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1

Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee 229  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled low-strength material (CLSM) is a self-compacted, cementitious material used primarily as a backfill in lieu of compacted fill. Many terms are currently used to describe this material including flowable fill, unshrinkable fill, controlled density fill, flowable mortar, flowable fly ash, fly ash slurry, plastic soil-cement, soil-cement slurry, K-Krete and other various names. This report contains information on applications, material properties, mix proportioning, construction and quality-control procedures. This report`s intent is to provide basic information on CLSM technology, with emphasis on CLSM material characteristics and advantages over conventional compacted fill. Applications include backfills, structural fills, insulating and isolation fills, pavement bases, conduit bedding, erosion control, void filling, and radioactive waste management.

Rajendran, N.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

WSRC-TR-97-0100 Controlled Low Strength Materials (CLSM), Reported by ACI  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

WSRC-TR-97-0100 WSRC-TR-97-0100 Controlled Low Strength Materials (CLSM), Reported by ACI Committee 229 r by N. Rajendran Westinghouse Savannah River Company Savannah River Site Aiken, South Carolina 29808 DOE Contract No. DE-AC09-96SR18500 This paper was prepared in connection with work done under the above contract number with the U. S. Department of Energy. By acceptance of this paper, the publisher and/or recipient acknowledges the U. S. Government's right to retain a nonexclusive, royalty-free license in and to any copyright covering this paper, along with the right to reproduce and to authorize others to reproduce all or part of the copyrighted paper. DISCLAIMER This q o r t was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of-the United state^ GovemmenL Neither the

3

Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Proportioning CLSM Using Fly Ash and GGBS. Author(s), Udayashankar B C, Raghavendra T. On-Site Speaker (Planned), Udayashankar  ...

4

MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 (08-98) Previous editions are obsolete. MANDATORY DATA COLLECTION AUTHORIZED BY 10 CFR 30, 40, 50, 70, 75, 150. Public Laws 83-703, 93-438, 95-91. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 18 U.S.C. SECTION 1001; ACT OF JUNE 25, 1948; 62 STAT. 749; MAKES IT A CRIMINAL OFFENSE TO MAKE A WILLFULLY FALSE STATEMENT OR REPRESENTATION TO ANY DEPARTMENT OR AGENCY OF THE UNITED STATES AS TO ANY MATTER WITHIN ITS JURISDICTION. Printed with soy ink on recycled paper OMB Control No. 1910-1800 OMB Burden Disclosure Statement on Reverse SECTION A 7. DOE/NRC 740M ATTACHED 8. BEGINNING INVENTORY - DOE OWNED 9. BEGINNING INVENTORY - NOT DOE OWNED RECEIPTS 11. PROCUREMENT FROM DOE FROM: 13. PROCUREMENT - FOR THE ACCOUNT OF DOE 14. DOD RETURNS - USE A 15. DOD RETURNS - USE B

5

CLSM as Quantitative Method to Determine the Size of Drug Crystals in a Solid Dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Purpose To test whether confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) can be used as an analytical tool to determine the drug crystal size in a powder mixture or a crystalline solid dispersion. Methods Crystals of the autofluorescent drug dipyridamole were incorporated in a matrix of crystalline mannitol by physical mixing or freeze-drying. Laser diffraction analysis and dissolution testing were used to validate the particle size that was found by CLSM. Results The particle size of the pure drug as determined by laser diffraction and CLSM were similar (D50 of approximately 22 ?m). CLSM showed that the dipyridamole crystals in the crystalline dispersion obtained by freeze-drying of less concentrated solutions were of sub-micron size (0.7 ?m), whereas the crystals obtained by freeze-drying of more concentrated solutions were larger (1.3 ?m). This trend in drug crystal size was in agreement with the dissolution behavior of the tablets prepared from these products. Conclusion CLSM is a useful technique to determine the particle size in a powder mixture. Furthermore, CLSM can be used to determine the drug crystal size over a broad size distribution. A limitation of the method is that the drug should be autofluorescent.

K. A. Sjollema

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Thermoelectric materials development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A systematic search for advanced thermoelectric materials was initiated at JPL several years ago to evaluate candidate materials which includes consideration of the following property attributes: (1) semiconducting properties; (2) large Seebeck coefficient; (3) high carrier mobility and high electrical conductivity; (4) low lattice thermal conductivity; and (5) chemical stability and low vapor pressure. Through this candidate screening process, JPL identified several families of materials as promising candidates for improved thermoelectric materials including the skutterudite family. There are several programs supporting various phases of the effort on these materials. As part of an ongoing effort to develop skutterudite materials with lower thermal conductivity values, several solid solutions and filled skutterudite materials were investigated under the effort sponsored by DOE. The efforts have primarily focused on: (1) study of existence and properties of solid solutions between the binary compounds CoSb{sub 3} and IrSb{sub 3}, and RuSb{sub 2}Te, and (2) CeFe{sub 4{minus}x}Sb{sub 12} based filled compositions. For the solid solutions, the lattice thermal conductivity reduction was expected to be reduced by the introduction of the Te and Ru atoms while in the case of CeFe{sub 4{minus}x}Ru{sub x}Sb{sub 12} based filled compositions. For the solid solutions, the lattice thermal conductivity reduction was expected to be reduced by the introduction of the Te and Ru atoms while in the case of CeFe{sub 4{minus}x}Ru{sub x}Sb{sub 12} filled compositions, the reduction would be caused by the rattling of Ce atoms located in the empty voids of the skutterudite structure and the substitution of Fe for Ru. The details of the sample preparation and characterization of their thermoelectric properties are reported in this report.

Fleurial, J.P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DWPF MATERIALS EVALUATION SUMMARY REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To better ensure the reliability of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) remote canyon process equipment, a materials evaluation program was performed as part of the overall startup test program. Specific test programs included FA-04 ('Process Vessels Erosion/Corrosion Studies') and FA-05 (melter inspection). At the conclusion of field testing, Test Results Reports were issued to cover the various test phases. While these reports completed the startup test requirements, DWPF-Engineering agreed to compile a more detailed report which would include essentially all of the materials testing programs performed at DWPF. The scope of the materials evaouation programs included selected equipment from the Salt Process Cell (SPC), Chemical Process Cell (CPC), Melt Cell, Canister Decon Cell (CDC), and supporting facilities. The program consisted of performing pre-service baseline inspections (work completed in 1992) and follow-up inspections after completion of the DWPF cold chemical runs. Process equipment inspected included: process vessels, pumps, agitators, coils, jumpers, and melter top head components. Various NDE (non-destructive examination) techniques were used during the inspection program, including: ultrasonic testing (UT), visual (direct or video probe), radiography, penetrant testing (PT), and dimensional analyses. Finally, coupon racks were placed in selected tanks in 1992 for subsequent removal and corrosion evaluation after chemical runs.

Gee, T.; Chandler, G.; Daugherty, W.; Imrich, K.; Jankins, C.

1996-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

8

Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt  

SciTech Connect

This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at Nini, Ndes, and Nmax. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

Paul J. Tikalsky, Hussain U. Bahia, An Deng and Thomas Snyder

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Excess Foundry Sand Characterization and Experimental Investigation in Controlled Low-Strength Material and Hot-Mixing Asphalt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides technical data regarding the reuse of excess foundry sand. The report addresses three topics: (1) a statistically sound evaluation of the characterization of foundry sand, (2) a laboratory investigation to qualify excess foundry sand as a major component in controlled low-strength material (CLSM), and (3) the identification of the best methods for using foundry sand as a replacement for natural aggregates for construction purposes, specifically in asphalt paving materials. The survival analysis statistical technique was used to characterize foundry sand over a full spectrum of general chemical parameters, metallic elements, and organic compounds regarding bulk analysis and leachate characterization. Not limited to characterization and environmental impact, foundry sand was evaluated by factor analyses, which contributes to proper selection of factor and maximization of the reuse marketplace for foundry sand. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into CLSM, excavatable CLSM and structural CLSM containing different types of excess foundry sands were investigated through laboratory experiments. Foundry sand was approved to constitute a major component in CLSM. Regarding the integration of foundry sand into asphalt paving materials, the optimum asphalt content was determined for each mixture, as well as the bulk density, maximum density, asphalt absorption, and air voids at N{sub ini}, N{sub des}, and N{sub max}. It was found that foundry sands can be used as an aggregate in hot-mix asphalt production, but each sand should be evaluated individually. Foundry sands tend to lower the strength of mixtures and also may make them more susceptible to moisture damage. Finally, traditional anti-stripping additives may decrease the moisture sensitivity of a mixture containing foundry sand, but not to the level allowed by most highway agencies.

Pauul J. Tikalsky

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the Materials Sciences Division`s annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

Not Available

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

Materials Sciences Division 1990 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the Materials Sciences Division's annual report. It contains abstracts describing materials research at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, and for research groups in metallurgy, solid-state physics, materials chemistry, electrochemical energy storage, electronic materials, surface science and catalysis, ceramic science, high tc superconductivity, polymers, composites, and high performance metals.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Physiochemical characteristics of controlled low strength materials influencing the electrochemical performance and service life of metallic materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Controlled Low Strength Materials (CLSM) are cementitious self-compacting materials, comprised of low cement content, supplementary cementing materials, fine aggregates, and water. CLSM is typically used as an alternative to conventional compacted granular backfill in applications, such as pavement bases, erosion control, bridge abutments, retaining walls, bedding and backfilling of pipelines. This dissertation presents the findings of an extensive study carried out to determine the corrosivity of CLSM on ductile iron and galvanized steel pipelines. The study was performed in two phases and evaluated more than 40 different CLSM mixture proportions for their corrosivity. An extensive literature survey was performed on corrosion of metals in soils and corrosion of reinforcement in concrete environments to determine possible influential factors. These factors were used as explanatory variables with multiple levels to identify the statistically significant factors. Empirical models were developed for percent mass loss of metals embedded in CLSM and exposed to different environments. The first and only service life models for ductile iron and galvanized steel pipes embedded in CLSM mixtures were developed. Models indicated that properly designed CLSM mixtures can provide an equal or longer service life for completely embedded ductile iron pipes. However, the service life of galvanized pipes embedded in CLSM should not be expected to be more than the service life provided by corrosive soils.

Halmen, Ceki

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5. MATERIAL TYPE (Submit separate report for each type) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY AND U.S. NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742...

14

REPORT NO. 5 background material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be altered to reduce human intake of radioactive materials from fallout. In September 1962 the Federal should be taken. In the 1963 hearings, "Fallout, Radiation Standards, and Countermeasures," conducted

15

Heat storage materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The properties of various alloys, eutectics, and salts in respect to their usefulness for latent and sensible heat storage are surveyed and reported. (TFD)

Birchenall, C.E.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Scrap material examination test report  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this test were to: (1) Determine the volume of fuel contained in the scrap material (fuel pieces plus W springs, spacer clips, or other non-fuel material) by photographic and graphical analysis, (2) Provide sufficient data quantity and quality to support: (a) statistical prediction of future scrap amounts and morphology with sufficient confidence to qualify the volume quantification process (b) thermal analysis of the scrap sufficient to support safety basis calculations for thermal stability, and (3) Provide sufficient operational experience to address usage of process in production operations, if necessary.

PITNER, A.L.

2001-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Materials Department Annual Report 1992  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3.5 Abrasive Ceramics 34 3.6 Fracture of Ceramic Matrix Composites 34 3.7 Ultrasonic Testing of Low.3 Stacked Solid Oxide Fuel Cells 59 4.4 Ceramic and Glass Processing 40 4.5 Fine and Ultra-fine Powder and materials technology. The work of the Department is directed towards the energy, industry and research

18

Thermoelectric material development. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A search was made for improved TE materials that could have higher efficiency than state-of-the-art SiGe alloys used in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators. A new family of materials having the skutterudite structure was identified (cubic space group Im3, formula (Fe, Co, Ni)As{sub 3}). Properties of n-type IrSb{sub 3}, CoSb{sub 3}, and their solid solutions were investigated. Pt, Te, Tl, and In were used as dopants. The thermal conductivity was reduced by about 70% for the solid solutions vs the binary compounds. A maximum ZT of about 0.36 was measured on Co-rich solid solutions which is 160% improved over that of the binary compounds.

Vandersande, J.W.; Allevato, C.; Caillat, T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Solid electrolyte battery materials. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This is the third technical report relating to work on Solid Electrolyte Battery Materials. During the past 18 months our efforts have had two major aims: one is to develop a novel technique for producing beta alumina solid electrolytes for use in the sodium-sulfur cell. The other is to search for new fast ion conducting materials for lithium and potassium ions, as well as to examine mixed conductor materials for potential application as electrodes in advanced secondary battery designs. The details and results of our efforts for the first year are presented in Technical Report No. 2. The present report covers the first six months of effort in the second year.

Huggins, R.A.

1974-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

20

Material Balance Report NRC 742_7  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT MATERIAL BALANCE REPORT 1. NAME AND ADDRESS MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY NRC FORM 742 (7-2008) (PREVIOUS EDITIONS ARE OBSOLETE) 4. REPORT PERIOD (MM/DD/YYYY) PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER Estimated burden per response to comply with this mandatory collection request: 5 hours. Reported lessons learned are incorporated into the licensing process and fed back to industry. Send comments regarding burden estimate to the Records and FOIA/Privacy Services Branch (T-5 F52), U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, or by internet e-mail to infocollects@nrc.gov, and to the Desk Officer, Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs, NEOB-10202, (3150-0004), Office of Management and Budget, Washington, DC 20503. If a means used to impose an information collection does not display a currently valid OMB

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermoelectric materials evaluation program. Technical summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress on the thermoelectric materials evaluation program is reported covering the period January 1, 1976 to September 30, 1978. Topical reports are presented on (1) hot and cold end ..delta..T's, (2) hardware mobility, (3) p-leg sublimation suppression, (4) thermodynamic stability of p-legs, (5) n-leg material process improvements to reduce extraneous resistance, (6) n-leg cracking, (7) dynamic evaluation of converter, and (8) data base and degradation modes. Twenty attachments are included which present supporting drawings, specifications, procedures, and data. (WHK)

Hinderman, J.D.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

2010 Annual Progress Report- Lightwighting Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

annual progress report 2010 Lightweighting Material Contents A. Acronyms and Abbreviations Acronyms and Abbreviations.............................................................................................................................................A-1 1. Introduction Introduction.........................................................................................................................................................................1-1 2. Automotive Metals A. Processing and Manufacturability - Oak Ridge National Laboratory..............................................2-1 B. Processing and Manufacturability - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory..................................2-8

23

2007 Propulsion Materials Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle t echnologies Progra M Less dependence on foreign oil today, and transition to a petroleum-free, emissions-free vehicle tomorrow. 2 0 0 7 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t U.S. Department of Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2007 Progress Report for Propulsion Materials Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies Advanced Materials Technologies Edward J. Wall Program Manager, OVT Rogelio A. Sullivan Advanced Materials Technologies Team Leader Jerry L. Gibbs Technology Manager January 2008 CONTENTS INTRODUCTION..................................................................................................................................... 1 PROJECT 18518 - MATERIALS FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY ENGINES......................................... 9

24

Final Technical Progress Report NANOSTRUCTURED MAGNETIC MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress made during the final phase of our DOE-funded program on Nanostructured Magnetic Materials. This period was quite productive, resulting in the submission of three papers and presentation of three talks at international conferences and three seminars at research institutions. Our DOE-funded research efforts were directed toward studies of magnetism at surfaces and interfaces in high-quality, well-characterized materials prepared by Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) and sputtering. We have an exceptionally well-equipped laboratory for these studies, with: Thin film preparation equipment; Characterization equipment; Equipment to study magnetic properties of surfaces and ultra-thin magnetic films and interfaces in multi-layers and superlattices.

Charles M. Falco

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

25

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in research in structure of materials, mechanical, and physical properties, solid state physics, and materials chemistry, including chemical structure, high temperature and surface chemistry, is reported. (FS)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Thermoelectric materials evaluation program. Quarterly Technical Task Report No. 43  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reported are: N-type material development (gadolinium selenide compositions), TPM-217 P-type material characterization, and couple development. 29 tables, 20 fig. (DLC)

Hampl, E.F. Jr.

1974-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

High Temperature Materials Interim Data Qualification Report  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Projects for the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office provide data in support of Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing of the VHTR. Fuel and materials to be used in the reactor are tested and characterized to quantify performance in high temperature and high fluence environments. The VHTR program has established the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS) to ensure that VHTR data are qualified for use, stored in a readily accessible electronic form, and analyzed to extract useful results. This document focuses on the first NDMAS objective. It describes the High Temperature Materials characterization data stream, the processing of these data within NDMAS, and reports the interim FY2010 qualification status of the data. Data qualification activities within NDMAS for specific types of data are determined by the data qualification category assigned by the data generator. The High Temperature Materials data are being collected under NQA-1 guidelines, and will be qualified data. For NQA-1 qualified data, the qualification activities include: (1) capture testing, to confirm that the data stored within NDMAS are identical to the raw data supplied, (2) accuracy testing to confirm that the data are an accurate representation of the system or object being measured, and (3) documenting that the data were collected under an NQA-1 or equivalent Quality Assurance program. Currently, data from two test series within the High Temperature Materials data stream have been entered into the NDMAS vault: 1. Tensile Tests for Sm (i.e., Allowable Stress) Confirmatory Testing – 1,403,994 records have been inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process. 2. Creep-Fatigue Testing to Support Determination of Creep-Fatigue Interaction Diagram – 918,854 records have been processed and inserted into the NDMAS database. Capture testing is in process.

Nancy Lybeck

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

FY06 High Strength Weight Reduction Materials Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HigH StrengtH HigH StrengtH WeigHt reduction MaterialS U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2006 Progress Report for High Strength Weight Reduction Materials Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Advanced Materials Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager, OFCVT Rogelio Sullivan Advanced Materials Technologies Team Leader James Eberhardt Chief Scientist March 2006 High Strength Weight Reduction Materials FY 2006 Progress Report CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................................... 1 2. MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT .......................................................................................................... 3

30

Chemistry and materials science progress report, FY 1994  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported in the areas of surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, transactinide materials and properties and other indirectly related areas of weapons research.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Materials and Molecular Research Division: Annual report, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research activities are reported under the following headings: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, energy storage systems, and work for others. (DLC)

Phillips, N.E.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSESMEASURED...

33

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2*** 2*** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 2 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

34

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

*** *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 A 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 2 1 1 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

35

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

*** *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 Company 1 RIS A 2 1 1 COMPANY NAME RIS A 3 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

36

Material Balance Report NRC 742u  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Example 4 *** Example 4 *** Company Name and Address License Number RIS A 10/01/2007 09/30/2008 20 / E4 1 1 1 A 2 1 1 DATE SIGNATURE (See instructions for provisions on confidentiality) TITLE 54. SHIPMENTS -- MISC 65. ROUNDING ADJUSTMENT 58. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO U.S. GOVT BY OTHERS 59. DONATED MATERIAL -- TO OTHERS BY U.S. GOVT a. ICT b. ICT 72. DECAY 75. ACCIDENTAL LOSSES 73. FISSION AND TRANSMUTATION 74. NORMAL OPERATIONAL LOSSES/MEASURED DISCARDS 77. INVENTORY DIFFERENCE 82. TOTAL (lines 41-81) 80. ENDING INVENTORY -- U.S. GOVT OWNED 81. ENDING INVENTORY -- NOT U.S. GOVT OWNED MATERIAL ACCOUNTABILITY SECTION A (Continued) FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS SECTION B CERTIFICATION SECTION C To the best of my knowledge and belief, the information given above and in any attached schedules is true, complete, and correct.

37

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following fields: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid-state physics, materials chemistry), chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques), actinide chemistry, fossil energy, electrochemical energy storage systems, superconducting magnets, semiconductor materials and devices, and work for others. (DLC)

Searcy, A.W.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

AEC FUELS AND MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Seventh Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

This report is the seventh annual report of the unclassified portion of the Fuels and Materials Development Programs being conducted by the General Electric Company's Nuclear Materials and Propulsion Operation under Contract AT(40-1)-2847, issued by the Fuels and Materials Branch, Division of Reactor Development and Technology, of the Atomic Energy Commission. This report covers the period from January 31, 1967 to January 31, 1968, and thus also serves as the quarterly progress report for the final quarter of the year.

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Geothermal Materials Development. Annual report FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored ``full cost`` recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R&D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Geothermal Materials Development, Annual Report FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials, the commercial availabilities of which are essential for the attainment of Hydrothermal Category Level I and II Objectives, continue to be made in the Geothermal Materials Development Project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, utility company sponsored full cost'' recovery programs based upon materials technology developed in this project were initiated on topics such as condensing heat exchangers, high temperature composites for utility vaults used in district heating systems, and corrosion resistant coatings for use in oil-fired electric generating processes. In FY 1991 the DOE/GD-sponsored R D project was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities being performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}- resistant well cements, chemical systems for lost circulation control, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective linear systems, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems needed for use in high temperature well drilling and safety related applications.

Kukacka, L.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

Hsu, S.

1998-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

42

2008 Propulsion Materials Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

annual progress report 2008 V e h i c l e T e c h n o l o g i e s P r o g r a m this document highlights work sponsored by agencies of the u.s. Government. neither the u.s. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

43

New Reports and Other Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Reports and Other Materials New Reports and Other Materials New Reports and Other Materials Recently released reports, presentations, and other materials are available for download: Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 2 Issue 4 (October 2013) Highlighting a few of the OE/ISER energy preparedness activities that occur each quarter. Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) Program - Progress Report II (October 2013) Including new information on expenditures, installations of technologies and systems, grid impacts, lessons learned, and accomplishments in cybersecurity and interoperability. Synchrophasor Technologies and their Deployment in the Recovery Act Smart Grid Programs (August 2013) Describing synchrophasor technologies, systems, and related software applications and basic aspects of the Recovery Act-funded projects that are

44

Nuclear materials research progress reports for 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is reported concerning radiation enhancement of stress corrosion cracking of Zircaloy, surface chemistry of epitaxial Si deposited by thermal cracking of silane, thermal gradient migration of metallic inclusions in UO/sub 2/, molecular beam studies of atomic H and reduction of oxides, mass transfer and reduction of UO/sub 2/, kinetics of laser pulse vaporization of UO/sub 2/, retention and release of water by UO/sub 2/ pellets, and solubility of H in UO/sub 2/. (FS)

Olander, D.R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Energy Materials Coordinating Committee, fiscal year 1997. Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1997 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

NONE

1998-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

New Reports and Other Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Reports and Other Materials New Reports and Other Materials New Reports and Other Materials Recently released reports, presentations, and other materials are available for download below. Energy Emergency Preparedness Quarterly Vol 1 Issue 4 - October 2012 October 2012 Energy Assurance Planning Bulletin Volume 3 No 4 Fact Sheet: Wind Firming EnergyFarm (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Tehachapi Wind Energy Storage Project (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Sodium-Ion Batteries for Grid-Level Applications (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Isothermal Compressed Air Energy Storage (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Flywheel Energy Storage Plant (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Grid-Scale Energy Storage Demonstration Using UltraBattery Technology (October 2012) Fact Sheet: Community Energy Storage for Grid Support (October 2012)

47

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental Management System Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the calender past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Nuclear materials 1993 annual report. Volume 8, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) describes activities conducted during 1993. The report is published in two parts. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 1, covers power reactors and presents an overview of the operating experience of the nuclear power industry from the NRC perspective, including comments about the trends of some key performance measures. The report also includes the principal findings and issues identified in AEOD studies over the past year and summarizes information from such sources as licensee event reports, diagnostic evaluations, and reports to the NRC`s Operations Center. NUREG-1272, Vol. 8, No. 2, covers nuclear materials and presents a review of the events and concerns during 1993 associated with the use of licensed material in nonreactor applications, such as personnel overexposures and medical misadministrations. Note that the subtitle of No. 2 has been changed from ``Nonreactors`` to ``Nuclear Materials.`` Both reports also contain a discussion of the Incident Investigation Team program and summarize both the Incident Investigation Team and Augmented Inspection Team reports. Each volume contains a list of the AEOD reports issued from 1980 through 1993.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

FY2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager December 2003 U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2003 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials Program Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Edward Wall Program Manager December 2003 CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1

51

Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes research conducted at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories, programs are discussed in the following topics: materials sciences; chemical sciences; fossil energy; energy storage systems; health and environmental sciences; exploratory research and development funds; and work for others. A total of fifty eight programs are briefly presented. References, figures, and tables are included where appropriate with each program.

Not Available

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Materials and Molecular Research Division. Annual report 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the areas of materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced (laser) isotope separation technology, energy storage, superconducting magnets, and nuclear waste management. Work for others included phase equilibria for coal gasification products and ..beta..-alumina electrolytes for storage batteries. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Geothermal materials studies. Quarterly report, July--September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported on the following subjects: erosion studies of nozzle and turbine materials, stress corrosion cracking experiments on Ti-, Fe-, Ni-, and Co-base alloys; general corrosion field tests; evaluation of corrosion and erosion failure, corrosion testing, and electroless nickel plating of a turbine wheel. (MHR)

Goldberg, A.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is divided into: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, advanced isotope separation technology (AISI), energy storage, magnetic fusion energy (MFE), nuclear waste management, and work for others (WFO). Separate abstracts have been prepared for all except AIST, MFE, and WFO. (DLC)

Not Available

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W. [eds.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

EVALUATION OF THE FINAL REPORT: WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EVALUATION OF THE FINAL REPORT: WASTE EVALUATION OF THE FINAL REPORT: WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER REVIEW PANEL B00000000-01717-5700-00005 REV 00 August 2002 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. QA: QA B00000000-01717-5700-00005 REV 00 August 2002 Evaluation of the Final Report: Waste Package Materials Performance Peer Review Panel Prepared by: Jack N. Bailey, Jack D. Cloud, Thomas E. Rodgers, and Tammy S.E. Summers Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Office P.O. Box 364629 North Las Vegas, Nevada 89036-8629 Prepared by: Bechtel SAIC Company, LLC 1180 Town Center Drive Las Vegas, Nevada 89144 Under Contract Number DE-AC28-01RW12101 Disclaimer Signature Page Change History Acknowledgments

57

FY2001 Progress Report for Automotive Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION AUTOMOTIVE PROPULSION MATERIALS 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory, Computer Systems Management, Inc., and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for Propulsion Materials

58

Microsoft Word - TRILATERAL CRITICAL MATERIALS WORKSHOP Summary Report final 20111129  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRILATERAL EU-JAPAN-U.S. CONFERENCE ON TRILATERAL EU-JAPAN-U.S. CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE Washington DC, 4-5 October 2011 Summary Report Introduction The conference convened officials and experts from the European Union, Japan and the United States, as well as guests from Australia and Canada, to discuss how best to ensure an adequate supply of critical materials for a clean energy future and how best to cooperate toward this end. A plenary seminar focused on strategic approaches to assuring critical materials supply. Two parallel technical workshops then examined opportunities for technology cooperation. Seminar on the Strategic Implications of Global Shortages in Critical Materials The seminar focused on a variety of strategic challenges that we face with respect to critical

59

Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Approach for enhancing nuclear materials tracking and reporting in waste  

SciTech Connect

Recent policy from the Department of Energy/Office of Safeguards and Security (DOE/OSS) has identified the need to report nuclear materials in waste in a manner that is consistent with the Department of Energy's Nuclear Materials Information System (NMIS), which uses Form 471 as its official record. NMIS is used to track nuclear material inventories while they are subject to safeguards. This requirement necessitates the reevaluation of existing business practices that are used to track and report these nuclear materials. This paper provides a methodology for applying a systems approach to the evaluation of the flow of nuclear waste materials from a generating facility through to permanent disposal. This methodology can be used to integrate existing systems and leverage data already gathered that support both the waste reporting requirements and the NMIS requirements. In order to consider an active waste reporting system that covers waste management through to final disposal, the requirements for characterization, certification, and transportation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) are used as an example. These requirements are found in the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria (WIPP/WAC) and associated requirement documents. This approach will prevent inconsistencies in reported data and address current and future needs. For example, spent fuel (which the U.S. intends to dispose of as high-level waste) has not been viewed as particularly attractive in terms of proliferation in comparison to materials associated with other parts of the nuclear fuel cycle. However, collecting high-level waste (or some types of defense waste) in one location where it will be left for hundreds or thousands of years presents proliferation and safeguards issues that need to be considered as part of a systems evaluation. This paper brings together information on domestic and international safeguards practices and considers the current system of documentation used by the U.S. Department of Energy for radioactive waste disposal. The information presented represents current practices, and we recognize that the practices were designed to address different goals. After providing an overview of these areas, some steps that may help develop safeguards systems for geologic repositories in the U.S. context are discussed.

Longmire, V. L. (Victoria L.); Seitz, S. L. (Sharon L.); Sinkule, B. J. (Barbara J.)

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Summary Report from Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials DOE Hydrogen Program Assessment of Modeling Needs for Hydrogen Storage This report provides a summary of feedback from co-organizers, speakers and participants of the Department of Energy's (DOE) Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials, held Thursday, May 18, 2006, Crystal City, VA, in conjunction with the DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review, May 16-19, 2006. Session co-organizers: Chris Wolverton (Ford), Karl Johnson (University of Pittsburgh), Maciek Gutowski (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) Goal of focus session: Identify critical areas, key barriers and gaps in current theory/modeling approaches for hydrogen storage materials and technologies Role of modeling and simulation in design of H

62

Final Report: Imaging of Buried Nanoscale Optically Active Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a final report covering work done at University of Maryland to develop a Ballistic Electron Emission Luminescence (BEEL) microscope. This technique was intended to examine the carrier transport and photon emission in deeply buried optically-active layers and thereby provide a means for materials science to unmask the detailed consequences of experimentally controllable growth parameters, such as quantum dot size, statistics and orientation, and defect density and charge recombination pathways.

Appelbaum, Ian

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

63

FINAL REPORT WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER REVIEW PANEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT WASTE PACKAGE MATERIALS PERFORMANCE PEER REVIEW PANEL FEBRUARY 28, 2002 This document is not an official copy and is for informational purposes only. Signature Page Preface Executive Summary TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. INTRODUCTION 1.1 Organization of the Peer Review 1.2 Objectives of the Review 1.3 Content of the Final Report 2. MAIN FINDINGS 2.1 Perspective 2.2 Overall Findings 2.3 Corrosion Degradation Modes 2.4 Higher or Lower Temperature Operating Modes 2.5 Long-Term Uniform Corrosion of Passive Metal 2.6 Alloy Specification and Comparison 2.7 Technical Issues to be Resolved 2.8 Organizational-Managerial Issues 3. SUMMARY OF DEGRADATION MODES AND CONTRIBUTING FACTORS 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Repository Conditions: Overview of Time, Temperature, Environment

64

Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate 2005 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1952, we began laboratory operations in the barracks building of the Naval Air Station with approximately 50 employees. Today, the Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS) Directorate is a major organization at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with more than 500 employees who continue to contribute to our evolving national security mission. For more than half a century, the mission of the Laboratory revolved primarily around nuclear deterrence and associated defense technologies. Today, Livermore supports a broad-based national security mission, and our specialized capabilities increasingly support emerging missions in human health and energy security. In the future, CMS will play a significantly expanded role in science and technology at the intersection of national security, energy and environment, and health. Our world-class workforce will provide the science and technology base for radically innovative materials to our programs and sponsors. Our 2005 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. Organized into two major sections-research themes and dynamic teams, this report focuses on achievements arising from earlier investments that address future challenges. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national security mission. Research Themes: (1) Materials Properties and Performance under Extreme Conditions--We are developing ultrahard nanocrystalline metals, exploring the properties of nanotubes when exposed to very high temperatures, and engineering stronger materials to meet future needs for materials that can withstand extreme conditions. (2) Chemistry under Extreme Conditions and Chemical Engineering to Support National-Security Programs--Our recent discovery of a new source of coherent light adds a new tool to an array of methods we use to more fully understand the properties of materials. Insights into the early stages of polymer crystallization may lead to new materials for our national-security mission and private industry. (3) Science Supporting National Objectives at the Intersection of Chemistry, Materials Science, and Biology--We are improving drug binding for cancer treatment through the use of new tools that are helping us characterize protein-antibody interactions. By probing proteins and nucleic acids, we may gain an understanding of Alzheimer's, Mad Cow, and other neurodegenerative diseases. (4) Applied Nuclear Science for Human Health and National Security--Our work with cyanobacteria is leading to a fuller understanding of how these microorganisms affect the global carbon cycle. We are also developing new ways to reduce nuclear threats with better radiation detectors. Dynamic Teams: The dynamic teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure that supports a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. Our three divisions maintain a close relationship with Laboratory programs, working with directorate and program leaders to ensure an effective response to programmatic needs. CMS's divisions are responsible for line management and leadership, and together, provide us with the flexibility and agility to respond to change and meet program milestones. The three divisions are: Materials Science and Technology Division; Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Division; and Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division. By maintaining an organizational structure that offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, we are able to nurture the discoveries and breakthroughs required for future successes. The dynamic teams section also presents the work of CMS's postdoctoral fellows, who bring to the Laboratory many of the most recent advances taking place in academic departments and provide a research stimulus to established research teams. Postdo

Diaz De La Rubia, T; Fluss, M J; Rath, K; Rennie, G; Shang, S; Kitrinos, G

2006-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

Lampert, C.M. [ed.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four alloys was comparable after sodium exposures at 550 C; the weight loss of ferritic-martensitic steels, G92 and G91 is more significant than that of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS after sodium exposures at 650 C. Sodium exposures up to 2700 h at 550 C had no significant influence on tensile properties, while sodium exposures up to 5064 h at 650 C dramatically lowered the tensile strengths of the four alloys. The ultimate tensile strength of H1 G92, H2 G92, and G91 ferritic-martensitic steels was reduced to as much as nearly half of its initial value after sodium exposures at 650 C. Though the uniform elongation was recovered to some extent, these three ferritic-martensitic steels showed considerable strain softening after sodium exposures. The yield stress of HT-UPS austenitic stainless steel increased, the ultimate tensile strength decreased, and the total elongation was reduced after sodium exposures at 650 C. The dynamic strain aging effect observed in the as-received HT-UPS specimens became less pronounced after sodium exposures at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of sodium-exposed specimens showed no appreciable surface deterioration or grain structure changes under an optical microscope, except for the H2 G92 steel, in which the martensite structure transformed to large grain ferrite after sodium exposures at 650 C. TEM observations of the sodium-exposed H2 G92 steel showed significant recrystallization after sodium exposure for 2700 h at 550 C, and transformation of martensite to ferrite and high density of precipitates in nearly dislocation-free matrix after sodium exposures at 650 C. Further microstructural analysis and evaluation of decarburization/carburization behavior is needed to understand the dramatic changes in the tensile strengths of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic steels after sodium exposures at 650 C.

Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Feed Materials Production Center, Fernald, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the environmental survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC), conducted June 16 through 27, 1986. The survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the FMPC. The survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at FMPC, and interviews with site personnel. The survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its onsite activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE national laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the FMPC Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the FMPC survey. 41 refs., 20 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes - May 2008  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Chemical Hydrogen Storage Center of Excellence FY2008 Second Quarter Milestone Report: Technical report describing assessment of hydrogen storage materials and progress towards meeting DOE’s hydrogen

69

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Division of Materials Sciences, Office of Basic EnergyDivision of lllaterials Sciences, Office of Basic :energyDivision of Materials Sciences, Office of the Basic Energy

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy Materials Blue Ribbon Panel Report June 2010 - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 22, 2010 ... The Energy Materials Blue Ribbon Panel convened by TMS has released “ Linking Transformational Materials and Processing for an Energy- ...

71

FY 2006 Annual Progress Report - Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inc.) ... 67 4. MATERIALS FOR AIR HANDLING AND THERMAL MANAGEMENT... 75 A. Austenitic Stainless Steel...

