered by etched grain boundaries in a near range from specular reflection to pass through, and optical detection devices for detecting and measuring intensities of the respective intermediate scattered light and near specular scattered light. A center blocking aperture or filter can be used to screen out specular reflected light, which would be reflected by nondefect portions of the polycrystalline material surface. An X-Y translation stage for mounting the polycrystalline material and signal processing and computer equipment accommodate raster mapping, recording, and displaying of respective dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A special etch procedure is included, which prepares the polycrystalline material surface to produce distinguishable intermediate and near specular light scattering in patterns that have statistical relevance to the dislocation and grain boundary defect densities. A reflectance measurement of the piece of material is obtained by adding together the signals from the optical detection devices. In the case where the piece of material includes a photovoltaic device, the current induced in the device by the illuminating light can be measured with a current sensing amplifier after the light integrating sphere is moved away from the device. 22 figs.

Sopori, B.L.

1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

57

Hydrogenated Graphene Nanoflakes: Semiconductor to Half-Metal Transition and Remarkable Large Magnetism  

SciTech Connect

The electronic and magnetic properties of graphene nanoflakes (GNFs) can be tuned by patterned adsorption of hydrogen. Controlling the H coverage from bare GNFs to half hydrogenated and then to fully hydrogenated GNFs, the transformation of small-gap semiconductor {yields} half-metal {yields} wide-gap semiconductor occurs, accompanied by a magnetic {yields} magnetic {yields} nonmagnetic transfer and a nonmagnetic {yields} magnetic {yields} nonmagnetic transfer for triangular and hexagonal nanoflakes, respectively. The half hydrogenated GNFs, associated with strong spin polarization around the Fermi level, exhibit the unexpected large spin moment that is scaled squarely with the size of flakes. The induced spin magnetizations of these nanoflakes align parallel and lead to a substantial collective character, enabling the half hydrogenated GNFs to be spin-filtering flakes. These hydrogenation-dependent behaviors are then used to realize an attractive approach to engineer the transport properties, which provides a new route to facilitate the design of tunable spin devices.

Zhou, Yungang; Wang, Zhiguo; Yang, Ping; Sun, Xin; Zu, Xiaotao; Gao, Fei

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

58

Metal-insulator-semiconductor structure on low-temperature grown GaAs M. Young, W. Li, and T. P. Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-insulator-semiconductor structure on low-temperature grown GaAs A. Chen,a M. Young, W. Li Received 28 July 2006; accepted 30 October 2006; published online 7 December 2006 The metal-insulator dielectrics and metal-insulator-semiconductor MIS structures; for ex- ample, in situ deposited Ga2O3 Gd2O3

Woodall, Jerry M.

59

Prospects and merits of metal-clad semiconductor lasers from nearly UV to far IR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using metal-clad (or plasmonic) waveguide structures in semiconductor lasers carries a promise of reduced size, threshold, and power consumption. This promise is put to a rigorous theoretical test, that takes into account increased waveguide loss, Auger recombination, and Purcell enhancement of spontaneous recombination. The conclusion is that purported benefits of metal waveguides are small to nonexistent for all the band-to-band and intersubband lasers operating from UV to Mid-IR range, with a prominent exception of far-IR and THz quantum cascade lasers. For these devices, however, metal waveguides already represent the state of the art, and the guiding mechanism in them has far more in common with a ubiquitous transmission line than with plasmonics.

Khurgin, Jacob B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Optical properties of metallic (III, Mn)V ferromagnetic semiconductors in the infrared to visible range  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Texas 77843-4242, USA 2Institute of Physics, ASCR, Cukrovarnick? 10, 162 53 Praha 6, Czech Republic 3Department of Physics, University of Texas, Austin, Texas 78712-0264, USA 4Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnik?w 32/46, PL-02... of ferromagnetic semiconductors based on (III, Mn)V materials.1?4 These materials have been the focus of intensive research over the recent years after nonequilibrium growth procedures5,6 have demonstrated the ability to achieve a ferromagnetic phase...

Hankiewicz, EM; Jungwirth, T.; Dietl, T.; Timm, C.; Sinova, Jairo.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Material accountancy for metallic fuel pin casting  

SciTech Connect

The operation of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) is based on the electrometallurgical processing of spent metallic reactor fuel. The pin casting operation, although only one of several operations in FCF, was the first to be on-line. As such, it has served to demonstrate the material accountancy system in many of its facets. This paper details, for the operation of the pin casting process with depleted uranium, the interaction between the mass tracking system (MTG) and some of the ancillary computer codes which generate pertinent information for operations and material accountancy. It is necessary to distinguish between two types of material balance calculations -- closeout for operations and material accountancy for safeguards. The two have much in common, for example, the mass tracking system database and the calculation of an inventory difference, but, in general, are not congruent with regard to balance period and balance spatial domain. Moreover, the objective, assessment, and reporting requirements of the calculated inventory difference are very different in the two cases.

Bucher, R.G.; Orechwa, Y.; Beitel, J.C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Heterogeneous reaction mechanisms and kinetics relevant to the CVD of semiconductor materials  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the state of the art in experimental and theoretical techniques for determining reaction mechanisms and chemical kinetics of heterogeneous reactions relevant to the chemical vapor deposition of semiconductor materials. It summarizes the most common ultra-high vacuum experimental techniques that are used and the types of rate information available from each. Several case studies of specific chemical systems relevant to the microelectronics industry are described. Theoretical methods for calculating heterogeneous reaction rate constants are also summarized.

Creighton, J.R.; Coltrin, M.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

(Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor-and solar-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon alloys and metal (excluding semiconductor- and solar- grade and aluminum alloys and the chemical industry. The semiconductor and solar industries, which manufacture chips%; Venezuela, 15%; Canada, 8%; and other, 8%. Silicon metal: Brazil, 38%; South Africa, 24%; Canada, 16

64

Elevated-Temperature Tribology of Metallic Materials  

SciTech Connect

The wear of metals and alloys takes place in many forms, and the type of wear that dominates in each instance is influenced by the mechanics of contact, material properties, the interfacial temperature, and the surrounding environment. The control of elevated-temperature friction and wear is important for applications like internal combustion engines, aerospace propulsion systems, and metalworking equipment. The progression of interacting, often synergistic processes produces surface deformation, subsurface damage accumulation, the formation of tribolayers, and the creation of free particles. Reaction products, particularly oxides, play a primary role in debris formation and microstructural evolution. Chemical reactions are known to be influenced by the energetic state of the exposed surfaces, and that surface energy is in turn affected by localized deformation and fracture. At relatively low temperatures, work-hardening can occur beneath tribo-contacts, but exposure to high temperatures can modify the resultant defect density and grain structure to affect the mechanisms of re-oxidation. As research by others has shown, the rate of wear at elevated temperatures can either be enhanced or reduced, depending on contact conditions and nature of oxide layer formation. Furthermore, the thermodynamic driving force for certain chemical reactions is moderated by kinetics and microstructure. The role of deformation, oxidation, and tribo-corrosion in the elevated temperature tribology of metallic alloys will be exemplified by three examples involving sliding wear, single-point abrasion, and repetitive impact plus slip.

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Comparative study of polyoxometalates and semiconductor metal oxides as catalyst. Photochemical oxidative degradation of thioethers  

SciTech Connect

The photochemical degradation of thioether substrates catalyzed by representative semiconductor metal oxides and sulfides (anatase TiO{sub 2}, SnO{sub 2}, cubic WO{sub 3}, and CdS) and photoredox-active early-transition-metal polyometalates (W{sub 10}O{sub 32}{sup 4{minus}}, PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, SiMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 4{minus}}, PV{sub 2}Mo{sub 10}O{sub 10}{sup 5{minus}}, and P{sub 2}W{sub 18}O{sub 62}{sup 6{minus}}) have been examined under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. Under anaerobic conditions, all the semiconductors are completely ineffective at photochemically oxidizing or degrading the exemplary thioether substrate tetrahydrothiophene (THT) in the oxidatively resistant solvent acetonitrile. In contrast, all the homogeneous polyoxometalate systems under the same reaction condition, except the neutral tetra-n-butylammonium (Q) salt of PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}{sup 3{minus}}, are quite effective. The latter systems generate products derived from the carbon-based radical {alpha} to the sulfur atom and not sulfoxide or sulfone, the usual products of thioether oxidation by oxometal species. The rate for the most active anaerobic system, that involving the photochemical degradation of THT by Q{sub 4}W{sub 10}O{sub 32}, under optically dilute conditions, is first order in W{sub 10}O{sub 32} {sup 4{minus}} and light intensity and variable order in THT substrate. A rate law consistent with these data is given. Upon addition of O{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} (with or without Pt(O)) becomes highly active, SnO{sub 2} becomes active, but WO{sub 3} and CdS remain inactive. Reactivity in thioether oxidation is dominated by the interactions of the semiconductors with O{sub 2} and O{sub 2}-derived intermediates; there is no correlation between reactivity and semiconductor band gap. Upon addition of O{sub 2}, all the polyoxometalate systems become more active. 29 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Chambers, R.C.; Hill, C.L. (Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States))

1991-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Generic tool for modelling and simulation of semiconductor intrabay material handling system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Semiconductor manufacturing facilities are migrating to 300mm technology, necessitating the implementation of automated material handling systems (AMHS) for a variety of ergonomic and safety considerations. A predictive tool, such as software simulation, is needed at the planning stage to estimate the performance of these relatively new systems. Two forms of AMHS are in general use in industry one which handles material within a group of machines (a bay) and one which transfers material between bays. This paper presents a generic tool for modelling and simulation of an intrabay AMHS. The model utilises a library of different blocks representing the different components of any intrabay material handling system, providing a tool that allows rapid building and analysis of an AMHS under different operating conditions. The ease of use of the system means that inexpert users have the ability to generate good models.

K.S. El-Kilany; P. Young; M.A. El Baradie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors using barium strontium titanate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AlGaN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor heterostructure field-effect transistors using barium strontium-effect transistors have been formed by incorporating barium strontium titanate (BST) deposited by rf magnetron in increased leakage. Due to its large dielectric constant, barium strontium ti- tanate [Ba1-xSrxTiO3, (BST

York, Robert A.

68

Simple Way to Engineer MetalSemiconductor Interface for Enhanced Performance of Perovskite Organic Lead Iodide Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simple Way to Engineer MetalSemiconductor Interface for Enhanced Performance of Perovskite Organic Lead Iodide Solar Cells ... School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, China ... However, ALD technique has the problems of strict working environment like vacuum and high cost precursors. ...

Yuzhuan Xu; Jiangjian Shi; Songtao Lv; Lifeng Zhu; Juan Dong; Huijue Wu; Yin Xiao; Yanhong Luo; Shirong Wang; Dongmei Li; Xianggao Li; Qingbo Meng

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Sharp semiconductor-to-metal transition of VO{sub 2} thin films on glass substrates  

SciTech Connect

Outstanding phase transition properties of vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}) thin films on amorphous glass were achieved and compared with the ones grown on c-cut sapphire and Si (111) substrates, all by pulsed laser deposition. The films on glass substrate exhibit a sharp semiconductor-to-metal transition (?4.3?C) at a near bulk transition temperature of ?68.4?C with an electrical resistance change as high as 3.2??10{sup 3} times. The excellent phase transition properties of the films on glass substrate are correlated with the large grain size and low defects density achieved. The phase transition properties of VO{sub 2} films on c-cut sapphire and Si (111) substrates were found to be limited by the high defect density.

Jian, Jie; Chen, Aiping [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Zhang, Wenrui [Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Wang, Haiyan, E-mail: wangh@ece.tamu.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States); Material Science and Engineering Program, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3128 (United States)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Recent advances as materials of functional metal-organic frameworks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), also known as hybrid inorganic-organic materials, represent an emerging class of materials that have attracted the imagination of solid-state chemists because MOFs combine unprecedented levels of porosity with a range ...

Xiao-Lan Tong; Hai-Lu Lin; Jian-Hua Xin; Fen Liu; Min Li; Xia-Ping Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Electron-Phonon Coupling and Thermal Conductance at a Metal-Semiconductor Interface: First-principles Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanism of heat transfer and the contribution of electron-phonon coupling to thermal conductance of a metal-semiconductor interface remains unclear in the present literature. We report ab initio simulations of a technologically important titanium silicide (metal) - silicon (semiconductor) interface to estimate the Schottky barrier height (SBH), and the strength of electron-phonon and phonon-phonon heat transfer across the interface. The electron and phonon dispersion relations of TiSi$_2$ with C49 structure and the TiSi$_2$-Si interface are obtained using first-principles calculations within the density functional theory (DFT) framework. These are used to estimate electron-phonon linewidths and the associated Eliashberg function that quantifies coupling. We show that the coupling strength of electrons with interfacial phonon modes is of the same order of magnitude as coupling of electrons to phonon modes in the bulk metal, and its contribution to electron-phonon interfacial conductance is comparable to ...

Sadasivam, Sridhar; Fisher, Timothy S

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Thin Film Solid-State Reactions Forming Carbides as Contact Materials for Carbon-Containing Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Metal carbides are good candidates to contact carbon-based semiconductors (SiC, diamond, and carbon nanotubes). Here, we report on an in situ study of carbide formation during the solid-state reaction between thin films. The solid-state reaction was examined between 11 transition metals (W, Mo, Fe, Cr, V, Nb, Mn, Ti, Ta, Zr, and Hf) and an amorphous carbon layer. Capping layers (C or TiN) of different thicknesses were applied to prevent oxidation. Carbide formation is evidenced for nine metals and the phases formed have been identified (for a temperature ranging from 100 to 1100 C). W first forms W{sub 2}C and then WC; Mo forms Mo{sub 2}C; Fe forms Fe{sub 3}C; Cr first forms metastable phases Cr{sub 2}C and Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2-x}, and finally forms Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}; V forms VC{sub x}; Nb transforms into Nb{sub 2}C followed by NbC; Ti forms TiC; Ta first forms Ta{sub 2}C and then TaC; and Hf transforms into HfC. The activation energy for the formation of the various carbide phases has been obtained by in situ x-ray diffraction.

Leroy,W.; Detavernier, C.; Van Meirhaeghe, R.; Lavoie, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

ITP Materials: Development of Materials Resistant to Metal Dustiing Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INDUSTRIAL INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Bringing you a prosperous future where energy is clean, abundant, reliable, and affordable Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Degradation of metallic structural compo- nents by metal dusting is a major issue in plants such as those involved in hydrogen production, ammonia synthesis, methanol reforming, and syngas (H 2 /CO mixtures) pro- duction. Metal dusting is also experienced at high temperatures in the oxidizing-carbur- izing environments that are prevalent in the heat-treating industry and in processes that involve direct reduction in the production of iron. While experiments have proved that metal dusting does occur, industries could not develop an approach to combat this problem because of a lack of understanding

75

The Journal of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 JOM The Journal of The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS) ISSN 1047-4838 JOM DOI 10 of Materials Science and Engineering and the Materials Research Institute, The Pennsylvania State University cycles require greater resistance of the cladding to failure, espe- cially in view of the industry

Motta, Arthur T.

76

Method to determine the position-dependant metal correction factor for dose-rate equivalent laser testing of semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method reconstructs the charge collection from regions beneath opaque metallization of a semiconductor device, as determined from focused laser charge collection response images, and thereby derives a dose-rate dependent correction factor for subsequent broad-area, dose-rate equivalent, laser measurements. The position- and dose-rate dependencies of the charge-collection magnitude of the device are determined empirically and can be combined with a digital reconstruction methodology to derive an accurate metal-correction factor that permits subsequent absolute dose-rate response measurements to be derived from laser measurements alone. Broad-area laser dose-rate testing can thereby be used to accurately determine the peak transient current, dose-rate response of semiconductor devices to penetrating electron, gamma- and x-ray irradiation.

Horn, Kevin M.

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nanocomposites of Semimetallic ErAs Nanoparticles Epitaxially Embedded within InGaAlAs-based Semiconductors for Thermoelectric Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GaAlAs-based Semiconductors for Thermoelectric Materials J.M.O. Zide', G. Zeng2, J.H. Bahk2, W. Kim3, S. L. Singer3, D array based on these materials for thermoelectric power generation; a power density > 1 W/cm2 is demonstrated with a temperature gradient of 120°C. Solid-state thermionics Efficient thermoelectric materials

78

3D Assembly of Semiconductor and Metal Nanocrystals: Hybrid CdTe/Au Structures with Controlled Content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3) Recently, attention was attracted by the possibility to create functional gels and aerogels via self-assembly of colloidal NCs(4) or clusters of metal chalcogenides,(5) which may open enormous opportunities for semiconductor technology, catalysis and photocatalysis, optoelectronics and photonics, sorbents and filters. ... A critical point drier (13200J-AB from Spi Supplies) was used for supercritical CO2 drying to prevent the fine nanostructures from collapsing and to obtain self-supporting aerogel monoliths. ...

Vladimir Lesnyak; Andr Wolf; Aliaksei Dubavik; Lars Borchardt; Sergei V. Voitekhovich; Nikolai Gaponik; Stefan Kaskel; Alexander Eychmller

2011-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

79

Semiconductor nanotechnology: novel materials and devices for electronics, photonics and renewable energy applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electronic and photonic information technology and renewable energy alternatives, such as solar energy, fuel cells and batteries, have now reached an advanced stage in their development. Cost-effective improvements to current technological approaches have made great progress, but certain challenges remain. As feature sizes of the latest generations of electronic devices are approaching atomic dimensions, circuit speeds are now being limited by interconnect bottlenecks. This has prompted innovations such as the introduction of new materials into microelectronics manufacturing at an unprecedented rate and alternative technologies to silicon CMOS architectures. Despite the environmental impact of conventional fossil fuel consumption, the low cost of these energy sources has been a long-standing economic barrier to the development of alternative and more efficient renewable energy sources, fuel cells and batteries. In the face of mounting environmental concerns, interest in such alternative energy sources has grown. It is now widely accepted that nanotechnology offers potential solutions for securing future progress in information and energy technologies. The Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC) forum was established 25 years ago in Ottawa as an important symbol of the intrinsic strength of the Canadian semiconductor research and development community, and the Canadian semiconductor industry as a whole. In 2007, the 13th CSTC was held in Montreal, moving for the first time outside the national capital region. The first three meetings in the series of 'Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics' NGCM2002 in Moscow, NGCM2004 in Krakow, and NGC2007 in Phoenix were focused on interdisciplinary research from the fundamentals of materials science to the development of new system architectures. In 2009 NGC2009 and the 14th Canadian Semiconductor Technology Conference (CSTC2009) were held as a joint event, hosted by McMaster University (1014 August, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada) and the scope was expanded to include renewable energy research and development. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of semiconductor devices that are relevant to information technology (both electronics and photonics based) and renewable energy applications. The papers contained in this special issue are selected from the NGC/CSTC2009 symposium. Among them is a report by Ray LaPierre from McMaster University and colleagues at the University of Waterloo in Canada on the ability to manipulate single spins in nanowire quantum bits. The paper also reports the development of a testbed of a few qubits for general quantum information processing tasks [1]. Lower cost and greater energy conversion efficiency compared with thin film devices have led to a high level of activity in nanowire research related to photovoltaic applications. This special issue also contains results from an impedance spectroscopy study of coreshell GaAs nanowires to throw light on the transport and recombination mechanisms relevant to solar cell research [2]. Information technology research and renewable energy sources are research areas of enormous public interest. This special issue addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements and provides a stimulating outlook for technological developments in these highly topical fields of research. References [1] Caram J, Sandoval C, Tirado M, Comedi D, Czaban J, Thompson D A and LaPierre R R 2101 Nanotechnology 21 134007 [2] Baugh J, Fung J S and LaPierre RR 2010 Nanotechnology 21 134018

Stephen Goodnick; Anatoli Korkin; Predrag Krstic; Peter Mascher; John Preston; Alex Zaslavsky

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 2  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 2 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 4  

SciTech Connect

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 4 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 3  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 3 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

The Materials Preparation Center - Making Rare Earth Metals - Part 1  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Trevor Riedeman, manager of the MPC Rare Earth Materials Section, gives a presentation on the importance of rare earth metals and how they are made at Ames Laboratory. Part 1 of 4.

Riedemann, Trevor

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ITP Materials: Poster - Development of Materials Resistant to Metal Dusting Degradation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metal dusting phenomenon metal dusting phenomenon in simulated process environments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ ITP Materials, Sensors, and Automation, and Glass Project and Portfolio Review Meeting, June 21-24, Arlington, Virginia. K. Natesan, Z. Zeng, and D. L. Rink Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 Introduction Metal dusting is a metal loss process that occurs in hot reactive gases The prerequisite for metal dusting is that carbon activity in the gas phase has to be >>1 Metal ends up as fine powder Pitting and crevice attack are common forms

87

Evaluation by room?temperature electroreflectance of the 77 K dark?storage time of bulk mercury cadmium telluride measured on metal?insulator semiconductor devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have studied a set of 14 very carefully characterized samples by spectroscopicellipsometry electrolyte electroreflectance (EER) and other measurements and have measured the 77 K storage time ? of metal?insulator semiconductor (MIS)devices built on these samples. The measured storage times ranged from 6.8 to 130.8 ?s. Only the results of the EER measurements showed a correlation with the measured values of ?. We interpret our EER results in terms of a two?phase model consisting of bulk plus very thin highly defectuous regions possibly associated with subgrain boundaries. The observed correlation between the values of the incremental linewidth ?? of the thin defectuous regions and the values of the charge?storage lifetimes ? of the MISdevices is excellent and capable of predicting the values of ?. Furthermore the exact form of the observed correlation is shown to follow immediately from a simple physical model.Correlations between the values of ? and those of other parameters measured by EER were also observed. They suggest a possible simple physical picture for the primary origin of dark current in these devices. This is the first predictive quantitative correlation ever observed between the results of room?temperature optical characterizations of semiconductor materials and the low?temperature electrical performance of devices built on those materials.

Paul M. Raccah; James W. Garland; De Yang; Hisham Abad; Roger L. Strong; Matthew C. McNeill

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Interfacial oxide re-growth in thin film metal oxide III-V semiconductor systems  

SciTech Connect

The Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/GaAs and HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interfaces after atomic layer deposition are studied using in situ monochromatic x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Samples are deliberately exposed to atmospheric conditions and interfacial oxide re-growth is observed. The extent of this re-growth is found to depend on the dielectric material and the exposure temperature. Comparisons with previous studies show that ex situ characterization can result in misleading conclusions about the interface reactions occurring during the metal oxide deposition process.

McDonnell, S.; Dong, H.; Hawkins, J. M.; Brennan, B.; Milojevic, M.; Aguirre-Tostado, F. S.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Hinkle, C. L.; Kim, J.; Wallace, R. M.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Time-resolved THz studies of carrier dynamics in semiconductors, superconductors, and strongly-correlated electron materials  

SciTech Connect

Perhaps the most important aspect of contemporary condensed matter physics involves understanding strong Coulomb interactions between the large number of electrons in a solid. Electronic correlations lead to the emergence of new system properties, such as metal-insulator transitions, superconductivity, magneto-resistance, Bose-Einstein condensation, the formation of excitonic gases, or the integer and fractional Quantum Hall effects. The discovery of high-Tc superconductivity in particular was a watershed event, leading to dramatic experimental and theoretical advances in the field of correlated-electron systems. Such materials often exhibit competition between the charge, lattice, spin, and orbital degrees of freedom, whose cause-effect relationships are difficult to ascertain. Experimental insight into the properties of solids is traditionally obtained by time-averaged probes, which measure e.g., linear optical spectra, electrical conduction properties, or the occupied band structure in thermal equilibrium. Many novel physical properties arise from excitations out of the ground state into energetically higher states by thermal, optical, or electrical means. This leads to fundamental interactions between the system's constituents, such as electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions, which occur on ultrafast timescales. While these interactions underlie the physical properties of solids, they are often only indirectly inferred from time-averaged measurements. Time-resolved spectroscopy, consequently, is playing an ever increasing role to provide insight into light-matter interaction, microscopic processes, or cause-effect relationships that determine the physics of complex materials. In the past, experiments using visible and near-infrared femtosecond pulses have been extensively employed, e.g. to follow relaxation and dephasing processes in metals and semiconductors. However, many basic excitations in strongly-correlated electron systems and nanoscale materials occur at lower energies. The terahertz (THz) regime is particularly rich in such fundamental resonances. This includes ubiquitous lattice vibrations and low-energy collective oscillations of conduction charges. In nanoscale materials, band structure quantization also yields novel infrared and THz transitions, including intersubband absorption in quantum wells. The formation of excitons in turn leads to low-energy excitations analogous to inter-level transitions in atoms. In transition-metal oxides, fundamental excitation gaps arise from charge pairing into superconducting condensates and other correlated states. This motivates the use of ultrafast THz spectroscopy as a powerful tool to study light-matter interactions and microscopic processes in nanoscale and correlated-electron materials.A distinct advantage of coherent THz pulses is that the amplitude and phase of the electric field can be measured directly, as the THz fields are coherent with the fs pulses from which they are generated. Using THz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS), both the real and imaginary parts of the response functions (such as the dielectric function) are obtained directly without the need for Kramers?Kronig transforms. The THz response can also be expressed in terms of absorption and refractive index, or as the optical conductivity. The optical conductivity describes the current response of a many-body system to an electric field, an ideal tool to study conducting systems. A second important advantage is the ultrafast time resolution that results from the short temporal duration of the THz time-domain sources. In particular, optical-pump THz-probe spectroscopy enables a delicate probe of the transient THz conductivity after optical photoexcitation. These experiments can provide insight into quasiparticle interactions, phase transitions, or nonequilibrium dynamics. In this chapter we will provide many such examples. Since THz spectroscopy of solids is a quickly expanding field

Kaindl, Robert A.; Averitt, Richard D.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

91

Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G. [Institute of Biophysics, Imaging and Optical Science, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom); Sharples, Steve D. [Applied Optics Group, Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, University of Nottingham, Nottinghamshire NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Metal-oxide-based energetic materials and synthesis thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of preparing energetic metal-oxide-based energetic materials using sol-gel chemistry has been invented. The wet chemical sol-gel processing provides an improvement in both safety and performance. Essentially, a metal-oxide oxidizer skeletal structure is prepared from hydrolyzable metals (metal salts or metal alkoxides) with fuel added to the sol prior to gelation or synthesized within the porosity metal-oxide gel matrix. With metal salt precursors a proton scavenger is used to destabilize the sol and induce gelation. With metal alkoxide precursors standard well-known sol-gel hydrolysis and condensation reactions are used. Drying is done by standard sol-gel practices, either by a slow evaporation of the liquid residing within the pores to produce a high density solid nanocomposite, or by supercritical extraction to produce a lower density, high porous nanocomposite. Other ingredients may be added to this basic nanostructure to change physical and chemical properties, which include organic constituents for binders or gas generators during reactions, burn rate modifiers, or spectral emitters.

Tillotson, Thomas M. (Tracy, CA), Simpson; Randall L. (Livermore, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Semiconductor systems utilizing materials that form rectifying junctions in both N and P-type doping regions, whether metallurgically or field induced, and methods of use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are semiconductor systems, such as integrated circuits utilizing Schotky barrier and/or diffused junction technology, which semiconductor systems incorporate material(s) that form rectifying junctions in both metallurgically and/or field induced N and P-type doping regions, and methods of their use. Disclosed are Schottky barrier based inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems and which can be operated as modulators, N and P-channel MOSFETS and CMOS formed therefrom, and (MOS) gate voltage controlled rectification direction and gate voltage controlled switching devices, and use of such material(s) to block parasitic current flow pathways. Simple demonstrative five mask fabrication procedures for inverting and non-inverting gate voltage channel induced semiconductor single devices with operating characteristics similar to multiple device CMOS systems are also presented.

Welch, James D. (10328 Pinehurst Ave., Omaha, NE 68124)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Complex metallic alloys as new materials for additive manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Additive manufacturing processes allow freeform fabrication of the physical representation of a three-dimensional computer-aided design (CAD) data model. This area has been expanding rapidly over the last 20 years. It includes several techniques such as selective laser sintering and stereolithography. The range of materials used today is quite restricted while there is a real demand for manufacturing lighter functional parts or parts with improved functional properties. In this article, we summarize recent work performed in this field, introducing new composite materials containing complex metallic alloys. These are mainly Al-based quasicrystalline alloys whose properties differ from those of conventional alloys. The use of these materials allows us to produce light-weight parts consisting of either metal?matrix composites or of polymer?matrix composites with improved properties. Functional parts using these alloys are now commercialized.

Samuel Kenzari; David Bonina; Jean Marie Dubois; Vincent Fourn?e

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Dynamic compression of materials: metallization of fluid hydrogen at high pressures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dynamic high pressure is 1?GPa (10?kbar) or greater with a rise time and a duration ranging from 1?ps (10?12?s) to 1?s (10?6?s). Today it is possible in a laboratory to achieve pressures dynamically up to ~500?GPa (5?Mbar) and greater, compressions as much as ~15-fold greater than initial density in the case of hydrogen and temperatures from ~0.1 up to several electronvolts (11?600?K). At these conditions materials are extremely condensed semiconductors or degenerate metals. Temperature can be tuned independently of pressure by a combination of shock and isentropic compression. As a result, new opportunities are now available in condensed matter physics at extreme conditions. The basic physics of the dynamic process, experimental methods of generating and diagnosing matter at these extreme conditions and a technique to recover metastable materials intact from ~100?GPa shock pressures are discussed.Results include (i) generation of pressure standards at static pressures up to ~200?GPa (2?Mbar) at 300?K, (ii) single-shock compression of small-molecular fluids, including resolution of the recent controversy over the correct shock-compression curve of liquid D2 at 100?GPa pressures, (iii) the first observations of metallization of fluid hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen compressed quasi-isentropically at 100?GPa pressures, (iv) implications for the interiors of giant planets within our solar system, extrasolar giant planets and brown dwarfs discovered recently and the equation of state of deuteriumtritium in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and (v) prospects of recovering novel materials from extreme conditions, such as metastable solid metallic hydrogen. Future research is suggested.

W J Nellis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Electron Transport Behavior on Gate Length Scaling in Sub-50 nm GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors  

SciTech Connect

Short channel GaAs Metal Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MESFETs) have been fabricated with gate length to 20 nm, in order to examine the characteristics of sub-50 nm MESFET scaling. Here the rise in the measured transconductance is mainly attributed to electron velocity overshoot. For gate lengths below 40 nm, however, the transconductance drops suddenly. The behavior of velocity overshoot and its degradation is investigated and simulated by using a transport model based on the retarded Langevin equation (RLE). This indicates the existence of a minimum acceleration length needed for the carriers to reach the overshoot velocity. The argument shows that the source resistance must be included as an internal element, or appropriate boundary condition, of relative importance in any model where the gate length is comparable to the inelastic mean free path of the carriers.

