Sample records for materials 0d 1d

  1. Emerging quasi-0D states at vanishing total entropy of the 1D hard sphere system: a coarse-grained similarity to the car parking problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Frusawa

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A coarse-grained system of one-dimensional (1D) hard spheres (HSs) is created using the Delaunay tessellation, which enables one to define the quasi-0D state. It is found from comparing the quasi-0D and 1D free energy densities that a frozen state due to the emergence of quasi-0D HSs is thermodynamically more favorable than fluidity with a large-scale heterogeneity above crossover volume fraction of $\\phi_c=e/(1+e)=0.731\\cdots$, at which the total entropy of the 1D state vanishes. The Delaunay-based lattice mapping further provides a similarity between the dense HS system above $\\phi_c$ and the jamming limit in the car parking problem.

  2. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide – CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Hoy, Jessica; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Li, Zhuo-Qun; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Fischer, Daniel A.; Taylor, Gordon T.; et al

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementarymore »electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.« less

  3. Probing structure-induced optical behavior in a new class of self-activated luminescent 0D/1D CaWO? metal oxide – CdSe nanocrystal composite heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyu [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McBean, Coray [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Wang, Lei [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Hoy, Jessica [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Liu, Haiqing [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Li, Zhuo-Qun [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Sfeir, Matthew Y. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Taylor, Gordon T. [State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Misewich, James A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we synthesize and characterize the structural and optical properties of novel heterostructures composed of (i) semiconducting nanocrystalline CdSe quantum dot (QDs) coupled with (ii) both one and zero-dimensional (1D and 0D) motifs of self-activated luminescence CaWO? metal oxides. Specifically, ~4 nm CdSe QDs have been anchored onto (i) high-aspect ratio 1D nanowires, measuring ~230 nm in diameter and ~3 ?m in length, as well as onto (ii) crystalline 0D nanoparticles (possessing an average diameter of ~ 80 nm) of CaWO? through the mediation of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) as a connecting linker. Composite formation was confirmed by complementary electron microscopy and spectroscopy (i.e. IR and Raman) data. In terms of luminescent properties, our results show that our 1D and 0D heterostructures evince photoluminescence (PL) quenching and shortened PL lifetimes of CaWO? as compared with unbound CaWO?. We propose that a photo-induced electron transfer process occurs from CaWO? to CdSe QDs, a scenario which has been confirmed by NEXAFS measurements and which highlights a decrease in the number of unoccupied orbitals in the conduction bands of CdSe QDs. By contrast, the PL signature and lifetimes of MPA-capped CdSe QDs within these heterostructures do not exhibit noticeable changes as compared with unbound MPA-capped CdSe QDs. The striking difference in optical behavior between CaWO? nanostructures and CdSe QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. In addition, the PL quenching behaviors for CaWO? within the heterostructure configuration were examined by systematically varying (i) the quantities and coverage densities of CdSe QDs as well as (ii) the intrinsic morphology (and by extension, the inherent crystallite size) of CaWO? itself.

  4. Researchers are developing novel zeolite-based materials with 1-D nanopores for automotive applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, Kenneth R.

    Researchers are developing novel zeolite-based materials with 1-D nanopores for automotive configuration. The calculations also demonstrate the important role of zeolite aluminum location and the relative aluminum arrangement in that site, current calculations are evaluating the catalytic activity

  5. Synthesis of compositionally-defined single-crystalline Eu³?-activated molybdate-tungstate solid solution composite nanowires and observation of charge transfer in a novel class of 1D CaMoO?-CaWO?: Eu³? – 0D CdS/CdSe QD nanoscale heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyi [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); McBean, Coray [State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Wang, Lei [State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Jaye, Cherno [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Liu, Haiqing [State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Fischer, Daniel A. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Wong, Stanislaus S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); State Univ. of Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY (United States)

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu³?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? ‘x’ ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (0 ? ‘x’ ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (‘x’). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition with our 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (0 ? ‘x’ ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at ‘x’ = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (‘x’ = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu³? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (‘x’ = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.

  6. Synthesis of compositionally-defined single-crystalline Eu³?-activated molybdate-tungstate solid solution composite nanowires and observation of charge transfer in a novel class of 1D CaMoO?-CaWO?: Eu³? – 0D CdS/CdSe QD nanoscale heterostructures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Han, Jinkyi; McBean, Coray; Wang, Lei; Jaye, Cherno; Liu, Haiqing; Fischer, Daniel A.; Wong, Stanislaus S.

    2015-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    As a first step, we have synthesized and optically characterized a systematic series of one-dimensional (1D) single-crystalline Eu³?-activated alkaline-earth metal tungstate/molybdate solid solution composite CaW??xMoxO? (0 ? ‘x’ ? 1) nanowires of controllable chemical composition using a modified template-directed methodology under ambient room-temperature conditions. Extensive characterization of the resulting nanowires has been performed using X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, and optical spectroscopy. The crystallite size and single crystallinity of as-prepared 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (0 ? ‘x’ ? 1) solid solution composite nanowires increase with increasing Mo component (‘x’). We note a clear dependence of luminescence output upon nanowire chemical composition withmore »our 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (0 ? ‘x’ ? 1) evincing the highest photoluminescence (PL) output at ‘x’ = 0.8, amongst samples tested. Subsequently, coupled with either zero-dimensional (0D) CdS or CdSe quantum dots (QDs), we successfully synthesized and observed charge transfer processes in 1D CaW1-xMoxO4: Eu3+ (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D QD composite nanoscale heterostructures. Our results show that CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (‘x’ = 0.8) nanowires give rise to PL quenching when CdSe QDs and CdS QDs are anchored onto the surfaces of 1D CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? nanowires. The observed PL quenching is especially pronounced in CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (‘x’ = 0.8) – 0D CdSe QD heterostructures. Conversely, the PL output and lifetimes of CdSe and CdS QDs within these heterostructures are not noticeably altered as compared with unbound CdSe and CdS QDs. The difference in optical behavior between 1D Eu³? activated tungstate and molybdate solid solution nanowires and the semiconducting 0D QDs within our heterostructures can be correlated with the relative positions of their conduction and valence energy band levels. We propose that the PL quenching can be attributed to a photo-induced electron transfer process from CaW??xMoxO?: Eu³? (‘x’ = 0.8) to both CdSe and CdS QDs, an assertion supported by complementary NEXAFS measurements.« less

  7. 0-D and 1-D inorganic-organic composite polyoxotungstates constructed from in-situ generated monocopper{sup II}-substituted Keggin polyoxoanions and copper{sup II}-organoamine complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Zheng Shoutian [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China); Yang Guoyu [State Key Laboratory of Structural Chemistry, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter and Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou, Fujian 350002 (China)], E-mail: guoyu.yang@hotmail.com

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Combination of in-situ generated monocopper{sup II}-substituted Keggin polyoxoanions with copper{sup II}-organoamine complexes under hydrothermal conditions results in seven inorganic-organic composite polyoxotungstates [Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}][{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}Cl]{r_brace}.3H{sub 2}O (1), {l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)][Cu(en){sub 2}]{sub 2}[{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}Cl]{r_brace}.6H{sub 2}O (2), {l_brace}[Cu(en){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub 2}[Cu(en){sub 2}][{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (3/4, X=Si{sup IV}/Ge{sup IV}), {l_brace}[Cu(deta)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(deta)(H{sub 2}O)][{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{r_brace}.5H{sub 2}O (5/6, X=Ge{sup IV}/Si{sup IV}) and [Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 2}{l_brace}[Cu(dap){sub 2}]{sub 2}[Cu(dap){sub 2}][{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sub 2}{r_brace} (7) (en=ethylenediamine, dap=1,2-diaminopropane and deta=diethylenetriamine). 1 is an isolated structure whereas 2 is a 1-D chain structure, but both contain [{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}Cl]{sup 6-} polyoxoanions. 3-6 contain the 1-D linear chains made up of [{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 6-} polyoxoanions in the pattern of -A-A-A- (A=[{alpha}-XCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sup 6-}), while 7 demonstrates the first 1-D zigzag chain constructed from [{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sub 2}{sup 10-} polyoxoanions via [Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+} bridges in the pattern of -A-B-A-B- (A=[{alpha}-PCuW{sub 11}O{sub 39}]{sub 2}{sup 10-}, B=[Cu(en){sub 2}]{sup 2+}). The successful syntheses of 1-7 can provide some experimental evidences that di-/tri-/hexa-vacant polyoxoanions can be transformed into mono-vacant Keggin polyoxoanions under hydrothermal conditions. - Graphical abstract: A family of inorganic-organic composite polyoxotugstates have been harvested by combination of in-situ generated monocopper{sup II}-substituted Keggin polyoxoanions and copper{sup II}-organoamine complexes based on di-/tri-/hexa-vacant polyoxoanion precursors, CuCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O and organoamines under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized by the elemental analysis, IR spectroscopy, TGA and single-crystal X-ray crystallography.

  8. DRAFT - DOE O 460.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation Safety

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    The Order establishes safety requirements for the proper packaging and transportation of Department of offsite shipments and onsite transfers of radioactive and other hazardous materials, and for modal transportation.

  9. A facile route for 3D aerogels from nanostructured 1D and 2D materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Sung Mi

    Aerogels have numerous applications due to their high surface area and low densities. However, creating aerogels from a large variety of materials has remained an outstanding challenge. Here, we report a new methodology ...

  10. Membranes from nanoporous 1D and 2D materials: A review of opportunities, developments, and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nair, Sankar

    : Membranes Layered materials Nanoporous Nanotubes Separations Nanocomposites a b s t r a c t Membranes (composite/hybrid) or single-phase membranes. The influence of surface chemistry and processing techniques

  11. XCHEM-1D: A Heat Transfer/Chemical Kinetics Computer Program for multilayered reactive materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gross, R.J.; Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An eXplosive CHEMical kinetics code, XCHEM, has been developed to solve the reactive diffusion equations associated with thermal ignition of energetic materials. This method-of-lines code uses stiff numerical methods and adaptive meshing to resolve relevant combustion physics. Solution accuracy is maintained between multilayered materials consisting of blends of reactive components and/or inert materials. Phase change and variable properties are included in one-dimensional slab, cylindrical and spherical geometries. Temperature-dependent thermal properties have been incorporated and the modification of thermal conductivities to include decomposition effects are estimated using solid/gas volume fractions determined by species fractions. Gas transport properties, including high pressure corrections, have also been included. Time varying temperature, heat flux, convective and thermal radiation boundary conditions, and layer to layer contact resistances have also been implemented.

  12. UW -Center for Intelligent Materials and Systems 1 1-D Heat Flow Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taya, Minoru

    : Calibrate Seebeck Coefficient for TFTC(Thin Film Thermocouples) x y Heater (70°C) Water (19°C) #12;UW ANSYS Simulation Used Data Water Temp. 2 Measured Temp. (Channel 14, 15) Heater size Assumption. Factor 2.258 #12;UW - Center for Intelligent Materials and Systems 3 2-D Heat Flow Measurement x y Heater

  13. Breaking symmetries in ordered materials : spin polarized light transport in magnetized noncentrosymmetric 1D photonic crystals, and photonic gaps and fabrication of quasiperiodic structured materials from interference lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bita, Ion

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of breaking various symmetries on optical properties in ordered materials have been studied. Photonic crystals lacking space-inversion and time-reversal symmetries were shown to display nonreciprocal dispersion ...

  14. Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuik, Kees

    Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research Mass and Heat balances V d dt = i - eDensity-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research Finite Transitions #12;Density-Enthalpy Phase Diagram 0D Boiler Simulation Finite Element Method Further Research

  15. First observation of the decay B-0 -> D*D+*(-)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kotov, S.; Kravchenko, I.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhou, L.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed four fully reconstructed B-0 --> D*+D*- candidates in 5.8 x 10(6) Y(4S) --> B (B) over bar decays recorded with the CLEO detector. The background is estimated to be 0.31 +/- 0.10 events. The probability that the background could...

  16. Branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B[over-bar] 0 to D[superscript (*)0?0, D[superscript (*)0]?, D[superscript (*)0]?, and D[superscript(*)0]?? and measurement of the polarization in the decay B[over-bar] 0-->D[superscript *0]?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowan, Ray Franklin

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays B? 0-->D0?0, D*0?0, D0?, D*0?, D0?, D*0?, D0??, and D*0??. We measure the branching fractions (×10-4): B(B? 0?D0?0)=2.69±0.09±0.13, B(B? ...

  17. First observation of the decays B-0 -> D*- p(p)over-tilde pi(+) and B-0 -> D*- p(n)over-bar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhao, X.

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measure the branching fractions B(B-0 --> D*(-) p (p) over bar pi (+)) = (6.5(-1.2)(+1.3) +/- 1.0) X 10(-4) and B(B-0 --> D*(-) p (n) over bar) = (14.5(-3.0)(+3.4) +/- 2.7) X 10(-4). Antineutrons are identified by their annihilation in the Cs...

  18. Order 430.1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find In response to430.1D

  19. Data:Eb1d6c89-9e0d-4025-a68f-b84bbedb81d3 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Southwest Public Power Dist Effective date: 20130101 End date if known: Rate name: Irrigation: Daily...

  20. Data:98de151b-1d5d-4884-9580-551cb0d2045c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2. Demand 3. Energy << Previous 1 2 3 Next >> Basic Information Utility name: Foley Board of Utilities...

  1. Data:03e0d005-1d37-4cdd-9dec-e96bb9c484b4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    All territories served by the Company. Definition: Distributed generation facilities are electricity generators owned by the customer, located R close to the point of energy...

  2. Data:46116516-9e98-44fa-aa9f-1d4a78532a0d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    required on the premises. Voltage Discount For customers who provide and maintain transformers and other necessary equipment at and beyond the point of service Where multiple...

  3. Testing CPT Invariance in B^0_d-\\bar{B}^0_d and B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ping Ren; Zhi-zhong Xing

    2007-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent CDF and D0 measurements of B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s mixing make it possible to search for CP violation and test CPT symmetry in a variety of B_s decays. Considering both coherent B^0_d\\bar{B}^0_d decays at the \\Upsilon (4S) resonance and coherent B^0_s\\bar{B}^0_s decays at the \\Upsilon (5S) resonance, we formulate their time-dependent and time-integrated rates by postulating small CPT violation in B^0_d-\\bar{B}^0_d and B^0_s-\\bar{B}^0_s oscillations. We show that the opposite-sign dilepton events from either C-odd or C-even B^0_q\\bar{B}^0_q states (for q = d or s) can be used to determine or constrain the CPT-violating parameter at a super-B factory. The possibility of distinguishing between the effect of CPT violation and that of \\Delta B = -\\Delta Q transitions is also discussed.

  4. D. Attinger1 D. Poulikakos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attinger, Daniel

    -solidification. DOI: 10.1115/1.1391274 Keywords: Droplet, Manufacturing, Microstructures, Phase Change, Surface in a deforming domain, complex fluid flow exemplified by the multidimensional motion of the phase change microdroplet impact and solidification on a colder flat substrate of the same material that melts due

  5. Visualizing 1D Regression David J. Olive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olive, David

    regression, binary regression and general- ized linear models. If a good estimate ^b of some non a single linear combination T x of the predictors. Special cases of 1D regression include multiple linear(y) = + T x + e. Generalized linear models (GLM's) are also a special case of 1D regression. Some notation

  6. Search for b--> u transitions in B- -> [K+pi-pi0]_D K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a kaon, with the D meson decaying into K+pi-pi0. This final state can be reached through the b --> c transition B- -> D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0 --> K+pi-pi0, or the b --> u transition B- --> D0bar K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D0bar --> K+ pi-pi 0. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. We present preliminary results based on 226 10^{6} e+e- --> Y(4s) --> BBbar events collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We find no significant evidence for these decays and we set a limit R_ADS =(BR(B- -->[K+pi-pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B+ --> [K-pi+pi0]_D K+))/(BR(B- -->[K-p i+pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B+ --> [K+pi-pi0]_D K+)) D0bar K-)|/|A(B- --> D0bar K-)| < 0.185 at 95% confidence level.

  7. Search for b--> u transitions in B- -> [K+pi-pi0]_D K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We search for decays of a B meson into a neutral D meson and a kaon, with the D meson decaying into K+pi-pi0. This final state can be reached through the b --> c transition B- -> D0K- followed by the doubly Cabibbo-suppressed D0 --> K+pi-pi0, or the b --> u transition B- --> D0bar K- followed by the Cabibbo-favored D0bar --> K+ pi-pi0. The interference of these two amplitudes is sensitive to the angle gamma of the unitarity triangle. We present preliminary results based on 226 10^{6} e+e- --> Y(4s) --> BBbar events collected with the BABAR detector at SLAC. We find no significant evidence for these decays and we set a limit R_ADS =(BR(B- -->[K+pi-pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B- --> [K-pi+pi0]_D K+))/(BR(B- -->[K-pi+pi0]_D K-)+ BR(B- --> [K+pi-pi0]_D K+)) D0bar K-)|/|A(B- --> D0bar K-)| < 0.185 at 95% confidence level.

  8. PTG exam 2322011 short answers 75. For this cyclic process: 0dUQW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    PTG exam 2322011 ­ short answers 75. For this cyclic process: 0dUQW a. Q1 + W2 + Q2 + W3 = 0 W3 = ( Q1 + W2 + Q2) = (180 + 50 200) = 30 J; Given off ­W3 = 30 J. Or, if also taking into consideration input W2, then total given off W3 ­ W2 = 20 J (system gain + 20 J) b

  9. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation. Thickness dependent self limiting 1-D tin oxide nanowire arrays by nanosecond pulsed...

  10. Search for the decay (B)over-bar(0) -> D*(0)gamma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Davis, Robin E. P.; Kwak, Nowhan; Zhao, X.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ? B 0 ! D H115690 g (and its charge conjugate state). In the SM framework this decay pro- ceeds via W exchange between b and ? d quarks (Fig. 1). Naively, this transition is suppressed by helicity effects and quantum chromodynamic (QCD) color... was replaced by a silicon vertex detector [10] and the argon-ethane gas of the main drift chamber was changed to a helium-propane mixture. This upgrade led to improved resolutions in momentum and specific ionization energy loss (dEH20862dx). The response...