72

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION Annual Report 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ve materials, useful for energy conversion applications, such as early detection of flaws in nuclear

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is presented concerning materials science including metallurgy and ceramics; solid state physics; and materials chemistry; chemical sciences covering radiation science, chemical physics, and chemical energy; nuclear science; coal research; solar energy; magnetic fusion, conservation; and environmental research. (FS)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Materials in In-situ Oil Shale Retorting Environments,"of Materials in In-Situ Oil Shale Environments," 8thUtilization of Metals in Oil Shale Retort Components Alan V.

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Corrosion and materials selection report update non-proprietary version. Final technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The revised Baseline design (dated 22 October, 1982) used most of the available information with regard to the corrosion, erosion and materials of construction. This information was collected through various programs conducted at the major coal liquefaction pilot plants, e.g. SRC-1 and SRC-2, H-Coal and EDS, and at various research laboratories. The selection of materials of construction was also based on certain basic assumptions with regard to the plant life and life of each type of equipment. Other selection criteria included various process considerations and economics. In cases where no data on corrosion and erosion was available, past experience, licensors' knowhow and engineering judgement, were utilized in the selection process. Beyond the date of publication of the revised Baseline document, additional data from various pilot plants and lab programs has been made available. On account of continuous review being performed by DOE and their subcontractors and consultants, a number of comments were forwarded to ICRC. These comments and latest developmental programs suggested several improvements in the design. This report consists of the following major sections: A discussion on corrosion/erosion related research and pilot plant programs; the materials selection criterion, including plant and equipment life, and various process considerations, are discussed in detail; copies of the materials diagrams from the Revised Baseline are attached; ICRC response to unresolved materials-related comments is included in the Appendix A; areas of concern and data gaps, with regard to the materials of construction are identified; and recommended areas of future research and development programs are listed.

Agrawal, P.D.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Summary Report for the Development of Materials for Volatile Radionuclides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials development summarized here is in support of the Waste Forms campaign, Volatile Radionuclide task. Specifically, materials are being developed for the removal and immobilization of iodine and krypton, specifically 129I and 85Kr. During FY 2010, aerogel materials were investigated for removal and immobilization of 129I. Two aerogel formulations were investigated, one based on silica aerogels and the second on chalcogenides. For 85Kr, metal organic framework (MOF) structures were investigated.

Strachan, Denis M.; Chun, Jaehun; Henager, Charles H.; Matyas, Josef; Riley, Brian J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Thallapally, Praveen K.

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

TMS/ASM Workshop Report Scopes Out Materials Data Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2013 ... According to Henry, the CMD Network "supports advanced computational materials science and engineering by facilitating the completion of ...

78

Advanced Industrial Materials Program. Annual progress report, FY 1993  

SciTech Connect

Mission of the AIM program is to commercialize new/improved materials and materials processing methods that will improve energy efficiency, productivity, and competitiveness. Program investigators in the DOE national laboratories are working with about 100 companies, including 15 partners in CRDAs. Work is being done on intermetallic alloys, ceramic composites, metal composites, polymers, engineered porous materials, and surface modification. The program supports other efforts in the Office of Industrial Technologies to assist the energy-consuming process industries. The aim of the AIM program is to bring materials from basic research to industrial application to strengthen the competitive position of US industry and save energy.

Stooksbury, F. [comp.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

June 2013 Most Viewed Documents for Fossil Fuels | OSTI, US Dept...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fossil Fuels Controlled low strength materials (CLSM), reported by ACI Committee 229 Rajendran, N. (1997) 78 EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL DETERMINATION OF HEAVY OIL VISCOSITY UNDER...

80

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending June 30, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat-source containment materials; (3) isotope brayton system materials support; and (4) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Use of recycled materials in highway construction. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of this study were to examine: (1) the types of recycled materials that are appropriate and feasible as alternative paving materials, such as glass and tires; and (2) the types of recycled materials, such as mixed-plastics and compost, that can be utilized in all types of transportation applications other than pavements. Seven key products are investigated: (1) tires, (2) glass, (3) asphalt concrete, (4) fly ash, (5) compost, (6) mixed plastics, and (7) aluminum sign stock. Performance and cost data for rubber-asphalt pavements is documented for both in-state and nationwide applications. The national experience with the use of waste glass as an additive to asphalt concrete and its use in unbound base materials is also highlighted. Programs for experimental use of recycled materials are outlined. Recommendations for staffing and program changes to deal with recycling issues are also discussed.

Swearingen, D.L.; Jackson, N.C.; Anderson, K.W.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fusion Materials Semiannual Progress Report for Period Ending December 31, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twenty-fifth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines the full spectrum of research and development activities on both metallic and non-metallic materials with primary emphasis on the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of materials for in-vessel components. This effort forms one element of the materials program being conducted in support of the Fusion Energy Sciences Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately.

Rowcliff, A.F.; Burn, G.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Summary report of the Solar Reflective Materials Technology Workshop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Reflective Materials Technology Workshop sponsored by the Department of Energy and organized by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the Solar Energy Research Institute was held on March 28--30, 1978, in Denver, Colorado. The two and one-half day seminar/workshop was attended by over 95 people representing some 60 private companies and government laboratories. The purpose of the workshop was to assess the ''state-of-the-art'' of solar reflector materials technology, define current mirror design requirements, and make recommendations to DOE for future research and development efforts. The reflector materials are defined for the purpose of this workshop as including all the materials which make up the reflector structure including the actual reflecting surface, the protective coatings, and the support substrate. The reflective surface includes metals, metallic films, metallic alloys, and dielectric or ceramic stacks. The protective coatings, which can be applied to both the front and back of the reflective surface, include such materials as polymer paints and films as well as inorganic coatings such as SiO, MgF/sub 2/ and thin glass. Mirror support structures which have been considered include polymer foams, cellular glass, aluminum honeycomb, wood and paper products, and fiberglass and epoxy composites. The authors of the invited papers were asked to emphasize one or more of four basic areas. These topics included: the requirements and properties for reflector materials, the testing procedures used to evaluate the materials, the results of environmental tests performed on some of the materials, and the actual field experience of solar concentrator structures. Acknowledging that the most severe applications for reflector materials result from high concentration ratio or central receiver concepts, the majority of the speakers addressed specific problems dealing with these concepts. (WHK)

Lind, M.A.; Ault, L.E.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, FY 1994. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thrust areas of the weapons-supporting research include surface science, fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals, energetic materials, etc. The laboratory directed R and D include director`s initiatives, individual projects, and transactinium science studies.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and total Immer­ sion 1n shale oil on the corrosion of steel1013 steel. Exposure to shale oil at 300 C for 100 hoursof Materials in In-situ Oil Shale Retorting Environments,"

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Materials and Chemical Sciences Division annual report, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research programs from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in materials science, chemical science, nuclear science, fossil energy, energy storage, health and environmental sciences, program development funds, and work for others is briefly described. (CBS)

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION Annual Report 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stainless Steel in Coal Gasification Environments, LBL-733Z.of Materials Used in Coal Gasification Plants, AGA- ERDA-MPCon ~hterials for the Gasification of Coal, presented to the

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Chemistry and Materials Science, 1990--1991. [Second annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2-year (FY 1990-91) contains 49 technical articles in ten sections: research sampler, metals and alloys, energetic materials, chemistry and physics of advanced materials, bonding and reactions at surfaces and interfaces, superconductivity, energy R and D, waste processing and management, characterization and analysis, and facilities and instrumentation. Two more sections list department personnel, their publications etc., consultants, and summary of department budgets. The articles are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

Sugihara, T.T.; Bruner, J.M.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

89

Technical Progress Report on Boiler Materials Development for USC Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major, 5-year, national effort is being sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) to develop/evaluate materials for advanced ultrasupercritical (AUSC) boilers capable of operating with steam up to 760C (1400F), 35 MPa (5000 psia). This work is being carried out by a consortium comprised of Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO), EPRI, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and all domestic boiler manufacturers. The scope of the materials evaluation includes mechani...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

90

Materials Technology Support for Radioisotope Power Systems Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the period of this sponsored research, UDRI performed a number of materials related tasks that helped to facilitate increased understanding of the properties and applications of a number of candidate program related materials including; effects of neutron irradiation on tantalum alloys using a 500kW reactor, thermodynamic based modeling of the chemical species in weld pools, and the application of candidate coatings for increased oxidation resistance of FWPF (Fine Weave Pierced Fabric) modules.

Daniel P. Kramer; Chadwick D. Barklay

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program: 19th Annual Report, October 1, 2005 - September 30, 2006  

SciTech Connect

Annual Report contains overview of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory User Program and includes selected highlights of user activities for FY2006. Report is submitted to individuals within sponsoring DOE agency and to other interested individuals.

Pasto, Arvid [ORNL

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Report Reveals Not-So-Rare Earth Elements - Materials Technology ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nov 22, 2010 ... The report describes significant deposits of REE in 14 states, with the ... Bokan Mountain, Alaska; and the Bear Lodge Mountains, Wyoming.

93

Fusion reactor materials. Semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

Rowcliffe, A.F.; Burn, G.L.; Knee`, S.S.; Dowker, C.L. [comps.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Materials Degradation and Detection (MD2): Deep Dive Final Report  

SciTech Connect

An effort is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a fundamental and general framework to foster the science and technology needed to support real-time monitoring of early degradation in materials used in the production of nuclear power. The development of such a capability would represent a timely solution to the mounting issues operators face with materials degradation in nuclear power plants. The envisioned framework consists of three primary and interconnected “thrust” areas including 1) microstructural science, 2) behavior assessment, and 3) monitoring and predictive capabilities. A brief state-of-the-art assessment for each of these core technology areas is discussed in the paper.

McCloy, John S.; Montgomery, Robert O.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hu, Shenyang Y.; Li, Yulan; Henager, Charles H.; Johnson, Bradley R.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Materials characterization center workshop on compositional and microstructural analysis of nuclear waste materials. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Workshop on Compositional and Microstructural Analysis of Nuclear Waste Materials, conducted November 11 and 12, 1980, was to critically examine and evaluate the various methods currently used to study non-radioactive, simulated, nuclear waste-form performance. Workshop participants recognized that most of the Materials Characterization Center (MCC) test data for inclusion in the Nuclear Waste Materials Handbook will result from application of appropriate analytical procedures to waste-package materials or to the products of performance tests. Therefore, the analytical methods must be reliable and of known accuracy and precision, and results must be directly comparable with those from other laboratories and from other nuclear waste materials. The 41 participants representing 18 laboratories in the United States and Canada were organized into three working groups: Analysis of Liquids and Solutions, Quantitative Analysis of Solids, and Phase and Microstructure Analysis. Each group identified the analytical methods favored by their respective laboratories, discussed areas needing attention, listed standards and reference materials currently used, and recommended means of verifying interlaboratory comparability of data. The major conclusions from this workshop are presented.

Daniel, J.L.; Strachan, D.M.; Shade, J.W.; Thomas, M.T.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publications and Reports d. Oil Shale Retort Components A.in Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts Research Plans forP. 1111ittle and A. V. Levy, "Oil Shale Eetort Components,"

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Annual Report Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in uncovering the unique electronic properties of graphene, which is a remarkable new material consisting. "Flexible Electronics, NanoCenter Industrial Workshop (Samsung)," August, 2007. "Graphene is all surface Function, Screening, and Plasmons in Two-Dimensional Graphene, E.H. Hwang and S. Das Sarma, Phys. Rev. B 75

Lathrop, Daniel P.

98

Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program annual progress report, FY 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program is a part of the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, US Department of Energy (DOE). The mission of AIM is to support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve energy efficiency, productivity, product quality, and reduced waste in the major process industries. OIT has embarked on a fundamentally new way of working with industries--the Industries of the Future (IOF) strategy--concentrating on the major process industries that consume about 90% of the energy and generate about 90% of the waste in the industrial sector. These are the aluminum, chemical, forest products, glass, metalcasting, and steel industries. OIT has encouraged and assisted these industries in developing visions of what they will be like 20 or 30 years into the future, defining the drivers, technology needs, and barriers to realization of their visions. These visions provide a framework for development of technology roadmaps and implementation plans, some of which have been completed. The AIM Program supports IOF by conducting research and development on materials to solve problems identified in the roadmaps. This is done by National Laboratory/industry/university teams with the facilities and expertise needed to develop new and improved materials. Each project in the AIM Program has active industrial participation and support.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Stress corrosion cracking of candidate waste container materials; Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Six alloys have been selected as candidate container materials for the storage of high-level nuclear waste at the proposed Yucca mountain site in Nevada. These materials are Type 304L stainless steel (SS). Type 316L SS, Incoloy 825, phosphorus-deoxidized Cu, Cu-30%Ni, and Cu-7%Al. The present program has been initiated to determine whether any of these materials can survive for 300 years in the site environment without developing through-wall stress corrosion cracks. and to assess the relative resistance of these materials to stress corrosion cracking (SCC)- A series of slow-strain-rate tests (SSRTs) and fracture-mechanics crack-growth-rate (CGR) tests was performed at 93{degree}C and 1 atm of pressure in simulated J-13 well water. This water is representative, prior to the widespread availability of unsaturated-zone water, of the groundwater present at the Yucca Mountain site. Slow-strain-rate tests were conducted on 6.35-mm-diameter cylindrical specimens at strain rates of 10-{sup {minus}7} and 10{sup {minus}8} s{sup {minus}1} under crevice and noncrevice conditions. All tests were interrupted after nominal elongation strain of 1--4%. Scanning electron microscopy revealed some crack initiation in virtually all the materials, as well as weldments made from these materials. A stress- or strain-ratio cracking index ranks these materials, in order of increasing resistance to SCC, as follows: Type 304 SS < Type 316L SS < Incoloy 825 < Cu-30%Ni < Cu and Cu-7%Al. Fracture-mechanics CGR tests were conducted on 25.4-mm-thick compact tension specimens of Types 304L and 316L stainless steel (SS) and Incoloy 825. Crack-growth rates were measured under various load conditions: load ratios M of 0.5--1.0, frequencies of 10{sup {minus}3}-1 Hz, rise nines of 1--1000s, and peak stress intensities of 25--40 MPa{center_dot}m {sup l/2}.

Park, J.Y.; Maiya, P.S.; Soppet, W.K.; Diercks, D.R.; Shack, W.J.; Kassner, T.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report Rapidly Renewable RAPIDLY RENEWABLE MATERIALS: WOOL AND CORK Done by: Bin Ou-Yang David Tan Ritesh Bhan #12;i ABSTRACT This report presents an investigation into the feasibility of using two rapidly renewable materials, cork

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UBC Social Ecological Economic Development Studies (SEEDS) Student Report An Investigation into Rapidly Renewable Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into Rapidly Renewable Materials: Bamboo and Cotton Mohammad Hassan Jafarian Thanet (Vic) Ying-udomrat Xiao of a project/report". #12;Page 1 An Investigation into Rapidly Renewable Materials: Bamboo and Cotton Prepared of renewable resources. Renewable resources, whether it is energy or material, are the ones that can

102

Material  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Li(Ni{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.15}Al{sub 0.05}Mn{sub 0.4})O{sub 2} was investigated to understand the effect of replacement of the cobalt by aluminum on the structural and electrochemical properties. In situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was performed, utilizing a novel in situ electrochemical cell, specifically designed for long-term X-ray experiments. The cell was cycled at a moderate rate through a typical Li-ion battery operating voltage range. (1.0-4.7 V) XAS measurements were performed at different states of charge (SOC) during cycling, at the Ni, Co, and the Mn edges, revealing details about the response of the cathode to Li insertion and extraction processes. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) region of the spectra revealed the changes of bond distance and coordination number of Ni, Co, and Mn absorbers as a function of the SOC of the material. The oxidation states of the transition metals in the system are Ni{sup 2+}, Co{sup 3+}, and Mn{sup 4+} in the as-made material (fully discharged), while during charging the Ni{sup 2+} is oxidized to Ni{sup 4+} through an intermediate stage of Ni{sup 3+}, Co{sup 3+} is oxidized toward Co{sup 4+}, and Mn was found to be electrochemically inactive and remained as Mn{sup 4+}. The EXAFS results during cycling show that the Ni-O changes the most, followed by Co-O, and Mn-O varies the least. These measurements on this cathode material confirmed that the material retains its symmetry and good structural short-range order leading to the superior cycling reported earlier.

Rumble, C.; Conry, T.E.; Doeff, Marca; Cairns, Elton J.; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Deb, Aniruddha

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

Htun, K.M.

1984-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS LABORATORY SAFETY REPORT, MARTIN NUCLEAR FACILITY, QUEHANNA SITE  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of the safety features and the major alterations to be performed prior to occupancy. The evaluation was made in support of fubrication work on the production of safe isotopic power sources from Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/. The chemical, nuclear, and radiobiological properties of Cm/sup 242/ and Sr/sup 90/ are outlined. The projected physical fiow of materials for production of the isotopic power souroes is schematically given. An evaluation of the malfunctions, operational hazards, and remedial health physics procedures is presented. The analysis and evaluation of postulated maximum credible incidents are demonstrated. (B.O.G.)

1960-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Engineered Materials for Cesium and Strontium Storage Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Closing the nuclear fuel cycle requires reprocessing spent fuel to recover the long-lived components that still have useful energy content while immobilizing the remnant waste fission products in stable forms. At the genesis of this project, next generation spent fuel reprocessing methods were being developed as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. One of these processes was focused on solvent extraction schemes to isolate cesium (Cs) and strontium (Sr) from spent nuclear fuel. Isolating these isotopes for short-term decay storage eases the design requirements for long-term repository disposal; a significant amount of the radiation and decay heat in fission product waste comes from Cs-137 and Sr-90. For the purposes of this project, the Fission Product Extraction (FPEX) process is being considered to be the baseline extraction method. The objective of this project was to evaluate the nature and behavior of candidate materials for cesium and strontium immobilization; this will include assessments with minor additions of yttrium, barium, and rubidium in these materials. More specifically, the proposed research achieved the following objectives (as stated in the original proposal): (1) Synthesize simulated storage ceramics for Cs and Sr using an existing labscale steam reformer at Purdue University. The simulated storage materials will include aluminosilicates, zirconates and other stable ceramics with the potential for high Cs and Sr loading. (2) Characterize the immobilization performance, phase structure, thermal properties and stability of the simulated storage ceramics. The ceramic products will be stable oxide powders and will be characterized to quantify their leach resistance, phase structure, and thermophysical properties. The research progressed in two stages. First, a steam reforming process was used to generate candidate Cs/Sr storage materials for characterization. This portion of the research was carried out at Purdue University and is detailed in Appendix A. Steam reforming proved to be too rigorous for efficient The second stage of this project was carried out at Texas A&M University and is Detailed in Appendix B. In this stage, a gentler ceramic synthesis process using Cs and Sr loaded kaolinite and bentonite clays was developed in collaboration with Dr. M. Kaminski at Argonne National Laboratory.

Sean M. McDeavitt

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hazardous material minimization for radar assembly. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Clean Air Act Amendment, enacted in November 1990, empowered the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to completely eliminate the production and usage of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) by January 2000. A reduction schedule for methyl chloroform beginning in 1993 with complete elimination by January 2002 was also mandated. In order to meet the mandates, the processes, equipment, and materials used to solder and clean electronic assemblies were investigated. A vapor-containing cleaning system was developed. The system can be used with trichloroethylene or d-Limonene. The solvent can be collected for recycling if desired. Fluxless and no-clean soldering were investigated, and the variables for a laser soldering process were identified.

Biggs, P.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Big Rock Point Aged Material Sampling Program -- Project Closeout Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In submitting an application for license renewal for a nuclear power plant, utilities must demonstrate that aging effects applicable to plant components will be effectively managed during the extended operating term. Destructive and non-destructive evaluation of components in operating plants provides particularly relevant information on aging effects and mechanisms that can be used to support a license renewal submittal. Such information is difficult to obtain. This report describes an effort to obtain ...

2002-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

108

Fusion materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This is the eighteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: {sm_bullet} Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance. {sm_bullet} Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies. {sm_bullet} Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide. This report has been compiled and edited under the guidance of A.F. Rowcliffe by Gabrielle Burn, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Their efforts, and the efforts of the many persons who made technical contributions, are gratefully acknowledged.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Electronic processes in thin-film PV materials. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The electronic and optical processes in an important class of thin-film PV materials, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and related alloys, have been investigated using several experimental techniques designed for thin-film geometries. The experimental techniques include various magnetic resonance and optical spectroscopies and combinations of these two spectroscopies. Two-step optical excitation processes through the manifold of silicon dangling bond states have been identifies as important at low excitation energies. Local hydrogen motion has been studied using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques and found to be much more rapid than long range diffusion as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. A new metastable effect has been found in a-Si:H films alloyed with sulfur. Spin-one optically excited states have been unambiguously identified using optically detected electron spin resonance. Local hydrogen bonding in microcrystalline silicon films has been studied using NMR.

Taylor, P.C.; Chen, D.; Chen, S.L. [and others

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M. [comps.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Dosimetry using environmental and biological materials. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although theoretical models have been the traditional tool for assessment of doses delivered by nuclear accidents, their use is now accompanied by increasing political and scientific demand for physical measurements which provide site specific dose information related directly to the original events, can be used to verify and augment the theoretical models, and can be performed and reflicated by independent laboratories. This report details a four year effort to improve the sensitivity and reliability of retrospective methods, to collaborate with laboratories engaged in related research, and to share the technology with startup laboratories seeking similar capabilities.

Haskell, E.; Kenner, G.; Hayes, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Depart of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. Separate abstracts were prepared for each individual section.

Not Available

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Alternate electrode materials for the SP100 reactor. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work was performed in response to a request by the Astro-Space Division of the General Electric Co. to develop alternate electrodes materials for the electrodes of the PD2 modules to be used in the SP100 thermoelectric power conversion system. Initially, the project consisted of four tasks: (1) development of a ZrB{sub 2} (C) CVD coating on SiMo substrates, (2) development of a ZrB{sub 2} (C) CVD coating on SiGe substrates, (3) development of CVI W for porous graphite electrodes, and (4) technology transfer of pertinent developed processes. The project evolved initially into developing only ZrB{sub 2} coatings on SiGe and graphite substrates, and later into developing ZrB{sub 2} coatings only on graphite substrates. Several sizes of graphite and pyrolytic carbon-coated graphite substrates were coated with ZrB{sub 2} during the project. For budgetary reasons, the project was terminated after half the allotted time had passed. Apart from the production of coated specimens for evaluation, the major accomplishment of the project was the development of the CVD processing to produce the desired coatings.

Randich, E.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for period ending September 30, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth in series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following technical progress reports: Alloy Development of Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials program being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

Not Available

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Fusion Reactor Materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the twelfth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; and Special Purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the US Department of Energy. The other major element of the program is concerned with the interactions between reactor materials and the plasma and is reported separately. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) Fiscal Year 1999 annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1999 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

None

2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Fiscal year 1996. Annual technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. The EMaCC reports to the Director of the Office of Energy Research in his or her capacity as overseer of the technical programs of the Department. This annual technical report is mandated by the EMaCC terms of reference. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1996 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is reported on materials for magnetic fusion energy, laser fusion energy, Al-air batteries, geothermal energy, oil shale, nuclear waste management, thermochemical cycles for hydrogen production, chemistry, and basic energy science. (FS)

Truhan, J.J.; Weld, F.N.

1979-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories annual report, fiscal year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1993. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included.

Martin, D.R.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, February-May 1980  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported in the magnetic fusion energy and laser fusion energy programs, aluminium-air battery and vehicle research, geothermal research, nuclear waste management, basic energy science, and chemistry and materials science. (FS)

Truhan, J.J.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Sandia National Laboratories, California Hazardous Materials Management Program annual report : February 2009.  

SciTech Connect

The annual program report provides detailed information about all aspects of the Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) Hazardous Materials Management Program. It functions as supporting documentation to the SNL/CA Environmental anagement ystem Program Manual. This program annual report describes the activities undertaken during the past year, and activities planned in future years to implement the Hazardous Materials Management Program, one of six programs that supports environmental management at SNL/CA.

Brynildson, Mark E.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) progress report for DOE Office of Buildings Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

The Monthly Report of the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) Program is a monthly update of both in-house ORNL projects and subcontract activities in the research areas of building materials, wall systems, foundations, roofs, building diagnostics, and research utilization and technology transfer. Presentations are not stand-alone paragraphs every month. Their principal values are the short-time lapse between accomplishment and reporting and their evolution over a period of several months.

Burn, G. (comp.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) progress report for DOE Office of Buildings Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

The Monthly Report of the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) Program is a monthly update of both in-house ORNL projects and subcontract activities in the research areas of building materials, wall systems, foundations, roofs, and building diagnostics. Presentations are not stand-alone paragraphs every month. Their principal values are the short-time lapse between accomplishment and reporting and their evolution over a period of several months.

Burn, G. (comp.)

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Building thermal envelope systems and materials (BTESM) monthly progress report for DOE Office Buildings Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

The Monthly Report of the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) Program is a monthly update of both in-house ORNL projects and subcontract activities in the research areas of building materials, wall systems, foundations, roofs, and building diagnostics. Presentations are not stand-alone paragraphs every month. Their principal values are the short-time lapse between accomplishment and reporting and their evolution over a period of several months.

Burn, G. (comp.)

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Critical Issues Report and Roadmap for the Advanced Radiation-Resistant Materials Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a program to identify and qualify advanced materials for use in structural applications in light water reactor (LWR) internals for extended operating periods, possibly 80 or more years. It describes the current situation with regard to irradiation-induced degradation of structural materials in LWR reactor internals and identifies the types of improvements needed for extended operating periods. It reviews the range of possible types of advanced materials, describes the ...

2012-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fusion reactor materials semiannual progress report for the period ending March 31, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report mainly discusses topics on the physical effects of radiation on thermonuclear reactor materials. The areas discussed are: irradiation facilities, test matrices, and experimental methods; dosimetry, damage parameters, and activation calculations; fundamental mechanical behavior; radiation effects; mechanistic studies, theory and modeling; development of structural alloys; solid breeding materials; and ceramics. (FI)

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Isotopic power materials development. Quarterly progress report for period ending December 31, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on: (1) high-temperature alloys for space isotopic heat sources; (2) physical and mechanical metallurgy of heat source containment materials; (3) /sup 144/Cm fuel development; (4) terrestrial radioisotope applications; (5) selenide isotope generator system support; (6) isotope Brayton system materials support; and (7) space nuclear flight systems hardware. (TFD)

Schaffhauser, A.C.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear materials stabilization and packaging end-of-year status report, April 1--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress on the Los Alamos Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Packaging projects for the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year 1996. It covers development and production activities for the Plutonium Packaging project, the Plutonium Recovery and Stabilization project, and the Uranium Recovery and Stabilization project. In addition, it reports on quality assurance activities for the Plutonium Packaging project.

Rink, N.A.; Aguino, V.T. [comps.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Quarterly progress report on the evaluation of critical materials for photovoltaic cells  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the activities included in this program are as follows: (1) characterize new and improved photovoltaic cell designs and production processes for subsequent analysis; (2) review or screen these designs for potential material shortages or other constraints; (3) carry out investigations of the probable costs of new sources of materials potentially in short supply, concentrating on gallium and indium; and (4) identify options for coping with or mitigating the problems identified. The methodology and data base used in the CMAP (Critical Material Analysis Program) computer program were developed as part of a broad scale DOE program to review the potential material constraints of all solar programs. The photovoltaic report screened 13 cells in 15 systems and assumed 100% material utilization (process efficiency) in producing the photovoltaic cells. This study emphasizes the availability of cell fabrication feedstock materials and the effects of process efficiencies on material availability by adding characterizations of photovoltaic production processes. This quarterly report presents the results of work with emphasis on Task I, the characterization of photovoltaic cells and their production processes. Task IIA, CMAP Modification, Data Base Development and Operation has been initiated. Task IIB, Review, Integration, Interpretation and Analysis of Screening will begin once the baseline screening has been completed in Task IIA. Work on Task IIIA, the Assessment of Future Costs and Supplies of Gallium and Indium and Task IIIB, Economics of Coal Derived PV Materials have been initiated. Progress and initial results are reported. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Pawlewicz, W.W.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC): Annual technical report, fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC) serves primarily to enhance coordination among the Department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the Department. These functions are accomplished through the exchange of budgetary and planning information among program managers and through technical meetings/workshops on selected topics involving both DOE and major contractors. In addition, EMaCC assists in obtaining materials-related inputs for both intra- and interagency compilations. This report summarizes EMaCC activities for FY 1993 and describes the materials research programs of various offices and divisions within the Department. The program descriptions consist of a funding summary for each Assistant Secretary office and the Office of Energy Research, and detailed project summaries with project goals and accomplishments. The FY 1993 budget summary table for DOE Materials Activities in each of the programs is presented.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Flows of selected hazardous materials by rail. Final report for Sep 87-Apr 91  

SciTech Connect

The report is a review of hazardous materials rail traffic in the continental United States. It focuses on the year 1986, a relatively typical recent year in which an estimated total of 1,477 million net tons of freight was moved by rail. Of this, 63 million net tons, or four percent of the total, were hazardous materials. The report is designed to characterize the flow of selected hazardous materials and show their geographical distribution. It focusses on materials that (1) have large tonnages moving by rail, such as Products of Refining, (2) are regarded as especially dangerous, such as Products That May Be Toxic by Inhalation, or (3) have been recently designated as hazardous materials, such as molten or liquid sulphur. Its scope includes national, state and Business Economic Areas (BEAs) rail traffic. The purpose of the report is to help those in government and industry who are interested in the flows of hazardous materials see how these materials are geographically distributed by rail.

Beier, F.; Church, R.; Zebe, P.; Frev, J.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

EPRI Report on Solid Material Disposition: Evaluation to Assess Industry Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2005, the NRC staff requested Commission approval for publication of a proposed rule in the Federal Register to amend 10CFR Part 20 to include criteria for controlling the disposition of solid materials. This report provides an initial analysis of whether or not methods of solid material assessment, currently practiced at nuclear power facilities, would be sufficient to meet the disposition limits in the proposed rule.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Screening report on cell materials for high-power Li-Ion HEV batteries.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Battery Technology Department at Argonne National Laboratory is a major participant in the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Technology Development (ATD) program. This multi-national laboratory program is dedicated to improving lithium-ion batteries for high-power HEV and FCEV applications. As part of the FreedomCAR Partnership, this program is addressing the three key barriers for high-power lithium-ion batteries: calendar life, abuse tolerance, and cost. All three of these barriers can be addressed by the choice of materials used in the cell chemistry. To date, the ATD program has developed two high-power cell chemistries, denoted our Gen 1 and Gen 2 cell chemistries. The selection of materials for use in the Gen 2 cell chemistry was based largely on reducing material cost and extending cell calendar life, relative to our Gen 1 cell chemistry. Table 1 provides a list of the materials used in our Gen 2 cell chemistry and their projected costs, when produced in large-scale quantities. In evaluating advanced materials, we have focused our efforts on materials that are lower cost than those listed in Table 1, while simultaneously offering enhanced chemical, structural, and thermal stability. Therefore, we have focused on natural graphite anode materials (having round-edge particle morphologies), cathode materials that contain more Mn and less Co and Ni (which can be produced via low-cost processes), lower cost electrode binders and/or binders that possess superior bonding properties at lower concentrations, and lower cost salts and solvents (with superior thermal and oxidation/reduction stability) for use in the electrolyte. The purpose of this report is to document the results of screening tests that were performed on a large number of advanced low-cost materials. These materials were screened for their potential to impact positively on the calendar life, safety, and/or cost of high-power lithium-ion cell chemistries, relative to our Gen 2 cell chemistry. As part of this effort, we developed and employed a set of standard test protocols to evaluate all of the materials. After brief descriptions of the screening test methodologies and equipment, relevant data on each material are summarized in the body of this report. We have evaluated five categories of materials, and the report is organized accordingly. Results will be presented on advanced carbons for anodes, improved cathode materials, new salts and solvent systems, alternative binders, and novel separators.

Liu, J.; Kahaian, A.; Belharouak, I.; Kang, S.; Oliver, S.; Henriksen, S.; Amine, K.

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Final report on the oxidation of energetic materials in supercritical water. Final Air Force report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the suitability of oxidation in supercritical fluids (SCO), particularly water (SCWO), for disposal of propellants, explosives, and pyrotechnics (PEPs). The SCO studies of PEPs addressed the following issues: The efficiency of destruction of the substrate. The products of destruction contained in the effluents. Whether the process can be conducted safely on a large scale. Whether energy recovery from the process is economically practicable. The information essential for process development and equipment design was also investigated, including issues such as practical throughput of explosives through a SCWO reactor, reactor materials and corrosion, and models for process design and optimization.

Buelow, S.J.; Allen, D.; Anderson, G.K. [and others

1995-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

135

Reclamation, reconstruction, and reuse of phosphogypsum for building materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Phosphogypsum, a by-product of phosphate fertilizer production, is a material that has potential for use in road building and other construction uses. Engineering properties of a number of phosphogypsum containing products are described and experimental programs to demonstrate applications are reported.

Chang, W.F.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Heavy Vehicle Materials Program 2005 Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MERIT REVIEW & PEER EVALUATION REPORT MERIT REVIEW & PEER EVALUATION REPORT HEAVY VEHICLE MATERIALS PROGRAM Less dependence on foreign oil, and eventual transition to an emissions-free, petroleum-free vehicle F r e e d o m C A r A n d V e h i C l e T e C h n o l o g i e s P r o g r A m Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 2005 Dear Colleague: This document summarizes the comments provided by the Review Panel for the FY 2005 Department of Energy (DOE) Heavy Vehicle Materials Program Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, held September 13-15, 2005 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The goal of this document is to provide the reader with a summary of the comments and scores from expert reviewers from industry and government on these Materials Technologies projects.

137

Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials and methods are available as supplementary materials on Science Online. 16. W. Benz, A. G. W. Cameron, H. J. Melosh, Icarus 81, 113 (1989). 17. S. L. Thompson, H. S. Lauson, Technical Rep. SC-RR-710714, Sandia Nat. Labs (1972). 18. H. J. Melosh, Meteorit. Planet. Sci. 42, 2079 (2007). 19. S. Ida, R. M. Canup, G. R. Stewart, Nature 389, 353 (1997). 20. E. Kokubo, J. Makino, S. Ida, Icarus 148, 419 (2000). 21. M. M. M. Meier, A. Reufer, W. Benz, R. Wieler, Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society LXXIV, abstr. 5039 (2011). 22. C. B. Agnor, R. M. Canup, H. F. Levison, Icarus 142, 219 (1999). 23. D. P. O'Brien, A. Morbidelli, H. F. Levison, Icarus 184, 39 (2006). 24. R. M. Canup, Science 307, 546 (2005). 25. J. J. Salmon, R. M. Canup, Lunar Planet. Sci. XLIII, 2540 (2012). Acknowledgments: SPH simulation data are contained in tables S2 to S5 of the supplementary materials. Financial support

138

TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE MATERIAL AND PERSONNEL HANDLING SYSTEM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Title III Evaluation Report (TER) provides the results of an evaluation that was conducted on the Material and Personnel Handling System. This TER has been written in accordance with the ''Technical Document Preparation Plan for the Mined Geologic Disposal System Title III Evaluation Reports'' (BA0000000-01717-4600-00005 REV 03). The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Material and Personnel Handling System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, the technical baseline requirements, and the baseline design are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications.