Han, Jaeheon [Department of Electronic Engineering, Kangnam University, 111 Gugal-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-city, Gyeonggi-do, Korea 446-702 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

97

Grain-boundary engineering markedly reduces susceptibility to intergranular hydrogen embrittlement in metallic materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

intergranularhydrogenembrittlementinmetallicmaterialsKeywords: Hydrogen embrittlement; Intergranularstrength (hydrogen embrittlement 1 ), hydrogen?

Bechtle, Sabine

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Realization of Spin Gapless Semiconductors: The Heusler Compound Mn2CoAl  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent studies have reported an interesting class of semiconductor materials that bridge the gap between semiconductors and half-metallic ferromagnets. These materials, called spin gapless semiconductors, exhibit a band gap in one of the spin channels and a zero band gap in the other and thus allow for tunable spin transport. Here, we report the first experimental verification of the spin gapless magnetic semiconductor Mn2CoAl, an inverse Heusler compound with a Curie temperature of 720K and a magnetic moment of 2?B. Below 300K, the compound exhibits nearly temperature-independent conductivity, very low, temperature-independent carrier concentration, and a vanishing Seebeck coefficient. The anomalous Hall effect is comparatively low, which is explained by the symmetry properties of the Berry curvature. Mn2CoAl is not only suitable material for room temperature semiconductor spintronics, the robust spin polarization of the spin gapless semiconductors makes it very promising material for spintronics in general.

Siham Ouardi; Gerhard H. Fecher; Claudia Felser; Jrgen Kbler

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method and apparatus for electron-only radiation detectors from semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for obtaining improved resolution in room temperature semiconductor radiation detectors such as CdZnTe and Hgl.sub.2, which exhibit significant hole-trapping. A electrical reference plane is established about the perimeter of a semiconductor crystal and disposed intermediately between two oppositely biased end electrodes. The intermediate reference plane comprises a narrow strip of wire in electrical contact with the surface of the crystal, biased at a potential between the end electrode potentials and serving as an auxiliary electrical reference for a chosen electrode--typically the collector electrode for the more mobile charge carrier. This arrangement eliminates the interfering effects of the less mobile carriers as these are gathered by their electrode collector.

Lund, James C. (429 Warwick Ave., San Leandro, CA 94577)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Selective CO{sub 2} reduction conjugated with H{sub 2}O oxidation utilizing semiconductor/metal-complex hybrid photocatalysts  

SciTech Connect

We developed a new hybrid photocatalyst for CO{sub 2} reduction, which is composed of a semiconductor and a metal complex. In the hybrid photocatalyst, ?G between the position of conduction band minimum (E{sub CBM}) of the semiconductor and the CO{sub 2} reduction potential of the complex is an essential factor for realizing fast electron transfer from the conduction band of semiconductor to metal complex leading to high photocatalytic activity. On the basis of this concept, the hybrid photocatalyst InP/Ru-complex, which functions in aqueous media, was developed. The photoreduction of CO{sub 2} to formate using water as an electron donor and a proton source was successfully achieved as a Z-scheme system by functionally conjugating the InP/Ru-complex photocatalyst for CO{sub 2} reduction with a TiO{sub 2} photocatalyst for water oxidation. The conversion efficiency from solar energy to chemical energy was ca. 0.04%, which approaches that for photosynthesis in a plant. Because this system can be applied to many other inorganic semiconductors and metal-complex catalysts, the efficiency and reaction selectivity can be enhanced by optimization of the electron transfer process including the energy-band configurations, conjugation conformations, and catalyst structures. This electrical-bias-free reaction is a huge leap forward for future practical applications of artificial photosynthesis under solar irradiation to produce organic species.

Morikawa, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Sato, S., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Arai, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Uemura, K., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Yamanaka, K. I., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Suzuki, T. M., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Kajino, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp; Motohiro, T., E-mail: morikawa@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp [Toyota Central R and D Labs, Inc., Nagakute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan)

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]X] (where 0 < X < 0.5) exhibits superconducting properties and is capable of conducting very large current densities. By aligning the two-dimensional Cu-O layers which carry the current in the superconducting state in the a- and b-directions, i.e., within the basal plane, a high degree of crystalline axes alignment is provided between adjacent grains permitting the conduction of high current densities. The highly anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of the polycrystalline metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state. 4 figs.

Capone, D.W.; Dunlap, B.D.; Veal, B.W.

1990-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Magnetic preferential orientation of metal oxide superconducting materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A superconductor comprised of a polycrystalline metal oxide such as YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-X (where 0metal oxide material permits the use of an applied magnetic field to orient the individual crystals when in the superconducting state to substantially increase current transport between adjacent grains. In another embodiment, the anisotropic paramagnetic susceptibility of rare-earth ions substituted into the oxide material is made use of as an applied magnetic field orients the particles in a preferential direction. This latter operation can be performed with the material in the normal (non-superconducting) state.

Capone, Donald W. (Bolingbrook, IL); Dunlap, Bobby D. (Bolingbrook, IL); Veal, Boyd W. (Downers Grove, IL)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Thermal ionization induced metal-semiconductor transition and room temperature ferromagnetism in trivalent doped ZnO codoped with lithium  

SciTech Connect

Thermal ionization induced metallic to semiconductor (MST) transition occurring at 460?K for Zn{sub 0.97}Al{sub 0.03}O, 463?K for Zn{sub 0.94}Al{sub 0.03}Li{sub 0.03}O, and 503?K for Zn{sub 0.91}Al{sub 0.03}Li{sub 0.03}Mn{sub 0.03}O has been found in the sol-gel synthesized (using hexamethylenetetramine), trivalent doped (Al, Mn) ZnO codoped with lithium. Increase in the thermally ionized carrier concentration due to Al doping is responsible for near band edge (NBE) peak shift causing Fermi level to move into conduction band making it metallic consistent with resistivity results. Free carrier (thermally activated) neutralization with ionized donor is responsible for semiconducting nature, which is supported from the free carrier screening produced energy shift in the NBE of photoluminescence peak. Furthermore, independently band gap shrinkage is also obtained from UV-Visible studies confirming localization induced MST. An anti-correlation is found between defect density (DLE) and room temperature ferromagnetism (RTFM) indicating intrinsic defects are not directly responsible for RTFM.

Sivagamasundari, A.; Chandrasekar, S.; Pugaze, R.; Kannan, R., E-mail: kannan@pec.edu [Department of Physics, Pondicherry Engineering College, Puducherry 605 014 (India); Rajagopan, S. [Department of Chemistry, Pondicherry Engineering College, Puducherry 605 014 (India)

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Atomic layer deposition of Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} as a work function material in metal gate MOS devices  

SciTech Connect

As advanced silicon semiconductor devices are transitioning from planar to 3D structures, new materials and processes are needed to control the device characteristics. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} films using hafnium chloride and trimethylaluminum precursors was combined with postdeposition anneals and ALD liners to control the device characteristics in high-k metal-gate devices. Combinatorial process methods and technologies were employed for rapid electrical and materials characterization of various materials stacks. The effective work function in metaloxidesemiconductor capacitor devices with the Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} layer coupled with an ALD HfO{sub 2} dielectric was quantified to be mid-gap at ?4.6?eV. Thus, Hf{sub x}Al{sub y}C{sub z} is a promising metal gate work function material that allows for the tuning of device threshold voltages (V{sub th}) for anticipated multi-V{sub th} integrated circuit devices.

Lee, Albert, E-mail: alee@intermolecular.com; Fuchigami, Nobi; Pisharoty, Divya; Hong, Zhendong; Haywood, Ed; Joshi, Amol; Mujumdar, Salil; Bodke, Ashish; Karlsson, Olov [Intermolecular, 3011 North First Street, San Jose, California 95134 (United States); Kim, Hoon; Choi, Kisik [GLOBALFOUNDRIES Technology Research Group, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12309 (United States); Besser, Paul [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, 1050 East Arques, Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, and/or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01material itself or as a support for said unary or binary metal oxides.

White, James H; Schutte, Erick J; Rolfe, Sara L

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

106

Radio frequency coupling apparatus and method for measuring minority carrier lifetimes in semiconductor materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for measuring the minority carrier lifetime of a semiconductor sample using radio-frequency coupling. The measuring apparatus includes an antenna that is positioned a coupling distance from a semiconductor sample which is exposed to light pulses from a laser during sampling operations. A signal generator is included to generate high frequency, such as 900 MHz or higher, sinusoidal waveform signals that are split into a reference signal and a sample signal. The sample signal is transmitted into a sample branch circuit where it passes through a tuning capacitor and a coaxial cable prior to reaching the antenna. The antenna is radio-frequency coupled with the adjacent sample and transmits the sample signal, or electromagnetic radiation corresponding to the sample signal, to the sample and receives reflected power or a sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal back. To lower impedance and speed system response, the impedance is controlled by limiting impedance in the coaxial cable and the antenna reactance. In one embodiment, the antenna is a waveguide/aperture hybrid antenna having a central transmission line and an adjacent ground flange. The sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal is then transmitted to a mixer which also receives the reference signal. To enhance the sensitivity of the measuring apparatus, the mixer is operated to phase match the reference signal and the sample-coupled-photoconductivity signal.

Johnston, Steven W. (Golden, CO); Ahrenkiel, Richard K. (Lakewood, CO)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Semiconductor bridge (SCB) detonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a low-energy detonator for high-density secondary-explosive materials initiated by a semiconductor bridge igniter that comprises a pair of electrically conductive lands connected by a semiconductor bridge. The semiconductor bridge is in operational or direct contact with the explosive material, whereby current flowing through the semiconductor bridge causes initiation of the explosive material. Header wires connected to the electrically-conductive lands and electrical feed-throughs of the header posts of explosive devices, are substantially coaxial to the direction of current flow through the SCB, i.e., substantially coaxial to the SCB length.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grubelich, Mark C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Industrial recovered-materials-utilization targets for the metals and metal-products industry  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Conservation Policy Act of 1978 directs DOE to set targets for increased utilization of energy-saving recovered materials for certain industries. These targets are to be established at levels representing the maximum feasible increase in utilization of recovered materials that can be achieved progressively by January 1, 1987 and is consistent with technical and economic factors. A benefit to be derived from the increased use of recoverable materials is in energy savings, as state in the Act. Therefore, emhasis on different industries in the metals sector has been related to their energy consumption. The ferrous industry (iron and steel, ferrour foundries and ferralloys), as defined here, accounts for approximately 3%, and all others for the remaining 3%. Energy consumed in the lead and zinc segments is less than 1% each. Emphasis is placed on the ferrous scrap users, followed by the aluminum and copper industries. A bibliography with 209 citations is included.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Semiconductor devices incorporating multilayer interference regions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor high reflector comprising a number of thin alternating layers of semiconductor materials is electrically tunable and may be used as a temperature insensitive semiconductor laser in a Fabry-Perot configuration. 8 figs.

Biefeld, R.M.; Drummond, T.J.; Gourley, P.L.; Zipperian, T.E.

1987-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

110

Performance characterization of microtomography with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detectors for computer-aided defect inspection  

SciTech Connect

We developed a computer-aided defect inspection system based on computed tomography (CT). The system consists of a homemade small cone-beam CT (CBCT) system and a graphical toolbox, which is used to extract a computer-aided design (CAD) model from the CT data. In the small CBCT system, the x-ray imaging detector is based on a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor photodiode array in conjunction with a scintillator. Imaging performance of the detector was evaluated in terms of modulation-transfer function, noise-power spectrum, and detective quantum efficiency. The tomographic imaging performance of the small CBCT system was evaluated in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and contrast-to-noise ratio. The graphical toolbox to support defect inspection incorporates various functional tools such as volume rendering, segmentation, triangular-mesh data generation, and data reduction. All the tools have been integrated in a graphical-user interface form. The developed system can provide rapid visual inspection as well as quantitative evaluation of defects by comparing the extracted CAD file with the original file, if available, of an object. The performance of the developed system is demonstrated with experimental CT volume data.

Kim, Ho Kyung; Yun, Seungman; Han, Jong Chul; Youn, Hanbean; Cho, Min Kook; Lim, Chang Hwy [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Sung Kyn; Shon, Cheol-Soon [Sensor Business Division, E-WOO Technology Co., Ltd., Bora-dong, Giheung, Gyeonggi-do 449-904 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Sik; Cho, Bong Hae [School of Dentistry, Pusan National University, Ami-dong, Seo-gu, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Achterkirchen, Thorsten Graeve [Rad-icon Imaging Corp., Belick Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054-2404 (United States)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

First-principles study of thin magnetic transition-metal silicide films on Si(001) Hua Wu, Peter Kratzer, and Matthias Scheffler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First-principles study of thin magnetic transition-metal silicide films on Si(001) Hua Wu, Peter of ferromag- netic FM materials have been suggested for the fabrication of metal/semiconductor heterojunctions s : 75.70. i, 73.20.At, 68.35.Md I. INTRODUCTION Metal-semiconductor heterojunctions have received much

112

Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods  

SciTech Connect

Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.

LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

Two-dimensional plasmon in a metallic monolayer on a semiconductor surface: Exchange-correlation effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Materials Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Iwate University, 4-3-5 Ueda, Morioka, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167, Hannover, Germany Received 9 July 2002; published 30 December 2002 Taking account on the clean Si(111)-(7 7) surface, though the reconstruction from an ideally truncated surface into a (7 7

Hasegawa, Shuji

114

Novel, band-controlled metal oxide compositions for semiconductor-mediated photocatalytic splitting of water to produce H{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Semiconductor-mediated photo-catalytic dissociation of water offers a unique opportunity for the production of H{sub 2}, a sustainable source of energy. More efficient and chemically stable photo-catalysts, however, remain a vital requirement for commercial viability of this process. The recent research in my group has focused on the synthesis of several new metal oxide (MO) photo-catalysts, such as: LaInO{sub 3}, GaFeO{sub 3}, InVO{sub 4}, In{sub 2}TiO{sub 5} and nanotubular TiO{sub 2}. These samples of controlled grain morphology have been synthesized by using different synthesis protocols and with and without coating of a noble metal co-catalyst. The doping of an impurity, either at cationic or at anionic lattice site, has helped in the tailoring of band structure and making these oxides visible-light-sensitive. Our study has revealed that the surface characteristics, grain morphology, band structure, and doping-induced lattice imperfections control the photo-physical properties and overall photo-catalytic water splitting activity of these metal/MO composites [1-6]. We have demonstrated that, besides promoting certain charge-transfer steps, metal-semiconductor interfaces influence the adsorption of water molecules and their subsequent interaction with photo-generated electron-hole pair at the catalyst surface. The role played by the above-mentioned micro-structural properties in photo-catalytic water splitting process will be discussed.

Gupta, Narendra M. [Catalysis Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pune - 411008 (India)

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

115

Multifunctional Metallic and Refractory Materials for Energy Efficient Handling of Molten Metals  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project was to extend the lifetime of hardware submerged in molten metal by an order of magnitude and to improve energy efficiency of molten metal handling process. Assuming broad implementation of project results, energy savings in 2020 were projected to be 10 trillion BTU/year, with cost savings of approximately $100 million/year. The project team was comprised of materials research groups from West Virginia University and the Missouri University of Science and Technology formerly University of Missouri Rolla, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, International Lead and Zinc Research Organization, Secat and Energy Industries of Ohio. Industry partners included six suppliers to the hot dip galvanizing industry, four end-user steel companies with hot-dip Galvanize and/or Galvalume lines, eight refractory suppliers, and seven refractory end-user companies. The results of the project included the development of: (1) New families of materials more resistant to degradation in hot-dip galvanizing bath conditions were developed; (2) Alloy 2020 weld overlay material and process were developed and applied to GI rolls; (3) New Alloys and dross-cleaning procedures were developed for Galvalume processes; (4) Two new refractory compositions, including new anti-wetting agents, were identified for use with liquid aluminum alloys; (5) A new thermal conductivity measurement technique was developed and validated at ORNL; (6) The Galvanizing Energy Profiler Decision Support System (GEPDSS)at WVU; Newly Developed CCW Laser Cladding Shows Better Resistance to Dross Buildup than 316L Stainless Steel; and (7) A novel method of measuring the corrosion behavior of bath hardware materials. Project in-line trials were conducted at Southwire Kentucky Rod and Cable Mill, Nucor-Crawfordsville, Nucor-Arkansas, Nucor-South Carolina, Wheeling Nisshin, California Steel, Energy Industries of Ohio, and Pennex Aluminum. Cost, energy, and environmental benefits resulting from the project are due to: i) a reduced number of process shutdowns to change hardware or lining material, ii) reduced need to produce new hardware or lining material, iii) improved product quality leads to reduced need to remake product or manufacturing of new product, iv) reduction in contamination of melt from degradation of refractory and metallic components, v) elimination of worn hardware will increase efficiency of process, vi) reduced refractory lining deterioration or formation of a less insulating phase, would result in decreased heat loss through the walls. Projected 2015 benefits for the U.S. aluminum industry, assuming 21% market penetration of improved refractory materials, are energy savings of approximately 0.2 trillion BTU/year, cost savings of $2.3 billion/year and carbon reductions of approximately 1.4 billion tons/year. The carbon reduction benefit of the project for the hot-dip galvanize and aluminum industries combined is projected to be approximately 2.2 billion tons/year in 2015. Pathways from research to commercialization were based on structure of the projects industrial partnerships. These partnerships included suppliers, industrial associations, and end users. All parties were involved in conducting the project including planning and critiquing the trials. Supplier companies such as Pyrotech Metaullics, Stoody, and Duraloy have commercialized products and processes developed on the project.

Xingbo Liu; Ever Barbero; Bruce Kang; Bhaskaran Gopalakrishnan; James Headrick; Carl Irwin

2009-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cyclic catalytic upgrading of chemical species using metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes are disclosure which comprise alternately contacting an oxygen-carrying catalyst with a reducing substance, or a lower partial pressure of an oxidizing gas, and then with the oxidizing gas or a higher partial pressure of the oxidizing gas, whereby the catalyst is alternately reduced and then regenerated to an oxygenated state. In certain embodiments, the oxygen-carrying catalyst comprises at least one metal oxide-containing material containing a composition having one of the following formulas: (a) Ce.sub.xB.sub.yB'.sub.zB''O.sub..delta., wherein B=Ba, Sr, Ca, or Zr; B'=Mn, Co, or Fe; B''=Cu; 0.01

White, James H. (Boulder, CO); Schutte, Erick J. (Thornton, CO); Rolfe, Sara L. (Loveland, CO)

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Alkali metal recovery from carbonaceous material conversion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced in the gasifier or similar reaction zone, alkali metal constitutents are recovered from the particles by withdrawing and passing the particles from the reaction zone to an alkali metal recovery zone in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen and treating the particles in the recovery zone with water or an aqueous solution in the substantial absence of molecular oxygen. The solution formed by treating the particles in the recovery zone will contain water-soluble alkali metal constituents and is recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preventing contact of the particles with oxygen as they are withdrawn from the reaction zone and during treatment in the recovery zone avoids the formation of undesirable alkali metal constituents in the aqueous solution produced in the recovery zone and insures maximum recovery of water-soluble alkali metal constituents from the alkali metal residues.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX); Clavenna, LeRoy R. (Baytown, TX); Gorbaty, Martin L. (Fanwood, NJ); Tsou, Joe M. (Galveston, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

Self assembled multi-layer nanocomposite of graphene and metal oxide materials  

SciTech Connect

Nanocomposite materials having at least two layers, each layer consisting of one metal oxide bonded to at least one graphene layer were developed. The nanocomposite materials will typically have many alternating layers of metal oxides and graphene layers, bonded in a sandwich type construction and will be incorporated into an electrochemical or energy storage device.

Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Kou, Rong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Donghai; Yang, Zhenguo

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

120

Magnetism, half-metallicity and electrical transport properties of V- and Cr-doped semiconductor SnTe: A theoretical study  

SciTech Connect

This work presents results for the electronic structure, magnetic properties, and electrical resistivity of the semiconductor SnTe doped with 3d transition metals V and Cr. From the standpoint of potential application in spintronics, we look for half-metallic states and analyze their properties in both rock salt and zinc blende structures using ab initio electronic structure methods. In both cases, it is the Sn-sublattice that is doped with the transition metals, as has been the case with experiments performed so far. We find four half-metallic compounds at their optimized cell volumes. Results of exchange interactions and the Curie temperature are presented and analyzed for all the relevant cases. Resistivity calculation based on Kubo-Greenwood formalism shows that the resistivities of these alloys due to transition metal doping of the Sn-sublattice may vary, in most cases, from typical liquid metal or metallic glass value to 23 times higher. 25% V-doping of the Sn-sublattice in the rock salt structure gives a very high resistivity, which can be traced to high values of the lattice parameter resulting in drastically reduced hopping or diffusivity of the states at the Fermi level.

Liu, Y. [State Key laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology and College of Science, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao, Hebei 066004 (China); Bose, S. K. [Physics Department, Brock University, St. Catharines, Ontario L2S 3A1 (Canada); Kudrnovsk, J. [Institute of Physics, Academy of the Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recommendation 221: Recommendation Regarding Recycling of Metals and Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Environmental Management Site-Specific Advisory Board believes DOE should make a final decision on standards for free-release metals and equipment.

122

Semiconductor nanowires DOI: 10.1002/smll.200500094  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a semiconductor Si nanowire, synthesized via the VLS pro- cess, into metallic nickel silicide through parameters. Anisotropic growth of a metal onto a semiconductor nanowire (or a semicon- ductor on a metal approach to prepare metal/semiconductor nano- wire heterostructures by transforming specific sections

Rogers, John A.

123

Method of passivating semiconductor surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of passivating Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound surfaces. The method includes selecting a passivating material having a lattice constant substantially mismatched to the lattice constant of the semiconductor compound. The passivating material is then grown as an ultrathin layer of passivating material on the surface of the Group III-V or II-VI semiconductor compound. The passivating material is grown to a thickness sufficient to maintain a coherent interface between the ultrathin passivating material and the semiconductor compound. In addition, a device formed from such method is also disclosed.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers: A theoretical and experimental study  

SciTech Connect

Graphene has been proposed as a material for semiconductor electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the charge transport mechanisms of graphene/semiconductor Schottky barriers will be crucial for future applications. Here, we report a theoretical model to describe the transport mechanisms at the interface of graphene and semiconductors based on conventional semiconductor Schottky theory and a floating Fermi level of graphene. The contact barrier heights can be estimated through this model and be close to the values obtained from the experiments, which are lower than those of the metal/semiconductor contacts. A detailed analysis reveals that the barrier heights are as the function of the interface separations and dielectric constants, and are influenced by the interfacial states of semiconductors. Our calculations show how this behavior of lowering barrier heights arises from the Fermi level shift of graphene induced by the charge transfer owing to the unique linear electronic structure.

Zhong, Haijian; Liu, Zhenghui; Xu, Gengzhao; Shi, Lin; Fan, Yingmin; Yang, Hui [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Xu, Ke, E-mail: kxu2006@sinano.ac.cn; Wang, Jianfeng; Ren, Guoqiang [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, CAS, Suzhou 215123 (China); Suzhou Nanowin Science and Technology Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215123 (China)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Low temperature production of large-grain polycrystalline semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An oxide or nitride layer is provided on an amorphous semiconductor layer prior to performing metal-induced crystallization of the semiconductor layer. The oxide or nitride layer facilitates conversion of the amorphous material into large grain polycrystalline material. Hence, a native silicon dioxide layer provided on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), followed by deposited Al permits induced crystallization at temperatures far below the solid phase crystallization temperature of a-Si. Solar cells and thin film transistors can be prepared using this method.

Naseem, Hameed A. (Fayetteville, AR); Albarghouti, Marwan (Loudonville, NY)

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Practical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: PolyethylenimPractical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: Polyethyleniminesines tailored onto The Surface oftailored onto The Surface of Porous SilicaPorous Silica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Practical Materials for Heavy Metal Ion Chelation: PolyethylenimPractical Materials for Heavy Metal *presenting author INTRODUCTION As a result of heavy metal ion release from industrial wastewater, water pollution has become a serious problem. Waste streams contain solutions of metal ions, such as copper

Taralp, Alpay

127

INFOGRAPHIC: Wide Bandgap Semiconductors  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Breakthrough material technology called wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors can help reduce the amount of wasted heat, boost energy efficiency, improve reliability, reduce cost, and decrease system size in existing and future power electronics.

128

Methods for associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework, systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks, thermal energy transfer assemblies, and methods for transferring thermal energy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for releasing associated guest materials from a metal organic framework are provided. Methods for associating guest materials with a metal organic framework are also provided. Methods are provided for selectively associating or dissociating guest materials with a metal organic framework. Systems for associating or dissociating guest materials within a series of metal organic frameworks are provided. Thermal energy transfer assemblies are provided. Methods for transferring thermal energy are also provided.

McGrail, B. Peter; Brown, Daryl R.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

129

The synthesis of inorganic semiconductor nanocrystalline materials for the purpose of creating hybrid organic/inorganic light-emitting devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) or quantum dots (QDs) can be synthesized to efficiently emit light from the ultraviolet, across the entire visible spectrum, and into the near infrared. This is now possible due ...

Steckel, Jonathan S. (Jonathan Stephen)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Field of Expertise Materials Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure-property relationships through the characterisation of diverse materials to process optimisation and international research partners in order to keep Austrian high-technology industry, scientific production semiconductors Paper and physical chemistry principles of paper strength Metallic materials for energy applica

131

Ferromagnetism in Oxide Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

In order to become a practical technology, semiconductor spintronics requires the discovery and utilization of ferromagnetic semiconductors which exhibit spin polarization in the majority carrier band at and above room temperature. Intrinsic remanent magnetization would allow spin polarized currents to be propagated in such materials without the need for a continuous magnetic field. However, the discovery and understanding of such materials is proving to be a grand challenge in solid-state science. Indeed, one of the 125 critical unanswered scientific questions recently posed in Science magazine asks, Is it possible to create magnetic semiconductors that work at room temperature?

Chambers, Scott A.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Wang, Chong M.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Heald, Steve M.; Schwartz, S. A.; Kittilstved, Kevin R.; Gamelin, Daniel R.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Electrical characteristics and thermal stability of HfO{sub 2} metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors fabricated on clean reconstructed GaSb surfaces  

SciTech Connect

HfO{sub 2}/GaSb interfaces fabricated by high-vacuum HfO{sub 2} deposition on clean reconstructed GaSb surfaces were examined to explore a thermally stable GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure with low interface-state density (D{sub it}). Interface Sb-O bonds were electrically and thermally unstable, and post-metallization annealing at temperatures higher than 200?C was required to stabilize the HfO{sub 2}/GaSb interfaces. However, the annealing led to large D{sub it} in the upper-half band gap. We propose that the decomposition products that are associated with elemental Sb atoms act as interface states, since a clear correlation between the D{sub it} and the Sb coverage on the initial GaSb surfaces was observed.

Miyata, Noriyuki, E-mail: nori.miyata@aist.go.jp; Mori, Takahiro; Yasuda, Tetsuji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Ohtake, Akihiro [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ichikawa, Masakazu [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrode materials for the electrolysis of metal oxides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon, tungsten, platinum, and iridium were examined as candidate anode materials for an electrolytic cell. The materials were pre-selected to endure high process temperatures and were characterized for inertness and high ...

Cooper, Benjamin D

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Temperature dependent junction capacitance-voltage characteristics of Ni embedded TiN/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si metalinsulatorsemiconductor structure  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the junction capacitancevoltage characteristics of highly textured/epitaxial Ni nanoparticle embedded in TiN matrix (TiN(Ni)) metal-insulator-semiconductor TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si (100) heterojunction in the temperature range of 10300?K. This heterojunction behaves as metal-semiconductor junction with unavoidable leakage through native oxide SiO{sub 2} layer. The clockwise hysteresis loop has been observed in the capacitance-voltage characteristics measured at various frequencies mainly due to presence of trap centers at the TiN(Ni)/SiO{sub 2} interface and these are temperature dependent. The spin-dependent trap charge effect at the interface influences the quadratic nature of the capacitance with magnetic field. The junction magnetocapacitance (JMC) is observed to be dependent on both temperature and frequency. The highest JMC of this heterojunction has been observed at 200?K at higher frequencies (100?kHz1?MHz). It is found that there is not much effect of band structure modification under magnetic field causing the JMC.

Panda, J.; Nath, T. K., E-mail: tnath@phy.iitkgp.ernet.in [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Chattopadhyay, S. [Department of Physics and Meteorology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal 721302 (India); Amity Institute of Nano Technology, Amity University, Sector-125, Noida, Uttar Pradesh 201313 (India)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Materials Science and Engineering A 496 (2008) 501-506 Joining Ceramics to Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ductility enhances the resistance of the joint to thermal cycling; AlN-Inconel 600 bonds exhibited good thermal shock resistance. Alumina- stainless steel bonds withstood more that 60 thermal cycles between 200Materials Science and Engineering A 496 (2008) 501-506 1 Joining Ceramics to Metals using Metallic

Cambridge, University of

136

Silica-polyamine composite materials for heavy metal ion removal, recovery, and recycling. 2. Metal ion separations from mine wastewater and soft metal ion extraction efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Silica-polyamine composites have been synthesized which have metal ion capacities as high as 0.84 mmol/g for copper ions removed from aqueous solutions. In previous reports it has been demonstrated that these materials survive more than 3,000 cycles of metal ion extraction, elution, and regeneration with almost no loss of capacity (less than 10%). This paper describes two modified silica-polyamine composite materials and reveals the results of tests designed to determine the effectiveness of these materials for extracting and separating metal ions from actual mining wastewater samples. Using these materials, the concentration of copper, aluminum, and zinc in Berkeley Pit mine wastewater is reduced to below allowable discharge limits. The recovered copper and zinc solutions were greater than 90% pure, and metal ion concentration factors of over 20 for copper were realized. Further, the ability of one of these materials to decrease low levels of the soft metals cadmium, mercury, and lead from National Sanitation Foundation recommended challenge levels to below Environmental Protection Agency allowable limits is also reported.

Fischer, R.J.; Pang, D.; Beatty, S.T.; Rosenberg, E.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

7 - New metallic materials development by laser additive manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The application of laser-based additive manufacturing (AM) technology to prepare novel structured high-performance materials and components is of unique interest. The special material incremental manufacturing (MIM) processing strategy and highly nonequilibrium metallurgical nature of laser processes favor the formation of bulk-form materials with unique microstructures and properties. This chapter summarizes our research work on the development of the nanostructured TiC reinforced Ti nanocomposites and microcellular stainless steel porous material, using the selective laser melting (SLM) AM process.

Dongdong Gu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride, carbide and carbonitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

Wong, Ming-Show (Northbrook, IL); Li, Dong (Evanston, IL); Chung, Yip-Wah (Wilmette, IL); Sproul, William D. (Palantine, IL); Chu, Xi (Evanston, IL); Barnett, Scott A. (Evanston, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN{sub x} where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN{sub x}. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45--55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating. 10 figs.