  11. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | NationalMaterials

  12. Modeling resonance interference by 0-D slowing-down solution with embedded self-shielding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Martin, W. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Kim, K. S.; Williams, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonance integral table based methods employing conventional multigroup structure for the resonance self-shielding calculation have a common difficulty on treating the resonance interference. The problem arises due to the lack of sufficient energy dependence of the resonance cross sections when the calculation is performed in the multigroup structure. To address this, a resonance interference factor model has been proposed to account for the interference effect by comparing the interfered and non-interfered effective cross sections obtained from 0-D homogeneous slowing-down solutions by continuous-energy cross sections. A rigorous homogeneous slowing-down solver is developed with two important features for reducing the calculation time and memory requirement for practical applications. The embedded self-shielding method (ESSM) is chosen as the multigroup resonance self-shielding solver as an integral component of the interference method. The interference method is implemented in the DeCART transport code. Verification results show that the code system provides more accurate effective cross sections and multiplication factors than the conventional interference method for UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel cases. The additional computing time and memory for the interference correction is acceptable for the test problems including a depletion case with 87 isotopes in the fuel region. (authors)

  13. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing and CP Violation at BaBar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giulia Casarosa; for the BaBar Collaboration

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a measurement of D0-D0bar mixing and a search for CP violation in the D0->K+K-, pi+pi- and K+-pi-+ channels. We use D0's coming from D*+ decays, so that the flavour of the D0 at production is tagged by the charge of the pion that is also emitted. We also use an independent set of D0's coming directly from the hadronization of the charm quark, but in this case the flavour of the charmed meson is not known. We analyze events collected by the BaBar experiment at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 468 fb-1. We measure the mixing parameter value to be yCP = [0.72 +- 0.18 (stat) +- 0.12 (syst)]%, and exclude the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3sigma significance. We find no evidence of CP violation, observing DeltaY = [0.09 +- 0.26 (stat) +- 0.06 syst)]% which is consistent with zero.

  14. Lanczos diagonalizations of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, E.Y.; Campbell, D.K.; Gammel, J.T.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In studies of interacting electrons in reduced dimensions'' one is trapped between the Scylla of exponential growth of the number of states in any exact many-body basis and the Charybdis of the failure of mean-field theories to capture adequately the effects of interactions. In the present article we focus on one technique -- the Lanczos method -- which, at least in the case of the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, appears to allow us to sail the narrow channel between these two hazards. In contrast to Quantum Monte Carlo methods, which circumvent the exponential growth of states by statistical techniques and importance sampling, the Lanczos approach attacks this problem head-on by diagonalizing the full Hamiltonian. Given the restrictions of present computers, this approach is thus limited to studying finite clusters of roughly 12--14 sites. Fortunately, in one dimension, such clusters are usually sufficient for extracting many of the properties of the infinite system provided that one makes full use of the ability to vary the boundary conditions. In this article we shall apply the Lanczos methodology and novel phase randomization'' techniques to study the 1-D Peierls-Hubbard model, with particular emphasis on the optical absorption properties, including the spectrum of absorptions as a function of photon energy. Despite the discreteness of the eigenstates in our finite clusters, we are able to obtain optical spectra that, in cases where independent tests can be made, agree well with the known exact results for the infinite system. Thus we feel that this combination of techniques represents an important and viable means of studying many interesting novel materials involving strongly correlated electrons. 26 refs., 6 figs.

  15. Algebraic theory of crystal vibrations: Singularities and zeros in vibrations of 1D and 2D lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Iachello; B. Dietz; M. Miski-Oglu; A. Richter

    2015-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for the calculation of the energy dispersion relation (EDR) and density of states (DOS) in one (1D) and two (2D) dimensions is introduced and applied to linear lattices (1D) and square and hexagonal lattices (2D). The (van Hove) singularities and (Dirac) zeros of the DOS are discussed. Results for the 2D hexagonal lattice (graphene-like materials) are compared with experimental data in microwave photonic crystals.

  16. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function $g_{1}^{d(x)}$ for $1(GeV/c)^{2} < Q^{2} < 40 (GeV/c)^{2}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony, P L; Averett, T; Band, H R; Berisso, M C; Borel, H; Bosted, P E; Bultmann, S L; Buénerd, M; Chupp, T E; Churchwell, S; Court, G R; Crabb, D; Day, D; Decowski, P; De Pietro, P; Erbacher, R; Erickson, R; Feltham, A; Fonvieille, H; Frlez, E; Gearhart, R A; Ghazikhanian, V; Gómez, J; Griffioen, K A; Harris, C; Houlden, M A; Hughes, E W; Hyde-Wright, C E; Igo, G; Incerti, S; Jensen, J; Johnson, J R; King, P M; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kuhn, S E; Lindgren, R; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marroncle, J; McCarthy, J; McKee, P; Meyer, Werner T; Mitchell, G; Mitchell, J; Olson, M; Penttila, S; Peterson, G; Petratos, G G; Pitthan, R; Pocanic, D; Prepost, R; Prescott, C; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reyna, D; Rochester, L S; Rock, S E; Rondon-Aramayo, O A; Sabatie, F; Sick, I; Smith, T; Sorrell, L; Staley, F; Lorant, S St; Stuart, L M; Szalata, Z M; Terrien, Y; Tobias, A; Todor, L; Toole, T; Trentalange, S; Walz, D; Welsh, R C; Wesselmann, F R; Wright, T R; Young, C C; Zeier, M; Zhu, H; Zihlmann, B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Sigma.

  17. Measurement of the Deuteron Spin Structure Function g_1^d(x) for 1 (GeV/c)^2 < Q^2 < 40 (GeV/c)^2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E155 Collaboration

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    New measurements are reported on the deuteron spin structure function g_1^d. These results were obtained from deep inelastic scattering of 48.3 GeV electrons on polarized deuterons in the kinematic range 0.01 deuteride (6Li2H) as the target material. Extrapolations of the data were performed to obtain moments of g_1^d, including Gamma_1^d, and the net quark polarization Delta Sigma.

  18. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mellors, Robert J.

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  19. Brady 1D seismic velocity model ambient noise prelim

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellors, Robert J.

    2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary 1D seismic velocity model derived from ambient noise correlation. 28 Green's functions filtered between 4-10 Hz for Vp, Vs, and Qs were calculated. 1D model estimated for each path. The final model is a median of the individual models. Resolution is best for the top 1 km. Poorly constrained with increasing depth.

  20. Data:5cbae07c-1d28-4b0d-aa5f-b62b5f3cdde8 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rate is applicable for service that is supplied through new or rebuilt streetlight systems, including extension of streetlighting systems to additional locations where service...

  1. Data:A5e4a233-9ef0-4c35-a849-1ed1d934fa0d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    power plant cost adjustment factor:0.01000 for all kWh, all service classes. State of Michigan P.A. 295, of Public Acts 2008, commonly referred to as the Clean, Renewable and...

  2. Data:Cc0acc3a-fb58-4bdd-8e1d-f7e0d6b32e6e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inc Effective date: 20090201 End date if known: Rate name: SL- 250 Watt HPS 106 kWh (Steel Pole Overhead) Sector: Lighting Description: Source or reference: http:...

  3. SOLAR ENERGY HARVESTINGSOLAR ENERGY HARVESTING P. BASSET1, Y. LEPRINCE-WANG3, K. N. NGUYEN1, D. ABI-SAAB1, E. RICHALOT2, F. MARTY1, D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudoin, Geneviève

    SOLAR ENERGY HARVESTINGSOLAR ENERGY HARVESTING P. BASSET1, Y. LEPRINCE-WANG3, K. N. NGUYEN1, D. ABI & Results Study the energy harvesting of the micro/nanostructured materials under solar radiation Light solar cell adding n type nanoparticles. High p-n junction interface due to the nano 3D structure. Multi

  4. Neutron occupancy of the 0d5/2 orbital and the N=16 shell closure in 24O

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Tshoo; Y. Satou; C. A. Bertulani; H. Bhang; S. Choi; T. Nakamura; Y. Kondo; S. Deguchi; Y. Kawada; Y. Nakayama; K. N. Tanaka; N. Tanaka; Y. Togano; N. Kobayashi; N. Aoi; M. Ishihara; T. Motobayashi; H. Otsu; H. Sakurai; S. Takeuchi; K. Yoneda; F. Delaunay; J. Gibelin; F. M. Marqués; N. A. Orr; T. Honda; T. Kobayashi; T. Sumikama; Y. Miyashita; K. Yoshinaga; M. Matsushita; S. Shimoura; D. Sohler; J. W. Hwang; T. Zheng; Z. H. Li; Z. X. Cao

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    One-neutron knockout from 24O leading to the first excited state in 23O has been measured for a proton target at a beam energy of 62 MeV/nucleon. The decay energy spectrum of the neutron unbound state of 23O was reconstructed from the measured four momenta of the 22O fragment and emitted neutron. A sharp peak was found at Edecay=50$\\pm$3 keV, corresponding to an excited state in 23O at 2.78$\\pm$0.11 MeV, as observed in previous measurements. The longitudinal momentum distribution for this state was consistent with d -wave neutron knockout, providing support for a J{\\pi} assignment of 5/2+. The associated spectroscopic factor was deduced to be C2S(0d5/2)=4.1$\\pm$0.4 by comparing the measured cross section (View the MathML source) with a distorted wave impulse approximation calculation. Such a large occupancy for the neutron 0d5/2 orbital is in line with the N=16 shell closure in 24O.

  5. From 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    and synthesized a family of novel organic-inorganic hybrid nanocomposites based on II-VI semiconductorsFrom 1D Chain to 3D Network: Tuning Hybrid II-VI Nanostructures and Their Optical Properties of these nanocomposite materials have been characterized by single crystal and/or powder X-ray diffraction methods. [Zn

  6. Data:8a8c7944-2910-48e5-9b38-f949d0d09d04 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    -f949d0d09d04 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  7. Data:B974b2b8-ef21-4643-a755-ad38f0d4ddc4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    5-ad38f0d4ddc4 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  8. Data:F09c66e9-260d-43f2-b321-8dadf0d50f7e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    dadf0d50f7e No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2....

  9. Data:F1581d23-25c9-4809-8929-157a0d37d5d2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    157a0d37d5d2 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information 2....

  10. Microwave-Induced Dephasing 1D Metal Wires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    ~ )()( TDTLL = Echternach et al. PRB 50, 5748 (1994) Ag wire ( )[ ] ( )TT EEIWL + #12;(T) in 1D wires µm 1.6 µm 0.4 µm 0.2 µm L(0.1K) = 2.3 µm d d = MG, P. Echternach et al., PRB 51,19256 (1995) One can

  11. NANO REVIEW Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    include dye-sensitized solar cells, quantum- dot-sensitized solar cells, and p-n junction solar cells their efficiencies more practical. Now the third-generation solar cells, such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCsNANO REVIEW Enhancing Solar Cell Efficiencies through 1-D Nanostructures Kehan Yu Ã? Junhong Chen

  12. 1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing Wei Yang1 , Carlos Torres the possibility of enabling steel-cased wells as galvanic sources to detect and quantify spatial variations of electrical conductivity in the subsurface. The study assumes a vertical steel-cased well that penetrates

  13. Frontiers of Fusion Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    migration Radiation damage accumulation kinetics · 1 D vs. 3D diffusion processes · ionization Insulators · Optical Materials *asterisk denotes Fusion Materials Task Group #12;Fusion Materials Sciences R Displacement cascades Quantification of displacement damage source term · Is the concept of a liquid valid

  14. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing and CP Violation in Two-Body D0 Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Lees; others

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of D0-D0bar mixing and CP violation using the ratio of lifetimes simultaneously extracted from a sample of D0 mesons produced through the flavor-tagged process D*+ -> D0 pi+, where D0 decays to K-+pi+-, K-K+, or pi-pi+, along with the untagged decays D0 -> K-+pi+- and D0 -> K-K+. The lifetimes of the CP-even, Cabibbo-suppressed modes K-K+ and pi-pi+ are compared to that of the CP-mixed mode K-+pi+- in order to measure yCP and DeltaY. We obtain yCP = [0.72 +- 0.18 (stat) +- 0.12 (syst)]% and DeltaY = [0.09 +- 0.26 (stat) +- 0.06 (syst)]%, where DeltaY constrains possible CP violation. The yCP result excludes the null mixing hypothesis at 3.3 sigma significance. This analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of 468 fb-1 collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  15. Emission from the D1D5 CFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven G. Avery; Borun D. Chowdhury; Samir D. Mathur

    2009-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is believed that the D1D5 brane system is described by an 'orbifold CFT' at a special point in moduli space. We first develop a general formulation relating amplitudes in a d-dimensional CFT to absorption/emission of quanta from flat infinity. We then construct the D1D5 vertex operators for minimally coupled scalars in supergravity, and use these to compute the CFT amplitude for emission from a state carrying a single excitation. Using spectral flow we relate this process to one where we have emission from a highly excited initial state. In each case the radiation rate is found to agree with the radiation found in the gravity dual.

  16. Emission from the D1D5 CFT: Higher Twists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven G. Avery; Borun D. Chowdhury

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a certain class of nonextremal D1D5 geometries and their ergoregion emission. Using a detailed CFT computation and the formalism developed in arXiv:0906.2015 [hep-th], we compute the full spectrum and rate of emission from the geometries and find exact agreement with the gravity answer. Previously, only part of the spectrum had been reproduced using a CFT description. We close with a discussion of the context and significance of the calculation.

  17. 1D to 1D Tunneling in a Dual Electron Waveguide Device C. C. Euaster, J. A. del Alamo,M. R. Mellocht, M. J. Rooks*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    del Alamo, Jesús A.

    1D to 1D Tunneling in a Dual Electron Waveguide Device C. C. Euaster, J. A. del Alamo,M. R on a dual electron waveguide device. In this device, two closely spaced 1D channels are electrostati- cally have fabricated a variety of dual electron waveguide devices with different lengths L and widths W

  18. Data:Cd13dc44-d0d6-46f0-bb39-fb84b30f7517 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cd13dc44-d0d6-46f0-bb39-fb84b30f7517 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  19. Data:Cf8bf5b4-fc53-4727-9f68-0d064fea712d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cf8bf5b4-fc53-4727-9f68-0d064fea712d No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading......

  20. Data:Ffc4d3a6-0d64-4f98-8247-016b66f80f14 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    >> Category:Categories Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleData:Ffc4d3a6-0d64-4f98-8247-016b66f80f14&oldid606947" Category: Utility Rates What links...

  1. DRAFT - DOE O 460.1D, Hazardous Materials Packaging and Transportation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePARTOffice ofHaleREPORT NUCLEARDirectives,Safety

  2. Light and Fast: Probing Carriers and Vibrations in 1D and 2D Materials |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatest Newsbiomass toInsurance | NationalMIT-Harvard

  3. Investigating Mould Heat Transfer in Thin Slab Casting with CON1D Begoa Santillana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian G.

    . Heat transfer in the thin slab casting mould is being investigated with the 1-D heat transfer model MODEL DESCRIPTION The heat transfer model, CON1D1 , models several aspects of the continuous casting

  4. Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY PROGRAM, DOE O 452.2D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE SAFETY Order Module--DOE O 452.1D, NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE AND WEAPON SURETY...

  5. Brady Geothermal 1D seismic velocity model - Datasets - OpenEI...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1025. Number is 262. Title is "Brady 1D seismic velocity http:geothermaldata.orgdatasetbrady-1d-seismic-velocity-model-ambient-noise-prelim-prelim-brady-median-vpvsqs-model...

  6. Practical variational tomography for critical 1D systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jong Yeon Lee; Olivier Landon-Cardinal

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We improve upon a recently introduced efficient quantum state reconstruction procedure targeted to states well-approximated by the multi-scale entanglement renormalization ansatz (MERA), e.g., ground states of critical models. We show how to numerically select a subset of experimentally accessible measurements which maximizes information extraction about renormalized particles, thus dramatically reducing the required number of physical measurements. We numerically estimate the number of measurements required to characterize the ground state of the critical 1D Ising (resp. XX) model and find that MERA tomography on 16-qubit (resp. 24-qubit) systems requires the same experimental effort than brute-force tomography on 8 qubits. We derive a bound computable from experimental data which certifies the distance between the experimental and reconstructed states.

  7. A Roadmap to Control Penguin Effects in $B^0_d\\to J/?K_{\\rm S}^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/??$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristof De Bruyn; Robert Fleischer

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of CP violation in $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ decays play key roles in testing the quark-flavour sector of the Standard Model. The theoretical interpretation of the corresponding observables is limited by uncertainties from doubly Cabibbo-suppressed penguin topologies. With continuously increasing experimental precision, it is mandatory to get a handle on these contributions, which cannot be calculated reliably in QCD. In the case of the measurement of $\\sin2\\beta$ from $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$, the $U$-spin-related decay $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ offers a tool to control the penguin effects. As the required measurements are not yet available, we use data for decays with similar dynamics and the $SU(3)$ flavour symmetry to constrain the size of the expected penguin corrections. We predict the CP asymmetries of $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi K_{\\rm S}^0$ and present a scenario to fully exploit the physics potential of this decay, emphasising also the determination of hadronic parameters and their comparison with theory. In the case of the benchmark mode $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\phi$ used to determine the $B^0_s$-$\\bar B^0_s$ mixing phase $\\phi_s$ the penguin effects can be controlled through $B^0_d\\to J/\\psi \\rho^0$ and $B^0_s\\to J/\\psi \\bar{K}^{*0}$ decays. The LHCb collaboration has recently presented pioneering results on this topic. We analyse their implications and present a roadmap for controlling the penguin effects.

