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Sample records for materials exercise evaluation

  1. TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms Hazardous Materials Exercise Evaluation Forms PDF icon Exercise Evaluation Forms More Documents & Publications...

  2. Exercise Controller and Evaluator Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume details the roles of controllers and evaluators in emergency exercises. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  3. ORISE: California Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    California Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP) Training The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) and the California Governor's Office of ...

  4. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 1: Summary of exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    In a September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton announced a new nonproliferation and export control policy that established a framework for US efforts to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction. The new policy proposed that the US undertake a comprehensive approach to the growing accumulation of fissile material. One of the key elements was for the US to support a special nuclear materials (SNM) multilateral convention prohibiting the production of highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium for nuclear explosives purposes or outside of international safeguards. This policy is often referred to as the President`s Cutoff Initiative or the Fissile Material Cutoff Treaty (FMCT). Because both the US Department of Energy (DOE) and foreign reprocessing facilities similar to PUREX will likely to be inspected under a FMCT, the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation, Negotiations and Analysis Division (DOE/NN-41) tasked Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to perform an information gathering exercise, the PUREX Exercise, using the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant located on the Hanford Site in Washington State. PUREX is a former production reactor fuel reprocessing plant currently undergoing a transition to a ``decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) ready`` mode. The PUREX Exercise was conducted March 29--30, 1994, to examine aspects of the imposition of several possible cutoff regimes and to study verification of non-production of SNM for nuclear weapons purposes or outside of safeguards. A follow-up activity to further examine various additional verification regimes was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on May 10, 1994.

  5. Emergency exercise methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-03-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  6. Emergency exercise methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klimczak, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    Competence for proper response to hazardous materials emergencies is enhanced and effectively measured by exercises which test plans and procedures and validate training. Emergency exercises are most effective when realistic criteria is used and a sequence of events is followed. The scenario is developed from pre-determined exercise objectives based on hazard analyses, actual plans and procedures. The scenario should address findings from previous exercises and actual emergencies. Exercise rules establish the extent of play and address contingencies during the exercise. All exercise personnel are assigned roles as players, controllers or evaluators. These participants should receive specialized training in advance. A methodology for writing an emergency exercise plan will be detailed.

  7. SUSTAINABLE REMEDIATION SOFTWARE TOOL EXERCISE AND EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, J.; Nichols, R.; Looney, B.

    2011-05-12

    The goal of this study was to examine two different software tools designed to account for the environmental impacts of remediation projects. Three case studies from the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, SC were used to exercise SiteWise (SW) and Sustainable Remediation Tool (SRT) by including both traditional and novel remediation techniques, contaminants, and contaminated media. This study combined retrospective analysis of implemented projects with prospective analysis of options that were not implemented. Input data were derived from engineering plans, project reports, and planning documents with a few factors supplied from calculations based on Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Conclusions drawn from software output were generally consistent within a tool; both tools identified the same remediation options as the 'best' for a given site. Magnitudes of impacts varied between the two tools, and it was not always possible to identify the source of the disagreement. The tools differed in their quantitative approaches: SRT based impacts on specific contaminants, media, and site geometry and modeled contaminant removal. SW based impacts on processes and equipment instead of chemical modeling. While SW was able to handle greater variety in remediation scenarios, it did not include a measure of the effectiveness of the scenario.

  8. Exercises

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume addresses development and conduct of emergency response exercises. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  9. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight...

  10. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel ...

  11. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, R.A.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.; Davis, C.

    1995-08-01

    This document is appendices D-J for the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise: Issues and Lessons Learned. Included are discussions of the US IAEA Treaty, safeguard regulations for nuclear materials, issue sheets for the PUREX process, and the LANL follow up activity for reprocessing nuclear materials.

  12. DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

    1996-09-12

    To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

  13. Special nuclear materials cutoff exercise: Issues and lessons learned, Volume 2 of 3: Appendixes A - C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Libby, R.A.; Davis, C.; Segal, J.E.; Stanbro, W.D.

    1995-08-01

    This document is the 2nd volume of the three volume set from the Special Nuclear Materials Cutoff Exercise held at Hanford in 1994. Volume 2 contains Appendices A-C, with Appendices A and B containing a discussion of the design of the PUREX process and Appendix C containing a discussion of the safeguards measures for the PUREX facility.

  14. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & ...

  15. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse High Voltage ...

  16. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Design and Evaluation of Novel High ...

  17. TEPP Exercises | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exercises TEPP Exercises Exercise Planning Resources One component of the TEPP is the "Drill-In-A-Box" exercise scenarios. TEPP has pre-scripted five exercise scenarios that are compliant with the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP). These exercises are used to validate responder readiness for response to a radiological transportation accident. TEPP works with the local jurisdiction to customize the exercise package including the scenario and exercise objectives.

  18. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    49thackeray2011o.pdf (1.66 MB) More Documents & Publications Cathodes Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Layered Cathode Materials

  19. Program Evaluation: Materials for Reviewers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials for Reviewers Program Evaluation: Materials for Reviewers So that the peer review is fair, credible, useful, and cost effective, the review leader should provide adequate and timely preparation materials to the peer review panel (via the panel chair) and to the presenters. Preparation materials need to be relevant to the objectives and review criteria. Within these materials there should not only be the relevant project-specific technical materials but also clear information about the

  20. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High...

  1. High-Throughput Analytical Model to Evaluate Materials for Temperature...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Throughput Analytical Model to Evaluate Materials for Temperature Swing Adsorption Processes Previous Next List mcontent.jpg Julian P. Sculley, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Weigang...

  2. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    17johnson2011p.pdf (651.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells ...

  3. Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thad M. Adams Materials Technology Section Savannah River National Laboratory DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project Review Meeting January 5-6, 2005 Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline ...

  4. Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science Evaluation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials for Hydrogen Science Presentation by 04-Adams to DOE Hydrogen Pipeline R&D Project Review Meeting held January 5-6, 2005 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. 04_adams_nat_gas.pdf (9.97 MB) More Documents & Publications Evalutation of Natural Gas Pipeline Materials and Infrastructure for Hydrogen/Mixed Gas Service Hydrogen Compatibility of

  5. Economic evaluation of closure cap barrier materials study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.G.; Bhutani, J.S.; Mead, S.M.

    1993-09-01

    Volume II of the Economic Evaluation of the Closure Cap Barrier Materials, Revision I contains detailed cost estimates for closure cap barrier materials. The cost estimates incorporate the life cycle costs for a generic hazardous waste seepage basin closure cap under the RCRA Post Closure Period of thirty years. The economic evaluation assessed six barrier material categories. Each of these categories consists of several composite cover system configurations, which were used to develop individual cost estimates. The information contained in this report is not intended to be used as a cost estimating manual. This information provides the decision makers with the ability to screen barrier materials, cover system configurations, and identify cost-effective materials for further consideration.

  6. international exercises

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    >NNSA provides assistance in developing and conducting emergency drills and exercises. Exercises provide a valuable test of emergency management systems...

  7. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy 17_johnson_2011_p.pdf (651.34 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells Lithium Source For High Performance Li-ion Cells

  8. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  9. What are the Starting Points? Evaluating Base-Year Assumptions in the Asian Modeling Exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Waldhoff, Stephanie; Clarke, Leon E.; Fujimori, Shinichiro

    2012-12-01

    A common feature of model inter-comparison efforts is that the base year numbers for important parameters such as population and GDP can differ substantially across models. This paper explores the sources and implications of this variation in Asian countries across the models participating in the Asian Modeling Exercise (AME). Because the models do not all have a common base year, each team was required to provide data for 2005 for comparison purposes. This paper compares the year 2005 information for different models, noting the degree of variation in important parameters, including population, GDP, primary energy, electricity, and CO2 emissions. It then explores the difference in these key parameters across different sources of base-year information. The analysis confirms that the sources provide different values for many key parameters. This variation across data sources and additional reasons why models might provide different base-year numbers, including differences in regional definitions, differences in model base year, and differences in GDP transformation methodologies, are then discussed in the context of the AME scenarios. Finally, the paper explores the implications of base-year variation on long-term model results.

  10. Evaluation Of Shielding Efficacy Of A Ferrite Containing Ceramic Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verst, C.

    2015-10-12

    The shielding evaluation of the ferrite based Mitsuishi ceramic material has produced for several radiation sources and possible shielding sizes comparative dose attenuation measurements and simulated projections. High resolution gamma spectroscopy provided uncollided and scattered photon spectra at three energies, confirming theoretical estimates of the ceramic’s mass attenuation coefficient, μ/ρ. High level irradiation experiments were performed using Co-60, Cs-137, and Cf-252 sources to measure penetrating dose rates through steel, lead, concrete, and the provided ceramic slabs. The results were used to validate the radiation transport code MCNP6 which was then used to generate dose rate attenuation curves as a function of shielding material, thickness, and mass for photons and neutrons ranging in energy from 200 keV to 2 MeV.

  11. Production of Working Reference Materials for the Capability Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip D. Noll, Jr.; Robert S. Marshall

    1999-03-01

    Nondestructive waste assay (NDA) methods are employed to determine the mass and activity of waste-entrained radionuclides as part of the National TRU (Trans-Uranic) Waste Characterization Program. In support of this program the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Mixed Waste Focus Area developed a plan to acquire capability/performance data on systems proposed for NDA purposes. The Capability Evaluation Project (CEP) was designed to evaluate the NDA systems of commercial contractors by subjecting all participants to identical tests involving 55 gallon drum surrogates containing known quantities and distributions of radioactive materials in the form of sealed-source standards, referred to as working reference materials (WRMs). Although numerous Pu WRMs already exist, the CEP WRM set allows for the evaluation of the capability and performance of systems with respect to waste types/configurations which contain increased amounts of {sup 241}Am relative to weapons grade Pu, waste that is dominantly {sup 241}Am, as well as wastes containing various proportions of depleted uranium. The CEP WRMs consist of a special mixture of PuO{sub 2}/AmO{sub 2} (IAP) and diatomaceous earth (DE) or depleted uranium (DU) oxide and DE and were fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The IAP WRMS are contained inside a pair of welded inner and outer stainless steel containers. The DU WRMs are singly contained within a stainless steel container equivalent to the outer container of the IAP standards. This report gives a general overview and discussion relating to the production and certification of the CEP WRMs.

  12. Materials Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04, 05, and 06

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Ingram, C; Simmons, L; Arganbright, R; Lyle, J; Wong, K

    2006-03-23

    The purpose of this work is to examine the environmental, safety, health and operational aspects of detonating a confined explosive test apparatus that has been designed to maximize the dynamics of impact on beryllium metal components for Contained Firing Facility (CFF) applications. A combination of experimental collection and evaluation methods were designed and implemented to provide an evaluation of immediately postdetonation by-products reflecting a potential worst-case scenario beryllium aerosolization explosive event. The collective Material Evaluation Test Series (METS) 04 - 06 provided explosive devices designed to scale for the dedicated METS firing tank that would provide a post-detonation internal environment comparable to the CFF. The experimental results provided appropriate information to develop operational parameters to be considered for conducting full-scale beryllium-containing experimental tests with similar designs within CFF and B801A. These operational procedures include the inclusion of chelating agents in pre-shot CFF cardboard containers with a minimum of 600 gallons content, an extended time period post-test before purging the CFF chamber, and an adaptation of approaches toward applications of the scrubber and HEPA systems during the post-shot sequence for an integrated environmental, safety, and health approach. In addition, re-entry and film retrieval procedures will be adapted, in line with abatement techniques for cleaning the chamber, that will be required for work inside a CFF that will contain an elevated concentration of spherical and highly aerosolizable beryllium particulate.

  13. Evaluation and significance of fracture toughness in ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mutoh, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Fracture toughness tests of several ceramic materials were carried out according to the various test methods, that is the Bridge indentation (BI, SEPB), Fatigue precrack (FP), Controlled surface flaw (CSF), Chevron notch (CN) and Indentation fracture (IF) methods. Mutual comparison of the test results was made to discuss the validity and applicability of each test method. Significance of the apparent fracture toughness with stable crack growth was discussed. The intrinsic fracture toughness can be obtained by the CSF method, in which a small surface crack is used. At high temperatures, since nonlinear deformation due to softening of glass phase and stable crack growth occur, nonlinear fracture mechanics approach should be applied. J{sub IC}-value is successfully evaluated according to the R-curve method.

  14. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 10. Nondestructive Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes.

  15. Health Physics Code System for Evaluating Accidents Involving Radioactive Materials.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    Version 03 The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculational tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes provide a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. The developer's website is: http://www.llnl.gov/nhi/hotspot/. Four general programs, PLUME, EXPLOSION, FIRE, and RESUSPENSION, calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosivemore » release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Additional programs deal specifically with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. The FIDLER program can calibrate radiation survey instruments for ground survey measurements and initial screening of personnel for possible plutonium uptake in the lung. The HOTSPOT codes are fast, portable, easy to use, and fully documented in electronic help files. HOTSPOT supports color high resolution monitors and printers for concentration plots and contours. The codes have been extensively used by the DOS community since 1985. Tables and graphical output can be directed to the computer screen, printer, or a disk file. The graphical output consists of dose and ground contamination as a function of plume centerline downwind distance, and radiation dose and ground contamination contours. Users have the option of displaying scenario text on the plots. HOTSPOT 3.0.1 fixes three significant Windows 7 issues: � Executable installed properly under "Program Files/HotSpot 3.0". Installation package now smaller: removed dependency on older Windows DLL files which previously needed to \\ � Forms now properly scale based on DPI instead of font for users who change their screen resolution to something other than 100%. This is a more common feature in Windows 7

  16. International Exercises | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    International Exercises First responders test plans and procedures during a radiation exercise in Murman NNSA provides assistance in developing and conducting emergency drills and exercises. Exercises provide a valuable test of emergency management systems that yields results and "lessons learned" necessary for continued improvements to emergency preparedness and response programs. Results from drills, exercises, and evaluation programs are used to develop and improve training programs

  17. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design and Evaluation of High Capacity Cathodes Design and ...

  18. Exercise Evaluation Forms

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Name OBJECTIVE 7: ALERT AND NOTIFICATION OF THE PUBLIC Demonstrate the ability to signal an alert and to provide emergency notifications containing information and...

  19. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  20. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  1. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  2. Candidate Materials Evaluation for Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. R. Allen and G. S. Was

    2008-12-12

    Final technical report on the corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, and radiation response of candidate materials for the supercritical water-cooled reactor concept.

  3. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials- 10. Nondestructive Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability.

  4. Evaluating different classes of porous materials for carbon capture...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    emission from power plants. In particular, amongst several separation strategies, adsorption by nano-porous materials is regarded as a potential means to efficiently capture CO2...

  5. Evaluation of ceramic filter material, selection for application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvin, M.A.; Tressler, R.E.; Lippert, T.E.; Diaz, E.S.

    1993-09-01

    Field testing in several of the Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (APF) systems has indicated that the oxide-based materials are more susceptible to thermal shock which results from system transients (i.e., combustion of char or reducing gases; system startup/turbine transients). The current clay bonded silicon carbide filter materials have a higher thermal shock resistance, but appear to be more susceptible to high temperature creep, as well as to changes that occur within the binder phase(s). Strength has frequently been used to assess what effects advanced coal fired process systems have on the stability and projected life of the various porous ceramic filter materials (Tables 1 and 2). Based on the numerous phase changes that occur, and the influence of pulse cleaning on the thermal fatigue characteristics of both the alumina/mullite and clay bonded silicon carbide filter materials, alternate material properties as thermal conductivity, thermal coefficient of expansion, elastic modulus, fracture toughness, and emissivity as a function of thermal/chemical aging are now being considered as critical factors for projecting filter durability and operating life. Table 3 provides a summary of the as-manufactured material properties for the alumina/mullite and clay bonded silicon carbide filter materials which have been used in the Westinghouse`s APF systems. Effort is currently being directed to determine how these properties change during thermal aging of the filters in various subpilot and pilot plant systems.