Wong, M.S.; Li, D.; Chung, Y.W.; Sproul, W.D.; Xi Chu; Barnett, S.A.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Superhard composite materials including compounds of carbon and nitrogen deposited on metal and metal nitride carbide and carbonitride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite material having high hardness comprises a carbon nitrogen compound, such as CN.sub.x where x is greater than 0.1 and up to 1.33, deposited on a metal or metal compound selected to promote deposition of substantially crystalline CN.sub.x. The carbon nitrogen compound is deposited on a crystal plane of the metal or metal compound sufficiently lattice-matched with a crystal plane of the carbon nitrogen compound that the carbon nitrogen compound is substantially crystalline. A plurality of layers of the compounds can be formed in alternating sequence to provide a multi-layered, superlattice coating having a coating hardness in the range of 45-55 GPa, which corresponds to the hardness of a BN coating and approaches that of a diamond coating.

Wong, Ming-Show (Northbrook, IL); Li, Dong (Evanston, IL); Chung, Yin-Wah (Wilmette, IL); Sproul, William D. (Palantine, IL); Chu, Xi (Evanston, IL); Barnett, Scott A. (Evanston, IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Ordered porous mesostructured materials from nanoparticle-block copolymer self-assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides mesostructured materials and methods of preparing mesostructured materials including metal-rich mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrids, porous metal-nonmetal nanocomposite mesostructures, and ordered metal mesostructures with uniform pores. The nanoparticles can be metal, metal alloy, metal mixture, intermetallic, metal-carbon, metal-ceramic, semiconductor-carbon, semiconductor-ceramic, insulator-carbon or insulator-ceramic nanoparticles, or combinations thereof. A block copolymer/ligand-stabilized nanoparticle solution is cast, resulting in the formation of a metal-rich (or semiconductor-rich or insulator-rich) mesostructured nanoparticle-block copolymer hybrid. The hybrid is heated to an elevated temperature, resulting in the formation of an ordered porous nanocomposite mesostructure. A nonmetal component (e.g., carbon or ceramic) is then removed to produce an ordered mesostructure with ordered and large uniform pores.

Warren, Scott; Wiesner, Ulrich; DiSalvo, Jr., Francis J

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Spectroscopy of semiconductor materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CuAg) 3 VO 4 compounds and theoretically predicted that hole producers (CuAg- vacancies) will dominate hole killers (CuAg interstitials, O vacancies). We synthesized Cu 3...

143

The effect of parent metal properties on the performance of Lattice Block Material{trademark}  

SciTech Connect

Lattice Block Material{trademark}, or LBM{trademark} is a unique lightweight structure consisting of repeated cells with an internal node connected to, in the most common configuration, 14 ligaments. In its metallic version, this product is available in a variety of castable metals including aluminum alloys, copper alloys, nickel alloys and steels. The relationship between LBM structural performance (strength and stiffness) and parent metal properties is investigated using compression tests in three primary orientations and 3-pt. bend tests. Analytical assessment of the LBM via finite element analysis shows reasonable agreement with experimental findings and provides predictions for LBM capabilities with different materials, unit cell sizes and ligament geometries.

Renauld, M.L.; Giamei, A.F.; Thompson, M.S. [United Technologies Research Center, East Hartford, CT (United States). Materials and Structures Technology Dept.; Priluck, J. [JAMCORP, Wilmington, MA (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

A continuum constitutive model for amorphous metallic materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A finite-deformation, Coulomb-Mohr type constitutive theory for the elastic-viscoplastic response of pressure-sensitive and plastically-dilatant isotropic materials has been developed. The constitutive model has been ...

Su, Cheng, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Metal-organic frameworksNew materials for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Published data on the physical sorption of hydrogen by new materials with a large specific ... (MOFs), are systematized and analyzed. The hydrogen-accumulating properties of MOFs are compared with ... and nanocar...

V. I. Isaeva; L. M. Kustov

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Variable temperature semiconductor film deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of depositing a semiconductor material on a substrate is disclosed. The method sequentially comprises (a) providing the semiconductor material in a depositable state such as a vapor for deposition on the substrate; (b) depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while heating the substrate to a first temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a first film layer having a first grain size; (c) continually depositing the semiconductor material on the substrate while cooling the substrate to a second temperature sufficient to cause the semiconductor material to form a second film layer deposited on the first film layer and having a second grain size smaller than the first grain size; and (d) raising the substrate temperature, while either continuing or not continuing to deposit semiconductor material to form a third film layer, to thereby anneal the film layers into a single layer having favorable efficiency characteristics in photovoltaic applications. A preferred semiconductor material is cadmium telluride deposited on a glass/tin oxide substrate already having thereon a film layer of cadmium sulfide.

Li, X.; Sheldon, P.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fast tuning of Fano resonance in metal/phase-change materials/metal metamaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose fast tuning of a Fano resonance (FR) in a three dimensional metamaterial (MM). The MM consists of an elliptical nanohole array (ENA) embedded through a metal/ phase-change...

Cao, Tun; Wei, Chenwei; Simpson, Robert E; Zhang, Lei; Cryan, Martin J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microporous Metal Organic Materials: Promising Candidates as Sorbents for Hydrogen Storage Long Pan coordination structures represent a promising new entry to the field of hydrogen storage materials.2 To fully that effectively store hydrogen are needed for use in fuel cell powered vehicles. Among the various candidate

Li, Jing

149

RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL SHIPPING PACKAGINGS AND METAL TO METAL SEALS FOUND IN THE CLOSURES OF CONTAINMENT VESSELS INCORPORATING CONE SEAL CLOSURES  

SciTech Connect

The containment vessels for the Model 9975 radioactive material shipping packaging employ a cone-seal closure. The possibility of a metal-to-metal seal forming between the mating conical surfaces, independent of the elastomer seals, has been raised. It was postulated that such an occurrence would compromise the containment vessel hydrostatic and leakage tests. The possibility of formation of such a seal has been investigated by testing and by structural and statistical analyses. The results of the testing and the statistical analysis demonstrate and procedural changes ensure that hydrostatic proof and annual leakage testing can be accomplished to the appropriate standards.

Loftin, B; Glenn Abramczyk, G; Allen Smith, A

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

150

Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity.

Lee, Hung-Sui (East Setauket, NY); Geng, Lin (Coram, NY); Skotheim, Terje A. (Shoreham, NY)

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electrolyte materials containing highly dissociated metal ion salts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to metal ion salts which can be used in electrolytes for producing electrochemical devices, including both primary and secondary batteries, photoelectrochemical cells and electrochromic displays. The salts have a low energy of dissociation and may be dissolved in a suitable polymer to produce a polymer solid electrolyte or in a polar aprotic liquid solvent to produce a liquid electrolyte. The anion of the salts may be covalently attached to polymer backbones to produce polymer solid electrolytes with exclusive cation conductivity. 2 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Geng, L.; Skotheim, T.A.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

152

Metal buildings study: performance of materials and field validation  

SciTech Connect

A 5000 square-foot metal building located at Brookhaven National Laboratory has been monitored over a winter season. Energy flows through wall sections were monitored using portable calorimeters. Air infiltration was measured using perfluorocarbon tracers, and the associated heat losses were calculated. Slab losses were assessed through a comparison of measured temperature gradients with results obtained through the use of heat-flow meters. The effect of thermal bridges and compressed insulation in locations where support beams are joined to the exterior skin was found to increase heat losses significantly. A retrofit strategy including spray insulation of beams is projected to save 30% on heating energy.

Loss, W.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Evidence of the semiconductor-metal transition in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films by the pulsed laser photoacoustic method  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the pulsed photoacoustic technique was used to investigate the semiconductor-metal transition of thin vanadium pentoxide films (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) under increasing temperature. The V{sub 2}O{sub 5} thin films were simultaneously deposited by RF magnetron sputtering at room temperature, on corning glass and SnO{sub 2}:F/glass substrates, in order to compare the photoacoustic response. The elemental and structural analysis of the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} films was performed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The optical transmission and band gap were determined using UV-Vis spectroscopy. The electrical properties were measured using four-point probe measurements with the Van der Pauw geometry.

Perez-Pacheco, A.; Acosta-Najarro, D. R.; Cruz-Manjarrez, H.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, L.; Pineda-Santamaria, J. C; Aguilar-Franco, M. [Instituto de Fisica-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico DF (Mexico)] [Instituto de Fisica-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico DF (Mexico); Castaneda-Guzman, R. [Laboratorio de Fotofisica y Peliculas Delgadas, CCADET-UNAM, Mexico DF (Mexico)] [Laboratorio de Fotofisica y Peliculas Delgadas, CCADET-UNAM, Mexico DF (Mexico)

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Investigation on edge fringing effect and oxide thickness dependence of inversion current in metal-oxide-semiconductor tunneling diodes with comb-shaped electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A particular edge-dependent inversion current behavior of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) tunneling diodes was investigated utilizing square and comb-shaped electrodes. The inversion tunneling current exhibits the strong dependence on the tooth size of comb-shaped electrodes and oxide thickness. Detailed illustrations of current conduction mechanism are developed by simulation and experimental measurement results. It is found that the electron diffusion current and Schottky barrier height lowering for hole tunneling current both contribute on inversion current conduction. In MOS tunneling photodiode applications, the photoresponse can be improved by decreasing SiO{sub 2} thickness and using comb-shaped electrodes with smaller tooth spacing. Meantime, the high and steady photosensitivity can also be approached by introducing HfO{sub 2} into dielectric stacks.

Lin, Chien-Chih; Hsu, Pei-Lun; Lin, Li; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo, E-mail: jghwu@ntu.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Electronics Engineering, Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 10, NO. 3, MAY 2011 499 TiSi2 Nanocrystal Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 10, NO. 3, MAY 2011 499 TiSi2 Nanocrystal Metal Oxide memory window, faster writing and erasing, and longer retention lifetime as a result of the metallic property of the silicide NCs. Due to thermally stable, CMOS compatible properties, TiSi2 NCs are highly

Yang, Zheng

156

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

Doeff, Marca M. (Hayward, CA); Peng, Marcus Y. (Cupertino, CA); Ma, Yanping (Albany, CA); Visco, Steven J. (Berkeley, CA); DeJonghe, Lutgard C. (Lafayette, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Joining of dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

159

Effect of the metal-semiconductor phase transition on the rate of hydrogen penetration into vanadium dioxide thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The rates of hydrogen penetration from an aqueous solution of glycerin into ... compared. It has been found that the rate of hydrogen penetration into the metal phase of vanadium dioxide ... order of magnitude hi...

V. N. Andreev; V. A. Klimov

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Study of metallic materials for solid oxide fuel cell interconnect applications.  

SciTech Connect

Metallic interconnect acts as a gas separator and a gas distributor and therefore, it needs to function adequately in two widely different environments. The interconnect material will be exposed to air on one side and natural gas or coal-derived synthesis gas on the other side. The viable material for the interconnect application must be resistant not only to oxidation but also carburization in hydrocarbon containing low-oxygen environments. In addition, the scales that develop on the exposed surfaces must possess adequate electrical conductivity for them to function as current leads over long service life of the fuel cell. This report addresses five topics of interest for the development of metallic interconnects with adequate performance in fuel cells for long service life. The research conducted over the years and the conclusions reached were used to identify additional areas of research on materials for improved performance of components, especially metallic interconnects, in the complex fuel cell environments. This report details research conducted in the following areas: measurement of area specific electrical resistivity, corrosion performance in dual gas environments by experiments using alloy 446, long term corrosion performance of ferritic and austenitic alloys in hydrogen and methane-reformed synthesis fuel-gas environments, approaches to reduce the area resistance of metallic interconnect, and reduction of electrical resistivity of alumina scales on metallic interconnect. Based on the key requirements for metallic interconnects and the data developed on the corrosion behavior of candidate materials in meeting those requirements, several areas are recommended for further research to develop metallic interconnects with acceptable and reliable long-term performance in solid oxide fuel cells.

Natesan, K.; Zeng, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Coated semiconductor devices for neutron detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for detecting neutrons includes a semi-insulated bulk semiconductor substrate having opposed polished surfaces. A blocking Schottky contact comprised of a series of metals such as Ti, Pt, Au, Ge, Pd, and Ni is formed on a first polished surface of the semiconductor substrate, while a low resistivity ("ohmic") contact comprised of metals such as Au, Ge, and Ni is formed on a second, opposed polished surface of the substrate. In one embodiment, n-type low resistivity pinout contacts comprised of an Au/Ge based eutectic alloy or multi-layered Pd/Ge/Ti/Au are also formed on the opposed polished surfaces and in contact with the Schottky and ohmic contacts. Disposed on the Schottky contact is a neutron reactive film, or coating, for detecting neutrons. The coating is comprised of a hydrogen rich polymer, such as a polyolefin or paraffin; lithium or lithium fluoride; or a heavy metal fissionable material. By varying the coating thickness and electrical settings, neutrons at specific energies can be detected. The coated neutron detector is capable of performing real-time neutron radiography in high gamma fields, digital fast neutron radiography, fissile material identification, and basic neutron detection particularly in high radiation fields.

Klann, Raymond T. (Bolingbrook, IL); McGregor, Douglas S. (Whitmore Lake, MI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Electrochemical cell with negative active material based on an alkali or alkaline earth metal  

SciTech Connect

In an electrochemical cell the negative active material is an alkali or alkaline earth metal, such as lithium, and the electrolyte comprises a solute and at least one solvent selected from the liquid oxyhalides and which serves also as the positive active material. The electrolyte further comprises a mineral substance the effect of which is to significantly reduce the voltage rise delay of the cell.

Vallin, D.; Chenebault, P.; Grassien, J.-V.; Kerouanton, A.

1985-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

163

Study of microstructure and semiconductor to metallic conductivity transition in solid state sintered Li{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4??} spinel ferrite  

SciTech Connect

Li{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite has been prepared by solid state sintering route. XRD pattern showed single phased cubic spinel structure. The samples exhibited typical character of plastoferrite with ring shaped surface microstructure. New feature observed in the present ferrite is the frequency activated conductivity transition from semiconductor to metallic state above 800?K. The increase of conductivity with frequency in the semiconducting regime follows Jonscher power law, while decrease of conductivity in metallic regime obeys Drude equation. The conductivity in semiconductor regime has been understood by hopping mechanism of localized charge carriers among the cations in B sites of cubic spinel structure. At higher temperatures, overlapping of electronic orbitals from neighbouring ions and free particle like motion of lighter Li{sup +} ions among interstitial lattices contributed metallic conductivity. The samples provided evidence of localized nature of the charge carriers at lower temperatures and increasing delocalized character with the increase of measurement temperature. From application point of view, such ferrites behave as semiconductor at low temperature and allow electromagnetic wave to pass through, but transform into a metallic reflector with negative dielectric constant at high temperature.

Bhowmik, R. N., E-mail: rnbhowmik.phy@pondiuni.edu.in; Vijayasri, G. [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, R. Venkataraman Nagar, Kalapet, Puducherry-605 014 (India)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

164

Hydrogen storage material and process using graphite additive with metal-doped complex hydrides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage material having improved hydrogen absorbtion and desorption kinetics is provided by adding graphite to a complex hydride such as a metal-doped alanate, i.e., NaAlH.sub.4. The incorporation of graphite into the complex hydride significantly enhances the rate of hydrogen absorbtion and desorption and lowers the desorption temperature needed to release stored hydrogen.

Zidan, Ragaiy (Aiken, SC); Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Jun (Columbia, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Solidification of Aluminum Alloys Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solidification of Aluminum Alloys Edited by TMS (The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society), 2004 Modeling the Effects of Mold Topography on Aluminum Cast Surfaces Lijian Tan1 , Nicholas Zabaras1 1 14853, USA Keywords: Aluminum Solidification; Mold topography; Cast Surfaces Abstract The air

Zabaras, Nicholas J.

166

Removal and recovery of radionuclides and toxic metals from wastes, soils and materials  

SciTech Connect

A process has been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the removal of metals and radionuclides from contaminated materials, soils, and waste sites (Figure 1). In this process, citric acid, a naturally occurring organic complexing agent, is used to extract metals such as Ba, Cd, Cr, Ni, Zn, and radionuclides Co, Sr, Th, and U from solid wastes by formation of water soluble, metal-citrate complexes. Citric acid forms different types of complexes with the transition metals and actinides, and may involve formation of a bidentate, tridentate, binuclear, or polynuclear complex species. The extract containing radionuclide/metal complex is then subjected to microbiological degradation followed by photochemical degradation under aerobic conditions. Several metal citrate complexes are biodegraded and the metals are recovered in a concentrated form with the bacterial biomass. Uranium forms binuclear complex with citric acid and is not biodegraded. The supernatant containing uranium citrate complex is separated and upon exposure to light, undergoes rapid degradation resulting in the formation of an insoluble, stable polymeric form of uranium. Uranium is recovered as a precipitate (uranium trioxide) in a concentrated form for recycling or for appropriate disposal. This treatment process, unlike others which use caustic reagents, does not create additional hazardous wastes for disposal and causes little damage to soil which can then be returned to normal use.

Francis, A.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Composition-Tailored Synthesis of Gradient Transition Metal Precursor Particles for Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Composition-Tailored Synthesis of Gradient Transition Metal Precursor Particles for Lithium-Ion Battery Cathode Materials ... Collected particles were lithiated, and one promising material was evaluated as the active cathode component in a lithium-ion battery. ...

Gary M. Koenig, Jr.; Ilias Belharouak; Haixai Deng; Yang-Kook Sun; Khalil Amine

2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

168

Lattice mismatched compound semiconductors and devices on silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III-V compound semiconductors, due to their superior electron mobility, are promising candidates for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). However, the limited size of III-V substrates and ...

Yang, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Semiconductor-based optical refrigerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical refrigerators using semiconductor material as a cooling medium, with layers of material in close proximity to the cooling medium that carries away heat from the cooling material and preventing radiation trapping. In addition to the use of semiconducting material, the invention can be used with ytterbium-doped glass optical refrigerators.

Epstein, Richard I. (Santa Fe, NM); Edwards, Bradley C. (Nekoosa, WI); Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Trend of tunnel magnetoresistance and variation in threshold voltage for keeping data load robustness of metaloxidesemiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction hybrid latches  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The robustness of data load of metaloxidesemiconductor/magnetic tunnel junction (MOS/MTJ) hybrid latches at power-on is examined by using Monte Carlo simulation with the variations in magnetoresistances for MTJs and in threshold voltages for MOSFETs involved in 90?nm technology node. Three differential pair type spin-transfer-torque-magnetic random access memory cells (4T2MTJ 6T2MTJ and 8T2MTJ) are compared for their successful data load at power-on. It is found that the 4T2MTJ cell has the largest pass area in the shmoo plot in TMR ratio (tunnel magnetoresistance ratio) and Vdd in which a whole 256?kb cell array can be powered-on successfully. The minimum TMR ratio for the 4T2MTJ in 0.9?V?

S. Ikeda; T. Hanyu; H. Ohno

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Compound Semiconductor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and chemistry foundations to advance the state-of-the-art compound semiconductor optoelectronic materials and devices. Our approach is based on a focused effort including...

172

Electrospun and oxidized cellulose materials for environmental remediation of heavy metals in groundwater  

SciTech Connect

This chapter focuses on the use of modified cellulosic materials in the field of environmental remediation. Two different chemical methods were involved in fabricating oxidized cellulose (OC), which has shown promise as a metal ion chelator in environmental applications. Electrospinning was utilized to introduce a more porous structure into an oxidized cellulose matrix. FTIR and Raman spectroscopy were used to study both the formation of OC and its surface complexation with metal ions. IR and Raman spectroscopic data demonstrate the formation of characteristic carboxylic groups in the structure of the final products and the successful formation of OC-metal complexes. Subsequent field tests at the Field Research Site at Oak Ridge National Laboratory confirmed the value of OC for sorption of both U and Th ions.

Han, Dong [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Halada, Gary P. [Stony Brook University (SUNY); Spalding, Brian Patrick [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Searching Room Temperature Ferromagnetism in Wide Gap Semiconductors Fe-doped Strontium Titanate and Zinc Oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientic findings in the very beginning of the millennium are taking us a step further in the new paradigm of technology: spintronics. Upgrading charge-based electronics with the additional degree of freedom of the carriers spin-state, spintronics opens a path to the birth of a new generation of devices with the potential advantages of non-volatility and higher processing speed, integration densities and power efficiency. A decisive step towards this new age lies on the attribution of magnetic properties to semiconductors, the building block of today's electronics, that is, the realization of ferromagnetic semiconductors (FS) with critical temperatures above room temperature. Unfruitful search for intrinsic RT FS lead to the concept of Dilute(d) Magnetic Semiconductors (DMS): ordinary semiconductor materials where 3 d transition metals randomly substitute a few percent of the matrix cations and, by some long-range mechanism, order ferromagnetically. The times are of intense research activity and the last few ...

Pereira, LMC; Wahl, U

174

Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery  

SciTech Connect

A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

Knosp, Bernard (Neuilly-sur-Seine, FR); Bouet, Jacques (Paris, FR); Jordy, Christian (Dourdan, FR); Mimoun, Michel (Neuilly-sur-Marne, FR); Gicquel, Daniel (Lanorville, FR)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Yucca Mountain project canister material corrosion studies as applied to the electrometallurgical treatment metallic waste form  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, Nevada is currently being evaluated as a potential site for a geologic repository. As part of the repository assessment activities, candidate materials are being tested for possible use as construction materials for waste package containers. A large portion of this testing effort is focused on determining the long range corrosion properties, in a Yucca Mountain environment, for those materials being considered. Along similar lines, Argonne National Laboratory is testing a metallic alloy waste form that also is scheduled for disposal in a geologic repository, like Yucca Mountain. Due to the fact that Argonne`s waste form will require performance testing for an environment similar to what Yucca Mountain canister materials will require, this report was constructed to focus on the types of tests that have been conducted on candidate Yucca Mountain canister materials along with some of the results from these tests. Additionally, this report will discuss testing of Argonne`s metal waste form in light of the Yucca Mountain activities.

Keiser, D.D.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metaloxidesemiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects  

SciTech Connect

We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ?5?nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265??A280??A with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 10{sup 6}7.4 10{sup 6} for a V{sub DD}?=?0.68?V corresponding to 10?nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

Methodology of Materials Discovery in Complex Metal Hydrides Using Experimental and Computational Tools  

SciTech Connect

We present a review of the experimental and theoretical methods used in the discovery of new metal-hydrogen materials systems for hydrogen storage applications. Rather than a comprehensive review of all new materials and methods used in the metal hydride community, we focus on a specific subset of successful methods utilizing theoretical crystal structure prediction methods, computational approaches for screening large numbers of compound classes, and medium-throughput experimental methods for the preparation of such materials. Monte Carlo techniques paired with a simplified empirical Hamiltonian provide crystal structure candidates that are refined using Density Functional Theory. First-principle methods using high-quality structural candidates are further screened for an estimate of reaction energetics, decomposition enthalpies, and determination of reaction pathways. Experimental synthesis utilizes a compacted-pellet sintering technique under high-pressure hydrogen at elevated temperatures. Crystal structure determination follows from a combination of Rietveld refinements of diffraction patterns and first-principles computation of total energies and dynamical stability of competing structures. The methods presented within are general and applicable to a wide class of materials for energy storage.

Majzoub, Eric H.; Ronnebro, Ewa

2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

A methodology to identify and quantify mobility-reducing defects in 4H-silicon carbide power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we present a methodology for the identification and quantification of defects responsible for low channel mobility in 4H-Silicon Carbide (SiC) power metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). To achieve this, we use an algorithm based on 2D-device simulations of a power MOSFET, density functional simulations, and measurement data. Using physical modeling of carrier mobility and interface traps, we reproduce the experimental I-V characteristics of a 4H-SiC doubly implanted MOSFET through drift-diffusion simulation. We extract the position of Fermi level and the occupied trap density as a function of applied bias and temperature. Using these inputs, our algorithm estimates the number of possible trap types, their energy levels, and concentrations at 4H-SiC/SiO{sub 2} interface. Subsequently, we use density functional theory (DFT)-based ab initio simulations to identify the atomic make-up of defects causing these trap levels. We study silicon vacancy and carbon di-interstitial defects in the SiC side of the interface. Our algorithm indicates that the D{sub it} spectrum near the conduction band edge (3.25?eV) is composed of three trap types located at 2.82.85?eV, 3.05?eV, and 3.13.2?eV, and also calculates their densities. Based on DFT simulations, this work attributes the trap levels very close to the conduction band edge to the C di-interstitial defect.

Ettisserry, D. P., E-mail: deva@umd.edu; Goldsman, N. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); Lelis, A. [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, 2800 Powder Mill Road, Adelphi, Maryland 20783 (United States)

2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Sample size requirements for estimating effective dose from computed tomography using solid-state metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Effective dose (ED) is a widely used metric for comparing ionizing radiation burden between different imaging modalities, scanners, and scan protocols. In computed tomography (CT), ED can be estimated by performing scans on an anthropomorphic phantom in which metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) solid-state dosimeters have been placed to enable organ dose measurements. Here a statistical framework is established to determine the sample size (number of scans) needed for estimating ED to a desired precision and confidence, for a particular scanner and scan protocol, subject to practical limitations. Methods: The statistical scheme involves solving equations which minimize the sample size required for estimating ED to desired precision and confidence. It is subject to a constrained variation of the estimated ED and solved using the Lagrange multiplier method. The scheme incorporates measurement variation introduced both by MOSFET calibration, and by variation in MOSFET readings between repeated CT scans. Sample size requirements are illustrated on cardiac, chest, and abdomenpelvis CT scans performed on a 320-row scanner and chest CT performed on a 16-row scanner. Results: Sample sizes for estimating ED vary considerably between scanners and protocols. Sample size increases as the required precision or confidence is higher and also as the anticipated ED is lower. For example, for a helical chest protocol, for 95% confidence and 5% precision for the ED, 30 measurements are required on the 320-row scanner and 11 on the 16-row scanner when the anticipated ED is 4 mSv; these sample sizes are 5 and 2, respectively, when the anticipated ED is 10 mSv. Conclusions: Applying the suggested scheme, it was found that even at modest sample sizes, it is feasible to estimate ED with high precision and a high degree of confidence. As CT technology develops enabling ED to be lowered, more MOSFET measurements are needed to estimate ED with the same precision and confidence.

Trattner, Sigal [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Cheng, Bin [Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York 10032 (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Pieniazek, Radoslaw L. [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States)] [Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Hoffmann, Udo [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Douglas, Pamela S. [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27715 (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27715 (United States); Einstein, Andrew J., E-mail: andrew.einstein@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, Division of Cardiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York and Department of Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center and New York-Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York (United States)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Synthesis of a material for semiconductor applications: Boron oxynitride prepared by low frequency rf plasma-assisted metalorganic chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rf plasma-assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition G. C. Chen, D.-C. Lim, S.-B. Lee, and J-derived plasma-assisted metalorganic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD , and have studied the electrical compounds have become promising functional materials for integrated circuits, flash memories, and solar

Boo, Jin-Hyo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Composite materials with metal oxide attached to lead chalcogenide nanocrystal quantum dots with linkers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite materials useful for devices such as photoelectrochemical solar cells include a substrate, a metal oxide film on the substrate, nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQDs) of lead sulfide, lead selenide, and lead telluride, and linkers that attach the NQDs to the metal oxide film. Suitable linkers preserve the 1s absorption peak of the NQDs. A suitable linker has a general structure A-B-C where A is a chemical group adapted for binding to a MO.sub.x and C is a chemical group adapted for binding to a NQD and B is a divalent, rigid, or semi-rigid organic spacer moiety. Other linkers that preserve the 1s absorption peak may also be used.

Fuke, Nobuhiro; Koposov, Alexey Y; Sykora, Milan; Hoch, Laura

2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined. 3 figures.

Hunt, T.K.; Novak, R.F.

1991-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

183

Braze material for joining ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic surfaces and joined ceramic to metal and ceramic to ceramic article  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved active metal braze filler material is provided in which the coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze filler is more closely matched with that of the ceramic and metal, or two ceramics, to provide ceramic to metal, or ceramic to ceramic, sealed joints and articles which can withstand both high temperatures and repeated thermal cycling without failing. The braze filler material comprises a mixture of a material, preferably in the form of a powder, selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, tungsten, silicon carbide and mixtures thereof, and an active metal filler material selected from the group consisting of alloys or mixtures of nickel and titanium, alloys or mixtures of nickel and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and copper, alloys or mixtures of nickel, titanium, and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium and zirconium, alloys or mixtures of niobium and titanium, alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, and nickel, alloys or mixtures of niobium, zirconium, and nickel, and alloys or mixtures of niobium, titanium, zirconium, and nickel. The powder component is selected such that its coefficient of thermal expansion will effect the overall coefficient of thermal expansion of the braze material so that it more closely matches the coefficients of thermal expansion of the ceramic and metal parts to be joined.

Hunt, Thomas K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Novak, Robert F. (Farmington Hills, MI)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Liquid metal MHD studies with non-magnetic and ferro-magnetic structural material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In most of the liquid metal MHD experiments reported in the literature to study liquid breeder blanket performance, SS316/SS304 grade steels are used as the structural material which is non-magnetic. On the other hand, the structural material for fusion blanket systems has been proposed to be ferritic martensitic grade steel (FMS) which is ferromagnetic in nature. In the recent experimental campaign, liquid metal MHD experiments have been carried out with two identical test sections: one made of SS316L (non-magnetic) and another with SS430 (ferromagnetic), to compare the effect of structural materials on MHD phenomena for various magnetic fields (up to 4T). The maximum Hartmann number and interaction number are 1047 and 300, respectively. Each test section consists of square channel (25mmנ25mm) cross-section with two U bends, with inlet and outlet at the middle portion of two horizontal legs, respectively. PbLi enters into the test section through a square duct and distributed into two parallel paths through a partition plate. In each parallel path, it travels ?0.28m length in plane perpendicular to the magnetic field and faces two 90 bends before coming out of the test section through a single square duct. The wall electrical potential and MHD pressure drop across the test sections are compared under identical experimental conditions. Similar MHD behavior is observed with both the test section at higher value of the magnetic field (>2T).