  8. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  9. Porous Materials Porous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Porous Materials x Porous Materials · Physical properties * Characteristic impedance p = p 0 e -jk xa- = vej[ ] p x - j ; Zc= p ve = c ka 0k = c 1-j #12;2 Porous Materials · Specific acoustic impedance Porous Materials · Finite thickness ­ blocked p e + -jk (x-d)a p e - jk (x-d)a d x #12

  10. ORIGINAL PAPER 1D Model of Precursors to Frictional Stick-Slip Motion Allowing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scheibert, Julien

    ], using a 1D spring-block model with a simple Amontons-Coulomb (AC) friction law, showed that the length November 2011 Ó Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011 Abstract In this article, we studythe dynamic], using a one-dimen- sional (1D) spring-block model with a complex time- dependent friction law, produced

  11. Rattling and freezing in a 1-D transport model Jean-Pierre Eckmann1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattling and freezing in a 1-D transport model Jean-Pierre Eckmann1 and Lai-Sang Young2 1 D . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Transport in the chain 8 3.1 Single-particle dynamics energy and fluxes as functions of (and time) . . . . . . . . . . . 14 4 Freezing 16 4.1 Distribution

  12. asjc0d2.tmp

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not FoundInformation DOEInformation Summary Big*Theea2/316Cap plasticity.6

  13. eodd0d4.tmp

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+eGallon:FinalThe State3/%2A,. .,', , !, ,

  14. Nonlinear Electron Heat Conduction Equation and Self similar method for 1-D Thermal Waves in Laser Heating of Solid Density DT Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mohammadian Pourtalari; M. A. Jafarizadeh; M. Ghoranneviss

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron heat conduction is one of the ways that energy transports in laser heating of fusible target material. The aim of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is to show that the thermal conductivity is strongly dependent on temperature and the equation of electron heat conduction is a nonlinear equation. In this article, we solve the one-dimensional (1-D) nonlinear electron heat conduction equation with a self-similar method (SSM). This solution has been used to investigate the propagation of 1-D thermal wave from a deuterium-tritium (DT) plane source which occurs when a giant laser pulse impinges onto a DT solid target. It corresponds to the physical problem of rapid heating of a boundary layer of material in which the energy of laser pulse is released in a finite initial thickness.

  15. Measurement of Time-Dependent CP Asymmetries and the CP-Odd Fraction in the Decay B0->D*+D*-

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an updated measurement of time-dependent CP asymmetries and the CP-odd fraction in the decay B{sup 0} D*{sup +}D*{sup -} using 232 x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II B factory. We determine the CP-odd fraction to be 0.125 {+-} 0.044(stat) {+-} 0.007(syst). The time-dependent CP asymmetry parameters C{sub +} and S{sub +} are determined to be 0.06 {+-} 0.17(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst) and -0.75 {+-} 0.25(stat) {+-} 0.03(syst), respectively. The Standard Model predicts these parameters to be 0 and -sin2{beta}, respectively, in the absence of penguin amplitude contributions.

  16. Data:Ff96ab4b-b24a-4e86-b1c1-70d4b0d306b5 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    b1c1-70d4b0d306b5 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic...

  17. Data:C1e3e9f3-1cc3-47bb-9908-5e94b4f0d932 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8-5e94b4f0d932 No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  18. 1D Modeling of Solar Cells ELEN E9501 Course Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavaei, Javad

    1D Modeling of Solar Cells ELEN E9501 Course Project Columbia University Department of Electrical.............................................................................................................8 4.3 Simulation Results of the Solar Cell Model......................................................................................................13 #12;2 ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1. IV Characteristic of the solar cell

  19. Measurement of D0-D0bar Mixing using the Ratio of Lifetimes for the Decays D0->K-pi+ and K+K-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The BABAR Collaboration; B. Aubert

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the rate of D0-D0bar mixing with the observable yCP=(tauKpi/tauKK)-1, where tauKK and tauKpi are respectively the mean lifetimes of CP-even D0->K+K- and CP-mixed D0->K-pi+ decays, using a data sample of 384/fb collected by the Babar detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory. From a sample of D0 and D0bar decays where the inital flavor of the decaying meson is not determined, we obtain yCP = [1.12 +/- 0.26 (stat) +/- 0.22 (sys)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 3.3 sigma, including both statistical and systematic uncertainties. This result is in good agreement with a previous Babar measurement of yCP obtained from a sample of D*+->D0pi+ events, where the D0 decays to K-pi+, K+K-, and pi+pi-, which is disjoint with the untagged D0 events used here. Combining the two results taking into account statistical and systematic uncertainties, where the systematic uncertainties are assumed to be 100% correlated, we find yCP = [1.16 +/- 0.22 (stat) +/- 0.18 (sys)]%, which excludes the no-mixing hypothesis at 4.1 sigma.

  20. Ligand-controlled assembly of Cd(II) coordination polymers based on mixed ligands of naphthalene-dicarboxylate and dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline: From 0D+1D cocrystal, 2D rectangular network (4,4), to 3D PtS-type architecture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Guocheng; Chen Yongqiang [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China); Wang Xiuli [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China)], E-mail: wangxiuli@bhu.edu.cn; Chen Baokuan; Lin Hongyan [Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Bohai University, Jinzhou 121000 (China)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three novel Cd(II) coordination polymers, namely, [Cd(Dpq)(1,8-NDC)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][Cd(Dpq)(1,8-NDC)].2H{sub 2}O (1), [Cd(Dpq)(1,4-NDC)(H{sub 2}O)] (2), and [Cd(Dpq)(2,6-NDC)] (3) have been obtained from hydrothermal reactions of cadmium(II) nitrate with the mixed ligands dipyrido [3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (Dpq) and three structurally related naphthalene-dicarboxylate ligands [1,8-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (1,8-H{sub 2}NDC), 1,4-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (1,4-H{sub 2}NDC), and 2,6-naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid (2,6-H{sub 2}NDC)]. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that the three polymers exhibit novel structures due to different naphthalene-dicarboxylic acid. Compound 1 is a novel cocrystal of left- and right-handed helical chains and binuclear complexes and ultimately packed into a 3D supramolecular structure through hydrogen bonds and {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions. Compound 2 shows a 2D rectangular network (4,4) bridged by 1,4-NDC with two kinds of coordination modes and ultimately packed into a 3D supramolecular structure through inter-layer {pi}-{pi} stacking interactions. Compound 3 is a new 3D coordination polymer with distorted PtS-type network. In addition, the title compounds exhibit blue/green emission in solid state at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three novel Cd(II) compounds have been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions exhibiting a systematic variation of architecture by the employment of three structurally related naphthalene-dicarboxylate ligands.

  1. Transparent Conducting Electrodes based on 1D and 2D Ag Nanogratings for Organic Photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical and electrical properties of optically-thin one-dimensional (1D) Ag nanogratings and two-dimensional (2D) Ag nanogrids are studied, and their use as transparent electrodes in organic photovoltaics are explored. A large broadband and polarization-insensitive optical absorption enhancement in the organic light-harvesting layers is theoretically and numerically demonstrated using either single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids or two perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, and is attributed to the excitation of surface plasmon resonances and plasmonic cavity modes. Total photon absorption enhancements of 150% and 200% are achieved for the optimized single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids and double (top and bottom) perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, respectively.

  2. Universal nature of collective plasmonic excitations in finite 1-D carbon-based nanostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polizzi, Eric

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tomonaga-Luttinger (T-L) theory predicts collective plasmon resonances in 1-D nanostructure conductors of finite length, that vary roughly in inverse proportion to the length of the structure. Yet, such resonances have not been clearly identified in experiments so far. Here we provide evidence of the T-L plasmon resonances using first-principle computational real-time spectroscopy studies of representative finite 1-D carbon-based nanostructures ranging from atom and benzene-like chain structures to short carbon nanotubes. Our all-electron Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory (TDDFT) real-time simulation framework is capable to accurately capture the relevant nanoscopic effects including correct frequencies for known optical transitions, and various collective plasmon excitations. The presence of 1-D T-L plasmons is universally predicted by the various numerical experiments, which also demonstrate a phenomenon of resonance splitting. Extending these simulations to longer structures will allow the accurate ...

  3. Standard 1D solar atmosphere as initial condition for MHD simulations and switch-on effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourdin, Philippe-A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many applications in Solar physics need a 1D atmospheric model as initial condition or as reference for inversions of observational data. The VAL atmospheric models are based on observations and are widely used since decades. Complementary to that, the FAL models implement radiative hydrodynamics and showed the shortcomings of the VAL models since almost equally long time. In this work, we present a new 1D layered atmosphere that spans not only from the photosphere to the transition region, but from the solar interior up to far in the corona. We also discuss typical mistakes that are done when switching on simulations based on such an initial condition and show how the initial condition can be equilibrated so that a simulation can start smoothly. The 1D atmosphere we present here served well as initial condition for HD and MHD simulations and should also be considered as reference data for solving inverse problems.

  4. Supplemental material to the manuscript "Bond breaking and bond making: how electron correlation is captured in many-body

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . From Eq. (7), one gets - d d lnG-1 = - d d ln G-1 s - - v ext - vH + vs = G d d + d d v ext + VH(r)vext(r) + EH[G] + [G] - Tr [G] - 1 0 dTr d d lnG-1 + G d d v ext + GVH =Ts + drn(r)vext(r) - EH[G] + [G] - Tr

  5. Transition from ultrafast laser photo-electron emission to space charge limited current in a 1D gap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yangjie Liu; L. K. Ang

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A one-dimensional (1D) model has been constructed to study the transition of the time-dependent ultrafast laser photo-electron emission from a flat metallic surface to the space charge limited (SCL) current, including the effect of non-equilibrium laser heating on metals at the ultrafast time scale. At a high laser field, it is found that the space charge effect cannot be ignored and the SCL current emission is reached at a lower value predicted by a short pulse SCL current model that assumed a time-independent emission process. The threshold of the laser field to reach the SCL regime is determined over a wide range of operating parameters. The calculated results agree well with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. It is found that the space charge effect is more important for materials with lower work function like tungsten (4.4 eV) as compared to gold (5.4 eV). However for a flat surface, both materials will reach the space charge limited regime at the sufficiently high laser field such as $>$ 5 GV/m with a laser pulse length of tens to one hundred femtoseconds.

  6. Fluid-Insulator transitions in a system of interacting Bose gas in 1D disordered lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Fluid-Insulator transitions in a system of interacting Bose gas in 1D disordered lattices insulator, Ander In this seminar, I shall discuss about our recent experimental results where we investigate strengths for which such critical momentum vanishes separating a fluid regime from an insulating one

  7. 1D AND 3D SYSTEMS IN MACHINE AUTOMATION Dr.-Ing. Werner Stempfhuber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1D AND 3D SYSTEMS IN MACHINE AUTOMATION Dr.-Ing. Werner Stempfhuber Leica Geosystems AG Heerbrugg with "stringless technology". Today there is a large range of potential markets for new machine automation, mining and agricultural industries. The use of machine automation in these applications will alter

  8. Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation in a 1D Numerical Model Used for Fog Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Ensemble Kalman Filter Data Assimilation in a 1D Numerical Model Used for Fog Forecasting SAMUEL RE significant. This led to the implementation of an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) within COBEL-ISBA. The new by using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF; Evensen 1994, 2003). Theoreti- cally, ensemble filters

  9. Analytical study of the propagation of acoustic waves in a 1D weakly disordered lattice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analytical study of the propagation of acoustic waves in a 1D weakly disordered lattice O. Richoux of the propagation of an acoustic wave through a normally distributed disordered lattice made up of Helmholtz propagation in random media, waveguide, scattering of acoustic waves. PACS 11.80.La ; 42.25.Dd ; 43.20.Mv ; 43

  10. Interweaving 3D Network with Double Helical Tubes Filled by 1D Coordination Polymer Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Song

    Interweaving 3D Network with Double Helical Tubes Filled by 1D Coordination Polymer Chains E Yang- tecture interpenetrated by three types of coordination polymer motifs. Two independent {[Cu2(mellitate)(4,4-bpy)(H2O)2]2- } 3D polymers incorporating helical substructures were interwoven into a 3D network

  11. Control oriented 1D electrochemical model of lithium ion battery Kandler A. Smith a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Control oriented 1D electrochemical model of lithium ion battery Kandler A. Smith a , Christopher D Available online 28 June 2007 Abstract Lithium ion (Li-ion) batteries provide high energy and power density dynamics (i.e. state of charge). Ó 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Lithium ion battery

  12. You are here: Home / News / 3D view of 1D nanostructures More services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    properties The nanowire battery Hybrid energy storage device is as small as it can possibly get ResearchersYou are here: Home / News / 3D view of 1D nanostructures Share More services Related LinksD nanostructures 09 January 2012 Nanowires show strong piezoelectricity Just 100 nanometers

  13. A FREEWARE 1D EMITTER MODEL FOR SILICON SOLAR CELLS Keith R. McIntosh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Centre for Sustainable Energy Systems, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200, AUSTRALIA 2 Leibniz University of Hannover, Inst. of Solid-State Physics, Dep. Solar Energy, Appelstrasse 2, 30167A FREEWARE 1D EMITTER MODEL FOR SILICON SOLAR CELLS Keith R. McIntosh 1 and Pietro P. Altermatt 2 1

  14. Definition RX Evaluate Kernels K-2d K-1d Change By definition undefined

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theiler, James

    Definition RX Evaluate Kernels K-2d K-1d Change By def·i·ni·tion undefined Adventures in anomaly Alamos National Laboratory Research supported by the United States Department of Energy through the Los Alamos Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. #12;Theiler LA-UR-14-24429 Definition

  15. A macroscopic 1D model for shape memory alloys including asymmetric behaviors and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanelli, Ulisse

    A macroscopic 1D model for shape memory alloys including asymmetric behaviors and transformation behavior of shape memory alloys (SMAs) has been widely growing in last years because of the in- creasing reproduce main macroscopic SMA behaviors (i.e., superelasticity and shape-memory effect), with- out however

  16. Feb15 2000 1 D.Jassby ELECTRICAL ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATW AND FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feb­15 2000 1 D.Jassby ELECTRICAL ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATW AND FUSION NEUTRONS by D.L. JASSBY the electrical energy requirements of accelerator (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides must utilize one blanket neutron for tritium breeding. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have

  17. Feb-15 2000 1 D.Jassby ELECTRICAL ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATW AND FUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feb-15 2000 1 D.Jassby ELECTRICAL ENERGY REQUIREMENTS FOR ATW AND FUSION NEUTRONS by D.L. JASSBY the electrical energy requirements of accelerator (ATW) and fusion plants designed to transmute nuclides must utilize one blanket neutron for tritium breeding. The ATW and fusion plants are found to have

  18. Local Limit Theorems for Random Walks in a 1D Random Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolgopyat, Dmitry

    Local Limit Theorems for Random Walks in a 1D Random Environment D. Dolgopyat and I. Goldsheid Abstract. We consider random walks (RW) in a one-dimensional i.i.d. random environment with jumps to the nearest neighbours. For almost all environments, we prove a quenched Local Limit Theorem (LLT

  19. The 1D Iterative Model for Predicting Thermal Radiation from a Jet Fire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    manuscript, published in "6. International Seminar on Fire and Explosion Hazards (FEH), Leeds : UnitedThe 1D Iterative Model for Predicting Thermal Radiation from a Jet Fire Leroy, G.* and Duplantier of the current jet fire models used in the accidental fire risks department are semi- empirical. They depend

  20. 1D Camera Geometry and Its Application to Circular Motion Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Kenneth K.Y.

    and Kwan-Yee K. Wong Department of Computer Science, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, China {gqzhang work has been done to solve the structure and motion problem for both calibrated and uncalibrated 1D under planar motion to the trifocal line images and derived a simple solution for self-calibration [5

  1. Light Transport in Cold Atoms and Thermal Decoherence G. Labeyrie,1,* D. Delande,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Light Transport in Cold Atoms and Thermal Decoherence G. Labeyrie,1,* D. Delande,2 R. Kaiser,1 experimentally and theoretically how coherent transport of light inside a cold atomic vapor is affected motivated by astrophysical purposes, wave transport in opaque media was first analyzed by means

  2. 1D Vehicle Scheduling with Conflicts Torsten J. Gellert Felix G. K onig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    1D Vehicle Scheduling with Conflicts Torsten J. Gellert Felix G. KË? onig Technische Universit,fkoenig}@math.tu­berlin.de Preprint 2010/22 October 5, 2010 Abstract Systems of rail­mounted vehicles play a key role in many to the vehicles of such systems and scheduling their execution amounts to finding k tours on a common line, where

  3. 1D Vehicle Scheduling with Conflicts Torsten J. Gellert Felix G. Konig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    1D Vehicle Scheduling with Conflicts Torsten J. Gellert Felix G. K¨onig Technische Universit,fkoenig}@math.tu-berlin.de Preprint 2010/22 October 5, 2010 Abstract Systems of rail-mounted vehicles play a key role in many to the vehicles of such systems and scheduling their execution amounts to finding k tours on a common line, where

  4. MR-Trackable Intramyocardial Injection Catheter P.V. Karmarkar,1* D.L. Kraitchman,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atalar, Ergin

    MR-Trackable Intramyocardial Injection Catheter P.V. Karmarkar,1* D.L. Kraitchman,1 I. Izbudak,1 L.V. Hofmann,1 L.C. Amado,2 D. Fritzges,1 R. Young,3 M. Pittenger,3 J.W.M. Bulte,1 and E. Atalar1 ventricular remodeling. MRI can be effectively used to differentiate in- farcted from healthy myocardium. MR

  5. Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets C. K. Li,1,* D. D. Ryutov,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structure and Dynamics of Colliding Plasma Jets C. K. Li,1,* D. D. Ryutov,2 S. X. Hu,3 M. J at various angles shed light on the structures and dynamics of these collisions. The observations compare noncollinear jets, the observed flow structure is similar to the analytic model's prediction of a character

  6. Chronotopic Lyapunov analysis. I. A detailed characterization of 1D systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepri, S. [Universita di Bologna (Italy); Politi, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Firenze (Italy); Torcini, A. [Bergische Universitaet-Gesamthochshule Wuppertal (Germany)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instabilities in 1D spatially extended systems are studied with the aid of both temporal and spatial Lyapunov exponents. A suitable representation of the spectra allows a compact description of all the possible disturbances in tangent space. The analysis is carried out for chaotic and periodic spatiotemporal patterns. Singularities of the spectra and localization properties of the associated Lyapunov vectors are discussed.