  6. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  7. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  8. Design and Evaluation of Novel High Capacity Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  9. Femtosecond laser processing of fuel injectors - a materials processing evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, B C; Wynne, A

    2000-12-16

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed a new laser-based machining technology that utilizes ultrashort-pulse (0.1-1.0 picosecond) lasers to cut materials with negligible generation of heat or shock. The ultrashort pulse laser, developed for the Department of Energy (Defense Programs) has numerous applications in operations requiring high precision machining. Due to the extremely short duration of the laser pulse, material removal occurs by a different physical mechanism than in conventional machining. As a result, any material (e.g., hardened steel, ceramics, diamond, silicon, etc.) can be machined with minimal heat-affected zone or damage to the remaining material. As a result of the threshold nature of the process, shaped holes, cuts, and textures can be achieved with simple beam shaping. Conventional laser tools used for cutting or high-precision machining (e.g., sculpting, drilling) use long laser pulses (10{sup -8} to over 1 sec) to remove material by heating it to the melting or boiling point (Figure 1.1a). This often results in significant damage to the remaining material and produces considerable slag (Figure 1.2a). With ultrashort laser pulses, material is removed by ionizing the material (Figure 1.1b). The ionized plasma expands away from the surface too quickly for significant energy transfer to the remaining material. This distinct mechanism produces extremely precise and clean-edged holes without melting or degrading the remaining material (Figures 1.2 and 1.3). Since only a very small amount of material ({approx} <0.5 microns) is removed per laser pulse, extremely precise machining can be achieved. High machining speed is achieved by operating the lasers at repetition rates up to 10,000 pulses per second. As a diagnostic, the character of the short-pulse laser produced plasma enables determination of the material being machined between pulses. This feature allows the machining of multilayer materials, metal on metal or metal on

  10. Post Test Evaluation of NSWCCD Materials at EERC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Eric Wuchina

    2001-12-31

    The higher combustion temperatures, particulate erosion, multivalent metal impurities, and local gas composition variations will all have dramatic effects on the performance of materials used for the cyclone combustor deflector cone.

  11. Survey and evaluation of available thermal insulation materials for use on solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-03-01

    This is the final report of a survey and evaluation of insulation materials for use with components of solar heating and cooling systems. The survey was performed by mailing questionnaires to manufacturers of insulation materials and by conducting an extensive literature search to obtain data on relevant properties of various types of insulation materials. The study evaluated insulation materials for active and passive solar heating and cooling systems and for multifunction applications. Primary and secondary considerations for selecting insulation materials for various components of solar heating and cooling systems are presented.

  12. An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Handling Equipment | Department of Energy An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment This report by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of

  13. Evaluation of Cadmium-Free Thick Film Materials on Alumina Substrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. H. Perdieu

    2009-09-01

    A new cadmium-free material system was successfully evaluated for the fabrication of thick film hybrid microcircuits at Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T). The characterization involved screen printing, drying and firing two groups of resistor networks which were made using the current material system and the cadmium-free material system. Electrical, environmental and adhesion tests were performed on both groups to determine the more suitable material system. Additionally, untrimmed test coupons were evaluated to further characterize the new materials. The cadmiumfree material system did as well or better than the current material system. Therefore, the new cadmium-free material system was approved for use on production thick film product.

  14. An environmental cracking evaluation of fastener materials for seawater applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aylor, D.M.

    1994-12-31

    Slow strain rate tests (SSRT) were conducted on various nickel-base, titanium base, and copper-nickel (Cu-Ni) alloys in order to identify a replacement material for Alloy K-500 in seawater fastener applications. SSRT data and fracture surface analysis of the test specimens identified a susceptibility to environmental cracking in cathodically polarized environments for Alloy K-500, Alloy 625 Plus, and Alloy 625PH. Alloy 625 Plus exhibited slightly increased environmental cracking resistance-at {minus}850 mV vs. SCE over Alloy K-500 and Alloy 625PH. Ti-6Al-4V ELI, Beta C, and Beta 21S titanium displayed no susceptibility to environmental cracking in freely corroding 3.5% NaCl or cathodically polarized conditions. Precharging these titanium alloys for 8 weeks at {minus}1,250 mV vs. SCE did not adversely affect their environmental cracking resistance. The Cu-3Ni and Cu-15Ni-7Sn spray formed alloys exhibited extensive scatter and low measured maximum loads, presumably due to macroporosity present in the as-fabricated material.

  15. Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program nuclear materials measurement data: Phase 1: Final report, 1985 through 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacic, C.G.

    1988-08-01

    The New Brunswick Laboratory has been tasked by the US Department of Energy Office of Safeguards and Security to assess and evaluate the adequacy of measurement technology as applied to materials accounting in US Department of Energy nuclear facilities. The Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program was developed as a means to monitor and evaluate the quality and effectiveness of accounting measurements by site, material balance area, or unit process. Phase 1 of the Safeguards Measurement Evaluation Program, initiated during 1985, involved evaluation of the primary accountability measurement methods at six US Department of Energy Defense Programs facilities. Resulting data are presented and evaluated as indicators of current state-of-the-practice accountability measurement methodology, deficiencies in materials accounting practices, and areas for possible assistance in upgrading measurement capabilities. 22 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. Evaluating safeguards effectiveness against protracted theft of special nuclear material by insiders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Ayat, R.A.; Sicherman, A. )

    1991-01-01

    The new draft DOE Material Control and Accountability Order 5633.3 requires that facilities handling special nuclear material (SNM) evaluate their effectiveness against protracted theft of SNM. Protracted theft means repeated thefts of small quantities of material to accumulate a goal quantity. In this paper the authors discuss issues regarding the evaluation of safeguards and describe how we are augmenting the Analytic System and Software for Evaluating Safeguards and Security (ASSESS) to provide the user with a tool for evaluating effectiveness against protracted theft. Currently, the Insider module of ASSESS focuses on evaluating the timely detection of abrupt theft attempts by various types of single nonviolent insiders. In this paper we describe the approach we're implementing to augment ASSESS to handle various cases of protracted theft attempts.

  17. GEN IV MATERIALS HANDBOOK BETA RELEASE FOR STRUCTURAL AND FUNCTIONAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Luttrell, Claire

    2006-09-12

    Development of the Gen IV Materials Handbook is briefly summarized up to date. Current status of the Handbook website construction is described. The developed Handbook components and access control of the beta version are discussed for the present evaluation release. Detailed instructions and examples are given to provide guidance for evaluators to browse the constructed parts and use all the currently developed functionalities of the Handbook in evaluation.

  18. Method for on-line evaluation of materials using prompt gamma ray analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W.

    2009-12-08

    A method for evaluating a material specimen comprises: Mounting a neutron source and a detector adjacent the material specimen; bombarding the material specimen with neutrons from the neutron source to create prompt gamma rays within the material specimen, some of the prompt gamma rays being emitted from the material specimen, some of the prompt gamma rays resulting in the formation of positrons within the material specimen by pair production; collecting positron annihilation data by detecting with the detector at least one emitted annihilation gamma ray resulting from the annihilation of a positron; storing the positron annihilation data on a data storage system for later retrieval and processing; and continuing to collect and store positron annihilation data, the continued collected and stored positron annihilation data being indicative of an accumulation of lattice damage over time.

  19. EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATION OF SALTSTONE MIXER AUGER/PADDLES MATERIALS OF CONSTRUCTION FOR IMPROVED WEAR RESISTANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Torres, R.

    2012-08-15

    Wear and corrosion testing were conducted to evaluate alternate materials of construction for the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles. These components have been degraded by wear from the slurry processed in the mixer. Material test options included PVD coatings (TiN, TiCN, and ZrN), weld overlays (Stellite 12 and Ultimet) and higher hardness steels and carbides (D2 and tungsten carbide). The corrosion testing demonstrated that the slurry is not detrimental to the current materials of construction or the new candidates. The ASTM G75 Miller wear test showed that the high hardness materials and the Stellite 12 weld overlay provide superior wear relative to the Astralloy and CF8M stainless steel, which are the current materials of construction, as well as the PVD coatings and Ultimet. The following recommendations are made for selecting new material options and improving the overall wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer components: A Stellite 12 weld overlay or higher hardness steel (with toughness equivalent to Astralloy) be used to improve the wear resistance of the Saltstone mixer paddles; other manufacturing specifications for the mixer need to be considered in this selection. The current use of the Stellite 12 weld overlay be evaluated so that coverage of the 316 auger can be optimized for improved wear resistance of the auger. The wear surfaces of the Saltstone mixer auger and paddles be evaluated so that laboratory data can be better correlated to actual service. The 2-inch Saltstone mixer prototype be used to verify material performance.

  20. Evaluation of the Materials Technology Required for a 760?C Power Steam Boiler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shingledecker, John P; Wright, Ian G

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Ultra-supercritical (USC) Steam Boiler Consortium, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Ohio Coal Development Office, has been working to develop the necessary materials technology to construct a steam power boiler with maximum steam conditions of 760 C and 35MPa. One large component of this work is to evaluate the properties of the materials chosen for such a boiler. While long-term creep strength of base metal is initially used to set temperatures, stresses, and simple design rules, it is clear that base metal creep strength is not always the material property of most importance when selecting an alloy. The fabrication issues (typically weldability), the properties of materials after fabrication, the corrosion resistance of the material, and material cost all need to be considered in addition to baseline mechanical properties. Work is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to evaluate the material technologies being developed by the USC Steam Boiler Consortium and perform additional advanced research activities in areas where new materials developments and better fundamental understanding are needed to ensure the long-term success of a 760 C power steam boiler.

  1. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE MATERIAL AND PERSONNEL HANDLING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Misiak

    1998-05-21

    This Title III Evaluation Report (TER) provides the results of an evaluation that was conducted on the Material and Personnel Handling System. This TER has been written in accordance with the ''Technical Document Preparation Plan for the Mined Geologic Disposal System Title III Evaluation Reports'' (BA0000000-01717-4600-00005 REV 03). The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Material and Personnel Handling System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications.

  2. ORISE: Exercise Planning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exercise Planning Exercise Planning The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) helps federal, state and local emergency management personnel plan and prepare for the...

  3. Environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities. A MITE Program evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This report documents an evaluation of the environmental, economic, and energy impacts of material recovery facilities (MRFs) conducted under the Municipal Solid Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program. The MITE Program is sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency to foster the demonstration and development of innovative technologies for the management of municipal solid waste (MSW). This project was also funded by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Material recovery facilities are increasingly being used as one option for managing a significant portion of municipal solid waste (MSW). The owners and operators of these facilities employ a combination of manual and mechanical techniques to separate and sort the recyclable fraction of MSW and to transport the separated materials to recycling facilities.

  4. exercise program

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    and dispose of many different hazardous substances, including radioactive materials, toxic chemicals, and biological agents and toxins.

    There are a few programs NNSA uses...

  5. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  6. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Understanding and manipulating the most fundamental properties of materials can lead to major breakthroughs in solar power, reactor fuels, optical computing, telecommunications. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Yu Seung Kim (left) and Kwan-Soo Lee (right) New class of fuel cells offer increased flexibility, lower cost A new class of fuel cells based on a newly discovered polymer-based material could bridge

  7. Evaluation of Activity Concentration Values and Doses due to the Transport of Low Level Radioactive Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rawl, Richard R; Scofield, Patricia A; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-04-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiated an international Coordinated Research Project (CRP) to evaluate the safety of transport of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). This report presents the United States contribution to that IAEA research program. The focus of this report is on the analysis of the potential doses resulting from the transport of low level radioactive material. Specific areas of research included: (1) an examination of the technical approach used in the derivation of exempt activity concentration values and a comparison of the doses associated with the transport of materials included or not included in the provisions of Paragraph 107(e) of the IAEA Safety Standards, Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Requirements No. TS-R-1; (2) determination of the doses resulting from different treatment of progeny for exempt values versus the A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values; and (3) evaluation of the dose justifications for the provisions applicable to exempt materials and low specific activity materials (LSA-I). It was found that the 'previous or intended use' (PIU) provision in Paragraph 107(e) is not risk informed since doses to the most highly exposed persons (e.g., truck drivers) are comparable regardless of intended use of the transported material. The PIU clause can also have important economic implications for co-mined ores and products that are not intended for the fuel cycle but that have uranium extracted as part of their industrial processing. In examination of the footnotes in Table 2 of TS-R-1, which identifies the progeny included in the exempt or A1/A2 values, there is no explanation of how the progeny were selected. It is recommended that the progeny for both the exemption and A{sub 1}/A{sub 2} values should be similar regardless of application, and that the same physical information should be used in deriving the limits. Based on the evaluation of doses due to the transport of low-level NORM

  8. Evaluation of materials for systems using cooled, treated geothermal or high-saline brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

    1982-09-01

    Lack of adequate quantities of clean surface water for use in wet (evaporative) cooling systems indicates the use of high-salinity waste waters, or cooled geothermal brines, for makeup purposes. High-chloride, aerated water represents an extremely corrosive environment. In order to determine metals suitable for use in such an environment, metal coupons were exposed to aerated, treated geothermal brine salted to a chloride concentration of 10,000 and 50,000 ppM (mg/L) for periods of up to 30 days. The exposed coupons were evaluated to determine the general, pitting, and crevice corrosion characteristics of the metals. The metals exhibiting corrosion resistance at 50,000 ppM chloride were then evaluated at 100,000 and 200,000 ppM chloride. Since these were screening tests to select materials for components to be used in a cooling system, with primary emphasis on condenser tubing, several materials were exposed for 4 to 10 months in pilot cooling tower test units with heat transfer for further corrosion evaluation. The results of the screening tests indicate that ferritic stainless steels (29-4-2 and SEA-CURE) exhibit excellent corrosion resistance at all levels of chloride concentration. Copper-nickel alloys (70/30 and Monel 400) exhibited excellent corrosion resistance in the high-saline water. The 70/30 copper-nickel alloy, which showed excellent resistance to general corrosion, exhibited mild pitting in the 30-day tests. This pitting was not apparent, however, after 6 months of exposure in the pilot cooling tower tests. The nickel-base alloys exhibited excellent corrosion resistance, but their high cost prevents their use unless no other material is found feasible. Other materials tested, although unsuitable for condenser tubing material, would be suitable as tube sheet material.

  9. An Evaluation of Frangible Materials as Veneers on Vented Structural Member Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jameson, Kevin Jay

    2015-10-01

    Literature shows there has been extensive research and testing done in the area of wall panels and frangible materials. There is evidence from past research that shows it is possible to vent a structure that has had an accidental internal explosion [1]. The reviewed literature shows that most designs vent the entire wall panel versus a frangible material attached to the wall panel. The frangible material attachment points are important to determine the overall loading of the wall panel structure [2]. The materials used in the reviewed literature were securely attached as well as strong enough to remain intact during the pressure loading to move the entire wall panel. Since the vented wall panel was the weakest part of the overall structure, the other walls of the structure were substantially larger. The structure was usually built from concrete and large amounts of steel with dirt and sand over the top of the structure.The study will be conducted at Sandia National Laboratories located in Albuquerque New Mexico. The skeletal structural design for evaluation is a rectangular frame with a square grid pattern constructed from steel. The skeletal structure has been given to the researcher as a design requirement. The grid pattern will be evaluated strictly on plastic deformation and the loading that is applied from the frangible material. The frangible material tested will either fit into the grid or will be a veneer lightly attached to the structure frame. The frangible material may be required on both sides of the structure to adequately represent the application.

  10. A Preliminary Evaluation of Using Fill Materials to Stabilize Used Nuclear Fuel During Storage and Transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maheras, Steven J.; Best, Ralph; Ross, Steven B.; Lahti, Erik A.; Richmond, David J.

    2012-08-01

    This report contains a preliminary evaluation of potential fill materials that could be used to fill void spaces in and around used nuclear fuel contained in dry storage canisters in order to stabilize the geometry and mechanical structure of the used nuclear fuel during extended storage and transportation after extended storage. Previous work is summarized, conceptual descriptions of how canisters might be filled were developed, and requirements for potential fill materials were developed. Elements of the requirements included criticality avoidance, heat transfer or thermodynamic properties, homogeneity and rheological properties, retrievability, material availability and cost, weight and radiation shielding, and operational considerations. Potential fill materials were grouped into 5 categories and their properties, advantages, disadvantages, and requirements for future testing were discussed. The categories were molten materials, which included molten metals and paraffin; particulates and beads; resins; foams; and grout. Based on this analysis, further development of fill materials to stabilize used nuclear fuel during storage and transportation is not recommended unless options such as showing that the fuel remains intact or canning of used nuclear fuel do not prove to be feasible.

  11. Evaluating high-temperature intumescent insulation materials under fire and blast conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, A.J.

    1997-11-01

    This paper describes recent testing conducted to evaluate the performance of high-temperature intumescent materials under adverse fire and blast conditions. Results from fire performance evaluations currently protecting offshore oil platforms are presented. Extensive fire and blast qualification testing of epoxy-based intumescent materials has been conducted utilizing specially designed blast chambers, jet fire facilities, and laboratory furnaces. Blast chambers are capable of loading up to a 3 x 3-m insulated bulkhead assembly to a 2 bar over pressure and having a duration of approximately 250 millisecond generated by a controlled flammable vapor cloud explosion. The jet fire test exposes an insulated test specimen to a fire environment characterized by temperatures of approximately 1100 C, sonic gas velocities, and peak heat flux levels in excess of 300 kW/m{sup 2}.

  12. Material property evaluations of bimetallic welds, stainless steel saw fusion lines, and materials affected by dynamic strain aging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudland, D.; Scott, P.; Marschall, C.; Wilkowski, G.