T. A. Misiak

1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

139

SERI Materials Branch semiannual report, January 1, 1978--June 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Comprehensive program planning, laboratory development, and cooperative research programs with subcontractors are reported. Initial planning has given direction to the materials research activated by SERI. The program planning activities have been consolidated so that the plans for reflector, absorber, and polymer materials research are complementary to each other and support the Branch effort to assess materials limitations in solar energy conversion systems. New equipment and General Services Administration (GSA) surplus equipment have been obtained or ordered. Laboratories for housing the equipment have been specified, laid out, and are under construction. Cooperative research contracts have been placed with Clarkson College (black chrome degradation) and the Colorado School of Mines (corrosion electrode development, black cobalt preparation and properties, sorption by desiccants). Negotiations are nearly complete for contracts to survey the properties of new thermoelectric materials, to study more corrosion resistant silver alloys for second-surface plastic mirrors, and to study the UV degradation of selected polymers.

Butler, B. L.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Audit Report on "The Department's Management of Nuclear Materials Provided to Domestic Licensees"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective if to determine whether the Department of Energy (Department) was adequately managing its nuclear materials provided to domestic licensees. The audit was performed from February 2007 to September 2008 at Department Headquarters in Washington, DC, and Germantown, MD; the Oak Ridge Office and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Oak Ridge, TN. In addition, we visited or obtained data from 40 different non-Departmental facilities in various states. To accomplish the audit objective, we: (1) Reviewed Departmental and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for the control and accountability of nuclear materials; (2) Analyzed a Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS) report with ending inventory balances for Department-owned nuclear materials dated September 30, 2007, to determine the amount and types of nuclear materials located at non-Department domestic facilities; (3) Held discussions with Department and NRC personnel that used NMMSS information to determine their roles and responsibilities related to the control and accountability over nuclear materials; (4) Selected a judgmental sample of 40 non-Department domestic facilities; (5) Met with licensee officials and sent confirmations to determine whether their actual inventories of Department-owned nuclear materials were consistent with inventories reported in the NMMSS; and, (6) Analyzed historical information related to the 2004 NMMSS inventory rebaselining initiative to determine the quantity of Department-owned nuclear materials that were written off from the domestic licensees inventory balances. This performance audit was conducted in accordance with generally accepted Government auditing standards. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain sufficient, appropriate evidence to provide a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objective. We believe that the evidence obtained provides a reasonable basis for our findings and conclusions based on our audit objectives. The audit included tests of controls and compliance with laws and regulations related to managing the Department-owned nuclear materials provided to non-Departmental domestic licensees. Because our review was limited it would not necessarily have disclosed all internal control deficiencies that may have existed at the time of our audit. We examined the establishment of performance measures in accordance with Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, as they related to the audit objective. We found that the Department had established performance measures related to removing or disposing of nuclear materials and radiological sources around the world. We utilized computer generated data during our audit and performed procedures to validate the reliability of the information as necessary to satisfy our audit objective. As noted in the report, we questioned the reliability of the NMMSS data.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Chemistry {ampersand} Materials Science program report, Weapons Resarch and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY96  

SciTech Connect

This report is the annual progress report for the Chemistry Materials Science Program: Weapons Research and Development and Laboratory Directed Research and Development. Twenty-one projects are described separately by their principal investigators.

Chase, L.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Process Knowledge Summary Report for Materials and Fuels Complex Contact-Handled Transuranic Debris Waste  

SciTech Connect

This Process Knowledge Summary Report summarizes the information collected to satisfy the transportation and waste acceptance requirements for the transfer of transuranic (TRU) waste between the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP). The information collected includes documentation that addresses the requirements for AMWTP and the applicable portion of their Resource Conservation and Recovery Act permits for receipt and treatment of TRU debris waste in AMWTP. This report has been prepared for contact-handled TRU debris waste generated by the Idaho National Laboratory at MFC. The TRU debris waste will be shipped to AMWTP for purposes of supercompaction. This Process Knowledge Summary Report includes information regarding, but not limited to, the generation process, the physical form, radiological characteristics, and chemical contaminants of the TRU debris waste, prohibited items, and packaging configuration. This report, along with the referenced supporting documents, will create a defensible and auditable record for waste originating from MFC.

R. P. Grant; P. J. Crane; S. Butler; M. A. Henry

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Bibliography of reports, papers, and presentations on naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in petroleum industry wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography was created to support projects conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) addressing issues related to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in petroleum industry wastes. The bibliography provides citations for many of the available published reports, papers, articles, and presentations on petroleum industry NORM. In the past few years, the rapid expansion of NORM treatment and disposal technologies, the efforts to characterize NORM wastes and their associated potential risks, and the promulgation of state-level NORM regulatory programs have been well-documented in project reports and in papers presented at technical conferences and symposia. There are 221 citations.

Smith, K.P.; Wilkey, M.L.; Hames, R.D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

MATERIALS TESTING REACTOR PROJECT. QUARTERLY REPORT FOR PERIOD ENDING MARCH 1, 1950  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in finaiizing basic design data for the Materials Testing Reactor. The major emphasis at ANL was on issurance of design reports on practically all phases of the MTR project outside the reactor face and low the first fioor level. Operation of the mock-up reacr at ORNL at 10 watts resulted in no major design changes. Topics discussed include the reactor building, wing, and reactor service building; canal and canal facilities; water systems; air exhaust systems; electrical power systems; effluent control; and shielding requirements. 11 drawings. (C.H.)

Huffman, J.R.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Interim Report on the Disposition of Solid Material: Comparative Review of Three Published Clearance Guides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the rulemaking process, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently evaluating alternative approaches to control the disposition of solid material at nuclear facilities. The proposed rule would likely incorporate a dose-based criterion. While the NRC has been developing the scope and details of a rule, various national and international organizations have reported dose-based activity concentration levels that utilities may apply to clearance. This document evaluates and discusses...

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

High performance materials in coal conversion utilization. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the research conducted at the University of Tennessee Space Institute on high performance materials for use in corrosive environments. The work was supported by a US Department of Energy University Coal Research grant. Particular attention was given to the silicon carbide particulate reinforced alumina matrix ceramic composite manufactured by Lanxide Corporation as a potential tubular component in a coal-fired recuperative high-temperature air heater. Extensive testing was performed to determine the high temperature corrosion effects on the strength of the material. A computer modeling of the corrosion process was attempted but the problem proved to be too complex and was not successful. To simplify the situation, a computer model was successfully produced showing the corrosion thermodynamics involved on a monolithic ceramic under the High Performance Power System (HIPPS) conditions (see Appendix A). To seal the material surface and thus protect the silicon carbide particulate from corrosive attack, a dense non porous alumina coating was applied to the material surface. The coating was induced by a defocused carbon dioxide laser beam. High temperature corrosion and strength tests proved the effectiveness of the coating. The carbon dioxide laser was also used to successfully join two pieces of the Lanxide material, however, resources did not allow for the testing of the resulting joint.

McCay, T.D.; Boss, W.H. [ed.; Dahotre, N. [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Biomedical studies on solvent refined coal (SRC-II) liquefaction materials: a status report  

SciTech Connect

This technical report summarizes the results of biomedical research effort on solvent refined coal (SRC) materials. The samples, described in the text, as well as samples of raw shale oil, crude petroleum, and some SRC-I materials were evaluated for biological activity in several different systems: (1) microbial mutagenesis (Ames assay), coupled to chemical characterization efforts, (2) in vitro mammalian cell toxicity and transformation, (3) epidermal carcinogenesis (skin painting) in mice, (4) acute and subchronic oral toxicity in rats, (5) developmental toxicity in rats, and (6) dosimetry and metabolism in rats. High boiling point materials (identified) showed significant mutagenic activity while lower boiling fractions from both processes were inactive; crude petroleum was also inactive, while raw shale oil showed only a low level of activity. Chemical characterization studies suggested that 3- and 4-ring primary aromatic amines are responsible for a large fraction of the mutagenic activity. Cultured mammalian cell studies showed that materials exhibiting a positive effect in the Ames system also caused mammalian cell transformation. The results of skin carcinogenesis studies in the mouse were generally consistent with those of the cellular studies. Light distillates were found to be moderately toxic after oral administration to rats. Fuel upgrading, process modification, and appropriate occupational/environmental controls may ameliorate some of the biological effects of SRC materials and other coal liquids of high boiling point. Low-boiling SRC liquids appear to have little biological effects in the assays employed. (LTN)

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 6, Alternatives study  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for material and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This report is organized according to the sections and subsections outlined by Attachment 111-2 of DOE Document AL 4700.1, Project Management System. It is organized into seven parts. This document, Part VI - Alternatives Study, presents a study of the different storage/containment options considered for NMSF.

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Studies of encapsulation materials for terrestrial photovoltic arrays. Forth quarterly progress report, June 16, 1976--September 15, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A report is presented on four studies on encapsulation: (1) Evaluation of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays; (2) Definition of encapsulant service environments and test conditions; (3) Evaluation of properties of encapsulation materials; and (4) Development of accelerated and abbreviated testing mathods for predicting performance of encapsulation materials over a 20-year lifetime. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C.

1976-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

150

Encapsulation of phase change materials in concrete masonry construction. Progress report No. 3, June 1978-September 1978. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed at Brookhaven National Laboratory on Union Carbide Nuclear Division, ORNL contract number 19Y-14279V, Encapsulation of Phase Change Materials (PCM) in Concrete Masonry Construction, is summarized. Due to program termination, the report also constitutes the final report of the program. Thermal analysis of the system Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/.10H/sub 2/O has shown that after separation upon melting, the heat of fusion is considerably higher than Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.10H/sub 2/O. The system NaCO/sub 3/-K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O has been found to be unsuitable for PCM use. A eutectic in the MgCl/sub 2/-CaCl/sub 2/-H/sub 2/O is under consideration. It exhibits a high heat of fusion and low transition temperature range. Cylindrical shells have been cast using polymer concrete. The shells were subsequently filled with PCM and thermally cycled. No leaking of PCM occurred. Thermal measurements on PCM composite materials were continued.

Sansone, M J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Electromagnetic material changes for remote detection and monitoring: a feasibility study: Progress report  

SciTech Connect

A new concept for radiation detection is proposed, allowing a decoupling of the sensing medium and the readout. An electromagnetic material, such as a magnetic ceramic ferrite, is placed near a source to be tracked such as a shipping container. The electromagnetic material changes its properties, in this case its magnetic permeability, as a function of radiation. This change is evident as a change in reflection frequency and magnitude when probed using a microwave/millimeter-wave source. This brief report discusses modeling of radiation interaction of various candidate materials using a radiation detector modeling code Geant4, system design considerations for the remote readout, and some theory of the material interaction physics. The theory of radiation change in doped magnetic insulator ferrites such as yttrium iron garnet (YIG) seems well founded based on literature documentation of the photomagnetic effect. The literature also suggests sensitivity of permittivity to neutrons in some ferroelectrics. Research to date indicates that experimental demonstration of these effects in the context of radiation detection is warranted.

McCloy, John S.; Jordan, David V.; Kelly, James F.; McMakin, Douglas L.; Johnson, Bradley R.; Campbell, Luke W.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar-cell encapsulants. Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Potentially useful low cost encapsulation materials are evaluated. The goal of the program is to identify, evaluate, test, and recommend encapsulant materials and processes for the production of cost-effective, long life solar cell modules. Technical investigations have concerned the development of advanced cure chemistries for lamination type pottants, the continued evaluation of soil resistant surface treatments, and the results of an accelerated aging test program for the comparison of material stabilities. Experiments are underway to assess the durability and cost effectiveness of coatings for protection of steel. Investigations are continuing with commercial maintenance coatings based on fluorocarbon and silicone-alkyd chemistries. Experiments were conducted to determine the effectiveness of occlusive coatings for wood products such as hard-board. An experimental program continued to determine the usefulness of soil resistant coatings. Primers were evaluated for effectiveness in bonding candidate pottants to outer covers, glass and substate materials. A program of accelerated aging and life predictive strategies is being conducted and data are reported for sunlamp exposure and thermal aging. Supporting activities are also discussed briefly. (LEW)

Willis, P. B.; Baum, B.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Secondary materials: Engineering properties, environmental consequences, and social and economic impacts. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report investigates two secondary materials, plastic lumber made from mixed plastic waste, and cement blocks and structures made with incinerator ash. Engineering properties, environmental impacts, and energy costs and savings of these secondary materials are compared to standard lumber products and cement blocks. Market capacity and social acceptance of plastic lumber and stabilized ash products are analyzed. These secondary materials apparently have potential markets; however, their economic value is primarily that they will not take up landfill space. For plastic lumber and stabilized incinerator ash products, marine and highway construction seem ideal public works applications. Incinerator ash may be suitable to use in seawalls, jetties, fishing reefs, highway barriers, and roadbed applications. Docks, piers, highway sound barriers, parking stops, and park furniture may all be made from plastic lumber. To encourage public acceptance and improve the market potential of secondary materials, these activities could be beneficial: industry should emphasize developing useful, long-lived products; industry and governments should create product performance criteria; government should provide rigorous testing and demonstration programs; and government and industry should cooperate to improve public outreach and educational programs.

Breslin, V.; Reaven, S.; Schwartz, M.; Swanson, L.; Zweig, M.; Bortman, M.; Schubel, J.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

SNMSP II: A system to fully automate special nuclear materials accountability reporting for electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

The USNRC requires each licensee who is authorized to possess Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) to prepare and submit reports concerning SNM received, produced, possessed, transferred, consumed, disposed of, or lost. These SNM accountability reports, which need to be submitted twice a year, contain detailed information on the origin, quantity, and type of SNM for several locations. The amount of detail required makes these reports very time consuming and error prone when prepared manually. Yankee Atomic is developing an IBM PC-based computer code that fully automates the process of generating SNM accountability reports. The program, called SNMSP II, prints a number of summaries including facsimiles of the NRC/DOE-741, 742, 742C, and RW-859 reports in a format that can be submitted directly to the NRC/DOE. SNMSP II is menu-driven and is especially designed for people with little or no computer training. Input can be either from a mainframe-based corporate data base or manually through user-friendly screens. In addition, extensive quality assurance features are available to ensure the security and accuracy of the data. This paper discusses the major features of the code and describes its implementation at Yankee.

Pareto, V.; Venegas, R.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Hydrogen Materials and Components Compatibility - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Aaron Harris (Primary Contact), Brian Somerday, Chris San Marchi Sandia National Laboratories P.O. Box 969 Livermore, CA 94551-0969 Phone: (925) 294-4530 Email: apharri@sandia.gov DOE Manager HQ: Antonio Ruiz Phone: (202) 586-0729 Email: Antonio.Ruiz@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October, 2003 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Complete Canadian Standards Association (CSA) Test * Method for Evaluating Material Compatibility for Compressed Hydrogen Applications - Phase I - Metals (CHMC1) document Issue Sandia report reflecting updated content from * Technical Reference website

157

Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

Palo, Daniel R.

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

Annual report: Purchasing and Materials Management Organization, Sandia National Laboratories, fiscal year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the purchasing and transportation activities of the Purchasing and Materials Management Organization for Fiscal Year 1992. Activities for both the New Mexico and California locations are included. Topics covered in this report include highlights for fiscal year 1992, personnel, procurements (small business procurements, disadvantaged business procurements, woman-owned business procurements, New Mexico commercial business procurements, Bay area commercial business procurements), commitments by states and foreign countries, and transportation activities. Also listed are the twenty-five commercial contractors receiving the largest dollar commitments, commercial contractors receiving commitments of $1,000 or more, integrated contractor and federal agency commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California, and transportation commitments of $1,000 or more from Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and California.

Zaeh, R.A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Final Report - Assessment of Potential Phosphate Ion-Cementitious Materials Interactions  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this limited study were to: (1) review the potential for degradation of cementitious materials due to exposure to high concentrations of phosphate ions; (2) provide an improved understanding of any significant factors that may lead to a requirement to establish exposure limits for concrete structures exposed to soils or ground waters containing high levels of phosphate ions; (3) recommend, as appropriate, whether a limitation on phosphate ion concentration in soils or ground water is required to avoid degradation of concrete structures; and (4) provide a "primer" on factors that can affect the durability of concrete materials and structures in nuclear power plants. An assessment of the potential effects of phosphate ions on cementitious materials was made through a review of the literature, contacts with concrete research personnel, and conduct of a "bench-scale" laboratory investigation. Results of these activities indicate that: no harmful interactions occur between phosphates and cementitious materials unless phosphates are present in the form of phosphoric acid; phosphates have been incorporated into concrete as set retarders, and phosphate cements have been used for infrastructure repair; no standards or guidelines exist pertaining to applications of reinforced concrete structures in high-phosphate environments; interactions of phosphate ions and cementitious materials has not been a concern of the research community; and laboratory results indicate similar performance of specimens cured in phosphate solutions and those cured in a calcium hydroxide solution after exposure periods of up to eighteen months. Relative to the "primer," a separate NUREG report has been prepared that provides a review of pertinent factors that can affect the durability of nuclear power plant reinforced concrete structures.

Naus, Dan J [ORNL; Mattus, Catherine H [ORNL; Dole, Leslie Robert [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program: Semiannual progress report, April 1996--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OTT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1, 2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. Separate abstracts have been submitted to the database for contributions to this report.

Johnson, D.R.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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161

Progress Report {number_sign}1 on the materials identification, characterization and evaluation activity: Acquisition of materials data from the Exploratory Studies Facility  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the initial work within the Materials Identification, Characterization and Evaluation Sub-activity Integration Activity within the Introduced Materials Task (IMT) (WBS 1.2.3.12.5). The goals of this activity are twofold.: (1) to identify and characterize types and usage of materials that are most likely to be introduced into a potential High Level Radioactive Waste (HLW) repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a result of its construction and operation and (2) to provide tools for the Integration Activity to evaluate the chemical impact on the repository based on information gathered from sources external and internal to the Introduced Materials Task-by the Literature Survey Sub-activity (Integration Activity, IMT). Based on this information and assessment, the Integration Activity activates relevant activities within the Introduced Materials Task and provides information to other Tasks within the Yucca Mountain Project.

Meike, A., LLNL

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Inorganic compounds for passive solar energy storage. Solid-state dehydration materials and high specific heat materials. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two classes of hydrated inorganic salts have been studied to assess their potential as materials for passive solar energy storage. The materials are part of the quaternary system CaO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SO/sub 3/-H/sub 2/O and related chemical systems, and the two classes are typified by ettringite, a trisubstituted salt, and Friedel's salt, a monosubstituted salt. The trisubstituted salts were studied for their possible application in latent heat storage, utilizing a low-temperature dehydration reaction, and both classes were studies for their application in sensible heat storage. In order to assess their potential for energy storage, the salts have been synthesized, characterized by several analytical techniques, and thermal properties measured. The dehydration data of that the trisubstituted salts vary somewhat with chemical composition, with the temperature of the onset of dehydration ranging from 6/sup 0/C to 33/sup 0/C, and enthalpy changes on dehydration ranging from 60 to 200 cal/g. Heat capacity is less variable with composition; values for the trisubstituted phases are 30 cal/g//sup 0/C and for the monosubstituted phases between 0.23 and 0.28 cal/g//sup 0/C. Preliminary experiments indicate that the dehydration is reversible, and suggest that the materials might have additional potential as solar desiccant materials. These thermal data demonstrate the trisubstituted salts have potential as latent heat storage materials, and that both classes of salts have potential as sensible heat storage materials.

Struble, L.J.; Brown, P.W.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be seen from the results of this materials cost study, a cell chemistry based on the use of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode material is lowest-cost and meets our battery-level material cost goal of <$250 for a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. A major contributing factor is the high-rate capability of this material, which allows one to design a lower-capacity cell to meet the battery-level power and energy requirements. This reduces the quantities of the other materials needed to produce a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. The same is true for the 40-kW maximum-power-assist HEV battery. Additionally, the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode is much more thermally and chemically stable than the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} type cathode, which should enhance inherent safety and extend calendar life (if the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode can be stabilized against dissolution via HF attack). Therefore, we recommend that the FreedomCAR Partnership focus its research and development efforts on developing this type of low-cost high-power lithium-ion cell chemistry. Details supporting this recommendation are provided in the body of this report.

Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

Materials cost evaluation report for high-power Li-ion batteries.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the lead federal agency in the partnership between the U.S. automobile industry and the federal government to develop fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) as part of the FreedomCAR Partnership. DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Office sponsors the Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program--involving 5 of its national laboratories--to assist the industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries to overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, and abuse tolerance so that this technology can be rendered practical for use in HEV and FCEV applications under the FreedomCAR Partnership. In the area of cost reduction, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is working to identify and develop advanced anode, cathode, and electrolyte components that can significantly reduce the cost of the cell chemistry, while simultaneously extending the calendar life and enhancing the inherent safety of this electrochemical system. The material cost savings are quantified and tracked via the use of a cell and battery design model that establishes the quantity of each material needed in the production of batteries that are designed to meet the requirements of a minimum-power-assist HEV battery or a maximum-power-assist HEV battery for the FreedomCAR Partnership. Similar models will be developed for FEV batteries when the requirements for those batteries are finalized. In order to quantify the material costs relative to the FreedomCAR battery cost goals, ANL uses (1) laboratory cell performance data, (2) its battery design model and (3) battery manufacturing process yields to create battery-level material cost models. Using these models and industry-supplied material cost information, ANL assigns battery-level material costs for different cell chemistries. These costs can then be compared with the battery cost goals to determine the probability of meeting the goals with these cell chemistries. As can be seen from the results of this materials cost study, a cell chemistry based on the use of a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode material is lowest-cost and meets our battery-level material cost goal of battery. A major contributing factor is the high-rate capability of this material, which allows one to design a lower-capacity cell to meet the battery-level power and energy requirements. This reduces the quantities of the other materials needed to produce a 25-kW minimum-power-assist HEV battery. The same is true for the 40-kW maximum-power-assist HEV battery. Additionally, the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode is much more thermally and chemically stable than the LiNi{sub 0.8}Co{sub 0.2}O{sub 2} type cathode, which should enhance inherent safety and extend calendar life (if the LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} cathode can be stabilized against dissolution via HF attack). Therefore, we recommend that the FreedomCAR Partnership focus its research and development efforts on developing this type of low-cost high-power lithium-ion cell chemistry. Details supporting this recommendation are provided in the body of this report.

Henriksen, G. L.; Amine, K.; Liu, J.

2003-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

High performance materials in coal conversion utilization. Technical progress report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This is the first quarterly report for this three year grant on {open_quotes}High Performance Materials in Coal Conversion Utilization.{close_quotes} The grant is a joint university/industry effort under the Department of Energy (DOE) University Coal Research program. The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) is the prime contractor and The University of Pennsylvania and Lanxide Corporation are subcontractors. It was initially planned to field test ceramic composite tubes furnished by Lanxide Corporation in conjunction with an on-going DOE magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) test series at UTSI. The MHD test program was curtailed due to funding limitations near the beginning of the grant so that the field test portion is now greatly reduced. Bench scale testing will replace most of the field testing. This development should have minimal effect on this research since there is now little interest in the affects of the potassium seeded MHD coal ash on heat exchanger surfaces. The objective is to test and analyze the heat and corrosion resistance of a SiC(p)/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} ceramic composite tubular material. The material will be evaluated for its ability to withstand the pressures, temperatures and corrosion attack which will be encountered within a coal-fired high-temperature, high-pressure air heater. The evaluation will include strength testing at elevated temperatures.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Implementation of the waste and reclaimed materials evaluation system. Research report  

SciTech Connect

Large quantities of waste materials are generated in the United States every year. Due to societal and environmental concerns many states have enacted legislation to promote their use in highway construction projects. The standard approach to charcterize these materials has been to evaluate them in technical laboratory studies which is not appropriate because these materials do not match natural aggregate in technical quality and may still have a high societal, environmental and economic value. A Waste and Reclaimed Materials (WRM) evaluation process has already been developed which takes into account such factors. This WRM Evaluation process is carried out before detailed technical and economic studies are done to develop specifications for their use. The determinination of their utilization potential is based on technical, economic, societal and environmental aspects. An initial screening process is also incorporated which is used to discard WRMs which clearly displays a low utilization potential. The Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) from decision analysis theory is used to assign weights to the four evaluation sub-systems and the respective attributes based on their importance. Implementation of this systems was carried out after the system was verified by detailed laboratory studies and economic analysis. All the available WRMs were subjected to this evaluation method and were ranked from the highest utilization potential to the lowest. The selected top three WRMs, reclaimed asphalt, Portland cement concrete pavement, and electric arc furnace slag, were subjected to detailed laboratory and economic analyses to determine their viability and to develop specifications for their use in roadhouse construction. The WRM evaluation process, laboratory studies, and the implementation package are presented in the report.

Saeed, A.; Hudson, W.R.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

GNEP Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal Analysis FY-08 Summary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary for FY-2008 of activities, analyses and products from the Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal (M-TSD) sub-task of Systems Analysis within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Research & Development area of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. The objective of this work is to evaluate near-term material management requirements for initial GNEP facilities and activities, long-term requirements for large-scale GNEP technology deployment, and alternatives and paths forward to meet these needs. For FY-08, the work expanded to include the Integrated Waste Management Strategy as well as integration with the newly formed Waste Forms Campaign. The M-TSD team was expanded with the addition of support from Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) to the existing team of Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL), Argonne National Lab (ANL), Idaho National Lab (INL), Sandia National Lab (SNL) and University of Nevada - Reno (UN-R). During the first half of the year, analysis was focused on providing supporting technical analysis and documentation to support anticipated high-level decisions on program direction. A number of analyses were conducted and reports prepared as program deliverables. This work is briefly summarized in this report. Analyses provided informally to other program efforts are included in this report to provide documentation. This year-end summary was planned primarily as a compilation of activities following the anticipated programmatic decisions. These decisions were deferred beyond the end of the year, and funds were reallocated in a number of areas, thus reducing the M-TSD activities. This report summarizes the miscellaneous 'ad-hoc' work conducted during the later part of the year, such as support to the draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS), and support to other program studies. Major programmatic contributions from the M-TSD team during the year included: (1) Completion of the IWMS in March 2008 as the baseline for waste management calculations for the GNEP Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The IWMS represents a collaborative effort between the Systems Analysis, Waste Forms, and Separations Campaigns with contributing authors from multiple laboratories. The IWMS reference is: 'Global Nuclear Energy Partnership Integrated Waste Management Strategy, D. Gombert, INL, et al, GNEP-WAST-WAST-AI-RT-2008-000214, March 2008'. (2) As input to the IWMS and support for program decisions, an evaluation of the current regulatory framework in the U.S. pertaining to the disposal of radioactive wastes under an advanced nuclear fuel cycle was completed by ANL. This evaluation also investigated potential disposal pathways for these wastes. The entire evaluation is provided in Appendix A of this report. (3) Support was provided to the development of the GNEP Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement from INL, SNL and ANL M-TSD staff. (4) M-TSD staff prepared input for DSARR (Dynamic Systems Analysis Report for Nuclear Fuel Recycle) report. The DSARR is an INL led report to examine the time-dependent dynamics for a transition from the current open fuel cycle to either a 1-tier or 2-tier closed fuel cycle. Section 5.3 Waste Management Impacts was provided to INL for incorporation into the DSARR. (5) SNL M-TSD staff prepared a M2 milestone report 'Material Transportation, Storage and Disposal Contribution for Secretarial Decision Package'. The report purpose was to comprehensively evaluate and discuss packaging, storage, and transportation for all potential nuclear and radioactive materials in the process and waste streams being considered by the GNEP program. In particular, a systems view was used to capture all packaging, storage, and transport operations needed to link the various functional aspects of the fuel cycle. (6) SRNL M-TSD staff developed a deliverable report 'Management of Decay Heat from Spent Nuclear Fuel'. This report evaluated a range of options for managing the near-term decay heat associated with Cs and Sr in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) reprocessing waste

Halsey, W

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Advanced Researech and Technology Development fossil energy materials program: Semiannual progress report for the period ending September 30, 1988  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the ARandTD Fossil Energy Materials Program is to conduct research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined semiannual progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure in which projects are organized according to materials research thrust areas. These areas are (1) Structural Ceramics, (2) Alloy Development and Mechanical Properties, (3) Corrosion and Erosion of Alloys, and (4) Assessments and Technology Transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Solar Photovoltaic Project: materials, processes, and testing activities. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established various experimental test sites, ranging in size from 0.1- to 25-kW-peak power, throughout the United States. These sites include modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. This report, the fifth in a series of similar reports (1-4), summarizes the activities of the Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Project during the three-month period (4/1/79 to 6/30/79). During this period, inspection trips were made to test sites at the University of Texas at Arlington and at Mead, Nebraska. Modules were tested in the field to determine the extent of physical and electrical degradation which had taken place since previous inspections. Several modules were removed from these sites for more detailed laboratory analysis. In addition, degradation analysis of modules from the rooftop of the Chicago Museum of Science and Industry, and failure analysis of modules from the Lincoln Laboratory Rooftop Test Bed and Residential Test Beds was performed. The results of both field testing and the laboratory analyses are reported.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1979-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Draft Report for Comment Office of Nuclear Regulatory ResearchAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Report of a technical evaluation panel on the use of beryllium for ITER plasma facing material and blanket breeder material  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium because of its low atomic number and high thermal conductivity, is a candidate for both ITER first wall and divertor surfaces. This study addresses the following: why beryllium; design requirements for the ITER divertor; beryllium supply and unirradiated physical/mechanical property database; effects of irradiation on beryllium properties; tritium issues; beryllium health and safety; beryllium-coolant interactions and safety; thermal and mechanical tests; plasma erosion of beryllium; recommended beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components; proposed manufacturing methods to produce beryllium parts for ITER; emerging beryllium materials; proposed inspection and maintenance techniques for beryllium components and coatings; time table and costs; and the importance of integrating materials and manufacturing personnel with designers.

Ulrickson, M.A. [ed.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Manly, W.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Photoelectrochemical Materials: Theory and Modeling - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Muhammad N. Huda (Primary Contact), Yanfa Yan*, Todd Deutsch*, Mowafak M. Al-Jassim* and A. John A. Turner* Department of Physics University of Texas at Arlington Arlington, TX 76019 Phone: (817) 272-1097 Email: huda@uta.edu *National Renewable Energy Laboratory DOE Manager HQ: Eric L. Miller Phone: (202) 287-5892 Email: Eric.Miller@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, TX Project Start Date: September 2009 Project End Date: August 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives For FY 2012, the main goal of this project was to improve materials efficiency by understanding and hence tuning the following by theoretical/computational modeling

173

Characterization of Fuel Cell Materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Karren L. More Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) 1 Bethel Valley Rd. Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6064 Phone: (865) 574-7788 Email: morekl1@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov Contributors: * David Cullen (ORNL) * Miaofang Chi (ORNL) * Kelly Perry (ORNL) Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) Year 1999 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop and/or apply novel preparation, imaging, and * analytical methods to characterize fuel cell materials and architectures in the as-processed (fresh) state, during

174

Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory. Technical progress report, November 1979-February 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Test and Application Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established various experimental test sites, ranging in size from 0.1 to 100 kW of peak power, throughout the United States. These sites contain modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. The activities of the Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Field Tests and Application Project during the last two months of 1979 and the first two months of 1980 are summarized. Module field inspection, I-V curve plotting, module failure analysis, and module degradation analysis are reported.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1980-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Optics and materials research for controlled radiant energy transfer in buildings. Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of this project was to perform the optics and materials research necessary to identify and solve the technical problems associated with fabricating durable, variable reflectivity electrochromic windows for energy efficient buildings and vehicles. The research performed at the Tufts Electro-Optics Technology Center (EOTC) has identified and solved nearly all the significant problems, as discussed below in this final technical report. There still remains, however, one important problem to be solved--i.e., to better understand the science of deposition processes and thereby develop and optimize one or more production-worthy deposition processes that could be used for the practical production of affordable, variable reflectivity electrochromic windows. Therefore, it is recommended that such studies be carried out with the goals of: (1) determining the probable practical limits of performance; and, very importantly, (2) to develop and optimize deposition processes that could be used for the practical production of affordable electrochromic windows.

Goldner, R.B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Development of materials for open-cycle magnetohydrodynamics (MHD): ceramic electrode. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory, supported by the US Department of Energy, developed advanced materials for use in open-cycle, closed cycle magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation, an advanced energy conversion system in which the flow of electrically conducting fluid interacts with an electric field to convert the energy directly into electricity. The purpose of the PNL work was to develop electrodes for the MHD channel. Such electrodes must have: (1) electrical conductivity above 0.01 (ohm-cm)/sup -1/ from near room temperature to 1900/sup 0/K, (2) resistance to both electrochemical and chemical corrosion by both slag and potassium seed, (3) resistance to erosion by high-velocity gases and particles, (4) resistance to thermal shock, (5) adequate thermal conductivity, (6) compatibility with other channel components, particularly the electrical insulators, (7) oxidation-reduction stability, and (8) adequate thermionic emission. This report describes the concept and development of high-temperature, graded ceramic composite electrode materials and their electrical and structural properties. 47 refs., 16 figs., 13 tabs.

Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory. Technical progress report: July, August, September, October 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Test and Application Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established various experimental test sites, ranging in size from 0.1 to 25 kW of peak power, throughout the United States. These sites contain modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. This report, the sixth in a series of similar reports, summarizes the activities of the Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Project during the four-month period, 1 July 1979 through 31 October 1979. During this period, field inspections of test sites at Bryan, Ohio, and Mead, Nebraska, were conducted and are reviewed. An inordinate module failure rate at the University of Texas at Arlington is reviewed and analyzed. Failures and degradation of Mead, Nebraska, modules are analyzed, and the development of testing equipment for PV systems is discussed.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1980-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

High Temperature Materials Laboratory eight and ninth annual reports, October 1994 through September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its ninth year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements, and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation. A total of 276 nonproprietary agreements (135 industry, 135 university, and 6 other federal agency) and 56 proprietary agreements are now in effect. This represents an increase of 70 nonproprietary user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1994). A state-by-state summary of these nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A, and an alphabetical listing is provided in Appendix B. Forty-four states are represented by these users. During FY 1995 and 1996, the HTML User Program evaluated 145 nonproprietary proposals (62 from industry, 82 from universities, and 1 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, frequently after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1995 and 1996.

Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

High Temperature Materials Laboratory, Eleventh Annual Report: October 1997 through September 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its eleventh year of operation as a designated US Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This document profiles the historical growth of the HTML User and Fellowship Programs since their inception in 1987. Growth of the HTML programs has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements and by the number of days of instrument use (user days) since the HTML began operation.A total of 522 agreements (351 industry,156 university,and 15 other federal agency) are now in effect (452 nonproprietary and 70 proprietary). This represents an increase of 75 user agreements since the last reporting period (for FY 1997). A state-by-state summary of the nonproprietary user agreements is given in Appendix A. Forty-six states are represented. During FY 1998, the HTML User Program evaluated 80 nonproprietary proposals (32 from industry, 45 from universities, and 3 from other government facilities) and several proprietary proposals. Appendix B provides a detailed breakdown of the nonproprietary proposals received during FY 1998. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about 95% of those proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the committee. This annual report discusses activities in the individual user centers as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users, proposals, and publications as well as summaries of the nonproprietary research projects active during 1998.

Pasto, A.E.; Russell, B.J.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

Rennich, M.J. [comp.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

20th International Training Course (ITC-20) on the physical protection of nuclear facilities and materials evaluation report.  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this evaluation report is to provide the information necessary to improve the effectiveness of the ITC provided to the International Atomic Energy Agency Member States. This report examines ITC-20 training content, delivery methods, scheduling, and logistics. Ultimately, this report evaluates whether the course provides the knowledge and skills necessary to meet the participants needs in the protection of nuclear materials and facilities.