  7. Covetic Materials

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Can re-melt, dilute, alloy... Fabrication of Covetic Materials - Nanocarbon Infusion 3 4 Technical Approach Unusual Characteristics of Covetic Materials ("covalent" &...

  8. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  9. Some open questions in the physics of quasi-1D systems: an experimental view

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud 11, Université de

    thermal broadening) #12;ORGANIC CHARGE TRANSFERT SALTS 1D 2 bands crossing at EF 2kF(A)= 2kF(D) Only the PLD modulates the inter-site (bond) distance one has a 2kF bond order wave (BOW) * not always the case if 2kF=1/2: the BOW and CDW can be decoupled a*/2 BOW: (CH)x : =­=­=­ all the C atoms have the same

  10. Software Quality Assurance Guide for Use with DOE O 414.1D, Quality Assurance

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The revision to DOE G 414.1-4 will conform to the revised DOE O 414.1D and incorporate new information and lessons learned since 2005, including information gained as a result of the February 2011, Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, GAO-11-143 NUCLEAR WASTE: DOE Needs a Comprehensive Strategy and Guidance on Computer Models that Support Environmental Cleanup Decisions.

  11. SOFTWARE DE GERAO DE MAPAS SOLARES 1D DO BRAZILIAN DECIMETRIC ARRAY BDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cachoeira Paulista em 2004, com 5 antenas de 4 metros de diâmetro, gerando dados de rádio interferometria desenvolvimento um software para gerar mapas de temperatura de brilho do Sol em 1 dimensão (1D) com os dados do largura de cada linha de base durante as observações e realiza uma comparação com medidas anteriores a fim

  12. Study of phase transformation and crystal structure for 1D carbon-modified titania ribbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Lihui, E-mail: lhzhou@ecust.edu.cn; Zhang, Fang; Li, Jinxia

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One-dimensional hydrogen titanate ribbons were successfully prepared with hydrothermal reaction in a highly basic solution. A series of one-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons were prepared via calcination of the mixture of hydrogen titanate ribbons and sucrose solution under N{sub 2} flow at different temperatures. The phase transformation process of hydrogen titanate ribbons was investigated by in-situ X-ray diffraction at various temperatures. Besides, one-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons calcined at different temperatures were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption isotherms, diffuse reflectance ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and so on. Carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons showed one-dimensional ribbon crystal structure and various crystal phases of TiO{sub 2}. After being modified with carbon, a layer of uniform carbon film was coated on the surface of TiO{sub 2} ribbons, which improved their adsorption capacity for methyl orange as a model organic pollutant. One-dimensional carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons also exhibited enhanced visible-light absorbance with the increase of calcination temperatures. - Highlights: • The synthesis of 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons. • The phase transformation of 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} ribbons. • 1D carbon-modified TiO{sub 2} exhibites enhanced visible-light absorbance.

  13. Reconstruction of 1-D conductivity from dual-loop EM data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Routh, P.S.; Oldenburg, D.W.; Alumbaugh, D.L.; Newman, G.A.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inversions of electromagnetic data from different coil configurations provide independent information about geological structures. The authors develop a 1-D inversion algorithm that can invert data from the horizontal coplanar (HC), vertical coplanar, coaxial (CA), and perpendicular coil configurations separately or jointly. The inverse problem is solved by minimizing a model objective function subject to data constraints. Tests using synthetic data from 1-D models indicate that if data are collected at a sufficient number of frequencies, then the recovered models from individual inversions of different coil systems can be quite similar. However, it only a limited number of frequencies are available, then joint inversion of data from different coils produces a better model than the individual inversions. Tests on 3-D synthetic data sets indicate that 1-D inversions can be used as a fast and approximate tool to locate anomalies in the subsurface. Also for the test example presented here, the joint inversion of HC and CA data over a 3-D conductivity provided a better model than that produced by the individual inversion of the data sets.

  14. Neutronic analysis of the 1D and 1E banks reflux detection system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Two H Canyon neutron monitoring systems for early detection of postulated abnormal reflux conditions in the Second Uranium Cycle 1E and 1D Mixer-Settle Banks have been designed and built. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulations using the general purpose, general geometry, n-particle MCNP code have been performed to model expected response of the monitoring systems to varying conditions.The confirmatory studies documented herein conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to achieve adequate neutron count rates for various neutron source and detector configurations, thereby eliminating excessive integration count time. Neutron count rate sensitivity studies are also performed. Conversely, the transport studies concluded that the neutron count rates are statistically insensitive to nitric acid content in the aqueous region and to the transition region length. These studies conclude that the 1E and 1D neutron monitoring systems are able to predict the postulated reflux conditions for all examined perturbations in the neutron source and detector configurations. In the cases examined, the relative change in the neutron count rates due to postulated transitions from normal {sup 235}U concentration levels to reflux levels remain satisfactory detectable.

  15. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.R. Maskaly

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with increasing RMS roughness. Again, the homogenization approximation is able to predict these results. The problem of surface scratches on 1D photonic crystals is also addressed. Although the reflectivity decreases are lower in this study, up to a 15% change in reflectivity is observed in certain scratched photonic crystal structures. However, this reflectivity change can be significantly decreased by adding a low index protective coating to the surface of the photonic crystal. Again, application of homogenization theory to these structures confirms its predictive power for this type of imperfection as well. Additionally, the problem of a circular pores in 2D photonic crystals is investigated, showing that almost a 50% change in reflectivity can occur for some structures. Furthermore, this study reveals trends that are consistent with the 1D simulations: parameter changes that increase the absolute reflectivity of the photonic crystal will also increase its tolerance to structural imperfections. Finally, experimental reflectance spectra from roughened 1D photonic crystals are compared to the results predicted computationally in this thesis. Both the computed and experimental spectra correlate favorably, validating the findings presented herein.

  16. Lysophospholipid presentation by CD1d and recognition by a human Natural Killer T-cell receptor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Sagaseta, Jacinto; Sibener, Leah V.; Kung, Jennifer E.; Gumperz, Jenny; Adams, Erin J. (UC); (UW-MED)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells use highly restricted {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) to probe the repertoire of lipids presented by CD1d molecules. Here, we describe our studies of lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) presentation by human CD1d and its recognition by a native, LPC-specific iNKT TCR. Human CD1d presenting LPC adopts an altered conformation from that of CD1d presenting glycolipid antigens, with a shifted {alpha}1 helix resulting in an open A pocket. Binding of the iNKT TCR requires a 7-{angstrom} displacement of the LPC headgroup but stabilizes the CD1d-LPC complex in a closed conformation. The iNKT TCR CDR loop footprint on CD1d-LPC is anchored by the conserved positioning of the CDR3{alpha} loop, whereas the remaining CDR loops are shifted, due in part to amino-acid differences in the CDR3{beta} and J{beta} segment used by this iNKT TCR. These findings provide insight into how lysophospholipids are presented by human CD1d molecules and how this complex is recognized by some, but not all, human iNKT cells.

  17. Dynamic regime of conduction in a 1D system with a single impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shapiro, D. S., E-mail: shapiro@ire.cplire.ru; Artemenko, S. N., E-mail: art@ire.cplire.ru; Remizov, S. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kotel'nikov Institute of Radio Engineering and Electronics (Russian Federation)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new regime of electron transport through an impurity in 1D conductors, which resembles the Josephson effect in its manifestations, is predicted. Passage of current through the impurity under voltages above the threshold value is accompanied with generation of ac current oscillations. The temperature below which the effect can be observed, the threshold voltage, and the frequency range are determined by the impurity potential and the strength of electron-electron interaction. The generation line width and the current-voltage characteristics are determined.

  18. DOE Order Self Study Modules - DOE O 414.1D Quality Assurance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout »Department of2 DOE FitsEnergyMessagein Alaska14.1D QUALITY

  19. THE GENESIS SOLAR-WIND COLLECTOR MATERIALS A. J. G. Jurewicz1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE GENESIS SOLAR-WIND COLLECTOR MATERIALS A. J. G. Jurewicz1 , D. S. Burnett2 , R. C. Wiens3 , T. #12;THE GENESIS SOLAR-WIND COLLECTOR MATERIALS Abstract. Genesis (NASA Discovery Mission #5) is a sample return mission. Collectors comprised of ultra-high purity materials will be exposed to the solar

  20. DISCOLORATION OF THE WETTED SURFACE IN THE 6.1D DISSOLVER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudisill, T.; Mickalonis, J.; Crapse, K.

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    During a camera inspection of a failed coil in the 6.1D dissolver, an orange discoloration was observed on a portion of the dissolver wall and coils. At the request of H-Canyon Engineering, the inspection video of the dissolver was reviewed by SRNL to assess if the observed condition (a non-uniform, orange-colored substance on internal surfaces) was a result of corrosion. Although the dissolver vessel and coil corrode during dissolution operations, the high acid conditions are not consistent with the formation of ferrous oxides (i.e., orange/rust-colored corrosion products). In a subsequent investigation, SRNL performed dissolution experiments to determine if residues from the nylon bags used for Pu containment could have generated the orange discoloration following dissolution. When small pieces of a nylon bag were placed in boiling 8 M nitric acid solutions containing other components representative of the H-Canyon process, complete dissolution occurred almost immediately. No residues were obtained even when a nylon mass to volume ratio greater than 100 times the 6.1D dissolver value was used. Degradation products from the dissolution of nylon bags are not responsible for the discoloration observed in the dissolver.

  1. Analytical solutions for quantum walks on 1D chain with different shift operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xin-Ping, E-mail: xuxp@mail.ihep.ac.cn [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Xiao-Kun [School of Physical Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Ide, Yusuke [Department of Information Systems Creation, Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8686 (Japan); Konno, Norio [Department of Applied Mathematics, Faculty of Engineering, Yokohama National University, Hodogaya, Yokohama 240-8501 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the discrete-time quantum walks on 1D Chain with the moving and swapping shift operators. We derive analytical solutions for the eigenvalues and eigenstates of the evolution operator U{sup -hat} using the Chebyshev polynomial technique, and calculate the long-time averaged probabilities for the two different shift operators respectively. It is found that the probability distributions for the moving and swapping shift operators display completely different characteristics. For the moving shift operator, the probability distribution exhibits high symmetry where the probabilities at mirror positions are equal. The probabilities are inversely proportional to the system size N and approach to zero as N??. On the contrary, for the swapping shift operator, the probability distribution is not symmetric, the probability distribution approaches to a power-law stationary distribution as N?? under certain coin parameter condition. We show that such power-law stationary distribution is determined by the eigenstates of the eigenvalues ±1 and calculate the intrinsic probability for different starting positions. Our findings suggest that the eigenstates corresponding to eigenvalues ±1 play an important role for the swapping shift operator. - Highlights: • QWs on 1D chain with the moving and swapping operators are studied for the first time. • We derive analytical results for the probability distribution for the two operators. •We compare the dynamics of QWs with two different shift operators. • We find the particular eigenvalues ±1 play an important role for the dynamics. • We use the Chebyshev technique to treat the problem.

  2. A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new “2D/1D” approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

  3. The Hanle Effect in 1D, 2D and 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Manso Sainz; J. Trujillo Bueno

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses the problem of scattering line polarization and the Hanle effect in one-dimensional (1D), two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) media for the case of a two-level model atom without lower-level polarization and assuming complete frequency redistribution. The theoretical framework chosen for its formulation is the QED theory of Landi Degl'Innocenti (1983), which specifies the excitation state of the atoms in terms of the irreducible tensor components of the atomic density matrix. The self-consistent values of these density-matrix elements is to be determined by solving jointly the kinetic and radiative transfer equations for the Stokes parameters. We show how to achieve this by generalizing to Non-LTE polarization transfer the Jacobi-based ALI method of Olson et al. (1986) and the iterative schemes based on Gauss-Seidel iteration of Trujillo Bueno and Fabiani Bendicho (1995). These methods essentially maintain the simplicity of the Lambda-iteration method, but their convergence rate is extremely high. Finally, some 1D and 2D model calculations are presented that illustrate the effect of horizontal atmospheric inhomogeneities on magnetic and non-magnetic resonance line polarization signals.

  4. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  5. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  6. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  7. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  8. U-152: OpenSSL "asn1_d2i_read_bio()" DER Format Data Processing Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The vulnerability is caused due to a type casting error in the "asn1_d2i_read_bio()" function when processing DER format data and can be exploited to cause a heap-based buffer overflow.

  9. A crossed molecular beam study of the O(/sup 1/D/sub 2/)+CH/sub 4/ reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casavecchia, P.; Buss, R.J.; Sibener, S.J.; Lee, Y.T.

    1980-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A cross molecular beam experiment was performed to study the O(/sup 1/D/sub 2/)+CH/sub 4/ reaction. The results show that hydrogen atom elimination reaction greatly exceeds molecular hydrogen elimination. (AIP)

  10. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

  11. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  12. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  13. Optimal modeling of 1D azimuth correlations in the context of Bayesian inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Kock, Michiel B; Trainor, Thomas A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis and interpretation of spectrum and correlation data from high-energy nuclear collisions is currently controversial because two opposing physics narratives derive contradictory implications from the same data-one narrative claiming collision dynamics is dominated by dijet production and projectile-nucleon fragmentation, the other claiming collision dynamics is dominated by a dense, flowing QCD medium. Opposing interpretations seem to be supported by alternative data models, and current model-comparison schemes are unable to distinguish between them. There is clearly need for a convincing new methodology to break the deadlock. In this study we introduce Bayesian Inference (BI) methods applied to angular correlation data as a basis to evaluate competing data models. For simplicity the data considered are projections of 2D angular correlations onto 1D azimuth from three centrality classes of 200 GeV Au-Au collisions. We consider several data models typical of current model choices, including Fourier seri...

  14. Toward a consistent use of overshooting parametrizations in 1D stellar evolution codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viallet, Maxime; Prat, Vincent; Arnett, David

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several parametrizations for overshooting in 1D stellar evolution calculations coexist in the literature. These parametrizations are used somewhat arbitrarily in stellar evolution codes, based on what works best for a given problem, or even for historical reasons related to the development of each code. We bring attention to the fact that these different parametrizations correspond to different physical regimes of overshooting, depending whether the effects of radiation are dominant, marginal, or negligible. Our analysis is based on previously published theoretical results, as well as multidimensional hydrodynamical simulations of stellar convection where the interaction between the convective region and a stably-stratified region is observed. Although the underlying hydrodynamical processes are the same, the outcome of the overshooting process is profoundly affected by radiative effects. Using a simple picture of the scales involved in the overshooting process, we show how three regimes are obtained, dependi...

  15. Material Symbols 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the relation between the material, conventional symbol structures that we encounter in the spoken and written word, and human thought? A common assumption, that structures a wide variety of otherwise competing ...

  16. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  17. 1-D closure models for slender 3-D viscoelastic free jets: von Karman flow geometry and elliptical cross section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel, S.E.; Forest, M.G.; Holm, D.D.; Lin, K.J.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we derive one space dimensional, reduced systems of equations (1-D closure models) for viscoelastic free jets. We begin with the three-dimensional system of conservation laws and a Maxwell-Jeffreys constitutive law for an incompressible viscoelastic fluid. First, we exhibit exact truncations to a finite, closed system of 1-D equations based on classical velocity assumptions of von Karman. Next, we demonstrate that the 3-D free surface boundary conditions overconstrain these truncated systems, so that only a very limited class of solutions exist. We then proceed to derive approximate 1-D closure theories through a slender jet asymptotic scaling, combined with appropriate definitions of velocity, pressure and stress unknowns. Our nonaxisymmetric 1-D slender jet models incorporate the physical effects of inertia, viscoelasticity (viscosity, relaxation and retardation), gravity, surface tension, and properties of the ambient fluid, and include shear stresses and time dependence. Previous special 1-D slender jet models correspond to the lowest order equations in the present asymptotic theory by an a posteriori suppression to leading order of some of these effects, and a reduction to axisymmetry. Solutions of the lowest order system of equations in this asymptotic analysis are presented: For the special cases of elliptical inviscid and Newtonian free jets, subject to the effects of surface tension and gravity, our model predicts oscillation of the major axis of the free surface elliptical cross section between perpendicular directions with distance down the jet, and drawdown of the cross section, in agreement with observed behavior. 15 refs.

  18. Coccinelle 1D: A one-dimensional neutron kinetic code using time-step size control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engrand, P.R.; Effantin, M.E.; Gherchanoc, J. [Electricite de France, Clamart (France); Larive, B. [Electricite de France, Villeurbanne (France)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    COCCINELLE 1D is a one-dimensional neutron kinetic code that has been adapted from Electricite de France (EDF)`s core design code : COCCINELLE. The aim of this work is to integrate a code, derived from COCCINELLE and therefore taking advantage of most of its developments, into EDF`s Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) simulation tools. The neutronic model of COCCINELLE ID has been optimized so that the code executes as rapidly as possible. In particular, a fast and stable kinetic method has been implemented: the Generalized Runge-Kutta (GRK) method together with its associated time-step size control. Moreover, efforts have been made to structure the code such that it could be easily integrated into any PWR simulation tool. Results show that the code executes at a rate faster than real-time on several test cases, and that, once integrated in a PWR simulation tool, the system is in good agreement with an experimental transient, that is a 3-hour load follow transient.

  19. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  20. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMARSecurityMaterials Science Materials

  1. Coherent Atom Optics With Fast Metastable Beams: Metastable Helium Diffraction By 1D and 2D Magnetized Reflection Gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grucker, J.; Baudon, J.; Karam, J.-C.; Perales, F.; Ducloy, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, UMR-CNRS 7538, Universite Paris 13, 99, Avenue J.B. Clement, 93430-Villetaneuse (France); Bocvarski, V. [Institute of Physics, Pregrevica 118, 11080 - Belgrade-Zemun (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    1D and 2D reflection gratings (Permalloy stripes or dots deposited on silicon), immersed in an external homogeneous static magnetic field, are used to study 1D and 2D diffraction of fast metastable helium atoms He* (23S1). Both the grazing incidence used here and the repulsive potential (for sub-level m = -1) generated by the magnetisation reduce the quenching effect. This periodically structured potential is responsible for the diffraction in the incidence plane as well as for the diffraction in the perpendicular plane.