    1997-04-01

    Pipe fracture analyses can often reasonably predict the behavior of flawed piping. However, there are material applications with uncertainties in fracture behavior. This paper summarizes work on three such cases. First, the fracture behavior of bimetallic welds are discussed. The purpose of the study was to determine if current fracture analyses can predict the response of pipe with flaws in bimetallic welds. The weld joined sections of A516 Grade 70 carbon steel to F316 stainless steel. The crack was along the carbon steel base metal to Inconel 182 weld metal fusion line. Material properties from tensile and C(T) specimens were used to predict large pipe response. The major conclusion from the work is that fracture behavior of the weld could be evaluated with reasonable accuracy using properties of the carbon steel pipe and conventional J-estimation analyses. However, results may not be generally true for all bimetallic welds. Second, the toughness of austenitic steel submerged-arc weld (SAW) fusion lines is discussed. During large-scale pipe tests with flaws in the center of the SAW, the crack tended to grow into the fusion line. The fracture toughness of the base metal, the SAW, and the fusion line were determined and compared. The major conclusion reached is that although the fusion line had a higher initiation toughness than the weld metal, the fusion-line J-R curve reached a steady-state value while the SAW J-R curve increased. Last, carbon steel fracture experiments containing circumferential flaws with periods of unstable crack jumps during steady ductile tearing are discussed. These instabilities are believed to be due to dynamic strain aging (DSA). The paper discusses DSA, a screening criteria developed to predict DSA, and the ability of the current J-based methodologies to assess the effect of these crack instabilities. The effect of loading rate on the strength and toughness of several different carbon steel pipes at LWR temperatures is also discussed.

  13. An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No.

  14. Evaluation of options for disposition of dispersible material in B-Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarz, R.D.; Defferding, L.J.; Adickes, M.D.; Keene, K.E.; Pilger, J.P.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Paxton, M.M.

    1993-10-01

    The radioactive contaminants in the dispersible material in B-cell of the 324 Building Radiochemical Energy (RE) hot-cell complex at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington exceed the allowable level. In 1986, there was a spill of 1.3 million curies of concentrated cesium and strontium in B-cell. Cleanup is required, and candidate technologies for cleaning up or otherwise addressing problems associated with the dispersible material are being evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The RE hot-cell complex in 324 Building was constructed in the late 1950s. From the early 1960s until today the complex has been the site of numerous research, development, and demonstration programs using radioactive and hazardous materials. In mid-FY 1988, a program to clean B-cell was initiated. At present, dispersible material has been collected from 45% of the cell floor area, and 64% of the equipment and support racks have been removed from the cell. The evaluation of decontamination procedures are described.

  15. Production of NDA Working Reference Materials for the Capability Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, P.D. Jr.; Marshall, R.S.

    1998-11-17

    The production of Non Destructive Assay (NDA) Working Reference Materials (WRMs) that are traceable to nationally recognized standards was undertaken to support implementation of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Nondestructive Waste Assay Capability Evaluation Project (CEP). The WRMs produced for the CEP project consist of Increased Am/Pu mass ration (IAP) and depleted Uranium (DU) WRMs. The CEP IAP/DU WRM set provides radioactive material standards for use in combination with 55 gallon drum waste matrix surrogates for the assessment of waste NDA assay system performance. The Production of WRMs is a meticulous process that is not without certain trials and tribulations. Problems may arise at any of the various stages of WRM production which include, but are not limited to; material characterization (physical, chemical, and isotopic), material blend parameters, personnel radiation exposure, gas generation phenomenon, traceability to national standards, encapsulation, statistical evaluation of the data, and others. Presented here is an overall description of the process by which the CEP WRMs were produced and certified as well as discussions pertaining to some of the problems encountered and how they were solved.

  16. Clear Path IV Exercise Summary Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In April 2016, DOE led Clear Path IV in Portland, Oregon and Washington, DC. Clear Path IV was an interagency exercise focused on testing and evaluating energy sector response plans to address...

  17. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 6. 6. Evaluation of filter material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engquist, E,H.

    1985-04-01

    Four types of standard and developmental filter materials used in individual and collective-protective devices and one type of developmental filter material used for sampling of air for particulate matter were evaluated against the contamination produced by the detonation of an atomic bomb and present in the resulting radioactive cloud. These filter materials were evaluated in multilayer pads at the standard flow-rate conditions used by the Chemical Corps in evaluation studies of filter materials. This permitted correlation of results of laboratory data. Analysis of the materials was made by counting the gross beta activity collected on successive layers of the same filter material and the efficiency of the materials was calculated from the data obtained.

  18. Evaluation of scuffing behavior of single-crystal zirconia ceramic materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Ajayi, O. O.; Singh, D.; Routbort, J. L.; Energy Systems

    2007-09-10

    Scuffing, described as sudden catastrophic failure of lubricated sliding surfaces, is usually characterized by a sudden rapid increase in friction, temperature, and noise, and is an important failure mode on sliding surfaces. In metallic materials, scuffing results in severe plastic deformation of surfaces in contact. This study evaluated the scuffing behavior of two variants of zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) ceramic. Using a block-on-ring contact configuration and unformulated polyalphaolefin (PAO) lubricant, step-load-increase scuffing tests were conducted with single crystals of cubic ZrO{sub 2}-9.5% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and tetragonal ZrO{sub 2}-3% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Phenomenological 'scuffing', characterized by a sudden rise in friction coefficient and noise, was observed in the cubic material. For this material, 'scuffing' occurred by sudden fracture at the end of test. The tetragonal material underwent no sudden failure (scuffing). This lack of scuffing is attributed to the sequential operation of three plastic deformation mechanisms: ferroelastic domain switching, tetragonal-to-monoclinic phase transformation, and dislocation slip as the frictional stress and energy dissipation pathway.

  19. Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations: Exploratory Shaft Facility fluids and materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, K.A.

    1988-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if any fluids or materials used in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) of Yucca Mountain will make the mountain unsuitable for future construction of a nuclear waste repository. Yucca Mountain, an area on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada, USA, is a candidate site for permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste from commercial nuclear power and defense nuclear activities. To properly characterize Yucca Mountain, it will be necessary to construct an underground test facility, in which in situ site characterization tests can be conducted. The candidate repository horizon at Yucca Mountain, however, could potentially be compromised by fluids and materials used in the site characterization tests. To minimize this possibility, Los Alamos National Laboratory was directed to evaluate the kinds of fluids and materials that will be used and their potential impacts on the site. A secondary objective was to identify fluids and materials, if any, that should be prohibited from, or controlled in, the underground. 56 refs., 19 figs., 11 tabs.

  20. Generic Exercise Objectives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume provides additional detail on preparation of exercise objectives. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-3.

  1. System and method for non-destructive evaluation of surface characteristics of a magnetic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiles, David C.; Sipahi, Levent B.

    1994-05-17

    A system and a related method for non-destructive evaluation of the surface characteristics of a magnetic material. The sample is excited by an alternating magnetic field. The field frequency, amplitude and offset are controlled according to a predetermined protocol. The Barkhausen response of the sample is detected for the various fields and offsets and is analyzed. The system produces information relating to the frequency content, the amplitude content, the average or RMS energy content, as well as count rate information, for each of the Barkhausen responses at each of the excitation levels applied during the protocol. That information provides a contiguous body of data, heretofore unavailable, which can be analyzed to deduce information about the surface characteristics of the material at various depths below the surface.

  2. Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsden, T.

    2013-04-01

    This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

  3. MATERIAL COMPATIBILITY EVALUATION FOR DWPF NITRIC-GLYCOLIC ACID - LITERATURE REVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mickalonis, J.; Skidmore, E.

    2013-06-05

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid. The reported corrosion rates and degradation characteristics have shown the following for the materials of construction.  For C276 alloy, the primary material of construction for the CPC vessels, corrosion rates of either 2 or 20 mpy were reported up to a temperature of 93 C.  For the austenitic stainless steels, 304L and 316L, variable rates were reported over a range of temperatures, varying from 2 mpy up to 200 mpy (at 100 C).  For 690, G30, Allcorr, Ultimet and Stellite alloys no data were available.  For relevant polymers where data are available, the data suggests that exposure to glycolic acid is not detrimental. The literature data had limited application to the DWPF process since only the storage and feed vessels, pumps and piping used to handle the glycolic acid are directly covered by the available data. These components are either 304L or 316L alloys for which the literature data is inconsistent (See Bullet 2 above). Corrosion rates in pure glycolic acid solutions also are not representative of the DWPF process streams. This stream is complex and contains aggressive species, i.e. chlorides, sulfates, mercury, as well as antifoaming agents which cumulatively have an unknown effect on the corrosion rates of the materials of construction. Therefore, testing is recommended to investigate any synergistic effects of the

  4. Evaluating Safeguards Benefits of Process Monitoring as compared with Nuclear Material Accountancy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humberto Garcia; Wen-Chiao Lin; Reed Carlson

    2014-07-01

    This paper illustrates potential safeguards benefits that process monitoring (PM) may have as a diversion deterrent and as a complementary safeguards measure to nuclear material accountancy (NMA). This benefit is illustrated by quantifying the standard deviation associated with detecting a considered material diversion scenario using either an NMA-based method or a PM-based approach. To illustrate the benefits of PM for effective safeguards, we consider a reprocessing facility. We assume that the diversion of interest for detection manifests itself as a loss of Pu caused by abnormally operating a dissolver for an extended period to accomplish protracted diversion (or misdirection) of Pu to a retained (unconditioned) waste stream. For detecting the occurrence of this diversion (which involves anomalous operation of the dissolver), we consider two different data evaluation and integration (DEI) approaches, one based on NMA and the other based on PM. The approach based on PM does not directly do mass balance calculations, but rather monitors for the possible occurrence of anomaly patterns related to potential loss of nuclear material. It is thus assumed that the loss of a given mass amount of nuclear material can be directly associated with the execution of proliferation-driven activities that trigger the occurrence of an anomaly pattern consisting of series of events or signatures occurring at different unit operations and time instances. By effectively assessing these events over time and space, the PM-based DEI approach tries to infer whether this specific pattern of events has occurred and how many times within a given time period. To evaluate the goodness of PM, the 3 Sigma of the estimated mass loss is computed under both DEI approaches as function of the number of input batches processed. Simulation results are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of phase change materials for thermal regulation enhancement of building integrated photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, A.; Norton, B.; McCormack, S.J.; Huang, M.J.

    2010-09-15

    Regulating the temperature of building integrated photovoltaics (BIPV) using phase change materials (PCMs) reduces the loss of temperature dependent photovoltaic (PV) efficiency. Five PCMs were selected for evaluation all with melting temperatures {proportional_to}25 {+-} 4 C and heat of fusion between 140 and 213 kJ/kg. Experiments were conducted at three insolation intensities to evaluate the performance of each PCM in four different PV/PCM systems. The effect on thermal regulation of PV was determined by changing the (i) mass of PCM and (ii) thermal conductivities of the PCM and PV/PCM system. A maximum temperature reduction of 18 C was achieved for 30 min while 10 C temperature reduction was maintained for 5 h at -1000 W/m{sup 2} insolation. (author)

  6. Safety evaluation for packaging 222-S laboratory cargo tank for onetime type B material shipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, P.M.

    1994-08-19

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to evaluate and document the safety of the onetime shipment of bulk radioactive liquids in the 222-S Laboratory cargo tank (222-S cargo tank). The 222-S cargo tank is a US Department of Transportation (DOT) MC-312 specification (DOT 1989) cargo tank, vehicle registration number HO-64-04275, approved for low specific activity (LSA) shipments in accordance with the DOT Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR). In accordance with the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) Order 5480.1A, Chapter III (RL 1988), an equivalent degree of safety shall be provided for onsite shipments as would be afforded by the DOT shipping regulations for a radioactive material package. This document demonstrates that this packaging system meets the onsite transportation safety criteria for a onetime shipment of Type B contents.

  7. Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  8. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the costmore » of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.« less

  9. Derivation of a Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC) metric for evaluation of solar selective absorber materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C. K.; Pacheco, J. E.

    2015-06-05

    A new metric, the Levelized Cost of Coating (LCOC), is derived in this paper to evaluate and compare alternative solar selective absorber coatings against a baseline coating (Pyromark 2500). In contrast to previous metrics that focused only on the optical performance of the coating, the LCOC includes costs, durability, and optical performance for more comprehensive comparisons among candidate materials. The LCOC is defined as the annualized marginal cost of the coating to produce a baseline annual thermal energy production. Costs include the cost of materials and labor for initial application and reapplication of the coating, as well as the cost of additional or fewer heliostats to yield the same annual thermal energy production as the baseline coating. Results show that important factors impacting the LCOC include the initial solar absorptance, thermal emittance, reapplication interval, degradation rate, reapplication cost, and downtime during reapplication. The LCOC can also be used to determine the optimal reapplication interval to minimize the levelized cost of energy production. As a result, similar methods can be applied more generally to determine the levelized cost of component for other applications and systems.

  10. Self-assembled peptide nanotubes as electronic materials: An evaluation from first-principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akdim, Brahim E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Pachter, Ruth E-mail: ruth.pachter@us.af.mil; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-05-04

    In this letter, we report on the evaluation of diphenylalanine (FF), dityrosine (YY), and phenylalanine-tryptophan (FW) self-assembled peptide nanotube structures for electronics and photonics applications. Realistic bulk peptide nanotube material models were used in density functional theory calculations to mimic the well-ordered tubular nanostructures. Importantly, validated functionals were applied, specifically by using a London dispersion correction to model intertube interactions and a range-separated hybrid functional for accurate bandgap calculations. Bandgaps were found consistent with available experimental data for FF, and also corroborate the higher conductance reported for FW in comparison to FF peptide nanotubes. Interestingly, the predicted bandgap for the YY tubular nanostructure was found to be slightly higher than that of FW, suggesting higher conductance as well. In addition, the band structure calculations along the high symmetry line of nanotube axis revealed a direct bandgap for FF. The results enhance our understanding of the electronic properties of these material systems and will pave the way into their application in devices.

  11. Evaluation of exposure pathways to man from disposal of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Parkhurst, M.A.; Aaberg, R.L.; Rhoads, K.C.; Hill, R.L.; Martin, J.B.

    1992-05-01

    In accordance with 10 CFR 20, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulates licensees` discharges of small quantities of radioactive materials into sanitary sewer systems. This generic study was initiated to examine the potential radiological hazard to the public resulting from exposure to radionuclides in sewage sludge during its treatment and disposal. Eleven scenarios were developed to characterize potential exposures to radioactive materials during sewer system operations and sewage sludge treatment and disposal activities and during the extended time frame following sewage sludge disposal. Two sets of deterministic dose calculations were performed; one to evaluate potential doses based on the radionuclides and quantities associated with documented case histories of sewer system contamination and a second, somewhat more conservative set, based on theoretical discharges at the maximum allowable levels for a more comprehensive list of 63 radionuclides. The results of the stochastic uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were also used to develop a collective dose estimate. The collective doses for the various radionuclides and scenarios range from 0.4 person-rem for {sup 137}Cs in Scenario No. 5 (sludge incinerator effluent) to 420 person-rem for {sup 137}Cs in Scenario No. 3 (sewage treatment plant liquid effluent). None of the 22 scenario/radionuclide combinations considered have collective doses greater than 1000 person-rem/yr. However, the total collective dose from these 22 combinations was found to be about 2100 person-rem.

  12. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-364-2202, Armco Advanced Materials Corporation, Butler, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tubbs, R.L.; Moss, C.E.; Fleeger, A.

    1992-04-01

    In response to a management request, an evaluation was made of possible hazardous working conditions at ARMCO Advanced Materials Corporation (SIC-3312), Butler, Pennsylvania. ARMCO produced primarily specialty steel products. An indirect method of electric heating was used at the facility to make steel. Concern was expressed about employee exposures to infrasound, electromagnetic radiation, and various dusts throughout the melt shop. The investigation was then expanded to include radiofrequency exposures at the Ultra-Rapid Annealing (URA) furnace located in the Strip Coating and Silicon Anneal Building (SCSAB). Air samples analyzed indicated that the recommended levels were being exceeded for chromium (7440473), manganese (7439965) and lead (7439921). Radiofrequency radiation measurements at the URA furnace and the visible radiation levels near the electric arc furnaces in the melt shops exceeded the appropriate evaluation criteria. The authors conclude that health hazards existed during the survey from excessive airborne levels of hexavalent chromium, manganese, and lead, high levels of optical radiation near the electric arc furnaces, and radiofrequency radiation at the URA furnace. The authors recommended measures to lower these exposures and suggested the institution of medical and environmental surveillance programs.

  13. Technical evaluation panel summary report. Ceramic and glass immobilization options fissile materials disposition program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, B. R.; Brummond, W.; Armantrout, G.; Shaw, H.; Jantzen, C. M.; Jostons, A.; McKibben, M.; Strachan, D.; Vienna, J. D.