A. Patel; R. Bhattacharyay; P.K. Swain; P. Satyamurthy; S. Sahu; E. Rajendrakumar; S. Ivanov; A. Shishko; E. Platacis; A. Ziks

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Investigation of Clad Metals for Use as Bipolar Plate Material in PEM Fuel Cell Stacks  

SciTech Connect

Although metal interconnects offer many advantages over their carbon-based counterparts, they suffer from surface corrosion which leads to a release of metal ions that can contaminate the electrolyte membrane and poison the electrode catalysts. In addition, the formation of a passivating oxide or oxyhydroxide layer on the surface of the metal will increase the contact resistance between the bipolar plate and the graphite electrode backing. The approach currently under development employs an inexpensive clad metal laminate as the primary material for the bipolar plate. The key in making this work is in identifying an appropriate surface passivation layer that mitigates corrosion while at the same time allows for good electronic conduction. The current study investigated the kinetics of nitride formation on Nb and Ti foils as a function of time, temperature, atmosphere (N2-H2 gas composition), and the corrosion behavior. These two metals are being considered for use as a thin external cladding layer over an inexpensive steel core layer. As the nitride layer formation temperature was increased, the surface morphologies for both niobium and titanium substrates became coarser and more pitted, the nitride thicknesses of both increased non-linearly, and in the titanium system an oxide layer product layer on the outer surface grew as well. As the isothermal hold time was increased, the surface morphologies of both niobium and titanium reaction product layers did not change noticeably, and the thicknesses of the nitride layers increased. As the amount of hydrogen in the atmosphere was increased the surface morphologies for both the niobium and titanium did not change detectably, the thicknesses of the nitride layers increased, and titanium thicknesses of the oxide layers decreased. The nitrided niobium exhibited much better corrosion behavior than the nitrided titanium but no improvement was obtained relative to the pure Nb corrosion rates.

Rich, John S.; Meier, Alan M.; Kim, Jin Yong; Xia, Guanguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Weil, K. Scott

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

ADVERTISEMENT SEMICONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVERTISEMENT SEMICONDUCTORS: 07.14.2010 Nano-enabled Coating Makes Aircraft Invisible Humble paint... The oil-separating centrifuges will work, but they... MORE FROM IEEE SPECTRUM ROBOTICS: 06.16.2010 Robo.01.2006 Look Out, Beckham: Here Come the Robots At the "World Cup" for robots, the talk is that one day

Stryk, Oskar von

187

Standard Test Method for Determination of the Susceptibility of Metallic Materials to Hydrogen Gas Embrittlement (HGE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the quantitative determination of the susceptibility of metallic materials to hydrogen embrittlement, when exposed to high pressure gaseous hydrogen. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Ferromagnetism in Doped Thin-Film Oxide and Nitride Semiconductors and Dielectrics  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal in the field of high-Tc ferromagnetic semiconductors is the synthesis, characterization and utilization of semiconductors which exhibit substantial carrier spin polarization at and above room temperature. Such materials are of critical importance in the emerging field of semiconductor spintronics. The interaction leading to carrier spin polarization, exchange coupling between the dopant spins and the valence or conduction band, is known to be sufficiently weak in conventional semiconductors, such as GaAs and Si, that magnetic ordering above cryogenic temperatures is essentially impossible. Since the provocative theoretical predictions of Tc above ambient in p-Mn:ZnO and p-Mn:GaN (T. Dietl et al., Science 287 1019 (2000)), and the observation of room-temperature ferromagnetism in Co:TiO2 anatase (Y. Matsumoto et al., Science 291 854 (2001)), there has been a flurry of work in oxides and nitrides doped with transition metals with unpaired d electrons. It has even been claimed that room-temperature ferromagnetism can be obtained in certain d0 transition metals oxides without a dopant. In this Report, the field of transition metal doped oxides and nitrides is critically reviewed and assessed from a materials science perspective. Since much of the field centers around thin film growth, this Report focuses on films prepared not only by conventional vacuum deposition methods, but also by spin coating colloidal nanoparticles.

Chambers, Scott A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Toward an integrated computational system for describing the additive manufacturing process for metallic materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The ability to simulate the thermal, mechanical, and material response in additive manufacturing offers tremendous utility for gaining a deeper understanding of the process, while also having significant practical application. The approach and progress in establishing an integrated computational system for simulating additive manufacturing of metallic components are discussed, with the primary focus directed at the computational intensive components, which include the process and material models. The ability to experimentally measure key characteristics for verification of the models is also presented and is seen as critical in the development of the integrated computational system. Two examples are also presented that utilize the current features of the analyses techniques for exploring and applying additive manufacturing technology.

Richard Martukanitz; Pan Michaleris; Todd Palmer; Tarasankar DebRoy; Zi-Kui Liu; Richard Otis; Tae Wook Heo; Long-Qing Chen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Compressibilities and phonon spectra of high-hardness transition metal-nitride materials  

SciTech Connect

We report compressibilities measured by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and phonon spectra from Raman scattering at high pressure in the diamond anvil cell (DAC) for cubic transition metal nitrides TiN{sub 1-x}, {gamma}-Mo{sub 2}N and VN{sub x}. The high-hardness metal nitride compounds have large values of the bulk modulus. B1-structured nitrides normally have no allowed first-order Raman spectra. However, they exhibit broad bands that reflect the vibrational density of states g({omega}) associated with breakdown of q=0 selection rules because of the presence of N{sup 3-} vacancies on anion sites. Peaks in g({omega}) at low frequency are identified with the longitudinal and transverse acoustic (TA) branches. The maximum in the TA band is correlated with the superconducting transition temperature in these materials (T{sub c}). In situ Raman scattering measurements in the DAC thus permit predictions of the T{sub c} variation with pressure for cubic nitrides and isostructural carbide materials.

Shebanova, O.; Soignard, E.; Mcmillan, P.F. (ASU); (UCL)

2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

191

Standard test method for determining the superplastic properties of metallic sheet materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes the procedure for determining the superplastic forming properties (SPF) of a metallic sheet material. It includes tests both for the basic SPF properties and also for derived SPF properties. The test for basic properties encompasses effects due to strain hardening or softening. 1.2 This test method covers sheet materials with thicknesses of at least 0.5 mm but not greater than 6 mm. It characterizes the material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Note 1Most industrial applications of superplastic forming involve a multi-axial stress condition in a sheet; however it is more convenient to characterize a material under a uni-axial tensile stress condition. Tests should be performed in different orientations to the rolling direction of the sheet to ascertain initial anisotropy. 1.3 This method has been used successfully between strain rates of 10-5 to 10-1 per second. 1.4 This method has been used successfully on Aluminum and Titanium alloys. The use of the method wi...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transmissive metallic contact for amorphous silicon semiconductors includes a thin layer of metal, such as aluminum or other low work function metal, coated on the amorphous silicon with an antireflective layer coated on the metal. A transparent substrate, such as glass, is positioned on the light reflective layer. The metallic layer is preferably thin enough to transmit at least 50% of light incident thereon, yet thick enough to conduct electricity. The antireflection layer is preferably a transparent material that has a refractive index in the range of 1.8 to 2.2 and is approximately 550A to 600A thick.

Madan, A.

1984-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Peter Y. Yu, Manuel Cardona, Fundamentals of semiconductors; physics and materials properties, 3rd rev. and enlarged edn. (Advanced texts in physics).  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of us consider semiconductors as a very technical subject, thinking of computer chips and all the electronic equipment in the lab and at home. ... some elaborate etching and deposition processes, but "Fundamentals

Walter Langel

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Stretchable semiconductor elements and stretchable electrical circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Seoul, KR); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC)

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

195

Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) from size-selected catalytic metal particles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNTs) from size-selected catalytic metal particles-quality synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has demonstrated new possibilities of applications and for the controlled synthesis directly on semiconductor materials. In this technique, it is known that material, size

Maruyama, Shigeo

196

Iron-Based Amorphous Metals:The High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials(HPCRM) Program  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal makes this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of such iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others.

Farmer, J

2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

197

METALS AND MATERIALS International, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2007), pp. 463~468 Comparative Study on Mechanical Properties of MoSiN Multilayer Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improved by controlling the number of layers, especially in metal silicide systems [12]. ThereforeMETALS AND MATERIALS International, Vol. 13, No. 6 (2007), pp. 463~468 Comparative Study

Boo, Jin-Hyo

198

Composition-tailored synthesis of gradient transition metal precursor particles for lithium-ion battery cathode materials.  

SciTech Connect

We report the tailored synthesis of particles with internal gradients in transition metal composition aided by the use of a general process model. Tailored synthesis of transition metal particles was achieved using a coprecipitation reaction with tunable control over the process conditions. Gradients in the internal composition of the particles was monitored and confirmed experimentally by analysis of particles collected during regularly timed intervals. Particles collected from the reactor at the end of the process were used as the precursor material for the solid-state synthesis of Li{sub 1.2}(Mn{sub 0.62}Ni{sub 0.38}){sub 0.8}O{sub 2}, which was electrochemically evaluated as the active cathode material in a lithium battery. The Li{sub 1.2}(Mn{sub 0.62}Ni{sub 0.38}){sub 0.8}O{sub 2} material was the first example of a structurally integrated multiphase material with a tailored internal gradient in relative transition metal composition as the active cathode material in a lithium-ion battery. We believe our general synthesis strategy may be applied to produce a variety of new cathode materials with tunable interior, surface, and overall relative transition metal compositions.

Koenig, G. M.; Belharouak, I.; Deng, H.; Amine, K.; Sun, Y. K. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

199

Preparation of a semiconductor thin film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the preparation of a semiconductor film. The process comprises depositing nanoparticles of a semiconductor material onto a substrate whose surface temperature during nanoparticle deposition thereon is sufficient to cause substantially simultaneous fusion of the nanoparticles to thereby coalesce with each other and effectuate film growth.

Pehnt, Martin (TuBingen, DE); Schulz, Douglas L. (Denver, CO); Curtis, Calvin J. (Lakewood, CO); Ginley, David S. (Evergreen, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Preparation of a semiconductor thin film  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the preparation of a semiconductor film. The process comprises depositing nanoparticles of a semiconductor material onto a substrate whose surface temperature during nanoparticle deposition thereon is sufficient to cause substantially simultaneous fusion of the nanoparticles to thereby coalesce with each other and effectuate film growth.

Pehnt, M.; Schulz, D.L.; Curtis, C.J.; Ginley, D.S.

1998-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

SciTech Connect

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Metal contacts on ZnSe and GaN  

SciTech Connect

Recently, considerable interest has been focused on the development of blue light emitting materials and devices. The focus has been on GaN and ZnSe, direct band gap semiconductors with bands gaps of 3.4 and 2.6 eV, respectively. To have efficient, reliable devices it is necessary to have thermally and electrically stable Ohmic contacts. This requires knowledge of the metal-semiconductor reaction behavior. To date few studies have investigated this behavior. Much information has accumulated over the years on the behavior of metals on Si and GaAs. This thesis provides new knowledge for the more ionic wide band gap semiconductors. The initial reaction temperatures, first phases formed, and phase stability of Pt, Pd, and Ni on both semiconductors were investigated. The reactions of these metals on ZnSe and GaN are discussed in detail and correlated with predicted behavior. In addition, comparisons are made between these highly ionic semiconductors and Si and GaAs. The trends observed here should also be applicable to other II-VI and III-Nitride semiconductor systems, while the information on phase formation and stability should be useful in the development of contacts for ZnSe and GaN devices.

Duxstad, K.J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials Science and Mineral Engineering; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Enhanced von Weizscker Wang-Govind-Carter kinetic energy density functional for semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

We propose a new form of orbital-free (OF) kinetic energy density functional (KEDF) for semiconductors that is based on the Wang-Govind-Carter (WGC99) nonlocal KEDF. We enhance within the latter the semi-local von Weizscker KEDF term, which is exact for a single orbital. The enhancement factor we introduce is related to the extent to which the electron density is localized. The accuracy of the new KEDF is benchmarked against Kohn-Sham density functional theory (KSDFT) by comparing predicted energy differences between phases, equilibrium volumes, and bulk moduli for various semiconductors, along with metal-insulator phase transition pressures. We also compare point defect and (100) surface energies in silicon for a broad test of its applicability. This new KEDF accurately reproduces the exact non-interacting kinetic energy of KSDFT with only one additional adjustable parameter beyond the three parameters in the WGC99 KEDF; it exhibits good transferability between semiconducting to metallic silicon phases and between various III-V semiconductors without parameter adjustment. Overall, this KEDF is more accurate than previously proposed OF KEDFs (e.g., the Huang-Carter (HC) KEDF) for semiconductors, while the computational efficiency remains at the level of the WGC99 KEDF (several hundred times faster than the HC KEDF). This accurate, fast, and transferable new KEDF holds considerable promise for large-scale OFDFT simulations of metallic through semiconducting materials.

Shin, Ilgyou [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-1009 (United States); Carter, Emily A., E-mail: eac@princeton.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, and Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544-5263 (United States)

2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Single Crystal Organic Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

The proposed research aims to achieve quantitative, molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped crystalline organic semiconductors via in situ linear and nonlinear optical spectroscopy, in conjunction with transport measurements and molecular/crystal engineering. Organic semiconductors are emerging as viable materials for low-cost electronics and optoelectronics, such as organic photovoltaics (OPV), organic field effect transistors (OFETs), and organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). Despite extensive studies spanning many decades, a clear understanding of the nature of charge carriers in organic semiconductors is still lacking. It is generally appreciated that polaron formation and charge carrier trapping are two hallmarks associated with electrical transport in organic semiconductors; the former results from the low dielectric constants and weak intermolecular electronic overlap while the latter can be attributed to the prevalence of structural disorder. These properties have lead to the common observation of low charge carrier mobilities, e.g., in the range of 10-5 - 10-3 cm2/Vs, particularly at low carrier concentrations. However, there is also growing evidence that charge carrier mobility approaching those of inorganic semiconductors and metals can exist in some crystalline organic semiconductors, such as pentacene, tetracene and rubrene. A particularly striking example is single crystal rubrene (Figure 1), in which hole mobilities well above 10 cm2/Vs have been observed in OFETs operating at room temperature. Temperature dependent transport and spectroscopic measurements both revealed evidence of free carriers in rubrene. Outstanding questions are: what are the structural features and physical properties that make rubrene so unique? How do we establish fundamental design principles for the development of other organic semiconductors of high mobility? These questions are critically important but not comprehensive, as the nature of charge carriers is known to evolve as the carrier concentration increases, due to the presence of intrinsic disorder in organic semiconductors. Thus, a complementary question is: how does the nature of charge transport change as a function of carrier concentration?

Zhu, Xiaoyang

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Novel Fabrication and Simple Hybridization of Exotic Material MEMS  

SciTech Connect

Work in materials other than silicon for MEMS applications has typically been restricted to metals and metal oxides instead of more ''exotic'' semiconductors. However, group III-V and II-VI semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material and electronic parameters available to the MEMS and MOEMS designer. With these materials, not only are the traditional mechanical material variables (thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus, etc.) available, but also chemical constituents can be varied in ternary and quaternary materials. This flexibility can be extremely important for both friction and chemical compatibility issues for MEMS. In addition, the ability to continually vary the bandgap energy can be particularly useful for many electronics and infrared detection applications. However, there are two major obstacles associated with alternate semiconductor material MEMS. The first issue is the actual fabrication of non-silicon devices and the second impediment is communicating with these novel devices. We will describe an essentially material independent fabrication method that is amenable to most group III-V and II-VI semiconductors. This technique uses a combination of non-traditional direct write precision fabrication processes such as diamond turning, ion milling, laser ablation, etc. This type of deterministic fabrication approach lends itself to an almost trivial assembly process. We will also describe in detail the mechanical, electrical, and optical self-aligning hybridization technique used for these alternate-material MEMS.

Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

1999-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermoelectric material including a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric material includes a multiple transition metal-doped type I clathrate crystal structure having the formula A.sub.8TM.sub.y.sub.1.sup.1TM.sub.y.sub.2.sup.2 . . . TM.sub.y.sub.n.sup.nM.sub.zX.sub.46-y.sub.1.sub.-y.sub.2.sub.- . . . -y.sub.n.sub.-z. In the formula, A is selected from the group consisting of barium, strontium, and europium; X is selected from the group consisting of silicon, germanium, and tin; M is selected from the group consisting of aluminum, gallium, and indium; TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, and TM.sup.n are independently selected from the group consisting of 3d, 4d, and 5d transition metals; and y.sub.1, y.sub.2, y.sub.n and Z are actual compositions of TM.sup.1, TM.sup.2, TM.sup.n, and M, respectively. The actual compositions are based upon nominal compositions derived from the following equation: z=8q.sub.A-|.DELTA.q.sub.1|y.sub.1-|.DELTA.q.sub.2|y.sub.2- . . . -|.DELTA.q.sub.n|y.sub.n, wherein q.sub.A is a charge state of A, and wherein .DELTA.q.sub.1, .DELTA.q.sub.2, .DELTA.q.sub.n are, respectively, the nominal charge state of the first, second, and n-th TM.

Yang, Jihui (Lakeshore, CA); Shi, Xun (Troy, MI); Bai, Shengqiang (Shanghai, CN); Zhang, Wenqing (Shanghai, CN); Chen, Lidong (Shanghai, CN); Yang, Jiong (Shanghai, CN)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

Semiconductor wire array structures, and solar cells and photodetectors based on such structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A structure comprising an array of semiconductor structures, an infill material between the semiconductor materials, and one or more light-trapping elements is described. Photoconverters and photoelectrochemical devices based on such structure also described.

Kelzenberg, Michael D.; Atwater, Harry A.; Briggs, Ryan M.; Boettcher, Shannon W.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Petykiewicz, Jan A.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

208

Fabrication of superconducting metal-oxide textiles by heating impregnated polymeric material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing crystalline fibers, textiles or shapes comprised of YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x] where x varies from about 0 to about 0.4, said process comprising: (a) impregnating a preformed organic polymeric material with three metal compounds to provide metal elements in said material in substantially the atomic ratio occurring in said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; (b) heating said impregnated material in a weakly oxidizing atmosphere containing from about 0.05% to about 2% oxygen by volume to a temperature sufficiently high to at least partially pyrolize and oxidize said organic material and at least partially oxidize said metal compounds substantially without ignition of said organic material and without formation of a molten phase or reaching a decomposition temperature of said YBa[sub 2]Cu[sub 3]O[sub 7[minus]x]; and (c) cooling the resulting material in at least a moderately oxidizing atmosphere to room temperature so as to obtain said fibers, textiles or shapes.

Van den Sype, J.S.

1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

209

Wide Bandgap Semiconductors: Pursuing the Promise  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wide bandgap semiconductor materials are more efficient than their silicon-based counterparts; making it possible to reduce weight, volume, and life-cycle costs in a wide range of power applications.

210

High-energy ultrafine metal powders in the manufacture of ceramic materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The addition of metal, powders produced by electric-pulse sputtering is examined as a possible way to activate sintering of conventional and plasma-chemical oxide systems. Since the metal particles have an ext...

T. A. Khabas

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Semiconductor research capabilities at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses semiconductor research capabilities (advanced materials, processing, packaging) and national user facilities (electron microscopy, heavy-ion accelerators, advanced light source). (DLC)

Not Available

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Holey Germanium - New Routes to Ordered Nanoporous Semiconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

currently exploring a variety of applications for these materials, including nanoscale solar cells and adsorption based chemical sensors. Because the semiconductor surface is...

213

Photons, Electrons and Holes: Fundamentals of Photocatalysis with Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although not all the heterogeneous photocatalysts are semiconductors, this type of solids represents, by far, the most representative and widely investigated photoactive materials. For that reason, the fundamentals

Juan Manuel Coronado

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced semiconductor devices Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northern Illinois University Collection: Engineering 39 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

215

Optical temperature indicator using thermochromic semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reversible optical temperature indicator utilizes thermochromic semiconductors which vary in color in response to various temperature levels. The thermochromic material is enclosed in an enamel which provides protection and prevents breakdown at higher temperatures. Cadmium sulfide is the preferred semiconductor material. The indicator may be utilized as a sign or in a striped arrangement to clearly provide a warning to a user. The various color responses provide multiple levels of alarm.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Impact of SF{sub 6} plasma treatment on performance of TaN-HfO{sub 2}-InP metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the experimental impact of SF{sub 6} plasma treatment on the performance of InP metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors is presented. S and F are incorporated into atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} via postgate SF{sub 6} plasma treatment. The decreased subthreshold swing, gate leakage (I{sub g}), and increased effective channel mobility ({mu}{sub eff}) indicate that better interface and bulk oxide quality have been achieved with SF{sub 6} plasma treatment due to the formation of stronger Hf-F bonds. Drive current (I{sub d}), transconductance (G{sub m}), and effective channel mobility ({mu}{sub eff}) are improved by 22.3%, 35%, and 35%, respectively, compared with those of control devices.

Wang Yanzhen; Chen Yenting; Zhao Han; Xue Fei; Zhou Fei; Lee, Jack C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Metallic phase-change materials for solar dynamic energy storage systems  

SciTech Connect

Solar (thermal) dynamic power systems for satellites require a heat storage system that is capable of operating the engine during eclipse. The conventional approach to this thermal storage problem is to use the latent heat of fluoride salts, which would melt during insolation and freeze during eclipse. Although candidate fluorides have large heats of fusion per unit mass, their poor thermal conductivity limits the rate at which energy can be transferred to and from the storage device. System performance is further limited by the high parasitic mass of the superalloy canisters needed to contain the salt. This report describes a new thermal storage system in which the phase-change material (PCM) is a metal (typically germanium) contained in modular graphite canisters. These modules exhibit good thermal conductivity and low parasitic mass, and they are physically and chemically stable. Prototype modules have survived over 600 melt/freeze cycles without degradation. Advanced concepts to further improve performance are described. These concepts include the selection of ternary eutectic alloys to provide a wider range of useful melting temperatures and the use of infiltration to control the location of liquid alloy and to compensate for differences in thermal expansion. 13 refs., 18 figs.

Lauf, R.J.; Hamby, C. Jr.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Materials Go/No-Go Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Go/No-Go Decisions Made Within Materials Go/No-Go Decisions Made Within the Department of Energy Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) In fulfillment of the end of Fiscal Year 2007 Project Milestone on Materials Down-selection Lennie Klebanoff, Director Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA 94551 September/October 2007 1 Acknowledgements The author wishes to acknowledge the contributions of all Principal Investigators within the Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) to the work summarized herein. Their names and affiliations are listed below. Especially significant contributions to this document were made by Dr. Ewa Ronnebro (SNL), Dr. John Vajo (HRL), Prof. Zak Fang (U. Utah), Dr. Robert Bowman Jr. (JPL), Prof. David Sholl (CMU) and Prof. Craig Jensen (U. Hawaii). The author thanks Dr.

219

Semiconductor bridge (SCB) igniter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an explosive device comprising an explosive material which can be made to explode upon activation by activation means in contact therewith; electrical activation means adaptable for activating said explosive material such that it explodes; and electrical circuitry in operation association with said activation means; there is an improvement wherein said activation means is an electrical material which, at an elevated temperature, has a negative temperature coefficient of electrical resistivity and which has a shape and size and an area of contact with said explosive material sufficient that it has an electrical resistance which will match the resistance requirements of said associated electrical circuitry when said electrical material is operationally associated with said circuitry, and wherein said electrical material is polycrystalline; or said electrical material is crystalline and (a) is mounted on a lattice matched substrate or (b) is partially covered with an intimately contacting metallization area which defines its area of contact with said explosive material.

Bickes, Jr., Robert W. (Albuquerque, NM); Schwarz, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Waste minimization in semiconductor processing  

SciTech Connect

The US semiconductor industry uses 5--7 thousand pounds of arsine annually. Fifty to eighty percent of the arsine used becomes a waste product, which requires abatement. Traditional methods of abatement are reviewed with an emphasis on dry chemical scrubbing. A variety of dry chemical scrubbing materials were evaluated for arsine capacity, using activated carbon as the baseline for comparison. Of the available technologies, dry chemical scrubbing is the most effective means of minimizing arsenic containing waste generated from semiconductor effluents. A copper oxide based media has been identified which has high capacity, high efficiency and treats the spectrum of gases used in MOCVD processes. Reclaim and recovery of spent scrubber media has the potential to drastically reduce arsenic waste from semiconductor manufacturing.

Hardwick, S.J.; Mailloux, J.C. [Novapure Corp., Danbury, CT (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Behavior of the thermopower in amorphous materials at the metal-insulator transition C. Villagonzalo , R. A. Romer, and M. Schreiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the metal-insulator transition (MIT). This quantum phase transition from a good conducting material values or vice versa at low temperature T . This corresponds to a change of thermal conductors fromBehavior of the thermopower in amorphous materials at the metal-insulator transition C

Chemnitz, Technische Universität

222

(Data in thousand metric tons of silicon content unless otherwise noted) Domestic Production and Use: Estimated value of silicon metal and alloys (excluding semiconductor-grade silicon)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

%; China, 16%; South Africa, 13%; Canada, 12%; and other, 39%. Tariff: Item Number Normal Trade Relations metal: Brazil, 37%; South Africa, 25%; Canada, 14%; Norway, 6%; and other, 18%. Total: Brazil, 20 energy costs. Demand for silicon metal comes primarily from the aluminum and chemical industries

223

Energy conversion catalysis using semiconducting transition metal cluster compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... semiconducting materials that provide a high density of transition metal d-states bordering the forbidden energy region (d-band semiconductors). During a detailed study of RuS2, the best material ... for photo-induced evolution of oxygen3, it became apparent that ~0.5 eV of energy per transferred electron is lost in the course of trapping positive charge carriers in the ...

N. Alonso Vante; H. Tributsch

1986-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

224

Efficient Heat Storage Materials: Metallic Composites Phase-Change Materials for High-Temperature Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: MIT is developing efficient heat storage materials for use in solar and nuclear power plants. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at nightwhen the suns not outto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. MIT is designing nanostructured heat storage materials that can store a large amount of heat per unit mass and volume. To do this, MIT is using phase change materials, which absorb a large amount of latent heat to melt from solid to liquid. MITs heat storage materials are designed to melt at high temperatures and conduct heat wellthis makes them efficient at storing and releasing heat and enhances the overall efficiency of the thermal storage and energy-generation process. MITs low-cost heat storage materials also have a long life cycle, which further enhances their efficiency.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Optimization of metal dispersion in doped graphitic materials for hydrogen storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The noncovalent hydrogen binding on transition-metal atoms dispersed on carbon clusters and graphene is studied with the use of the pseudopotential density-functional method. It is found that the presence of acceptorlike states in the absorbents is essential for enhancing the metal adsorption strength and for increasing the number of hydrogen molecules attached to the metal atoms. Particular configurations of boron substitutional doping are found to be very efficient for providing such states and thus enhancing storage capacity. Optimal doping conditions are suggested based on our calculations for the binding energy and ratio between metal and hydrogen molecules.

Gyubong Kim; Seung-Hoon Jhi; Noejung Park; Steven G. Louie; Marvin L. Cohen

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Optical temperature sensor using thermochromic semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical thermometry is a growing technological field which exploits the ability of certain materials to change their optical properties with temperature. A subclass of such materials are those which change their color as a reversible and reproducible function of temperature. These materials are thermochromic. This invention is a composition to measure temperature utilizing thermochromic semiconductors.

Kronberg, J.W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 5. Automotive Metals-Steel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

228

FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 2. Automotive Metals-Wrought  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

229

FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 6. Automotive Metals-Crosscutting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

230

FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 3. Automotive Metals-Cast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

231

Synthesis of thin films and materials utilizing a gaseous catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the fabrication of nanostructured semiconducting, photoconductive, photovoltaic, optoelectronic and electrical battery thin films and materials at low temperature, with no molecular template and no organic contaminants. High-quality metal oxide semiconductor, photovoltaic and optoelectronic materials can be fabricated with nanometer-scale dimensions and high dopant densities through the use of low-temperature biologically inspired synthesis routes, without the use of any biological or biochemical templates.

Morse, Daniel E; Schwenzer, Birgit; Gomm, John R; Roth, Kristian M; Heiken, Brandon; Brutchey, Richard

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

Electrostatic screening by semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrostatic screening by semiconductors is studied, hics. applying the Thomas-Fermi theory. The semiconductor is treated as a medium with dielectric constant e due to vocalizable atoms, with force charge due to electrons. Two models...

Krcmar, Maja

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Semiconductor Nanowires for Energy Conversion Allon I. Hochbaum*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiconductor Nanowires for Energy Conversion Allon I. Hochbaum*, and Peidong Yang* Department. Introduction: Role of Materials in Energy Conversion 527 2. Why Are Semiconductor Nanowires Special? 527 3 of Materials in Energy Conversion Between 2004 and 2030 the annual global consumption of energy is estimated

Wu, Zhigang

234

Material Flow Analysis of Scarce Metals: Sources, Functions, End-Uses and Aspects for Future Supply  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First, it surveys the main sources of geologically scarce (byproduct) metals currently considered critical by one or other of several recent studies. ... One example is the use of phosphors based on scarce metals in LEDs now competing with older types of light for many applications such as automobile headlights and streetlights as well as interior lighting. ... (9) MFA has been used to study the industrial metabolism of major base metals (iron and steel, aluminum, copper, zinc, lead, and nickel) to quantify waste residuals generated by processing. ...

Laura Talens Peir; Gara Villalba Mndez; Robert U. Ayres

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

235

Catalytic Activity of Alkali Metals on the Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first reaction in the thermal decomposition of cellulose is very sensitive to the existence of mineral impurities such as alkali metals and iron at concentrations as low as 0.5%. The catalytic reaction app...

Mahmood M. Barbooti

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Metal Aminoboranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. June 25, 2013 Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Metal Aminoboranes Metal aminoboranes of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other metal aminoboranes. Metal aminoboranes can be dehydrogenated to form hydrogen and a reaction product. The reaction product can react with hydrogen to form a hydrogen storage material. Metal aminoboranes can be included in a kit. U.S. Patent No.: 7,713,506 (DOE S-112,798)

237

Spire Semiconductor formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Semiconductor formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC Semiconductor formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC) Place Hudson, New Hampshire Zip 3051 Product Spire-owned US-based manufacturer of gallium-arsenide (GaAs) cells; offers design and manufacturing capabilities of concentrator cells. References Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC) is a company located in Hudson, New Hampshire . References ↑ "Spire Semiconductor (formerly Bandwidth Semiconductor LLC)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Spire_Semiconductor_formerly_Bandwidth_Semiconductor_LLC&oldid=351621"

238

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor detector for ionizing electromagnetic radiation, neutrons, and energetic charged particles. The detecting element is comprised of a compound having the composition I-III-VI.sub.2 or II-IV-V.sub.2 where the "I" component is from column 1A or 1B of the periodic table, the "II" component is from column 2B, the "III" component is from column 3A, the "IV" component is from column 4A, the "V" component is from column 5A, and the "VI" component is from column 6A. The detecting element detects ionizing radiation by generating a signal proportional to the energy deposited in the element, and detects neutrons by virtue of the ionizing radiation emitted by one or more of the constituent materials subsequent to capture. The detector may contain more than one neutron-sensitive component.