  2. Efficient numerical schemes for viscoplastic avalanches. Part 1: The 1D case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernández-Nieto, Enrique D., E-mail: edofer@us.es [Departamento de Matemática Aplicada I, Universidad de Sevilla, E.T.S. Arquitectura, Avda, Reina Mercedes, s/n, 41012 Sevilla (Spain); Gallardo, José M., E-mail: jmgallardo@uma.es [Departamento de Análisis Matemático, Universidad de Málaga, F. Ciencias, Campus Teatinos S/N (Spain); Vigneaux, Paul, E-mail: Paul.Vigneaux@math.cnrs.fr [Unitée de Mathématiques Pures et Appliquées, Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 allée d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the numerical resolution of a shallow water viscoplastic flow model. Viscoplastic materials are characterized by the existence of a yield stress: below a certain critical threshold in the imposed stress, there is no deformation and the material behaves like a rigid solid, but when that yield value is exceeded, the material flows like a fluid. In the context of avalanches, it means that after going down a slope, the material can stop and its free surface has a non-trivial shape, as opposed to the case of water (Newtonian fluid). The model involves variational inequalities associated with the yield threshold: finite-volume schemes are used together with duality methods (namely Augmented Lagrangian and Bermúdez–Moreno) to discretize the problem. To be able to accurately simulate the stopping behavior of the avalanche, new schemes need to be designed, involving the classical notion of well-balancing. In the present context, it needs to be extended to take into account the viscoplastic nature of the material as well as general bottoms with wet/dry fronts which are encountered in geophysical geometries. We derived such schemes and numerical experiments are presented to show their performances.

  3. Materials compatibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives are to enable development and implementation of codes and standards for H{sub 2} containment components: (1) Evaluate data on mechanical properties of materials in H{sub 2} gas - Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials; (2) Generate new benchmark data on high-priority materials - Pressure vessel steels, stainless steels; and (3) Establish procedures for reliable materials testing - Sustained-load cracking, fatigue crack propagation. Summary of this presentation are: (1) Completed measurement of cracking thresholds (K{sub TH}) for Ni-Cr-Mo pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - K{sub TH} measurements required in ASME Article KD-10 (2) Crack arrest test methods appear to yield non-conservative results compared to crack initiation test methods - (a) Proposal to insert crack initiation test methods in Article KD-10 will be presented to ASME Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks, and (b) Crack initiation methods require test apparatus designed for dynamic loading of specimens in H{sub 2} gas; and (3) Demonstrated ability to measure fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - (a) Fatigue crack growth data in H{sub 2} required in ASME Article KD-10, and (b) Test apparatus is one of few in U.S. or abroad for measuring fatigue crack growth in >100 MPa H{sub 2} gas.

  4. Inclusion of a Drag Approach in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) Scheme: Offline 1D Evaluation in a Street Canyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    Inclusion of a Drag Approach in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) Scheme: Offline 1D Evaluation 2008) ABSTRACT The Town Energy Balance module bridges the micro- and mesoscale and simulates local-scale urban surface energy balance for use in mesoscale meteorological models. Previous offline evaluations

  5. Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Thermodynamics of Potassium Exchange in Soil Using a Kinetics Approach1 D. L. SPARKS AND P. M. JARDINEZ ABSTRACT Thermodynamics of potassium (K) exchange using a kinetics ap- proach was investigated that more energy was needed to desorb K than to adsorb K. Thermodynamic and pseudother- modynamic parameters

  6. The Anisotropic Multifractal Model and Wind Turbine Wakes G. Fitton1, I. Tchiguirinskaia1, D. Schertzer1 & S. Lovejoy2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Anisotropic Multifractal Model and Wind Turbine Wakes G. Fitton1, I. Tchiguirinskaia1, D. Figure 1: Schematic of turbine positions and wake effect due to North-Westerly winds (map courtesy on a mast in a wind farm test site subject to wake turbulence effects (see Fig. 1). The quality of the data

  7. Enhanced Features for Design of Traveling Wave Tubes Using CHRISTINE-1D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These devices are critical for radar, communications and electronic warfare missions in the military, as well. They are critical for radar, communications and electronic warfare missions of all Armed Services, as well, and materials processing. The TWT amplifies by converting the kinetic energy of an electron beam

  8. Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Materials & Processes Overview Atmospheric Aerosol Systems Biosystem Dynamics & Design Energy Materials & Processes Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Energy Materials &...

  9. Alloy materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo (Westborough, MA); Thompson, Elliott D. (Coventry, RI); Fritzemeier, Leslie G. (Acton, MA); Cameron, Robert D. (Franklin, MA); Siegal, Edward J. (Malden, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  10. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  11. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The EnergyCenter (LMI-EFRC) -PublicationsMaterials Science

  12. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | National NuclearMaterial Misfits

  13. Thermal imaging analysis of material structures and defects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, J. G.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical one-dimensional (1D) heat-transfer model was developed to simulate the surface temperature response under one-sided pulsed thermal imaging for plate samples with internal material variations including different optical and thermal properties, multilayer structures, and defect distributions (delaminations). The simulation results showed the complexity and subtle differences of the thermal imaging response to the material variations. With further development in data processing technologies, it is expected that thermal imaging may be used to detect and predict these material property variations.

  14. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  15. C:\DOCUME~1\d3k776\LOCALS~1\TEM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r k C o . C l a r k

  16. Materials Characterization | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMAR Os2010Material Safety Electron

  17. Final LDRD report : the physics of 1D and 2D electron gases in III-nitride heterostructure NWs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Andrew M.; Arslan, Ilke (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Upadhya, Prashanth C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Morales, Eugenia T. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Leonard, Francois Leonard (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Li, Qiming; Wang, George T.; Talin, Albert Alec (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Prasankumar, Rohit P. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lin, Yong

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed work seeks to demonstrate and understand new phenomena in novel, freestanding III-nitride core-shell nanowires, including 1D and 2D electron gas formation and properties, and to investigate the role of surfaces and heterointerfaces on the transport and optical properties of nanowires, using a combined experimental and theoretical approach. Obtaining an understanding of these phenomena will be a critical step that will allow development of novel, ultrafast and ultraefficient nanowire-based electronic and photonic devices.

  18. Critical Materials Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  19. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  20. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  1. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  2. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  3. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  4. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

  5. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  6. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  7. Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at...

  8. The Neural Basis of Financial Risk-Taking* Supplementary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knutson, Brian

    1 The Neural Basis of Financial Risk-Taking* Supplementary Material Camelia M. Kuhnen1 and Brian in each block, a rational risk-neutral agent should pick stock i if he/she expects to receive a dividend D is the information set up to trial -1. That is: I-1 ={D i t| t-1, i{Stock T, Stock R, Bond C}}. Let x i = Pr{ Stock

  9. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand (MIT); Persson, Kristin (LBNL)

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  10. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL NOTICE OF DESIGNATED DEPARTMENTAL OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS 1. Include a copy of any relevant documents. 2. Item MATERIALS COORDINATOR ­ IC-8 Mail, Fax or PDF the entire package to: MC 2010 Fax: 679-4240 REFERENCE # DMC

  11. The effect of magnetic field on bistability in 1D photonic crystal doped by magnetized plasma and coupled nonlinear defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdian, H.; Mohammadzahery, Z.; Hasanbeigi, A. [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics and Institute for Plasma Research, Kharazmi University, 49 Dr Mofatteh Avenue, Tehran 15614 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study the defect mode and bistability behavior of 1-D photonic band gap structure with magnetized plasma and coupled nonlinear defects. The transfer matrix method has been employed to investigate the magnetic field effect on defect mode frequency and bistability threshold. The obtained results show that the frequency of defect mode and bistability threshold can be altered, without changing the structure of the photonic multilayer. Therefore, the bistability behavior of the subjected structure in the presence of magnetized plasma can be utilized in manufacturing wide frequency range devices.

  12. A One-Dimensional (1-D) Three-Region Model for a Bubbling Fluidized-Bed Adsorber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Andrew; Miller, David C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general one-dimensional (1-D), three-region model for a bubbling fluidized-bed adsorber with internal heat exchangers has been developed. The model can predict the hydrodynamics of the bed and provides axial profiles for all temperatures, concentrations, and velocities. The model is computationally fast and flexible and allows for any system of adsorption and desorption reactions to be modeled, making the model applicable to any adsorption process. The model has been implemented in both gPROMS and Aspen Custom Modeler, and the behavior of the model has been verified.

  13. DREDGED MATERIAL EVALUATION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DREDGED MATERIAL EVALUATION AND DISPOSAL PROCEDURES (USERS' MANUAL) Dredged Material Management 2009) Prepared by: Dredged Material Management Office US Army Corps of Engineers Seattle District #12........................................................................................2-1 2.2 The Dredged Material Evaluation Process

  14. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  15. Relationship of Ammonium Nitrogen Distribution to Mineralogy in a Hapludalf Soil1 D. L. SPARKS, R. L. BLEVINS, H. H. BAILEY, AND R. I. BARNHISELZ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Relationship of Ammonium Nitrogen Distribution to Mineralogy in a Hapludalf Soil1 D. L. SPARKS, R to the soil. Additional Index Words: silt mineralogy, clay mineralogy, exchangeable ammonium. Sparks, D. L., R

  16. Data:2ed1dd65-5ac0-4cfc-bc71-1d83e289685f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1-1d83e289685f No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Loading... 1. Basic Information...

  17. Simplified 1-D Hydrodynamic and Salinity Transport Modeling of the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversion Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleenor, William E.; Bombardelli, Fabian

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    salinity simulations of sea level rise scenarios. AppendixSan Joaquin Delta: Sea Level Rise and Water Diversiona 1-D model of sea level rise in an estuary must account for

  18. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  19. D6 Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 160 (1) D6-D9 (2013) 0013-4651/2013/160(1)/D6/4/$28.00 The Electrochemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electrochemical properties of the coatings is studied. The electrochemical activity of the material is found current values, marked amounts of lithium charge are observed to interchange with the material owing- calation process. Consequently, a large surface area, providing for ease of interaction

  20. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reisslein, Martin

    Materials Science & Engineering The development of new high-performance materials for energy Research in Niskayuna, NY. He received his BS and PhD in Materials Science and Engineering at MIT. For 22 and composition of materials at higher spatial resolution, with greater efficiency, and on real materials

  1. Emulating quantum state transfer through a spin-1 chain on a 1D lattice of superconducting qutrits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joydip Ghosh

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Spin-1 systems, in comparison to spin-1/2 systems, offer a better security for encoding and transfer of quantum information, primarily due to their larger Hilbert spaces. Superconducting artificial atoms possess multiple energy-levels, thereby capable of emulating higher-spin systems. Here we consider a 1D lattice of nearest-neighbor-coupled superconducting transmon systems, and devise a scheme to transfer an arbitrary qutrit-state (a state encoded in a three-level quantum system) across the chain. We assume adjustable couplings between adjacent transmons, derive an analytic constraint for the control-pulse, and show how to satisfy the constraint to achieve a high-fidelity state-transfer under current experimental conditions. Our protocol thus enables enhanced quantum communication and information processing with promising superconducting qutrits.

  2. Observations of O (1S) and O (1D) in Spectra of C/1999 S4 (LINEAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anita L. Cochran; William D. Cochran

    2001-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on high spectral resolution observations of comet C/1999 S4 (LINEAR) obtained at McDonald Observatory in June and July 2000. We report unequivocal detections of the O (1S) and O (1D) metastable lines in emission in the cometary spectrum. These lines are well separated from any telluric or cometary emission features. We have derived the ratio of the two red doublet lines and show they are consistent with the predictions of the branching ratio. We also derived a ratio of 0.06+/-0.01 for the green line flux to the sum of the red line fluxes. This ratio is consistent with H2O as the dominant parent for atomic oxygen. We have measured the widths of the lines and show that the widths imply that there must be some parent of atomic oxygen in addition to the H2O.

  3. Free Energies and Probe Actions for Near-horizon D-branes and D1 + D5 System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shijong Ryang

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    By working with the free energy for the type II supergravity near-horizon solution of N coincident non-extremal Dp-branes we study the transitions among the non-conformal Dp-brane system, the perturbative super Yang-Mills theory and a certain system associated with M theory. We derive a relation between this free energy and the action of a Dp-brane probe in the N Dp-brane background. Constructing the free energy for the five dimensional black hole labeled by the D1-brane and D5-brane charges we find the similar relation between it and the action of a D1 or D5 brane probe in the D1 + D5 brane background. These relations are explained by the massive open strings stretched between the relevant D-branes

  4. Department of Materials Science &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Materials Science & Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, students in materials science, engineering physics and engineering science choose to tackle compelling issues in materials science and engineering or engineering science

  5. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  6. MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

  7. Materials at the Mesoscale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials at the Mesoscale 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:January 2015 All Issues submit Materials at the Mesoscale Los Alamos's bold proposal to...

  8. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Materials Science Lecture Series Dr Roger D Doherty M.A. D. Phil., Fellow TMS Emeritus Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University,...

  9. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  10. battery materials | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery materials battery materials Leads No leads are available at this time. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract: The...

  11. EMSL - Energy Materials & Processes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy Energy Materials and Processes focuses on the dynamic transformation mechanisms and physical and chemical properties at critical interfaces in catalysts and energy materials...

  12. Propulsion Materials Research Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    * Materials for Electric and Hybrid Drive Systems - Address materials issues impacting power electronics, motors, and other hybrid drive system components * Combustion System...

  13. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of these as mixed- material systems. Additionally, materials such as titanium, polycarbonate, acrylics, and metal matrix composites, and approaches to their use must be...

  14. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering In this presentation the role of materials in power generation and the person responsible for the integration of science and resources in the Materials Science & Technology University in Mexico City and a Ph.D. in Materials Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY

  15. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  16. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  17. UNDERGRADUATE Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Materials Science & Engineering 2013 2014 #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

  18. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

  19. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  20. University Materials Institute INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    University Materials Institute INTRODUCTION The University Materials Science Institute of Alicante the needed multidisciplinary character of the materials area. It is important to highlight the fact participate in the Materials Science PhD program which is imparted at the UA. Scientific research

  1. Dental Materials BIOMATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dental Materials BIOMATERIALS Our goal is to provide reference materials and clinically relevant measurement methods to facilitate a rational approach to dental materials design, thus enabling improvements in the clinical performance of dental materials. In particular, methods for determining long-term performance

  2. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  3. Dynamic Incompressible Navier-Stokes Model of Catalytic Converter in 1-D Including Fundamental Oxidation Reaction Rate Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loya, Sudarshan Kedarnath

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    , this work includes the history of the fundamental reactions of automotive catalysts including carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen (H2) and nitric oxide (NO) oxidation on a widely used material formulation (platinum catalyst on alumina washcoat). A detailed report...

  4. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  5. Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Cecily J.

    1 Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods (15) For all possible earthquake pairs. The parameters chosen for window length, filter bandpass, negative sidelobe identification, and cross-correlation threshold are appropriate for high-frequency earthquakes. In order to remove false positives or poor data

  6. SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsome, William

    SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods Two adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta with a head-holding device (S1), scleral search coil for monitoring eye position (S2) and a recording chamber monkeys remain actively engaged in experiments, so precise histological identification of recording sites

  7. Sensors & Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors and Materials Argonne uses its materials and engineering expertise to develop, test, and deploy sensors and materials to detect nuclear and radiological materials, chemical...

  8. Lightweighting Materials | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORNL conducts lightweight materials research in several areas: materials development, properties and manufacturing, computational materials science, and multi-material enabling...

  9. {sup 1}D states of the beryllium atom: Quantum mechanical nonrelativistic calculations employing explicitly correlated Gaussian functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharkey, Keeper L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Bubin, Sergiy [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States); Adamowicz, Ludwik [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Very accurate finite-nuclear-mass variational nonrelativistic calculations are performed for the lowest five {sup 1}D states (1s{sup 2} 2p{sup 2}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 3d{sup 1}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 4d{sup 1}, 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 5d{sup 1}, and 1s{sup 2} 2s{sup 1} 6d{sup 1}) of the beryllium atom ({sup 9}Be). The wave functions of the states are expanded in terms of all-electron explicitly correlated Gaussian functions. The exponential parameters of the Gaussians are optimized using the variational method with the aid of the analytical energy gradient determined with respect to those parameters. The calculations exemplify the level of accuracy that is now possible with Gaussians in describing bound states of a four-electron system where some of the electrons are excited into higher angular states.

  10. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  11. Materials for breeding blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified.

  12. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  13. Materials Science and Engineering B 138 (2007) 224227 Synthesis of single crystalline europium-doped ZnO nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bongsoo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Science and Engineering B 138 (2007) 224­227 Synthesis of single crystalline europium; ZnO; Europium doping; XPS 1. Introduction Synthesizing one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures in semi and studies of the luminescent properties of europium (Eu)-doped semicon- ductors in various morphologies

  14. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S [ORNL

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  15. INTERDISCIPLINARY MATERIALS SCIENCE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MATERIALS SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    .m.satterwhite@vanderbilt.edu Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Materials Science Vanderbilt University School of Engineering PMB 350106INTERDISCIPLINARY MATERIALS SCIENCE GRADUATE PROGRAM IN MATERIALS SCIENCE Materials advancements, faculty members from chemistry, physics, materials engineering, chemical engineering, electrical

  16. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

  17. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Material Science Who we are and what we do 2:23 Institute for Materials Science: Alexander V. Balatsky IMS is an interdisciplinary research and educational center...

  18. Electronic digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langford, William Kai

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital materials are constructions assembled from a small number of types of discrete building blocks; they represent a new way of building functional, multi-material, three-dimensional structures. In this thesis, I focus ...

  19. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  20. Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

  1. Factors of material consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

  2. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  3. VHTR Materials Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The PowerPoint presentation was given at the DOE-NE Materials Crosscut Coordination Meeting, Tuesday, 30 July 2013.