    1997-12-23

    This report documents the results of a technical evaluation of the merits of ceramic and glass immobilization forms for the disposition of surplus weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluation was conducted by a Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP), whose members were selected to cover a relevant range of scientific and technical expertise and represented each of the technical organizations involved in the Plutonium Immobilization Program. The TEP held a formal review at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory (LLNL) from July 2%August 1, 1997. Following this review, the TEP documented the review and its evaluation of the two immobilization technologies in this report to provide a technical basis for a recommendation by LLNL to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the preferred immobilization form. The comparison of the glass and ceramic forms and manufacturing processes was a tremendous challenge to the TEP. The two forms and their processes are similar in many ways. The TEP went to great effort to accurately assess what were, in many cases, fine details of the processes, unit operations, and the glass and ceramic forms themselves. The set of criteria used by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) in past screenings and down-selections was used to measure-the two options. One exception is that the TEP did not consider criteria that were largely nontechnical (namely international impact, public acceptance, and effects on other : DOE programs). The TEP' s measures and assessments are documented in detail. Care was taken to ensure that the data used were well documented and traceable to their source. Although no final conclusion regarding the preferred form was reached or explicitly stated in this report (this was not within the TEP' s charter), no "show stoppers" were identified for either form. Both forms appear capable of satisfying all the criteria, as interpreted by the TEP. The TEP identified a number of distinct and quantifiable differences between the forms

  14. Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrickson, M.A.; Manly, W.D.; Dombrowski, D.E.

    1995-08-01

    Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

  15. SEQUESTRATION OF METALS IN ACTIVE CAP MATERIALS: A LABORATORY AND NUMERICAL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.; Knox, A.

    2012-02-13

    Active capping involves the use of capping materials that react with sediment contaminants to reduce their toxicity or bioavailability. Although several amendments have been proposed for use in active capping systems, little is known about their long-term ability to sequester metals. Recent research has shown that the active amendment apatite has potential application for metals contaminated sediments. The focus of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of apatite in the sequestration of metal contaminants through the use of short-term laboratory column studies in conjunction with predictive, numerical modeling. A breakthrough column study was conducted using North Carolina apatite as the active amendment. Under saturated conditions, a spike solution containing elemental As, Cd, Co, Se, Pb, Zn, and a non-reactive tracer was injected into the column. A sand column was tested under similar conditions as a control. Effluent water samples were periodically collected from each column for chemical analysis. Relative to the non-reactive tracer, the breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite. Furthermore, breakthrough of each metal was substantially delayed by the apatite compared to the sand column. Finally, a simple 1-D, numerical model was created to qualitatively predict the long-term performance of apatite based on the findings from the column study. The results of the modeling showed that apatite could delay the breakthrough of some metals for hundreds of years under typical groundwater flow velocities.

  16. 20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, Amanda Ann

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

  17. Tanks 18 And 19-F Structural Flowable Grout Fill Material Evaluation And Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langton, C. A.; Stefanko, D. B.

    2013-04-23

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: 1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non-compressible material; 2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; 3) reduce contaminant mobility by a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and 4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: 1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). 2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. 3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix design. 4

  18. TANKS 18 AND 19-F STRUCTURAL FLOWABLE GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-11-01

    Cementitious grout will be used to close Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The functions of the grout are to: (1) physically stabilize the final landfill by filling the empty volume in the tanks with a non compressible material; (2) provide a barrier for inadvertent intrusion into the tank; (3) reduce contaminant mobility by (a) limiting the hydraulic conductivity of the closed tank and (b) reducing contact between the residual waste and infiltrating water; and (4) providing an alkaline, chemically reducing environment in the closed tank to control speciation and solubility of selected radionuclides. The objective of this work was to identify a single (all-in-one) grout to stabilize and isolate the residual radionuclides in the tank, provide structural stability of the closed tank and serve as an inadvertent intruder barrier. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, High Level Waste (HLW) Tank Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The complete task scope is provided in the Task Technical and QA Plan, SRNL-RP-2011-00587 Revision 0. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Identify new admixtures and dosages for formulating a zero bleed flowable tank fill material selected by HLW Tank Closure Project personnel based on earlier tank fill studies performed in 2007. The chemical admixtures used for adjusting the flow properties needed to be updated because the original admixture products are no longer available. Also, the sources of cement and fly ash have changed, and Portland cements currently available contain up to 5 wt. % limestone (calcium carbonate). (2) Prepare and evaluate the placement, compressive strength, and thermal properties of the selected formulation with new admixture dosages. (3) Identify opportunities for improving the mix selected by HLW Closure Project personnel and prepare and evaluate two potentially improved zero bleed flowable fill design concepts; one based on the reactor fill grout and the other based on a shrinkage compensating flowable fill mix

  19. Evaluation of Co-precipitation Processes for the Synthesis of Mixed-Oxide Fuel Feedstock Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Emory D; Voit, Stewart L; Vedder, Raymond James

    2011-06-01

    The focus of this report is the evaluation of various co-precipitation processes for use in the synthesis of mixed oxide feedstock powders for the Ceramic Fuels Technology Area within the Fuels Cycle R&D (FCR&D) Program's Advanced Fuels Campaign. The evaluation will include a comparison with standard mechanical mixing of dry powders and as well as other co-conversion methods. The end result will be the down selection of a preferred sequence of co-precipitation process for the preparation of nuclear fuel feedstock materials to be used for comparison with other feedstock preparation methods. A review of the literature was done to identify potential nitrate-to-oxide co-conversion processes which have been applied to mixtures of uranium and plutonium to achieve recycle fuel homogeneity. Recent studies have begun to study the options for co-converting all of the plutonium and neptunium recovered from used nuclear fuels, together with appropriate portions of recovered uranium to produce the desired mixed oxide recycle fuel. The addition of recycled uranium will help reduce the safeguard attractiveness level and improve proliferation resistance of the recycled fuel. The inclusion of neptunium is primarily driven by its chemical similarity to plutonium, thus enabling a simple quick path to recycle. For recycle fuel to thermal-spectrum light water reactors (LWRs), the uranium concentration can be {approx}90% (wt.), and for fast spectrum reactors, the uranium concentration can typically exceed 70% (wt.). However, some of the co-conversion/recycle fuel fabrication processes being developed utilize a two-step process to reach the desired uranium concentration. In these processes, a 50-50 'master-mix' MOX powder is produced by the co-conversion process, and the uranium concentration is adjusted to the desired level for MOX fuel recycle by powder blending (milling) the 'master-mix' with depleted uranium oxide. In general, parameters that must be controlled for co

  20. Impact of Surface Coatings on LMR-NMC Materials: Evaluation and Downselect

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  1. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal and Overcharge Abuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  2. TANKS 18 AND 19-F EQUIPMENT GROUT FILL MATERIAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.; Langton, C.

    2011-12-15

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) intends to remove Tanks 18-F and 19-F at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from service. The high-level waste (HLW) tanks have been isolated from the F-area Tank Farm (FTF) facilities and will be filled with cementitious grout for the purpose of: (1) physically stabilizing the empty volumes in the tanks, (2) limiting/eliminating vertical pathways from the surface to residual waste on the bottom of the tanks, (3) providing an intruder barrier, and (4) providing an alkaline, chemical reducing environment within the closure boundary to limit solubility of residual radionuclides. Bulk waste and heel waste removal equipment will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F when the tanks are closed. This equipment includes: mixer pumps, transfer pumps, transfer jets, equipment support masts, sampling masts and dip tube assemblies. The current Tank 18-F and 19-F closure strategy is to grout the internal void spaces in this equipment to eliminate fast vertical pathways and slow water infiltration to the residual material on the tank floor. This report documents the results of laboratory testing performed to identify a grout formulation for filling the abandoned equipment in Tanks 18-F and 19-F. The objective of this work was to formulate a flowable grout for filling internal voids of equipment that will remain in Tanks 18-F and 19-F during the final closures. This work was requested by V. A. Chander, Tank Farm Closure Engineering, in HLW-TTR-2011-008. The scope for this task is provided in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP), SRNL-RP-2011-00587. The specific objectives of this task were to: (1) Prepare and evaluate the SRR cooling coil grout identified in WSRC-STI-2008-00298 per the TTR for this work. The cooling coil grout is a mixture of BASF MasterFlow{reg_sign} 816 cable grout (67.67 wt. %), Grade 100 ground granulated blast furnace slag (7.52 wt. %) and water (24.81 wt. %); (2) Identify equipment grout placement and

  3. The 1987 Federal field exercise: The DOE experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adler, M.V.; Gant, K.S.

    1989-06-01

    The second full-scale field exercise of the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan (FRERP) was held at the Zion Nuclear Power Station, Zion, Illinois, in June 1987. The exercise incorporated the annual compliance exercise for the Zion plant and involved the operating utility, Commonwealth Edison Company, the states of Illinois and Wisconsin, local governments, volunteer groups, and representatives from 12 federal agencies. The 3-day exercise was played from many locations in the Zion area; Springfield, Illinois; Madison, Wisconsin; and Washington, DC. Approximately 1000 people participated in the exercise, which used a scenario in which an accident at the plant resulted in the release of radioactive material outside the plant boundary. The US Department of Energy (DOE) had major responsibilities during the planning, playing, and critiquing of the exercise; these functions are outlined in the report. This document describes the DOE participation in the planning and response during the exercise. During a radiological emergency, the FRERP gives DOE the responsibility for coordinating the federal radiological monitoring and assessment activities in support of the states and the cognizant federal agency. At Zion, a self-sufficient Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center was established by DOE at a nearby fairground in which over 200 people from DOE, the two states, and other federal agencies participated. Before the field exercise, a tabletop exercise and a dry run were held for training purposes. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Evaluation of MC&A Effectiveness and Its Contribution to the Safeguarding Of Nuclear Material with Assurance Assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlegel, Steven C.

    2007-07-10

    Safeguards and Security within the DOE complex has struggled with integrating MC&A and Physical Security together in a single model. Attempts were made to incorporate MC&A elements that provide detection into vulnerability assessments. While this approach has met with some success, it does not fully address the different contributions that each make to nuclear material protection. Protection measures that rely on the lack of alarms to imply all nuclear material is still present, in the correct location, and intended use are limited due to their passive nature. A highly effective system may provide confidence that all nuclear material is still present, but it does not provide assurance that it is there. MC&A, through active measures that confirm or verify the actual presence of nuclear material, provides assurance that all of the nuclear material is controlled and accounted for. This paper presents a model that combines the detection and assessment functions from vulnerability assessments with assurance activities provided by MC&A to provide an integrated model that can be used for evaluation of current systems, evaluation of system changes, and monitoring assurance in real time based upon operational activities. 1.0 OVERVIEW Material control and accounting (MC&A) and physical security provide complementary measures that can effectively protect nuclear material against the threats of theft, diversion, and sabotage. Tools have been introduced to evaluate and quantify the effectiveness of different protective measures and schemes, but the ability to fully model the contribution of MC&A to protection effectiveness has been limited. This is due, in part, by not fully recognizing that the two areas contribute differently, but not independently, to protection effectiveness. Physical protection provides detection, assessment, interruption, neutralization, and deterrence against a threat. Except for deterrence, mathematical models have been developed to quantify the

  5. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal and Overcharge Abuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  6. emergency exercise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Emergency Exercise to Focus on Aerial Radiation Detection and Measuring Systems at Nevada ... WINGS is a series of tabletop exercises... Emergency Exercise to Focus on Aerial Radiation ...

  7. Exercise Program | National Nuclear Security Administration ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    planning and training to counter both domestic and international nuclear terrorism. NNSA's Exercise Program includes the leading of exercise schedule development, exercise ...

  8. An evaluation of complementary approaches to elucidate fundamental interfacial phenomena driving adhesion of energetic materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoss, Darby J.; Knepper, Robert; Hotchkiss, Peter J.; Tappan, Alexander S.; Boudouris, Bryan W.; Beaudoin, Stephen P.

    2016-03-23

    In this study, cohesive Hamaker constants of solid materials are measured via optical and dielectric properties (i.e., Lifshitz theory), inverse gas chromatography (IGC), and contact angle measurements. To date, however, a comparison across these measurement techniques for common energetic materials has not been reported. This has been due to the inability of the community to produce samples of energetic materials that are readily compatible with contact angle measurements. Here we overcome this limitation by using physical vapor deposition to produce thin films of five common energetic materials, and the contact angle measurement approach is applied to estimate the cohesive Hamakermore » constants and surface energy components of the materials. The cohesive Hamaker constants range from 85 zJ to 135 zJ across the different films. When these Hamaker constants are compared to prior work using Lifshitz theory and nonpolar probe IGC, the relative magnitudes can be ordered as follows: contact angle > Lifshitz > IGC. Furthermore, the dispersive surface energy components estimated here are in good agreement with those estimated by IGC. Due to these results, researchers and technologists will now have access to a comprehensive database of adhesion constants which describe the behavior of these energetic materials over a range of settings.« less

  9. Rules of Engagement for Exercise Players, March 12, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Rules of engagement (ROE) provide for control of an exercise while allowing maximum free play in a tactical setting and enable evaluators to objectively monitor a participant’s performance.

  10. Benchmark Evaluation of Fuel Effect and Material Worth Measurements for a Beryllium-Reflected Space Reactor Mockup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.

    2015-02-01

    The critical configuration of the small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) in 1962-1965 have been evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The initial intent of these experiments was to support the design of the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) program, whose purpose was to study “power plants for the production of electrical power in space vehicles.” The third configuration in this series of experiments was a beryllium-reflected assembly of stainless-steel-clad, highly enriched uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel mockup of a potassium-cooled space power reactor. Reactivity measurements cadmium ratio spectral measurements and fission rate measurements were measured through the core and top reflector. Fuel effect worth measurements and neutron moderating and absorbing material worths were also measured in the assembly fuel region. The cadmium ratios, fission rate, and worth measurements were evaluated for inclusion in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. The fuel tube effect and neutron moderating and absorbing material worth measurements are the focus of this paper. Additionally, a measurement of the worth of potassium filling the core region was performed but has not yet been evaluated Pellets of 93.15 wt.% enriched uranium dioxide (UO2) were stacked in 30.48 cm tall stainless steel fuel tubes (0.3 cm tall end caps). Each fuel tube had 26 pellets with a total mass of 295.8 g UO2 per tube. 253 tubes were arranged in 1.506-cm triangular lattice. An additional 7-tube cluster critical configuration was also measured but not used for any physics measurements. The core was surrounded on all side by a beryllium reflector. The fuel effect worths were measured by removing fuel tubes at various radius. An accident scenario

  11. Multi angle laser light scattering evaluation of field exposed thermoplastic photovoltaic encapsulant materials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kempe, Michael D.; Miller, David C.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Kurtz, Sarah R.; Moseley, John M.; Nobles, Dylan L.; Stika, Katherine M.; Brun, Yefim; Samuels, Sam L.; Shah, Qurat Annie; et al

    2016-01-08

    As creep of polymeric materials is potentially a safety concern for photovoltaic modules, the potential for module creep has become a significant topic of discussion in the development of IEC 61730 and IEC 61215. To investigate the possibility of creep, modules were constructed, using several thermoplastic encapsulant materials, into thin-film mock modules and deployed in Mesa, Arizona. The materials examined included poly(ethylene)-co-vinyl acetate (EVA, including formulations both cross-linked and with no curing agent), polyethylene/polyoctene copolymer (PO), poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS), polyvinyl butyral (PVB), and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU). The absence of creep in this experiment is attributable to several factors of which themore » most notable one was the unexpected cross-linking of an EVA formulation without a cross-linking agent. It was also found that some materials experienced both chain scission and cross-linking reactions, sometimes with a significant dependence on location within a module. The TPU and EVA samples were found to degrade with cross-linking reactions dominating over chain scission. In contrast, the PO materials degraded with chain scission dominating over cross-linking reactions. Furthermore, we found no significant indications that viscous creep is likely to occur in fielded modules capable of passing the qualification tests, we note that one should consider how a polymer degrades, chain scission or cross-linking, in assessing the suitability of a thermoplastic polymer in terrestrial photovoltaic applications.« less

  12. A cost-effective approach to evaluate insulative materials for low heat flux applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneer, M.J.; Koo, J.H.; Miller, M.J.; Schneider, M.E. )

    1993-01-01

    Insulative materials are used as thermal barriers to protect a substrate (e.g., wood, metal, or ordnance) from heat sources (e.g., fires or aerodynamic heating). Insulative coatings can be either inert, ablative, intumescent, or a combination of these three. This paper describes a cost-effective approach that we have developed to screen candidate materials for an application before proceeding with expensive qualification testings. Both radiant heat and hydrocarbon flame environments were used and compared. Several applications are discussed in this paper with emphasis on fast cookoff simulations. Eight insulative materials were tested and compared. Mass loss, maximum expansion, backface temperature, thermal margin, and surface and subsurface analyses were performed. 8 refs.