Bell, Zane W. (Oak Ridge, TN); Burger, Arnold (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

239

High Throughput Combinatorial Screening of Biometic Metal-Organic Materials for Military Hydrogen-Storage Materials (New Joint Miami U/NREL DoD/DLA Project) (presentation)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project Miami University/NREL DoD/DLA Project High throughput combinatorial screening of biomimetic metal-organic materials for military hydrogen-storage applications Philip Parilla - NREL Joe Zhou, Dan Zhao - Miami U, Ohio Jeff Blackburn, Kevin O'Neill, Lin Simpson, Mike Heben - NREL Outline * Miami/NREL Project - Synthesis (Miami) - High Throughput Characterization (NREL) - Other Characterization * Other High Throughput Activities (NREL) - Parallel Sieverts - Parallel Gravimetric * Final Comments Overview of Miami/NREL Project * Goals - Development of H 2 storage materials based on MOFs, targeting 15 kJ/mole binding energy and high density of H 2 sites - Development of optical-based detection of adsorbed H 2 allowing rapid screening of samples * Approach - Combinatorial MOFs synthesis involving 8

240

Unusual Bi-Containing Surface Layers of IIIV Compound Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this chapter, it is first described how the surface science and engineering of the IIIV compound semiconductors are relevant to developing the semiconductor-based materials, including bismuth (Bi) containi...

Pekka Laukkanen; Marko Punkkinen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Life-cycle Assessment of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The international technology roadmap for semiconductors,The international technology roadmap for semiconductors:The international technology roadmap for semiconductors,

Boyd, Sarah B.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 2. Automotive Metals- Wrought  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

243

FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 6. Automotive Metals- Crosscutting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

244

FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 5. Automotive Metals- Steel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

245

FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 3. Automotive Metals- Cast  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

246

Electrical and structural characterization of metal germanides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Metal-semiconductor contacts have been widely studied in the past 60 years. These structures are of importance in the microelectronics industry. As the scaling down of (more)

Chawanda, Albert

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

Hsu, George C. (La Crescenta, CA); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (W. Corine, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Menard, Etienne (Urbana, IL); Lee, Keon Jae (Savoy, IL); Khang, Dahl-Young (Urbana, IL); Sun, Yugang (Champaign, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Zhengtao (Urbana, IL)

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

249

Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

250

Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

Nuzzo, Ralph G; Rogers, John A; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang, Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao

2014-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

251

Methods and devices for fabricating and assembling printable semiconductor elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides methods and devices for fabricating printable semiconductor elements and assembling printable semiconductor elements onto substrate surfaces. Methods, devices and device components of the present invention are capable of generating a wide range of flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices and arrays of devices on substrates comprising polymeric materials. The present invention also provides stretchable semiconductor structures and stretchable electronic devices capable of good performance in stretched configurations.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC); Lee, Keon Jae (Daejeon, KR); Khang, Dahl-Young (Urbana, IL); Sun, Yugang (Champaign, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Raleigh, NC); Zhu, Zhengtao (Urbana, IL)

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

L{sub g}?=?100?nm In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As quantum well metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with atomic layer deposited beryllium oxide as interfacial layer  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we have fabricated nanometer-scale channel length quantum-well (QW) metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) incorporating beryllium oxide (BeO) as an interfacial layer. BeO has high thermal stability, excellent electrical insulating characteristics, and a large band-gap, which make it an attractive candidate for use as a gate dielectric in making MOSFETs. BeO can also act as a good diffusion barrier to oxygen owing to its small atomic bonding length. In this work, we have fabricated In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As MOS capacitors with BeO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and compared their electrical characteristics. As interface passivation layer, BeO/HfO{sub 2} bilayer gate stack presented effective oxide thickness less 1 nm. Furthermore, we have demonstrated In{sub 0.7}Ga{sub 0.3}As QW MOSFETs with a BeO/HfO{sub 2} dielectric, showing a sub-threshold slope of 100?mV/dec, and a transconductance (g{sub m,max}) of 1.1 mS/?m, while displaying low values of gate leakage current. These results highlight the potential of atomic layer deposited BeO for use as a gate dielectric or interface passivation layer for IIIV MOSFETs at the 7?nm technology node and/or beyond.

Koh, D., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kwon, H. M. [Department of Electronics Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T.-W., E-mail: dh.koh@utexas.edu, E-mail: Taewoo.Kim@sematech.org; Veksler, D.; Gilmer, D.; Kirsch, P. D. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Kim, D.-H. [SEMATECH, Inc., Albany, New York 12203 (United States); GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Malta, New York 12020 (United States); Hudnall, Todd W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas State University, San Marcos, Texas, 78666 (United States); Bielawski, Christopher W. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Maszara, W. [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Santa Clara, California 95054 (United States); Banerjee, S. K. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

Analysis of Lateritic Material from Cerro Impacto by Instrumental Neutron Activation Employing a Low-Energy Photon Semiconductor and a High-Energy Ge(Li) Detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nineteen elements were determined in four different grain size fractions of a bulk geological material from Cerro Impacto for a study of the physical (mechanical) concentration...

Labrecque, J J; Beusen, J M; Van Grieken, R E

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes recent progress on a collaborative project between scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at PNNL and at Ford Motor Company, involving investigations of laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We are investigating SCR catalysts with reduced ammonia slip, increased low temperature activity, and increased product selectivity to N2. More recent recognition that high temperature performance, under regimes that sometimes cause deactivation, also needs to be improved is driving current work focused on catalyst materials modifications needed to achieve this enhanced performance. We are also studying materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we examine the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measure the kinetic parameters to update Fords HC adsorption model.

Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Kim, Do Heui; Li, Xiaohong S.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

255

Removal of radioactive materials and heavy metals from water using magnetic resin  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Magnetic polymer resins capable of efficient removal of actinides and heavy metals from contaminated water are disclosed together with methods for making, using, and regenerating them. The resins comprise polyamine-epichlorohydrin resin beads with ferrites attached to the surfaces of the beads. Markedly improved water decontamination is demonstrated using these magnetic polymer resins of the invention in the presence of a magnetic field, as compared with water decontamination methods employing ordinary ion exchange resins or ferrites taken separately. 9 figs.

Kochen, R.L.; Navratil, J.D.

1997-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Advanced process research and development to enhance metals and materials recycling.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative, cost-effective technologies that have a positive life-cycle environmental impact and yield marketable products are needed to meet the challenges of the recycling industry. Four materials-recovery technologies that are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with industrial partners are described in this paper: (1) dezincing of galvanized steel scrap; (2) material recovery from auto-shredder residue; (3) high-value-plastics recovery from obsolete appliances; and (4) aluminum salt cake recycling. These technologies are expected to be applicable to the production of low-cost, high-quality raw materials from a wide range of waste streams.

Daniels, E. J.

1997-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

257

Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research.

Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

258

Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, February-May 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported in the magnetic fusion energy and laser fusion energy programs, aluminium-air battery and vehicle research, geothermal research, nuclear waste management, basic energy science, and chemistry and materials science. (FS)

Truhan, J.J.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Predicting adhesive properties of liquid-metal materials for fusion reactor blankets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A technique for calculating the surface energy and adhesion energy of single-component and multicomponent structural materials is suggested. It is based on a second-order model for an elastic continuum that assum...

I. V. Vitkovsky; A. N. Konev; V. S. Shorkin

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

PVP-functionalized nanometre scale metal oxide coatings for cathode materials: successful application to LiMn2O4 spinel nanoparticlesw  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PVP-functionalized nanometre scale metal oxide coatings for cathode materials: successful-MnO2, may react with the electrolyte, leading to passivating structural changes of the active material retention compared to the bare counterpart. Spinel LiMn2O4 cathodes have been studied for possible use in Li

Cho, Jaephil

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Modeling Metal Stocks and Flows: A Review of Dynamic Material Flow Analysis Methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Remote sensing methods are used by Takahashi et al.,(86) who analyze in-use copper stocks using satellite nighttime light observation data. ... McMillan et al.(54) quantify the sensitivity of the lifetime distribution, recycling rate, and metallic recovery by using the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test method, which provides a measure of input sensitivity defined as the fraction of total model variance. ... Yano, J.; Hirai, Y.; Okamoto, K.; Sakai, S.Dynamic flow analysis of current and future end-of-life vehicles generation and lead content in automobile shredder residue J. Mater. ...

Esther Mller; Lorenz M. Hilty; Rolf Widmer; Mathias Schluep; Martin Faulstich

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Optical amplifier operating at 1.3 microns useful for telecommunications and based on dysprosium-doped metal chloride host materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dysprosium-doped metal chloride materials offer laser properties advantageous for use as optical amplifiers in the 1.3 {micro}m telecommunications fiber optic network. The upper laser level is characterized by a millisecond lifetime, the host material possesses a moderately low refractive index, and the gain peak occurs near 1.31 {micro}m. Related halide materials, including bromides and iodides, are also useful. The Dy{sup 3+}-doped metal chlorides can be pumped with laser diodes and yield 1.3 {micro}m signal gain levels significantly beyond those currently available. 9 figs.

Page, R.H.; Schaffers, K.I.; Payne, S.A.; Krupke, W.F.; Beach, R.J.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Metal Oxides  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal oxides are the class of materials having the widest application in gas sensors. This chapter presents information related to the application of various metal oxides in gas sensors designed on different p...

Ghenadii Korotcenkov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

SciTech Connect

In this collaborative program, scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Ford Motor Company have investigated laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We have also studied materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we have examined the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measured the kinetic parameters to update Fords HC adsorption model. Since this CRADA has now been completed, in this annual report we will provide very brief summaries of most of the work carried out on this CRADA over the last several years.

Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Cheng, Yisun; Lupescu, Jason; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Lambert, Christine; McCabe, Robert W.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

With the increase in demand for more efficient, higher-power, and higher-temperature operation of power converters, design engineers face the challenge of increasing the efficiency and power density of converters [1, 2]. Development in power semiconductors is vital for achieving the design goals set by the industry. Silicon (Si) power devices have reached their theoretical limits in terms of higher-temperature and higher-power operation by virtue of the physical properties of the material. To overcome these limitations, research has focused on wide-bandgap materials such as silicon carbide (SiC), gallium nitride (GaN), and diamond because of their superior material advantages such as large bandgap, high thermal conductivity, and high critical breakdown field strength. Diamond is the ultimate material for power devices because of its greater than tenfold improvement in electrical properties compared with silicon; however, it is more suited for higher-voltage (grid level) higher-power applications based on the intrinsic properties of the material [3]. GaN and SiC power devices have similar performance improvements over Si power devices. GaN performs only slightly better than SiC. Both SiC and GaN have processing issues that need to be resolved before they can seriously challenge Si power devices; however, SiC is at a more technically advanced stage than GaN. SiC is considered to be the best transition material for future power devices before high-power diamond device technology matures. Since SiC power devices have lower losses than Si devices, SiC-based power converters are more efficient. With the high-temperature operation capability of SiC, thermal management requirements are reduced; therefore, a smaller heat sink would be sufficient. In addition, since SiC power devices can be switched at higher frequencies, smaller passive components are required in power converters. Smaller heat sinks and passive components result in higher-power-density power converters. With the advent of the use of SiC devices it is imperative that models of these be made available in commercial simulators. This enables power electronic designers to simulate their designs for various test conditions prior to fabrication. To build an accurate transistor-level model of a power electronic system such as an inverter, the first step is to characterize the semiconductor devices that are present in the system. Suitable test beds need to be built for each device to precisely test the devices and obtain relevant data that can be used for modeling. This includes careful characterization of the parasitic elements so as to emulate the test setup as closely as possible in simulations. This report is arranged as follows: Chapter 2--The testing and characterization of several diodes and power switches is presented. Chapter 3--A 55-kW hybrid inverter (Si insulated gate bipolar transistor--SiC Schottky diodes) device models and test results are presented. A detailed description of the various test setups followed by the parameter extraction, modeling, and simulation study of the inverter performance is presented. Chapter 4--A 7.5-kW all-SiC inverter (SiC junction field effect transistors (JFET)--SiC Schottky diodes) was built and tested. The models built in Saber were validated using the test data and the models were used in system applications in the Saber simulator. The simulation results and a comparison of the data from the prototype tests are discussed in this chapter. Chapter 5--The duration test results of devices utilized in buck converters undergoing reliability testing are presented.

Chinthavali, M.S.

2005-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

267

Improving nickel metal hydride batteries through research in negative electrode corrosion control and novel electrode materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrode materials. In order to fully understand the processes involved in the corrosion study, tests were carried at Brookhaven National Laboratory using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy. These tests showed that Zn prevented the corrosion of Ni-a...

Alexander, Michael Scott

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Comparison of Nonprecious Metal Cathode Materials for Methane Production by Electromethanogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a stoichiometric ratio of hydrogen (abiotic):methane (biotic) of 4:1, methane production with platinum could be explained solely by hydrogen production. For most other materials, however, abiotic hydrogen production the electrodes.1,2 Combined biological and electrochemical methods for methane production show great promise

269

Laser Cooling of a Semiconductor by 40 Kelvin: An Optical Refrigerator Based on Cadmium Sulfide Nanoribbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of semiconductors using CdS nanoribbons (or nanobelts) in this work. This net cooling effect is found: Optical refrigeration, Laser cooling of semiconductors, CdS nanobelts, anti-Stokes luminescence 1) doped crystals or glasses and direct bandgap semiconductors. Rare-earth doped materials were proposed

Xiong, Qihua

270

A High Through-put Combinatorial Growth Technique for Semiconductor Thin Film Search  

SciTech Connect

Conventional semiconductor material growth technique is costly and time-consuming. Here we developed a new method to growth semiconductor thin films using high through-put combinatorial technique. In this way, we have successfully fabricated tens of semiconductor libraries with high crystallinity and high product of {mu}{tau} for the purpose of radiation detection.

Ma, Z. X.; Hao, H. Y.; Xiao, P.; Oehlerking, L. J.; Liu, D. F.; Zhang, X. J.; Yu, K.-M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Mao, S. S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Yu, P. Y. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

271

Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline  

SciTech Connect

In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more components of the elastomers (by the solvent). This extraction of additives can negatively change the properties of the elastomer, leading to reduced performance and durability. For a seal application, some level of volume swell is acceptable, since the expansion will serve to maintain a seal. However, the acceptable level of swell is dependent on the particular application of the elastomer product. It is known that excessive swell can lead to unacceptable extrusion of the elastomer beyond the sealed interface, where it becomes susceptible to damage. Also, since high swell is indicative of high solubility, there is a heightened potential for fluid to seep through the seal and into the environment. Plastics, on the other hand, are used primarily in structural applications, such as solid components, including piping and fluid containment. Volume change, especially in a rigid system, will create internal stresses that may negatively affect performance. In order to better understand and predict the compatibility for a given polymer type and fuel composition, an analysis based on Hansen solubility theory was performed for each plastic and elastomer material. From this study, the solubility distance was calculated for each polymer material and test fuel combination. Using the calculated solubility distance, the ethanol concentration associated with peak swell and overall extent of swell can be predicted for each polymer. The bulk of the material discussion centers on the plastic materials, and their compatibility with Fuel C, CE25a, CE50a, and CE85a. The next section of this paper focuses on the elastomer compatibility with the higher ethanol concentrations with comparison to results obtained previously for the lower ethanol levels. The elastomers were identical to those used in the earlier study. Hansen solubility theory is also applied to the elastomers to provide added interpretation of the results. The final section summarizes the performance of the metal coupons.

Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

273

Self-assembled photosynthesis-inspired light harvesting material and solar cells containing the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar cell is described that comprises: (a) a semiconductor charge separation material; (b) at least one electrode connected to the charge separation material; and (c) a light-harvesting film on the charge separation material, the light-harvesting film comprising non-covalently coupled, self-assembled units of porphyrinic macrocycles. The porphyrinic macrocycles preferably comprise: (i) an intramolecularly coordinated metal; (ii) a first coordinating substituent; and (iii) a second coordinating substituent opposite the first coordinating substituent. The porphyrinic macrocycles can be assembled by repeating intermolecular coordination complexes of the metal, the first coordinating substituent and the second coordinating substituent.

Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC); Chinnasamy, Muthiah (Raleigh, NC); Fan, Dazhong (Raleigh, NC)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Controlled deposition of sulphur-containing semiconductor and dielectric nano-structured films on metals in SF{sub 6} ion-ion plasma  

SciTech Connect

In the present paper, the deposition processes and formation of films in SF{sub 6} ion-ion plasma, with positive and negative ion flows accelerated to the surface, are investigated. The PEGASES (acronym for Plasma Propulsion with Electronegative GASES) source is used as an ion-ion plasma source capable of generating almost ideal ion-ion plasma with negative ion to electron density ratio more than 2500. It is shown that film deposition in SF{sub 6} ion-ion plasma is very sensitive to the polarity of the incoming ions. The effect is observed for Cu, W, and Pt materials. The films formed on Cu electrodes during negative and positive ion assisted deposition were analyzed. Scanning electron microscope analysis has shown that both positive and negative ion fluxes influence the copper surface and leads to film formation, but with different structures of the surface: the low-energy positive ion bombardment causes the formation of a nano-pored film transparent for ions, while the negative ion bombardment leads to a continuous smooth insulating film. The transversal size of the pores in the porous film varies in the range 50500 nm, and further analysis of the film has shown that the film forms a diode together with the substrate preventing positive charge drain, and positive ions are neutralized by passing through the nano-pores. The film obtained with the negative ion bombardment has an insulating surface, but probably with a multi-layer structure: destroying the top surface layer allows to measure similar diode IV-characteristics as for the nano-pored film case. Basing on results, practical conclusions for the probes and electrodes cleaning in ion-ion SF{sub 6} plasmas have been made. Different applications are proposed for the discovered features of the controlled deposition from ion-ion plasmas, from Li-sulphur rechargeable batteries manufacturing and nanofluidics issues to the applications for microelectronics, including low-k materials formation.

Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Bredin, Jrme; Aanesland, Ane [LPP, CNRSEcole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau cedex (France)] [LPP, CNRSEcole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau cedex (France)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Studies on Materials for Heavy-Liquid-Metal-Cooled Reactors in Japan  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies on materials for the development of lead-bismuth (Pb-Bi)-cooled fast reactors (FR) and accelerator-driven sub-critical systems (ADS) in Japan are reported. The measurement of the neutron cross section of Bi to produce {sup 210}Po, the removal experiment of Po contamination and steel corrosion test in Pb-Bi flow were performed in Tokyo Institute of Technology. A target material corrosion test was performed in the project of Transmutation Experimental Facility for ADS in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Steel corrosion test was started in Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Co., LTD (MES). The feasibility study for FR cycle performed in Japan Nuclear Cycle Institute (JNC) are described. (authors)

Minoru Takahashi; Masayuki Igashira; Toru Obara; Hiroshi Sekimoto [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kenji Kikuchi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Kazumi Aoto [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (Japan); Teruaki Kitano [Mitsui Engineering and Shipbuilding Company Ltd., 6-4, Tsukiji 5-chome, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-8439 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Installation of semiconductor crystal growth and processing facilities in the Building 166 addition at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

A new addition has been constructed to Building 166 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This addition is intended to contain facilities as described below. The Metalorganic Chemical Vapor Deposition (MOCVD) facility is a proposed facility for the growth of semiconductor crystals composed of various combinations of gallium, aluminum, indium, arsenic, phosphorous, antimony, silicon, and zinc. This facility will utilize hazardous metal hydride gases (arsine, silane, and disilane) and pyrophoric materials (metal alkyls). The MOCVD process has been intensively developed over the past 10 years and is being safetly utilized in over 75 locations worldwide in both research and manufacturing applications. All equipment in the LLNL MOCVD facility is commercially available and is typical of that used in similar facilities in both industry and academia. The Semiconductor Device Fabrication (SDF) facility is a proposed facility for the fabrication of semiconductor devices from crystals grown in the MOCVD facility. General laboratory chemicals and silane gas will be utilized in this facility. The remaining space in the building addition will consist of an optics laboratory and general purpose work area. The only hazardous materials to be used in these areas are small quantities of common laboratory solvents. For the purposes of this Environmental Assessment, these areas will be considered to be part of the SDF. 27 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Acoustoelectric Interactions in Piezoelectric Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Piezoelectric semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide exhibit a strong coupling between conduction electrons that are present in the substance and acoustic waves that are propagated along certain directions in the material. This energy exchange mechanism is highly nonlinear, and thus the simultaneous introduction of several collinear acoustic waves into the substance generates new signals at the conbination (sum and difference) frequencies. A theoretical explanation of this interaction mechanism, based on consideration of the nonlinear cross term present in the current-density equation, has been developed, and the validity of this method of analysis has been tested and qualitatively confirmed through experimentation.

R. Mauro and W. C. Wang

1970-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Use of impure inert gases in the controlled heating and cooling of mixed conducting metal oxide materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for processing an article comprising mixed conducting metal oxide material. The method comprises contacting the article with an oxygen-containing gas and either reducing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a cooling period or increasing the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas during a heating period; during the cooling period, reducing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the cooling period and increasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is reduced during at least a portion of the cooling period; and during the heating period, increasing the oxygen activity in the oxygen-containing gas during at least a portion of the heating period and decreasing the rate at which the temperature of the oxygen-containing gas is increased during at least a portion of the heating period.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Bernhart, John Charles (Fleetwood, PA)

2012-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced electronic materials Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of Cambridge Collection: Materials Science 78 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

280

Invited paper History of Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractThe history of semiconductors is presented beginning with the first documented observation of a semiconductor effect (Faraday), through the development of the first devices (point-contact rectifiers and transistors, early field-effect transistors) and the theory of semiconductors up to the contemporary devices (SOI and multigate devices). Keywordsband theory, laser, Moores law, semiconductor, transistor.

Lidia ?ukasiak; Andrzej Jakubowski

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method and apparatus for use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductors in optical communications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure relates to the use of III-nitride wide bandgap semiconductor materials for optical communications. In one embodiment, an optical device includes an optical waveguide device fabricated using a III-nitride semiconductor material. The III-nitride semiconductor material provides for an electrically controllable refractive index. The optical waveguide device provides for high speed optical communications in an infrared wavelength region. In one embodiment, an optical amplifier is provided using optical coatings at the facet ends of a waveguide formed of erbium-doped III-nitride semiconductor materials.

Hui, Rongqing (Lenexa, KS); Jiang,Hong-Xing (Manhattan, KS); Lin, Jing-Yu (Manhattan, KS)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

282

Type-II quasi phase matching in periodically intermixed semiconductor superlattice waveguides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Many semicon- ductors have nonlinear optical susceptibilities with values well in excess of conventional materials, such as lithium niobate. Semiconductors have an addi- tional advantage

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - ag-in-s ternary semiconductor Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering 14 Semiconductor Materials S. K. Tewksbury Summary: and for optoelectronic devices. Optoelectronics has taken advantage of ternary and quaternary III-V...

284

2006 R&D 100 Award: Materials Resistant to Metal Dusting Degradation,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 R&D 6 R&D 100 Award Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Awards Patents Professional Societies Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Awards 2006 R&D 100 award Bookmark and Share Printable Organization Chart (70 KB) R&D 100 Awards Awardees: Ken Natesan and Zuotao Zeng Engineering Development & Applications Department Corrosion & Mechanics of Materials Section

285

Process for carbonaceous material conversion and recovery of alkali metal catalyst constituents held by ion exchange sites in conversion residue  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered for the particles by contacting or washing them with an aqueous solution containing calcium or magnesium ions in an alkali metal recovery zone at a low temperature, preferably below about 249.degree. F. During the washing or leaching process, the calcium or magnesium ions displace alkali metal ions held by ion exchange sites in the particles thereby liberating the ions and producing an aqueous effluent containing alkali metal constituents. The aqueous effluent from the alkali metal recovery zone is then recycled to the conversion process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst.

Sharp, David W. (Seabrook, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Mixed Semiconductor Nanocrystal Compositions Composition comprising one or more energy donors and one or more energy acceptors, wherein energy is transferred from the energy donor to the energy acceptor and wherein: the energy acceptor is a colloidal nanocrystal having a lower band gap energy than the energy donor; the energy donor and the energy acceptor are separated by a distance of 40 nm or less; wherein the average peak absorption energy of the acceptor is at least 20 meV greater than the average peak emission energy of the energy donor; and

287

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

288

Metalized T graphene: A reversible hydrogen storage material at room temperature  

SciTech Connect

Lithium (Li)-decorated graphene is a promising hydrogen storage medium due to its high capacity. However, homogeneous mono-layer coating graphene with lithium atoms is metastable and the lithium atoms would cluster on the surface, resulting in the poor reversibility. Using van der Waals-corrected density functional theory, we demonstrated that lithium atoms can be homogeneously dispersed on T graphene due to a nonuniform charge distribution in T graphene and strong hybridizations between the C-2p and Li-2p orbitals. Thus, Li atoms are not likely to form clusters, indicating a good reversible hydrogen storage. Both the polarization mechanism and the orbital hybridizations contribute to the adsorption of hydrogen molecules (storage capacity of 7.7?wt. %) with an optimal adsorption energy of 0.19?eV/H{sub 2}. The adsorption/desorption of H{sub 2} at ambient temperature and pressure is also discussed. Our results can serve as a guide in the design of new hydrogen storage materials based on non-hexagonal graphenes.

Ye, Xiao-Juan; Zhong, Wei, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn; Du, You-Wei [Nanjing National Laboratory of Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Liu, Chun-Sheng, E-mail: csliu@njupt.edu.cn, E-mail: wzhong@nju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Frequency and Micro-Nano Electronics of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Zeng, Zhi [Key Laboratory of Materials Physics, Institute of Solid State Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

2014-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

289

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth Emissivity Correcting Pyrometry of Semiconductor Growth by W. G. Breiland, L. A. Bruskas, A. A. Allerman, and T. W. Hargett Motivation-Temperature is a critical factor in the growth of thin films by either chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). It is particularly important in compound semiconductor growth because one is often challenged to grow materials with specific chemical compositions in order to maintain stringent lattice-matching conditions or to achieve specified bandgap values. Optical pyrometry can be used to measure surface temperatures, but the thin film growth causes significant changes in the emissivity of the surface, leading to severe errors in the pyrometer measurement. To avoid these errors, emissivity changes must be measured and

290

Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

semiconductors and ceramics with desired thermalthermal conductivity of several polycrystalline semiconductors and ceramics,Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

Wang, Zhaojie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect

This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called Shockley-Queisser limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates hot charge carriers that quickly cool to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a phonon bottleneck wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

Zhu, Xiaoyang

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

292

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

charge injection in organic semiconducting materials for improving the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductor devices. Publication " Spin injection from...

293

S9 -Kinetics & Mechanism of Metal Sorption/Release on Natural Materials ADSORPTION MECHANISMS OF PB ON AMORPHOUS SILICA: AN XAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S9 - Kinetics & Mechanism of Metal Sorption/Release on Natural Materials ADSORPTION MECHANISMS the sorption behavior and mechanisms of Pb on amorphous silica using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS t h o d s Pb sorption on silica was studied as a function of pH. The pH range used was pH 3

Sparks, Donald L.

294

Thermally robust semiconductor optical amplifiers and laser diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A highly heat conductive layer is combined with or placed in the vicinity of the optical waveguide region of active semiconductor components. The thermally conductive layer enhances the conduction of heat away from the active region, which is where the heat is generated in active semiconductor components. This layer is placed so close to the optical region that it must also function as a waveguide and causes the active region to be nearly the same temperature as the ambient or heat sink. However, the semiconductor material itself should be as temperature insensitive as possible and therefore the invention combines a highly thermally conductive dielectric layer with improved semiconductor materials to achieve an overall package that offers improved thermal performance. The highly thermally conductive layer serves two basic functions. First, it provides a lower index material than the semiconductor device so that certain kinds of optical waveguides may be formed, e.g., a ridge waveguide. The second and most important function, as it relates to this invention, is that it provides a significantly higher thermal conductivity than the semiconductor material, which is the principal material in the fabrication of various optoelectronic devices.

Dijaili, Sol P. (Moraga, CA); Patterson, Frank G. (Danville, CA); Walker, Jeffrey D. (El Cerrito, CA); Deri, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA); Petersen, Holly (Manteca, CA); Goward, William (Antioch, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nanoscale Heat Conduction across Metal-Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistance between a metal and a dielectric material assumedresistance of a metallic film bounded by dielectric materials.resistance of a metallic film bounded by dielectric materials.

Ju, Y. Sungtaek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Semiconductor nanocrystal probes for biological applications and process for making and using such probes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor nanocrystal compound and probe are described. The compound is capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. The compound comprises (1) one or more semiconductor nanocrystals capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy, and (2) one or more linking agents, having a first portion linked to the one or more semiconductor nanocrystals and a second portion capable of linking to one or more affinity molecules. One or more semiconductor nanocrystal compounds are linked to one or more affinity molecules to form a semiconductor nanocrystal probe capable of bonding with one or more detectable substances in a material being analyzed, and capable of, in response to exposure to a first energy, providing a second energy. Also described are processes for respectively: making the semiconductor nanocrystal compound; making the semiconductor nanocrystal probe; and treating materials with the probe.

Weiss, Shimon; Bruchez, Marcel; Alivisatos, Paul

2014-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

297

Metal Oxide Semiconductors for Solar Energy Harvesting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The correlation between energy consumption and human development illustrates the importance of this societal resource. We will consume more energy in the future. In light (more)

Thimsen, Elijah

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Investigation of abnormal negative threshold voltage shift under positive bias stress in input/output n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with TiN/HfO{sub 2} structure using fast I-V measurement  

SciTech Connect

This letter investigates abnormal negative threshold voltage shifts under positive bias stress in input/output (I/O) TiN/HfO{sub 2} n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors using fast I-V measurement. This phenomenon is attributed to a reversible charge/discharge effect in pre-existing bulk traps. Moreover, in standard performance devices, threshold-voltage (V{sub t}) shifts positively during fast I-V double sweep measurement. However, in I/O devices, V{sub t} shifts negatively since electrons escape from bulk traps to metal gate rather than channel electrons injecting to bulk traps. Consequently, decreasing pre-existing bulk traps in I/O devices, which can be achieved by adopting Hf{sub x}Zr{sub 1?x}O{sub 2} as gate oxide, can reduce the charge/discharge effect.

Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Lu, Ching-Sen [Device Department, United Microelectronics Corporation, Tainan Science Park, Taiwan (China)

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

Novel room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Today's information world, bits of data are processed by semiconductor chips, and stored in the magnetic disk drives. But tomorrow's information technology may see magnetism (spin) and semiconductivity (charge) combined in one 'spintronic' device that exploits both charge and 'spin' to carry data (the best of two worlds). Spintronic devices such as spin valve transistors, spin light emitting diodes, non-volatile memory, logic devices, optical isolators and ultra-fast optical switches are some of the areas of interest for introducing the ferromagnetic properties at room temperature in a semiconductor to make it multifunctional. The potential advantages of such spintronic devices will be higher speed, greater efficiency, and better stability at a reduced power consumption. This Thesis contains two main topics: In-depth understanding of magnetism in Mn doped ZnO, and our search and identification of at least six new above room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors. Both complex doped ZnO based new materials, as well as a number of nonoxides like phosphides, and sulfides suitably doped with Mn or Cu are shown to give rise to ferromagnetism above room temperature. Some of the highlights of this work are discovery of room temperature ferromagnetism in: (1) ZnO:Mn (paper in Nature Materials, Oct issue, 2003); (2) ZnO doped with Cu (containing no magnetic elements in it); (3) GaP doped with Cu (again containing no magnetic elements in it); (4) Enhancement of Magnetization by Cu co-doping in ZnO:Mn; (5) CdS doped with Mn, and a few others not reported in this thesis. We discuss in detail the first observation of ferromagnetism above room temperature in the form of powder, bulk pellets, in 2-3 mu-m thick transparent pulsed laser deposited films of the Mn (<4 at. percent) doped ZnO. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) spectra recorded from 2 to 200nm areas showed homogeneous distribution of Mn substituting for Zn a 2+ state in the ZnO lattice. Ferromagnetic Resonance (FMR) technique is used to confirm the existence of ferromagnetic ordering at temperatures as high as 425K. The ab initio calculations were found to be consistent with the observation of ferromagnetism arising from fully polarized Mn 2+ state. The key to observed room temperature ferromagnetism in this system is the low temperature processing, which prevents formation of clusters, secondary phases and the host ZnO from becoming n-type. The electronic structure of the same Mn doped ZnO thin films studied using XAS, XES and RIXS, revealed a strong hybridization between Mn 3d and O 2p states, which is an important characteristic of a Dilute magnetic Semiconductor (DMS). It is shown that the various processing conditions like sintering temperature, dopant concentration and the properties of precursors used for making of DMS have a great influence on the final properties. Use of various experimental techniques to verify the physical properties, and to understand the mechanism involved to give rise to ferromagnetism is presented. Methods to improve the magnetic moment in Mn doped ZnO are also described. New promising DMS materials (such as Cu doped ZnO are explored). The demonstrated new capability to fabricate powder, pellets, and thin films of room temperature ferromagnetic semiconductors thus makes possible the realization of a wide range of complex elements for a variety of new multifunctional phenomena related to Spintronic devices as well as magneto-optic components.

Gupta, Amita

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Semiconductor bridge: A plasma generator for the ignition of explosives  

SciTech Connect

Small metal bridgewires are commonly used to ignite energetic powders such as pyrotechnics, propellants, and primary or secondary explosives. In this paper we describe a new means for igniting explosive materials using a semiconductor bridge (SCB). When driven with a short (20 ..mu..s), low-energy pulse (less than 3.5 mJ), the SCB produces a hot plasma that ignites explosives. The SCB, a heavily n-doped silicon film, typically 100 ..mu..m long by 380 ..mu..m wide by 2 ..mu..m thick, is 30 times smaller in volume than a conventional bridgewire. SCB devices produce a usable explosive output in a few tens of microseconds and operate at one-tenth the input energy of metal bridgewires. In spite of the low energies for ignition, SCB devices are explosively safe. We describe SCB processing and experiments evaluating SCB operation. Also discussed are the SCB vaporization process, plasma formation, optical spectra from the discharge, heat transfer mechanisms from the SCB to the explosive powders, and SCB device applications.

Benson, D.A.; Larsen, M.E.; Renlund, A.M.; Trott, W.M.; Bickes R.W. Jr.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Semiconductor bridge: A plasma generator for the ignition of explosives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Small metal bridgewires are commonly used to ignite energetic powders such as pyrotechnics propellants and primary or secondary explosives. In this paper we describe a new means for igniting explosive materials using a semiconductor bridge (SCB). When driven with a short (20 ?s) low?energy pulse (less than 3.5 mJ) the SCB produces a hot plasma that ignites explosives. The SCB a heavily n?doped silicon film typically 100 ?m long by 380 ?m wide by 2 ?m thick is 30 times smaller in volume than a conventional bridgewire. SCB devices produce a usable explosive output in a few tens of microseconds and operate at one?tenth the input energy of metal bridgewires. In spite of the low energies for ignition SCB devices are explosively safe. We describe SCB processing and experiments evaluating SCB operation. Also discussed are the SCB vaporization process plasma formation optical spectra from the discharge heat transfer mechanisms from the SCB to the explosive powders and SCB device applications.

D. A. Benson; M. E. Larsen; A. M. Renlund; W. M. Trott; R. W. Bickes Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Synthetic Design of New Metal-Organic Framework Materials for Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Pingyun Feng (Primary Contact), Qipu Lin, Xiang Zhao Department of Chemistry University of California Riverside, CA 92521 Phone: (951) 827-2042 Email: pingyun.feng@ucr.edu DOE Program Officer: Dr. Michael Sennett Phone: (301) 903-6051 Email: Michael.Sennett@science.doe.gov Objectives Design and * synthesize new metal-organic framework materials using lightweight chemical elements to help improve gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity. Develop new synthetic strategies to generate novel * active binding sites on metal ions and ligands to enhance solid-gas interactions for increased uptake near ambient conditions.

303

The roadmap for downscaling and introducing new technologies in the semiconductor industry is well laid out for the next ten years2.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The roadmap for downscaling and introducing new technologies in the semiconductor industry is well in the International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors, one- dimensional structures, such as carbon nanotubes an impact on future post-complementary metal- oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology depends on more factors

304

Argonne licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies licenses diamond semiconductor discoveries to AKHAN Technologies By Joseph Bernstein * By Jared Sagoff * March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint LEMONT, Ill. - The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The Argonne-developed technology allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400 degrees Celsius. The combination of the Argonne's low-temperature diamond technology with AKHAN's Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor

305

Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Rogers, John A.; Menard, Etienne; Lee, Keon Jae; Khang; , Dahl-Young; Sun, Yugang; Meitl, Matthew; Zhu, Zhengtao; Ko, Heung Cho; Mack, Shawn

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

306

Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Menard, Etienne (Urbana, IL); Lee, Keon Jae (Tokyo, JP); Khang, Dahl-Young (Urbana, IL); Sun, Yugang (Westmont, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Zhengtao (Rapid City, SD); Ko, Heung Cho (Urbana, IL); Mack, Shawn (Goleta, CA)

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

307

Printable semiconductor structures and related methods of making and assembling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a high yield pathway for the fabrication, transfer and assembly of high quality printable semiconductor elements having selected physical dimensions, shapes, compositions and spatial orientations. The compositions and methods of the present invention provide high precision registered transfer and integration of arrays of microsized and/or nanosized semiconductor structures onto substrates, including large area substrates and/or flexible substrates. In addition, the present invention provides methods of making printable semiconductor elements from low cost bulk materials, such as bulk silicon wafers, and smart-materials processing strategies that enable a versatile and commercially attractive printing-based fabrication platform for making a broad range of functional semiconductor devices.

Nuzzo, Ralph G. (Champaign, IL); Rogers, John A. (Champaign, IL); Menard, Etienne (Durham, NC); Lee, Keon Jae (Tokyo, JP); Khang, Dahl-Young (Urbana, IL); Sun, Yugang (Westmont, IL); Meitl, Matthew (Raleigh, NC); Zhu, Zhengtao (Rapid City, SD); Ko, Heung Cho (Urbana, IL); Mack, Shawn (Goleta, CA)

2011-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

308

Scientists seek nonlinear optical materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nonlinear optical materials seem about to do for light what semiconductors already have done for electricity. ... Successful development of these materials could mean big payoffs in telecommunications, data processing, nuclear fusion, and applications of lasers in commerce and industry generally. ...

1982-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Energy resolution in semiconductor gamma radiation detectors using heterojunctions and methods of use and preparation thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In one embodiment, a system comprises a semiconductor gamma detector material and a hole blocking layer adjacent the gamma detector material, the hole blocking layer resisting passage of holes therethrough. In another embodiment, a system comprises a semiconductor gamma detector material, and an electron blocking layer adjacent the gamma detector material, the electron blocking layer resisting passage of electrons therethrough, wherein the electron blocking layer comprises undoped HgCdTe. In another embodiment, a method comprises forming a hole blocking layer adjacent a semiconductor gamma detector material, the hole blocking layer resisting passage of holes therethrough. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

Nikolic, Rebecca J.; Conway, Adam M.; Nelson, Art J.; Payne, Stephen A.

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of combining storage and processing functions in one integrated system. In electronics, processing is done using semiconductor materials like silicon and germanium that have the requisite properties to perform logical operations with both electrons (negative n-type charge carriers) and holes (positive p-type charge carriers). Thus, a spintronically desirable semiconductor would simultaneously have discrete spin-up and spin-down states as well as both positive and negative charge carriers. Strategies for developing spintronic semiconductors have been based on surface doping or on alloying, both of which have drawbacks such as chemical instability or reduced mobility. In BiTeI, however, electron and hole conduction is achieved without modifying the ideal crystal structure. One of the things discovered by Crepaldi et al. was that the electronic band structure of BiTeI bends in different ways near the surface depending on which layer is on top. That, in turn, means that the Fermi level (which determines a material's conductivity) can be located in either the valence band (for positive charge carriers) or the conduction band (for negative charge carriers). With techniques such as molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, it is realistic to consider that regions with opposite band bending could be patterned on a substrate, opening new possibilities for the manipulation of spin-polarized states.

311

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of combining storage and processing functions in one integrated system. In electronics, processing is done using semiconductor materials like silicon and germanium that have the requisite properties to perform logical operations with both electrons (negative n-type charge carriers) and holes (positive p-type charge carriers). Thus, a spintronically desirable semiconductor would simultaneously have discrete spin-up and spin-down states as well as both positive and negative charge carriers. Strategies for developing spintronic semiconductors have been based on surface doping or on alloying, both of which have drawbacks such as chemical instability or reduced mobility. In BiTeI, however, electron and hole conduction is achieved without modifying the ideal crystal structure. One of the things discovered by Crepaldi et al. was that the electronic band structure of BiTeI bends in different ways near the surface depending on which layer is on top. That, in turn, means that the Fermi level (which determines a material's conductivity) can be located in either the valence band (for positive charge carriers) or the conduction band (for negative charge carriers). With techniques such as molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, it is realistic to consider that regions with opposite band bending could be patterned on a substrate, opening new possibilities for the manipulation of spin-polarized states.

312

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of combining storage and processing functions in one integrated system. In electronics, processing is done using semiconductor materials like silicon and germanium that have the requisite properties to perform logical operations with both electrons (negative n-type charge carriers) and holes (positive p-type charge carriers). Thus, a spintronically desirable semiconductor would simultaneously have discrete spin-up and spin-down states as well as both positive and negative charge carriers. Strategies for developing spintronic semiconductors have been based on surface doping or on alloying, both of which have drawbacks such as chemical instability or reduced mobility. In BiTeI, however, electron and hole conduction is achieved without modifying the ideal crystal structure. One of the things discovered by Crepaldi et al. was that the electronic band structure of BiTeI bends in different ways near the surface depending on which layer is on top. That, in turn, means that the Fermi level (which determines a material's conductivity) can be located in either the valence band (for positive charge carriers) or the conduction band (for negative charge carriers). With techniques such as molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, it is realistic to consider that regions with opposite band bending could be patterned on a substrate, opening new possibilities for the manipulation of spin-polarized states.

313

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of combining storage and processing functions in one integrated system. In electronics, processing is done using semiconductor materials like silicon and germanium that have the requisite properties to perform logical operations with both electrons (negative n-type charge carriers) and holes (positive p-type charge carriers). Thus, a spintronically desirable semiconductor would simultaneously have discrete spin-up and spin-down states as well as both positive and negative charge carriers. Strategies for developing spintronic semiconductors have been based on surface doping or on alloying, both of which have drawbacks such as chemical instability or reduced mobility. In BiTeI, however, electron and hole conduction is achieved without modifying the ideal crystal structure. One of the things discovered by Crepaldi et al. was that the electronic band structure of BiTeI bends in different ways near the surface depending on which layer is on top. That, in turn, means that the Fermi level (which determines a material's conductivity) can be located in either the valence band (for positive charge carriers) or the conduction band (for negative charge carriers). With techniques such as molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, it is realistic to consider that regions with opposite band bending could be patterned on a substrate, opening new possibilities for the manipulation of spin-polarized states.

314

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of combining storage and processing functions in one integrated system. In electronics, processing is done using semiconductor materials like silicon and germanium that have the requisite properties to perform logical operations with both electrons (negative n-type charge carriers) and holes (positive p-type charge carriers). Thus, a spintronically desirable semiconductor would simultaneously have discrete spin-up and spin-down states as well as both positive and negative charge carriers. Strategies for developing spintronic semiconductors have been based on surface doping or on alloying, both of which have drawbacks such as chemical instability or reduced mobility. In BiTeI, however, electron and hole conduction is achieved without modifying the ideal crystal structure. One of the things discovered by Crepaldi et al. was that the electronic band structure of BiTeI bends in different ways near the surface depending on which layer is on top. That, in turn, means that the Fermi level (which determines a material's conductivity) can be located in either the valence band (for positive charge carriers) or the conduction band (for negative charge carriers). With techniques such as molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, it is realistic to consider that regions with opposite band bending could be patterned on a substrate, opening new possibilities for the manipulation of spin-polarized states.

315

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print A Spintronic Semiconductor with Selectable Charge Carriers Print Accentuating the Positive (or the Negative) Spintronics-a type of electronics that makes use of electron spin as well as charge-is already here to a certain extent. The discovery of giant magnetoresistance, a spin-based effect, has revolutionized the information storage industry. Beyond this, however, scientists envision the possibility of combining storage and processing functions in one integrated system. In electronics, processing is done using semiconductor materials like silicon and germanium that have the requisite properties to perform logical operations with both electrons (negative n-type charge carriers) and holes (positive p-type charge carriers). Thus, a spintronically desirable semiconductor would simultaneously have discrete spin-up and spin-down states as well as both positive and negative charge carriers. Strategies for developing spintronic semiconductors have been based on surface doping or on alloying, both of which have drawbacks such as chemical instability or reduced mobility. In BiTeI, however, electron and hole conduction is achieved without modifying the ideal crystal structure. One of the things discovered by Crepaldi et al. was that the electronic band structure of BiTeI bends in different ways near the surface depending on which layer is on top. That, in turn, means that the Fermi level (which determines a material's conductivity) can be located in either the valence band (for positive charge carriers) or the conduction band (for negative charge carriers). With techniques such as molecular-beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition, it is realistic to consider that regions with opposite band bending could be patterned on a substrate, opening new possibilities for the manipulation of spin-polarized states.

316

Colloidal Nanocrystal-Based Gels and Aerogels: Material Aspects and Application Perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aerogel materials may be further processed in order to achieve improvements in their properties relevant to applications in optical sensing, photovoltaics, LEDs, nonlinear optics, thermoelectrics, and catalysis. ... Recently, attention was attracted by the possibility to create oxide-free functional aerogels, based mainly on metal chalcogenides,(5) which may open enormous opportunities for semiconductor technology, catalysis and photocatalysis, optoelectronics and photonics, sorbents, and filters. ...

Nikolai Gaponik; Anne-Kristin Herrmann; Alexander Eychmller

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

317

Semiconductor Nanoclusters as Potential Photocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Power Electronics Based on the 2-Dimensional Electron Gas in GaN High Power Electronics Based on the 2-Dimensional Electron Gas in GaN Heterostructures by S. R. Kurtz, A. A. Allerman, and D. Koleski Motivation-GaN-based electronics offer miniaturization potential of radical proportions for microwave power amplifiers. GaN's large bandgap, high breakdown field, high electron velocity, and excellent thermal properties have led to high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) with up to 10x the power density of GaAs and other traditional semiconductors at frequencies up to 20 GHz. Further contributing to the outstanding performance of GaN-based amplifiers is the highly conducting, 2-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) used for the HEMT channel. Intrinsic polarization and piezoelectric properties of GaN materials can produce a 2DEG at an

318

Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project  

SciTech Connect

KASP (Kansas Advanced Semiconductor Project) completed the new Layer 0 upgrade for D0, assumed key electronics projects for the US CMS project, finished important new physics measurements with the D0 experiment at Fermilab, made substantial contributions to detector studies for the proposed e+e- international linear collider (ILC), and advanced key initiatives in non-accelerator-based neutrino physics.

Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bolton, T.; Horton-Smith, G.; Maravin, Y.; Ratra, B.; Stanton, N.; von Toerne, E.; Wilson, G.

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

GaTe semiconductor for radiation detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

GaTe semiconductor is used as a room-temperature radiation detector. GaTe has useful properties for radiation detectors: ideal bandgap, favorable mobilities, low melting point (no evaporation), non-hygroscopic nature, and availability of high-purity starting materials. The detector can be used, e.g., for detection of illicit nuclear weapons and radiological dispersed devices at ports of entry, in cities, and off shore and for determination of medical isotopes present in a patient.

Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Burger, Arnold (Nashville, TN); Mandal, Krishna C. (Ashland, MA)

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

320

Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Center of Excellence - Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summaries Executive Summaries for the Hydrogen Storage Materials Centers of Excellence Chemical Hydrogen Storage CoE, Hydrogen Sorption CoE, and Metal Hydride CoE Period of Performance: 2005-2010 Fuel Cell Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U. S. Department of Energy April 2012 2 3 Primary Authors: Chemical Hydrogen Storage (CHSCoE): Kevin Ott, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Sorption (HSCoE): Lin Simpson, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Metal Hydride (MHCoE): Lennie Klebanoff, Sandia National Laboratory Contributors include members of the three Materials Centers of Excellence and the Department of Energy Hydrogen Storage Team in the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

94720 6 Institute for Problems of Materials Science, National Academy of Science of Ukraine, Kiev, Ukraine 7 Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of...

322

Semiconductor gamma radiation detectors: band structure effects in energy resolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high precision and in a broad energy range, the number of created pairs N is just proportional (referred to as the pair excitation energy). For semiconductor materials the pair excitation energy becomes important in the search for materials with improved energy resolution. #12;Theoretical models used

Luryi, Serge

323

Metal Toxicity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Problems posed to plants by metal toxicity in the soils of the world are basically of two kinds. The first kind are of natural origin. These arise either as a consequence of the nature of the parent material f...

T. McNeilly

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Selective separation of some ecotoxic transition metal ions from aqueous solutions using immobilized macrocyclic material containing solid phase extraction system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simple flow-based method was developed for the simultaneous separation of certain transition metal ions (Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd) from aqueous systems, which ions show ecotoxic effects when present at elevated ... (...

Ismail M. M. Rahman; Yoshiaki Furusho

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Materials Reliability Program Low-Temperature Cracking of Nickel-Based Alloys and Weld Metals (MRP-108)  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 A rising load test in low-temperature (50-100 degree C) pH 10 water containing a high concentration of dissolved hydrogen (150 cc/kg) has demonstrated that Alloy 690 as well as weld metals 82 and 52 exhibit a marked loss of ductility. A similar loss of ductility has been shown to occur in widely used weld metal 182 under replica test conditions and simulated PWR primary water containing 100 cc/kg of hydrogen. The objective of this report was to confirm the Bettis test results for weld metal 82 and determine whether weld metal 182 is susceptible to the same reductions in toughness. This report documents the first industry effort to reckon with the low temperature crack propagation (LTCP) issue.

B. Young

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Change in the electrical resistance of the metallic composite material-steel contact under friction and electric current  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The IV characteristics of the sliding contact of metallic composites of grade 45 steel without a lubricant are presented. Steel-based composites are shown to increase the actual electric-contact area due to the ...

V. V. Fadin; M. I. Aleutdinova

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Methods of forming semiconductor devices and devices formed using such methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Single source precursors are subjected to carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The carbon dioxide may be in a supercritical state. Single source precursors also may be subjected to supercritical fluids other than supercritical carbon dioxide to form particles of material. The methods may be used to form nanoparticles. In some embodiments, the methods are used to form chalcopyrite materials. Devices such as, for example, semiconductor devices may be fabricated that include such particles. Methods of forming semiconductor devices include subjecting single source precursors to carbon dioxide to form particles of semiconductor material, and establishing electrical contact between the particles and an electrode.

Fox, Robert V; Rodriguez, Rene G; Pak, Joshua

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Semiconductor radiation detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor radiation detector is provided to detect x-ray and light photons. The entrance electrode is segmented by using variable doping concentrations. Further, the entrance electrode is physically segmented by inserting n+ regions between p+ regions. The p+ regions and the n+ regions are individually biased. The detector elements can be used in an array, and the p+ regions and the n+ regions can be biased by applying potential at a single point. The back side of the semiconductor radiation detector has an n+ anode for collecting created charges and a number of p+ cathodes. Biased n+ inserts can be placed between the p+ cathodes, and an internal resistor divider can be used to bias the n+ inserts as well as the p+ cathodes. A polysilicon spiral guard can be implemented surrounding the active area of the entrance electrode or surrounding an array of entrance electrodes.

Patt, Bradley E. (Sherman Oaks, CA); Iwanczyk, Jan S. (Los Angeles, CA); Tull, Carolyn R. (Orinda, CA); Vilkelis, Gintas (Westlake Village, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Materials Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Materials Science Materials Science1354608000000Materials ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Materials Science Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Data Sources Reference Organizations Journals Key Resources CINDAS Materials Property Databases video icon Thermophysical Properties of Matter Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys Handbook (SAH) Proquest Technology Collection Includes the Materials Science collection MRS Online Proceedings Library Papers presented at meetings of the Materials Research Society Data Sources

330

ESTABLISHING SUSTAINABLE US HEV/PHEV MANUFACTURING BASE: STABILIZED LITHIUM METAL POWDER, ENABLING MATERIAL AND REVOLUTIONARY TECHNOLOGY FOR HIGH ENERGY LI-ION BATTERIES  

SciTech Connect

FMC Lithium Division has successfully completed the project Establishing Sustainable US PHEV/EV Manufacturing Base: Stabilized Lithium Metal Powder, Enabling Material and Revolutionary Technology for High Energy Li-ion Batteries. The project included design, acquisition and process development for the production scale units to 1) produce stabilized lithium dispersions in oil medium, 2) to produce dry stabilized lithium metal powders, 3) to evaluate, design and acquire pilot-scale unit for alternative production technology to further decrease the cost, and 4) to demonstrate concepts for integrating SLMP technology into the Li- ion batteries to increase energy density. It is very difficult to satisfy safety, cost and performance requirements for the PHEV and EV applications. As the initial step in SLMP Technology introduction, industry can use commercially available LiMn2O4 or LiFePO4, for example, that are the only proven safer and cheaper lithium providing cathodes available on the market. Unfortunately, these cathodes alone are inferior to the energy density of the conventional LiCoO2 cathode and, even when paired with the advanced anode materials, such as silicon composite material, the resulting cell will still not meet the energy density requirements. We have demonstrated, however, if SLMP Technology is used to compensate for the irreversible capacity in the anode, the efficiency of the cathode utilization will be improved and the cost of the cell, based on the materials, will decrease.

Yakovleva, Marina

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Semiconductor P-I-N detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor P-I-N detector including an intrinsic wafer, a P-doped layer, an N-doped layer, and a boundary layer for reducing the diffusion of dopants into the intrinsic wafer. The boundary layer is positioned between one of the doped regions and the intrinsic wafer. The intrinsic wafer can be composed of CdZnTe or CdTe, the P-doped layer can be composed of ZnTe doped with copper, and the N-doped layer can be composed of CdS doped with indium. The boundary layers is formed of an undoped semiconductor material. The boundary layer can be deposited onto the underlying intrinsic wafer. The doped regions are then typically formed by a deposition process or by doping a section of the deposited boundary layer.

Sudharsanan, Rengarajan (53 Timber Line Dr., Nashua, NH 03062); Karam, Nasser H. (577 Lowell St., Lexington, MA 02173)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Theory and Design of Smith-Purcell Semiconductor Terahertz Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-power semiconductor devices, but have also been demonstrated to be highly useful in the development of state of the art light emitting diode (LED) technology. One of the more promising LED materials, gallium nitride (GaN) comes from the three-nitride (III-N) family...-power semiconductor devices, but have also been demonstrated to be highly useful in the development of state of the art light emitting diode (LED) technology. One of the more promising LED materials, gallium nitride (GaN) comes from the three-nitride (III-N) family...

Smith, Don DeeWayne

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Argonne CNM News: State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies State-of-the-Art Diamond Semiconductor Technology Licensed to AKHAN Technologies The U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory announced today that the laboratory has granted AKHAN Technologies, Inc., exclusive diamond semiconductor application licensing rights to breakthrough low-temperature diamond deposition technology developed by Argonne's Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM). The method allows for the deposition of nanocrystalline diamond on a variety of wafer substrate materials at temperatures as low as 400°C, highly advantageous for integration with processed semiconductor electronic materials and resulting in the deposition of low-defect nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) thin films. The combination of CNM's low-temperature diamond technology with the AKHAN Miraj Diamond(tm) process represents the state of the art in diamond semiconductor thin-film technology.

334

Monte-Carlo simulations of light propagation in luminescent solar concentrators based on semiconductor nanoparticles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wavelengths, which can be more efficiently converted to electricity by a PV cell. To achieve this, most-remission events. This is also a big advantage over conventional single material semiconductor nanopar- ticles of semiconductor-based LSCs in detail we employ Monte Carlo simulations (see Sec. II) using the measured data

Ilan, Boaz

335

Fall-2003 PH-314 A. La Rosa I. HARNESSING ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN SEMICONDUCTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall-2003 PH-314 A. La Rosa JUNCTIONS I. HARNESSING ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN SEMICONDUCTOR of the JUNCTION V. FORWARD BIAS, REVERSE BIAS I. HARNESSING ELECTRICAL CONDUCTIVITY IN SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS Let III. CHEMICAL POTENTIAL (FERMI LEVEL) IV. COMPARISON of CHARGE-CARRIER POPULATION at EACH SIDE

La Rosa, Andres H.

336

Short Metal Capillary Columns Packed with Polymer-Coated Fibrous Materials in High-Temperature Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......along with the subsequent commercialization. However, only a limited...After the deac- tivation process, a bundle of heat-resistant...followed by the polymer-coating process onto the packed filaments...capillary The metal deactivation process was carried out according......

Yoshihiro Saito; Mitsuhiro Ogawa; Motohiro Imaizumi; Kazuhiro Ban; Akira Abe; Tsutomu Takeichi; Hiroo Wada; Kiyokatsu Jinno

337

Avalanche semiconductor radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect

Operation of novel avalanche semiconductor detector, produced on the basis of heterojunctions Si-SiC and Si-Si{sub x}O{sub y} is described. A uniform avalanche process with gain from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} can be reached depending on the conductivity of SiC and Si{sub x}O{sub y} layers. Two types of avalanche photodetectors designed for applications in wavelength range 500--10,00 nm with quantum efficiency 60 {+-} 10% (650 nm) and 200--700 nm with quantum efficiency 60 {+-} 15% (450 nm) are presented.

Sadygov, Z.Y. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); [Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan). Physics Inst.; Zheleznykh, I.M.; Kirillova, T.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research] [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Malakhov, N.A.; Jejer, V.N. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)] [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Method for measuring the drift mobility in doped semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for measuring the drift mobility of majority carriers in semiconductors consists of measuring the current transient in a Schottky-barrier device following the termination of a forward bias pulse. An example is given using an amorphous silicon hydrogenated material doped with 0.2% phosphorus. The method is particularly useful with material in which the dielectric relaxation time is shorter than the carrier transit time. It is particularly useful in material useful in solar cells. 10 figs.

Crandall, R.S.

1982-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optoelectronic cooling of mechanical modes in a semiconductor nanomembrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optical cavity cooling of mechanical resonators has recently become a research frontier. The cooling has been realized with a metal-coated silicon microlever via photo-thermal force and subsequently with dielectric objects via radiation pressure. Here we report cavity cooling with a crystalline semiconductor membrane via a new mechanism, in which the cooling force arises from the interaction between the photo-induced electron-hole pairs and the mechanical modes through the deformation potential coupling. The optoelectronic mechanism is so efficient as to cool a mode down to 4 K from room temperature with just 50 uW of light and a cavity with a finesse of 10 consisting of a standard mirror and the sub-wavelength-thick semiconductor membrane itself. The laser-cooled narrow-band phonon bath realized with semiconductor mechanical resonators may open up a new avenue for photonics and spintronics devices.

K. Usami; A. Naesby; T. Bagci; B. Melholt Nielsen; J. Liu; S. Stobbe; P. Lodahl; E. S. Polzik

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. June 25, 2013 Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having surface contaminants. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Method Of Transferring Strained Semiconductor Structures The transfer of strained semiconductor layers from one substrate to another substrate involves depositing a multilayer structure on a substrate having

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Semiconductor Physics at the Optical Sciences Center  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This talk reviews semiconductor physics experiments and theory at the Optical Sciences Center including optical bistability, femtosecond dynamics, as well as semiconductor laser...

Koch, Stephan W

342

Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen...

343

Pollution control measures/regulations for metal industries: World business briefs. (Latest citations from Materials Business file). NewSearch  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning environmental pollution control and regulations for the worldwide metal industry. Articles discuss overall environmental concerns, federal and state regulations, new technologies for pollution control and waste minimization, waste recycling, environmental clean-up, and environmental violations and penalties. Citations address individual companies' concerns and solutions for environmental problems, including water, wastewater, soil, and air pollution. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials: Iron-Based Amorphous-Metal Thermal-Spray Coatings: SAM HPCRM Program ? FY04 Annual Report ? Rev. 0 - DARPA DSO & DOE OCRWM Co-Sponsored Advanced Materials Program  

SciTech Connect

The multi-institutional High Performance Corrosion Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Team is cosponsored by the Defense Advanced Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Science Office (DSO) and the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), and has developed new corrosion-resistant, iron-based amorphous metals that can be applied as coatings with advanced thermal spray technology. Two compositions have corrosion resistance superior to wrought nickel-based Alloy C-22 (UNS No. N06022) in very aggressive environments, including concentrated calcium-chloride brines at elevated temperature. Corrosion costs the Department of Defense billions of dollars every year, with an immense quantity of material in various structures undergoing corrosion. For example, in addition to fluid and seawater piping, ballast tanks, and propulsions systems, approximately 345 million square feet of structure aboard naval ships and crafts require costly corrosion control measures. The use of advanced corrosion-resistant materials to prevent the continuous degradation of this massive surface area would be extremely beneficial. The Fe-based corrosion-resistant, amorphous-metal coatings under development may prove of importance for applications on ships. Such coatings could be used as an 'integral drip shield' on spent fuel containers, as well as protective coatings that could be applied over welds, thereby preventing exposure to environments that might cause stress corrosion cracking. In the future, such new high-performance iron-based materials could be substituted for more-expensive nickel-based alloys, thereby enabling a reduction in the $58-billion life cycle cost for the long-term storage of the Nation's spent nuclear fuel by tens of percent.