  4. 2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 W. Imperatori1, *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2D versus 1D ground-motion modelling for the Friuli region, north-eastern Italy1 2 W. Imperatori1 and CO2 Storage Security Division, BRGM, 3 avenue C. Guillemin, 450607 Orléans Cedex 2, France.8 9 affects ground motions, particularly in terms of peak ground velocity (PGV). The decay of PGV14

  5. 1D-NMR and 2D-NMR analysis of the thermal degradation products from vitrinites in relation to their

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1D-NMR and 2D-NMR analysis of the thermal degradation products from vitrinites in relation'Orléans, Batiment Géosciences, BP 6759, 45067, Cedex 2, France Abstract A study of coal products obtained from Gray oil yield obtained, the similarity between the infrared spectra of the generated oils and those

  6. An Image Merge For GONG+ C.G. Toner1, D. Haber2, T. Corbard1, R. Bogart3, B. Hindman2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    An Image Merge For GONG+ C.G. Toner1, D. Haber2, T. Corbard1, R. Bogart3, B. Hindman2 1NSO/GONG Abstract We are developing an algorithm for merging GONG+ velocity images. Here we describe the algorithm-area helioseismology, focusing specifically on ring-diagram analysis. Introduction The GONG Project recently completed

  7. RING-DIAGRAM ANALYSIS WITH GONG++ T. Corbard 1 , C. Toner 1 , F. Hill 1 , K. D. Hanna 1 , D. A. Haber 2 , B. W. Hindman 2 , and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    1 RING-DIAGRAM ANALYSIS WITH GONG++ T. Corbard 1 , C. Toner 1 , F. Hill 1 , K. D. Hanna 1 , D. A-HEPL, Stanford, CA 94305-4085, USA ABSTRACT Images from the updated GONG network (GONG+) have been produced since of the new GONG pipeline (GONG++) (Hill et al., 2003). We present here the data-cube, 3D power spectra

  8. Heating Greenhouses1 D.E. Buffington, R.A. Bucklin, R.W. Henley and D.B. McConnell2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    AE11 Heating Greenhouses1 D.E. Buffington, R.A. Bucklin, R.W. Henley and D.B. McConnell2 1 supplemental heat is required. Obviously there are many ways this can be accomplished from the standpoint of these factors be considered when selecting and installing a heating system. HEATING SYSTEMS Greenhouse heating

  9. [1] D. Alderson and K. S. Hoo. The role of economic incentives in securing cyberspace. Technical report, CISAC, Stanford University, November 2004. [ bib | .pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briesemeister, Linda

    [1] D. Alderson and K. S. Hoo. The role of economic incentives in securing cyberspace. Technical of a failure by public policy to recognize and to address those incentives and the technological, economic of coherent policy in which the interaction of economic incentives among stakeholders is explicitly considered

  10. 7. Distributed AI D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 10/13 1D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7. Distributed AI 10/13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keil, David M.

    the relation between distributed artificial intelligence and self- organized systems D. Keil Artificial7. Distributed AI D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 10/13 1D. Keil Artificial Intelligence 7. Distributed AI 10/13 David M. Keil, Framingham State University CSCI 400 Artificial Intelligence 7

  11. E M 9 0 2 1 D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Recognize Fruit Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    E M 9 0 2 1 · D e c e m b e r 2 0 1 0 Recognize Fruit Damage from SpottedWing Drosophila (SWD identification of damage symp- toms may be a tool to help growers identify SWD in fruit. This publication shows damage caused by SWD on blueberries (Duke), raspberries (Malahat), strawber- ries (Seascape), cherries

  12. Tripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation Schemes by Using Three Regions at Each Height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    that a mere 4% increase in global cloud cover could counter- act the warming caused by a doubling of carbon the effect of in- homogeneity on the radiative properties of high cloud. They used cloud radar data to inferTripleclouds: An Efficient Method for Representing Horizontal Cloud Inhomogeneity in 1D Radiation

  13. Research Councils UK materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    as completely new materials such as super-strong graphene, or developments of traditional materials such as graphene is still being realised, with the Research Councils investing in both the further exploitation to UK growth. For example, the 2004 `discovery' of wonder-material graphene sparked a host of global

  14. MATERIALS SCIENCE ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Irvine, University of

    MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING GRADUATE MANUAL COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA AT BERKELEY October 23, 2013 #12;Materials Science and Engineering University of California at Berkeley Page 2 Subject Matter · Outcome of the Preliminary Exam #12;Materials Science and Engineering University

  15. MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING BACHELOR OF SCIENCE MASTER OF SCIENCE Get your own impression. Materials Science and Engineering in Ilmenau stands for: + a broad and practical university education Catòlica del Peru (PUCP) in Lima/Peru and to receive a double degree in Materials Science and Engineering

  16. Radioactive Materials License Commitments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive Materials License Commitments for The University of Texas at Austin May 2009 July 2009 in the use of radioactive materials. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means

  17. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  18. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

  19. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  20. ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Biomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Biomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Physical Chemistry 4 CP General Chemistry 2 CP Synthesis of Org. & Inorg. Materials 4 CP Introductory Solid

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  3. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

  4. Deformation Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Farghalli A.; Yang, Heather

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A 47. F.A.12. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 41A,of Slip: Progress in Materials Science, Pergamon Press,

  5. Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials SHARE Advanced Materials ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of...

  6. Wide Bandgap Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Materials Madhu Chinthavali Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 15, 2012 Project ID: APE007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted...

  7. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in magnets, batteries, photovoltaic films and phosphors; environmentally sound mining and materials processing; and recycling. The eight programs and policies address...

  8. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  9. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  10. UESC Workshop Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Policy Act (NEPA) Detailed disposal requirements statement for hazardous materials related to the project are essential It is in the FAR Subpart 23.3. Acquisition...

  11. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geopolymer Sealing Materials PI : Dr. Tomas Butcher Presenter: Dr. Toshi Sugama Brookhaven National Laboratory May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

  12. Materials for MA 182.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials for MA 182. INSTRUCTOR: Richard Penney. Office: MATH 822: Telephone: 494-1968: e-mail: rcp@math.purdue.edu: Office Hours: Mon, Tu, Fri,

  13. Layered Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Layered Cathode Materials presented by Michael Thackeray Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne Annual Merit Review DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Washington, D.C....

  14. EMSL - battery materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery-materials en Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmodeling-interfacial-glass-wa...

  15. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  16. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  17. LANSCE | Materials Test Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Facility Training Office Contact Administrative nav background Materials Test Station dotline Testing New Reactor Fuels that Reduce Radioactive Waste Mission Used...

  18. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain, Austin, TX 78731); Dumitru, Earl T. (10116 Aspen St., Austin, TX 78758)

    1986-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  19. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain, Austin, TX 78731); Dumitru, Earl T. (10116 Aspen St., Austin, TX 78758)

    1990-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  20. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  1. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  2. DOE Automotive Lightweighting Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    materials for fiber reinforced composites. Until now, they have only been used in the automotive industry with thermoplastics and not as a matrix for fiber reinforced...

  3. Webinar: Materials Genome Initative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

  4. Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

  5. Materials and Metallurgy Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    Materials and Metallurgy Materials Science and Metallurgical Engineering Objective Students "Rocks and Materials Science" Presentation. Review uses of rocks. Explain that engineers extract Engineers to efficiently and safely extract ore, Metallurgical Engineers to refine the copper, and Materials

  6. Plasmon-polariton and ⟨n⟨ = 0 non-Bragg gaps in 1D Cantor photonic superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mejía-Salazar, J. R.; Porras-Montenegro, N. [Departamento de Física, Universidad del Valle, A.A. 25360 Cali (Colombia); Reyes-Gómez, E. [Instituto de Física, Universidad de Antioquia, AA 1226, Medellín (Colombia); Cavalcanti, S. B. [Instituto de Física, UFAL, Cidade Universitária, Maceió-AL, 57072-970 (Brazil); Oliveira, L. E. [Instituto de Física, Unicamp, Campinas-SP, 13083-859 (Brazil)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the transfer-matrix approach for one-dimensional Cantor photonic superlattices, and studied the plasmon-polariton modes for a multilayered system composed by alternating layers of positive and dispersive materials. Results indicate that the corresponding plasmon-polariton modes, which show up for oblique incidence, strongly depend on the Cantor step, and the plasmon-polariton subbands are associated with the number of metamaterial layers contained in the elementary cell. Moreover, we have studied the ⟨n⟩ = 0 non-Bragg gap in such fractal photonic superlattices and characterized its behavior as function of the steps of the Cantor series.

  7. Rapid estimation of 4DCT motion-artifact severity based on 1D breathing-surrogate periodicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Guang, E-mail: lig2@mskcc.org; Caraveo, Marshall [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Wei, Jie [Department of Computer Science, City College of New York, New York, New York 10031 (United States); Rimner, Andreas; Wu, Abraham J.; Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States); Yorke, Ellen [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Motion artifacts are common in patient four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) images, leading to an ill-defined tumor volume with large variations for radiotherapy treatment and a poor foundation with low imaging fidelity for studying respiratory motion. The authors developed a method to estimate 4DCT image quality by establishing a correlation between the severity of motion artifacts in 4DCT images and the periodicity of the corresponding 1D respiratory waveform (1DRW) used for phase binning in 4DCT reconstruction. Methods: Discrete Fourier transformation (DFT) was applied to analyze 1DRW periodicity. The breathing periodicity index (BPI) was defined as the sum of the largest five Fourier coefficients, ranging from 0 to 1. Distortional motion artifacts (excluding blurring) of cine-scan 4DCT at the junctions of adjacent couch positions around the diaphragm were classified in three categories: incomplete, overlapping, and duplicate anatomies. To quantify these artifacts, discontinuity of the diaphragm at the junctions was measured in distance and averaged along six directions in three orthogonal views. Artifacts per junction (APJ) across the entire diaphragm were calculated in each breathing phase and phase-averaged APJ{sup ¯}, defined as motion-artifact severity (MAS), was obtained for each patient. To make MAS independent of patient-specific motion amplitude, two new MAS quantities were defined: MAS{sup D} is normalized to the maximum diaphragmatic displacement and MAS{sup V} is normalized to the mean diaphragmatic velocity (the breathing period was obtained from DFT analysis of 1DRW). Twenty-six patients’ free-breathing 4DCT images and corresponding 1DRW data were studied. Results: Higher APJ values were found around midventilation and full inhalation while the lowest APJ values were around full exhalation. The distribution of MAS is close to Poisson distribution with a mean of 2.2 mm. The BPI among the 26 patients was calculated with a value ranging from 0.25 to 0.93. The DFT calculation was within 3 s per 1DRW. Correlations were found between 1DRW periodicity and 4DCT artifact severity: ?0.71 for MAS{sup D} and ?0.73 for MAS{sup V}. A BPI greater than 0.85 in a 1DRW suggests minimal motion artifacts in the corresponding 4DCT images. Conclusions: The breathing periodicity index and motion-artifact severity index are introduced to assess the relationship between 1DRW and 4DCT. A correlation between 1DRW periodicity and 4DCT artifact severity has been established. The 1DRW periodicity provides a rapid means to estimate 4DCT image quality. The rapid 1DRW analysis and the correlative relationship can be applied prospectively to identify irregular breathers as candidates for breath coaching prior to 4DCT scan and retrospectively to select high-quality 4DCT images for clinical motion-management research.

  8. From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials Requirements and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials ­ Requirements and Challenges Lutz Frommberger (lutz materials are materials that are either capa- ble of changing some of their properties according to external within the material itself. The latter is also called sensorial material (Lawo et. al., 2009). Recently

  9. Materials Science and Technology Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Materials Science and Technology Metallurgy Mechanical and Materials Engineering Materials Science with Energy Engineering Materials Science with Business Management Course Prospectus School of Metallurgy for Metallurgy and Materials What difference will you make? #12;2 School of Metallurgy and Materials Contents

  10. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  11. Nanocrystalline heterojunction materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H.; Su, Yali; Gao, Yufei; Heald, Steve M.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  12. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  13. Impacted material placement plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

  14. MATERIAL TRACKING USING LANMAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, F.

    2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    LANMAS is a transaction-based nuclear material accountability software product developed to replace outdated and legacy accountability systems throughout the DOE. The core underlying purpose of LANMAS is to track nuclear materials inventory and report transactions (movement, mixing, splitting, decay, etc.) to the Nuclear Materials Management and Safeguards System (NMMSS). While LANMAS performs those functions well, there are many additional functions provided by the software product. As a material is received onto a site or created at a site, its entire lifecycle can be tracked in LANMAS complete to its termination of safeguards. There are separate functions to track material movements between and within material balance areas (MBAs). The level of detail for movements within a MBA is configurable by each site and can be as high as a site designation or as detailed as building/room/rack/row/position. Functionality exists to track the processing of materials, either as individual items or by modeling a bulk process as an individual item to track inputs and outputs from the process. In cases where sites have specialized needs, the system is designed to be flexible so that site specific functionality can be integrated into the product. This paper will demonstrate how the software can be used to input material into an account and track it to its termination of safeguards.

  15. Detecting Illicit Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat that weapons of mass destruction might enter the United States has led to a number of efforts for the detection and interdiction of nuclear, radiological, chemical, and biological weapons at our borders. There have been multiple deployments of instrumentation to detect radiation signatures to interdict radiological material, including weapons and weapons material worldwide.

  16. ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Holger

    ADVANCED MATERIALS Curriculum Nanomaterials Materials Science I 5 CP Materials Science II 5 CP Lab Materials Science II 5 CP Computational Methods in Materials Science 4 CP Lab Materials Science I 5 CP Science Chemistry Physics Engineering Nanomaterials Introductory Engineering 5 CP #12;

  17. Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Course outline School of Metallurgy and Materials Materials us? Dr Alessandro Mottura Undergraduate Admissions Tutor for Metallurgy and Materials What difference will you make? #12;Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Understanding the properties of new materials

  18. ORSAY LAL 12-130 n0 d'ordre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the Majo- rana neutrino 7 1 The majorana neutrino and the neutrinoless double beta decay 9 1.1 The neutrinoless double beta decay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.2 Constraints from neutrino

  19. Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lightweighting Materials Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory: Focus Lightweighting Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  20. Analytical evaluation of thermal conductance and heat capacities of one-dimensional material systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saygi, Salih [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, 60200 Turkey (Turkey)] [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, 60200 Turkey (Turkey)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically predict some thermal properties versus temperature dependence of one dimensional (1D) material nanowire systems. A known method is used to provide an efficient and reliable analytical procedure for wide temperature range. Predicted formulas are expressed in terms of Bloch-Grüneisen functions and Debye functions. Computing results has proved that the expressions are in excellent agreement with the results reported in the literature even if it is in very low dimension limits of nanowire systems. Therefore the calculation method is a fully predictive approach to calculate thermal conductivity and heat capacities of nanowire material systems.

  1. ATS materials/manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  3. Material Challenges and Perspectives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Daiwon; Wang, Wei; Yang, Zhenguo

    2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    General history and principals of Li-ion battery, characterization techniques and terminology of its operation will be discussed and explained. Current Li-ion battery applications and comparison to other energy storage and conversion systems will be outlined. Chemistry, material and design of currently commercialized Li-ion batteries will be discussed including various electrode materials for cathodes and anodes. The electrode material candidates and its physical and chemical properties including crystal structure, capacity, cycling stability, cost and safety. Also, current limitations of Li-ion batteries will be discussed.

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  5. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  6. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  7. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  8. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  9. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    xi Material CharacterizationThermoelectric Materials . . . . . . . . Graphene-Like5 Nanostructured Materials for Electrochemical Energy

  10. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  11. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  12. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. No cancellation. Certified 11-18-10.

  13. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  14. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  15. Leadership Honors Application Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    1 Leadership Honors Application Materials Spring 2013 Purpose Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation in order to recognize and honor their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities must enhance

  16. Leadership Honors Application Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    1 Leadership Honors Application Materials Fall 2009 Purpose Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation in order to recognize and honor their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities must enhance

  17. Leadership Honors Application Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    1 Leadership Honors Application Materials Fall 2012 Purpose Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation in order to recognize and honor their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities must enhance

  18. Leadership Honors Application Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantaleone, Jim

    1 Leadership Honors Application Materials Spring 2012 Purpose Leadership Honors are awarded to individuals upon graduation in order to recognize and honor their leadership contributions to the University of Alaska Anchorage while maintaining academic excellence. Leadership activities must enhance

  19. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  20. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  1. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

  2. MATERIALS SCIENCE HEALTHCARE POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    for Polymer Research are paving the way to optimizing organic substances for use in solar cells, light-emitting diodes and memory chips, and are using molecular materials to develop electronic components

  3. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  4. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Home Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department through processing for improving their performance for engineering applications · Use and develop with usable ­ Chemical ­ Electronic ­ Optical ­ Magnetic ­ Transport, thermal and mechanical properties

  5. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  6. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  7. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  8. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  9. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  10. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  11. Materials in design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perata, Alfredo Ferando

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    alloys have good machinability. Melding has two -25- critical factors, the weakness of aluminum alloys at high temperatures and oxidation. However, aluminum derives its corrosion ? resistance quality from this oxide, It has to removed before welding...-Ferrous Metals Copper alloys Aluminum Magnesium Lead Zinc Tin Non-Metallic Materials Wood Stone Brick Cement Cont rete Rubber Leather Asbestos Mica Ceramics Glass Engineering design has to have in consideration, the use to which the material...