  13. Method and apparatus for millimeter-wave detection of thermal waves for materials evaluation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for generating thermal waves in a sample and for measuring thermal inhomogeneities at subsurface levels using millimeter-wave radiometry. An intensity modulated heating source is oriented toward a narrow spot on the surface of a material sample and thermal radiation in a narrow volume of material around the spot is monitored using a millimeter-wave radiometer; the radiometer scans the sample point-by-point and a computer stores and displays in-phase and quadrature phase components of thermal radiations for each point on the scan. Alternatively, an intensity modulated heating source is oriented toward a relatively large surface area in a material sample and variations in thermal radiation within the full field of an antenna array are obtained using an aperture synthesis radiometer technique.

  14. Evaluation of Corrosion of Aluminum Based Reactor Fuel Cladding Materials During Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1999-10-21

    This report provides an evaluation of the corrosion behavior of aluminum cladding alloys and aluminum-uranium alloys at conditions relevant to dry storage. The details of the corrosion program are described and the results to date are discussed.

  15. Analytical evaluation of thermal conductance and heat capacities of one-dimensional material systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saygi, Salih

    2014-02-15

    We theoretically predict some thermal properties versus temperature dependence of one dimensional (1D) material nanowire systems. A known method is used to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. Predicted formulas are expressed in terms of Bloch-Grneisen functions and Debye functions. Computing results has proved that the expressions are in excellent agreement with the results reported in the literature even if it is in very low dimension limits of nanowire systems. Therefore the calculation method is a fully predictive approach to calculate thermal conductivity and heat capacities of nanowire material systems.

  16. Analysis of the Argonne distance tabletop exercise method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanzman, E. A.; Nieves, L. A.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2008-02-14

    The purpose of this report is to summarize and evaluate the Argonne Distance Tabletop Exercise (DISTEX) method. DISTEX is intended to facilitate multi-organization, multi-objective tabletop emergency response exercises that permit players to participate from their own facility's incident command center. This report is based on experience during its first use during the FluNami 2007 exercise, which took place from September 19-October 17, 2007. FluNami 2007 exercised the response of local public health officials and hospitals to a hypothetical pandemic flu outbreak. The underlying purpose of the DISTEX method is to make tabletop exercising more effective and more convenient for playing organizations. It combines elements of traditional tabletop exercising, such as scenario discussions and scenario injects, with distance learning technologies. This distance-learning approach also allows playing organizations to include a broader range of staff in the exercise. An average of 81.25 persons participated in each weekly webcast session from all playing organizations combined. The DISTEX method required development of several components. The exercise objectives were based on the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Target Capabilities List. The ten playing organizations included four public health departments and six hospitals in the Chicago area. An extent-of-play agreement identified the objectives applicable to each organization. A scenario was developed to drive the exercise over its five-week life. Weekly problem-solving task sets were designed to address objectives that could not be addressed fully during webcast sessions, as well as to involve additional playing organization staff. Injects were developed to drive play between webcast sessions, and, in some cases, featured mock media stories based in part on player actions as identified from the problem-solving tasks. The weekly 90-minute webcast sessions were discussions among the playing organizations that were

  17. Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

    2003-01-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be

  18. Hands-On Exercises

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC » Hands-On Exercises Hands-On Exercises The following commands are to be run from a Linux, UNIX, BSD, or Mac OSX command prompt. You can do the same functions from a GUI or third-party application, but the procedure will be application-dependent. mymachine% - commands typed at your local machine prompt hopper% - commands to be typed at the hopper command prompt Connecting to NERSC SSH to hopper.nersc.gov mymachine% ssh -l <username> -Y -A hopper.nersc.gov Look around on Hopper

  19. Hands-On Exercises

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC » Hands-On Exercises Hands-On Exercises The following commands are to be run from a Linux, UNIX, BSD, or Mac OSX command prompt. You can do the same functions from a GUI or third-party application, but the procedure will be application-dependent. mymachine% - commands typed at your local machine prompt hopper% - commands to be typed at the hopper command prompt Connecting to NERSC SSH to hopper.nersc.gov mymachine% ssh -l <username> -Y -A hopper.nersc.gov Look around on Hopper

  20. Hands-On Exercises

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC » Hands-On Exercises Hands-On Exercises The following commands are to be run from a Linux, UNIX, BSD, or Mac OSX command prompt. You can do the same functions from a GUI or third-party application, but the procedure will be application-dependent. mymachine% - commands typed at your local machine prompt hopper% - commands to be typed at the hopper command prompt Connecting to NERSC SSH to hopper.nersc.gov mymachine% ssh -l <username> -Y -A hopper.nersc.gov Look around on Hopper

  1. Evaluation of ultra-low background materials for uranium and thorium using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, E. W.; Overman, N. R.; LaFerriere, B. D.

    2013-08-08

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. This paper discusses how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  2. Evaluation of Ultra-Low Background Materials for Uranium and Thorium Using ICP-MS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Overman, Nicole R.; LaFerriere, Brian D.

    2013-08-08

    An increasing number of physics experiments require low background materials for their construction. The presence of Uranium and Thorium and their progeny in these materials present a variety of unwanted background sources for these experiments. The sensitivity of the experiments continues to drive the necessary levels of detection ever lower as well. This requirement for greater sensitivity has rendered direct radioassay impractical in many cases requiring large quantities of material, frequently many kilograms, and prolonged counting times, often months. Other assay techniques have been employed such as Neutron Activation Analysis but this requires access to expensive facilities and instrumentation and can be further complicated and delayed by the formation of unwanted radionuclides. Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) is a useful tool and recent advancements have increased the sensitivity particularly in the elemental high mass range of U and Th. Unlike direct radioassay, ICP-MS is a destructive technique since it requires the sample to be in liquid form which is aspirated into a high temperature plasma. But it benefits in that it usually requires a very small sample, typically about a gram. Here we will discuss how a variety of low background materials such as copper, polymers, and fused silica are made amenable to ICP-MS assay and how the arduous task of maintaining low backgrounds of U and Th is achieved.

  3. exercise | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    exercise NNSA to Participate in Aerial Radiation Training Exercise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (WASHINGTON, D.C.) - On March 21 through March 24, the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) will participate in a federal and state/local training exercise in Philadelphia that will also include the Philadelphia Police Department and the Departments of Defense,... Gamma Shield Thunder Exercise Concludes National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the FBI

  4. Method for the thermal characterization, visualization, and integrity evaluation of conducting material samples or complex structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure (herein called a system) as at least two regions which comprise an electrical network of resistances, for measuring electric resistance between at least two selected pairs of external leads attached to the surface of the system, wherein at least one external lead is attached to the surface of each of the regions, and, using basic circuit theory, for translating measured resistances into temperatures or thermophysical properties in corresponding regions of the system.

  5. Performance evaluation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) as a booster material for insensitive high explosives using the onionskin test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S; Francois, Elizabeth G; Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Harry, Herbert H

    2010-11-09

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in DAAF for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemisphericallHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  6. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Oakland Harbor intensive study, IC-1 and OC4-B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Mayhew, H.L.; Karle, L.M.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-11-01

    Oakland Harbor is located on the eastern shoreline of central San Francisco Bay in Alameda County, between the cities of Oakland and Alameda, California. Oakland Harbor and its access channels are no longer wide or deep enough to accommodate modern deeper-draft vessels. The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District to deepen and widen the navigation channels to {minus}44 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) ({minus}42 ft MLLW plus 2 ft of overdraft) in Oakland Harbor. Several options for disposal of the material from this dredging project are under consideration by USACE. Those options include disposal within San Francisco Bay, at open-ocean sites, or at upland disposal sites. Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, specifies that all proposed disposal of dredged material into open water be evaluated to determine the potential environmental impacts to those activities. To comply with those requirements, the potential environmental impacts of the dredged material must be evaluated by chemical characterization, toxicity testing, and bioaccumulation testing prior to dredging and disposal. Test results are described.

  7. Method for the thermal characterization, visualization, and integrity evaluation of conducting material samples or complex structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1992-11-24

    Disclosed is a method for modeling a conducting material sample or structure (herein called a system) as at least two regions which comprise an electrical network of resistances, for measuring electric resistance between at least two selected pairs of external leads attached to the surface of the system, wherein at least one external lead is attached to the surface of each of the regions, and, using basic circuit theory, for translating measured resistances into temperatures or thermophysical properties in corresponding regions of the system. 16 figs.

  8. Technical evaluation of topsoil substitution practices and handling of potential acid/toxic-forming materials in Texas. Special study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Texas State program approved by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) allows that selected overburden materials may, if justified, be substituted for topsoil in mined land reclamation. The report presents the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement's (OSM's) findings regarding the practice of topsoil substitution under the approved Texas program and related reclamation problems with potential minesoil acidification. The purpose of the study was not to determine whether the substitution of overburden for topsoil should be approved or disapproved on any specific mine or soil series in Texas. The report presents a summary of pertinent technical considerations that need to be addressed in permit approvals for surface coal mines which (1) may encounter potentially acid/toxic-forming materials during mining or (2) intend to substitute overburden for topsoil as a plant growth material. The report summarizes the results of a special study OSM conducted to evaluate the technical basis and justification for reclamation plans and the substitution of overburden for topsoil as a plant growth material suitable for the reclamation of coal mines.

  9. High speed optical and X-ray methods for evaluating laser-generated shock-wave in materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisley, D.; Swift, D.

    2000-11-01

    Optical diagnostic techniques including interferometry, electronic streak photography, and transient x-ray diffraction are used to study the dynamic material response to shock loading by direct laser irradiation and impact by laser-launched plates. The Los Alamos Trident laser is one of several lasers that have been used to generate shocks of 10 Kbar to several Mbar in single crystal and polycrystalline materials. Incorporating optical velocity interferometry (line-VISAR and point-VISAR) with transient x-ray diffraction can provide a complete understanding of the dynamic material response to shock compression and release. Laser-launched flyer plates provide an ideal method to generate one-dimensional shocks in materials. The quality of the one-dimensionality of the launch and acceleration of plates is evaluated by line-imaging VISA.R. The line-imaging VISAR images the fringes along a line across the diameter of the plate. Each fringe maxima and minima provide acceleration and velocity information at the specific point on the plate. By varying the fringe constant number of fringes and fringe spacing on the plate, detailed experimental data can be obtained. For our experiments, most plates are 3-mm diameter and accelerated to 0.2-->6 km/sec.

  10. Evaluation of residual shale oils as feedstocks for valuable carbon materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fei, You Qing; Derbyshire, F. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Oil shale represents one of the largest fossil fuel resources in the US and in other pans of the world. Beginning in the 1970s until recently, there was considerable research and development activity directed primarily to technologies for the production of transportation fuels from oil shale. Due to the low cost of petroleum, as with other alternate fuel strategies, oil shale processing is not economically viable at present. However, future scenarios can be envisaged in which non-petroleum resources may be expected to contribute to the demand for hydrocarbon fuels and chemicals, with the expectation that process technologies can be rendered economically attractive. There is potential to improve the economics of oil shale utilization through broadening the spectrum of products that can be derived from this resource, and producing added-value materials that are either unavailable or more difficult to produce from other sources. This concept is by no means original. The history of oil shale development shows that most attempts to commercialize oil shale technology have relied upon the marketing of by-products. Results are presented on carbonization and the potential for generating a pitch that could serve as a precursur material.

  11. Ecological evaluation of proposed dredged material from Winyah Bay, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, J.A.; Gardiner, W.W.; Pinza, M.R.; Word, J.Q.

    1993-10-01

    The navigational channels of Winyah Bay, Georgetown Harbor, South Carolina require dredging to enable normal shipping traffic to use these areas. Before dredging, environmental assessments must be conducted to determine the suitability of this dredged sediment for unconfined, open-water disposal. The Charleston, South Carolina District Office of the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) requested that the Battelle/Marine Science Laboratory (MSL) collect sediment samples and conduct the required physical/chemical, toxicological, and bioaccumulation evaluations as required in the 1991 Implementation Manual. This report is intended to provide information required to address potential ecological effects of the Entrance Channel and Inner Harbor sediments proposed disposal in the ocean.

  12. Practical Thermal Evaluation Methods For HAC Fire Analysis In Type B Radiaoactive Material (RAM) Packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramczyk, Glenn; Hensel, Stephen J; Gupta, Narendra K.

    2013-03-28

    Title 10 of the United States Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (10 CFR Part 71.73) requires that Type B radioactive material (RAM) packages satisfy certain Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) thermal design requirements to ensure package safety during accidental fire conditions. Compliance with thermal design requirements can be met by prototype tests, analyses only or a combination of tests and analyses. Normally, it is impractical to meet all the HAC using tests only and the analytical methods are too complex due to the multi-physics non-linear nature of the fire event. Therefore, a combination of tests and thermal analyses methods using commercial heat transfer software are used to meet the necessary design requirements. The authors, along with his other colleagues at Savannah River National Laboratory in Aiken, SC, USA, have successfully used this 'tests and analyses' approach in the design and certification of several United States' DOE/NNSA certified packages, e.g. 9975, 9977, 9978, 9979, H1700, and Bulk Tritium Shipping Package (BTSP). This paper will describe these methods and it is hoped that the RAM Type B package designers and analysts can use them for their applications.

  13. Evaluation of Aluminum-Boron Carbide Neutron Absorbing Materials for Interim Storage of Used Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Lumin; Wierschke, Jonathan Brett

    2015-04-08

    The objective of this work was to understand the corrosion behavior of Boral® and Bortec® neutron absorbers over long-term deployment in a used nuclear fuel dry cask storage environment. Corrosion effects were accelerated by flowing humidified argon through an autoclave at temperatures up to 570°C. Test results show little corrosion of the aluminum matrix but that boron is leaching out of the samples. Initial tests performed at 400 and 570°C were hampered by reduced flow caused by the rapid build-up of solid deposits in the outlet lines. Analysis of the deposits by XRD shows that the deposits are comprised of boron trioxide and sassolite (H3BO3). The collection of boron- containing compounds in the outlet lines indicated that boron was being released from the samples. Observation of the exposed samples using SEM and optical microscopy show the growth of new phases in the samples. These phases were most prominent in Bortec® samples exposed at 570°C. Samples of Boral® exposed at 570°C showed minimal new phase formation but showed nearly the complete loss of boron carbide particles. Boron carbide loss was also significant in Boral samples at 400°C. However, at 400°C phases similar to those found in Bortec® were observed. The rapid loss of the boron carbide particles in the Boral® is suspected to inhibit the formation of the new secondary phases. However, Material samples in an actual dry cask environment would be exposed to temperatures closer to 300°C and less water than the lowest test. The results from this study conclude that at the temperature and humidity levels present in a dry cask environment, corrosion and boron leaching will have no effect on the performance of Boral® and Bortec® to maintain criticality control.

  14. Chemical hazard evaluation of material disposal area (MDA) B closure project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laul, Jagdish C

    2010-04-19

    TA-21, MDA-B (NES) is the 'contaminated dump,' landfill with radionuclides and chemicals from process waste disposed in 1940s. This paper focuses on chemical hazard categorization and hazard evaluation of chemicals of concern (e.g., peroxide, beryllium). About 170 chemicals were disposed in the landfill. Chemicals included products, unused and residual chemicals, spent, waste chemicals, non-flammable oils, mineral oil, etc. MDA-B was considered a High hazard site. However, based on historical records and best engineering judgment, the chemical contents are probably at best 5% of the chemical inventory. Many chemicals probably have oxidized, degraded or evaporated for volatile elements due to some fire and limited shelf-life over 60 yrs, which made it possible to downgrade from High to Low chemical hazard site. Knowing the site history and physical and chemical properties are very important in characterizing a NES site. Public site boundary is only 20 m, which is a major concern. Chemicals of concern during remediation are peroxide that can cause potential explosion and beryllium exposure due to chronic beryllium disease (CBD). These can be prevented or mitigated using engineering control (EC) and safety management program (SMP) to protect the involved workers and public.

  15. Materials Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Videos Materials

  16. Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Daniel E; Morris, John S; Hill, Larry G; Francois, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

  17. Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savings Portfolio (122013) Energy Smart Grocer Impact Evaluation (102013) Energy Smart Industrial - Energy Management Pilot Impact Evaluation (22013) Clark PUD Home...

  18. ORISE: National Security and Emergency Preparedness Exercises...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE supports BOR's exercise program by providing operational assistance and expertise for five national-critical exercise facilities, including Hoover Dam and Shasta Dam. ...

  19. International Exercises | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    International Exercises First responders test plans and procedures during a radiation ... Exercises provide a valuable test of emergency management systems that yields results and ...