Ramirez, Amanda Ann

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

High temperature materials technology research for advanced thermionic systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tungsten and tungsten alloys are candidate materials for the thermionic emitter in the space nuclear power convertor. In this work, the creep behavior of HfC strengthened tungsten alloys was studied. An ultrahigh vacuum, high precision creep test system was constructed for this purpose so that the samples could be heated up to 3,000 K for heat treatment and creep strain could be measured from the creep sample inside the UHV chamber. To explain the creep behavior observed in this dispersion strengthened alloy, a creep model was proposed which accounted for the presence of HfC particles in the form of a back stress generated by these particles. This model was verified by the creep test data of W-0.37 HfC alloys tested under both extruded and recrystallized microstructural conditions. According to this model, the steady state creep of this type of alloys was expected to increase with time due to coarsening of HfC particle and recrystallization of the alloys under high temperatures. In contrast, conventional simple power law creep model only predicts a constant steady state creep for these materials, which does not represent the microstructural evolution of the materials. The creep of solid solution alloys such as W-Re, W-Nb and W-Hf and Mo-Nb was also studied. These materials are expected to be more stable in creep properties due to the absence of coarsening particles. These solid solution alloys, in their single crystalline state, are reported possessing better corrosion resistance over their polycrystalline counterparts. Existing creep data of both solid solution tungsten and molybdenum alloys were re-analyzed. The data of these alloys showed two distinct different creep mechanisms: Class I and Class II. The dominating creep mechanism at low stresses could be explained by the Takuchi-Argon model (Class I). At higher stresses, the data could not be explained by any of the existing creep models. A creep model was thus proposed that contained a shift factor due to the effect of the solute in these alloys. In this model, the Class II creep behavior of these solution alloys were found as a function of the alloy concentration and atomic size mismatch.

Zee, R.H.; Rose, M.F.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Advanced research and technology development fossil energy materials program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending September 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the fourth combined quarterly progress report for those projects that are part of the Advanced Research and Technology Development Fossil Energy Materials Program. The objective is to conduct a program of research and development on materials for fossil energy applications with a focus on the longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The program includes research aimed toward a better understanding of materials behavior in fossil energy environments and the development of new materials capable of substantial enhancement of plant operations and reliability. Work performed on the program generally falls into the Applied Research and Exploratory Development categories as defined in the DOE Technology Base Review, although basic research and engineering development are also conducted. A substantial portion of the work on the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program is performed by participating cntractor organizations. All subcontractor work is monitored by Program staff members at ORNL and Argonne National Laboratory. This report is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1981 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program.

Bradley, R.A. (comp.) [comp.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which lead to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. A survey of agglomeration and deposit formation in industrial fluidized bed boilers is in progress. Preliminary results indicate that at least five boilers were experiencing some form of bed material agglomeration. In these instances it was observed that large particles were forming within the bed which were larger that the feed. Four operators could confirm that the larger bed particles had formed due to bed particles sticking together or agglomerating. Deposit formation was reported at nine sites with these deposits being found most commonly at coal feed locations and in cyclones. Other deposit locations included side walls and return loops. Examples of these agglomerates and deposits have been received from five of the surveyed facilities. Also during this quarter, a bulk sample of Illinois No. 6 coal was obtained from the Fossil Energy Program at Ames Laboratory here at Iowa State University and prepared for combustion tests. This sample was first ground to a top-size of 3/8`` using a jaw crusher then a size fraction of 3/8`` {times} 8 (US mesh) was then obtained by sieving using a Gilson Test-Master. This size fraction was selected for the preliminary laboratory-scale experiments designed to simulate the dense bed conditions that exist in the bottom of CFB combustors. To ensure uniformity of fuel composition among combustion runs, the sized coal was riffled using, a cone and long row method and stored in bags for each experiment. During this quarter additional modifications were made to achieve better control of fluidization regimes and to aid in monitoring the hydrodynamic and chemical conditions within the reactor.

Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Solar Photovoltaic Project: materials, processes, and testing activities. Quarterly report, 1 January-31 March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has set a 20-year-lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Lincoln Laboratory, in its capacity as a Photovoltaic Field Tests and Applications Center, has established throughout the United States various experimental test sites which range in size from 0.1 to 25 kW of peak power. These sites include modules from several manufacturers and serve as test beds for photovoltaic system components. The activities of the Materials, Processes, and Testing Laboratory of the Solar Photovoltaic Project during a three-month (1/1/79-3/31/79) period are summarized. During this period, an inspection trip was made to the Mead, Nebraska, test site. The modules were tested in the field to determine the extent of physical and electrical degradation which had taken place since previous inspections. In addition, several modules were removed from the site for more detailed laboratory examination. The results of both the field testing and laboratory analyses are reported.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

186

Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Final subcontract report, 16 January 1990--15 January 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes results and conclusions of the final phase (III) of a three-year research program on polycrystalline thin-film heterojunction solar cells. The research consisted of the investigation of the relationships between processing, materials properties, and device performance. This relationship was quantified by device modeling and analysis. The analysis of thin-film polycrystalline heterojunction solar cells explains how minority-carrier recombination at the metallurgical interface and at grain boundaries can be greatly reduced by the proper doping of the window and absorber layers. Additional analysis and measurements show that the present solar cells are limited by the magnitude of the diode current, which appears to be caused by recombination in the space charge region. Developing an efficient commercial-scale process for fabricating large-area polycrystalline, thin-film solar cells from a research process requires a detailed understanding of the individual steps in making the solar cell, and their relationship to device performance and reliability. The complexities involved in characterizing a process are demonstrated with results from our research program on CuInSe{sub 2}, and CdTe processes.

Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Yokimcus, T.A. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Process feasibility study in support of silicon material task I. Quarterly technical progress report (IV)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this reporting period, major efforts were expended on process system properties, chemical engineering, and economic analyses. In Task 1, primary activities were devoted to properties analyses of silicon source materials and silicon tetrafluoride investigation. Experimental data were identified for critical temperature and pressure for silicon tetrafluoride. Major chemical engineering analysis activities in Task 2 were devoted to preliminary process design for a 1000 metric ton/yr plant (solar cell grade silicon) based on the Zn/SiCl/sub 4/ process (Battelle). In Task 3, economic analysis activities were continued including survey results for product cost estimation techniques. Nominal values--product cost subitems for application to alternate processes--were selected. Economic results based on the preliminary process design are presented for the Zn/Sicl/sub 4/ process. Capital investment (fixed) was determined at $10,100,000 for the 1000 metric/tons year plant. Total product cost was estimated at $9.49 per kg of silicon. (WDM)

Hansen, K.C.; Hopper, J.R.; Miller, J.W. Jr.; Yaws, C.L.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

High Temperature Materials Laboratory seventh annual report, October 1993--September 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) has completed its seventh year of operation as a designated Department of Energy User Facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Growth of the User Program has been demonstrated by the number of institutions executing user agreements since the HTML began operation in 1987. A total of 193 nonproprietary agreements (91 industry and 102 university) and 41 proprietary agreements (39 industry and two university) are now in effect. This represents an increase of 21 nonproprietary user agreements during FY 1994. Forty-one states are represented by these users. During FY 1994, the HTML User Program evaluated 106 nonproprietary proposals (46 from industry, 52 from universities, and 8 from other government facilities) and 8 proprietary proposals. The HTML User Advisory Committee approved about ninety-five percent of those evaluated proposals, sometimes after the prospective user revised the proposal based on comments from the Committee. This annual report discusses FY 1994 activities in the individual user centers, as well as plans for the future. It also gives statistics about users and their proposals and FY 1994 publications, and summarizes nonproprietary research projects active in FY 1994.

Tennery, V.J.; Teague, P.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Advances in materials science, Metals and Ceramics Division. Triannual progress report, October 1979-January 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is summarized concerning magnetic fusion energy materials, laser fusion energy, aluminium-air battery and vehicle, geothermal research, oil-shale research, nuclear waste management, office of basic energy sciences research, and materials research notes. (FS)

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

Chemistry and Materials Science progress report, first half FY 1992. Weapons-Supporting Research and Laboratory Directed Research and Development  

SciTech Connect

This report contains sections on: Fundamentals of the physics and processing of metals; interfaces, adhesion, and bonding; energetic materials; plutonium research; synchrotron radiation-based materials science; atomistic approach to the interaction of surfaces with the environment: actinide studies; properties of carbon fibers; buried layer formation using ion implantation; active coherent control of chemical reaction dynamics; inorganic and organic aerogels; synthesis and characterization of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels; structural transformation and precursor phenomena in advanced materials; magnetic ultrathin films, surfaces, and overlayers; ductile-phase toughening of refractory-metal intermetallics; particle-solid interactions; electronic structure evolution of metal clusters; and nanoscale lithography induced chemically or physically by modified scanned probe microscopy.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Review of the management of materials research and development in the Department of Energy. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Materials Working Group of DOE findings and recommendations of a management nature to improve the handling of materials R and D within DOE are presented. The special role of materials in the development of new energy technologies is provided. (FS)

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

High Temperature Materials Laboratory 18th Annual Report October 1, 2004 Through September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

HTML Annual Report for 10/1/04 - 9/30/05, assigned ORNL Technical Report # ORNL/TM-2006/41. Incorrect number appears in next field.

Pasto, Arvid E [ORNL; Russell, Billie J [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Recommended criteria for retrofit materials and products eligible for tax credit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Criteria are recommended for materials and products considered eligible for proposed tax credit for retrofitting one and two family residences to conserve energy. The materials considered include insulation and vapor barriers, storm windows and doors, caulking and weatherstripping, and clock thermostats. A list of these retrofit materials was compiled by generic type and recommendations made on their installation. In addition to recommended criteria for materials and products eligible for tax credit, desired levels of performance for the retrofit materials are presented as a guide to homeowners to achieve maximum benefits in energy conservation through retrofitting.

Rossiter, W.J. Jr.; Mathey, Robert G.

1977-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

SUMMARY REPORT, 1954-1959 RAW MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT LABORATORY WINCHESTER, MASSACHUSETTS AND GRAND JUNCTION, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the research work performed by the National Lead Company on the recovery of U from its ores is presented. A bibliography is presented which includes all reports on raw materials published by National Lead Company through Dec. 1958. Also included is a list of complete publications on raw materials from 1944 to 1954. (W.L.H.) low conditions at room temperature. Emphasis was placed on the effect of reaction parameters and mercury-recovery techniques on the Hg/sup 202/ content of the solid calomel formed in the reaction. For pure hydrogen chloride the Hg/sup 202/ content of the Calomel was found to be 39.9 plus or minus 0.3%, compared to the natural abundance of 29.8%. With 20 to 40 mole% of butadiene-1,3 in the hydrogen chloride, calomels containing 83 to 84% of Hg/sup 202/ were consistently obtained. The Hg/sup 202/ content of the calomel product was found to increase markedly when unsaturated hydrocarbons were added to the hydrogen chloride stream. The addends studied included butadiene - 1,3, benzene, isoprene, acetylene, propylene, and ethylene in order of decreasing effectiveness. From steady-state calculations the effectiveness of the addend can be shown to be determined by the rate ratio, k/sub 8// k/sub 4/. For the maximally enriching mixture of hydrogen chloride and butadiene, the effect of variations in lamp temperature and reaction pressure was studied. At lamp temperatures exceeding approximately 35 deg 'C, reduced enrichments were obtained owing to emission-line broadening. A progressive reduction in enrichment was also observed with substrate pressures greater than 25 mm, owing presumably to Lorentz-broadening of the hyperfine absorption contours of the Hg/sup N/ in the reaction cell. The Hg/sup 202/ content of the calomel product was determined by resonance radiation absorbiometry. The apparent Hg/sup 202/ abundances of the mercury recovered from the calomel product were found to depend strongly on the method used for isolating the enriched mercury from the calomel. Evidence was obtained for the occurrence of isotopically degradative exchange reactions during the recovery process. A recovery technique was developed which appeared to eliminate this exchange degradation. (auth)

Beverly, R.G. ed.

1959-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program. Quarterly progress report for the period ending December 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ORNL Fossil Energy Materials Program Office compiles and issues this combined quarterly progress report from camera-ready copies submitted by each of the participating subcontractor organizations. This report of activities on the program is organized in accordance with a work breakdown structure defined in the AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program Plan for FY 1982-1986 in which projects are organized according to fossil energy technologies. This report is divided into parts and chapters with each part describing projects related to a particular fossil energy technology. Chapters within a part provide details of the various projects associated with that technology. We hope this series of AR and TD Fossil Energy Materials Program quarterly progress reports will aid in the dissemination of information developed on the program. Plans for the program will be issued annually. A draft of the program plan for FY 1982 to 1986 has been prepared and is in the review process. The implementation of these plans will be reflected by these quarterly progress reports, and this dissemination of information will bw augmented by topical or final reports as appropriate.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geothermal elastomeric materials. Twelve-months progress report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on efforts to develop elastomers for packer seal element applications which will survive downhole geothermal well chemistry at 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) for 24 hours. To achieve this development, a three level elastomer testing and evaluation program was established. The first level Screening Tests is a broad screening of potential candidates and with the end objective to filter out the more promising candidates for more expensive subsequent testing. The battery of tests include standard ASTM tests and a special test developed to test extrusion resistance using specimens all made from sheet stock. The second level or Simulation Tests provide a laboratory equivalent of downhole conditions using synthetic geothermal fluid. Full scale packer seals are tested under simulated operational conditions by a test fixture. The third level or In-Situ Tests which are currently in the planning, provide for testing the most favored materials in-situ in the geothermal well. A test module provides for testing of the specimen without interfacing with the well casing. A test module freely hanging on a wireline has much lower probability of causing a problem, such as becoming lodged in the well, as compared to an operational casing packer. This maximizes the number of wells (hence geothermal environments) where access can be gained and In-Situ Testing performed. During this period commercially available polymers were investigated. Most of the work centered around formulating peroxide cured Vitons and some on EPDMs, butyls, and resin cured Vitons. Of the formulations tested to date the EPDMs appear most promising and the peroxide cured Vitons next most promising. However, data is too sparse to make any firm conclusions at this time. Minor tasks were performed evaluating current commercially available elastomers used in oil tools and conceptualization of casing packer for the geothermal application.

Hirasuna, A.R.; Bilyeu, G.D.; Davis, D.L.; Stephens, C.A.; Veal, G.R.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The quarterly status report for the Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research Program is presented. Objectives for 1 October 1995--31 December 1995 include completion of contract negotiations for Study of Foaming Characteristics project, and finalizing Phase IV and Phase V projects.

Szymurski, S.R.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Program on Technology Innovation: Environmentally Assisted Cracking in LWR Structural Materials, 2011 PEACE-E Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the interim results of PEACE-E, a joint research program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with the Fracture & Reliability Research Institute (FRRI) at Tohoku University, Japanese utilities, vendors, and international organizations. The program addressed environmentally assisted cracking of light water reactor structural materials in pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) environments.

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Chemistry and materials science progress report. Weapons-supporting research and laboratory directed research and development: FY 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers different materials and chemistry research projects carried out a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory during 1995 in support of nuclear weapons programs and other programs. There are 16 papers supporting weapons research and 12 papers supporting laboratory directed research.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Wear-resistant materials for coal conversion and utilization. First progress report, October 1979-April 1980  

SciTech Connect

Studies of wear-resistant materials were concentrated mostly on hard coatings and surface treatments, such as chemical vapor deposited materials, thermal-sprayed materials with post-deposition laser treatments, and surface-bonded materials. Several coatings were found to have extremely good erosion resistance. A nickel-bonded titanium diboride material was found to have extremely high erosion resistance. An erosion data bank for existing and promising valve materials was begun. Erosion test results at six impingment angles and four particle velocities were produced. Testing of a 6-inch ball-valve ball coated with a Cr-Ni-B coating in a laboratory ball-valve testing facility reached the half-way point; 10,000 open-close cycles in coal-ash.

Block, F.E.; Kelley, J.E.; Leavenworth, H.W. Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Battery resource assessment. Interim report No. 1. Battery materials demand scenarios  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Projections of demand for batteries and battery materials between 1980 and 2000 are presented. The estimates are based on existing predictions for the future of the electric vehicle, photovoltaic, utility load-leveling, and existing battery industry. Battery demand was first computed as kilowatt-hours of storage for various types of batteries. Using estimates for the materials required for each battery, the maximum demand that could be expected for each battery material was determined.

Sullivan, D.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

New materials for chemical laser windows. Final report, Jun--Dec 1976  

SciTech Connect

Many of the more common materials such as the alkaline earth fluorides, ZnSe, and the alkali halides have been studied for use as low loss windows on DF-HF chemical lasers; yet, there remain others which have received little or no attention at these wavelengths. Some of these other materials were studied in hopes of finding additional low absorbing materials which show potential as laser windows.

Harrington, J.A.; Gregory, D.A.; Rosenstock, H.B.; Hass, M.

1977-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Metals and ceramics division materials science program annual progress report for period ending June 30, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research progress is summarized concerning the structure of metals; deformation and mechanical properties; physical properties and transport phenomena; radiation effects; and engineering materials.

McHargue, C.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Audit Report on "Containers Suitable for Shipping Fissile Material", DOE/IG-0490  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

As a result of its weapons program activities, the Department of Energy (Department) has a significant inventory of surplus fissile materials. Within the Department, the National Nuclear Security...

205

Process feasibility study in support of silicon material Task I. Quarterly technical progress report (XIV), January-March 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyses of process system properties was continued for materials involved in the alternate processes under consideration for solar cell grade silicon. The following property data are reported for silicon tetrafluoride: critical constants, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat of formation, and Gibb's free energy of formation. In the viscosity investigation, experimentally determined values for gas viscosity of trichlorosilane and dichlorosilane are reported in the temperature range of 40/sup 0/C to 200/sup 0/C. Previous data are not available in this temperature range for either compound. Chemical engineering analysis of the BCL process was continued with primary efforts being devoted to the preliminary process design. Status and progress are reported for base case conditions; process flow diagram; reaction chemistry; material and energy balances; and major process equipment design. Current engineering efforts are nearing completion for manpower estimate of production labor requirements for the plant.

Li, K.Y.; Hansen, K.C.; Yaws, C.L.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Characterization of Materials for Photoelectrochemical (PEC) Hydrogen Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Clemens Heske Department of Chemistry University of Nevada, Las Vegas 4505 S. Maryland Parkway Las Vegas, NV 89154-4003 Phone: (702) 895-2694 Email: heske@unlv.nevada.edu DOE Manager HQ: Eric Miller Phone: (202) 287-5829 Email: Eric.Miller@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: November 4, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Enhance the understanding of PEC materials and interfaces and promote break-through discoveries by: Utilizing and developing cutting-edge soft X-ray and * electron spectroscopy characterization. Determining electronic and chemical structures of PEC * candidate materials. Addressing materials performance, materials lifetime, * and capital costs through close collaboration with the

207

Development, characterization and evaluation of materials for open cycle MHD. Quarterly report for the period ending June 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are directed toward the development and characterization of high temperature ceramics for open-cycle, coal-fired MHD power generators. The current activities are directed to electrode and insulator materials, and include (1) determination of the effects of alkali seed on the behavior of ceramics in a dc electric field; (2) development and testing of improved high temperature ceramic electrodes and insulators with controlled composition, microstructure, and properties; and (3) characterization and evaluation of materials utilized in channels being tested for MHD power generator development. Research is reported on (1) evaluation of metal electrodes from 250 hour MHD test, (2) characterization and properties of USSR MgO insulating wall material, (3) thermal diffusivity/thermal conductivity of electrode and insulator materials, (4) coprecipitation of ceramic powders, (5) properties of yttria chromites, and (6) rare earth hafnates. (WHK)

Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.; Daniel, J.L.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Conversion of cellulosic and waste polymer material to gasoline. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in research on the improvement of the composition of pyrolysis gas produced by the Fischer-Tropsch catalytic reactor. Results of studies of the effects of pressure on product yields are reported. (JGB)

Kuester, J.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Materials Research Laboratory progress report for FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This interdisciplinary laboratory in the College of Engineering support research in areas of condensed matter physics, solid state chemistry, and materials science. These research programs are developed with the assistance of faculty, students, and research associates in the departments of Physics, Materials Science and Engineering, chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Nuclear Engineering.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Development of radiative-cooling materials. Final technical report: FY 1980-1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on research and development on glazing and selective emitter materials that will enhance day and night sky radiative cooling is described. The emphasis is on glazing development with a secondary interest in the appropriate selective emitter. The testing focused on the individual material properties. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Recommended criteria for retrofit materials and products eligible for tax credit. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Energy Administration requested the National Bureau of Standards to develop criteria for retrofitting for possible use by the Internal Revenue Service in implementing the Presidential initiative authorizing tax credit to homeowners. Criteria are recommended for materials and products considered eligible for proposed tax credit for retrofitting one and two family residences to conserve energy. The materials considered include insulation and vapor barriers, storm windows and doors, caulking and weatherstripping, and clock thermostats. A list of these retrofit materials is compiled by generic type and recommendations made on their installation. In addition to recommended criteria for materials and products eligible for tax credit, desired levels of performance for the retrofit materials are presented as a guide to homeowners to achieve maximum benefits in energy conservation through retrofitting. (GRA)

Rossiter, W.J. Jr.; Mathey, R.G.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Materials for high-temperature hydrogen fluorine environments. Final report, June 1976-December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A determination has been made of the stability of 35 materials under high-temperature, fluorine rich, hydrogen fluoride torch testing. Refractory materials tested included 4 borides, 3 carbides, 3 nitrides, 12 oxides, 1 oxynitride, 1 sulfide, 10 metals, and carbon (10 types). Three materials distinctly performed better than nickel: lanthanum hexaboride, calcium hexaboride, and lanthanum silicon oxynitride. Of these, lanthanum hexaboride is the best candidate tested since it has an estimated upper use temperature > 1726 K, which is above the melting point and more than 300 K above the upper use temperature of nickel.

Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Kovach, L.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Lightweight combustion residues-based structural materials for use in mines. Quarterly report, 1 March 1995--31 May 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this PrOject is to develop, design, and test artificial supports (post and crib members), for use in mines, which will be manufactured from coal combustion by-products (CCB) based lightweight structural materials. During the last quarter (Dec. 1, 1994--Feb. 28, 1995), it was reported that low LOI ({approx}5%) F-fly ash-based lightweight materials with density ranging from 70-1 110 pcf and compressive strength ranging from about 1,500 psi to 5,000 psi had been developed. During this quarter, 1) similar materials were developed using higher LOI ({approx}1O%) F-fly ash, 2) performance of materials using nylon fibers rather than polypropylene fibers was examined, 3) effect of addition of small amounts of FBC spent bed material on strength-deformation properties was evaluated, 4) flexural strength tests were performed on 2 in. X 2 in. X 12 in. cast beams, 5) compressive strength tests were performed on cast hollow cylinders (6 in. outer diameter, 2.762 in. inner diameter and 12 in. long) and 6) limited number of tests were conducted to determine the effect of mixing speed on strength of developed materials. The results of these studies indicate that 1) suitable lightweight materials using 60--65% higher LOI F-fly ash can be developed for fabrication of artificial supports, 2) nylon fibers perform significantly better than Polypropylene fibers, 3) loss of strength and deformability due to the use of higher LOI fly ash can be offset to some extent by adding 5--10% FBC spent bed material, 4) relationship between flexural strength and compressive strength, similar to that in concrete exists, 5) strength-deformation properties of hollow cylinders are similar to 3 in. X 6 in. solid cylinders, and 6) strength and deformation modulus increase with mixing speed. Two mixes for final development of lightweight materials have been identified and final test` will begin June 1, 1995.

Chugh, Y.P.; Zhang, Yuzhuo; Ghosh, A.K.; Palmer, S.R.; Peng, Suping; Xiao, Y

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Computational studies of hydrogen interactions with storage materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Chris G. Van de Walle (Primary Contact), Lars Ismer, Anindya Roy, and Anderson Janotti Materials Department, University of California Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5050 Phone: (805) 893-7144 Email: vandewalle@mrl.ucsb.edu DOE Program Officer: James Davenport Phone: (301) 903-0035 Email: James.Davenport@science.doe.gov Objectives Building on our accumulated knowledge of hydrogen interactions with semiconductors and insulators we have been conducting computational studies with the goal of developing new insights for hydrogen interactions with hydrogen storage materials. Using state-of-the-art density functional calculations, our research addresses the energetics

215

Advances in materials science, metals and ceramics division. Triannual progress report, June-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning the magnetic fusion energy program; the laser fusion energy program; geothermal research; nuclear waste management; Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) research; diffusion in silicate minerals; chemistry research resources; and chemistry and materials science research.

Truhan, J.J.; Hopper, R.W.; Gordon, K.M. (eds.)

1980-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

216

Solar-collector-materials exposure to the IPH site environment. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-situ environmental exposure tests were conducted at nine proposed intermediate-temperature Industrial Process Heat (IPH) sites. Three types of reflector materials were evaluated for survivability at the nine sites: second-surface silvered glass, aluminized acrylic FEK-244 film on aluminumsubstrate and Alzak (electropolished aluminum) on aluminium substrate. Black chrome absorber material and low-iron float glass were evaluated for thermal, photochemical, and environmental degradation. The reflector specimens were monitored for decreases in specular and hemispherical reflectance due to soil buildup. The absorber material was evaluated for changes in solar absorptivity and emissivity, and the float glass was monitored for changes in transmissivity. Surface and subsurface defects on all materials were examined microscopically and, where deemed of note, were documented photographically.

Morris, V.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Solar-collector materials exposure to the IPH site environment. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-situ environmental exposure tests were conducted at nine proposed intermediate-temperature Industrial Process Heat (IPH) sites. Three types of reflector materials were evaluated for survivability at the nine sites: second-surface silvered glass, aluminized acrylic FEK-244 film on aluminum substrate, and Alzak (electropolished aluminum) on aluminum substrate. Black chrome absorber material and low-iron float glass were evaluated for thermal, photochemical, and environmental degradation. The reflector specimens were monitored for decreases in specular and hemispherical reflectance due to soil buildup. The absorber material was evaluated for changes in solar absorptivity and emissivity, and the float glass was monitored for changes in transmissivity. Surface and subsurface defects on all materials were examined microscopically and, where deemed of note, were documented photographically.

Morris, V.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Down Select Report of Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials, Catalysts, and Spent Fuel Regeneration Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Hydrogen Storage Program is focused on identifying and developing viable hydrogen storage systems for onboard vehicular applications. The program funds exploratory research directed at identifying new materials and concepts for storage of hydrogen having high gravimetric and volumetric capacities that have the potential to meet long term technical targets for onboard storage. Approaches currently being examined are reversible metal hydride storage materials, reversible hydrogen sorption systems, and chemical hydrogen storage systems. The latter approach concerns materials that release hydrogen in endothermic or exothermic chemical bond-breaking processes. To regenerate the spent fuels arising from hydrogen release from such materials, chemical processes must be employed. These chemical regeneration processes are envisioned to occur offboard the vehicle.

Ott, Kevin; Linehan, Sue; Lipiecki, Frank; Aardahl, Christopher L.

2008-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1999 through September 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks.

Johnson, D.R.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Materials Coordinating Committee (EMaCC), Fiscal year 1992. Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

The DOE EMaCC serves to coordinate the department`s materials programs and to further effective use of materials expertise within the department. This document presents summaries of budgets and of research projects, arranged according to the offices of energy efficiency and renewable energy, energy research, environmental restoration and waste management, nuclear energy, civilian radioactive waste management, defense, and fossil energy. A directory and a keyword index are included.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Concrete--polymer materials for geothermal applications. Progress report No. 6, July--September 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials are needed for handling hot brine and steam at temperatures greater than 200/sup 0/C. Thermal stability of styrene--acrylonitrile (ACN)--trimethylolpropane trimethylacrylate (TMPTMA) polymers was studied. Compressive strengths of polymer concretes using styrene--TMPTMA or styrene--ACN--TMPTMA were determined after exposure to hot brine. Field tests of concrete-polymer materials at The Geysers and other geothermal sites are under way and are described. Radioinduced polymerization was used as well as chemical polymerization. (DLC)

Not Available

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Advisory Committee on human radiation experiments. Supplemental, Volume 1, Ancillary materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a large collection of contemporary documents pertaining to the consideration of ethical and legal aspects of use of human beings in medical and experimental studies.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program Semiannual Progress Report for October 1998 Through March 1999  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1-3 trucks to realize a 35% fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7-8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OIT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55% efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NOX and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulate. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55% efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies. OIT OHVT also recognizes a significant opportunity for reduction in petroleum consumption by dieselization of pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. Application of the diesel engine to class 1,2, and 3 trucks is expected to yield a 35% increase in fuel economy per vehicle. The foremost barrier to diesel use in this market is emission control. Once an engine is made certifiable, subsequent challenges will be in cost; noise, vibration, and harshness (NVH); and performance. The design of advanced components for high-efficiency diesel engines has, in some cases, pushed the performance envelope for materials of construction past the point of reliable operation. Higher mechanical and tribological stresses and higher temperatures of advanced designs limit the engine designer; advanced materials allow the design of components that may operate reliably at higher stresses and temperatures, thus enabling more efficient engine designs. Advanced materials also offer the opportunity to improve the emissions, NVH, and performance of diesel engines for pickup trucks, vans, and sport utility vehicles. The principal areas of research are: (1) Cost Effective High Performance Materials and Processing; (2) Advanced Manufacturing Technology; (3)Testing and Characterization; and (4) Materials and Testing Standards.

Johnson, R.D.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semiannual progress report for April 1998 thru September 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

Johnson, D.R.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Exposure testing and evaluation of solar utilization materials. Semiannual report, May 1, 1975--October 31, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The initial efforts of a program of research and experimental testing is described in which the optical performance of materials for use in solar energy utilization devices will be determined before and after exposure to outdoor weathering tests. Materials which are currently in use and others which are being considered or developed for these applications will be characterized and exposed to natural solar radiation. Outdoor testing will be accomplished in Phoenix (Ariz.), Miami (Fla.), and Chicago (Ill.). The results of these tests, primarily the effects of outdoor exposure on optical and physical properties, will be compiled in a handbook, along with cost, availability and other pertinent information. These data are vital to the intelligent selection of solar utilization materials, since a knowledge of the cost performance and lifetime characteristics of candidate materials will greatly assist the design of efficient and reliable solar energy utilization devices. Primary accomplishments include the definition of sample requirements, specification of test samples and test configurations, formulation of acceptance/rejection criteria and contacts with numerous potential materials suppliers.

Gilligan, J.E.; Brzuskiewicz, J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Program on Technology Innovation: Environmentally Assisted Cracking in LWR Structural Materials--2009-10 PEACE-E Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the interim results of PEACE-E Phase-1, a three-year joint research program sponsored by EPRI in collaboration with Fracture Reliability Research Institute (FRRI) at Tohoku University, Japanese utilities, vendors, and international organizations. The program addressed environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor (LWR) structural materials in pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) environments. PEACE-E Phase-1 focuses on combining multiple a...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Thermoelectric Materials Evaluation Program. Annual technical report for fiscal year 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Optimization was initiated with respect to performance, operating temperatures, and thermoelectric properties of an N-type material based on rare earth (neodymium and gadolinium) selenide technology. Effort was expanded to experimentally describe the chemical, electrical and physical behavior of P-type thermoelectric material over a range of temperatures. Emphasis was changed in P-type material research from basic properties to sublimation suppression by wrapping, and to the understanding of contact resistance problems at the hot end. Analytical performance calculations were made as an aid in couple development. In the area of module development an evaluation of the reduction of bypass-heat loss was made and module M-22R was placed on test. Parts were fabricated for M23R. Data on long term operating characteristics, ingradient compatibility, and reliability of elements and couples was obtained.

Hinderman, J.D.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

CE IGCC repowering project: Materials for coal gasification environment. Topical report, June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A task to develop material requirements and a materials testing strategy was established with the Materials and Water Chemistry Department of the ABB Power plant Laboratories. This involved examining the requirements for each system under ABB CE scope. The basis for the material recommendations was largely based on in-house test programs under DOE contract and ABB CE experience. Consultants were utilized in a parallel task to assist in the design and material specification for the solids handling systems. ABB CE experience includes operating data from a former process development unit (PDU) located in Windsor, Connecticut. The unit gasified Pittsburgh seam coal at a nominal firing rate of 120 tons per day. The objectives of the program were to produce clean, low-Btu gas from coal, and to provide the design information for scale-up to commercial-size plants. The results of the task were used to specify and, depending on scope, design the equipment used in the plant. A detailed document was developed and used to generate a Metallurgical Flow Diagram. Specifications were developed from this diagram. For the equipment designed, these selections were provided to representatives of cognizant design and manufacturing departments. In addition, where appropriate, recommendations were made for operating procedures and for design changes. Specified materials will be again evaluated during detailed engineering. In some areas the results of the task were not conclusive. Additional investigation will be required. These areas are the types of approaches which can be taken to accommodate product gas sulfidation resistance and solids transport erosion.

Gibbons, T.B.; O`Neill, J.K.; Plumley, A.L.; Thibeault, P.R.; Waryasz, R.W.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Materials review for improved automotive gas-turbine engine. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advanced materials are the key to achieving the performance and fuel economy goals of improved automotive gas turbine engines. The potential role of superalloys, refractory alloys, and ceramics in the hottest sections of future engines that may be required to operate with turbine inlet temperatures as high as 1370/sup 0/C (2500/sup 0/F) is examined. These high temperature materials are reviewed. The characteristics of the best modern conventional superalloys, directionally solidified eutectics, oxide dispersion strengthened alloys, and tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys are reviewed; and the most promising alloys in each system are compared on the basis of maximum turbine blade temperature capability. The requirements for improved high temperature protective coatings and special fabrication techniques for these advanced alloys are discussed. Chromium, columbium, molybdenum, tantalum, and tungsten alloys are reviewed. On the basis of properties, cost, availability, and strategic importance, molybdenum alloys are found to be the most suitable refractory material for turbine wheels for mass produced engines. Ceramic material candidates are reviewed and ranked according to their probability of success in particular applications. Various forms of, and fabrication processes for both silicon nitride and silicon carbide, along with SiAlON's are investigated for use in high-stress and medium-stress high temperature environments. Low-stress glass-ceramic regenerator materials are also investigated. Treatment is given to processing requirements, such as coatings for oxidation/corrosion protection, joining methods, and machining technology. Economics of ceramic raw materials, and of various processing methods are discussed. Conclusions are drawn, and recommendations for areas of further research are proposed for consideration and/or adoption.

Belleau, C.; Ehlers, W.L.; Hagen, F.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 3, Supplemental information  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. It is organized into seven parts. Part I - Design Concept describes the selected solution. Part III - Supplemental Information contains calculations for the various disciplines as well as other supporting information and analyses.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

231

[Materials Research Collaborative Access Team] Final Report - DOE Grant No.DEFG0200ER45811  

SciTech Connect

Operations Funding for the Materials Research Collaborative Access Team. In the proposal they presented five specific objectives for the MR-CAT Insertion Device beam line: (1) enable the accomplishment of the best possible science at MR-CAT; (2) facilitate efficient set-up and operations of a variety of complex materials-related experiments; (3) open the beamlines' facilities to scientists and science projects from non-traditional backgrounds and disciplines, respectively; (4) enable efficient 24 hour use of the beamline through interdisciplinary research teams and appropriate operations support; and (5) develop selected operations modes in support of the MR-CAT institutions, DOE collaborators, and general users.

Carlo Segre

2004-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Thermoelectric Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoelectric materials can generate electricity or provide cooling by converting thermal gradients to electricity or electricity to thermal gradients. More efficient thermoelectric materials would make feasible the widespread use of thermoelectric converters in mundane applications. This report summarizes the state-of-the-art of thermoelectric materials including currently available materials and applications, new developments, and future prospects.

2000-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

233

Battery resource assessment. Subtask II. 5. Battery manufacturing capability recycling of battery materials. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials. Each recycle process has been designed to produce a product material which can be used directly as a raw material by the battery manufacturer. Metal recoverabilities are in the range of 93 to 95% for all processes. In each case, capital and operating costs have been developed for a recycling plant which processes 100,000 electric vehicle batteries per year. These costs have been developed based on material and energy balances, equipment lists, factored installation costs, and manpower estimates. In general, there are no technological barriers for recycling in the Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine and Zinc/Bromine battery systems. The recycling processes are based on essentially conventional, demonstrate technology. The lead times required to build battery recycling plants based on these processes is comparable to that of any other new plant. The total elapsed time required from inception to plant operation is approximately 3 to 5 y. The recycling process for the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/sulfide battery systems are not based on conventional technology. In particular, mechanical systems for dismantling these batteries must be developed.