  12. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  13. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  14. A Materials World Materials science and Engineering at the ANU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials World Materials science and Engineering at the ANU For a challenging and rewarding a career in materials science and engineering. Materials science is emerging as one of the most important. Researchers at ANU's Department of Electronic Materials Engineering are leading nanotube science

  15. 1D coordination polymers formed by tetranuclear lead(II) building blocks with carboxylate ligands: In situ isomerization of itaconic acid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rana, Abhinandan; Jana, Swapan Kumar; Datta, Sayanti [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721 102, West Bengal (India); Butcher, Raymond J. [Department of Chemistry, Howard University, Washington, DC (United States); Zangrando, Ennio [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Dalai, Sudipta, E-mail: sudipta@mail.vidyasagar.ac.in [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721 102, West Bengal (India)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The synthesis of two new lead(II) coordination polymers, [Pb{sub 2}(mpic){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O)]·0.5H{sub 2}O (1) and [Pb{sub 2}(phen){sub 2}(cit)(mes)]·2H{sub 2}O (2) has been reported, where mpic=3-methyl picolinate, phen=o-phenanthroline, H{sub 2}cit=citraconic acid, H{sub 2}mes mesaconic acid. X-ray single crystal diffraction analyses showed that the complexes comprise topologically different 1D polymeric chains stabilized by weak interactions and both containing tetranuclear Pb{sub 4} units connected by carboxylate groups. In compound 1 3-methylpicolinic acid is formed in situ from 3-methyl piconitrile, and mesaconate and citraconate anions were surprisingly formed from itaconic acid during the synthesis of 2. The photoluminescence and thermal properties of the complexes have been studied. - Graphical abstract: Two new topologically different 1D coordination polymers formed by Pb{sub 4} clusters have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray analysis. The luminescence and thermal properties have been studied. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Both the complexes, made up of different ligands, forms topologycally different 1D polymeric chains containing Pb{sub 4} clusters. • The final structures are stabilized by weak interactions (H-bond, ????? stacking). • In complex 1, the 3-methylpicolinic acid is generated in situ from 3-methyl piconitrile. • Mesaconate and citraconate anions are surprisingly formed in situ from itaconic acid during the synthesis of complex 2, indicating an exceptional transformation.

  16. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  17. Panel 3 - material science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarrao, John L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yip, Sidney [MIT

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decades, NNSA's national security challenge has evolved, and the role of simulation and computation has grown dramatically. The process of certifying nuclear weapons performance has changed from one based on integrated tests to science-based certification in which underground nuclear tests have been replaced by large-scale simulations, appropriately validated with fundamental experimental data. Further, the breadth of national security challenges has expanded beyond stewardship of a nuclear deterrent to a broad range of global and asymmetric threats. Materials challenges are central to the full suite of these national security challenges. Mission requirements demand that materials perform predictably in extreme environments -- high pressure, high strain rate, and hostile irradiation and chemical conditions. Considerable advances have been made in incorporating fundamental materials physics into integrated codes used for component certification. On the other hand, significant uncertainties still remain, and materials properties, especially at the mesoscale, are key to understanding uncertainties that remain in integrated weapons performance codes and that at present are treated as empirical knobs. Further, additional national security mission challenges could be addressed more robustly with new and higher performing materials.

  18. Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

  19. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  20. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  1. Apparatus for dispensing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Peter Werner (Beach, NY); Sutter, Eli Anguelova (Beach, NY)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus capable of dispensing drops of material with volumes on the order of zeptoliters is described. In some embodiments of the inventive pipette the size of the droplets so dispensed is determined by the size of a hole, or channel, through a carbon shell encapsulating a reservoir that contains material to be dispensed. The channel may be formed by irradiation with an electron beam or other high-energy beam capable of focusing to a spot size less than about 5 nanometers. In some embodiments, the dispensed droplet remains attached to the pipette by a small thread of material, an atomic scale meniscus, forming a virtually free-standing droplet. In some embodiments the droplet may wet the pipette tip and take on attributes of supported drops. Methods for fabricating and using the pipette are also described.

  2. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  3. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  4. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  5. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  6. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  7. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311, 3312), October 20122 DOE Technologies|10Materials Materials

  8. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMAR Os2010 TeppeiMaterialMaterial

  9. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | NationalMaterialsMPA Materials

  10. Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreja, Vasile V. N. [National Research and Development Institute for Microtechnologies (IMT-Bucuresti), Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science The Quest for Efficiency in Thermoelectric Nanowires On February 26, 2015, in Materials Science, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities Sandia researchers...

  12. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the damping material and epoxy resin. The surface of theinfiltration of the epoxy resin into the damping materialthe damping material and resin (epoxy) is occurring and is

  13. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  14. Materials and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assurance Anne Meinhold Unprecedented Accomplishments in the Use of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy Preston is the solution. Other times, the design must accommodate the limitations of materials properties. The design requirements, and written procedures. Nondestructive testing depends on incident or input energy that interacts

  15. Action Plan Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitze, Patrick

    sense, including all strata) has available to it a wide range of con- venient products which improve, improving companies' pros- pects and generating wealth without harming the environment. And allAction Plan 2010-2013 Materials Science Area EXECUTIVE SUMMARY #12;N.B.: If you require any further

  16. Materials Engineering Is Materials Engineering right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    Materials Engineering Is Materials Engineering right for me? If you are interested in the development of new products and technologies then Materials Engineering is well worth considering for university study. A Materials Engineering degree programme will focus on aspects such as structure

  17. ALTERNATE MATERIALS IN DESIGN OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanton, P.; Eberl, K.

    2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of design and testing of material and composites for use in radioactive material packages. These materials provide thermal protection and provide structural integrity and energy absorption to the package during normal and hypothetical accident condition events as required by Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Testing of packages comprising these materials is summarized.

  18. Short Scale Turbulent Fluctuations Driven by Electron Temperature Gradient in NSTX E. Mazzucato,1,* D. R. Smith,1 R. E. Bell,1 S. M. Kaye,1 J. C. Hosea,1 B. P. LeBlanc,1 J. R. Wilson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzucato, Ernesto

    . Mazzucato,1,* D. R. Smith,1 R. E. Bell,1 S. M. Kaye,1 J. C. Hosea,1 B. P. LeBlanc,1 J. R. Wilson,1 P. M

  19. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasser, Leslie, E-mail: l.glasser@curtin.edu.au

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy, lattice energy, enthalpy, Gibbs energy values are available.

  20. Branching Fraction Measurements of the Color-Suppressed Decays B0bar to D(*)0 pi0, D(*)0 eta, D(*)0 omega, and D(*)0 eta_prime and Measurement of the Polarization in the Decay B0bar to D*0 omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Milanes, D.A.; /INFN, Bari; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; /Bergen U.; Brown, D.N.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; /UC, Berkeley; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; /Ruhr U., Bochum; Asgeirsson, D.J.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T.S.; McKenna, J.A.; /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Harvey Mudd Coll. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Paris U., VI-VII /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas Nuclear Corp., Austin /Texas U. /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison; ,

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report updated branching fraction measurements of the color-suppressed decays {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, D{sup 0}{eta}, D*{sup 0}{eta}, D{sup 0}{omega}, D*{sup 0}{omega}, D{sup 0}{eta}', and D*{sup 0}{eta}'. We measure the branching fractions (x10{sup -4}): {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.13, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) = 3.05 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.28, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.53 {+-} 0.09 {+-} 0.11, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}) = 2.69 {+-} 0.14 {+-} 0.23, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{omega}) = 2.57 {+-} 0.11 {+-} 0.14, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{omega}) = 4.55 {+-} 0.24 {+-} 0.39, {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.48 {+-} 0.13 {+-} 0.07, and {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup 0}{eta}') = 1.49 {+-} 0.22 {+-} 0.15. We also present the first measurement of the longitudinal polarization fraction of the decay channel D*{sup 0}{omega}, f{sub L} = (66.5 {+-} 4.7 {+-} 1.5)%. In the above, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The results are based on a sample of (454 {+-} 5) x 10{sup 6} B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II storage rings at SLAC. The measurements are the most precise determinations of these quantities from a single experiment. They are compared to theoretical predictions obtained by factorization, Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and perturbative QCD (pQCD). We find that the presence of final state interactions is favored and the measurements are in better agreement with SCET than with pQCD.

  1. Two-dimensional nanohybridization of gold nanorods and polystyrene colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    nanostructures templated onto monolayered col- loid thin films. These hybrid nanocomposite materials have hybrid nanomaterials. The process is demonstrated using 0D polystyrene colloids and 1D Au nanorods-blocks are crucial parameters that determine the dominant rod-colloid hybrid nanoarrays that are obtained. Plasmon

  2. Nitrogen-doped graphene and its electrochemical applications Yuyan Shao,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    -graphene is promising for applications in electrochemical energy devices (fuel cells, metal­air batteries for graphitic materials of all other dimensionalities (0D fullerenes, 1D nanotubes, and 3D graphite),1 mechanical exfoliation of graphite with scotch tape,33 mild exfoliation of graphite,34 chemical vapor

  3. The effects of material properties and confinement on DDT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.L.; Weston, A.M.; Aldis, D.F.

    1990-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a DDT numerical code, RDUCT, to evaluate the effect of material properties and confinement on DDT in porous beds. RDUCT is a 1-D solid and gas two phase hydrodynamic program that computes deflagration to detonation transition in porous beds, using and ignition and growth'' type reaction model in a solid phase Lagrange coordinate system. The calculation model contains tamper masses at both ends of the reacting bed and is ignited by a squib at one end. Here RDUCT is used to compute the growth of reaction in porous bed inside a rigid tube. The input parameters are varied to produce changes in ignition, burn rate, and confinement. The results of this study illustrate the great sensitivity of the DDT phenomenon to these basic parameters. Implications to modelling and to practical problems of hazard are discussed. 15 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Materials Department Annual Report 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Department Annual Report 1992 Published by the Materials Department Risø National and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 46 77 46 77 Fax: +4542351173 #12;Abstract Selected activities ot the Materials Department at Riso

  5. Materials Department Annual Report 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Department Annual Report 1991 Published by the Materials Department Risø National, iron and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 42 37 12 12 Fax: + 45 42 35 11 73 #12;Abstract Selected activities of the Materials

  6. Webinar: Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, originally presented on August 13, 2013.

  7. MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

  8. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  9. Laser detection of material thickness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is provided a method for measuring material thickness comprising: (a) contacting a surface of a material to be measured with a high intensity short duration laser pulse at a light wavelength which heats the area of contact with the material, thereby creating an acoustical pulse within the material: (b) timing the intervals between deflections in the contacted surface caused by the reverberation of acoustical pulses between the contacted surface and the opposite surface of the material: and (c) determining the thickness of the material by calculating the proportion of the thickness of the material to the measured time intervals between deflections of the contacted surface.

  10. 1-D and 2-D homoleptic dicyanamide structures, [Ph{sub 4}P]{sub 2}{Co{sup II}[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 4}} and [Ph{sub 4}P]{M[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}} (M = Mn, Co).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raebiger, J. W.; Manson, J. L.; Sommer, R. D.; Geiser, U.; Rheingold, A. L.; Miller, J. S.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Utah; Univ. of Delaware

    2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The homoleptic complexes [Ph{sub 4}P]{sub 2}{l_brace}Co[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 4}{r_brace} and [Ph{sub 4}P]{l_brace}M[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}{r_brace} [ M = Co, Mn] have been structurally as well as magnetically characterized. The complexes containing {l_brace}M[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 4}{r_brace}{sup 2-} form 1-D chains, which are bridged via a common dicyanamide ligand in {l_brace}M[N(CN){sub 2}]{sub 3}{r_brace}{sup -} to form a 2-D structure. The five-atom [NCNCN]{sup -} ligands lead to a {sup 4}T{sub 1g} ground state for Co(II) which has an unquenched spin-orbit coupling that is reflected in the magnetic properties. Long-range magnetic ordering was not observed in any of these materials.

  11. Geothermal materials development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

  12. Biodesulfurization of rubber materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torma, A.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Raghavan, D. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most challenging problems in municipal waste treatment is the recycling of polymeric waste materials. The present study has demonstrated the applicability of biotechnological principles in the desulfurization of rubber using shake flask and Warburg respirometric techniques. In terms of oxygen uptake and specific rate of oxygen uptake, it was found that the mixed culture of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans and Thiobacillus thiooxidans was more efficient in this process than the individual pure cultures of these bacteria. Furthermore, the mixed cultures resulted in ten times higher sulfur removals from rubber relative to those of sterile controls. Additional studies are needed to elucidate the mechanisms of biodesulfurization of rubber. It is expected that the development of this process may provide a solution to recycling of car tire materials. 32 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Materials in design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perata, Alfredo Ferando

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the strength, hardness and wear resistance has been increased. S rin Materials Since in many cases equipment requires that springs have to operate properly at conditions of excessive vibration, corrosive environment, extremes temperatures. A great care has...) It is considered a good long wearing bearing metal where good bearing conditions are present once the design has been done very good. (Accurate filling, good oil clearance; good lubrication, non-corrosive oil). It can be used with hardened shafts. B ' g B Tin...

  14. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  15. Hydrolysis of biomass material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Andrew J.; Orth, Rick J.; Franz, James A.; Alnajjar, Mikhail

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for selective hydrolysis of the hemicellulose component of a biomass material. The selective hydrolysis produces water-soluble small molecules, particularly monosaccharides. One embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A second embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose and subsequently enzymatically hydrolyzing the solubilized hemicellulose to produce at least one monosaccharide. A third embodiment includes solubilizing at least a portion of the hemicellulose by heating the biomass material to greater than 110.degree. C. resulting in an aqueous portion that includes the solubilized hemicellulose and a water insoluble solids portion and subsequently separating the aqueous portion from the water insoluble solids portion. A fourth embodiment is a method for making a composition that includes cellulose, at least one protein and less than about 30 weight % hemicellulose, the method including solubilizing at least a portion of hemicellulose present in a biomass material that also includes cellulose and at least one protein and subsequently separating the solubilized hemicellulose from the cellulose and at least one protein.

  16. Data:Eac1dd3a-0268-4e5c-b1d1-ed9feeb2a12a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision has beenEac1dd3a-0268-4e5c-b1d1-ed9feeb2a12a No

  17. Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feser, Joseph Patrick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermoelectric materials consisting of epitaxially-grownefficient thermoelectric materials," Nature, vol. 451, pp.superlattice thermoelectric materials and devices," Science,

  18. Materials Engineering Research Facility | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Engineering Research Facility Argonne's new Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) supports the laboratory's Advanced Battery Materials Synthesis and...

  19. Materials Synthesis and Characterization | Center for Functional...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility materials synthesis The Materials Synthesis and Characterization Facility includes laboratories for producing nanostructured...

  20. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success...

  1. Materials Research in the Information Age

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 | Tags: Materials...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechnologiesLight Creation Materials Light Creation Materials Overview of SSL Light Creation Materials Different families of inorganic semiconductor materials can...

  3. Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  4. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  5. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  6. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  7. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  8. Materials Data on VPO4 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Nd (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on VP (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on P (SG:2) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on BPO4 (SG:152) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Ge (SG:96) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on Ge (SG:225) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Ge (SG:148) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on Ge (SG:96) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on UGe2 (SG:63) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on UGe2 (SG:65) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on Ge (SG:69) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Materials Data on Nd (SG:229) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  1. Materials Data on Tc (SG:194) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  2. Materials Data on Er (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  3. Materials Data on YB2 (SG:191) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  4. Materials Data on La (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  5. Materials Data on Tb (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  6. Materials Data on Dy (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  7. Materials Data on YZn (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  8. Materials Data on Tm (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  9. Materials Data on Lu (SG:229) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on B (SG:166) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. Materials Data on Fe (SG:194) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  12. Materials Data on YS (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  13. Materials Data on Nd (SG:225) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  14. Materials Data on KC10 (SG:204) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  15. Materials Data on Se (SG:148) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  16. Materials Data on VPt2 (SG:71) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Materials Data on Ga (SG:139) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on S (SG:221) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. Materials Data on UAl2 (SG:227) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  20. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  1. Immobilized lipid-bilayer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sasaki, Darryl Y. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Yamanaka, Stacey A. (Dallas, TX)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials in a silica matrix comprising preparing a silica sol, mixing a lipid-bilayer material in the silica sol and allowing the mixture to gel to form the encapsulated lipid-bilayer material. The mild processing conditions allow quantitative entrapment of pre-formed lipid-bilayer materials without modification to the material's spectral characteristics. The method allows for the immobilization of lipid membranes to surfaces. The encapsulated lipid-bilayer materials perform as sensitive optical sensors for the detection of analytes such as heavy metal ions and can be used as drug delivery systems and as separation devices.

  2. Construction Material And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  3. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  4. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, J.B.

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

  5. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.SpaceFluorControlsEnergy ReaffirmedCritical Materials

  6. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center at CornellOf NSEC »INNOVATIONFaces

  7. Ion Beam Materials Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > The Energy Materials Center atdiffusivities in mesopores

  8. Material efficiency in construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moynihan, Muiris

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , this generation must change its use of energy and materials. 1.1 The need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states as #16;unequivocal#17; that the Earth's atmosphere and oceans... in order to save energy and carbon. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ISBN 978-0- 903428-32-3 3. Allwood, J.M., Cullen, J.M., Patel, A.C.H., Cooper, D.R.,Moynihan, M.C., Milford, R.L., Carruth, M.A. and McBrien, M. 2011. Prolonging our metal life #22...

  9. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  10. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMAR Os2010 TeppeiMaterial Disposal

  11. Material Safety Data Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMAR Os2010Material Safety Data Sheet

  12. Materials Under Extremes | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMARSecurityMaterialsMPA » MPA-11

  13. Materials in the news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from a New 183-GHzMARSecurityMaterialsMPA » MPA-11News

  14. Materials Science Application Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition | NationalMaterialsMPA

  15. Materials for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition |Materials and

  16. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition |Materials anddata' for rapid

  17. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |IsLove Your Home andDisposition |Materials anddata' for

  18. Multi Material Paradigm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProductsUptake andUser ManualTowardMulti Material

  19. Order 580.1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the provisions of the Federal Management Regulations (FMR), Department of Energy Personal Property Management Program, Department of Energy Personal Property Management Guide,...