Farmer, J; Haslam, J; Wong, F; Ji, S; Day, S; Branagan, D; Marshall, M; Meacham, B; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Buffa, E; Blue, C; Rivard, J; Beardsley, M; Weaver, D; Aprigliano, L; Kohler, L; Bayles, R; Lemieux, E; Wolejsza, T; Martin, F; Yang, N; Lucadamo, G; Perepezko, J; Hildal, K; Kaufman, L; Heuer, A; Ernst, F; Michal, G; Kahn, H; Lavernia, E

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

345

Novel air electrode for metal-air battery with new carbon material and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a rechargeable battery or fuel cell. More particularly, this invention relates to a novel air electrode comprising a new carbon electrode support material and a method of making same. 3 figs.

Ross, P.N. Jr.

1988-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

346

New Conducting and Electrically Switching Molecular Materials based on Main Group and Transition Metal Ions Bridged by TCNQ Derivatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The field of molecular electronics has been under investigation by materials scientists for the last two decades, activity that has increased in recent years as their potential to be components in modern quantum computing devices began...

Zhang, Zhongyue

2013-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

Wide Bandgap Semiconductors for Power Electronics, Optoelectronics, and Advanced Communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wide Bandgap Semiconductors for Power Electronics, Optoelectronics, and Advanced Communications with material composition over a range of 0.7 to 5 eV. This factor allows them to be used for optoelectronic. Improvement in growth quality and doping of GaN is needed to improve the performance of optoelectronics

Li, Mo

348

Photocatalysis Using Semiconductor Nanoclusters  

SciTech Connect

We report on experiments using nanosize MoS{sub 2} to photo-oxidize organic pollutants in water using visible light as the energy source. We have demonstrated that we can vary the redox potentials and absorbance characteristics of these small semiconductors by adjusting their size, and our studies of the photooxidation of organic molecules have revealed that the rate of oxidation increases with increasing bandgap (i.e. more positive valence band and more negative conduction band potentials). Because these photocatalysis reactions can be performed with the nanoclusters fully dispersed and stable in solution, liquid chromatography can be used to determine both the intermediate reaction products and the state of the nanoclusters during the reaction. We have demonstrated that the MoS{sub 2} nanoclusters remain unchanged during the photooxidation process by this technique. We also report on studies of MoS{sub 2} nanoclusters deposited on TiO{sub 2} powder.

Thurston, T.R.; Wilcoxon,J.P.

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

349

Web Growth of Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel process for growth of diamond?lattice semiconductors is described and a model is proposed for the growth mechanism. For germanium the process yields extended thin flat sheets typically 1 cm wide and 0.1 mm thick of good crystalline quality and relatively flat {111} surfaces. The sheet or web freezes from a liquid film drawn up by surface tension between two coplanar dendrites which originate from a single seed and are grown from the melt simultaneously with the sheet. Resistivity throughout the sheet is quite uniform. Etching of germanium webs shows them to be essentially dislocation?free and does not reveal any microsegregation of impurities. Silicon and indium antimonide have also been grown in this manner.

S. O'Hara; A. I. Bennett

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Photoacoustic measurement of bandgaps of thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials are a promising class of direct energy conversion materials, usually consisting of highly doped semiconductors. The key to maximizing their thermal to electrical energy conversion lies in optimizing ...

Ni, George (George Wei)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of silicon carbide based semiconductor power devices and their application in power factor correction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cannot handle. The requirements include higher blocking voltages, switching frequencies, efficiency, and reliability. Material technologies superior to Si are needed for future power device developments. Silicon Carbide (SiC) based semiconductor devices...

Durrani, Yamin Qaisar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ge-on-Si Integrated Photonics: New Tricks from an Old Semiconductor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent progress in Ge active photonic devices for electronic-photonic integration on Si, demonstrating new tricks in optoelectronics from this old semiconductor material used for the first transistor more than ...

Jifeng, Liu

353

Physics and simulation of transport processes in hybrid organic semiconductor devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic semiconductors and nanomaterials promise to potentially form the basis for future efficient and cost-effective large area optoelectronic devices, such as lightemitting diodes and solar cells. Although these materials' ...

Rousseau, Ian Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Toward a Unified Treatment of Electronic Processes in Organic Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

A quantitative study of n-type doping in highly crystalline organic semiconductor films establishes the predominant influence of electrostatic forces in these low-dielectric materials. Based on these findings, a self-consistent model of doped (purposely or not) organic semiconductors is proposed in which: (1) the equilibrium free carrier density, nf, is a small fraction of the total charge density; (2) a superlinear increase in conductivity with doping density is universal; (3) nf increases with applied electric field; and (4) the carrier mobility is field-dependent regardless of crystallinity.

Gregg. B.A.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Unveiling and controlling the electronic structure of oxidized semiconductor surfaces: Crystalline oxidized InSb(100)(1 2)-O  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exothermic nature of oxidation causes nearly all semiconductor applications in various fields like electronics, medicine, photonics, and sensor technology to acquire an oxidized semiconductor surface part during the application manufacturing. The significance of understanding and controlling the atomic scale properties of oxidized semiconductor surfaces is expected to increase even further with the development of nanoscale semiconductor crystals. The nature of oxidized semiconductor layers is, however, hard to predict and characterize as they are usually buried and amorphous. To shed light on these issues, we pursue a different approach based on oxidized III-V semiconductor layers that are crystalline. We present a comprehensive characterization of oxidized crystalline InSb(100)(12)-O layers by ab initio calculations, photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and spectroscopy, and demonstrate the electronic band structures of different oxidized phases of the semiconductor, which elucidate the previous contradictory semiconductor-oxidation effects. At 0.5 monolayer (ML) oxidation, oxygen atoms tend to occupy subsurface Sb sites, leading to metallic states in the semiconductor band gap, which arise from top dimers. When the oxidation is increased to the 1.02.0 ML concentration, oxygen occupies also interstitial sites, and the insulating band structure without gap states is stabilized with unusual occupied In dangling bonds. In contrast, the 2.53.0 ML oxide phases undergo significant changes toward a less ordered structure. The findings suggest a methodology for manipulating the electronic structure of oxidized semiconductor layers.

J. J. K. Lng; M. P. J. Punkkinen; M. Tuominen; H.-P. Hedman; M. Vh-Heikkil; V. Polojrvi; J. Salmi; V.-M. Korpijrvi; K. Schulte; M. Kuzmin; R. Punkkinen; P. Laukkanen; M. Guina; K. Kokko

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

356

Mechanical characterization of metallic materials for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors in air and in helium environments  

SciTech Connect

In the French R and D program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), three metallic alloys were studied: steel Chromesco-3 with 2.25% chromium, alloy 800H, and Hastelloy-X. The Chromesco-3 and alloy 800H creep behavior is the same in air and in HTGR atmosphere (helium). The tensile tests of Hastelloy-X specimens reveal that aging has embrittlement and hardening effects up to 700/sup 0/C, but the creep tests at 800/sup 0/C show opposite effects. This particular behavior could be due to induced precipitation by aging and the depletion of hardening elements from the matrix. Tests show a low influence of cobalt content on mechanical properties of Hastelloy-X.

Sainfort, G.; Cappelaere, M.; Gregoire, J.; Sannier, J.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Mathematical Modeling of Semiconductor Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fibers. · Optoelectronic emitters convert an electronic signal into light. Examples are light-emitting diodes (LED) used in displays and indication lambs and semiconductor lasers used in compact disk systems

Jüngel, Ansgar

358

Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seebeck coefficient in organic semiconductors A dissertation submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Deepak Venkateshvaran Fitzwilliam College & Optoelectronics Group, Cavendish Laboratory University of Cambridge February 2014 The end...

Venkateshvaran, Deepak

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Imaging of semiconductors using a flying laser spot scanning system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be obsezved in the wavelength vs. absorption coefficient curves shown in Figure 1 for both a direct and an indirect semiconductor material (gallium-arsenide and silicon). It is only in the direct absorption and subsequent generation of a hole electron pair... in wavelength of light used to generate carriers pro- vides some contzol over the depth of the material analyzed. Long wavelength energy (- 1 micrometer) penetrates deeply into silicon, while gallium phosphide is considered almost transparent for a typical...

Richardson, Thomas William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Metal-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

Metal-air batteries have much higher specific energies than most currently available primary and rechargeable batteries. Recent advances in electrode materials and electrolytes, as well as new designs on metal-air batteries, have attracted intensive effort in recent years, especially in the development of lithium-air batteries. The general principle in metal-air batteries will be reviewed in this chapter. The materials, preparation methods, and performances of metal-air batteries will be discussed. Two main metal-air batteries, Zn-air and Li-air batteries will be discussed in detail. Other type of metal-air batteries will also be described.

Zhang, Jiguang; Bruce, Peter G.; Zhang, Gregory

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

OPTICAL AND DYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF UNDOPED AND DOPED SEMICONDUCTOR NANOSTRUCTURES  

SciTech Connect

This chapter provides an overview of some recent research activities on the study of optical and dynamic properties of semiconductor nanomaterials. The emphasis is on unique aspects of these properties in nanostructures as compared to bulk materials. Linear, including absorption and luminescence, and nonlinear optical as well as dynamic properties of semiconductor nanoparticles are discussed with focus on their dependence on particle size, shape, and surface characteristics. Both doped and undoped semiconductor nanomaterials are highlighted and contrasted to illustrate the use of doping to effectively alter and probe nanomaterial properties. Some emerging applications of optical nanomaterials are discussed towards the end of the chapter, including solar energy conversion, optical sensing of chemicals and biochemicals, solid state lighting, photocatalysis, and photoelectrochemistry.

Grant, C D; Zhang, J Z

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

362

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS User Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3Lashkaryov Institute for Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine; 4Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State University...

363

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - CNMS Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ridge, TN, 37831 2 Institute of Semiconductor Physics, National Academy of Science of Ukraine,41, pr. Nauki, 03028 Kiev, Ukraine 3 Institute for Problems of Materials Science,...

364

Paul V. Braun and John A. Rogers Materials Research Laboratory...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

epitaxy of high- performance III-V semiconductor materials. We have demonstrated optoelectronic functionality by fabricating a 3D photonic crystal LED, the rst- ever electrically...

365

Microbially-mediated method for synthesis of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to a method for producing non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, the method comprising: (a) subjecting a combination of reaction components to conditions conducive to microbially-mediated formation of non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, wherein said combination of reaction components comprises i) anaerobic microbes, ii) a culture medium suitable for sustaining said anaerobic microbes, iii) a metal component comprising at least one type of metal ion, iv) a non-metal component containing at least one non-metal selected from the group consisting of S, Se, Te, and As, and v) one or more electron donors that provide donatable electrons to said anaerobic microbes during consumption of the electron donor by said anaerobic microbes; and (b) isolating said non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticles, which contain at least one of said metal ions and at least one of said non-metals. The invention is also directed to non-oxide semiconductor nanoparticle compositions produced as above and having distinctive properties.

Phelps, Tommy J.; Lauf, Robert J.; Moon, Ji Won; Rondinone, Adam J.; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad Edward; Madden, Andrew Stephen; Li, Yiliang; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Rawn, Claudia Jeanette

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Wednesday, 29 May 2013 00:00 Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

369

Quasiferromagnetism in semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

Ferromagnetic hysteresis has been observed at room temperature in materials not consisting of elements commonly associated with ferromagnetism, such as Co, Ni, Fe, or Mn-containing alloys. In particular, we report on magnetic hysteresis seen in silicon prepared by two different techniques: ion implantation (Si and Ar) and neutron irradiation. Because the material investigated contains no ferromagnetic elements, we tentatively call it ''quasiferromagnetic.'' The paramagnetic defects present in these materials were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance. We suggest that these defects are one of the factors responsible for the observed macroscopic magnetic hysteresis loop.

Dubroca, T.; Hack, J.; Hummel, R.E.; Angerhofer, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Rhines Hall room 106, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Florida, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

High Performance Ceramic Interconnect Material for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs): Ca- and Transition Metal-doped Yttrium Chromite  

SciTech Connect

The effect of transition metal substitution on thermal and electrical properties of Ca-doped yttrium chromite was investigated in relation to use as a ceramic interconnect in high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). 10 at% Co, 4 at% Ni, and 1 at% Cu substitution on B-site of 20 at% Ca-doped yttrium chromite led to a close match of thermal expansion coefficient (TEC) with that of 8 mol% yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and a single phase Y0.8Ca0.2Cr0.85Co0.1Ni0.04Cu0.01O3 remained stable between 25 and 1100 degree C over a wide oxygen partial pressure range. Doping with Cu significantly facilitated densification of yttrium chromite. Ni dopant improved both electrical conductivity and dimensional stability in reducing environments, likely through diminishing the oxygen vacancy formation. Substitution with Co substantially enhanced electrical conductivity in oxidizing atmosphere, which was attributed to an increase in charge carrier density and hopping mobility. Electrical conductivity of Y0.8Ca0.2Cr0.85Co0.1Ni0.04Cu0.01O3 at 900 degree C is 57 S/cm in air and 11 S/cm in fuel (pO2=510^-17 atm) environments. Chemical compatibility of doped yttrium chromite with other cell components was verified at the processing temperatures. Based on the chemical and dimensional stability, sinterability, and thermal and electrical properties, Y0.8Ca0.2Cr0.85Co0.1Ni0.04Cu0.01O3 is suggested as a promising SOFC ceramic interconnect to potentially overcome technical limitations of conventional acceptor-doped lanthanum chromites.

Yoon, Kyung J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Marina, Olga A.

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method of making silicon on insalator material using oxygen implantation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The described embodiments of the present invention provide a semiconductor on insulator structure providing a semiconductor layer less susceptible to single event upset errors (SEU) due to radiation. The semiconductor layer is formed by implanting ions which form an insulating layer beneath the surface of a crystalline semiconductor substrate. The remaining crystalline semiconductor layer above the insulating layer provides nucleation sites for forming a crystalline semiconductor layer above the insulating layer. The damage caused by implantation of the ions for forming an insulating layer is left unannealed before formation of the semiconductor layer by epitaxial growth. The epitaxial layer, thus formed, provides superior characteristics for prevention of SEU errors, in that the carrier lifetime within the epitaxial layer, thus formed, is less than the carrier lifetime in epitaxial layers formed on annealed material while providing adequate semiconductor characteristics.

Hite, Larry R. (Dallas, TX); Houston, Ted (Richardson, TX); Matloubian, Mishel (Dallas, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Optical Properties and Potential Applications of Doped Semiconductor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Properties and Potential Applications of Doped Semiconductor Nanoparticles. Optical Properties and Potential Applications of Doped Semiconductor Nanoparticles. Abstract:...

373

Metal silicide nanoelectromechanical relays for low power applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT Scaling down the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) has continuously brought lower cost, higher density and increased performance since the 1960s. However, as MOS (more)

Stanford University, Dept. of Electrical; Engineering

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Electromagnetic compatibility in semiconductor manufacturing  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) causes problems in semiconductor manufacturing facilities that range from nuisances to major disruptions of production. In many instances, these issues are addressed in a reactionary rather than proactive manner by individuals who do not have the experience or the equipment necessary to combat EMI problems in a timely, cost effective manner. This approach leads to expensive retrofits, reduced equipment availability, long recovery times, and in some cases, line yield impacts. The goal of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in semiconductor manufacturing is to ensure that semiconductor process, metrology, and support equipment operate as intended without being affected by electromagnetic disturbances either transmitted through air (radiated interference), or transferred into the equipment via a conductive media (conducted interference). Rather than being neglected until serious issues arise, EMC should be considered in the early stages of facility design, in order to gain the most benefit at the lowest cost.

Montoya, J.A. [Intel Corp., Hillsboro, OR (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Method and making group IIB metal - telluride films and solar cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique is disclosed forming thin films (13) of group IIB metal-telluride, such as Cd.sub.x Zn.sub.1-x Te (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1), on a substrate (10) which comprises depositing Te (18) and at least one of the elements (19) of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate and then heating the elements to form the telluride. A technique is also provided for doping this material by chemically forming a thin layer of a dopant on the surface of the unreacted elements and then heating the elements along with the layer of dopant. A method is disclosed of fabricating a thin film photovoltaic cell which comprises depositing Te and at least one of the elements of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate which contains on its surface a semiconductor film (12) and then heating the elements in the presence of a halide of the Group IIB metals, causing the formation of solar cell grade Group IIB metal-telluride film and also causing the formation of a rectifying junction, in situ, between the semiconductor film on the substrate and the Group IIB metal-telluride layer which has been formed.

Basol, Bulent M. (Redondo Beach, CA); Kapur, Vijay K. (Northridge, CA)

1990-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

376

Electronic structure and ferromagnetism of Mn-doped group-IV semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate ab initio full-potential augmented plane wave (FLAPW) electronic calculations within density functional theory in both local density and generalized gradient approximations have been performed for MnxGe1-x and MnxSi1-x ordered alloys, focusing on their electronic and magnetic properties as a function of the host semiconducting matrix (i.e., Si vs Ge), the Mn concentration, and the spin magnetic alignment (i.e., ferromagnetic vs antiferromagnetic). As expected, Mn is found to be a source of holes and localized magnetic moments of about 3?B/Mn. The results show that irrespective of the Mn content, the Ge-based systems are very close to half-metallicity, whereas the Si-based structures just miss the half-metallic behavior due to the crossing of the Fermi level by the lowest conduction bands. Moreover, the ferromagnetic alignment is favored compared to the antiferromagnetic one, with its stabilization generally increasing with Mn content; this is in agreement with recent experimental findings for MnGe systems and supports the view that this class of ferromagnetic semiconductors constitute basic spintronic materials.

A. Stroppa; S. Picozzi; A. Continenza; A. J. Freeman

2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

377

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

378

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

379

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

380

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Trending: Metal Oxo Bonds Print Metal oxides are important for scientific and technical applications in a variety of disciplines, including materials science, chemistry, and biology. Highly covalent metal-oxygen multiple bonds (metal oxos) are the building blocks of metal oxides and have a bearing on the oxide's desirable chemical, magnetic, electronic, and thermal properties. The lack of a more sophisticated grasp of bonding in metal oxides constitutes a roadblock to innovation in a wide variety of important emergent technologies, including industrial catalysis, biomimetic transformations, and artificial photosynthesis. To address this problem, a research team from four national laboratories, three Department of Energy synchrotron user facilities, and the University of Washington has applied spectroscopic and computational analyses to a number of metal oxides, quantifying trends in metal oxo bonding for groups of metals across the periodic table.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Semiconductor nanocrystal-based phagokinetic tracking  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for determining metabolic properties of living cells through the uptake of semiconductor nanocrystals by cells. Generally the methods require a layer of neutral or hydrophilic semiconductor nanocrystals and a layer of cells seeded onto a culture surface and changes in the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals are detected. The observed changes made to the layer of semiconductor nanocrystals can be correlated to such metabolic properties as metastatic potential, cell motility or migration.

Alivisatos, A Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A; Parak, Wolfgang J; Le Gros, Mark; Boudreau, Rosanne

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

Semiconductor electrode with improved photostability characteristics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode is described for use in photoelectrochemical cells having an electrolyte which includes an aqueous constituent. The electrode consists of a semiconductor and a hydrophobic film disposed between the semiconductor and the aqueous constituent. The hydrophobic film is adapted to permit charges to pass therethrough while substantially decreasing the activity of the aqueous constituent at the semiconductor surface thereby decreasing the photodegradation of the semiconductor electrode.

Frank, A.J.

1985-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Soft X-ray spectromicroscopy and its application to semiconductor microstructure characterization  

SciTech Connect

The universal trend towards device miniaturization has driven the semiconductor industry to develop sophisticated and complex instrumentation for the characterization of microstructures. Many significant problems of relevance to the semiconductor industry cannot be solved with conventional analysis techniques, but can be addressed with soft x-ray spectromicroscopy. An active spectromicroscopy program is being developed at the Advanced Light Source, attracting both the semiconductor industry and the materials science academic community. Examples of spectromicroscopy techniques are presented. An ALS {mu}-XPS spectromicroscopy project is discussed, involving the first microscope completely dedicated and designed for microstructure analysis on patterned silicon wafers.

Gozzo, F.; Franck, K.; Howells, M.R.; Hussain, Z. [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Semiconductor Radiation Detectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...detector in which the material is not fully depleted. 284 SCIENCE, VOL. 170 (77 K), reduces...isotopes produced in fragmentation of uranium nuclei by 5-Gev protons as observed...staff of the U.S. De-partment of Health, Education, and Welfare National Air...

Fred S. Goulding; Yvonne Stone

1970-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Monolayer Semiconductors Gilbert Arias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to be successfully and reliably isolated is graphene, which has received a lot of attention due to the fact, the electrical tunability and valley physics of these materials can be observed. 2 Monolayer Transistors 2 onto a tape, and then sticking this tape onto some kind of Silicon wafer. When the tape is peele

Washington at Seattle, University of - Department of Physics, Electroweak Interaction Research Group

386

Hybrid high-temperature superconductor-semiconductor tunnel diode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the demonstration of hybrid high-Tc-superconductor-semiconductor tunnel junctions, enabling new interdisciplinary directions in condensed matter research. The devices were fabricated by our newly-developed mechanical bonding technique, resulting in high-Tc-semiconductor planar junctions acting as superconducting tunnel diodes. Tunneling-spectra characterization of the hybrid junctions of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\\delta} combined with bulk GaAs, or a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well, exhibits excess voltage and nonlinearity - in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a d-wave superconductor-normal material junction, and similar to spectra obtained in scanning tunneling microscopy. Additional junctions are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+{\\delta} combined with graphite or Bi2Te3. Our results pave the way for new methods in unconventional superconductivity studies, novel materials and quantum technology applications.

Alex Hayat; Parisa Zareapour; Shu Yang F. Zhao; Achint Jain; Igor G. Savelyev; Marina Blumin; Zhijun Xu; Alina Yang; G. D. Gu; Harry E. Ruda; Shuang Jia; R. J. Cava; Aephraim M. Steinberg; Kenneth S. Burch

2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hybrid High-Temperature-SuperconductorSemiconductor Tunnel Diode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the demonstration of hybrid high-Tc-superconductorsemiconductor tunnel junctions, enabling new interdisciplinary directions in condensed matter research. The devices are fabricated by our newly developed mechanical-bonding technique, resulting in high-Tc-superconductorsemiconductor tunnel diodes. Tunneling-spectra characterization of the hybrid junctions of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+? combined with bulk GaAs, or a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well, exhibits excess voltage and nonlinearity, similarly to spectra obtained in scanning-tunneling microscopy, and is in good agreement with theoretical predictions for a d-wave-superconductornormal-material junction. Additional junctions are demonstrated using Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+? combined with graphite or Bi2Te3. Our results pave the way for new methods in unconventional superconductivity studies, novel materials, and quantum technology applications.

Alex Hayat; Parisa Zareapour; Shu Yang F. Zhao; Achint Jain; Igor G. Savelyev; Marina Blumin; Zhijun Xu; Alina Yang; G. D. Gu; Harry E. Ruda; Shuang Jia; R. J. Cava; Aephraim M. Steinberg; Kenneth S. Burch

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mechanical scriber for semiconductor devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mechanical scriber using a scribing tip, such as a diamond, provides controlled scriber forces with a spring-loaded compound lever arrangement. The scribing force and range of scribing depth are adjusted by a pair of adjustable micrometer heads. A semiconductor device, such as a multilayer solar cell, can be formed into scribed strips at each layer. 5 figs.

Lin, P.T.

1985-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

389

Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage R and D  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials including light-weight complex hydrides, destabilized binary hydrides, intermetallic hydrides,...

390

Metal Hydride Hydrogen Storage Research and Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE's research on complex metal hydrides targets the development of advanced metal hydride materials including light-weight complex hydrides, destabilized binary hydrides, intermetallic hydrides,...

391

Applications of Ceramic Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of ceramic materials in science and industry is becoming increasingly widespread. As discussed in Chap. 4, ceramic materials have important advantages over metals and polymers in electronic devices at ...

Murat Bengisu

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NEWTON's Material Science Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Science Archive: Materials Science Archive: Loading Most Recent Materials Science Questions: Hydrogen Compounds and Heat Conduction Weaving Carbon Nanotubes Metal as Electrical Conductor, Not Thermal Steel Changes with Age PETE, Ultraviolet Light, Benefits Strength of Yarn by Spinning Each Substance Unique Density Alloy versus Constituent Density Knowing When Material is Melted Crystalline Metal Versus Metallic Glass and Conduction Super Glue, Surgery, and Skin Silica Gel Teflon Non-Stick Property Salt Crystal Formation Lubricating Rubber Bands and Elasticity Materials for Venus Probe Crystalline Solids and Lowest Energy Sodium Polycarbonate and Salt Water Early Adhesives Surface Energy and Temperature Separating Polypropylene, Polyester, and Nylon Factors Effecting Polymer Flexibility

393

Fabrication of photonic band gap materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a periodic dielectric structure exhibiting photonic band gap effects includes forming a slurry of a nano-crystalline ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material and monodisperse polymer microspheres, depositing a film of the slurry on a substrate, drying the film, and calcining the film to remove the polymer microspheres therefrom. The film may be cold-pressed after drying and prior to calcining. The ceramic dielectric or semiconductor material may be titania, and the polymer microspheres may be polystyrene microspheres.

Constant, Kristen (Ames, IA); Subramania, Ganapathi S. (Ames, IA); Biswas, Rana (Ames, IA); Ho, Kai-Ming (Ames, IA)

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

Weil, R.B.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

LASER METALLIZATION AND DOPING FOR SILICON CARBIDE DIODE FABRICATION AND ENDOTAXY.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Silicon carbide is a promising semiconductor material for high voltage, high frequency and high temperature devices due to its wide bandgap, high breakdown electric field (more)

Tian, Zhaoxu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Metal Aminoboranes - Energy Innovation Portal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the formula M(NH.sub.2BH.sub.3).sub.n have been synthesized. Metal aminoboranes are hydrogen storage materials. Metal aminoboranes are also precursors for synthesizing other...

397

Semiconductor with protective surface coating and method of manufacture thereof. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Passivation of predominantly crystalline semiconductor devices is provided for by a surface coating of sputtered hydrogenated amorphous semiconductor material. Passivation of a radiation detector germanium diode, for example, is realized by sputtering a coating of amorphous germanium onto the etched and quenched diode surface in a low pressure atmosphere of hydrogen and argon. Unlike prior germanium diode semiconductor devices, which must be maintained in vacuum at cryogenic temperatures to avoid deterioration, a diode processed in the described manner may be stored in air at room temperature or otherwise exposed to a variety of environmental conditions. The coating compensates for pre-existing undesirable surface states as well as protecting the semiconductor device against future impregnation with impurities.

Hansen, W.L.; Haller, E.E.

1980-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

398

Materials Preparation Center | Ames Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Preparation Center Materials Preparation Center Materials Preparation Center The Materials Preparation Center (MPC) is a U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences & Engineering specialized research center located at the Ames Laboratory. MPC operations are primarily funded by the Materials Discovery, Design, & Synthesis team's Synthesis & Processing Science core research activity. MPC is recognized throughout the worldwide research community for its unique capabilities in purification, preparation, and characterization of: Rare earth metals [learn about rare earths] Single crystal growth Metal Powders/Atomization Alkaline-earth metals [learn more, wikipedia] External Link Icon Refractory metal [learn more, wikipedia] External Link Icon

399

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials  

SciTech Connect

Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the holy grails of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

400

Synthesis of refractory materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogren. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN.sub.3. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Synthesis of refractory materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

Holt, J.B.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

Catalytic photooxidation of pentachlorophenol using semiconductor nanoclusters  

SciTech Connect

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a toxic chlorinated aromatic molecule widely used as fungicide, a bactericide and a wood preservation, and thus ubiquitous in the environment. The authors report photo-oxidation of PCP using a variety of nanosize semiconductor metal oxides and sulfides in both aqueous and polar organic solvents and compare the photo-oxidation kinetics of these nanoclusters to widely studied bulk powders like Degussa P-25 TiO{sub 2} and CdS. They study both the light intensity dependence of PCP photooxidation for nanosize SnO{sub 2} and the size dependence of PCP photooxidation for both nanosize SnO{sub 2} and MoS{sub 2}. They find an extremely strong size dependence for the latter which they attribute to its size-dependent band gap and the associated change in redox potentials due to quantum confinement of the hole-electron pair. The authors show that nanosize MoS{sub 2} with a diameter of d=3.0 nm and an absorbance edge of {approximately}450 nm is a very effective photooxidation catalyst for complete PCP mineralization, even when using only visible light irradiation.

WILCOXON,JESS P.

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

403

Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Optical devices featuring textured semiconductor layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semiconductor sensor, solar cell or emitter, or a precursor therefor, has a substrate and one or more textured semiconductor layers deposited onto the substrate. The textured layers enhance light extraction or absorption. Texturing in the region of multiple quantum wells greatly enhances internal quantum efficiency if the semiconductor is polar and the quantum wells are grown along the polar direction. Electroluminescence of LEDs of the invention is dichromatic, and results in variable color LEDs, including white LEDs, without the use of phosphor.

Moustakas, Theodore D. (Dover, MA); Cabalu, Jasper S. (Cary, NC)

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced packaging materials Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Technology Council (WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 22 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

406

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced materials development Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Fossil Energy Program Collection: Fossil Fuels 84 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

407

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced materials technology Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center, University of Missouri-Rolla Collection: Engineering 16 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

408

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced technological materials Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center, University of Missouri-Rolla Collection: Engineering 16 Kompetenzzentrum fr Automobil-und Industrieelektronik Summary: of materials for these advanced semiconductor...

409

Photon Statistics of Semiconductor Light Sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In recent years, semiconductor light sources have become more and more interesting in terms of applications due to their high efficiency and low cost. Advanced (more)

Amann, Marc

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Earth-abundant semiconductors for photovoltaic applications ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth-abundant semiconductors for photovoltaic applications Thin film photovoltaics (solar cells) has the potential to revolutionize our energy landscape by producing clean,...

411

Wide Bandgap Semiconductors for Clean Energy Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A workshop on Wide Bandgap (WBG) Semiconductors for Clean Energy (held July 25, 2012, in Chicago, Illinois) brought together stakeholders from industry and academia to discuss the technical status of WBG semiconductors. The workshop also explored emerging WBG market applications in clean energy and barriers to the development and widespread commercial use of WBG semiconductors. Improving the quality and reliability of WBG semiconductorsand reducing their manufacturing costscould accelerate their use in automotive, power electronics, solid-state lighting, and other clean energy applications.

412

Low Energy Ion Implantationin Semiconductor Manufacturing | U...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Low Energy Ion Implantation in Semiconductor Manufacturing Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science...

413

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors: Work...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Plans The Semiconductor Industry Association has finalized its work plan with the collaboration of EPA. The plan describes actions the industry intends to take to achieve its...