Pemsler, P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

INTEGRATED PROCESS DESIGN REPORT ON FEED MATERIALS PRODUCTION CENTER, FERNALD, OHIO REFINERY AND GREEN SALT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A coordinated record of the design of a FMPC processing plant for the production of pure massive U from U-contrining raw materials is presented. A thorough understanding of FMPC operations may be obtained through the medium of over-all flow diagrams and associated rate criteria.(auth)

1952-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

235

SCIENCE HIGHLIGHTS 2008 ANNUAL REPORT ORNL NEUTRON SCIENCES The Next Generation of Materials Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.The experiments employed instruments at HFIR and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NISTFeAsO, are antiferromagnetic materials when chilled to a low temperature. Using both a powder diffractometer at NIST and HFIR and Christianson studied the samples syn- thesized at ORNL using the Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR and the Wide

236

III-antimonide/nitride based semiconductors for optoelectronic materials and device studies : LDRD 26518 final report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this LDRD was to investigate III-antimonide/nitride based materials for unique semiconductor properties and applications. Previous to this study, lack of basic information concerning these alloys restricted their use in semiconductor devices. Long wavelength emission on GaAs substrates is of critical importance to telecommunication applications for cost reduction and integration into microsystems. Currently InGaAsN, on a GaAs substrate, is being commercially pursued for the important 1.3 micrometer dispersion minima of silica-glass optical fiber; due, in large part, to previous research at Sandia National Laboratories. However, InGaAsN has not shown great promise for 1.55 micrometer emission which is the low-loss window of single mode optical fiber used in transatlantic fiber. Other important applications for the antimonide/nitride based materials include the base junction of an HBT to reduce the operating voltage which is important for wireless communication links, and for improving the efficiency of a multijunction solar cell. We have undertaken the first comprehensive theoretical, experimental and device study of this material with promising results. Theoretical modeling has identified GaAsSbN to be a similar or potentially superior candidate to InGaAsN for long wavelength emission on GaAs. We have confirmed these predictions by producing emission out to 1.66 micrometers and have achieved edge emitting and VCSEL electroluminescence at 1.3 micrometers. We have also done the first study of the transport properties of this material including mobility, electron/hole mass, and exciton reduced mass. This study has increased the understanding of the III-antimonide/nitride materials enough to warrant consideration for all of the target device applications.

Kurtz, Steven Ross; Hargett, Terry W.; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Waldrip, Karen Elizabeth; Modine, Normand Arthur; Klem, John Frederick; Jones, Eric Daniel; Cich, Michael Joseph; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Peake, Gregory Merwin

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Propulsion system materials program. Semiannual progress report, October 1995--March 1996  

SciTech Connect

This portion of the program is identified as program element 1.0 within the work breakdown structure (WBS). It contains five subelements: (1) Monolithics, (2) Ceramic Composites, (3) Thermal and Wear Coatings, (4) Joining, and (5) Ceramic Machining. Ceramic research conducted within the Monolithics subelement currently includes work activities on low Cost Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} powder, green state ceramic fabrication, characterization, and densification, and on structural, mechanical, and physical properties of these ceramics. Research conducted within the Ceramic Composites subelement currently includes silicon nitride and oxide-based composites, and low expansion materials. Research conducted in the Thermal and Wear Coatings subelement is currently limited to oxide-based coatings and involves coating synthesis, characterization, and determination of the mechanical and physical properties of the coatings. Research conducted in the Joining subelement currently includes studies of processes to produce strong, stable joints between zirconia ceramics and iron-base alloys. As part of an expanded effort to reduce the cost of ceramic components, a new initiative in cost effective machining has been started. A major objective of the research in the Materials and Processing program element is to systematically advance the understanding of the relationships between ceramic raw materials such as powders and reactant gases, the processing variables involved in producing the ceramic materials, and the resultant microstructures and physical and mechanical properties of the ceramic materials. Success in meeting this objective will provide U.S. companies with new or improved ways for producing economical, highly reliable ceramic components for advanced heat engines.

Johnson, D.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Basic Research Needs for Materials Under Extreme Environments. Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Materials Under Extreme Environments, June 11-13, 2007  

SciTech Connect

To evaluate the potential for developing revolutionary new materials that will meet demanding future energy requirements that expose materials to environmental extremes.

Wadsworth, J.; Crabtree, G. W.; Hemley, R. J.; Falcone, R.; Robertson, I.; Stringer, J.; Tortorelli, P.; Gray, G. T.; Nicol, M.; Lehr, J.; Tozer, S. W.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.; Fitzsimmons, T.; Vetrano, J. S.; Ashton, C. L.; Kitts, S.; Landson, C.; Campbell, B.; Gruzalski, G.; Stevens, D.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Japan); Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE WORKSHOP REPORT: Trucks and Heavy-Duty Vehicles Technical Requirements and Gaps for Lightweight and Propulsion Materials February 2013 FINAL REPORT This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available information defining the state of the art of encapsulation materials and processes for terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications were collected and analyzed. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for low-cost, long-life terrestrial photovoltaic arrays manufactured by automated, high-volume processes. The criteria for consideration of the encapsulation systems were based on the goals for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total array price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C.; Gaines, G.B.; Sliemers, F.A.; Kistler, C.W.; Igou, R.D.

1976-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

242

Testing of organic waste surrogate materials in support of the Hanford organic tank program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

To address safety issues regarding effective waste management efforts of underground organic waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, the Bureau of Mines conducted a series of tests, at the request of the Westinghouse Hanford company. In this battery of tests, the thermal and explosive characteristics of surrogate materials, chosen by Hanford, were determined. The surrogate materials were mixtures of inorganic and organic sodium salts, representing fuels and oxidants. The oxidants were sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite. The fuels were sodium salts of oxalate, citrate and ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Polyethylene powder was also used as a fuel with the oxidant(s). Sodium aluminate was used as a diluent. In addition, a sample of FeCN, supplied by Hanford was also investigated.

Turner, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Miron, Y. [Bureau of Mines (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Strategic partnerships final LDRD report : nanocomposite materials for efficient solar hydrogen production.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 'campus executive' project sought to advance solar thermochemical technology for producing the chemical fuels. The project advanced the common interest of Sandia National Laboratories and the University of Arizona in creating a sustainable and viable alternative to fossil fuels. The focus of this effort was in developing new methods for creating unique monolithic composite structures and characterizing their performance in thermochemical production of hydrogen from water. The development and processing of the materials was undertaken in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at the University of Arizona; Sandia National Laboratories performed the thermochemical characterization. Ferrite/yttria-stabilized zirconia composite monoliths were fabricated and shown to have exceptionally high utilization of the ferrite for splitting CO{sub 2} to obtain CO (a process analogous to splitting H{sub 2}O to obtain H{sub 2}).

Corral, Erica L. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Miller, James Edward; Walker, Luke S. (University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ); Evans, Lindsey R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Alternate materials of construction for geothermal applications. Progress report No. 17, October--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A program to determine if non-metallic materials such as polymers, concrete polymer composites, and refractory cements can be utilized as materials of construction in geothermal processes is in progress. To date, several high temperature polymer concrete systems have been formulated, laboratory and field tests performed in brine, flashing brine, and steam at temperatures up to 260/sup 0/C (500{sup 0}F), and economic studies started. Laboratory data for exposure times > 2 years are available. Results are also available from field exposures of up to 24 months in four geothermal environments. Good durability is indicated. Work at five of these sites is continuing and plans to initiate other tests are being implemented.

Steinberg, M.; Kukacka, L.E.

1978-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

245

American Electric Power/Alstom Chilled Ammonia Process Validation Facility -- Material Inspection Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A CO2 capture and storage (CCS) pilot plant was constructed at American Electric Power’s (AEP’s) 1300-MWe Mountaineer station in New Haven, West Virginia, employing Alstom Power’s Chilled Ammonia Process (CAP). This CAP Process Validation Facility (PVF) was operated for 7900 hours between September 2009 and May 2011, when the demonstration ended. One of the objectives of the program was a determination of the adequacy of the materials that had been selected for the ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

Gas Turbine Rotor Life: CrMoV Material Testing, 2013 Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas turbine rotor materials are subject to degradation from prolonged hours and multiple start/stop cycles of operation. Periodically, plant operators disassemble the compressor and turbine sections of the rotor system and inspect the components for signs of creep, embrittlement, corrosion, thermal fatigue, and high- and low-cycle fatigue. Beyond limited rotor inspections performed during hot gas path inspections and major overhauls, a more thorough inspection is often required by the equipment ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

Materials Reliability Program: Inspection Data Survey Report (MRP-219, revision 8)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides summaries and details of inspection data collected from U.S. Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs) in response to a biannual survey conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Materials Reliability Program (MRP). This revision includes results through fall 2011. The results of the MRP surveys have informed industry practices and prompted mitigative actions, the results of which are already reflected in the current industry ...

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

248

Investigation of test methods, material properties, and processes for solar cell encapsulants. Seventh annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program is to identify and evaluate encapsulation materials and processes for the protection of silicon solar cells for service in a terrestrial environment. Aging and degradation studies were performed including: thermal aging, sunlamp exposures, aging in controlled environment reactors and outdoor photothermal aging devices, and metal catalyzed degradation. Other tests addressed water absorption, primers and adhesives, soiling experiments, and corrosion protection. (LEW)

Willis, P.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Management of radioactive material safety programs at medical facilities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A Task Force, comprising eight US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and two Agreement State program staff members, developed the guidance contained in this report. This report describes a systematic approach for effectively managing radiation safety programs at medical facilities. This is accomplished by defining and emphasizing the roles of an institution`s executive management, radiation safety committee, and radiation safety officer. Various aspects of program management are discussed and guidance is offered on selecting the radiation safety officer, determining adequate resources for the program, using such contractual services as consultants and service companies, conducting audits, and establishing the roles of authorized users and supervised individuals; NRC`s reporting and notification requirements are discussed, and a general description is given of how NRC`s licensing, inspection and enforcement programs work.

Camper, L.W.; Schlueter, J.; Woods, S. [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

THIRD STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. There is no clear trend thus far to indicate one material ages in a manner significantly different from the other material. Some softwood fiberboard properties degrade faster in some environments, while cane fiberboard degrades faster with regards to other properties and environments. Given the limited aging time accumulated to date in the elevated humidity environments, it is recommended that aging and testing of softwood fiberboard continue for another year. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Further understanding of the variability of softwood fiberboard properties will require testing of additional material.

Daugherty, W.

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from activated PEEK is well suited for hydrogen storage due to its controlled microporous structure and large surface area. • A new porosimetry method for evaluating the pore landscape using H2 as a probe was developed. 1H NMR can probe the nanoscale pore structure of synthesized material and can assess the pore dimension over a range covering 1.2 nm to 2.5 nm, the size that is desired for H2 adsorption. • Analysis of 1H NMR spectra in conjunction with the characterization of the bonding structure of the adsorbent by 13C NMR distinguishes between a heterogeneous and homogeneous pore structure as evidenced by the work on AX21 and activated PEEK. • Most of the sorbents studied are suited to hydrogen storage at low temperature (T < 100K). Of the materials investigated, only boron substituted graphite has the potential to work at higher temperatures if the boron content in the favorable planar BC3 configuration that actively contributes to adsorption can be increased.

Yue Wu; Alfred Kleinhammes

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

252

Measurement and modeling of energetic material mass transfer to soil pore water :project CP-1227 FY03 annual technical report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Military test and training ranges operate with live fire engagements to provide realism important to the maintenance of key tactical skills. Ordnance detonations during these operations typically produce minute residues of parent explosive chemical compounds. Occasional low order detonations also disperse solid phase energetic material onto the surface soil. These detonation remnants are implicated in chemical contamination impacts to groundwater on a limited set of ranges where environmental characterization projects have occurred. Key questions arise regarding how these residues and the environmental conditions (e.g., weather and geostratigraphy) contribute to groundwater pollution impacts. This report documents interim results of experimental work evaluating mass transfer processes from solid phase energetics to soil pore water. The experimental work is used as a basis to formulate a mass transfer numerical model, which has been incorporated into the porous media simulation code T2TNT. This report documents the results of the Phase III experimental effort, which evaluated the impacts of surface deposits versus buried deposits, energetic material particle size, and low order detonation debris. Next year, the energetic material mass transfer model will be refined and a 2-d screening model will be developed for initial site-specific applications. A technology development roadmap was created to show how specific R&D efforts are linked to technology and products for key customers.

Phelan, James M.; Barnett, James L.; Kerr, Dayle R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

New anion-exchange resins for improved separations of nuclear materials. Mid-year progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

'The authors are developing multi-functional anion-exchange resins that facilitate anion uptake by carefully controlling the structure of the anion receptor site. The new ion-exchange resins interface the rapidly developing field of ion-specific chelating ligands with robust, commercial ion exchange technology. The overall objective of the research is to develop a predictive capability which allows the facile design and implementation of multi-functionalized anion exchange materials which selectively sorb metal complexes of interest from targeted process, waste, and environmental streams. The basic scientific issues addressed are actinide complex speciation along with modeling of the metal complex/functional site interactions in order to determine optimal binding-site characteristics. Their approach uses a thorough determination of the chemical species both in solution and as bound to the resin to determine the characteristics of resin active sites which can actively facilitate specific metal-complex sorption to the resin. The first year milestones were designed to allow us to build off of their extensive expertise with plutonium in nitrate solutions prior to investigating other, less familiar systems. While the principle investigators have successfully developed actinide chelators and ion-exchange materials in the past, the authors were fully aware that integration of this two fields would be challenging, rewarding and, at times, highly frustrating. Relatively small differences in the substrate (cross-linkage, impurities), the active sites (percent substitution, physical accessibility), the actinide solution (oxidation state changes, purity) and the analytical procedures (low detection limits) can produce inconsistent sorption behavior which is difficult to interpret. The potential paybacks for success, however, are enormous. They feel that they have learned a great deal about how to control these numerous variables to produce consistent, reliable analysis of actinide sorption behavior with the new and baseline anion-exchange materials. The four Year 1 (FY97) milestones are listed below along with an update on the progress towards their completion.'

Barr, M.E.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Propulsion System Materials Program semiannual progress report for April 1995 through September 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the DOE, NASA, and DOD advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a 5-year program plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. During the course of the Propulsion System Materials Program, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. However, further work is needed to reduce the cost of ceramics to facilitate their commercial introduction, especially in the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. To this end, the direction of the Propulsion System Materials Program is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported to include near-term (5--10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Development of materials for open-cycle MHD. Quarterly report for the period ending March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is conducting an ongoing study of channel components for open-cycle, coal-fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generators. Specifically, electrodes and insulators are being developed. The electrical conductivity has been measured on several compositions based on hafnium oxide, rare earth oxides, and indium oxide. Indium oxide at present appears to be the main constituent required for high conductivity. As part of the development, materials are being corrosion tested in both Montana Rosebud coal slag and potassium sulfate (K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/). The results from three coal slag tests and one K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ test are discussed in this document.

Marchant, D.D.; Bates, J.L.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

THE SNAP II POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM TOPICAL REPORT NO. 14. MERCURY MATERIALS EVALUATION AND SELECTION  

SciTech Connect

SNAP II is the designation for a 3 kw nuclear auxiliary power unit to be used in a satellite vehicle. The SNAP II System consists of a reactor heat source, a boiler, a Hg Rankine engine, an alternator, and a condenser. The corrosion and subsequent mass transfer resulting from the use of Hg as the thermodynamic wo:king fluid are important considerations in the selection of materials for the SNAP II System. Consequently, corrosion and mass transfer behavior were under study for the past three years. Recent results of this study are presented and the corrosion mechanisms involved are discussed. (auth)

Nejedlik, J.F.

1961-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

Mutagenic and chemical properties of SRC-I materials: a status report  

SciTech Connect

Process solvent (PS) and solid product (dissolved in organic solvent) produced by the Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-I) process at the Wilsonville pilot plant contain mutagenically active components against the Ames-Salmonella strains, Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100. Ames-positive mutagens are apparently concentrated in the moderately polar to strongly polar chemical constituents of both materials. However, the dissolved solid product contains a much higher proportion of very strongly polar mutagens, and may be enriched in acidic - i.e., oxygen-containing mutagens.

Pelroy, R.A. (ed.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ex-vessel core catcher materials interactions. Annual progress report. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

A twelve-month program to investigate ex-vessel core catcher materials interactions has been completed. The investigations, involving depleted uranium dioxide, magnesia brick, stainless steel, and low-carbon steel, were conducted in furnaces and associated facilities existing at Aerospace, which were modified to process molten and solidified radioactive samples. In addition to developing efficient methods for the melting, pouring, and sustained heating of UO/sub 2/, extensive sample characterizations and microanalyses were performed. Theoretical analyses were also made in data interpretation for the purpose of understanding the interaction kinetics.

Swanson, D.G.; Zehms, E.H.; Ang, C.Y.; McClelland, J.D.; Meyer, R.A.; vanPaassen, H.L.L.

1976-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

259

Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

•\tAnalysis of 1H NMR spectra in conjunction with the characterization of the bonding structure of the adsorbent by 13C NMR distinguishes between a heterogeneous and homogeneous pore structure as evidenced by the work on AX21 and activated PEEK. • Most of the sorbents studied are suited to hydrogen storage at low temperature (T < 100K). Of the materials investigated, only boron substituted graphite has the potential to work at higher temperatures if the boron content in the favorable planar BC3 configuration that actively contributes to adsorption can be increased.

Yue Wu; Alfred Kleinhammes

2011-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

260

Method for determining trace quantities of chloride in polymeric materials using ion selective electrodes: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for determining trace quantities of chloride in polymeric materials has been developed. Ion-selective electrodes and the standard addition method were used in all the analyses. The ion-selective electrode method was compared with neutron activation, ion chromatography and chloridometer titration. The ion-selective electrode technique results for chloride were similar to those of neutron activation, which is the acknowledged referee method. This ion-selective electrode method showed the highest standard recovery when compared with the ion chromatography and chloridometer titration methods.

Salary, J.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fuel cell applied research: electrocatalysis and materials. Quarterly report, April 1-June 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Topics studied include: (1) oxygen reduction and cyclic voltammetry on carbon supported platinum electrodes in 85% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/; (2) oxygen reduction on platinum in 85% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ with small additions of trifluoromethane sulfonic acid or trifluoracetic acid; (3) overpotential characteristics of electrodes at interfaces with solid oxide electrolytes; and (4) oxygen diffusion through interconvection material in high temperature solid electrolyte fuel cells. Also, studies of phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cell technologies are surveyed. (WHK)

Srinivasan, S.; Isaacs, H.S.; McBreen, J.; O'Grady, W.E.; Olender, H.; Olmer, L.J.; Schouler, E.J.L.; Yang, C.Y.; Taylor, E.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Fluid Phase Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Benjamin L. Davis (Primary Contact), Tessui Nakagawa, Biswajit Paik, and Troy A. Semelsberger Materials Physics and Applications, Materials Chemistry Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), MS J514 P.O. Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 500-2463 Email: bldavis@lanl.gov DOE Manager Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@hq.doe.gov Partner Tom Baker, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop fluid, pumpable ammonia-borane (AB)-based fuels with high-H 2 content. Technical Barriers

263

Final Report: X-ray Studies of Materials Dynamics at MHATT-CAT Sector 7 , Advanced Photon Source  

SciTech Connect

This Final Report describes the scientific accomplishments that have been achieved with support from grant DE-FG02-03ER46023 during the period 12/01/02 ? 11/30/05. The funding supported a vigorous scientific program allowing the PI to achieve leadership in a number of important areas. In particular, research carried out during this period has opened way to ultrafast dynamics studies of materials by combining the capabilities of synchrotron radiation with those of ultrafast lasers. This enables the initiation of laser-induced excitations and studies of their subsequent dynamics using laser-pump/x-ray probe techniques. Examples of such excitations include phonons, shock waves, excitons, spin-waves, and polaritons. The breadth of phenomena that can now be studied in the time-domain is very broad, revealing new phenomena and mechanisms that are critical to many applications of materials.

Roy Clarke

2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

264

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Uncertainty assessment for deposited material and external doses. Volume 1: Main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA deposited material and external dose models.

Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Boardman, J. [AEA Technology (United Kingdom); Jones, J.A. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Progress Report 2011: Understanding compound phase transitions in Heusler alloy giant magnetocaloric materials  

SciTech Connect

Our goal is to gain insight into the fundamental physics that is responsible for magnetocaloric effects (MCE) and related properties at the atomic level. We are currently conducting a systematic study on the effects of atomic substitutions in Ni2MnGa-based alloys, and also exploring related full- and half-Heusler alloys, for example Ni-Mn-X (X=In, Sn, Sb), that exhibit a wide variety of interesting and potentially useful physical phenomena. It is already known that the magnetocaloric effect in the Heusler alloys is fundamentally connected to other interesting phenomena such as shape-memory properties. And the large magnetic entropy change in Ni2Mn0.75Cu0.25Ga has been attributed to the coupling of the first-order, martensitic transition with the second-order ferromagnetic�paramagnetic (FM-PM) transition. Our research to this point has focused on understanding the fundamental physics at the origin of these complex, compound phase transitions, and the novel properties that emerge. We synthesize the materials using a variety of techniques, and explore their material properties through structural, magnetic, transport, and thermo-magnetic measurements.

Shane Stadler

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

266

FOURTH STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Samples have been prepared from a 9975 lower fiberboard subassembly fabricated from softwood fiberboard. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. Some softwood fiberboard properties tend to degrade faster in elevated humidity environments, while some cane fiberboard properties degrade faster in the hotter dry environments. As a result, it is premature to assume both materials will age at the same rates, and the preliminary aging models developed for cane fiberboard might not apply to softwood fiberboard. However, it is expected that both cane and softwood fiberboard assemblies will perform satisfactorily in conforming packages stored in a typical KAMS environment for up to 15 years. Aging and testing of softwood fiberboard will continue and additional data will be collected. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Further understanding of the variability of softwood fiberboard properties will require testing of additional material.

Daugherty, W.

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

267

Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report P. Zelenay (Primary Contact), H. Chung, C.M. Johnston, Y.S. Kim, Q. Li, D. Langlois, D. Spernjak, P. Turner, G. Wu Materials Physics and Applications Division Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Los Alamos, NM 87545 Phone: (505) 667-0197 Email: zelenay@lanl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Subcontractors: * R.R. Adzic (PI), S. Bliznakov, M. Li, P. Liu, K. Sasaki, M.-P. Zhou Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY * Y. Yan (PI), S. Alia, J. Zheng University of Delaware, Newark, DE

268

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This quarterly project status report discusses research projects being conducted on hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River basin. We continued to seek improvement in our methods of communication and interactions to support the inter-disciplinary, inter-university collaborators within this program. In addition to the defined collaborative research teams, there is increasing interaction among investigators across projects. Planning for the second year of the project has included the development of our internal request for proposals, and refining the review process for selection of proposals for funding.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Lightweight concrete materials and structural systems for water tanks for thermal storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermally efficient hot water storage tanks were designed, fabricated and evaluated. The tanks were made using cellular concrete at a nominal density of 100 lb/ft/sup 3/ for the structural elements and at a 30 lb/ft/sup 3/ density for the insulating elements. Thermal performance testing of the tanks was done using a static decay test since the test procedure specified in ASHRAE 94-77 was not experimentally practical. A series of composition modifications to the cellular concrete mix were investigated and the addition of alkaline resistant glass fibers was found to enhance the mechanical properties at no sacrifice in thermal behavior. Economic analysis indicated that cellular concrete provides a cost-effective insulating material. The total portability of the plant for producing cellular concrete makes cellular concrete amenable to on-site fabrication and uniquely adaptable to retrofit applications.

Buckman, R.W. Jr.; Elia, G.G.; Ichikawa, Y.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Ferrocyanide safety program: Final report on adiabatic calorimetry and tube propagation tests with synthetic ferrocyanide materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on Fauske and Associates, Inc. Reactive System Screening Tool tests, the onset or initiation temperature for a ferrocyanide-nitrate propagating reaction is about 250 degrees Celcius. This is at about 200 degrees Celcius higher than current waste temperatures in the highest temperature ferrocyanide tanks. Furthermore, for current ambient waste temperatures, the tube propagation tests show that a ferrocyanide concentration of 15.5 wt% or more is required to sustain a propagation reaction in the complete absence of free water. Ignoring the presence of free water, this finding rules out propagating reactions for all the Hanford flowsheet materials with the exception of the ferrocyanide waste produced by the original In Farm flowsheet

Fauske, H.F. [Fauske and Associates, Inc. (United States); Meacham, J.E.; Cash, R.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fuel cells: applied research fuel cell materials and electrocatalysis. Annual report, January 1976--December 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is described on electrocatalysis of fuel cell reactions including the topics (1) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes, (2) electrolyte effects on the oxygen reduction reaction, (3) anion effects on the oxygen reduction reaction, and (4) selection and evaluation of electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction in KHCO/sub 3//K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ buffered electrolytes. Phosphoric acid fuel cell studies include inhibition of sintering of fuel cell catalyst particles: electrochemical methods for surface regeneration and temperature effects on the oxygen reduction reaction at platinum in phosphoric acid electrolyte. Research on the characterization of overpotentials of solid electrolyte fuel cells and selection and evaluation of interconnector materials for solid electrolyte fuel cells is summarized. (WHK)

Srinivasan, S; Isaacs, H S

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Bipolar plate materials in molten carbonate fuel cells. Final CRADA report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Advantages of implementation of power plants based on electrochemical reactions are successfully demonstrated in the USA and Japan. One of the msot promising types of fuel cells (FC) is a type of high temperature fuel cells. At present, thanks to the efforts of the leading countries that develop fuel cell technologies power plants on the basis of molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are really close to commercialization. One of the problems that are to be solved for practical implementation of MCFC and SOFC is a problem of corrosion of metal components of stacks that are assembled of a number of fuel cells. One of the major components of MCFC and SOFC stacks is a bipolar separator plate (BSP) that performs several functions - it is separation of reactant gas flows sealing of the joints between fuel cells, and current collection from the surface of electrodes. The goal of Task 1 of the project is to develop new cost-effective nickel coatings for the Russian 20X23H18 steel for an MCFC bipolar separator plate using technological processes usually implemented to apply corrosion stable coatings onto the metal parts for products in the defense. There was planned the research on production of nickel coatings using different methods, first of all the galvanic one and the explosion cladding one. As a result of the works, 0.4 x 712 x 1296 mm plates coated with nickel on one side were to be made and passed to ANL. A line of 4 galvanic baths 600 liters was to be built for the galvanic coating applications. The goal of Task 2 of the project is the development of a new material of an MCFC bipolar separator plate with an upgraded corrosion stability, and development of a technology to produce cold roll sheets of this material the sizes of which will be 0.8 x 712x 1296 mm. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of the rolled material in sheets 0.8 x 712 x 1296 mm in size is to be made (in accordance with the norms and standards of the Russian metallurgical industry) and supplied to the partner for tests in a stack of fuel cells. A feasibility study on the cost of the Russian material for a BSP is to be done on Tasks 1, 2 in case the annual order makes up 400,000 sheets. The goal of Task 3 of the project is to research on possible implementation of cermet compositions on the basis of LiAlO{sub 2}, TiN, B{sub 4}C, ceramics with Ni and Ni-Mo binders. BaCeO{sub 3} conductive ceramics with metal binders of Ni, Ni-Cr etc. were also planned to be studied. As a result of these works, a pilot batch of samples is to be made and passed to FCE for tests. The goal of Task 4 of the Project is development of a new alloy or alloys with a ceramic coating that will have upgraded corrosion stability in operation within a SOFC. A new alloy was to be worked out by the way of modification of compositions of industrial alloys. Ceramic coatings are to be applied onto ferrite steel produced serially by iron and steel industry of Russia as sheet iron.

Krumpelt, M.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Materials Characterization Center. Second workshop on irradiation effects in nuclear waste forms. Summary report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this second workshop on irradiations effects was to continue the discussions initiated at the first workshop and to obtain guidance for the Materials Characterization Center in developing test methods. The following major conclusions were reached: Ion or neutron irradiations are not substitutes for the actinide-doping technique, as described by the MCC-6 Method for Preparation and Characterization of Actinide-Doped Waste Forms, in the final evaluation of any waste form with respect to the radiation effects from actinide decay. Ion or neutron irradiations may be useful for screening tests or more fundamental studies. The use of these simulation techniques as screening tests for actinide decay requires that a correlation between ion or neutron irradiations and actinide decay be established. Such a correlation has not yet been established and experimental programs in this area are highly recommended. There is a need for more fundamental studies on dose-rate effects, temperature dependence, and the nature and importance of alpha-particle effects relative to the recoil nucleus in actinide decay. There are insufficient data presently available to evaluate the potential for damage from ionizing radiation in nuclear waste forms. No additional test methods were recommended for using ion or neutron irradiations to simulate actinide decay or for testing ionization damage in nuclear waste forms. It was recognized that additional test methods may be required and developed as more data become available. An American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Task Group on the Simulation of Radiation Effects in Nuclear Waste Forms (E 10.08.03) was organized to act as a continuing vehicle for discussions and development of procedures, particularly with regard to ion irradiations.

Weber, W.J.; Turcotte, R.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Coal gasification via the Lurgi process: Topical report: Volume 1, Production of SNG (substitute material gas)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lurgi baseline study was requested by the DOE/GRI Operating Committee of the Joint Coal Gasification Program for the purpose of updating the economics of earlier Lurgi coal gasification plant studies for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) based on commercially advanced technologies. The current study incorporates the recent experience with large size Lurgi plants in an effort to improve capital and operating costs of earlier plant designs. The present coal gasification study is based on a mine mouth plant producing 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG using the Lurgi dry bottom coal gasification technology. A Western subbituminous coal was designated as the plant food, obtained from the Rosebud seam at Colstrip, Montana. This study presents the detailed description of an integrated facility which utilizes coal, air, and water to produce 250 billion Btu (HHV) per day of SNG. The plant consists of coal handling and preparation, twenty-six Lurgi dry bottom gasifiers, shift conversion, acid gas removal, methanation, compression and drying of product gas, sulfur recovery, phenol and ammonia recovery, as well as necessary support facilities. The plant is a grass roots, mine mouth facility located in a Western location similar to the town of Colstrip in Rosebud County, Montana. The Lurgi Corporation assisted in this study, under subcontract to Foster Wheeler, by supplying the heat and material balances, flow sheets, utilities, catalysts and chemical requirements, and cost data for Lurgi designed process sections. Details of material supplied by Lurgi Corporation are presented in Appendix A. 52 refs., 36 figs., 64 tabs.

Zahnstecher, L.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic candle filter materials. Final report, September 1988--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

High-temperature ceramic candle filters are being developed for use in advanced power generation systems such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC), Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC), and Direct Coal-Fired Turbine (DCFT). The direct firing of coal produces particulate matter which must be removed to meet both environmental and process limitations. The ceramic candles increase the efficiency of the advanced power generation systems and protect downstream equipment from erosion and impingement of particulate matter in the hot exhaust gases. Ceramic candle filters are rigid, closed-ended (capped on one side) porous cylinders which generally have a flange on the open-ended side. The flange at the open end allows the candle to be suspended by a tubesheet in the filter vessel. Candle filters have shown promise, but have also encountered durability problems during use in hostile, high-temperature environments. Limitations in the candle lifetime lower the economic advantages of using candle filters for this application. Candles typically fail by cracking at the flange or in the body of the candle. The objective of this project was to test and analyze ceramic candle filter materials and to evaluate the degradation mechanisms. The tests were conducted such that the effects of each degradation mechanism could be examined. Separately. The overall objective of the project was to: (a) develop a better understanding of the thermal and chemical degradation mechanisms of ceramic candle filter materials in advanced coal utilization projects, (b) develop test procedures, and (c) recommend changes to increase filter lifetime. 15 refs., 67 figs., 17 tabs.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Silicon-germanium/gallium phosphide material in high power density thermoelectric modules. Final report, February 1980--September 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of work on the characterization of an improved Si-Ge alloy and the fabrication of thermoelectric devices. The improved Si-Ge alloy uses a small addition of GaP in n- and p- type 80 at.% Si-20 at.% Ge; this addition reduces the thermal conductivity, thereby increasing its figure of merit and conversion efficiency. The thermoelectric devices fabricated include multicouples intended for use in Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and ring-type modules intended for use with nuclear reactor heat sources. This report summarizes the effort in the material as well as the device areas and discusses individual phases of each area. Results should form basis for further effort.

Not Available

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Materials, processes and testing laboratory residential technical progress report, October-December 1980, January -February 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has set a 20-year lifetime goal for terrestrial photovoltaic modules. In its capacity as a Residential Photovoltaic Field Test and Applications Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratory has established and is monitoring experimental residential test sites in various locations of the United States. These sites contain either real or simulated residences coupled with photovoltaic modules from several manufacturers as well as the necessary balance-of-system components. Tests reported include visual and electrical inspection of modules, flash testing, and determination of module I-V curves.

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1981-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Properties of aircraft fuels and related materials. Interim report 15 Feb 82-15 Jul 83  

SciTech Connect

Fuel tests, analyses, and analytical method development were conducted on a number of fuels of an experimental nature in conjunction with ongoing Air Force programs for studying fuel combustion behavior, turbine engine design, and other fuel related technologies. Fuels from conventional and alternate sources were studied, as were fuels of the high density missile propellant type. A wide variety of both physical and chemical properties of the fuels were measured and are tabulated. Studies conducted to aid in the solution of operational problems are also reported.

Hodgson, F.N.; Gable, R.G.; Fritsch, C.D.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel cell applied research: electrocatalysis and materials. Quarterly report, July 1-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of underpotential deposited metal layers on the electrocatalysis of fuel cell reactions was studied. It was found that Bi, Ag and Pb form underpotential deposited metal adatom layers on gold in 85% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Underpotential deposited Bi enhances oxygen reduction on gold with the formation of peroxide. Underpotential deposited Ag on the other hand inhibits oxygen reduction. Results indicate the potential for developing organic compound/air fuel cells using underpotential deposited Pb adatoms to enhance the electrocatalysis of the fuel electrode. The effects of adsorbed layers of Pb, Tl and Bi on formic acid and methanol oxidation on platinum in 85% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ were investigated. The effect of crystal orientation on formic acid oxidation on platinum in 1 M CHlO/sub 2/ was investigated. The kinetics of the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions at the electrode (metal or oxide)-solid electrolyte (yttria stabilized zirconia) interface were investigated using ac and dc techniques. Platinum point contact electrodes were also used in the preliminary studies of the fuel electrode reaction. dc, ac and potential sweep methods were used in this study. Results are reported. Progress on a survey of status studies of phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells is reported. (WHK)

Srinivasan, S.; Isaacs, H.S.; McBreen, J.; O'Grady, W.E.; Olender, H.; Olmer, L.J.; Schouler, E.J.L.; Adzic, R.R.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Capital requirements for the transportation of energy materials: 1979 ARC estimates. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains TERA's estimates of capital requirements to transport natural gas, crude oil, petroleum products, and coal in the United States by 1990. The low, medium, and high world-oil-price scenarios from the EIA's Mid-range Energy Forecasting System (MEFS), as used in the 1979 Annual Report to Congress (ARC), were provided as a basis for the analysis and represent three alternative futures. TERA's approach varies by energy commodity to make best use of the information and analytical tools available. Summaries of transportation investment requirements through 1990 are given. Total investment requirements for three modes (pipelines, rails, waterways and the three energy commodities can accumulate to a $49.9 to $50.9 billion range depending on the scenario. The scenarios are distinguished primarily by the world price of oil which, given deregulation of domestic oil prices, affects US oil prices even more profoundly than in the past. The high price of oil, following the evidence of the last year, is projected to hold demand for oil below the recent past.