  20. Sample Proficiency Test exercise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

    2006-02-05

    The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

  1. Evaluation of plastic materials for range shifting, range compensation, and solid-phantom dosimetry in carbon-ion radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Koba, Yusuke; Ogata, Risa

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Beam range control is the essence of radiotherapy with heavy charged particles. In conventional broad-beam delivery, fine range adjustment is achieved by insertion of range shifting and compensating materials. In dosimetry, solid phantoms are often used for convenience. These materials should ideally be equivalent to water. In this study, the authors evaluated dosimetric water equivalence of four common plastics, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), polyethylene terephthalate (PET), and polyoxymethylene (POM). Methods: Using the Bethe formula for energy loss, the Gottschalk formula for multiple scattering, and the Sihver formula for nuclear interactions, the authors calculated the effective densities of the plastics for these interactions. The authors experimentally measured variation of the Bragg peak of carbon-ion beams by insertion of HDPE, PMMA, and POM, which were compared with analytical model calculations. Results: The theoretical calculation resulted in slightly reduced multiple scattering and severely increased nuclear interactions for HDPE, compared to water and the other plastics. The increase in attenuation of carbon ions for 20-cm range shift was experimentally measured to be 8.9% for HDPE, 2.5% for PMMA, and 0.0% for POM while PET was theoretically estimated to be in between PMMA and POM. The agreement between the measurements and the calculations was about 1% or better. Conclusions: For carbon-ion beams, POM was dosimetrically indistinguishable from water and the best of the plastics examined in this study. The poorest was HDPE, which would reduce the Bragg peak by 0.45% per cm range shift, although with marginal superiority for reduced multiple scattering. Between the two clear plastics, PET would be superior to PMMA in dosimetric water equivalence.

  2. Guidance for Planning Exercises

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This guidebook and accompanying support materials presented in this manual was developed to assist local, state, tribal and federal agencies in conducting emergency preparedness tabletops, drills...

  3. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed removal of contaminated materials at the Elza Gate site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has been prepared in support of the proposed removal action for cleanup of radioactive and chemically contaminated soil at the Elza Gate site in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. This property became contaminated as a result of storage of ore residues, equipment, and other materials for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The US Department of Energy is responsible for cleanup of portions of the site under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. In December 1990 an area known as Pad 1 was abrasively scoured to remove surface contamination, and in March 1991 removal of Pad 1 contamination was begun under a separate EE/CA. This EE/CA is intended to cover the remaining portions of the site for which the Department of Energy has responsibility. It has been determined that an EE/CA report is appropriate documentation for the proposed removal action. This EE/CA covers removal of contaminated soils and contaminated concrete rubble from the Elza Gate site. The primary objectives of this EE/CA report are to identify and describe the preferred removal action, and to document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential for release of contaminants from the property into the environment and that will minimize the associated threats to human health or welfare and the environment. The preferred alternative is disposition on the Oak Ridge Reservation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 12 tabs.

  4. international exercises | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    exercises International Exercises NNSA provides assistance in developing and conducting emergency drills and exercises. Exercises provide a valuable test of emergency management systems that yields results and "lessons learned" necessary for continued improvements to emergency preparedness and response programs. Results

  5. exercise program | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    exercise program DOE/NNSA Participates in Large-Scale CTBT On-Site Inspection Exercise in Jordan Experts from U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories, including Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, are participating in the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT) Integrated... Exercise Program NNSA's Exercise Program includes the leading of exercise schedule development,

  6. Evaluation of wear rates and mechanisms of titanium diboride-graphite composite materials proposed for use as cathodes in Hall-Heroult cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Brimhall, J.L.; Raney, P.J.; Hart, P.E.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose of this study was to measure the initial wear rates of TiB/sub 2/ carbon-containing cathode materials (TiB/sub 2/-G) under electrolytic conditions. Parameters evaluated included bath ratio, current density, and aluminum pad thickness. In order to measure initial wear rates, the tests were limited to 8 h.

  7. Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives PDF icon Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise ...

  8. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of BZO layers on CIGS

  9. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  10. Guideline for Evaluating Analytical Chemistry Capabilities and Recommending Upgraded Methods and Instrumentation for Nuclear Material Control and Accountability at Russian Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russ, G.P.

    1999-10-21

    Analytical chemistry plays a key role in nuclear material control and accounting (MC and A). A large part of Special Nuclear Material (SNM) inventories and virtually all of the highly attractive SNM inventories are based on sampling bulk materials followed by destructive assay (DA) of these materials. These measurements support MC and A in process control, physical inventory verification, evaluation of the effects of process changes, detecting and resolving shipper-receiver differences, and the resolution of inspector-facility differences. When evaluating these important functions, US Project Teams need to carefully assess the existing Russian analytical chemistry capabilities and to specify appropriate upgrades where needed. This evaluation and the specification of upgrades have proven difficult, in part, because of the highly specialized and technical nature of DA and because of the wide variety of methods and applications. In addition, providing a DA capability to a Russian analytical laboratory requires much more than simply supplying new instrumentation. Experience has shown that DA upgrades at Russian analytical facilities require more support equipment than was originally anticipated by US Teams. The purpose of this guidance document is to: (1) recommend criteria for US Projects Teams to use in their evaluation of Russian DA capabilities; (2) provide a basis for selection of appropriate upgrades where capabilities are inadequate to support MC and A goals; and (3) to provide a list of Da methods suitable for MC and A with the following information: performance and applications information, strengths and limitations, and references and information on cost. Criteria for evaluating existing capabilities and determining appropriate upgrades are difficult to define. However, this is the basic information needed by the US project Teams. Section IV addresses these criteria.

  11. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary PDF icon ...

  12. Post-test evaluation of the oxygen electrode from a solid oxide electrolysis stack and electrode materials development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mawdsley, J. R.; Carter, J. D.; Yildiz, B.; Call, A. V.; Kropf, A. J.; Ferrandon, M. S.; Myers, D. J.; Maroni, V. A.

    2009-05-01

    The conclusions of this paper are: (1) stack degradation analysis - significant sources of degradation have been identified, (a) oxygen electrode delamination off the electrolyte and (b) chromium contamination of the oxygen electrode and bond layer; (2) electrode materials development - improved electrode materials have been demonstrated, Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} oxygen electrodes show state-of-the-art performance without optimization of fabrication parameters.

  13. Leaching tests as a tool in waste management to evaluate the potential for utilization of waste materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloot, H.A. van der; Kosson, D.S.

    1995-12-01

    Several waste materials from large scale industrial processes possess technical properties that would allow their use in certain construction applications, e.g. coal fly ash, slags from large scale industrial melting and ore processing, and incinerator residues. The disposal of such materials requires space and controlled landfills to minimize long term environmental risks. The beneficial use of such bulk materials is an attractive alternative, if it can be shown that such applications are environmentally acceptable. For this management of wastes and the decision to either dispose or use, information on the environmental properties of materials is needed. Leaching tests have been developed to assess such properties. These have been designed typically in relation to regulatory tools, not as instruments to guide the management of wastes and the possibilities to improve material properties. New methods have been designed to address this aspect, in which maximum benefit can be derived from knowledge of the systematic behaviour of materials and the already existing knowledge in other countries producing similar residues. After initial detailed characterization, concise procedures can be used for control purposes focused on the typical aspects of a certain residue stream. Examples of existing knowledge in this field will be presented.

  14. The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Finck; Bevin Brush; Dick Jansen; David Chamberlain; Don Dry; George Brooks; Margaret Goldberg

    2012-03-01

    The development of radioactive sample surrogates for training and exercises Source term information is required for to reconstruct a device used in a dispersed radiological dispersal device. Simulating a radioactive environment to train and exercise sampling and sample characterization methods with suitable sample materials is a continued challenge. The Idaho National Laboratory has developed and permitted a Radioactive Response Training Range (RRTR), an 800 acre test range that is approved for open air dispersal of activated KBr, for training first responders in the entry and exit from radioactively contaminated areas, and testing protocols for environmental sampling and field characterization. Members from the Department of Defense, Law Enforcement, and the Department of Energy participated in the first contamination exercise that was conducted at the RRTR in the July 2011. The range was contaminated using a short lived radioactive Br-82 isotope (activated KBr). Soil samples contaminated with KBr (dispersed as a solution) and glass particles containing activated potassium bromide that emulated dispersed radioactive materials (such as ceramic-based sealed source materials) were collected to assess environmental sampling and characterization techniques. This presentation summarizes the performance of a radioactive materials surrogate for use as a training aide for nuclear forensics.

  15. Marine One Landing Exercise at Argonne

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-20

    Marine One and its support helicopters conduct a landing exercise at Argonne prior to the President's visit.

  16. Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and infrastructure R&D through its FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program to help the United States reduce its dependence on imported petroleum and to pave the way to a future transportation network based on hydrogen. Natural gas vehicles can also reduce emissions of regulated pollutants compared with vehicles powered by conventional fuels such as gasoline and diesel. The goal of this project was to evaluate the safety implications of refueling natural gas vehicles at home with a home

  17. Composite structures 4; Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference, Paisley College of Technology, Scotland, July 27-29, 1987. Volume 2 - Damage assessment and material evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    The present collection of papers on damage assessment and material evaluation of composite structures discusses recent advancements in the dynamics of composite structures, the crush performance of composite structures, strengthening mechanisms in discontinuous SiC/Al composites, considerations for designing with metal matrix composite materials, a causal approach to the effective dynamic moduli of random composites, and failure modes for compression-loaded angle-ply plates with holes. Also discussed are the fabrication and mechanical properties of hybrid composites with braiding construction, the reprocessing of carbon fiber/PEEK laminates, rate effects on delamination fracture toughness of graphite/epoxy composites, the shear modulus testing of composites, composite materials for bone-fracture fixation, and the thermomechanical properties of three-dimensional fiber composites.

  18. Using Social Media in Exercises

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donaldson, Jeff

    2014-04-28

    This presentation discusses the use of social media as a tool during the full-scale exercise Tremor-14 in Las Vegas, and examines Lessons Learned as a path forward in using social media to disseminate Emergency Public Information (EPI) on a regular basis.

  19. Preliminary evaluation of the use of the greater confinement disposal concept for the disposal of Fernald 11e(2) byproduct material at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R.; Brown, T.J.; Stockman, H.W.; Gallegos, D.P.; Conrad, S.H.; Price, L.L. |

    1997-09-01

    This report documents a preliminary evaluation of the ability of the greater confinement disposal boreholes at the Nevada Test Site to provide long-term isolation of radionuclides from the disposal of vitrified byproduct material. The byproduct material is essentially concentrated residue from processing uranium ore that contains a complex mixture of radionuclides, many of which are long-lived and present in concentrations greater than 100,000 picoCuries per gram. This material has been stored in three silos at the fernald Environmental Management Project since the early 1950s and will be vitrified into 6,000 yd{sup 3} (4,580 m{sup 3}) of glass gems prior to disposal. This report documents Sandia National Laboratories` preliminary evaluation for disposal of the byproduct material and includes: the selection of quantitative performance objectives; a conceptual model of the disposal system and the waste; results of the modeling; identified issues, and activities necessary to complete a full performance assessment.

  20. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F. )

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  1. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 3 B of -42-foot project). Volume 1, Analyses and discussion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, N.P.; Ward, J.A.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Barrows, E.S.; Goodwin, S.M.; Lefkovitz, L.F.

    1992-06-01

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-662) authorized the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) San Francisco District, to deepen and widen the navigational channels of the Oakland Inner and Outer Harbors to accomodate deeper-draft vessels. The USACE is considering several disposal options for the dredged material removed during these channel improvements including open-water disposal. Dredged material proposed for open-water disposal must be evaluated to determine the potential impacts of the disposal activity on the water column and disposal site enviromments. The USACE requested that Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) conduct studies to evaluate open-water disposal options for Oakland Harbor sediments. This request developed into the Oakland Harbor Phase III Program. This is Volume 1 of a two-volume report that presents information gathered to determine the suitability of ocean disposal of sediments dredged from Oakland Harbor. This volume contains project background, materials and methods, results, discussion, and conclusions.

  2. Evaluation and comparison of SuperLig{reg_sign} 644, resorcinol-formaldehyde and CS-100 ion exchange materials for the removal of cesium from simulated alkaline supernate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.N.; Bray, L.A.; Eloviche, R.J.; Bruening, R.L.; Decker, R.M.; Kafka, T.M.; White, L.R.

    1995-03-01

    PNL evaluated three polymeric materials for Cs removal efficiency from a simulated Hanford Neutralized Current Acid Waste (NCAW) supernatant liquid using 200 mL ion exchange columns. Cs loadings (mmole Cs/g resin) were 0.20, 0.18, and 0.039 for Super Lig 644, R-F, and CS-100 (0.045, 0.070, 0.011 mmole Cs/mL resin). Elution of each resin material with 0.5 M HNO{sub 3} required 3.5, 7.0, and 3.2 cv to reach 0.1 C/C{sub 0} for the respective materials, resulting in volume compressions of 27, 20, and 6.9. Peak Cs concentrations during elution was 185, 38.5, and 27.8 C/C{sub 0}. SuperLig 644 had the highest Cs loading per gram in NCAW and the greatest volume compression on aci elution. Because of high density and poor elution, R-F had the highest Cs loading per unit volume and lower volume compression. CS-100, the baseline material for Cs removal at Hanford, was inferior to both SuperLig 644 and R-F in terms of Cs loading and selectivity over sodium.

  3. Microstructural Characterization of Burnable Absorber Materials Being Evaluated for Application in LEU U-Mo Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. F. Jue; B. Miller; B. Yao; E. Perez; Y. H. Sohn

    2011-03-01

    The starting microstructure of a fuel plate will impact how it performs during irradiation. As a result, microstructural characterization has been performed on as-fabricated monolithic fuel plates to determine the changes in fuel plate microstructure that may result from changes in fabrication parameters. Particular focus has been given to the fuel plate U-10Mo/Zr and Zr/AA6061 cladding interfaces, since the integrity of these interfaces will play a big role in determining the overall performance of the fuel plate during irradiation. In addition, burnable absorber materials for potential incorporation into monolithic fuel plates have been characterized to identify their as-fabricated microstructures. This information will be important when trying to understand the PIE data from fuel plates with burnable absorbers that are irradiated in future irradiation experiments. This paper will focus on the microstructures observed using optical metallography, X-ray diffraction, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy for monolithic fuel plates exposed to different fabrication parameters and for as-fabricated burnable absorber materials.

  4. Development, characterization and evaluation of materials for open-cycle MHD. Quarterly report for the period ending December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.

    1982-01-01

    The development and fabrication is continuing on a graded composite electrode with a refractory HfO/sub 2/-Re/sub x/O/sub y/ surface and a HfO/sub 2/-RE/sub x/O/sub y/-In/sub 2/O/sub 3/ current leadout for testing. The electrical conductivity of some oxide current leadouts were measured, and some general conclusions made regarding effects of composition. Also measured was the electrical conductivity of some yttrium chromites doped with Mg and Ca. The characterization and evaluation of Pt-coated Cu anodes tested in AVCO's Mark VI generator using K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ as seed was completed. Potential mechanisms for enhanced corrosion of Cu and Pt in sulfate seed are discussed. The characterization of slag removed from MSU No. 1 heat exchanger core was completed. Possible reasons for enhanced slag blocking of RFG core are considered.

  5. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    43 - 51 Procedia Engineering www.elsevier.comlocateprocedia The 13 th Hypervelocity Impact Symposium FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations Mark Boslougha, Barbara ...

  6. ORISE: Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Training and Analysis Tool Training Tool Improves Information Sharing Between CSEPP and its Response Partners In 2006,...

  7. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - Making A Difference DOE Efforts in Preparing and Improving First Response Capabilities and Performance through Drills and Exercises Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program...

  8. ALPHA SPECTROMETRIC EVALUATION OF SRM-995 AS A POTENTIAL URANIUM/THORIUM DOUBLE TRACER SYSTEM FOR AGE-DATING URANIUM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beals, D.

    2011-12-06

    Uranium-233 (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 1.59E5 years) is an artificial, fissile isotope of uranium that has significant importance in nuclear forensics. The isotope provides a unique signature in determining the origin and provenance of uranium-bearing materials and is valuable as a mass spectrometric tracer. Alpha spectrometry was employed in the critical evaluation of a {sup 233}U standard reference material (SRM-995) as a dual tracer system based on the in-growth of {sup 229}Th (t{sub 1/2} {approx} 7.34E3 years) for {approx}35 years following radiochemical purification. Preliminary investigations focused on the isotopic analysis of standards and unmodified fractions of SRM-995; all samples were separated and purified using a multi-column anion-exchange scheme. The {sup 229}Th/{sup 233}U atom ratio for SRM-995 was found to be 1.598E-4 ({+-} 4.50%) using recovery-corrected radiochemical methods. Using the Bateman equations and relevant half-lives, this ratio reflects a material that was purified {approx} 36.8 years prior to this analysis. The calculated age is discussed in contrast with both the date of certification and the recorded date of last purification.