414

CCEC Seminar Wireless Sensors for SemiconductorWireless Sensors for Semiconductor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCEC Seminar Wireless Sensors for SemiconductorWireless Sensors for Semiconductor Manufacturing perhaps. In this talk, we describe our efforts in developing a new class of wireless sensors for use in semiconductor manufacturing. These sensors are fully self-contained with on board power, communications

Akhmedov, Azer

415

Hydrogen in semiconductors and insulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

type can be applied to hydrogen storage materials. Keywords:can be applied to hydrogen storage materials. Manuscript O-of the formalism to hydrogen storage materials. A partial

Van de Walle, Chris G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Impact of Chemical States on the Effective Work Function of Metal Gate and High-kappa Dielectric Materials on Novel Heterostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental and theoretical approach is taken to determine the effect of a heterojunction on the effective work function in a metal/high-? gate stack, the characteristics of aqueous hydrochloric acid cleaned (aq-HCl) GaN surface...

Coan, Mary

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

417

Optic probe for semiconductor characterization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein is an optical probe (120) for use in characterizing surface defects in wafers, such as semiconductor wafers. The optical probe (120) detects laser light reflected from the surface (124) of the wafer (106) within various ranges of angles. Characteristics of defects in the surface (124) of the wafer (106) are determined based on the amount of reflected laser light detected in each of the ranges of angles. Additionally, a wafer characterization system (100) is described that includes the described optical probe (120).

Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Hambarian, Artak (Yerevan, AM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

418

Spectroscopy of Charge Carriers and Traps in Field-Doped Organic Semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

This research project aims to achieve quantitative and molecular level understanding of charge carriers and traps in field-doped organic semiconductors via in situ optical absorption spectroscopy, in conjunction with time-resolved electrical measurements. During the funding period, we have made major progress in three general areas: (1) probed charge injection at the interface between a polymeric semiconductor and a polymer electrolyte dielectric and developed a thermodynamic model to quantitatively describe the transition from electrostatic to electrochemical doping; (2) developed vibrational Stark effect to probe electric field at buried organic semiconductor interfaces; (3) used displacement current measurement (DCM) to study charge transport at organic/dielectric interfaces and charge injection at metal/organic interfaces.

Zhu, Xiaoyang; Frisbie, C Daniel

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

419

PASSIVATION OF SEMICONDUCTOR SURFACES FOR IMPROVED RADIATION DETECTORS: X-RAY PHOTOEMISSION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Surface passivation of device-grade radiation detector materials was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in combination with transport property measurements before and after various chemical treatments. Specifically Br-MeOH (2% Br), KOH with NH{sub 4}F/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and NH{sub 4}OH solutions were used to etch, reduce and oxidize the surface of Cd{sub (1-x)}Zn{sub x}Te semiconductor crystals. Scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the resultant microscopic surface morphology. Angle-resolved high-resolution photoemission measurements on the valence band electronic structure and core lines were used to evaluate the surface chemistry of the chemically treated surfaces. Metal overlayers were then deposited on these chemically treated surfaces and the I-V characteristics measured. The measurements were correlated to understand the effect of interface chemistry on the electronic structure at these interfaces with the goal of optimizing the Schottky barrier height for improved radiation detector devices.

Nelson, A; Conway, A; Reinhardt, C; Ferreira, J; Nikolic, R; Payne, S

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Organic Semiconductors for LowCost Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current cost of solar electricity derived from silicon photovoltaics is about 30 to 40 cents per kilowatthour. This cost is similar to peakpower charges in California during the height of summer thus establishing a partial path to economic viability. However this competitiveness is not viable in other seasons and many other locations. This paper will discuss the basic theory and progress of a new class of photovoltaic semiconductors derived from organic polymer materials. These materials have obtained promising results with 5% conversion efficiency. In addition these materials can be manufactured relatively easily by using printing technologies and roll?to?roll coating machines similar to those used to make photographic film or newspapers. Solar cells made this way would not only be cheaper but could also be incorporated into roofing materials to reduce installation costs. Organic semiconductors can be dissolved in common solvents and sprayed or printed onto substrates so they are very promising candidates for the solar production of electricity.

Michael D. McGehee; Chiatzun Goh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Charge-carrier transport in amorphous organic semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the first reports of efficient luminescence and absorption in organic semiconductors, organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) and photovoltaics (OPVs) have attracted increasing interest. Organic semiconductors have ...

Limketkai, Benjie, 1982-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Comments on the National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The SIA National Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (NTRS) [1] represents ... in defining a unified description of the semiconductor technology requirements for ensuring advancements in the performance ... an ...

James F. Freedman

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced Thermoelectric Power Factor Engineering Density of States of Earth Abundant Semiconductors for Enhanced...

424

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print Wednesday, 29 November 2006 00:00...

425

Wide Bandgap Semiconductors for Clean Energy Workshop Agenda  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Wide Bandgap Semiconductors for Clean Energy Workshop Wednesday, July 25, 2012 Hilton Rosemont O'Hare, Chicago, IL Introduction Wide bandgap (WBG) semiconductors operate at...

426

Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronic...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for...

427

Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronic...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power Electronics for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Applications Webinar: Opportunities for Wide Bandgap Semiconductor Power...

428

Spin injection and transport in semiconductor and metal nanostructures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coefficient and can be determined for our devices from two-terminal spin valvecoefficient of the spin-selective contacts, ? n and ? sf are total transport time through the spin valve andcoefficient of the spin-selective contacts, ? n and ? sf are total transport time through the spin valve and

Zhu, Lei

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

e! Science News Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arsenide chips manufactured in multilayer stacks: light sensors, high-speed transistors and solar cellse! Science News Semiconductor manufacturing technique holds promise for solar energy Published semiconductor manufacturing method pioneered at the University of Illinois, the future of solar energy just got

Rogers, John A.

430

Semiconductor heterojunction band offsets and charge neutrality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on semi- conductors A and B like Figure 3. 1, and commutativity of semiconductors A and B, i. e. , DEs(A ? B) = DE?(B ? A). (3. 33) We predict the charge neutrality levels &b, 4is and 4i, might align in semiconductors A, B and C as shown in Figure 3...

Lee, Chomsik

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene Triple Junction Points. Stabilization of Electrocatalytic Metal Nanoparticles at Metal-Metal Oxide-Graphene...

432

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Inert electrode containing metal oxides, copper and noble metal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cermet composite material is made by treating at an elevated temperature a mixture comprising a compound of iron and a compound of at least one other metal, together with an alloy or mixture of copper and a noble metal. The alloy or mixture preferably comprises particles having an interior portion containing more copper than noble metal and an exterior portion containing more noble metal than copper. The noble metal is preferably silver. The cermet composite material preferably includes alloy phase portions and a ceramic phase portion. At least part of the ceramic phase portion preferably has a spinel structure.

Ray, Siba P. (Murrysville, PA); Woods, Robert W. (New Kensington, PA); Dawless, Robert K. (Monroeville, PA); Hosler, Robert B. (Sarver, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Low Temperature Fully Lithographic Process For MetalOxide Field-Effect Transistors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report a low temperature ( ~ 100 °C) lithographic method for fabricating hybrid metal oxide/organic field-effect transistors (FETs) that combine a zinc-indium-oxide (ZIO) semiconductor channel and organic, parylene, ...

Sodini, Charles G.

435

Low temperature lithographically patterned metal oxide transistors for large area electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optically transparent, wide bandgap metal oxide semiconductors are a promising candidate for large-area electronics technologies that require lightweight, temperature-sensitive flexible substrates. Because these thin films ...

Wang, Annie I. (Annie I-Jen), 1981-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Details in Semiconductors Gordon Conference, New London, NH, August 3-8, 2008  

SciTech Connect

Continuing its tradition of excellence, this Gordon Conference will focus on research at the forefront of the field of defects in homogeneous and structured semiconductors. The conference will have a strong emphasis on the control of defects during growth and processing, with an increases emphasis on nanostructures as compared to previous conferences. Electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of bulk, thin film, and nanoscale semiconductors will be discussed in detail. In contrast to many conferences, which tend to focus on specific semiconductors, this conference deals with defects in a broad range of bulk and nanoscale electronic materials. This approach has proved to be extremely fruitful for advancing fundamental understanding in emerging materials such as wide-band-gap semiconductors, doped nanoparticles, and organic semiconductors. Presentations of state-of-the-art theoretical methods will contribute to a fundamental understanding of atomic-scale phenomena. The program consists of about twenty invited talks, with plenty of discussion time, and a number of contributed poster sessions. Because of the large amount of discussion time, the conference provides an ideal forum for dealing with topics that are new and/or controversial.

Shengbai Zhang and Nancy Ryan Gray

2009-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

437

Integrated decontamination process for metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated process for decontamination of metals, particularly metals that are used in the nuclear energy industry contaminated with radioactive material. The process combines the processes of electrorefining and melt refining to purify metals that can be decontaminated using either electrorefining or melt refining processes.

Snyder, Thomas S. (Oakmont, PA); Whitlow, Graham A. (Murrysville, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr{sup 2+}-doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 {micro}m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d{sup 4} and d{sup 6} electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers. 18 figs.

Krupke, W.F.; Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

1996-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Acoustic-phonon propagation in rectangular semiconductor nanowires with elastically dissimilar barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering, University of California--Riverside, Riverside, California 92521, USA Received 15 February 2005 dissimilar materials. As example systems, we have considered GaN nanowires with AlN and plastic barrier­5 The modification of the acoustic phonon dispersion in semiconductor superlattices has been mostly studied, both

440

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Hybrid Life Cycle Inventory of Nano-Scale Semiconductor Manufacturing ... There is a need to both quantify unit process emissions and the impacts of auxiliary equipment at the facility scale; (iii) There is a need for streamlined methodologies to assess upstream impacts of manufacturing chemicals, materials and equipment infrastructure. ...

Nikhil Krishnan; Sarah Boyd; Ajay Somani; Sebastien Raoux; Daniel Clark; David Dornfeld

2008-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Effect of Quantum Confinement on Thermoelectric Properties of 2D and 1D Semiconductor Thin Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Quantum Confinement on Thermoelectric Properties of 2D and 1D Semiconductor Thin Films A. Bulusu and D. G. Walker1 Interdisciplinary Program in Material Science Vanderbilt University Nashville on device characteristics of 1D and 2D thin film superlattices whose applications include thermoelectric

Walker, D. Greg

442

FY08 Annual Report: Amorphous Semiconductors for Gamma Radiation Detection (ASGRAD)  

SciTech Connect

This is the annual report for an old project funded by NA22. The purpose of the project was to develop amorphous semiconductors for use as radiation detectors. The annual report contains information about the progress made in synthesizing, characterizing, and radiation response testing of these new materials.

Johnson, Bradley R.; Riley, Brian J.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Sundaram, S. K.; McCloy, John S.; Rockett, Angus

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Synthesis and Treatment Parameters for Controlling Metal Particle Size and Composition in Cu/ZnO MaterialsFirst Evidence of Cu3Zn Alloy Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper deals with the study of the conditions of obtention of small metal copper particles on ZnO using easy synthesis methods and activation treatments, which were found efficient for the preparation of copper particles on silica, that is, ...

Salim Derrouiche; Hlne Lauron-Pernot; Catherine Louis

2012-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Energy Management in Semiconductor Cleanrooms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Energy Management in Semiconductor Cleanrooms Cleanrooms are used extensively in the manufacturing of integrated circuits and in the biological and pharmaceutical industries. For particle concentrations to remain low, for example, less than 100 particles/ft3 at >0.5 micrometers (Class 100), the air in the cleanroom must be filtered. Typically, the air is circulated through high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters at a very high rate, such as 400 to 600 room air volumes per hour, to maintain low particle concentrations. The combined effect of high recirculation and a high pressure drop through HEPA filters is higher power costs per unit floor area to operate the cleanroom than to ventilate a commercial building. Cleanrooms are usually ventilated constantly and

445

Boron doping a semiconductor particle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method (10,30) of boron doping a semiconductor particle using boric acid to obtain a p-type doped particle. Either silicon spheres or silicon powder is mixed with a diluted solution of boric acid having a predetermined concentration. The spheres are dried (16), with the boron film then being driven (18) into the sphere. A melt procedure mixes the driven boron uniformly throughout the sphere. In the case of silicon powder, the powder is metered out (38) into piles and melted/fused (40) with an optical furnace. Both processes obtain a p-type doped silicon sphere with desired resistivity. Boric acid is not a restricted chemical, is inexpensive, and does not pose any special shipping, handling, or disposal requirements.

Stevens, Gary Don (18912 Ravenglen Ct., Dallas, TX 75287); Reynolds, Jeffrey Scott (703 Horizon, Murphy, TX 75094); Brown, Louanne Kay (2530 Poplar Tr., Garland, TX 75042)

1998-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

446

Heating device for semiconductor wafers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernable pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light.

Vosen, Steven R. (Berkeley, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Heating device for semiconductor wafers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for heat treating semiconductor wafers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a heating device which contains an assembly of light energy sources for emitting light energy onto a wafer. In particular, the light energy sources are positioned such that many different radial heating zones are created on a wafer being heated. For instance, in one embodiment, the light energy sources form a spiral configuration. In an alternative embodiment, the light energy sources appear to be randomly dispersed with respect to each other so that no discernible pattern is present. In a third alternative embodiment of the present invention, the light energy sources form concentric rings. Tuning light sources are then placed in between the concentric rings of light. 4 figs.

Vosen, S.R.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Amorphous Silicon as Semiconductor Material for High Resolution LAPS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-08 3.E -08 0 200 400 600 800 displacem ent/µµµµm current/A 1000 2000 3000 4000 1000 2000 3000 4000-substrate Amorphous silicon -4 -2 0 2 4 0,2 0,4 0,6 0,8 1,0 photocurrenta.u. gate voltage/V 600µm x 600µm area scan

Moritz, Werner

449

Photocell utilizing a wide-bandgap semiconductor material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photocell comprises a p-i-n amorphous silicon structure having a wide bandgap layer adjacent to either the p-type or n-type layer. This structure reduces the absorption of light entering the photocell and the back-diffusion of minority carriers.

Carlson, David E. (Yardley, PA); Williams, Brown F. (Princeton, NJ)

1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

450

Scanning probe characterization of novel semiconductor materials and devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surf where q is the fundamental electronic charge magnitude,m * , where q is the fundamental electronic charge and m *

Zhou, Xiaotian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Influences of semiconductor morphology on the mechanical fatigue behavior of flexible organic electronics  

SciTech Connect

The influence of crystalline morphology on the mechanical fatigue of organic semiconductors (OSCs) was investigated using 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene (TIPS-pentacene) as a crystalline OSC and poly(triarylamine) (PTAA) as an amorphous OSC. During cyclic bending, resistances of the OSCs were monitored using the transmission-line method on a metal-semiconductor-metal structure. The resistance of the TIPS-pentacene increased under fatigue damage in tensile-stress mode, but no such degradation was observed in the PTAA. Both OSCs were stable under compressive bending fatigue. The formation of intergranular cracks at the domain boundaries of the TIPS-pentacene was responsible for the degradation of its electrical properties under tensile bending fatigue.

Lee, Young-Joo; Yeon, Han-Wool; Shin, Hae-A-Seul; Joo, Young-Chang, E-mail: ycjoo@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 151-744 Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, 151-744 Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Uk Lee, Yong; Evans, Louise A. [Center for Process Innovation Limited, Thomas Wright Way, NETPark, Sedgefield, TS21 3FG County Durham (United Kingdom)] [Center for Process Innovation Limited, Thomas Wright Way, NETPark, Sedgefield, TS21 3FG County Durham (United Kingdom)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

452

Study of tunable negative index metamaterials based on phase-change materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The tunable optical response of elliptical nanohole arrays penetrating through metalphase change materialmetal...

Cao, Tun; Simpson, Robert E; Cryan, Martin J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

AgBiS2 Semiconductor-Sensitized Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AgBiS2 Semiconductor-Sensitized Solar Cells ... We present a new ternary semiconductor sensitizer-AgBiS2 for solar cells. ... Liquid-junction semiconductor-sensitized solar cells were fabricated from the synthesized AgBiS2 semiconductor. ...

Pen-Chi Huang; Wei-Chih Yang; Ming-Way Lee

2013-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Transport Equations for Semiconductors Prof. Dr. Ansgar Jungel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- cations have been invented; for instance, semiconductor lasers, solar cells, light-emitting diodes (LED

Jüngel, Ansgar

455

Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}CoPO{sub 4}F and Li{sub 2}NiPO{sub 4}F) as cathode materials for lithium ion battery from atomistic simulation  

SciTech Connect

Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}MPO{sub 4}F, M: Co and Ni) have been investigated from atomistic simulation. In order to predict the characteristics of these materials as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries, structural property, defect chemistry, and Li{sup +} ion transportation property are characterized. The coreshell model with empirical force fields is employed to reproduce the unit-cell parameters of crystal structure, which are in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the formation energies of intrinsic defects (Frenkel and antisite) are determined by energetics calculation. From migration energy calculations, it is found that these flurophosphates have a 3D Li{sup +} ion diffusion network forecasting good Li{sup +} ion conducting performances. Accordingly, we expect that this study provides an atomic scale insight as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}CoPO{sub 4}F and Li{sub 2}NiPO{sub 4}F). Display Omitted - Highlights: Lithium transition metal fluorophosphates (Li{sub 2}MPO{sub 4}F, M: Co and Ni) are investigated from classical atomistic simulation. The unit-cell parameters from experimental studies are reproduced by the coreshell model. Li{sup +} ion conducting Li{sub 2}MPO{sub 4}F has a 3D Li{sup +} ion diffusion network. It is predicted that Li/Co or Li/Ni antisite defects are well-formed at a substantial concentration level.

Lee, Sanghun, E-mail: sh0129.lee@samsung.com; Park, Sung Soo, E-mail: sung.s.park@samsung.com

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

456

Diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires exhibiting magnetoresistance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for is disclosed for fabricating diluted magnetic semiconductor (DMS) nanowires by providing a catalyst-coated substrate and subjecting at least a portion of the substrate to a semiconductor, and dopant via chloride-based vapor transport to synthesize the nanowires. Using this novel chloride-based chemical vapor transport process, single crystalline diluted magnetic semiconductor nanowires Ga.sub.1-xMn.sub.xN (x=0.07) were synthesized. The nanowires, which have diameters of .about.10 nm to 100 nm and lengths of up to tens of micrometers, show ferromagnetism with Curie temperature above room temperature, and magnetoresistance up to 250 Kelvin.

Yang, Peidong (El Cerrito, CA); Choi, Heonjin (Seoul, KR); Lee, Sangkwon (Daejeon, KR); He, Rongrui (Albany, CA); Zhang, Yanfeng (El Cerrito, CA); Kuykendal, Tevye (Berkeley, CA); Pauzauskie, Peter (Berkeley, CA)

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

457

Novel theoretical and experimental approaches for understanding and optimizing hydrogen-sorbent interactions in metal organic framework materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Yves. J. Chabal (Primary Contact), Jing Li, Timo Thonhauser UT Dallas - Department of Materials Science and Engineering 800 W. Campbell Road, RL 10 Richardson, TX 75080 Phone: (972) 883-5751 Email: chabal@utdallas.edu DOE Program Officer: Dr. Bonnie Gersten Phone: (301) 903-0002 Email: Bonnie.Gersten@science.doe.gov Subcontractors: * Jing Li (Rutgers University) * Timo Thonhauser (Wake Forest University) Objectives Develop a * comprehensive understanding of how small molecules (e.g. H 2 ) bind inside metal organic framework

458

Eyesafe pulsed microchip laser using semiconductor saturable absorber R. Fluck,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition MOCVD grown InGaAsP/InP semiconductor saturable absorber mirror an InGaAsP/InP SESAM to obtain a higher modulation depth than for an InGaAs/GaAs SESAM.15 The InGaAsP coupler and the SESAM. The ytterbium codoping of the glass makes possible the efficient absorption

Keller, Ursula

459

Hydroxyl-decorated graphene systems as candidates for organic metal-free ferroelectrics, multiferroics, and high-performance proton battery cathode materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Using a first-principles method we show that graphene based materials, functionalized with hydroxyl groups, constitute a class of multifunctional, lightweight, and nontoxic organic materials with functional properties such as ferroelectricity, multiferroicity, and can be used as proton battery cathode materials. For example, the polarizations of semihydroxylized graphane and graphone, as well as fully hydroxylized graphane, are much higher than any organic ferroelectric materials known to date. Further, hydroxylized graphene nanoribbons with proton vacancies at the end can have much larger dipole moments. They may also be applied as high-capacity cathode materials with a specific capacity that is six times larger than lead-acid batteries and five times that of lithium-ion batteries.

Menghao Wu; J. D. Burton; Evgeny Y. Tsymbal; Xiao Cheng Zeng; Puru Jena

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

460

Single-Frequency High-Power Continuous-Wave Oscillation at 1003 nm of an Optically Pumped Semiconductor Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reduction of the thermal resistance of the active semiconductor medium, resulting in a high power laser powers [1,2]. However the poor thermal conductivity of III-V materials might prevent an efficient heat by bonding it to a material of high thermal conductivity and good optical quality [2,4,5]. In this work we

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials semiconductor metal" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Metal-based reactive nanomaterials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent developments in materials processing and characterization resulted in the discovery of a new type of reactive materials containing nanoscaled metal components. The well-known high oxidation energies of metallic fuels can now be released very rapidly because of the very high reactive interface areas in such metal-based reactive nanomaterials. Consequently, these materials are currently being examined for an entire range of applications in energetic formulations inappropriate for conventional, micron-sized metal fuels having relatively low reaction rates. New application areas, such as reactive structural materials, are also being explored. Research remains active in manufacturing and characterization of metal-based reactive nanomaterials including elemental metal nanopowders and various nanocomposite material systems. Because of the nanometer scale of the individual particles, or phase domains, and because of the very high enthalpy of reaction between components of the nanocomposite materials, the final phase compositions, morphology, and thermodynamic properties of the reactive nanocomposite materials may be different from those of their micron-scaled counterparts. Ignition mechanisms in such materials can be governed by heterogeneous reactions that are insignificant for materials with less developed reactive interface areas. New combustion regimes are being observed that are affected by very short ignition delays combined with very high metal combustion temperatures. Current progress in this rapidly growing research area is reviewed and some potential directions for the future research are discussed.

Edward L. Dreizin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Reliability Tools for Resonance Inspection of Light Metal Castings...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

for Light Metal Castings FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestructive Evaluation NDE 701: Enhanced Resonance Inspection for Light Metal Castings...

463

Mospec Semiconductor Corp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mospec Semiconductor Corp Mospec Semiconductor Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name Mospec Semiconductor Corp Place Tainan, Taiwan Sector Solar Product Taiwanese semiconductor products producer; offers monocrystalline silicon wafers and as of April 2008, ingots for the solar industry. Coordinates 22.99721°, 120.180862° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":22.99721,"lon":120.180862,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

464

Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC Hemlock Semiconductor Corp HSC Jump to: navigation, search Name Hemlock Semiconductor Corp (HSC) Place Hemlock, Michigan Zip 48626 Sector Solar Product US-based manufacturer polycrystalline silicon for semiconductor and solar industries. Coordinates 39.589497°, -82.153275° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.589497,"lon":-82.153275,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Semiconductors  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Letters of Intent/Agreements Letters of Intent/Agreements The U.S. semiconductor industry, represented by the members of the Environmental Protection Agency's PFC Reduction/Climate Partnership for the Semiconductor Industry, has committed to reduce absolute perfluorocompound (PFC) emissions by 10% below the 1995 baseline level by the year 2010. Perfluorocompounds include the most potent and long-lived greenhouse gases such as perfluorocarbons (e.g., CF4, C2F6, C3F8), trifluoromethane (CHF3), nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6). The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) voluntary semiconductor industry partnership was developed collaboratively with the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA). EPA, SIA, and the Partner companies (listed below) are working to reduce industry greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. EPA's

466

Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

1985-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

467

Sandia National Laboratories: wide-bandgap semiconductor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

electroluminescence was first reported by H.J. Round in 1907, and the first light-emitting diode (LED) was reported by O.V. Losev in 1927. Not until the birth of semiconductor...

468

ITRS: The International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a move singular for the worlds industry, the semiconductor industry established a quantitative strategy for its progress with the establishment of the ITRS. In its 17th year, it has been extended in 2009 t...

Bernd Hoefflinger

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Thermovoltaic semiconductor device including a plasma filter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermovoltaic energy conversion device and related method for converting thermal energy into an electrical potential. An interference filter is provided on a semiconductor thermovoltaic cell to pre-filter black body radiation. The semiconductor thermovoltaic cell includes a P/N junction supported on a substrate which converts incident thermal energy below the semiconductor junction band gap into electrical potential. The semiconductor substrate is doped to provide a plasma filter which reflects back energy having a wavelength which is above the band gap and which is ineffectively filtered by the interference filter, through the P/N junction to the source of radiation thereby avoiding parasitic absorption of the unusable portion of the thermal radiation energy.

Baldasaro, Paul F. (Clifton Park, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Gaining creative control over semiconductor nanowires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaining creative control over semiconductor nanowires Gaining creative control over semiconductor nanowires Gaining creative control over semiconductor nanowires Using a microfluidic reactor, Los Alamos researchers transformed the SLS process into a flow-based technique. September 26, 2013 Growth of nanowire precursors in a flowing carrier solvent Growth of nanowire precursors in a flowing carrier solvent The new "flow" solution-liquid-solid method allows scientists to slow down growth and thereby capture mechanistic details as the nanowires grow in solution. A Los Alamos research team has transformed the synthesis process of semiconductor nanowires for use in solar cells, batteries, electronics, sensors and photonics using a solution-liquid-solid (SLS) batch approach to achieve unprecedented control over growth rates, nanowire size and internal

471

Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18-0.35 mm or less.

Molvik, Arthur W. (Livermore, CA); Ellingboe, Albert R. (Fremont, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Helicon wave excitation to produce energetic electrons for manufacturing semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A helicon plasma source is controlled by varying the axial magnetic field or rf power controlling the formation of the helicon wave. An energetic electron current is carried on the wave when the magnetic field is 90 G; but there is minimal energetic electron current when the magnetic field is 100 G in one particular plasma source. Similar performance can be expected from other helicon sources by properly adjusting the magnetic field and power to the particular geometry. This control for adjusting the production of energetic electrons can be used in the semiconductor and thin-film manufacture process. By applying energetic electrons to the insulator layer, such as silicon oxide, etching ions are attracted to the insulator layer and bombard the insulator layer at higher energy than areas that have not accumulated the energetic electrons. Thus, silicon and metal layers, which can neutralize the energetic electron currents will etch at a slower or non-existent rate. This procedure is especially advantageous in the multilayer semiconductor manufacturing because trenches can be formed that are in the range of 0.18--0.35 mm or less. 16 figs.

Molvik, A.W.; Ellingboe, A.R.

1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

473

High-efficiency photovoltaics based on semiconductor nanostructures  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to exploit a variety of semiconductor nanostructures, specifically semiconductor quantum wells, quantum dots, and nanowires, to achieve high power conversion efficiency in photovoltaic devices. In a thin-film device geometry, the objectives were to design, fabricate, and characterize quantum-well and quantum-dot solar cells in which scattering from metallic and/or dielectric nanostructures was employed to direct incident photons into lateral, optically confined paths within a thin (~1-3um or less) device structure. Fundamental issues concerning nonequilibrium carrier escape from quantum-confined structures, removal of thin-film devices from an epitaxial growth substrate, and coherent light trapping in thin-film photovoltaic devices were investigated. In a nanowire device geometry, the initial objectives were to engineer vertical nanowire arrays to optimize optical confinement within the nanowires, and to extend this approach to core-shell heterostructures to achieve broadspectrum absorption while maintaining high opencircuit voltages. Subsequent work extended this approach to include fabrication of nanowire photovoltaic structures on low-cost substrates.

Yu, Paul K.L. [University of California, San Diego; Yu, Edward T. [University of Texas at Austin; Wang, Deli [University of California, San Diego

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nanostructured composite reinforced material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

475

Carbon-Based Materials, High-Surface-Area Sorbents, and New Materials and Concepts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This category of materials-based storage technologies includes a range of carbon-based materials such as carbon nanotubes, aerogels, nanofibers (including metal-doped hybrids), as well as metal...

476

Dynamics of excitons and charges in organic materials and semiconducto...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of excitons and charges in organic materials and semiconductor nanocrystals for optoelectronics December 5, 2014 at 3pmRLE Haus 36-428 Laurens D.A. Siebbeles Department of...

477

Diverse and tunable electronic structures of single-layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides for photocatalytic water splitting  

SciTech Connect

The family of bulk metal phosphorus trichalcogenides (APX{sub 3}, A = M{sup II}, M{sub 0.5}{sup I}M{sub 0.5}{sup III}; X = S, Se; M{sup I}, M{sup II}, and M{sup III} represent Group-I, Group-II, and Group-III metals, respectively) has attracted great attentions because such materials not only own magnetic and ferroelectric properties, but also exhibit excellent properties in hydrogen storage and lithium battery because of the layered structures. Many layered materials have been exfoliated into two-dimensional (2D) materials, and they show distinct electronic properties compared with their bulks. Here we present a systematical study of single-layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides by density functional theory calculations. The results show that the single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides have very low formation energies, which indicates that the exfoliation of single layer APX{sub 3} should not be difficult. The family of single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides exhibits a large range of band gaps from 1.77 to 3.94 eV, and the electronic structures are greatly affected by the metal or the chalcogenide atoms. The calculated band edges of metal phosphorus trichalcogenides further reveal that single-layer ZnPSe{sub 3}, CdPSe{sub 3}, Ag{sub 0.5}Sc{sub 0.5}PSe{sub 3}, and Ag{sub 0.5}In{sub 0.5}PX{sub 3} (X = S and Se) have both suitable band gaps for visible-light driving and sufficient over-potentials for water splitting. More fascinatingly, single-layer Ag{sub 0.5}Sc{sub 0.5}PSe{sub 3} is a direct band gap semiconductor, and the calculated optical absorption further convinces that such materials own outstanding properties for light absorption. Such results demonstrate that the single layer metal phosphorus trichalcogenides own high stability, versatile electronic properties, and high optical absorption, thus such materials have great chances to be high efficient photocatalysts for water-splitting.

Liu, Jian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China) [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); College of Electrical and Information Engineering, Hunan Institute of Engineering, Xiangtan 411105, Hunan (China); Li, Xi-Bo; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min, E-mail: ppeng@hnu.edu.cn, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China)] [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Lau, Woon-Ming [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China) [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Beijing 100084 (China); Chengdu Green Energy and Green Manufacturing Technology R and D Center, Chengdu, Sichuan 610207 (China); Peng, Ping, E-mail: ppeng@hnu.edu.cn, E-mail: limin.liu@csrc.ac.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)] [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)