Not Available

1980-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Efficiency Improvement of Nitride-Based Solid State Light Emitting Materials -- CRADA Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The development of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x} N/GaN thin film growth by Molecular Beam Epitaxy has opened a new route towards energy efficient solid-state lighting. Blue and green LED's became available that can be used to match the whole color spectrum of visible light with the potential to match the eye response curve. Moreover, the efficiency of such devices largely exceeds that of incandescent light sources (tungsten filaments) and even competes favorably with lighting by fluorescent lamps. It is, however, also seen in Figure 1 that it is essential to improve on the luminous performance of green LED's in order to mimic the eye response curve. This lack of sufficiently efficient green LED's relates to particularities of the In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N materials system. This ternary alloy system is polar and large strain is generated during a lattice mismatched thin film growth because of the significantly different lattice parameters between GaN and InN and common substrates such as sapphire. Moreover, it is challenging to incorporate indium into GaN at typical growth temperatures because a miscibility gap exists that can be modified by strain effects. As a result a large parameter space needs exploration to optimize the growth of In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N and to date it is unclear what the detailed physical processes are that affect device efficiencies. In particular, an inhomogeneous distribution indium in GaN modifies the device performance in an unpredictable manner. As a result technology is pushed forward on a trial and error basis in particular in Asian countries such as Japan and Korea, which dominate the market and it is desirable to strengthen the competitiveness of the US industry. This CRADA was initiated to help Lumileds Lighting/USA boosting the performance of their green LED's. The tasks address the distribution of the indium atoms in the active area of their blue and green LED's and its relation to internal and external quantum efficiencies. Procedures to measure the indium distribution with near atomic resolution were developed and applied to test samples and devices that were provided by Lumilids. Further, the optical performance of the device materials was probed by photoluminescence, electroluminescence and time resolved optical measurements. Overall, the programs objective is to provide a physical basis for the development of a simulation program that helps making predictions to improve the growth processes such that the device efficiency can be increased to about 20%. Our study addresses all proposed aspects successfully. Carrier localization, lifetime and recombination as well as the strain-induced generation of electric fields were characterized and modeled. Band gap parameters and their relation to the indium distribution were characterized and modeled. Electron microscopy was developed as a unique tool to measure the formation of indium clusters on a nanometer length scale and it was demonstrated that strain induced atom column displacements can reliably be determined in any materials system with a precision that approaches 2 pm. The relation between the local indium composition x and the strain induced lattice constant c(x) in fully strained In{sub x}Ga{sub 1-x}N quantum wells was found to be: c(x) = 0.5185 + {alpha}x with {alpha} = 0.111 nm. It was concluded that the local indium concentration in the final product can be modulated by growth procedures in a predictable manner to favorably affect external quantum efficiencies that approached target values and that internal quantum efficiencies exceeded them.

Kisielowski, Christian; Weber, Eicke

2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

282

Neutron Scattering Studies of Fundamental Processes in Earth Materials, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aim of this work was to use neutron scattering techniques to explore the dynamics and structure of water in rock samples. The dynamics of water in rock at low (residual) saturation are directly related to the transport properties of fluids within the host rock. The structure of water in rock may be related to the elastic behavior of the rock, which in many cases is nonlinear and hysteretic. Neutron scattering techniques allow us to study water in intact rock samples at both the molecular and microstructural scales. Our samples were Berea sandstone, Calico Hills and Prow Pass tuffs from Yucca Mountain, NV, and pure samples of the tuff constituents, specifically mordenite and clinoptilolite. We chose Berea sandstone because its macroscopic elastic behavior is known to be highly unusual, and the microscopic mechanisms producing this behavior are not understood. We chose Yucca Mountain tuff, because the fluid transport properties of the geologic structure at Yucca Mountain, Nevada could be relevant to the performance of a high level nuclear waste repository at that site. Neutron scattering methods have a number of properties that are extremely useful for the study of earth materials. In contrast to X-rays, neutrons have very low absorption cross-sections for most elements so that entire bulk samples of considerable size can be 'illuminated' by the neutron beam. Similarly, samples that are optically opaque can be readily investigated by inelastic neutron scattering techniques. Neutrons are equally sensitive to light atoms as to heavy atoms, and can, for example, readily distinguish between Al and Si, neighboring atoms in the periodic table that are difficult to tell apart by X-ray diffraction. Finally, neutrons are particularly sensitive to hydrogen and thus can be used to study the motions, both vibrational and diffusive, of H-containing molecules in rocks, most notably of course, water. Our studies were primarily studies of guest molecules (in our case, water) in a host material (rock). We used three neutron scattering techniques: quasielastic neutron scattering (QNS), inelastic neutron scattering (INS), and neutron powder diffraction (NPD). We used QNS to measure the translational and rotational diffusional motion of water in rock; INS vibrational spectra allowed us to determine the nature of residual water in a sample (disassociated, chemisorbed, or physisorbed); and NPD measurements may allow us to determine the locations of residual water molecules (and the associated dynamic disorder), and thereby understand the binding of water molecules in our samples.

McCall, K. R.

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

283

INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and Security Plan was modified. We also found that some highly enriched uranium in a complex material configuration was not removed from Sandia. This material was designated as Category III material using a methodology for assessing the attractiveness of complex materials that was not specifically addressed in any current DOE directive. Although DOE and NNSA officials believed that this designation was appropriate, the methodology used to support this designation had not, as of the time of our review, been incorporated into the DOE directives system. Historically, the Department has considered the categorization of SNM to be an important national security and public policy issue. Consequently, we believe that expedited action should be taken to formalize this methodology in the DOE directives system and that it be disseminated throughout the Department of Energy complex.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Final Report for Project Titled Nanoporous Materials: Experimental Studies and Molecular Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In recent years significant research has been carried out aimed at developing a fundamental understanding of the phenomena involved in the transport of mixtures in nanoporous systems, such as adsorbents and membranes, which are crucial to many industrial separation processes. Carbon molecular-sieve membranes (CMSM) were the key focus early on in our DOE/BES-supported investigations. They are thought to be more stable and versatile than polymeric membranes, and capable of operating at higher temperatures, up to 300 C. In our research the emphasis was on understanding the factors determining the ability of the CMSM to separate mixtures based on differences in molecular mobility, and in affinity to the pore surface. Our study involved: (1) the preparation and characterization of the CMSM; (2) the computational modeling of their structure, and (3) the measurement and computer simulations of sorption and transport of mixtures through the membranes. The membranes developed are currently undergoing field-testing by Media & Process Technology (M & PT), our industrial collaborators in the project. In this research project we adopted the methodology and tools developed with the nanoporous CMSM to the preparation of novel membranes and films made of SiC. Our efforts were motivated here by the growing interest in the hydrogen economy, which has necessitated the development of robust nanoporous films that can be used as membranes and sensors in high-temperature and pressure processes related to H{sub 2} production. SiC is a promising material for these applications due to its many unique properties, such as high thermal conductivity, thermal shock resistance, biocompatibility, resistance in acidic and alkali environments, chemical inertness (e.g., towards steam, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and HCl, of particular concern for H{sub 2} production from biomass and coal), and high mechanical strength. Though the CMSM exhibit many similar good properties, they are themselves unstable in the presence of O{sub 2} and steam at temperatures higher than 300 C (conditions typically encountered in reactive separations for H{sub 2} production). Other inorganic membranes, like ceramic (e.g., alumina, silica, and zeolite) and metal (Pd, Ag, and their alloys) membranes have, so far, also proven unstable, in such high-temperature applications in the presence of steam and H{sub 2}S. The preparation of SiC nanoporous membranes involves two important steps. First, the preparation of appropriate SiC porous supports, and second the deposition on these supports of crack- and pinhole-free, thin nanoporous SiC films. Our early research, in collaboration with M & PT, focused on the preparation of quality porous SiC substrates. Our recent efforts involved the deposition of thin nanoporous films on these substrates by the pyrolysis of pre-ceramic polymeric precursors. We have made substantial strides in this area (as discussed further in Section II) preparing hydrogen-selective membranes and films. The objective of the project was not only to advance the 'state-of-the-art' of preparing the SiC membranes and films, but also to significantly broaden our understanding of factors that determine the ability of the SiC materials to separate gas mixtures, based on differences in molecular mobility and molecule-pore surface interactions. It is only such an improved fundamental understanding that will lead to further substantial improvements in the techniques for preparing such materials. In our studies we proceeded along two paths: (1) the preparation and characterization of SiC membranes, and the computational modeling of their molecular structure, and (2) the measurement and simultaneous computer simulation of sorption and transport of mixtures through the membranes. Coupling experiments and simulations facilitated our efforts to relate the membrane's structure with its transport properties, and separation efficacy. This, in turn, enabled progress towards the long-term goal of first-principle molecular engineering and design of improved materials for adsorption and separati

Muhammad Sahimi and Theodore T. Tsotsis

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Throughout the 17-month period of its grant, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The reactor was operated 4115 hours during FY 1986 and for 6080 hours during the entire 17-month period, an average of 82 hours per week. Utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research; nuclear materials research and development; radiochemistry and trace analysis; nuclear medicine; radiation health physics; computer control of reactors; dose reduction in nuclear power reactors; reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT; MIT Research Reactor. Data on the above utilization for FY 1986 show that the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (NRL) engaged in joint activities with nine academic departments and interdepartmental laboratories at MIT, the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, and 22 other universities and nonprofit research institutions, such as teaching hospitals.

Not Available

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

286

Slicing of silicon into sheet material. Final report, January 9, 1976-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Complete results, from raw data to interpretation to recommendations, of a program to investigate the use of multiblade slurry sawing to produce silicon wafers from ingots are presented. During the course of this program, the commercially available state of the art process was improved by 20% in terms of area of silicon wafers produced from an ingot. The process was improved 34% on an experimental basis. Production of 20 wafers per centimeter length of 100 mm diameter ingot is now possible on a production basis. Economic analyses presented show that further improvements are necessary to approach the desired wafer costs, mostly reduction in expendable materials costs. Tests which indicate that such reduction is possble are included, although demonstration of such reduction was not completed. A new, large capacity saw was designed and tested. Performance comparable with current equipment (in terms of number of wafers/cm) was demonstrated. Improved performance was partially demonstrated, but problems (both mechanical and of unknown origin) precluded full demonstration of improved performance.

Fleming, J R; Holden, S C; Wolfson, R G

1979-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

287

Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Annual subcontract report, 16 January 1991--15 January 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of Phase II of a research program on polycrystalline thin film heterojunction solar cells are presented. Relations between processing, materials properties and device performance were studied. The analysis of these solar cells explains how minority carrier recombination at the interface and at grain boundaries can be reduced by doping of windows and absorber layers, such as in high efficiency CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} based solar cells. The additional geometric dimension introduced by the polycrystallinity must be taken into consideration. The solar cells are limited by the diode current, caused by recombination in the space charge region. J-V characteristics of CuInSe{sub 2}/(CdZn)S cells were analyzed. Current-voltage and spectral response measurements were also made on high efficiency CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells prepared by vacuum evaporation. Cu-In bilayers were reacted with Se and H{sub 2}Se gas to form CuInSe{sub 2} films; the reaction pathways and the precursor were studied. Several approaches to fabrication of these thin film solar cells in a superstrate configuration were explored. A self-consistent picture of the effects of processing on the evolution of CdTe cells was developed.

Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

SECOND STATUS REPORT: TESTING OF AGED SOFTWOOD FIBERBOARD MATERIAL FOR THE 9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

Samples have been prepared from a softwood fiberboard lower subassembly. Physical, mechanical and thermal properties have been measured following varying periods of conditioning in each of several environments. These tests have been conducted in the same manner as previous testing on cane fiberboard samples. Overall, similar aging trends are observed for softwood and cane fiberboard samples, with a few differences. On the positive side, the softwood fiberboard data to date shows less sample-to-sample variation in physical properties than cane fiberboard, and the thermal conductivity decreases at a slower rate at 250F for softwood fiberboard than for cane fiberboard. On the other hand, the softwood fiberboard physical property samples generally show degradation rates greater than cane fiberboard samples in the 185F 30%RH environment. Testing following additional conditioning will continue and the addition of samples in other elevated humidity environment(s) will be pursued to identify the extent of these trends. Post-conditioning data have been measured on samples from a single softwood fiberboard assembly, and baseline data are also available from a limited number of vendor-provided samples. This provides minimal information on the possible sample-to-sample variation exhibited by softwood fiberboard. Data to date are generally consistent with the range seen in cane fiberboard, but some portions of the data trends are skewed toward the lower end of that range. Further understanding of the variability of softwood fiberboard properties will require testing of additional material.

Daugherty, W.

2010-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Thermoelectric material development. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have found that there is a limited range of solid solutions between the skutterudite compounds CoSb{sub 3} and RuSb{sub 2}Te (about 5% on each side). For the system (RuSb{sub 2}Te){sub x}(CoSb{sub 3}){sub 1-x}, preliminary results obtained on one n-type sample on the CoSb{sub 3}-rich side show that these alloys have good thermoelectric properties and a maximum ZT of about 0.89 was obtained at about 600 C. More experiments will be started to investigate the possibility of a broader range of miscibility in this system which would allow an even further decrease in the lattice thermal conductivity, resulting in better thermoelectric properties. IrSb{sub 3} and RuSb{sub 2}Te form a complete range of solid solutions. Hot-pressed samples in this system have shown p-type conductivity. The thermoelectric properties of these p-type alloys have been measured and results have shown that their potential for thermoelectric applications is limited mainly because of the relatively low Seebeck coefficient values for p-type materials. Efforts will be directed on preparing n-type samples of the same alloys by doping with various dopants such as Ni and Pd.

Vandersande, J.W.; Caillat, T.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

NONE

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

291

Final Scientific Report, New Proton Conductive Composite Materials for PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

This project covered one of the main challenges in present-day PEM fuel cell technology: to design a membrane capable of maintaining high conductivity and mechanical integrity when temperature is elevated and water vapor pressure is severely reduced. The DOE conductivity milestone of 0.1 S cm-1 at 120 degrees C and 50 % relative humidity (RH) for designed membranes addressed the target for the project. Our approach presumed to develop a composite membrane with hydrophilic proton-conductive inorganic material and the proton conductive polymeric matrix that is able to “bridge” the conduction paths in the membrane. The unique aspect of our approach was the use of highly functionalized inorganic additives to benefit from their water retention properties and high conductivity as well. A promising result turns out that highly hydrophilic phosphorsilicate gels added in Nafion matrix improved PEM fuel cell performance by over 50% compared with bare Nafion membrane at 120 degrees C and 50 % RH. This achievement realizes that the fuel cell operating pressure can be kept low, which would make the PEM fuel cell much more cost efficient and adaptable to practical operating conditions and facilitate its faster commercialization particularly in automotive and stationary applications.

Lvov, Serguei

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

292

Process feasibility study in support of silicon material Task I. Final report, October 1, 1975-February 6, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Low-Cost Solar Array (LSA) Project is directed toward effective cost reduction in the production of silicon for solar cells. Results are presented for process system properties, chemical engineering and economic analyses of the new technologies and processes being developed for the production of lower cost silicon for solar cells. Major physical, thermodynamic and transport property data are reported for the following silicon source and processing chemical materials: silane, silicon tetrachloride, trichlorosilane, dichlorosilane, silicon tetrafluoride, and silicon. The property data are reported for critical temperature, critical pressure, critical volume, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, heat capacity, density, surface tension, viscosity, thermal conductivity, heat of formation and Gibb's free energy of formation. Chemical engineering analyses involving the preliminary process design of a plant (1000 MT/yr capacity) to produce silicon via the technology under consideration were accomplished for the following processes: UCC silane process for silicon, BCL process for silicon, conventional polysilicon process (Siemens technology), SiI/sub 4/ decomposition process, and DCS process (dichlorosilane).Major activities in chemical engineering analyses include base case conditions, reaction chemistry, process flowsheet, material balance, energy balance, property data, equipment design, major equipment list, production labor and forward for economic analysis. The process design package provides detailed data for raw materials, utilities, major process equipment and production labor requirements necessary for polysilicon production in each process. Using detailed data from the process design package, economic analyses for a 1000 MT/yr silicon plant were accomplished. Primary results from the economic analyses included plant capital investment and product cost. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Yaws, C.L.; Li, K.Y.; Hopper, J.R.; Fang, C.S.; Hansen, K.C.

1981-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 166: Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 166 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials' and consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 02-42-01, Condo Release Storage Yd - North; CAS 02-42-02, Condo Release Storage Yd - South; CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area; CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard; CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum; CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank; and CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain. Closure activities were conducted from March to July 2009 according to the FF ACO (1996, as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 166 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007b). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities are summarized. CAU 166, Storage Yards and Contaminated Materials, consists of seven CASs in Areas 2, 3, 5, and 18 of the NTS. The closure alternatives included No Further Action and Clean Closure. This CR provides a summary of completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and confirmation that remediation goals were met. The following site closure activities were performed at CAU 166 as documented in this CR: (1) At CAS 02-99-10, D-38 Storage Area, approximately 40 gal of lead shot were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW, and approximately 50 small pieces of DU were removed and disposed as LLW. (2) At CAS 03-42-01, Conditional Release Storage Yard, approximately 7.5 yd{sup 3} of soil impacted with lead and Am-241 were removed and disposed as LLW. As a BMP, approximately 22 ft{sup 3} of asbestos tile were removed from a portable building and disposed as ALLW, approximately 55 gal of oil were drained from accumulators and are currently pending disposal as HW, the portable building was removed and disposed as LLW, and accumulators, gas cylinders, and associated debris were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW. (3) At CAS 05-19-02, Contaminated Soil and Drum, as a BMP, an empty drum was removed and disposed as sanitary waste. (4) At CAS 18-01-01, Aboveground Storage Tank, approximately 165 gal of lead-impacted liquid were removed and are currently pending disposal as HW, and approximately 10 gal of lead shot and 6 yd{sup 3} of wax embedded with lead shot were removed and are currently pending treatment and disposal as MW. As a BMP, approximately 0.5 yd{sup 3} of wax were removed and disposed as hydrocarbon waste, approximately 55 gal of liquid were removed and disposed as sanitary waste, and two metal containers were grouted in place. (5) At CAS 18-99-03, Wax Piles/Oil Stain, no further action was required; however, as a BMP, approximately l.5 yd{sup 3} of wax were removed and disposed as hydrocarbon waste, and one metal container was grouted in place.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Application of phase-change materials in passive solar systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Institute of Energy Conversion of the University of Delaware has designed and constructed a modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. In the winter of 1977-78, the Thermal Wall Panel was tested at Solar One, the Institute's solar house and laboratory. The key results and conclusions from this testing and analysis program include the following: (1) Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable nighttime insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. (2) Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. (3) A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. (4) A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance. Based on these results, it is recommended that full-scale testing of the system be initiated at multiple sites in the Mid-Atlantic Region.

Sliwkowski, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Materials technology for coal-conversion processes. Eleventh quarterly report, April--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Silicon-carbide refractories with various bond systems exposed to molten slag at 1500/sup 0/C for 500 h in Run 4 showed virtually no attack. The resistance of the silicon carbide to slag attack is attributed to large thermal fluxes induced by water-cooled chills applied to the cold faces. Magnesia-chromia refractories exposed to molten slag at 1500/sup 0/C for 500 h in Run 5 were somewhat less resistant to slag attack than the silicon-carbide refractories. In-situ erosive-wear measurements on the Bi-Gas A106B low-carbon steel main coal feed line were obtained during the present quarter, with initial indications of a nominal 5% wall-thickness reduction after approximately 200 h of exposure. Acoustic leak-detection tests were carried out at the Morgantown Energy Research Center Valve Test Facility. Uniaxial tensile data were generated on several specified alloys in an as-received condition at temperatures of 750, 871, and 982/sup 0/C. A generalized approach, based on thermodynamic equilibria of gas mixtures, has been developed to evaluate the chemical potentials of the reactive elements, i.e., O, S, C, H, and N in multicomponent gas streams. The results showed that the chemical potentials can be uniquely established by the total atomic ratios C/H, C/O, and C/S in the initial gas mixture. A work plan for the experimental phase of the erosion program will include initial short-term testing to characterize the erosive behavior of various candidate materials for coal-conversion plants and also longer-term tests to characterize combined erosion/corrosion. Failed components from the Synthane Plant (ballooned pipe, pump impeller shaft (GA-207), thermowell, purge piping (BB-1), and the Battelle Char-Burner (Thermowells) were examined. (LTN)

Ellingson, W A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Materials technology for coal-conversion processes. Progress report, July-September 1980  

SciTech Connect

Failure analysis of the refractory lining of the Grand Forks Energy Technology Center slagging gasifier revealed that sodium hydroxide had reacted with the refractory, causing a large volume change and consequent spallation. Laboratory studies on pressure coupling of acoustic waveguides to pressure boundaries for long-term erosive wear measurements show that the use of annealed copper foil (0.25-0.76 mm (10-30 mil) thick) with a contact pressure of 50-70 MPa (7-10 ksi) can yield satisfactory coupling in the presence of thermal cycling. High-temperature corrosion studies have been initiated to investigate effects of deposits such as CaO and CaSO/sub 4/ on corrosion rates of Fe-2-1/4Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. Erosion studies at room temperature and atmospheric pressure were conducted on 1015 carbon steel, 304 and 310 stainless steel, Incoloy 800, and Stellite 6B. Impact particles were 150-..mu..m Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with impact angles of 16-81/sup 0/. Weight-loss measurements are in good agreement with prior work. Materials studies for instrumentation included studies of thermowells at the U-Gas plant run by IGT. Analysis of a product gas line from Bi-Gas indicates that failure was caused by caustic- or oxygen-assisted stress-corrosion cracking. A product gas line expansion joint from U-gas was also examined; at present, chloride-induced pitting seems to have been the cause of this failure, which was initiated at the inner surface.

Not Available

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Materials, Processes and Testing Laboratory technical progress report: July, August, September, October 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Test experiences with photovoltaic modules at various experimental photovoltaic test facilities are detailed. Specific details are given for module failure analyses conducted between December 1979 and July 1981. An analysis of broken interconnects is presented, as is a comparison of the insolations measured by a reference cell and a pyranometer. Modules and many components of a photovoltaic system are evaluated at a Systems Test Facility, two of which are a 25-kWp array field at the Mead Field Station of the University of Nebraska, and a 100-kWp array field at the Natural Bridges National Monument in Utah. Failed modules are also analyzed from the Mount Washington Endurance Test Site in New Hampshire, the Lincoln Laboratory Rooftop Test Bed, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the Radio Station Test Site at Bryan, Ohio, and the University of Texas at Arlington. Also reported is a search for electrical anomalies in the array field at the Natural Bridges National Monument test site. (LEW)

Forman, S.E.; Themelis, M.P.

1982-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

298

[Research at and operation of the material science x-ray absorption beamline (X-11) at the National Synchrotron Light Source]. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses three projects at the Material Science X-Ray Absorption Beamline. Topics discussed include: XAFS study of some titanium silicon and germanium compounds; initial XAS results of zirconium/silicon reactions; and low angle electron yield detector.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Polycrystalline thin film materials and devices. Annual subcontract report, 16 January 1990--15 January 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results and conclusion of Phase I of a multi-year research program on polycrystalline thin film solar cells are presented. The research comprised investigation of the relationships among processing, materials properties and device performance of both CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells. The kinetics of the formation of CuInSe{sub 2} by selenization with hydrogen selenide was investigated and a CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS solar cell was fabricated. An alternative process involving the reaction of deposited copper-indium-selenium layers was used to obtain single phase CuInSe{sub 2} films and a cell efficiency of 7%. Detailed investigations of the open circuit voltage of CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells showed that a simple Shockley-Read-Hall recombination mechanism can not account for the limitations in open circuit voltage. Examination of the influence of CuInSe{sub 2} thickness on cell performance indicated that the back contact behavior has a significant effect when the CuInSe{sub 2} is less than 1 micron thick. CdTe/CdS solar cells with efficiencies approaching 10% can be repeatedly fabricated using physical vapor deposition and serial post deposition processing. The absence of moisture during post deposition was found to be critical. Improvements in short circuit current of CdTe solar cells to levels approaching 25 mA/cm{sup 2} are achievable by making the CdS window layer thinner. Further reductions in the CdS window layer thickness are presently limited by interdiffusion between the CdS and the CdTe. CdTe/CdS cells stored without protection from the atmosphere were found to degrade. The degradation was attributed to the metal contact. CdTe cells with ZnTe:Cu contacts to the CdTe were found to be more stable than cells with metal contacts. Analysis of current-voltage and spectral response of CdTe/CdS cells indicates the cell operates as a p-n heterojunction with the diode current dominated by SRH recombination in the junction region of the CdTe.

Baron, B.N.; Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Inst. of Energy Conversion

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Advanced Nuclear Technology: EPRI Materials Management Matrix Project—Toshiba Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Materials Managem ent Table Report, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experience gained through years of operating nuclear plants has shown that materials performance issues can be a significant concern related to economic and safe long-term plant operations. Although concerns remain, industry efforts to address materials performance issues at operating plants have led to several important advances in both the underlying scientific understanding of materials degradation and the implementation of practical mitigation and management technologies. The Electric Power Research...

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Development of New Low-Cost, High-Performance, PV Module Encapsulant/Packaging Materials: Final Technical Progress Report, 22 October 2002 - 15 November 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Report on objectives to work with U.S.-based PV module manufacturers (c-Si, a-Si, CIS, other thin films) to develop/qualify new low-cost, high-performance PV module encapsulant/packaging materials, and processes using the packaging materials.

Tucker, R.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

MACHINING OF REFRACTORY MATERIALS. Phase II Technical Engineering Report, February 1, 1962 to April 30, 1962  

SciTech Connect

Machining studies were performed on pressed and sintered unalloyed tungsten, D-31 niobium alloy, 90Ta10W alloy, molybdenum TZM and Mo-0.5% Ti alloys, and a high temperature glass ceramic material. The investigation consisted of drilling and grinding tests on tungsten; turning, face milling, and grinding on D-31 niobium, turning, drilling, reaming, and tapping on 90Ta-10W alloy,; face milling, end milling, drilling, reaming, tapping, and grinding on molybdenum alloys; and grinding of the high temperature glass ceramic. A drill life of 27 holes was obtained on tungsten heated to 800 deg F using a 0.213 in. dia. solid carbide drill at 200 ft/min. In grinding, a G Ratio of 5.2 was obtained with a 32A46N5VBE wheel. In turning D-31 niobium, a tool life of 35 minutes was obtained at 300 ft/min. with a C-2 (K6) carbide, and a cutter life of 100 m-. of work travel in face milling with an M-2 HSS cutter at 98 ft/min. The best G Ratio, 7.5 for grinding D-31 was obtained with a 32A46K8VBE wheel using a KNO/sub 2/ solution grinding fluid. The 90Ta-10W alloy was somewhat more difficult to machine. Tool life in turning with a C-2 (K6) carbide was 25 min at 100 ft/min. In drilling, 45 holes were obtained with a 0.193 in. dia. M-1 HSS drill at 50 ft/min. Reaming with a 0.213 in. dia. M-2 HSS reamer at 85 ft/min gave 68 holes, and a tap life of 60 holes was obtained at 4 ft/min with a 1/4-28 M-10 HSS tap. In milling TZM molybdenum with a C-2 (883) carbide face mill at 350 ft/min a cutter life of 110 in. of work travel was obtained. A T-15 HSS end mill produced 80 in. of work travel at 190 ft/min. Drilling with a 0.250 in. dia. M-1 HSS drill produced 100 holes at 125 ft/min and reaming with a 0.272 in. dia. M-2 HSS reamer gave a tool life of 50 holes at 60 ft/min. Tapping with a 5/16-24 M-10 HSS tap at 70 ft/min produced 100 holes. Grinding ratios of 15 to 25 were obtained using aluminum oxide wheels with KNO/sub 2/ solution as a grinding fiuid. Silicon carbide wheels gave the best G Ratios, 30 to 40, in grinding a high temperature glass ceramic. Wheel speeds of 5000 to 6000 ft/mth and a down feed of 0.002 in./pass produced the best G Ratio. (auth)

Nowikowski, L.J.; Zlatin, N.; Field, M.

1962-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) final report on aging and condition monitoring of low-voltage cable materials.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results generated on a 5-year cable-aging program that constituted part of the Nuclear Energy Plant Optimization (NEPO) program, an effort cosponsored by the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). The NEPO cable-aging effort concentrated on two important issues involving the development of better lifetime prediction methods as well as the development and testing of novel cable condition-monitoring (CM) techniques. To address improved life prediction methods, we first describe the use of time-temperature superposition principles, indicating how this approach improves the testing of the Arrhenius model by utilizing all of the experimentally generated data instead of a few selected and processed data points. Although reasonable superposition is often found, we show several cases where non-superposition is evident, a situation that violates the constant acceleration assumption normally used in accelerated aging studies. Long-term aging results over extended temperature ranges allow us to show that curvature in Arrhenius plots for elongation is a common occurrence. In all cases the curvature results in a lowering of the Arrhenius activation energy at lower temperatures implying that typical extrapolation of high temperature results over-estimates material lifetimes. The long-term results also allow us to test the significance of extrapolating through the crystalline melting point of semi-crystalline materials. By utilizing ultrasensitive oxygen consumption (UOC) measurements, we show that it is possible to probe the low temperature extrapolation region normally inaccessible to conventional accelerated aging studies. This allows the quantitative testing of the often-used Arrhenius extrapolation assumption. Such testing indicates that many materials again show evidence of ''downward'' curvature (E{sub a} values drop as the aging temperature is lowered) consistent with the limited elongation results and many literature results. It is also shown how the UOC approach allows the probing of temperatures that cross through the crystalline melting point region of semi-crystalline materials such as XLPO and EPR cable insulations. New results on combined environment aging of neoprene and hypalon cable jacketing materials are presented and offer additional evidence in support of our time-temperature-dose rate (t-T-DR) superposition approach that had been used successfully in the past for such situations.

Assink, Roger Alan; Gillen, Kenneth Todd; Bernstein, Robert

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

305

Hydrogen Storage by Novel CBN Heterocycle Materials - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Shih-Yuan Liu University of Oregon Department of Chemistry 1253 University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403-1253 Phone: (541) 346-5573 Email: lsy@uoregon.edu DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18143 Project Start Date: September 1, 2008 Project End Date: September 30, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The objective of this project is to develop novel boron- nitrogen heterocycles as liquid-phase hydrogen storage materials with storage capacities and thermodynamic properties that have the potential to lead to rechargeable systems capable of meeting DOE targets. We seek to:

306

Novel Molecular Materials for Hydrogen Storage Applications - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Maddury Somayazulu (Primary Contact), Timothy Strobel, Robert Potter, Raja Chellappa, Viktor Struzhkin, Russell J Hemley Geophysical Laboratory Carnegie Institution of Washington 5251 Broad Branch Rd NW Washington, D.C. 20015 Phone: (202) 478-8911 Email: zulu@gl.ciw.edu DOE Program Manager: Dr. P. Thiyagarajan Phone: (301) 903-9706 Email: P.Thiyagarajan@science.doe.gov Objectives Discover, identify and characterize novel hydrogen-rich * compounds that can be used for hydrogen storage or as agents for rehydrogenation of hydrogen storage materials at high pressures. Investigate high pressure routes to rehydrogenating * ammonia borane and polymeric complexes of ammonia borane. Investigate interaction of hydrogen with metallo-organic *

307

Materials research for hydrogen-cooled superconducting power transmission lines. Sixth quarterly report, April 1, 1981-June 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this three-year program are to: perform dielectric breakdown and loss measurements in liquid hydrogen and liquid-hydrogen-impregnatd synthetic dielectrics at temperatures between 14 and 20/sup 0/K and at hydrostatic pressures up to 5 atmospheres and to determine the effects of dissolved impurities/additives in the liquid; and characterize the self-field and low-field superconducting properties of high-critical temperature materials at temperatures between approximately 14 and 20/sup 0/K. During the current reporting period, the following was accomplished. The construction of the dielectric test apparatus continued and the system of small electrodes was completed. Difficulties were encountered in the construction of the LH/sub 2/ vessels and the junction box, which have retarded their completion. Other work to be performed at the Westinghouse R and D Center on the dielectrics part of this project has been postponed indefinitely due to the shortage of funding.

Sletten, A.M.; Braginski, A.I.; Rosado, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly MCLR program technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Production of Solar Reflective Materials Using a Laboratory-Scale Roll Coater: Final Subcontract Report, September 30, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes work performed by Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) in fulfillment of a contract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The work described here is a continuation of work performed on an earlier contract (YAR-5-15005-01). The goal of the work has been to demonstrate that it is possible to produce a durable low-cost reflector for solar-thermal-electric power systems. The core technology is a technique called ion-beam-assisted physical vapor deposition to produce a silvered reflector with a protective alumina coating. In the previous contract, SAIC optimized the coating process for batch coating. In this contract, we transitioned the coating process from batch coating to roll coating. In the course of the contract, we successfully designed and built a laboratory-scale web handling machine; integrated the machine into the existing SAIC coating chamber; and roll-coated material using an alumina deposition rate as high as 20 nm/s. For a set of optimized parameters, the reflective material was highly reflective and well adhered.

Smilgys, R.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Process feasibility study in support of silicon material. Task I. Quarterly technical progress report (XV), April-June 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyses of process system properties were continued for materials involved in the alternate processes under consideration for semiconductor silicon. Primary efforts centered on physical and thermodynamic property data for dichlorosilane. The following property data are reported for dichlorosilane which is involved in processing operations for solar cell grade silicon: critical temperature, critical pressure, critical volume, critical density, acentric factor, vapor pressure, heat of vaporization, gas heat capacity, liquid heat capacity and density. Work was initiated on the assembly of a system to prepare binary gas mixtures of known proportions and to measure the thermal conductivity of these mixtures between 30/sup 0/ and 350/sup 0/C. The binary gas mixtures will include silicon source material such as silanes and halogenated silanes which are used in the production of semiconductor silicon. Chemical engineering analysis of the BCL process was continued with major efforts being concentrated to the preliminary process design. Primary activities in the preliminary design were devoted to determining production labor requirements for operating the major process equipment. The plant was divided into the following sections for determining labor: Purification (I), Deposition (II), Electrolysis (III), Waste Treatment (IV) and Product Handling (V). The results indicated the production labor requirements were 0.06309 man-hr/kg silicon production for the plant size of 1,000 metric tons/year.

Li, K.; Hansen, K.C.; Yaws, C.L.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

Moore, J.P.

2000-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

312

Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

Moore, J.P.

2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, December 30, 1992--December 29, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and by the year 2000. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier CBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. These research and education projects are particularly relevant to the US Department of Energy`s programs aimed at addressing aquatic pollution problems associated with DOE National Laboratories. First year funding supported seven collaborative cluster projects and twelve initiation projects. This report summarizes research results for period December 1992--December 1993.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

DOE A9024 Final Report Functional and Nanoscale Materials Systems: Frontier Programs of Science at the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The scientific programs of the FSMRL supported under the DOE A9024 Grant consisted of four interdisciplinary research clusters, as described. The clusters were led by Professors Tai Chiang (Physics), Jeffrey Moore (Chemistry), Paul Goldbart (Physics), and Steven Granick (Materials Science and Engineering). The completed work followed a dominant theme--Nanoscale Materials Systems--and emphasized studies of complex phenomena involving surfaces, interfaces, complex materials, dynamics, energetics, and structures and their transformations. A summary of our key accomplishments is provided for each cluster.