  9. PAVAN: an atmospheric-dispersion program for evaluating design-basis accidental releases of radioactive materials from nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bander, T.J.

    1982-11-01

    This report provides a user's guide for the NRC computer program, PAVAN, which is a program used by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to estimate downwind ground-level air concentrations for potential accidental releases of radioactive material from nuclear facilities. Such an assessment is required by 10 CFR Part 100 and 10 CFR Part 50. The program implements the guidance provided in Regulatory Guide 1.145, Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants. Using joint frequency distributions of wind direction and wind speed by atmospheric stability, the program provides relative air concentration (X/Q) values as functions of direction for various time periods at the exclusion area boundary (EAB) and the outer boundary of the low population zone (LPZ). Calculations of X/Q values can be made for assumed ground-level releases (e.g., through building penetrations and vents) or elevated releases from free-standing stacks. Various options may be selected by the user. They can account for variation in the location of release points, additional plume dispersion due to building wakes, plume meander under low wind speed conditions, and adjustments to consider non-straight trajectories. It computes an effective plume height using the physical release height which can be reduced by inputted terrain features. It cannot handle multiple emission sources. A description of the main program and all subroutines is provided. Also included as appendices are a complete listing of the program and two test cases with the required data inputs and the resulting program outputs.

  10. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  11. WAXS fat subtraction model to estimate differential linear scattering coefficients of fatless breast tissue: Phantom materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Robert Y.; Laamanen, Curtis McDonald, Nancy; LeClair, Robert J.

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: Develop a method to subtract fat tissue contributions to wide-angle x-ray scatter (WAXS) signals of breast biopsies in order to estimate the differential linear scattering coefficients ?{sub s} of fatless tissue. Cancerous and fibroglandular tissue can then be compared independent of fat content. In this work phantom materials with known compositions were used to test the efficacy of the WAXS subtraction model. Methods: Each sample 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm thick was interrogated by a 50 kV 2.7 mm diameter beam for 3 min. A 25 mm{sup 2} by 1 mm thick CdTe detector allowed measurements of a portion of the ? = 6 scattered field. A scatter technique provided means to estimate the incident spectrum N{sub 0}(E) needed in the calculations of ?{sub s}[x(E, ?)] where x is the momentum transfer argument. Values of ?{sup }{sub s} for composite phantoms consisting of three plastic layers were estimated and compared to the values obtained via the sum ?{sup }{sub s}{sup ?}(x)=?{sub 1}?{sub s1}(x)+?{sub 2}?{sub s2}(x)+?{sub 3}?{sub s3}(x), where ?{sub i} is the fractional volume of the ith plastic component. Water, polystyrene, and a volume mixture of 0.6 water + 0.4 polystyrene labelled as fibphan were chosen to mimic cancer, fat, and fibroglandular tissue, respectively. A WAXS subtraction model was used to remove the polystyrene signal from tissue composite phantoms so that the ?{sub s} of water and fibphan could be estimated. Although the composite samples were layered, simulations were performed to test the models under nonlayered conditions. Results: The well known ?{sub s} signal of water was reproduced effectively between 0.5 < x < 1.6 nm{sup ?1}. The ?{sup }{sub s} obtained for the heterogeneous samples agreed with ?{sup }{sub s}{sup ?}. Polystyrene signals were subtracted successfully from composite phantoms. The simulations validated the usefulness of the WAXS models for nonlayered biopsies. Conclusions: The methodology to measure ?{sub s} of homogeneous

  12. Some considerations in the evaluation of concrete as a structural material for alternative LLW (low-level radioactive waste) disposal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Siskind, B.; Bowerman, B.S.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop information needed to evaluate the long-term performance of concrete and reinforced concrete as a structural material for alternative LLW disposal methods. The capability to carry out such an evaluation is required for licensing a site which employs one of these alternative methods. The basis for achieving the study objective was the review and analysis of the literature on concrete and its properties, particularly its durability. In carrying out this program characteristics of concrete useful in evaluating its performance and factors that can affect its performance were identified. The factors are both intrinsic, i.e., associated with composition of the concrete (and thus controllable), and extrinsic, i.e., due to external environmental forces such as climatic conditions and aggressive chemicals in the soil. The testing of concrete, using both accelerated tests and long-term non-accelerated tests, is discussed with special reference to its application to modeling of long-term performance prediction. On the basis of the study's results, conditions for acceptance are recommended as an aid in the licensing of disposal sites which make use of alternative methods.

  13. Using Rose’s metal alloy as a pinhole collimator material in preclinical small-animal imaging: A Monte Carlo evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Mikael Strand, Sven-Erik; Ljungberg, Michael

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Pinhole collimation is the most common method of high-resolution preclinical single photon emission computed tomography imaging. The collimators are usually constructed from dense materials with high atomic numbers, such as gold and platinum, which are expensive and not always flexible in the fabrication step. In this work, the authors have investigated the properties of a fusible alloy called Rose’s metal and its potential in pinhole preclinical imaging. When compared to current standard pinhole materials such as gold and platinum, Rose’s metal has a lower density and a relatively low effective atomic number. However, it is inexpensive, has a low melting point, and does not contract when solidifying. Once cast, the piece can be machined with high precision. The aim of this study was to evaluate the imaging properties for Rose’s metal and compare them with those of standard materials. Methods: After validating their Monte Carlo code by comparing its results with published data and the results from analytical calculations, they investigated different pinhole geometries by varying the collimator material, acceptance angle, aperture diameter, and photon incident angle. The penetration-to-scatter and penetration-to-total component ratios, sensitivity, and the spatial resolution were determined for gold, tungsten, and Rose’s metal for two radionuclides, {sup 99}Tc{sup m} and {sup 125}I. Results: The Rose’s metal pinhole-imaging simulations show higher penetration/total and scatter/total ratios. For example, the penetration/total is 50% for gold and 75% for Rose’s metal when simulating {sup 99}Tc{sup m} with a 0.3 mm aperture diameter and a 60° acceptance angle. However, the degradation in spatial resolution remained below 10% relative to the spatial resolution for gold for acceptance angles below 40° and aperture diameters larger than 0.5 mm. Conclusions: Extra penetration and scatter associated with Rose’s metal contribute to degradation in the

  14. Introduction to Cyber Technologies exercise environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-12-17

    Exercise environment for Introduction to Cyber Technologies class. This software is essentially a collection of short scripts, configuration files, and small executables that form the exercise component of the Sandia Cyber Technologies Academy?s Introduction to Cyber Technologies class. It builds upon other open-source technologies, such as Debian Linux and minimega, to provide comprehensive Linux and networking exercises that make learning these topics exciting and fun. Sample exercises: a pre-built set of home directories the student must navigate through to learn about privilege escalation, the creation of a virtual network playground designed to teach the student about the resiliency of the Internet, and a two-hour Capture the Flag challenge for the final lesson. There are approximately thirty (30) exercises included for the students to complete as part of the course.

  15. Introduction to Cyber Technologies exercise environment

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-17

    Exercise environment for Introduction to Cyber Technologies class. This software is essentially a collection of short scripts, configuration files, and small executables that form the exercise component of the Sandia Cyber Technologies Academy’s Introduction to Cyber Technologies class. It builds upon other open-source technologies, such as Debian Linux and minimega, to provide comprehensive Linux and networking exercises that make learning these topics exciting and fun. Sample exercises: a pre-built set of home directories the studentmore » must navigate through to learn about privilege escalation, the creation of a virtual network playground designed to teach the student about the resiliency of the Internet, and a two-hour Capture the Flag challenge for the final lesson. There are approximately thirty (30) exercises included for the students to complete as part of the course.« less

  16. DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP DOE Exercises 5 Year Option on Washington TRU Solutions Contract to Operate WIPP January 18, 2005 - ...

  17. ORISE: Exercise Builder software tool helps DOE design and implement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration to develop an exercise tool for hospitals known as Exercise Builder: Hospital. The VA serves nearly eight million veteran enrollees and their families at more than...

  18. Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report (Program...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Program Document: Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lidar Inter-Comparison Exercise Final Campaign Report The ...

  19. Naval Spent Fuel Rail Shipment Accident Exercise Objectives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NAVAL SPENT FUEL RAIL SHIPMENT ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES * Familiarize stakeholders with the Naval spent fuel ACCIDENT EXERCISE OBJECTIVES Familiarize stakeholders with the ...

  20. weapons material | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    material

  1. Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-10-08

    ACE-IT is a computer-based training tool developed to simulate an on-site inspection of a facility. Inspectors and hosts practice realistic scenarios to prepare for inspections, to supplement tabletop and mock inspections, and for general training in managed access techniques. A training exercise is conducted between interconnected computer workstations. Participants at each workstation play a role, such as inspector or host, and the exercise permits team-specific actions at each stage of the inspection. Prompts and on-screenmore » menus let the participants know what responses are expected from them to continue the exercise.« less

  2. DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emergency Exercise Feedback Form DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form Emergency Exercise Feedback Form DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form (21.01 KB) More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Review, DOE Headquarters Facilities - March 2002 Employee Assistance Self-ID Form Independent Oversight Review, National Energy Technology Laboratory - May 2014

  3. SU-C-213-05: Evaluation of a Composite Copper-Plastic Material for a 3D Printed Radiation Therapy Bolus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitzthum, L; Ehler, E; Sterling, D; Reynolds, T; Higgins, P; Dusenbery, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a novel 3D printed bolus fabricated from a copper-plastic composite as a thin flexible, custom fitting device that can replicate doses achieved with conventional bolus techniques. Methods: Two models of bolus were created on a 3D printer using a composite copper-PLA/PHA. Firstly, boluses were constructed at thicknesses of 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 mm. Relative dose measurements were performed under the bolus with an Attix Chamber as well as with radiochromic film. Results were compared to superficial Attix Chamber measurements in a water equivalent material to determine the dosimetric water equivalence of the copper-PLA/PHA plastic. Secondly, CT images of a RANDO phantom were used to create a custom fitting bolus across the anterolateral scalp. Surface dose with the bolus placed on the RANDO phantom was measured with radiochromic film at tangential angles with 6, 10, 10 flattening filter free (FFF) and 18 MV photon beams. Results: Mean surface doses for 6, 10, 10FFF and 18 MV were measured as a percent of Dmax for the flat bolus devices of each thickness. The 0.4 mm thickness bolus was determined to be near equivalent to 2.5 mm depth in water for all four energies. Surface doses ranged from 59–63% without bolus and 85–90% with the custom 0.4 mm copper-plastic bolus relative to the prescribed dose for an oblique tangential beam arrangement on the RANDO phantom. Conclusion: Sub-millimeter thickness, 3D printed composite copper-PLA/PHA bolus can provide a build-up effect equivalent to conventional bolus. At this thickness, the 3D printed bolus allows a level of flexure that may provide more patient comfort than current 3D printing materials used in bolus fabrication while still retaining the CT based custom patient shape. Funding provided by an intra-department grant of the University of Minnesota Department of Radiation Oncology.

  4. Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program Exercise Overview

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exercise Program TEPP Exercise Program Tom Clawson TEPP Contractor tom@trgroupinc.com Brief TEPP History Brief TEPP History * In 1988, identified need to address emergency preparedness concerns of DOE emergency preparedness concerns of DOE radiological shipments bl h d * EM established in 1989 - Identified need for responder training along all transportation corridors as key to EM mission - TEPP incorporated into DOE Order 151.1, with responsibility assigned to EM * WIPP adopted the the TEPP

  5. Sample Preparation Report of the Fourth OPCW Confidence Building Exercise on Biomedical Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Udey, R. N.; Corzett, T. H.; Alcaraz, A.

    2014-07-03

    Following the successful completion of the 3rd biomedical confidence building exercise (February 2013 – March 2013), which included the analysis of plasma and urine samples spiked at low ppb levels as part of the exercise scenario, another confidence building exercise was targeted to be conducted in 2014. In this 4th exercise, it was desired to focus specifically on the analysis of plasma samples. The scenario was designed as an investigation of an alleged use of chemical weapons where plasma samples were collected, as plasma has been reported to contain CWA adducts which remain present in the human body for several weeks (Solano et al. 2008). In the 3rd exercise most participants used the fluoride regeneration method to analyze for the presence of nerve agents in plasma samples. For the 4th biomedical exercise it was decided to evaluate the analysis of human plasma samples for the presence/absence of the VX adducts and aged adducts to blood proteins (e.g., VX-butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) and aged BuChE adducts using a pepsin digest technique to yield nonapeptides; or equivalent). As the aging of VX-BuChE adducts is relatively slow (t1/2 = 77 hr at 37 °C [Aurbek et al. 2009]), soman (GD), which ages much more quickly (t1/2 = 9 min at 37 °C [Masson et al. 2010]), was used to simulate an aged VX sample. Additional objectives of this exercise included having laboratories assess novel OP-adducted plasma sample preparation techniques and analytical instrumentation methodologies, as well as refining/designating the reporting formats for these new techniques.

  6. Forced running exercise attenuates hippocampal neurogenesis impairment and the neurocognitive deficits induced by whole-brain irradiation via the BDNF-mediated pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Jian-feng; Ji, Sheng-jun; Sun, Rui; Li, Kun; Zhang, Yuan; Zhang, Li-yuan; Tian, Ye

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: Forced exercise can ameliorate WBI induced cognitive impairment in our rat model. Mature BDNF plays an important role in the effects of forced exercise. Exercise may be a possible treatment of the radiation-induced cognitive impairment. -- Abstract: Cranial radiotherapy induces progressive and debilitating cognitive deficits, particularly in long-term cancer survivors, which may in part be caused by the reduction of hippocampal neurogenesis. Previous studies suggested that voluntary exercise can reduce the cognitive impairment caused by radiation therapy. However, there is no study on the effect of forced wheel exercise and little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating the effect of exercise. In the present study, we investigated whether the forced running exercise after irradiation had the protective effects of the radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Sixty-four Male SpragueDawley rats received a single dose of 20 Gy or sham whole-brain irradiation (WBI), behavioral test was evaluated using open field test and Morris water maze at 2 months after irradiation. Half of the rats accepted a 3-week forced running exercise before the behavior detection. Immunofluorescence was used to evaluate the changes in hippocampal neurogenesis and Western blotting was used to assess changes in the levels of mature brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), phosphorylated tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) receptor, protein kinase B (Akt), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), calcium-calmodulin dependent kinase (CaMKII), cAMP-calcium response element binding protein (CREB) in the BDNFpCREB signaling. We found forced running exercise significantly prevented radiation-induced cognitive deficits, ameliorated the impairment of hippocampal neurogenesis and attenuated the down-regulation of these proteins. Moreover, exercise also increased behavioral performance, hippocampal neurogenesis and elevated BDNFpCREB signaling in non-irradiation group. These

  7. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  8. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  9. Safety Analysis: Evaluation of Accident Risks in the Transporation of Hazardous Materials by Truck and Rail at the Savannah River Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-04-15

    This report presents an analysis of the consequences and risks of accidents resulting from hazardous material transportation at the Savannah River Plant.

  10. DOE - NNSA/NFO -- News & Views Emergency Joint Exercise

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part in a 1981 weapons accident training exercise, in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of the exercise was to put into action a planned response to a nuclear accident. ...

  11. Functional Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Functional Materials Researchers in NETL's Functional Materials Development competency work to discover and develop advanced functional materials and component processing technologies to meet technology performance requirements and enable scale-up for proof-of-concept studies. Research includes separations materials and electrochemical and magnetic materials, specifically: Separations Materials Synthesis, purification, and basic characterization of organic substances, including polymers and

  12. Jefferson Lab to Conduct Emergency Response Exercise | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Conduct Emergency Response Exercise Jefferson Lab to Conduct Emergency Response Exercise on Aug. 9 NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Aug. 9, 2016 - Today, City of Newport News first responders and staff at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility will participate in an emergency response exercise. The objective of the exercise is to provide a training opportunity for members of the lab community and for Newport News emergency responders. Local fire department personnel plan to participate in the

  13. NAMP Participates in Homeland Security Exercise

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – A program led by EM’s Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) that coordinates analytical capabilities throughout DOE for response to potential national radiological incidents participated in a multi-agency exercise that simulated emergency response scenarios in Denver and Chicago.