Lewis, Jennifer A.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

315

REPORT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT REPORT of the INFRASTRUCTURE TASK FORCE of the DOE NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH ADVISORY COMMITTEE January 16, 2003 2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY On October 1, 2002 the DOE Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee was asked to provide specific, focused updates to its Nuclear Science and Technology Infrastructure Roadmap and review the specific issues at the DOE key nuclear energy research and development (R&D) laboratories. This activity was assigned to a five-member Infrastructure Task Force (ITF). After receiving extensive written materials from DOE, the Idaho Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W), on November 6-8, 2002 the ITF visited the Idaho site and received briefings and tours of the INEEL and ANL-W facilities. INEEL and

316

Report on Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at Richland Operations, IG-0378  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 1 INFORMATION: Report on "Follow-up Inspection of the Double Funding of Security for Special Nuclear Material at the Richland Operations Office" The Secretary BACKGROUND: On June 3, 1993, the Deputy Assistant Inspector General for Inspections issued a Letter Report to the Department's Acting Chief Financial Officer which stated that during Fiscal Year 1993 the Department had requested and received $60 million, double the funding needed, for the safeguard and security of special nuclear material at the Richland Operations Office. In response to that Report, the Acting Chief Financial Officer took control of the funds and placed them into a management reserve account. A follow-up inspection was initiated to:

317

Low-temperature thermal energy storage quarterly progress report for period July--September 1976. [Phase-change materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The document is the second in a series of quarterly progress reports covering activities funded at ORNL by the ERDA Division of Energy Storage Systems to develop low-temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technology. These systems will be based on either sensible or latent heat storage at temperatures up to approximately 250/sup 0/C. At ORNL, research efforts were continued to (a) develop a time-dependent analytical model that will describe a TES system charged with a phase-change material, (b) measure thermophysical properties and melt-freeze cyclic behavior of interesting PCM's and (c) determine crystal lattice structures of hydrated salts and their nucleators. A report on TES subsystems for application to solar energy sources was completed and is being reviewed. In the area of program management, subcontracts were signed with Clemson University, Dow Chemical Company, Suntek Research Associates, and The Franklin Institute. Detailed reviews were completed for ten unsolicited proposals related to TES. Industries, research institutions, universities, and other national laboratory participation in the TES program, for which ORNL has management responsibilities, are listed.

Hoffman, H. W.; Kedi, R. J.

1977-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Removal action report on the Building 3001 canal at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a federal facility managed by Lockheed Martin C, Energy Research, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ORNL on the Oak Ridge Reservation in East Tennessee at the Anderson and Roane County lines, approximately 38 km (24 miles) west of Knoxville, Tennessee, and 18 km (11 miles) southwest of downtown Oak Ridge. The Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and its storage and transfer canal are located in Bldg. 3001 in the approximate center of Waste Area Grouping I in the ORNL main complex. 4:1 The Bldg. 3001 Storage Canal is an L-shaped, underground, reinforced-concrete structure running from the back and below the Graphite Reactor in Bldg. 3001 to a location beneath a hot cell in the adjacent Bldg. 3019. The Graphite Reactor was built in 1943 to produce small quantities of plutonium and was subsequently used to produce other isotopes for medical research before it was finally shut down in 1963. The associated canal was used to transport, under water, spent fuel slugs and other isotopes from the back of the reactor to the adjacent Bldg. 31319 hot cell for further processing. During its operation and years subsequent to operation, the canal`s concrete walls and floor became contaminated with radioisotopes from the water.This report documents the activities involved with replacing the canal water with a solid, controlled, low-strength material (CLSM) in response to a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

License Renewal Draft Report for Comment Office of Nuclear Reactor RegulationAVAILABILITY OF REFERENCE MATERIALS IN NRC PUBLICATIONS NRC Reference Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publicly released records include, to name a few, NUREG-series publications; Federal Register notices; applicant, licensee, and vendor documents and correspondence; NRC correspondence and internal memoranda; bulletins and information notices; inspection and investigative reports; licensee event reports; and Commission papers and their attachments. NRC publications in the NUREG series, NRC regulations, and Title 10, Energy, in the Code of Federal Regulations may also be purchased from one of these two sources.

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Feasibility study for fuel-grade-ethanol complex, Kennewick, Washington. Volume III of V. Technical report. Appendix A, Book 1. Equipment and material specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Books 1 and 2 of Appendix A to Volume III, Technical Report, contain copies of major equipment and material specifications used in the preliminary design and engineering of the Ethanol Complex. These specifications are used in securing vendor quotations which are the basis of the plant definitive cost estimate. Section 3 contains copies of all equipment and material, process, and mechanical outline specifications. Included in this part are: cooling towers and mechanical equipment.

Not Available

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Materials Reliability Program: Determination of Crack Growth Rates for Alloy 82 at Low K Values Under PWR Primary Water Environment: 2011 Interim Report (MRP-337)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Crack propagation experiments, which were performed in the past on nickel-based materials under pressurized water reactor (PWR) primary water environments, have left some open questions that need to be answered. In particular, no crack growth rate (CGR) data for control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) nozzle materials are available at low stress intensity (K) values (K 15 MPam). This interim report summarizes the work done during 2011 on a cooperative project to generate CGR data at low K values for alloy 82 ...

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

322

Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

Campbell, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Corrosion resistance of metallic solar absorber materials in a range of heat transfer fluids. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report is intended to provide manufacturers, designers, and installers with reliable corrosion compatibility data, meaningful maintenance schedule, and confidence in durability and performance of solar collector units. The corrosion behavior of Cu alloy 122, Al alloy 1100, mild steel 1010, and a ferritic stainless steel (alloy 444) was determined in a variety of potential solar heat transfer fluids. The fluids included potable waters, water glycol solutions, and four non-aqueous fluids. The test apparatus cycled the temperatures of the fluids through those typical of an operating solar energy collector unit. The 444 stainless steel was the most corrosion resistant material and in uninhibited solutions demonstrated only extremely shallow pits during the 180 day test. The use of inhibited solutions generally prevented pits from forming. Cu alloy 122 showed quite low corrosion rates in uninhibited solutions although the presence of excess solder flux promoted some crevice corrosion. In such solutions, uniform, corrosive attack produced general surface roughening along with a protective surface oxide. The overall corrosion rate of the alloy was generally lower in inhibited glycol solutions although pitting within the crevice region occurred in limited cases. Exposure in the non-aqueous fluids resulted in extremely low corrosion rates with little evidence of localized attack.

Brock, A.J.; Smith, E.F. III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Structure and dynamics of material surfaces, interphase-interfaces and finite aggregates, Progress report, November 1, 1994--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the research program supported by this grant is the formulation, development, implementation and application of modeling strategies and large-scale computer simulation methods for studies of critical issues in three main areas: (1) Physical and chemical properties of atomic and molecular clusters and the origins of size-evolutionary patterns of materials properties; charging and fission of atomic and molecular clusters-energetics, geometry, and electronic structure of metallic, ionic and semi-conductor clusters; cluster collisions and cluster reactions; metal-insulator transitions in finite systems; and nanocluster assemblies. (2) Tribological Interactions, Nanomechanics, Thin Film Lubrication, and dynamical and rheological properties of thin films of complex molecular liquids. (3) Surface processing, the stablity of nanostructures on surfaces, the mechanical and electric properties of interfacial junctions, and the electric, magnetic and spectroscopic properties of nano- and micro-structures, such as dots, antidots and point-contacts. During the current report period research efforts were aimed toward the above objectives.

Landman, U.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Carbon, oxygen and their interaction with intrinsic point defects in solar silicon ribbon material. Annual report, September 1982-September 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report first provides some background information on intrinsic point defects, and on carbon and oxygen in silicon in so far as it may be relevant for the efficiency of solar cells fabricated from EFG ribbon material. We discuss the co-precipitation of carbon and oxygen and especially of carbon and silicon self interstitials. A simple model for the electrical activity of carbon-self-interstitial agglomerates is presented. We assume that the self-interstitial content of these agglomerates determines their electrical activity and that both compressive stresses (high self-interstitial content) and tensile stresses (low self-interstitial content) give rise to electrical activity of the agglomerates. The self-interstitial content of these carbon-related agglomerates may be reduced by an appropriate high-temperature treatment and enhanced by a supersaturation of self-interstitials generated during formation of the p-n junction of solar cells. It is suggested that oxygen present in supersaturation in carbon-rich silicon may be induced to form SiO/sub 2/ precipitates by self-interstitials generated during phosphorus diffusion. It is proposed that the SiO/sub 2/-Si interface of the precipates gives rise to a continuum of donor states and that these interface states are responsible for at least part of the light-enhancement effects observed in oxygen containing EFG silicon after phosphorus diffusion.

Goesele, U.; Ast, D.G.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Ceramics Technology Project database: September 1991 summary report. [Materials for piston ring-cylinder liner for advanced heat/diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The piston ring-cylinder liner area of the internal combustion engine must withstand very-high-temperature gradients, highly-corrosive environments, and constant friction. Improving the efficiency in the engine requires ring and cylinder liner materials that can survive this abusive environment and lubricants that resist decomposition at elevated temperatures. Wear and friction tests have been done on many material combinations in environments similar to actual use to find the right materials for the situation. This report covers tribology information produced from 1986 through July 1991 by Battelle columbus Laboratories, Caterpillar Inc., and Cummins Engine Company, Inc. for the Ceramic Technology Project (CTP). All data in this report were taken from the project's semiannual and bimonthly progress reports and cover base materials, coatings, and lubricants. The data, including test rig descriptions and material characterizations, are stored in the CTP database and are available to all project participants on request. Objective of this report is to make available the test results from these studies, but not to draw conclusions from these data.

Keyes, B.L.P.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Recycled materials for roadbuilding. 1970-May, 1980 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for 1970-May 80  

SciTech Connect

Road construction materials containing solid wastes are researched. Fly ash, mine wastes, glass, and rubber tires are among the candidates selected for recycling. Pavement surfaces and subbases are constructed using these otherwise discarded materials. (Contains 75 citations)

Habercom, G.E. Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Recycled materials for roadbuilding. 1964-May, 1980 (citations from the NTIS Data Base). Report for 1964-May 80  

SciTech Connect

Road construction materials containing solid wastes are researched. Fly ash, mine wastes, glass, and rubber tires are among the candidates selected for recycling. Pavement surfaces and subbases are constructed using these otherwise discarded materials. (Contains 114 citations)

Habercom, G.E. Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

A study of potential high band-gap photovoltaic materials for a two step photon intermediate technique in fission energy conversion. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress made to develop a high bandgap photovoltaic materials for direct conversion to electricity of excimer radiation produced by fission energy pumped laser. This report summarizes the major achievements in sections. The first section covers n-type diamond. The second section covers forced diffusion. The third section covers radiation effects. The fourth section covers progress in Schottky barrier and heterojunction photovoltaic cells. The fifth section covers cell and reactor development.

Prelas, M.A.

1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

STATUS REPORT FOR AGING STUDIES OF EPDM O-RING MATERIAL FOR THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an interim status report for tasks carried out per Task Technical Plan SRNL-STI-2011-00506. A series of tasks/experiments are being performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory to monitor the aging performance of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) Orings used in the H1616 shipping package. The data will support the technical basis to extend the annual maintenance of the EPDM O-rings in the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. Current expectations are that the O-rings will maintain a seal at bounding normal temperatures in service (152 F) for at least 12 months. The baseline aging data review suggests that the EPDM O-rings are likely to retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at bounding service temperatures to provide a service life of at least 2 years. At lower, more realistic temperatures, longer service life is likely. Parallel compression stress relaxation and vessel leak test efforts are in progress to further validate this assessment and quantify a more realistic service life prediction. The H1616 shipping package O-rings were evaluated for baseline property data as part of this test program. This was done to provide a basis for comparison of changes in material properties and performance parameters as a function of aging. This initial characterization was limited to physical and mechanical properties, namely hardness, thickness and tensile strength. These properties appear to be consistent with O-ring specifications. Three H1616-1 Containment Vessels were placed in test conditions and are aging at temperatures ranging from 160 to 300 F. The vessels were Helium leak-tested initially and have been tested at periodic intervals after cooling to room temperature to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97 (aging model based on material properties. O-ring segments were initially aged at four temperatures (175 F, 235 F, 300 F and 350 F). These temperatures were selected to bound normal service temperatures and to challenge the seals within a reasonable aging period. Currently, samples aging at 300 F and 350 F have reached the mechanical failure point (end of life) which is defined in this study as 90% loss of initial sealing force. As a result, additional samples more recently began aging at {approx}270 F to provide additional data for the aging model. Aging and periodic leak testing of the full containment vessels, as well as CSR testing of O-ring segments is ongoing. Continued testing per the Task Technical Plan is recommended in order to validate the assumptions outlined in this status report and to quantify and validate the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.

Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

STATUS REPORT FOR AGING STUDIES OF EPDM O-RING MATERIAL FOR THE H1616 SHIPPING PACKAGE  

SciTech Connect

This is an interim status report for tasks carried out per Task Technical Plan SRNL-STI-2011-00506. A series of tasks/experiments are being performed at the Savannah River National Laboratory to monitor the aging performance of ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) Orings used in the H1616 shipping package. The data will support the technical basis to extend the annual maintenance of the EPDM O-rings in the H1616 shipping package and to predict the life of the seals at bounding service conditions. Current expectations are that the O-rings will maintain a seal at bounding normal temperatures in service (152 F) for at least 12 months. The baseline aging data review suggests that the EPDM O-rings are likely to retain significant mechanical properties and sealing force at bounding service temperatures to provide a service life of at least 2 years. At lower, more realistic temperatures, longer service life is likely. Parallel compression stress relaxation and vessel leak test efforts are in progress to further validate this assessment and quantify a more realistic service life prediction. The H1616 shipping package O-rings were evaluated for baseline property data as part of this test program. This was done to provide a basis for comparison of changes in material properties and performance parameters as a function of aging. This initial characterization was limited to physical and mechanical properties, namely hardness, thickness and tensile strength. These properties appear to be consistent with O-ring specifications. Three H1616-1 Containment Vessels were placed in test conditions and are aging at temperatures ranging from 160 to 300 F. The vessels were Helium leak-tested initially and have been tested at periodic intervals after cooling to room temperature to determine if they meet the criterion of leaktightness defined in ANSI standard N14.5-97 (< 1E-07 std cc air/sec at room temperature). To date, no leak test failures have occurred. The cumulative time at temperature ranges from 174 days for the 300 F vessel to 189 days for the 160 F vessel as of 8/1/2012. The compression stress-relaxation (CSR) behavior of H1616 shipping package O-rings is being evaluated to develop an aging model based on material properties. O-ring segments were initially aged at four temperatures (175 F, 235 F, 300 F and 350 F). These temperatures were selected to bound normal service temperatures and to challenge the seals within a reasonable aging period. Currently, samples aging at 300 F and 350 F have reached the mechanical failure point (end of life) which is defined in this study as 90% loss of initial sealing force. As a result, additional samples more recently began aging at {approx}270 F to provide additional data for the aging model. Aging and periodic leak testing of the full containment vessels, as well as CSR testing of O-ring segments is ongoing. Continued testing per the Task Technical Plan is recommended in order to validate the assumptions outlined in this status report and to quantify and validate the long-term performance of O-ring seals under actual service conditions.

Stefek, T.; Daugherty, W.; Skidmore, E.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Safety analysis report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMS). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance. This document contains the appendices to the NREL safety analysis report.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P.; Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

data and reports on accountable nuclear material to NMMSS and Nuclear Materials Inventory Assessments.", to "The accounting system provides data for reporting on accountable...

334

Program on Technology Innovation: Prediction and Evaluation of Environmentally Assisted Cracking in LWR Structural Materials: 2011 P EACE-E Phase II Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the interim results of PEACE-E, a joint research program sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with the Fracture & Reliability Research Institute (FRRI) at Tohoku University, Japanese utilities, vendors, and international organizations. The program addressed environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of light water reactor (LWR) structural materials in pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) ...

2012-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved quality assurance programs for radioactive materials packages. Volume 3, Revision 15  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Audit Report - The Department of Energy's Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials, OAS-L-13-04  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Management Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials OAS-L-13-04 January 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE DIRECTOR INTEGRATION ADMINISTRATION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION Management of Surplus Nuclear Materials BACKGROUND A primary mission of the Department of Energy design, build and test the Nation' Department's complex was devoted to the production and fabrication of n components. With the end of the C suspended or shutdown. Because Department did not make long term plans for storage or permanent disposition of material, including material that In 2005, the Department chartered

337

Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a 2011 workshop that addressed the potential role of rapid, time-resolved electron microscopy measurements in accelerating the solution of important scientific and technical problems. A series of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Academy of Science workshops have highlighted the critical role advanced research tools play in addressing scientific challenges relevant to biology, sustainable energy, and technologies that will fuel economic development without degrading our environment. Among the specific capability needs for advancing science and technology are tools that extract more detailed information in realistic environments (in situ or operando) at extreme conditions (pressure and temperature) and as a function of time (dynamic and time-dependent). One of the DOE workshops, Future Science Needs and Opportunities for Electron Scattering: Next Generation Instrumentation and Beyond, specifically addressed the importance of electron-based characterization methods for a wide range of energy-relevant Grand Scientific Challenges. Boosted by the electron optical advancement in the last decade, a diversity of in situ capabilities already is available in many laboratories. The obvious remaining major capability gap in electron microscopy is in the ability to make these direct in situ observations over a broad spectrum of fast (µs) to ultrafast (picosecond [ps] and faster) temporal regimes. In an effort to address current capability gaps, EMSL, the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, organized an Ultrafast Electron Microscopy Workshop, held June 14-15, 2011, with the primary goal to identify the scientific needs that could be met by creating a facility capable of a strongly improved time resolution with integrated in situ capabilities. The workshop brought together more than 40 leading scientists involved in applying and/or advancing electron microscopy to address important scientific problems of relevance to DOE’s research mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

Encapsulation of phase change materials in concrete masonry construction. Progress report No. 1, August 1977--February 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The improvement of thermal energy storage capacity of potential building materials by incorporation of phase change materials (PCM's) is being explored. Both inorganic salt hydrates and organic systems are potentially useful PCM's for encapsulation in concrete, polymer concrete, and/or polymer-impregnated concrete matrices. It is felt at this time that most PCM's melting at or above 40/sup 0/C can be encapsulated in large quantities in polymer concrete. Methods relating to the encapsulation of lower melting materials in various matrices are currently being studied.

Sansone, M J

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Study program for encapsulation materials interface for low-cost solar array. Annual report, January 1, 1980-December 31, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emphasis is placed on the development of ac impedance as a nondestructive evaluation methodology for solar arrays and the further development of corrosion models and materials selection criteria for corrosion resistant interfaces.

Kaelble, D.H.; Mansfeld, F.B.; Kendig, M.; Leung, C.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Mathematical methods in material science and large scale optimization workshops: Final report, June 1, 1995-November 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The summer program in Large Scale Optimization concentrated largely on process engineering, aerospace engineering, inverse problems and optimal design, and molecular structure and protein folding. The program brought together application people, optimizers, and mathematicians with interest in learning about these topics. Three proceedings volumes are being prepared. The year in Materials Sciences deals with disordered media and percolation, phase transformations, composite materials, microstructure; topological and geometric methods as well as statistical mechanics approach to polymers (included were Monte Carlo simulation for polymers); miscellaneous other topics such as nonlinear optical material, particulate flow, and thin film. All these activities saw strong interaction among material scientists, mathematicians, physicists, and engineers. About 8 proceedings volumes are being prepared.

Friedman, A. [Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (United States). Inst. for Mathematics and Its Applications

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Quarterly project status report, 1 April--30 June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains a cluster of twenty separate project reports concerning the fate, environmental transport, and toxicity of hazardous wastes in the Mississippi River Basin. Some of topics investigated involve: biological uptake and metabolism; heavy metal immobilization; biological indicators; toxicity; and mathematical models.

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Processing Materials Devices and Diagnostics for Thin Film Photovoltaics: Fundamental and Manufacturability Issues; Final Report, 5 September 2001 - 31 May 2008  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20-45545 20-45545 April 2009 Processing Materials Devices and Diagnostics for Thin Film Photovoltaics: Fundamental and Manufacturability Issues Final Report 1 March 2005 - 30 November 2008 R.W. Birkmire, W.N. Shafarman, E. Eser, S.S. Hegedus, B.E. McCandless, K.D. Dobson, and S. Bowden University of Delaware Newark, Delaware National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-520-45545 April 2009 Processing Materials Devices and Diagnostics for Thin Film Photovoltaics: Fundamental and

343

DEVELOPMENT OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING FUEL MATERIALS. Progress Report for Period January 1 through March 31, 1962  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During this reporting period, particular effort was of aced on powder blending and pellet sintering studies prior to irradiation sample fabrication, and, subsequently, the production and characterization of the pellets slated for irradiation. Also, PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ characterization studies were continued, and new techniques are being developed. Specifically, dynamic moisture pickup determinations on PuO/sub 2/ were made in moist air, N, and CO/ sub 2/ atmospheres using a recording thermogravimetric balance; the Sharples Micromerograph was committed to Pu, and powder particle size distributions were measured and compared with previous determinations made with air-permeability equipment; and the suitability and reliability of analytical chemistry assaying procedures such as x-ray-fluorescence and gamma spectrometry are being evaluated. Prototype work on UO/sub 2/ for the direct precipitation of PuO/sub 2/ and PuO/ sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ feed materials for swaging, vibratory compaction, and dispersion fabrication was also continued. In addition, investigation of PuO/sub 2/ spherical particle formation by mechanical buildup and by plasma torch fusion was extended. Associated reactor physics studies were concentrated on the further comparison of Pu and U/sup 235/ in near-thermal converter reactors. In preparation for the fabrication of irradiation test specimens to be prepared by the mechanical blending of individuaI PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/ powders, bIending studies were initiated to develop methods required for the attainment of desired homogeneity. Sintering studies were carried out on PuOs/sub 2/ to study the effects of compaction pressure, firing temperature, firing time, and firing atmosphere. It was determined that 1400 to 1500 deg C is the best firing temperature to obtain maximum pellet density, and that sintering in air yields higher densities than sintering in a N/sub 2/--H/sub 2/ atmosphere. Further, it was noted that the degree of Pu/sub 2/O/sub 3/ formation while sintering in an N/ sub 2/--H/sub 2/ atm osphere is inversely proportional to compaction pressure, indicating that the degree of formation is determined by the exposed surface area. Two additional Iots of UO/sub 2/-5 wt% PuO/sub 2/ powder were precipitated during this period. Powder characterization data for these and two previously produced lots were obtained. Also, powder characteristics were remeasured following hammermilling in order to allow assessment of the effects of this treatment. In preparation for work with PuO/sub 2/ and UO/sub 2/--PuO/sub 2/, prototype studies are being carried out with UO/sub 2/ to assess the possibility of producing directly high density granular feed for swaging, vibratory compaction, and dispersion fuel fabrication. Effort was continued on the fabrication of spherical PuO/sub 2/ particles by mechanical buildup and by plasma torch fusion. Reactor physics studies were continued to allow assessment of Pu relative to U/ sup 235/ in near-thermal reactor sys tems. Under cost assumptions used previously, it was shown that optimum fuel cycle costs from Pu-natural U fueled systems are well below those attainable with slightly enriched U iueled systems even if it is assumed that radiation damage is not limiting and that an ideal burnable poison (or solution poison) exists to limit the reactivity. (auth)

None

1962-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Heavy vehicle propulsion system materials program semi-annual progress report for October 1997 through March 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System materials Program is the development of materials: ceramics, intermetallics, metal alloys, and metal and ceramic coatings, to support the dieselization of class 1--3 trucks to realize a 35{percent} fuel-economy improvement over current gasoline-fueled trucks and to support commercialization of fuel-flexible LE-55 low-emissions, high-efficiency diesel engines for class 7--8 trucks. The Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OTT OHVT) has an active program to develop the technology for advanced LE-55 diesel engines with 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions levels of 2.0 g/bhp-h NO{sub x} and 0.05 g/bhp-h particulates. The goal is also for the LE-55 engine to run on natural gas with efficiency approaching that of diesel fuel. The LE-55 program is being completed in FY 1997 and, after approximately 10 years of effort, has largely met the program goals of 55{percent} efficiency and low emissions. However, the commercialization of the LE-55 technology requires more durable materials than those that have been used to demonstrate the goals. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion System Materials will, in concert with the heavy-duty diesel engine companies, develop the durable materials required to commercialize the LE-55 technologies.

Johnson, D.R.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Emerging materials systems for solar cell applications - CU/sub 2-x/Se. Final report, May 1, 1979-April 30, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research program was the investigation of copper selenide (Cu/sub 2-x/Se) films as a promising potential semiconductor material for low cost, mass produced thin film photovoltaic solar cells. Major activities during this program have been the development of the semiconductor film formation process, characterization of the deposited films, calculation of the projected cell performance from theoretical analysis, and the fabrication and testing of simple cell structures. Progress is reported.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Stewart, J.M.; Chen, W.S.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

BWRVIP-54: Post-NMCA Materials and Fuel Surveillance Program at Duane Arnold Energy Center First Surveillance Report for 1996-1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NobleMetalChemicalAddition(NMCA)treatment increases the effectiveness of hydrogeninjection, and can increase the lifetime of the reactor internals and allow reduction of radiation exposure to plant personnel. A cooperative effort to demonstrate NMCA was undertaken by General Electric, IES Utilities and the BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) and EPRI. This report describes the results of the first year of the materials and fuel surveillance program following NMCA treatment at the Duane Arnold Energ...

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

347

Materials Reliability Program: Characterization of Type 316 Cold Worked Stainless Steel Highly Irradiated Under PWR Operating Conditions (International IASCC Advisory Committee Phase 3 Program Final Report) (MRP-214)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various types of irradiation-induced material degradation such as irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC), irradiation-induced void swelling, and irradiation-caused embrittlement have been observed in core internals components in pressurized water reactors (PWR). This report describes hot cell testing and characterization of bottom-mounted instrument tubes (flux thimble) that were exposed in operating PWRs for about 10 to 20 effective full power years (EFPY), providing valuable data for as...

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

Not Available

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Final LDRD report : nanoscale mechanisms in advanced aging of materials during storage of spent %22high burnup%22 nuclear fuel.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the results of a three-year LDRD project focused on understanding microstructural evolution and related property changes in Zr-based nuclear cladding materials towards the development of high fidelity predictive simulations for long term dry storage. Experiments and modeling efforts have focused on the effects of hydride formation and accumulation of irradiation defects. Key results include: determination of the influence of composition and defect structures on hydride formation; measurement of the electrochemical property differences between hydride and parent material for understanding and predicting corrosion resistance; in situ environmental transmission electron microscope observation of hydride formation; development of a predictive simulation for mechanical property changes as a function of irradiation dose; novel test method development for microtensile testing of ionirradiated material to simulate the effect of neutron irradiation on mechanical properties; and successful demonstration of an Idaho National Labs-based sample preparation and shipping method for subsequent Sandia-based analysis of post-reactor cladding.

Clark, Blythe G.; Rajasekhara, Shreyas; Enos, David George; Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel; Doyle, Barney Lee; Hattar, Khalid Mikhiel; Weiner, Ruth F.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Development of fly ash-based slope protection materials for waste disposal ponds. Topical report, Task 7.7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A research project was conducted to develop a cost-effective slope protection material for a 100-acre scrubber sludge disposal pond located at the Sherco power plant. The technical objective of the project was to formulate and evaluate the performance of a slope protection material produced using self-cementing coal combustion by-products. The material was to have sufficient durability and erosion resistance to protect the underlying bottom ash fill and clay liner from wave erosion for at least 5 years when it was placed on the interior side slopes of the pond. The two coal combustion by-products that were considered for use in the slope protection material were 1) a spray dryer waste and 2) a subbituminous coal fly ash. The spray dryer waste was approximately a 50:50 mixture of subbituminous coal fly ash and reacted, lime-based scrubber sorbent. The subbituminous coal fly ash was produced from a cyclone-fired boiler. Both by-products displayed self-cementing behavior when mixed with water. The results of the field tests indicated that a slope protection slab prepared from Sherco spray dryer waste placed with a 20% moisture content showed almost no deterioration after 20 months in the field. A slab prepared from a mixture of 25% Riverside fly ash and 75% bottom ash with a moisture content of 18% showed a slight loss of material from the surface of the slab, but no substantial deterioration after 20 months in the field. Two other materials containing Riverside fly ash that were prepared with higher moisture contents showed somewhat more deterioration after 20 months, although none of the field test slabs appeared to have failed in that time period.

Moretti, C.J.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Screening of candidate corrosion resistant materials for coal combustion environments -- Volume 4. Final report, January 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The development of a silicon carbide heat exchanger is a critical step in the development of the Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) power system. SiC is the only material that provides the necessary combination of resistance to creep, thermal shock, and oxidation. While the SiC structural materials provide the thermomechanical and thermophysical properties needed for an efficient system, the mechanical properties of the SiC tubes are severely degraded through corrosion by the coal combustion products. To obtain the necessary service life of thousands of hours at temperature, a protective coating is needed that is stable with both the SiC tube and the coal combustion products, resists erosion from the particle laden gas stream, is thermal-shock resistant, adheres to SiC during repeated thermal shocks (start-up, process upsets, shut-down), and allows the EFCC system to be cost competitive. The candidate protective materials identified in a previous effort were screened for their stability to the EFCC combustion environment. Bulk samples of each of the eleven candidate materials were prepared, and exposed to coal slag for 100 hours at 1,370 C under flowing air. After exposure the samples were mounted, polished, and examined via x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. In general, the alumina-based materials behaved well, with comparable corrosion depths in all five samples. Magnesium chromite formed a series of reaction products with the slag, which included an alumina-rich region. These reaction products may act as a diffusion barrier to slow further reaction between the magnesium chromite and the slag and prove to be a protective coating. As for the other materials; calcium titanate failed catastrophically, the CS-50 exhibited extension microstructural and compositional changes, and zirconium titanate, barium zironate, and yttrium chromite all showed evidence of dissolution with the slag.

Boss, D.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development, characterization, and evaluation of materials for open cycle MHD. Quarterly report for the period ending September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to develop, test, characterize, and evaluate materials for open-cycle, coal-fired MHD power generators. The specific immediate goals emphasize electrode and insulator materials, including: (1) testing and evaluation of the enhanced effects of alkali seed on materials in a dc electric field; (2) development and testing of improved electrodes and insulators with controlled microstructures, compositions and properties; and (3) characterization and evaluation of materials relating to both the US MHD Program and the US-USSR Cooperative Program for MHD power generators. The electrochemical effects of alkali seed/coal slag on MgO and La(Mg)CrO/sub 3/ electrodes were studied. Also, thermal diffusivity/conductivity of La/sub 0/./sub 95/Mg/sub 0/./sub 95/CrO/sub 3/, 0.75MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/ . 0.25Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/, 0.12Y/sub 2/O/sub 3/ . 0.88ZrO/sub 2/, MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/, and 0.75MgAl/sub 2/O/sub 4/ . 0.25Fe/sub 3/O/sub 4/--chromium cermets were studied. Results are presented and discussed. (WHK)

Bates, J.L.; Marchant, D.D.; Daniel, J.L.; Griffin, C.W.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Evaluation of thermal-energy-storage materials for advanced compressed-air energy-storage systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Proposed designs of adiabatic and hybrid advanced compressed air energy storage (ACAS) plants have utilized sensible heat storage systems to store the heat developed during air compression for subsequent use during the power generation phase of operation. This experimental study was performed to screen four porposed heat storage materials for performance and durability: 3/8-in. sintered iron oxide pellets, 1/2-in. Denstone pellets, 1-in. cast iron alloy balls, and crushed Dresser basalt. Specific concerns addressed included particle formation and thermal ratcheting of the materials during thermal cycling and the chemical attack on the materials by the high temperature and moist environment in an ACAS heat storage bed. The results indicated that from the durability standpoint Denstone, cast iron containing 27% or more chromium, and crushed Dresser basalt would possible stand up to ACAS conditions. If costs are considered in addition to durability and performance, the crushed Dresser basalt would probably be the most desirable heat storage material for adiabatic and hybrid ACAS plants.

Zaloudek, F.R.; Wheeler, K.R.; Marksberry, L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

356

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen- containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, Dale Elden; Hamp, S.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Readiness Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power and Material Handling Equipment Markets Doug Wheeler DJW Technology Michael Ulsh National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-53046 August 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 2010 Manufacturing Readiness Assessment Update to the 2008 Report for Fuel Cell Stacks and Systems for the Backup Power

358

2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000160 01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from May 1, 2010 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of special compliance conditions • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 partial reporting year, an estimated 3.646 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. The concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David B. Frederick

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000160-01), for the wastewater reuse site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Materials and Fuels Complex Industrial Waste Ditch and Industrial Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: (1) Facility and system description; (2) Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; (3) Groundwater monitoring data; (4) Status of special compliance conditions; and (5) Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts. During the 2011 reporting year, an estimated 6.99 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Industrial Waste Ditch and Pond which is well below the permit limit of 13 million gallons per year. Using the dissolved iron data, the concentrations of all permit-required analytes in the samples from the down gradient monitoring wells were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Primary and Secondary Constituent Standards.

David Frederick

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility. Interim final report, 7 November 1986-31 October 1989  

SciTech Connect

Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

Gage, M.L.

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Studies of encapsulant materials for terrestrial solar-cell arrays. First quarterly progress report, October 9--December 9, 1975  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Study 1 of this contract is entitled ''Evaluation of World Experience and Properties of Materials for Encapsulation of Terrestrial Solar-Cell Arrays.'' The approach of this study is to review and analyze world experience and to compile data on properties of encapsulants for photovoltaic cells and for related applications. The objective of the effort is to recommend candidate materials and processes for encapsulating terrestrial photovoltaic arrays at low cost for a service life greater than 20 years. The objectives of Study 2, ''Definition of Encapsulant Service Environments and Test Conditions,'' are to develop the climatic/environmental data required to define the frequency and duration of detrimental environmental conditions in a 20-year array lifetime and to develop a corresponding test schedule for encapsulant systems. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C. (comp.)

1975-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Review of composite material applications in the automotive industry for the electric and hybrid vehicle. Annual report, November 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive review is made of the state-of-the-art in regard to the use of composite materials for reducing the structural mass of automobiles. Reduction of mass will provide, in addition to other engineering improvements, increased performance/range advantages that are particularly needed in the electric and hybrid vehicle field. Problems to be overcome include the attainment of mass production techniques and the prevention of environmental hazards.

Bauer, J.L.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hydrogen compatibility of structural materials for energy storage and transmission applications. Semiannual report for period through October 1, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Substantial support activities for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have been completed since the initiation of this program. The suitability of commercial alloys for containment of hydride-dehydride reactions have been assessed, and recommendations for materials selection based upon tensile and slow crack growth tests have been made. We have also prepared and installed in a test chamber at BNL a series of in-situ test specimens to be exposed to a cyclic iron-titanium hydride environment. Future BNL support activities will include welding/joining specification development and a post-mortem examination of the in-situ test specimens. Efforts are becoming more oriented to materials development and to the development of specifications for the use of structural steels in hydrogen environment. BNL's hydride storage program has been supported during the last six months by supplying 80 self-loaded tensile specimens for accelerated testing in an FeTiH/sub x/ test bed. A preliminary welding specification for containment of hydrogen in structural mild steels has been developed. Hydrogen permeation resistant coatings, applied by pyrolysis of silane, and by brush electroplating, have been developed. Environmentally assisted, cyclic fatigue in high-pressure hydrogen has been identified as a potential hazard to the integrity of flawed pressure vessels in materials where slow crack growth under constant load is not expected.

Robinson, S.L. (comp.)

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Investigation of metal fluoride thermal energy storage materials: availability, cost, and chemistry. Final report, July 15, 1976--December 15, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of thermal energy in the 400 to 1000/sup 0/C range is attracting increasing consideration for use in solar power, central power, vehicular, and commercial process systems. This study investigates the practicality of using metal fluorides as the heat storage medium. The projected availability of metal fluorides has been studied and is shown to be adequate for widespread thermal storage use. Costs are projected and discussed in relation to thermal energy storage applications. Phase diagrams, heats of fusion, heat capacities, vapor pressures, toxicity, stability, volume changes, thermal conductivities, fusion kinetics, corrosion, and container materials of construction for a wide range of fluorides have been examined. Analyses of these data in consideration of thermal energy storage requirements have resulted in selection of the most cost-effective fluoride mixture for each of 23 temperature increments between 400 and 1000/sup 0/C. Thermo-physical properties of these 23 materials are presented. Comparison of fluoride with non-fluoride materials shows that the fluorides are suitable candidates for high temperature applications on the bases of cost, heat capacity/unit volume, heat capacity/unit weight, corrosive properties, and availability.

Eichelberger, J.L.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Iron-Based Amorphous-Metals: High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Development Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An overview of the High-Performance Corrosion-Resistant Materials (HPCRM) Program, which was co-sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Defense Sciences Office (DSO) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian and Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), is discussed. Programmatic investigations have included a broad range of topics: alloy design and composition; materials synthesis; thermal stability; corrosion resistance; environmental cracking; mechanical properties; damage tolerance; radiation effects; and important potential applications. Amorphous alloys identified as SAM2X5 (Fe{sub 49.7}Cr{sub 17.7}Mn{sub 1.9}Mo{sub 7.4}W{sub 1.6}B{sub 15.2}C{sub 3.8}Si{sub 2.4}) and SAM1651 (Fe{sub 48}Mo{sub 14}Cr{sub 15}Y{sub 2}C{sub 15}B{sub 6}) have been produced as melt-spun ribbons, drop-cast ingots and thermal-spray coatings. Chromium (Cr), molybdenum (Mo) and tungsten (W) additions provided corrosion resistance, while boron (B) enabled glass formation. Earlier electrochemical studies of melt-spun ribbons and ingots of these amorphous alloys demonstrated outstanding passive film stability. More recently thermal-spray coatings of these amorphous alloys have been made and subjected to long-term salt-fog and immersion tests. Good corrosion resistance has been observed during salt-fog testing. Corrosion rates were measured in situ with linear polarization, while simultaneously monitoring the open-circuit corrosion potentials. Reasonably good performance was observed. The sensitivity of these measurements to electrolyte composition and temperature was determined. The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal make this amorphous alloy an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. In general, the corrosion resistance of these iron-based amorphous metals is maintained at operating temperatures up to the glass transition temperature. These materials are much harder than conventional stainless steel and nickel-based materials, and are proving to have excellent wear properties, sufficient to warrant their use in earth excavation, drilling and tunnel boring applications. The observed corrosion resistance may enable applications of importance in industries such as: oil and gas production, refining, nuclear power generation, shipping, and others. Large areas have been successfully coated with these materials, with thicknesses of approximately one centimeter.

Farmer, J C; Choi, J; Saw, C; Haslem, J; Day, D; Hailey, P; Lian, T; Rebak, R; Perepezko, J; Payer, J; Branagan, D; Beardsley, B; D'Amato, A; Aprigliano, L

2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports Reports About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements Reviews Reports Careers Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside the US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Reports ESnet publishes reports from science network Program Requirements Reviews on a regular basis. View the most recent of these below. Sort by: Date | Author | Type 2012 Eli Dart, Brian Tierney, Editors, "Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop, November 2012 - Final Report"", November 29, 2012, LBNL LBNL-6395E

367

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2010 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. These components were also produced for the Pluto New Horizons and Mars Science Lab missions launched in January 2006 and November 2011respectively. The ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for nearly four decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2011. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS. Work has also been initiated to establish fabrication capabilities for the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units.

King, James F [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2004. Production and production maintenance activities for flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None listed

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2006 Through September 30, 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Radioisotope Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2007. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

King, James F [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2009. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

King, James F [ORNL

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2008. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

King, James F [ORNL

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None listed

2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

373

ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2005 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

King, James F [ORNL

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2004 Through September 30, 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

King, James F [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technical Program Tasks for October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

None

2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

376

Theoretical studies of surface reactions on metals and electronic materials. Final report, December 1, 1993--May 15, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to achieve accurate energetics for surface reactions, first-principles calculations are performed using a cluster embedding theory. The projects dealing with hydrocarbon reactions and CO adsorption and dissociation on nickel and iron address fundamental questions related to surface reactivity. The study of the dissociation of methane on a nickel surface containing an iron atom is relevant to the use of methane for synthesis of other hydrocarbons and to the general topic of alkane reactivity. Studies of oxygen and sulfur containing compounds are designed to aid in the interpretation of structural and spectroscopic experiments. Silicon surface studies focus on several questions related to chemical vapor deposition reactions and growth of electronic materials. In collaborative work with experimental groups at N.C. State developing diagnostic techniques for monitoring film growth, influences on second harmonic generation arising from chemical modifications of interfaces are explored. The project involving diamond growth explores factors that influence the bonding of carbon to nickel surfaces and surface reactions on carbon. Studies of defects produced by H atom migration in amorphous silicon are related to the degradation of the photovoltaic properties of this material on continued exposure to light.

Whitten, J.L.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Study program to develop and evaluate die and container materials for the growth of silicon ribbons. Quarterly report No. 5  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Die and container material development efforts under the current program are shared among three organizations: Miami Research Laboratories (MRL) - ceramic process development and overall program management; University of missouri-Rolla (UMR) - silicon sessile drop studies with characterization of reaction products and emphasis on atmospheric effects; and Chemetal Corporation, Pacoima, California - special coatings to be applied to test coupons, die shapes, and containers provided by MRL and tested/characterized by UMR. The completion of a major hardware delivery milestone was accomplished with the delivery of three CNTD Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ coated hot pressed Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/ crucibles to JPL. A limited characterization of the coating was performed at MRL prior to delivery. The coatings were fine grained ..cap alpha.. - Si/sub 3/N/sub 4/. It has been determined that a two piece die design will be required. At UMR the importance of the role of oxygen in influencing the attack of the CNTD materials by molten silicon has been demonstrated. The stability is greatly enhanced by maintaining the oxygen partial pressure near or below the Si + O/sub 2/ = SiO/sub 2/ equilibrium.

Ownby, P.D.; Yu, B.B.; Barsoum, M.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Hazardous materials in aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Annual technical report, 30 December 1992--29 December 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tulane and Xavier Universities have singled out the environment as a major strategic focus for research and training for now and beyond the year 2000. In 1989, the Tulane/Xavier Center for Bioenvironmental Research (CBR) was established as the umbrella organization which coordinates environmental research at both universities. In December, 1992, the Tulane/Xavier DBR was awarded a five year grant to study pollution in the Mississippi River system. The ``Hazardous Materials in Aquatic Environments of the Mississippi River Basin`` project is a broad research and education program aimed at elucidating the nature and magnitude of toxic materials that contaminate aquatic environments of the Mississippi River Basin. Studies include defining the complex interactions that occur during the transport of contaminants, the actual and potential impact on ecological systems and health, and the mechanisms through which these impacts might be remediated. The Mississippi River Basin represents a model system for analyzing and solving contamination problems that are found in aquatic systems world-wide. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hydrogen compatibility of structural materials for energy storage and transmission. Annual report, October 1, 1978-September 30, 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report documents the activities and contributions accomplished during FY79 on a research contract aimed at assessing the feasibility of transporting hydrogen gas through the existing natural gas pipeline network. Studies of the hydrogen-induced degradation of pipeline steels reveal that hydrogen can be transported in these steels if a number of precautions are taken. These issues are discussed and plans for further research are presented.

Hoover, W.R.; Iannucci, J.J.; Robinson, S.L.; Spingarn, J.R.; Stoltz, R.E.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Progress report on the results of testing advanced conceptual design metal barrier materials under relevant environmental conditions for a tuff repository  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the performance of candidate metallic materials envisioned for fabricating waste package containers for long-term disposal at a possible geological repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Candidate materials include austenitic iron-base to nickel-base alloy (AISI 304L, AISI 316L, and Alloy 825), high-purity copper (CDA 102), and copper-base alloys (CDA 613 and CDA 715). Possible degradation modes affecting these container materials are identified in the context of anticipated environmental conditions at the repository site. Low-temperature oxidation is the dominant degradation mode over most of the time period of concern (minimum of 300 yr to a maximum of 1000 yr after repository closure), but various forms of aqueous corrosion will occur when water infiltrates into the near-package environment. The results of three years of experimental work in different repository-relevant environments are presented. Much of the work was performed in water taken from Well J-13, located near the repository, and some of the experiments included gamma irradiation of the water or vapor environment. The influence of metallurgical effects on the corrosion and oxidation resistance of the material is reviewed; these effects result from container fabrication, welding, and long-term aging at moderately elevated temperatures in the repository. The report indicates the need for mechanisms to understand the physical/chemical reactions that determine the nature and rate of the different degradation modes, and the subsequent need for models based on these mechanisms for projecting the long-term performance of the container from comparatively short-term laboratory data. 91 refs., 17 figs., 16 tabs.

McCright, R.D.; Halsey, W.G.; Van Konynenburg, R.A.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "materials clsm reported" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Materials Reliability Program: South Texas Project Unit 1 Bottom Mounted Instrumentation Nozzles (#1 and #46) Analysis Reports and R elated Documentation (MRP-102)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update documents analysis of two nozzles at South Texas Project Unit 1 that were found to be leaking during a visual inspection of the bottom head of the reactor vessel. The first two sections of this report document research completed by BWXT Services Inc. for Framatome ANP on behalf of South Texas Project Nuclear Operating Company and the EPRI Materials Reliability Program Alloy 600 Issue Task Group. The first section is the analysis of bottom mounted instrument nozzle samples #1 and #46...

2003-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research on polycrystalline thin film submodules based on CuInSe{sub 2} materials. Annual subcontract report, 11 November 1990--31 October 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress during the first year of a three-year research program to develop 12%-efficient CuInSe{sub 2} (CIS) submodules with area greater than 900 cm{sup 2}. To meet this objective, the program was divided into five tasks: (1) windows, contacts, substrates; (2) absorber material; (3) device structure; (4) submodule design and encapsulation; and (5) process optimization. In the first year of the program, work was concentrated on the first three tasks with an objective to demonstrate a 9%-efficient CIS solar cell. 7 refs.

Catalano, A.; Arya, R.; Carr, L.; Fieselmann, B.; Lommasson, T.; Podlesny, R.; Russell, L.; Skibo, S.; Rothwarf, A.; Birkmire, R. [Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Research on polycrystalline thin-film submodules based on CuInSe{sub 2} materials. Annual subcontract report, 1 November 1991--31 December 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a 3-year, cost-shared research program at Solarex to develop all pertinent processes and technologies required to achieve the goal of 12% CIS submodule (with areas > 900 cm{sup 2}). The work is focused on four tasks: (1) window layers, contacts, substrate; (2) CIS absorber layer; (3) device structure; and (4) submodule design and encapsulation. Each task addresses (1) basic material improvements, (2) fabrication and characterization of CIS solar cells, and (3) scale up of processes to large-area substrates.

Arya, R.; Fogleboch, J.; Lommasson, T.; Podlesny, R.; Russell, L.; Skibo, S.; Wiedeman, S.; Rothwarf, A.; Birkmire, R. [Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (United States). Thin Film Div.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

SOME RESULTS OF STUDIES ON THE UPTAKE OF RADIOACTIVE WASTE MATERIALS BY MARINE AND ESTUARINE PHYTOPLANKTON ORGANISMS USING CONTINUOUS CULTURE TECHNIQUES. Technical Report XXI  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in studies on the uptake of radioactive waste products by phytoplackton organisms in a marine environment. Laboratory studies were made of the growth requirements of a number of phytoplankton algae. Data are included on the uptake of Ru/sup 103/ by a green algae and oysters and the uptake of Zn/sup 65/ by selected marine algae. The advantages of the use of continuous culturing techniques for the study of the uptake of radioactive materials by phytoplankton organisms are discussed. (C.H.)

Taylor, W.R.

1960-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Detection and Quantitative Analysis of Chemical Species in Hanford Tank Materials Using Raman Spectroscopy Technology: FY94Florida State University Raman Spectroscopy Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of work completed in FY-94 by FSU to develop and investigate the feasibility of using Raman spectroscopy with Hanford tank waste materials. Raman performance impacts from sample morphology, including the effects of absorption, particle size, density, color and refractive index, are discussed. An algorithm for relative species concentration measurement from Raman data is presented. An Algorithm for applying Raman to tank waste core screening is presented and discussed. A library of absorption and Raman spectra are presented that support this work.

Reich, F.R.

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

386

Synthetic Design of New Metal-Organic Framework Materials for Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Pingyun Feng (Primary Contact), Qipu Lin, Xiang Zhao Department of Chemistry University of California Riverside, CA 92521 Phone: (951) 827-2042 Email: pingyun.feng@ucr.edu DOE Program Officer: Dr. Michael Sennett Phone: (301) 903-6051 Email: Michael.Sennett@science.doe.gov Objectives Design and * synthesize new metal-organic framework materials using lightweight chemical elements to help improve gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity. Develop new synthetic strategies to generate novel * active binding sites on metal ions and ligands to enhance solid-gas interactions for increased uptake near ambient conditions.

387

High temperature materials technology research for advanced thermionic systems. Quarterly progress report, March 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concept of shift factor was used successfully to develop a model which described the role of solid solution atoms in dispersion strengthened tungsten alloys. This shift factor separates the solid solution strengthening effect of Re in the creep of W-Re-HfC materials. The creep of the alloys is expressed by the modified Lagneborg`s creep model in the following form: {dot {var_epsilon}} = A`(b/G{sup 3}kT)D{sub L}exp({minus} 580000eC{sup 1/2}/T)({sigma} {minus}{sigma}{sub p}){sup 4} (1955 K{le}T{le}2500 K), where D{sub L} is the lattice diffusion coefficient of tungsten.

Zee, R.H. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Rose, M.F. [Space Power Inst. (United States)

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Development of materials for solid state electrochemical sensors and fuel cell applications. Final report, September 30, 1995--December 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intent of this project was two fold: (1) to develop new ionically conducting materials for solid state gas phase sensors and fuel cells and (2) to train students and create an environment conducive to Solid State Ionics research at Southern University. The authors have investigated the electrode-electrolyte interfacial reactions, defect structure and defect stability in some perovoskite type solid electrolyte materials and the effect of electrocatalyst and electrolyte on direct hydrocarbon and methanol/air fuel cell performance using synchrotron radiation based Extended X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (EXAFS), surface analytical and Impedance Spectroscopic techniques. They have measured the AC impedance and K edge EXAFS of the entire family of rare earth dopants in Cerium Oxide to understand the effect of dopants on the conductivity and its impact on the structural properties of Cerium Oxide. All of the systems showed an increase in the conductivity over undoped ceria with ceria doped Gd, Sm and Y showing the highest values. The conductivity increased with increasing ionic radius of the dopant cation. The authors have measured the K edge of the EXAFS of these dopants to determine the local structural environment and also to understand the nature of the defect clustering between oxygen vacancies and trivalent ions. The analysis and the data reduction of these complex EXAFS spectra is in progress. Where as in the DOWCs, the authors have attempted to explore the impact of catalyst loadings on the performance of direct oxidation of methanol fuel cells. Their initial measurements on fuel cell performance characteristics and EXAFS are made on commercial membranes Pt/Ru/Nafion 115, 117 and 112.

Bobba, R.; Hormes, J.; Young, V.; Baker, J.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DISCLAIMER DISCLAIMER Neither Pinnacle Technologies, Inc. nor any person acting on behalf of Pinnacle: * Makes any warranty or representation, express or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the information contained in this report, or that the use of any apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report may not infringe privately owned rights; or * Assumes any liability with respect to the use of, or for damages resulting from the use of, any information, apparatus, method or process disclosed in this report Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions DE-FC26-02NT41663 Final Report for National Energy Technology Laboratory Morgantown, WV Project No.: USDE-0511 Report Date: December 2005 By:

390

Directory of Certificates of Compliance for radioactive materials packages: Report of NRC approved packages. Volume 1, Revision 18  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this directory is to make available a convenient source of information on packagings which have been approved by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. To assist in identifying packaging, an index by Model Number and corresponding Certificate of Compliance Number is included at the front of Volumes 1 and 2. An alphabetical listing by user name is included in the back of Volume 3 of approved QA programs. The reports include a listing of all users of each package design and approved QA programs prior to the publication date.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Ammonia-Borane: a Promising Material for Hydrogen Storage - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Larry G. Sneddon (Primary Contact), Martin Bluhm, Dan Himmelberger, William Ewing, Laif Alden, Emily Berkeley, Chang Won Yoon and Allegra Marchione University of Pennsylvania Department of Chemistry 231 S. 34 th Street Philadelphia, PA 19104-6323 Phone: (215) 898-8632 Email: lsneddon@sas.upenn.edu DOE Program Officer: Larry Rahn Phone: (301) 903-2508 Email: Larry.Rahn@science.doe.gov Subcontractors: R. Tom Baker, Richard Burchell, Felix Gaertner, Hassan Kalviri, Morgane Le Fur, Larena Menant, Giovanni Rachiero Matthew Rankin, Johannes Thomas,

392

Certification Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certified Reference Materials AOCS 1206-A and AOCS 1206-B Report of the certification process for Conventional and Roundup Ready

393

Final Technical Report-Grant # DE-FG02-97ER45628 ?Structural Diorder in Materials?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the grant was renewed in 2000 and 2003 final technical reports of the grant have been previously submitted for those years. For that reason this final technical report covers the last four years of the grant. We had an exceptionally successful and productive last four years under the support of the grant. Our progress takes three different aspects, described in more detail below: 1.1 instrumentation, infrastructure, and other research support at Sector 20 of the Advanced Photon Source (APS); 1.2 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were PI?s; and 1.3 research on which Profs. Stern or Seidler were co-PI?s or where Drs. Dale Brewe or Julie Cross were authors or co-authors. Drs. Brewe and Cross are the two research scientists (permanently stationed at sector 20) who are supported by the grant. They provide support to the scientific goals of the grant and more broadly provide research support for many general users at Sector 20. Finally, in section 1.4 we provide a complete list of publications resulting from funding in the grant on which at least one of Stern, Seidler, Cross, or Brewe were co-authors. Given the inclusion of operations funding in the grant, this is of course a subset of the full scientific impact of the grant.

Stern, Edward A

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

394

Diffusion and Leaching Behavior of Radionuclides in Category 3 Waste Encasement Concrete and Soil Fill Material – Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

One of the methods being considered for safely disposing of Category 3 low-level radioactive wastes is to encase the waste in concrete. Such concrete encasement would contain and isolate the waste packages from the hydrologic environment and would act as an intrusion barrier. The current plan for waste isolation consists of stacking low-level waste packages on a trench floor, surrounding the stacks with reinforced steel, and encasing these packages in concrete. These concrete-encased waste stacks are expected to vary in size with maximum dimensions of 6.4 m long, 2.7 m wide, and 4 m high. The waste stacks are expected to have a surrounding minimum thickness of 15 cm of concrete encasement. These concrete-encased waste packages are expected to withstand environmental exposure (solar radiation, temperature variations, and precipitation) until an interim soil cover or permanent closure cover is installed, and to remain largely intact thereafter. Any failure of concrete encasement may result in water intrusion and consequent mobilization of radionuclides from the waste packages. The mobilized radionuclides may escape from the encased concrete by mass flow and/or diffusion and move into the surrounding subsurface environment. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the performance of the concrete encasement structure and the ability of the surrounding soil to retard radionuclide migration. The retardation factors for radionuclides contained in the waste packages can be determined from measurements of diffusion coefficients for these contaminants through concrete and fill material. Some of the mobilization scenarios include (1) potential leaching of waste form before permanent closure cover is installed; (2) after the cover installation, long-term diffusion of radionuclides from concrete waste form into surrounding fill material; (3) diffusion of radionuclides from contaminated soils into adjoining concrete encasement and clean fill material. Additionally, the rate of diffusion of radionuclides may be affected by the formation of structural cracks in concrete, the carbonation of the buried waste form, and any potential effect of metallic iron (in the form of rebars) on the mobility of radionuclides. The radionuclides iodine-129 ({sup 129}I), technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc), and uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) are identified as long-term dose contributors in Category 3 waste (Mann et al. 2001; Wood et al. 1995). Because of their anionic nature in aqueous solutions, {sup 129}I, {sup 99}Tc, and carbonate-complexed {sup 238}U may readily leach into the subsurface environment (Serne et al. 1989, 1992a, b, 1993, and 1995). The leachability and/or diffusion of radionuclide species must be measured to assess the long-term performance of waste grouts when contacted with vadose-zone pore water or groundwater. Although significant research has been conducted on the design and performance of cementitious waste forms, the current protocol conducted to assess radionuclide stability within these waste forms has been limited to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure, Method 1311 Federal Registry (EPA 1992) and ANSI/ANS-16.1 leach test (ANSI 1986). These tests evaluate the performance under water-saturated conditions and do not evaluate the performance of cementitious waste forms within the context of waste repositories which are located within water-deficient vadose zones. Moreover, these tests assess only the diffusion of radionuclides from concrete waste forms and neglect evaluating the mechanisms of retention, stability of the waste form, and formation of secondary phases during weathering, which may serve as long-term secondary hosts for immobilization of radionuclides. The results of recent investigations conducted under arid and semi-arid conditions (Al-Khayat et al. 2002; Garrabrants et al. 2002; Garrabrants and Kosson 2003; Garrabrants et al. 2004; Gervais et al. 2004; Sanchez et al. 2002; Sanchez et al. 2003) provide valuable information suggesting structural and chemical changes to concrete waste forms which may affect contaminant containm

Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Bovaird, Chase C.; Parker, Kent E.; Clayton, Libby N.; Powers, Laura; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Wood, Marcus I.

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

396

Materials Degradation and Aging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 28, 2007 ... Improve plant capacity, reliability, and availability. Materials Degradation and Aging - An EPRI Nuclear Power Action Plan, Report No.

397

Energy Storage in Clathrate Hydrogen Material - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Carolyn A. Koh (Primary Contact), Amadeu K. Sum, R. Gary Grim, Matthew R. Walsh, Prasad B. Kerkar Center for Hydrate Research Colorado School of Mines 1600 Illinois Street Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 273-3237 Email: ckoh@mines.edu DOE Program Officer: Bonnie Gersten Phone: (303) 903-0002 Email: Bonnie.Gersten@science.doe.gov Objectives The current project aims to probe key questions surrounding the metastability of hydrates relating to synthesis, structure, and composition. The questions on metastability are crucial in all energy applications of clathrate hydrates including energy storage, energy transportation, and energy recovery. Specifically, this project

398

Application of phase change materials in passive solar systems. Final report, October 1, 1977-November 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A modular, hybrid passive solar energy collection and storage unit called the Thermal Wall Panel was designed and constructed. The Thermal Wall Panel uses the concept of energy storage in phase change materials combined with direct solar gain. Based on measurements, a Thermal Wall Panel with movable night-time insulation (R = 6.80) between the storage components and the outside can retain and deliver as heat an average of 45 percent of the sun's energy which falls on it during the day. Based on calculations, a 120 square foot wall can provide about 25 percent of the heating needs of a 1100 square foot house. Analysis indicates that when the Thermal Wall Panel (R = 6.00 nighttime insulation) is combined with other direct gain passive solar energy systems as large, south-facing windows, 56 percent of a home's heating needs can be provided. A Thermal Wall Panel can be installed into a typical home in the Mid-Atlantic Region for an incremental cost of from $6 to $8 per square foot beyond the cost of the normal wall and pay for itself in 5 to 9 years at 1978 energy costs. Also, the Thermal Wall Panel does not require any additional foundation support. A computer model has been developed for the Thermal Wall Panel which shows good agreement with predicted and measured performance.

Sliwkowski, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI's employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Characterization of Amorphous Silicon Advanced Materials and PV Devices: Final Technical Report, 15 December 2001--31 January 2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The major objectives of this subcontract have been: (1) understand the microscopic properties of the defects that contribute to the Staebler-Wronski effect to eliminate this effect, (2) perform correlated studies on films and devices made by novel techniques, especially those with promise to improve stability or deposition rates, (3) understand the structural, electronic, and optical properties of films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) made on the boundary between the amorphous and microcrystalline phases, (4) search for more stable intrinsic layers of a-Si:H, (5) characterize the important defects, impurities, and metastabilities in the bulk and at surfaces and interfaces in a-Si:H films and devices and in important alloy systems, and (6) make state-of-the-art plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) devices out of new, advanced materials, when appropriate. All of these goals are highly relevant to improving photovoltaic devices based on a-Si:H and related alloys. With regard to the first objective, we have identified a paired hydrogen site that may be the defect that stabilizes the silicon dangling bonds formed in the Staebler-Wronski effect.

Taylor, P. C.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Materials Sustainability: Digital Resource Center -- Recycling ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Materials Recycling Research and Process Development Many reports by Argonne National Laboratory on recycling materials especially from vehicles.

402

Safety Analysis Report for the use of hazardous production materials in photovoltaic applications at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure the continued safety of SERI`s employees, the community, and the environment, NREL commissioned an internal audit of its photovoltaic operations that used hazardous production materials (HPMs). As a result of this audit, NREL management voluntarily suspended all operations using toxic and/or pyrophoric gases. This suspension affected seven laboratories and ten individual deposition systems. These activities are located in Building 16, which has a permitted occupancy of Group B, Division 2 (B-2). NREL management decided to do the following. (1) Exclude from this SAR all operations which conformed, or could easily be made to conform, to B-2 Occupancy requirements. (2) Include in this SAR all operations that could be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements with special administrative and engineering controls. (3) Move all operations that could not practically be made to conform to B-2 Occupancy requirements to alternate locations. In addition to the layered set of administrative and engineering controls set forth in this SAR, a semiquantitative risk analysis was performed on 30 various accident scenarios. Twelve presented only routine risks, while 18 presented low risks. Considering the demonstrated safe operating history of NREL in general and these systems specifically, the nature of the risks identified, and the layered set of administrative and engineering controls, it is clear that this facility falls within the DOE Low Hazard Class. Each operation can restart only after it has passed an Operational Readiness Review, comparing it to the requirements of this SAR, while subsequent safety inspections will ensure future compliance.

Crandall, R.S.; Nelson, B.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Design guide for composite-material flywheels: rotor dyamic considerations. Part I. System whirling and stability. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information to designers of flywheels is provided which will enable them to predict many aspects of the dynamic behavior of their flywheel systems when spin-tested with a quill-shaft support and driven by an air turbine. Computer programs are presented for the following dynamic analysis to obtain the results indicated: free whirling for natural frequencies versus rotational speed and the associated mode shapes; rough-type stability analysis for determining the stability limits; and forced whirling analysis for estimating the response of major components of the system to flywheel mass eccentricity and initial tilt. For the first and third kinds of analyses, two different mathematical models of the generic system are investigated. One is a seven-degree-of-freedom lumped-parameter analysis, while the other is a combined distributed- and lumped-parameter analysis. When applied to an existing flywheel system, the two models yielded numerical values for the lowest first-order forward critical speed in very close agreement with each other and with experimental results obtained in spin tests. Therefore, for the second kind of analysis, only the lumped-parameter model is implemented. Qualitative discussions as to why forced retrograde whirling is not as severe as forward whirling are also presented. The analyses are applied to the multi-material ring type flywheel systems, a constant-thickness-diskring type, and a tapered-thickness-disk type. In addition, the effects of the following flywheel design parameters on system dynamics were investigated: flywheel mass; diametral and polar mass moments of inertia; location of mass center from the lower end of the quill shaft; quill shaft length; lower turbine-bearing support stiffness; equivalent viscous damping coefficient of the external damper; flywheel dead weight; and torque applied at the turbine.

Bert, C.W.; Ramunujam, G.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Energy material transport, now through 2000, system characteristics and potential problems. Task 3. Final report - petroleum transportation  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a summary characterization of the petroleum transportation system and an assessment of some potential problems that may impact petroleum transportation in the United States during the balance of the century. A primary purpose of this task is to provide information and perspective that contribute to the evaluation of research and development needs and priorities in future programs. The system characterization in Section 3 includes a review of petroleum product movements, modal operations and comparisons, and transportation regulations and safety. This system overview summarizes domestic production and consumption scenarios to the year 2000. A median scenario based on published projections shows that the US will probably rely on foreign oil to supply between 40 and 50 percent of domestic petroleum needs throughout the balance of the century. Potential problems in petroleum transportation were identified by the analysis and prioritization of current issues. The relative priorities of problem concerns were judged on the basis of their overall impact on the system and the immediacy of this potential impact. Two classes of concern are distinguished: 1. Potential problems that appear to require new programmatic action, in addition to effort already committed, to minimize the possible future impact of these concerns. 2. Latent concerns that may increase or decrease in priority or entirely change in nature as they develop. While the trend of these concerns should be monitored, new program action does not appear necessary at this time.

DeSteese, J.G.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Final Report of a CRADA Between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Ford Motor Company (CRADA No. PNNL/265): “Deactivation Mechanisms of Base Metal/Zeolite Urea Selective Catalytic Reduction Materials, and Development of Zeolite-Based Hydrocarbon Adsorber Materials  

SciTech Connect

Reducing NOx emissions and particulate matter (PM) are primary concerns for diesel vehicles required to meet current LEV II and future LEV III emission standards which require 90+% NOx conversion. Currently, urea SCR as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) are being used for emission control system components by Ford Motor Company for 2010 and beyond diesel vehicles. Because the use of this technology for vehicle applications is new, the relative lack of experience makes it especially challenging to satisfy durability requirements. Of particular concern is being able to realistically simulate actual field aging of the catalyst systems under laboratory conditions. This is necessary both as a rapid assessment tool for verifying improved performance and certifiability of new catalyst formulations, and to develop a good understanding of deactivation mechanisms that can be used to develop improved catalyst materials. In addition to NOx and PM, the hydrocarbon (HC) emission standards are expected to become much more stringent during the next few years. Meanwhile, the engine-out HC emissions are expected to increase and/or be more difficult to remove. Since HC can be removed only when the catalyst becomes warm enough for its oxidation, three-way catalyst (TWC) and diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) formulations often contain proprietary zeolite materials to hold the HC produced during the cold start period until the catalyst reaches its operating temperature (e.g., >200°C). Unfortunately, much of trapped HC tends to be released before the catalyst reaches the operating temperature. Among materials effective for trapping HC during the catalyst warm-up period, siliceous zeolites are commonly used because of their high surface area and high stability under typical operating conditions. However, there has been little research on the physical properties of these materials related to the adsorption and release of various hydrocarbon species found in the engine exhaust. For these reasons, automakers and engine manufacturers have difficulty improving their catalytic converters for meeting the stringent HC emission standards. In this collaborative program, scientists and engineers in the Institute for Integrated Catalysis at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and at Ford Motor Company have investigated laboratory- and engine-aged SCR catalysts, containing mainly base metal zeolites. These studies are leading to a better understanding of various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of SCR catalysts and improve the correlation between laboratory and engine aging, saving experimental time and cost. We have also studied materials effective for the temporary storage of HC species during the cold-start period. In particular, we have examined the adsorption and desorption of various HC species produced during the combustion with different fuels (e.g., gasoline, E85, diesel) over potential HC adsorber materials, and measured the kinetic parameters to update Ford’s HC adsorption model. Since this CRADA has now been completed, in this final report we will provide brief summaries of most of the work carried out on this CRADA over the last several years.

Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Lee, Jong H.; Tran, Diana N.; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Cheng, Yisun; Lupescu, Jason; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Lambert, Christine; McCabe, Robert W.

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

406

Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For Researchers For Researchers What You Need to Know and Do The Tech Transfer Process Business Development Services Berkeley Lab LaunchPad Funding - Innovation Grants Forms and Policies Conflict of Interest Outside Employment Export Control Record of Invention Software Disclosure and Abstract See Also FAQs for Researchers Entrepreneurial Resources Webcast: Transferring Technology to the Marketplace Pre-Publication Review Report Invention/Software The next step is for Lab researchers to report the invention or software to the Technology Transfer and Intellectual Property Management Department. The invention report is not a patent application and in and of itself secures no intellectual property rights. It is used by the Lab to make a decision as to whether to proceed with a patent application.

407

Analysis of Durability of Advanced Cementitious Materials for Rigid Pavement Construction in California Report Prepared for CALIFORNIA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report. Two forms of aggregate reactions known to occur in California are addressed: alkaliaggregate reaction and oxidation reactions. The alkali aggregate reaction is greatly dependent upon the alkali content of the cement. Clays used in the manufacture of Portland cements may contribute high alkali concentrations to the pore solution. Low-alkali Portland cements may be specified when needed to provide resistance to alkali-aggregate reactions. Portland-pozzolan blends and calcium aluminate cements and blends are expected to exhibit improved alkaliaggregate reaction resistance in sulfate-rich environments, while the resistance of calcium sulfoaluminate cements is expected to be similar to that of Portland cement. Fly ash-based cements may exhibit improved resistance, but the alkali concentration contributed by the set accelerator should be investigated. The oxidation of sulfide and sulfate minerals, such as pyrite, in aggregate may cause concrete cracking and aggregate pop-outs. Portland-pozzolan blends and fly ash-based cements are expected to exhibit improved resistance to this oxidation reaction because of decreased permeability to water. Carbonation or chloride attack from CaCl 2 -containing admixtures, seawater, or de-icing salts may initiate corrosion of steel dowels, which are used to transfer load between pavement slabs. The Building Code limits the maximum chloride ion content for the purpose of corrosion protection of reinforced concrete to 0.15 percent by weight of cement. In addition to low chloride content, low concrete permeability and high pore solution alkalinity are essential for corrosion resistance. Low permeability concrete produced from Portland cement, Portlandpozzolan blends, and calcium sulfoaluminate cements is expected provide resistance t...

Kimberly Kurtis And; Kimberly E. Kurtis; Paulo Monteiro

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Emerging materials for solar cell applications: electrodeposited CdTe. Final report, February 14, 1979-February 14, 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thin film gold/polycrystalline cadmium telluride Schottky solar cells made by electrodepositing the semiconductor on an ITO-coated glass substrate serving also as an ohmic contact demonstrated an internal efficiency of 4% over 2 mm/sup 2/ areas. During the year being reported upon, Monosolar devoted mator attention to refining the electroplating process and determining the parameters governing CdTe film stoichiometry, grain size, substrate adhesion, and quality. UCLA acting as a Monosolar sub-contractor characterized both the CdTe films themselves and solar cells made from them. Techniques were developed for making measurements on films often less than 1 micron in thickness. The highest values achieved for efficiency parameters, not necessarily all in the same cell, were V/sub oc/ = 0.5 V, J/sub sc/ = 11 mA/cm/sup 2/, and fill factor = 0.55 before corrections in the absence of anti-reflection coatings. Typical resistivities for n-CdTe films were 10/sup 5/ ..cap omega..-cm. Lifetimes of about 10/sup -10/ sec were measured. Absorption coefficient of these films is in the order of 10/sup 4/ for lambda < 0.7 ..mu..m. Measured energy gap for these CdTe films is 1.55 eV, sightly higher than the 1.45 eV value for single crystal CdTe. The activation energy of the dominating trap level is 0.55 eV. Trap density is in the order of 10/sup 16//cm/sup 3/. Schottky diodes were of excellent quality and pinhole-free. The measured barrier height varied between 0.75 and 0.85 eV. Rectification ratios of 10/sup 4/ were obtained reproducibly. Films measure about 1 inch square. Indications are that larger and more efficient low cost solar devices can readily be obtained soon using the techniques developed in this program.

Rod, R.L.; Bunshah, R.; Stafsudd, O.; Basol, B.M.; Nath, P.

1980-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

409