  14. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boslough, Mark; Jennings, Barbara; Carvey, Brad; Fogleman, William

    2015-05-19

    We describe the computational simulations and damage assessments that we provided in support of a tabletop exercise (TTX) at the request of NASA's Near-Earth Objects Program Office. The overall purpose of the exercise was to assess leadership reactions, information requirements, and emergency management responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact with Earth. The scripted exercise consisted of discovery, tracking, and characterization of a hypothetical asteroid; inclusive of mission planning, mitigation, response, impact to population, infrastructure and GDP, and explicit quantification of uncertainty. Participants at the meeting included representatives of NASA, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the White House. The exercise took place at FEMA headquarters. Sandia's role was to assist the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in developing the impact scenario, to predict the physical effects of the impact, and to forecast the infrastructure and economic losses. We ran simulations using Sandia's CTH hydrocode to estimate physical effects on the ground, and to produce contour maps indicating damage assessments that could be used as input for the infrastructure and economic models. We used the FASTMap tool to provide estimates of infrastructure damage over the affected area, and the REAcct tool to estimate the potential economic severity expressed as changes to GDP (by nation, region, or sector) due to damage and short-term business interruptions.

  15. FEMA Asteroid Impact Tabletop Exercise Simulations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Boslough, Mark; Jennings, Barbara; Carvey, Brad; Fogleman, William

    2015-05-19

    We describe the computational simulations and damage assessments that we provided in support of a tabletop exercise (TTX) at the request of NASA's Near-Earth Objects Program Office. The overall purpose of the exercise was to assess leadership reactions, information requirements, and emergency management responses to a hypothetical asteroid impact with Earth. The scripted exercise consisted of discovery, tracking, and characterization of a hypothetical asteroid; inclusive of mission planning, mitigation, response, impact to population, infrastructure and GDP, and explicit quantification of uncertainty. Participants at the meeting included representatives of NASA, Department of Defense, Department of State, Department of Homeland Security/Federal Emergencymore » Management Agency (FEMA), and the White House. The exercise took place at FEMA headquarters. Sandia's role was to assist the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in developing the impact scenario, to predict the physical effects of the impact, and to forecast the infrastructure and economic losses. We ran simulations using Sandia's CTH hydrocode to estimate physical effects on the ground, and to produce contour maps indicating damage assessments that could be used as input for the infrastructure and economic models. We used the FASTMap tool to provide estimates of infrastructure damage over the affected area, and the REAcct tool to estimate the potential economic severity expressed as changes to GDP (by nation, region, or sector) due to damage and short-term business interruptions.« less

  16. Structural Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Materials Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in extreme environments (high-temperature, high-stress, erosive, and corrosive environments, including the performance of materials in contact with molten slags and salts). Research includes materials design and discovery, materials processing and manufacturing, and service-life prediction of materials

  17. Nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H.E.

    1997-02-01

    Research reported in the thrust area of nondestructive evaluation includes: advanced 3-D imaging technologies; new techniques in laser ultrasonic testing; infrared computed tomography for thermal NDE of materials, structures, sources, and processes; automated defect detection for large laser optics; multistatic micropower impulse radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation; and multi-modal NDE for AVLIS pod shielding components.

  18. Lessons learned from the first US/Russian Federation joint tabletop exercise to prepare for conducting on-site inspections under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filarowski, C; Kreek, S; Smith, A; Sweeney, J; Wild, J; Gough, R; Rockett, P; MacLeod, G; Hawkins, W; Wohletz, K; Knowles, S

    1999-03-24

    A U.S./Russian Federation Joint Tabletop Exercise took place in Snezhinsk, Russia, from 19 to 24 October 1998 whose objectives were to examine the functioning of an Inspection Team (IT) in a given scenario, to evaluate the strategies and techniques employed by the IT, to identify ambiguous interpretations of treaty provisions that needed clarification, and to confirm the overall utility of tabletop exercises to assist in developing an effective Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) verification regime. To achieve these objectives, the United States and Russian Federation (RF) agreed that two exercises would be conducted. The first would be developed by the RF, who would act as controller and as the inspected State Party (ISP), while the United States would play the role of the IT. The roles would be reversed in the second exercise; the United States would develop the scenario and play the ISP, while the RF would play the IT. A joint control team, comprised of members of both the U.S. and RF control teams, agreed on a number of ground rules for the two exercises and established a joint Evaluation Team to evaluate both of the exercises against the stated objectives. To meet time limitations, the scope of this joint exercise needed to be limited. The joint control team decided that each of the two exercises would not go beyond the first 25 days of an on-site inspection (OSI) and that the focus would be on examining the decision-making of the IT as it utilized the various technologies to clarify whether a nuclear test explosion had taken place. Hence, issues such as logistics, restricted access, and activities prior to Point of Entry (POE) would be played only to the extent needed to provide for a realistic context for the exercises' focus on inspection procedures, sensor deployments, and data interpretation. Each of the exercises began at the POE and proceeded with several iterations of negotiations between the IT and ISP, instrument deployments, and data evaluation by

  19. Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Propulsion Materials FY 2013 Progress Report ii CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................... 1 Project 18516 - Materials for H1ybrid and Electric Drive Systems ...................................................... 4 Agreement 19201 - Non-Rare Earth Magnetic Materials ............................................................................ 4 Agreement 23278 - Low-Cost

  20. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Materials Physics and Applications» Materials Science and Technology» Institute for Materials Science» Materials Science Rob Dickerson uses a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope at the Electron Microscopy Laboratory managed by Los

  1. Lightweight Materials Overview | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Overview Lightweight Materials Overview 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington ...

  2. Overview of Propulsion Materials | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Propulsion Materials Overview of Propulsion Materials 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting ...

  3. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter...

  4. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation...

  5. Structural Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Materials Development enables advanced technologies through the discovery, development, and demonstration of cost-effective advanced structural materials for use in ...

  6. Exercise Program | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Exercise Program NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier responder to any nuclear or radiological incident within the United States or abroad and provides operational planning and training to counter both domestic and international nuclear terrorism. NNSA ensures that capabilities are in place to respond to any NNSA and Department of Energy facility emergency. It is also the nation's premier

  7. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  8. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  9. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  10. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestruct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 10. Nondestructive Evaluation Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and ...

  11. Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

    2006-09-01

    Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsins 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature

  12. RELAP5-3D results for phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, G.; Epiney, A. S.

    2012-07-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2. (authors)

  13. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  14. Vibrant Response Exercise 2014 | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Vibrant Response Exercise 2014 Friday, July 25, 2014 - 4:09pm Preparing the country to respond to a large scale nuclear event is the primary function of the NNSA Office of Emergency Response. This week, Consequence Management teams from that office participated in the Vibrant Response 14 exercise at Camp Atterbury in Muscatatuck, Ind. and surrounding areas. Taking advantage of a U. S. Army North exercise, NNSA, alongside FEMA, Indiana Department of Homeland Security, and numerous

  15. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:35:05

  16. Indiana Department of Homeland Security - NNPP Exercise | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Indiana Department of Homeland Security - NNPP Exercise (1.68 MB) More Documents & Publications Kentucky National Guard Radiation Specialist Course DOE Office of Nuclear Energy ...

  17. NNSA to Participate in Aerial Radiation Training Exercise in...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Participate in Aerial Radiation Training Exercise in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania March ... The AMS, and other participating assets, characterizes ground-deposited radiation from ...

  18. Gamma Shield Thunder Exercise Concludes | National Nuclear Security...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The NNSA began the Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD) Counterterrorism Exercise Program in 1999. It has grown to include both domestic Department of Energy facilities and private ...

  19. ORISE: Helping Bureau of Reclamation with National Security Exercises...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities: Flaming Gorge, Folsom, Glen Canyon, Grand Coulee, Hoover and Shasta. ... In 2010, ORISE conducted an exercise at Shasta Dam, which spans California's Sacramento ...

  20. Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory...

  1. Materials Characterization

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Researchers in the Materials Characterization Research competency conduct studies of both natural and engineered materials from the micropore (nanometers) to macropore (meters) scale. Research includes, but is not limited to, thermal, chemical, mechanical, and structural (nano to macro) interactions and processes with regard to natural and engineered materials. The primary research investigation tools include SEM, XRD, micro XRD, core logging, medical CT, industrial

  2. Rotary combustor and boiler tubes after long term service: A materials evaluation: Municipal solid waste subscale rotary combustor program: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitlow, G.A.

    1986-11-01

    A metallurgical evaluation of sections of combustor and superheater tubing removed after 27,500 hours of exposure in the Westinghouse-O'Connor, waste-to-energy facility at Gallatin, Tennessee, has been performed. Both of these carbon steel components have withstood an aggressive, corrosion/erosion environment with minimal metal wastage, which augurs well for safe, reliable service to continue for the foreseeable future. Extensive deposition of chlorides and sulfates occurred on the exposed surfaces, but due to the relatively low metal temperatures involved little interaction with the carbon steel surfaces was observed. 2 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Materials Physics | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate In materials physics, NREL focuses on realizing materials that transcend the present constraints of photovoltaic (PV) and solid-state lighting technologies. Through materials growth and characterization, coupled with theoretical modeling, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. Capabilities Optimizing New Materials An illustration showing

  4. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) Material Control & Accountability Safeguards First Principles Initiative NNSA undertook a Safeguards First Principles Initiative (SFPI) to develop a principle-based standard for Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) Programs. The objective of SFPI was to prepare a model/standard for developing, implementing, and evaluating MC&A Programs to be adopted NNSA-wide. The model/standard: Establishes fundamental principles that the NNSA expects its management

  5. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  6. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  7. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  8. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F.; Kross, Brian J.

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  9. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  10. Functional Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Testing of materials under ideal and realistic process conditions such as those found in coal-fired power plant and integrated gasification combined cycle fuel gas. Performance ...

  11. Engineering evaluation/cost analysis for the proposed removal of contaminated materials from pad 1 at the Elza Gate site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This engineering evaluation/cost analysis (EE/CA) has been prepared in support of the proposed removal action for cleanup of radioactively contaminated concrete and soil beneath a building on privately owned commercial property in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The property, known as the Elza Gate site, became contaminated with uranium-238, radium-226, thorium-232, thorium-230, and decay products as a result of the Manhattan Engineer District storing uranium ore and ore processing residues at the site in the early 1940s. The US Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for cleanup of the property under its Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The DOE plans to remove the cracked and worn concrete pad and contaminated subsoil beneath the pad, after which the property owner/tenant will provide clean backfill and new concrete. Portions of the pad and subsoil are contaminated and, if stored or disposed of improperly, may represent a potential threat to public health or welfare and the environment. The EE/CA report is the appropriate documentation for the proposed removal action, as identified in guidance from the US Environmental Protection Agency. The objective of the EE/CA report, in addition to identifying the planned removal action, is to document the selection of response activities that will mitigate the potential for release of contaminants from the property into the environment and minimize the related threats to public health or welfare and the environment. 7 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research January 5-6, 2011 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  13. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE ASCR Program Manager Yukiko Sekine Last edited: 2016-04-29 11:34:54

  14. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  15. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A.; Woodward, Jonathan; Evans, Barbara R.; O'Neill, Hugh M.

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  16. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials discovery serves as a foundation for technological progress in renewable energies. Our experimental activities in inorganic solid-state materials innovation span a broad range of technological readiness levels-from basic science through applied research to device development-relying on a high-throughput combinatorial materials science approach, followed by traditional targeted experiments. In addition, our researchers work

  17. Mechanics and tribology of MEMS materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Somuri V.; Dugger, Michael Thomas; Boyce, Brad Lee; Buchheit, Thomas Edward

    2004-04-01

    Micromachines have the potential to significantly impact future weapon component designs as well as other defense, industrial, and consumer product applications. For both electroplated (LIGA) and surface micromachined (SMM) structural elements, the influence of processing on structure, and the resultant effects on material properties are not well understood. The behavior of dynamic interfaces in present as-fabricated microsystem materials is inadequate for most applications and the fundamental relationships between processing conditions and tribological behavior in these systems are not clearly defined. We intend to develop a basic understanding of deformation, fracture, and surface interactions responsible for friction and wear of microelectromechanical system (MEMS) materials. This will enable needed design flexibility for these devices, as well as strengthen our understanding of material behavior at the nanoscale. The goal of this project is to develop new capabilities for sub-microscale mechanical and tribological measurements, and to exercise these capabilities to investigate material behavior at this size scale.

  18. Exercise manual for the Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT) software

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, P.R.; Widney, T.W.; Goolsby, P.T.; Nelson, J.D.; Evanko, D.A.

    1997-09-01

    The on-site inspection provisions in many current and proposed arms control agreements require extensive preparation and training on the part of both the Inspected Party and the Inspection Team. Current training techniques include table-top inspections and practice inspections. The Augmented Computer Exercise for Inspection Training (ACE-IT), an interactive computer training tool, increases the utility of table-top inspections. ACE-IT has been designed to provide training for a hypothetical challenge inspection under the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC); however, this training tool can be modified for other inspection regimes. Although ACE-IT provides training from notification of an inspection through post-inspection activities, the primary emphasis of ACE-IT is in the inspection itself--particularly with the concept of managed access. ACE-IT also demonstrates how inspection provisions impact compliance determination and the protection of sensitive information. The Exercise Manual supplements the ACE-IT software by providing general information on on-site inspections and detailed information for the CWC challenge inspection exercise. The detailed information includes the pre-inspection briefing, maps, list of sensitive items, medical records, and shipping records.

  19. Materials Compatibility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C.

  20. Propulsion Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C.

  1. Reference Material for Radionuclides in Sediment, IAEA-384 (Fangataufa Lagoon Sediment)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Povinec, P; Pham, M; Barci-Funel, G; Bojanawski, R; Boshkova, T; Burnett, W; Carvalho, F; Chapeyron, B; Cunha, I; Dahlgaard, H; Galabov, N; Gastaud, J; Geering, J; Gomez, I; Green, N; Hamilton, T; Ibanez, F; Majah, M I; John, M; Kanisch, G; Kenna, T; Kloster, M; Korun, M; Wee Kwong, L L; La Rosa, J; Lee, S; Levy-Palomo, I; Malatova, M; Maruo, Y; Mitchell, P; Murciano, I; Nelson, R; Oh, J; Oregioni, B; Petit, G L; Pettersson, H; Reineking, A; Smedley, P; Suckow, A; der Struijs, T v; Voors, P; Yoshimizu, K; Wyse, E

    2005-09-23

    The IAEA Marine Environment Laboratory (IAEA-MEL) in Monaco has conducted intercomparison exercises on radionuclides in marine samples for many years as part of its contribution to the IAEA's program of Analytical Quality Control Services (AQCS). An important part of the AQCS program has been a production of Reference Materials (RMs) and their provision to radioanalytical laboratories. The RMs have been developed for different marine matrices (sediment, water, biota), with accuracy and precision required for the present state of the art of radiometrics and mass spectrometry methods. The RMs have been produced as the final products of world-wide intercomparison exercises organized during last 30 years. A total of 44 intercomparison exercises were undertaken and 39 RMs were produced for radionuclides in the marine environment. All required matrices (seawater, biota, sediment) have been covered with radionuclide concentrations ranging from typical environmental levels to elevated levels affected by discharges from nuclear reprocessing plants. The long-term availability of RMs (over 10 years) requires the use of very specific techniques to collect and pretreat large quantities of material (e.g., in excess of 100 kg) in order to ensure sample stability and homogenization of any analytes of interest. The production of a RM is therefore a long process, covering the identification of needs, sample collection, pre-treatment, homogenization, bottling, distribution to laboratories, evaluation of data, preliminary reporting, additional analyses in expert laboratories, certification of the material, and finally issuing the RM. In this paper we describe a reference material IAEA-384, Fangataufa lagoon sediment, designed for determination of anthropogenic and natural radionuclides in the marine environment. This RM has been prepared with the aim of testing the performance of analytical laboratories to measure the activity of these radionuclides in a sediment sample contaminated

  2. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  3. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  4. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Page...

  5. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences August 3-4, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors [not available] NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion

  6. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics November 12-13, 2009 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  7. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  8. Meeting Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Meeting Materials Meeting Materials Here you will find various items to be used before and during the requirements review. The following documents are included: Case study worksheet to be filled in by meeting participants Sample of a completed case study from a Nuclear Physics requirements workshop held in 2011 A graph of NERSC and HEP usage as a function of time A powerpoint template you can use at the requirements review Downloads CaseStudyTemplate.docx | unknown Case Study Worksheet -

  9. Engineered Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Engineered Materials Materials design, fabrication, assembly, and characterization for national security needs. Contact Us Group Leader (Acting) Kimberly Obrey Email Deputy Group Leader Dominic Peterson Email Group Office (505)-667-6887 We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly, characterization, and field support. We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly,

  10. The cooperative monitoring of military forces: An exercise in strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    This exercise examines a hypothetical security problem associated with conventional military forces and border security: a surprise attack. The goal of the exercise is to provide an opportunity to think about how cooperative monitoring can be part of regional security. Two hypothetical countries, VOLCANOES and MOUNTAINS, have been created for this exercise based on the US states of Arizona and New Mexico. They were selected for their size and variety of terrain. Hypothetical background information and characteristics of the two countries are provided. An outline of activities is given, including prioritization of security concerns and monitoring of objectives for security concerns. 6 tabs.