  20. Order 580.1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and Biofuels Biomass and Biofuels Find In response

  1. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Hazardous materials can be silent killers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS #12;Hazardous materials can be silent killers. Almost every household they may be found, and what to do, or not do, about hazardous material spills. #12;Ways that hazardous or eyes · Ingestion; swallowing · Injection; penetrating skin #12;The key to dealing with hazardous

  2. What materials can I recycle? Material Where Whose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What materials can I recycle? Material Where Whose responsibility Batteries Chatham reception desk Individuals Clay Recycled in the workshop Users of the purchased material Cardboard Designated skip Recycled via swop bins in the studios and outside the fabric store Unwanted items to Grumpy ( Greater

  3. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, C.A.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  4. Optical polarizer material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebbers, Christopher A. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several crystals have been identified which can be grown using standard single crystals growth techniques and which have a high birefringence. The identified crystals include Li.sub.2 CO.sub.3, LiNaCO.sub.3, LiKCO.sub.3, LiRbCO.sub.3 and LiCsCO.sub.3. The condition of high birefringence leads to their application as optical polarizer materials. In one embodiment of the invention, the crystal has the chemical formula LiK.sub.(1-w-x-y) Na.sub.(1-w-x-z) Rb.sub.(1-w-y-z) Cs.sub.(1-x-y-z) CO.sub.3, where w+x+y+z=1. In another embodiment, the crystalline material may be selected from a an alkali metal carbonate and a double salt of alkali metal carbonates, where the polarizer has a Wollaston configuration, a Glan-Thompson configuration or a Glan-Taylor configuration. A method of making an LiNaCO.sub.3 optical polarizer is described. A similar method is shown for making an LiKCO.sub.3 optical polarizer.

  5. Laser Plasma Material Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

  6. STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, MECHANICS AND MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    of companies worldwide; cladding effects on, and hybrid control of, the response of tall buildings Buildings · Masonry Structures · Nano/Microstructure of Cement-based Materials · Polymeric Composite Systems · Reliable Engineering Computing · Risk Analysis · Seismic Hazard Mitigation · Smart Materials

  7. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  8. DPC materials and corrosion environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Bryan, Charles R.; Teich-McGoldrick, Stephanie; Hardin, Ernest

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review focuses on the performance of basket materials that could be exposed to ground water over thousands of years, and prospective disposal overpack materials that could possibly be used to protect dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) in disposal environments.

  9. FURTHERING THE RECLAIMED MATERIALS EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Robert A.

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study of the reclaimed materials industry and ways it could be improved from a management standpoint by working through a Design Management problem solving approach. Project Objectives: To improve the sourcing of reclaimed materials...

  10. Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -DRAFT - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Thermoelectric Generation ......

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biomass, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Energy, Energy Storage, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Nuclear Energy, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research &...

  12. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  13. Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

  14. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  15. Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination Demonstration for the Port of New York and New Jersey Department of Energy Brookhaven National Laboratory Fast Track Dredged Material Decontamination Demonstration .............................................................................. 3 3.3 Relation to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District Dredged Material Management

  16. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Walls, Claudia A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  17. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  18. Dry pulverized solid material pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meyer, John W. (Palo Alto, CA); Bonin, John H. (Sunnyvale, CA); Daniel, Jr., Arnold D. (Alameda, CA)

    1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is shown for substantially increasing the feed rate of pulverized material into a pressurized container. The apparatus includes a rotor that is mounted internal to the pressurized container. The pulverized material is fed into an annular chamber defined by the center of the rotor. A plurality of impellers are mounted within the annular chamber for imparting torque to the pulverized material.

  19. Materials Performance in USC Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

    2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

  20. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  1. Inline evenflow material distributor for pneumatic material feed systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thiry, Michael J. (Oakdale, CA)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for reducing clogs in a pneumatic material feed line, such as employed in abrasive waterjet machining systems, by providing an evenflow feed of material therethrough. The apparatus preferably includes a hollow housing defining a housing volume and having an inlet capable of connecting to an upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, an outlet capable of connecting to a downstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, and an air vent located between the inlet and outlet for venting excess air pressure out from the housing volume. A diverter, i.e. an impingement object, is located at the inlet and in a path of incoming material from the upstream portion of the pneumatic material feed line, to break up clumps of ambient moisture-ridden material impinging on the diverter. And one or more filter screens is also preferably located in the housing volume to further break up clumps and provide filtering.

  2. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  3. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  4. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  5. Packaging - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmann, Matthias [Hoppecke Advanced Battery Technology GmbH, 08056 Zwickau (Germany)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Nowadays, a large number of different electrochemical energy storage systems are known. In the last two decades the development was strongly driven by a continuously growing market of portable electronic devices (e.g. cellular phones, lap top computers, camcorders, cameras, tools). Current intensive efforts are under way to develop systems for automotive industry within the framework of electrically propelled mobility (e.g. hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, full electric vehicles) and also for the energy storage market (e.g. electrical grid stability, renewable energies). Besides the different systems (cell chemistries), electrochemical cells and batteries were developed and are offered in many shapes, sizes and designs, in order to meet performance and design requirements of the widespread applications. Proper packaging is thereby one important technological step for designing optimum, reliable and safe batteries for operation. In this contribution, current packaging approaches of cells and batteries together with the corresponding materials are discussed. The focus is laid on rechargeable systems for industrial applications (i.e. alkaline systems, lithium-ion, lead-acid). In principle, four different cell types (shapes) can be identified - button, cylindrical, prismatic and pouch. Cell size can be either in accordance with international (e.g. International Electrotechnical Commission, IEC) or other standards or can meet application-specific dimensions. Since cell housing or container, terminals and, if necessary, safety installations as inactive (non-reactive) materials reduce energy density of the battery, the development of low-weight packages is a challenging task. In addition to that, other requirements have to be fulfilled: mechanical stability and durability, sealing (e.g. high permeation barrier against humidity for lithium-ion technology), high packing efficiency, possible installation of safety devices (current interrupt device, valve, etc.), chemical inertness, cost issues, and others. Finally, proper cell design has to be considered for effective thermal management (i.e. cooling and heating) of battery packs.

  6. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  7. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

  8. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

  9. Polyphosphazine-based polymer materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Robert V.; Avci, Recep; Groenewold, Gary S.

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of removing contaminant matter from porous materials include applying a polymer material to a contaminated surface, irradiating the contaminated surface to cause redistribution of contaminant matter, and removing at least a portion of the polymer material from the surface. Systems for decontaminating a contaminated structure comprising porous material include a radiation device configured to emit electromagnetic radiation toward a surface of a structure, and at least one spray device configured to apply a capture material onto the surface of the structure. Polymer materials that can be used in such methods and systems include polyphosphazine-based polymer materials having polyphosphazine backbone segments and side chain groups that include selected functional groups. The selected functional groups may include iminos, oximes, carboxylates, sulfonates, .beta.-diketones, phosphine sulfides, phosphates, phosphites, phosphonates, phosphinates, phosphine oxides, monothio phosphinic acids, and dithio phosphinic acids.

  10. Analytic 1D pn junction diode photocurrent solutions following ionizing radiation and including time-dependent changes in the carrier lifetime.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axness, Carl L.; Keiter, Eric Richard; Kerr, Bert (New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM)

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuit simulation tools (e.g., SPICE) have become invaluable in the development and design of electronic circuits in radiation environments. These codes are often employed to study the effect of many thousands of devices under transient current conditions. Device-scale simulation tools (e.g., MEDICI) are commonly used in the design of individual semiconductor components, but require computing resources that make their incorporation into a circuit code impossible for large-scale circuits. Analytic solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation, an approximation to the carrier transport equations, may be used to characterize the transient currents at nodes within a circuit simulator. We present new transient 1D excess carrier density and photocurrent density solutions to the ambipolar diffusion equation for low-level radiation pulses that take into account a finite device geometry, ohmic fields outside the depleted region, and an arbitrary change in the carrier lifetime due to neutron irradiation or other effects. The solutions are specifically evaluated for the case of an abrupt change in the carrier lifetime during or after, a step, square, or piecewise linear radiation pulse. Noting slow convergence of the raw Fourier series for certain parameter sets, we use closed-form formulas for some of the infinite sums to produce 'partial closed-form' solutions for the above three cases. These 'partial closed-form' solutions converge with only a few tens of terms, which enables efficient large-scale circuit simulations.

  11. A 3-Stage Shunt-Feedback Op-Amp having 19.2dB Gain, 54.1dBm OIP3 (2GHz), and 252 OIP3/PDC ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodwell, Mark J. W.

    A 3-Stage Shunt-Feedback Op-Amp having 19.2dB Gain, 54.1dBm OIP3 (2GHz), and 252 OIP3/PDC ratio-Miller compensation demon- strating 19.2dB mid-band S21 gain, PDC = 1020mW. At 2GHz operation the amplifier shows 54.1dBm OIP3 and a record high OIP3/PDC ratio = 252. Through the use of a 350GHz f , fmax 0.5um InP HBT

  12. Fossil energy materials needs assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, R.T.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of needs for materials of construction for fossil energy systems was prepared by ORNL staff members who conducted a literature search and interviewed various individuals and organizations that are active in the area of fossil energy technology. Critical materials problems associated with fossil energy systems are identified. Background information relative to the various technologies is given and materials research needed to enhance the viability and improve the economics of fossil energy processes is discussed. The assessment is presented on the basis of materials-related disciplines that impact fossil energy material development. These disciplines include the design-materials interface, materials fabrication technology, corrosion and materials compatibility, wear phenomena, ceramic materials, and nondestructive testing. The needs of these various disciplines are correlated with the emerging fossil energy technologies that require materials consideration. Greater emphasis is given to coal technology - particularly liquefaction, gasification, and fluidized bed combustion - than to oil and gas technologies because of the perceived inevitability of US dependence on coal conversion and utilization systems as a major part of our total energy production.

  13. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  14. Method for synthesizing powder materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, R.J.; Ho, P.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for synthesizing ultrafine powder materials, for example, ceramic and metal powders, comprises admitting gaseous reactants from which the powder material is to be formed into a vacuum reaction chamber maintained at a pressure less than atmospheric and at a temperature less than about 400/degree/K (127/degree/C). The gaseous reactants are directed through a glow discharge provided in the vacuum reaction chamber to form the ultrafine powder material. 1 fig.

  15. Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: understanding of composite material...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of composite material behavior in realistic wind applications Composite-Materials Fatigue Database Updated On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

  17. PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Jr., J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mechanisms of turbine materials in this environment, whichTurbines Research Opportunities: •Thermodynamics and kinetics of material-for designing improved materials. Gas turbines of the closed

  18. Materials Sciences and Engineering Program | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Sciences and Engineering Program SHARE BES Materials Sciences and Engineering Program The ORNL materials sciences and engineering program supported by the Department of...

  19. NUCLEAR MATERIALS PROGRESS REPORTS FOR 1980

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olander, D.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramics", Progress in Material Science 21, 307 (1976}. S. -heating techniques in material processing. Thermal analysisIrreversible Thermodynamics in Materials Problems", in Mass

  20. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    toughness of advanced materials ?? By Maximilien E. LauneyAbstract: Few engineering materials are limited by theirare manufactured from materials that are comparatively low

  1. Cybersecurity Awareness Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cybersecurity Awareness Materials Cybersecurity Awareness Materials The OCIO develops and distributes a variety of awareness material to be used during cyber awareness campaigns or...

  2. UESC Workshop Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    UESC Workshop Materials UESC Workshop Materials Presentation covers the UESC Workshop Materials and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG)...

  3. Materials Theory, Modeling and Simulation | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Quantum Monte Carlo Density Functional Theory Monte Carlo Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Chemical and Materials Theory...

  4. Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Disordered materials hold promise for better batteries Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries February 21, 2014 | Tags: Chemistry, Hopper, Materials Science,...

  5. Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

  6. Computational materials: Embedding Computation into the Everyday

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomsen, Mette Ramsgard; Karmon, Ayelet

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational materials: Embedding Computation into thepaper presents research into material design merging thean integrated part of our material surroundings. Rather than

  7. Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical & Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the...

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechnologiesWavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion Materials Overview of SSL Wavelength Conversion Materials Rare-Earth Phosphors Inorganic phosphors doped with...

  9. Magnesium Research in the Automotive Lightweighting Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Life Cycle Modeling of Propulsion Materials Overview of LightweightingMaterials: Past, Present and FutureMaterials Ionic Liquids as Novel Engine Lubricants or Lubricant...

  10. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Launey, Maximilien E.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is invariably a critical material parameter for many suchbulk) materials that we currently use in critical structuralsame as the critical crack size (a c ). In materials with a

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: wind turbine blade materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    materials Wind-Turbine Blade Materials and Reliability Progress On May 21, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy, Research &...

  12. Material-based design computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxman, Neri

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The institutionalized separation between form, structure and material, deeply embedded in modernist design theory, paralleled by a methodological partitioning between modeling, analysis and fabrication, resulted in ...

  13. Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    June 2011 DOE STANDARD Nuclear Materials Control and Accountability U.S. Department of Energy AREA SANS Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public...

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Participated in AMII to Support American-Made Wind-Turbine Blades On December 3, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Materials Science, News, News &...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: materials science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Selected for Outstanding Engineer Award On December 10, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Solar...

  16. MULTIDISCIPLINARY FREE MATERIAL OPTIMIZATION 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonlinear Anal. and Mech., Pitman, London, pages 136–212, 1979. [22] R. Werner. Free Material Optimization. PhD thesis, Institute of Applied Mathematics II, ...

  17. Toda Cathode Materials Production Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Cathode Materials Production Facility 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 13-17, 2013 David Han, Yasuhiro Abe Toda America Inc. Project ID: ARRAVT017...

  18. Solder Joint Materials By Design

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - * Need to understand effect of higher temperatures on material microstructural evolution and property degradation 3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recent successes with metal-organic framework (MOF) materials by combining them with dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). ... Fuel-Cell-Powered Mobile Lights Tested, Proven,...

  20. New Materials for Spintronics. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Abstract: One of the critical materials needs for the development of spin electronics is diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMS) which retain their ferromagnetism at and...

  1. Materials for Harsh Service Conditions:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tomorrow Program EPRI Fossil Materials and Repair Program The DOE Clean Coal Plant Optimization Technologies Program includes R&D on high-temperature turbine alloys in its...

  2. Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    and batteries/fuel cells. Nanostructured electrode materials have demonstrated superior electrochemical of polymethine dyes electronic spectra is crucial for successful design of the new molecules with optimized

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: materials technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Researchers Win CSP:ELEMENTS Funding Award On June 4, 2014, in Advanced Materials Laboratory, Concentrating Solar Power, Energy, Energy Storage, Facilities, National...

  4. Materials and Methods Strain construction, materials, and Net1 mutagenesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shou, Wenying

    Materials and Methods Strain construction, materials, and Net1 mutagenesis All strains used and destruction boxes (Clb2C2DK100)HA3 was used in over-expression experiments with Clb2 (1). Net1 mutant constructs were created as previously described (2). Briefly, a wild type NET1-myc9 epitope tagged construct

  5. From 1D Chain to 3D Network: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties of K2MnSn2Se6, K2MnSnSe4, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    and MnSe4 tetrahedra, with large channels hosting the K+ cations. III is a layered compound containing 2 tetrahedra into two-dimensional (2D) sheets.1 The 1D 1 [SnQ3]2- rib- bons have also been observed- rahedra to Ag atoms, with large channels hosting the K+ cations.4 In this paper, we report the preparation

  6. Numerical Simulation of PulseTube Refrigerators: 1D model I.A. Lyulina 1 , R.M.M. Mattheij 1 , A.S. Tijsseling 1 , A.T.A.M. de Waele 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Numerical Simulation of Pulse­Tube Refrigerators: 1D model I.A. Lyulina 1 , R.M.M. Mattheij 1 , A of a pulse­tube refrigerator. Conservation equations describing compressible gas flow in the tube are solved, calculate the average enthalpy flow and estimate the refrigeration power. Keywords: pulse­tube refrigerator

  7. This is a 1D model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) that was developed in MATLAB. The model uses cycle inputs such as the fluid mass flow and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    This is a 1D model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator (AMRR) that was developed of an Active Magnetic Regenerator Refrigerator 1. Governing Equations Figure 1 shows a schematic of an active in MATLAB. The model uses cycle inputs such as the fluid mass flow and magnetic field profiles, fluid

  8. K.Trabbic-Carlson1, D.E.Meyer1, L.Liu1, R.Piervincenzi1, N.Nath1, T.LaBean1 and A.Chilkoti2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaBean, Thomas H.

    K.Trabbic-Carlson1, D.E.Meyer1, L.Liu1, R.Piervincenzi1, N.Nath1, T.LaBean1 and A.Chilkoti2,3 1 gradually collapses and sheds bound water resulting in the formation of intramolecular contacts between non

  9. Conversion of Human Steroid 5[beta]-Reductase (AKR1D1) into 3[beta]-Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase by Single Point Mutation E120H: Example of Perfect Enzyme Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Mo; Drury, Jason E.; Christianson, David W.; Penning, Trevor M. (UPENN)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Human aldo-keto reductase 1D1 (AKR1D1) and AKR1C enzymes are essential for bile acid biosynthesis and steroid hormone metabolism. AKR1D1 catalyzes the 5{beta}-reduction of {Delta}{sup 4}-3-ketosteroids, whereas AKR1C enzymes are hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (HSDs). These enzymes share high sequence identity and catalyze 4-pro-(R)-hydride transfer from NADPH to an electrophilic carbon but differ in that one residue in the conserved AKR catalytic tetrad, His120 (AKR1D1 numbering), is substituted by a glutamate in AKR1D1. We find that the AKR1D1 E120H mutant abolishes 5{beta}-reductase activity and introduces HSD activity. However, the E120H mutant unexpectedly favors dihydrosteroids with the 5{alpha}-configuration and, unlike most of the AKR1C enzymes, shows a dominant stereochemical preference to act as a 3{beta}-HSD as opposed to a 3{alpha}-HSD. The catalytic efficiency achieved for 3{beta}-HSD activity is higher than that observed for any AKR to date. High resolution crystal structures of the E120H mutant in complex with epiandrosterone, 5{beta}-dihydrotestosterone, and {Delta}{sup 4}-androstene-3,17-dione elucidated the structural basis for this functional change. The glutamate-histidine substitution prevents a 3-ketosteroid from penetrating the active site so that hydride transfer is directed toward the C3 carbonyl group rather than the {Delta}{sup 4}-double bond and confers 3{beta}-HSD activity on the 5{beta}-reductase. Structures indicate that stereospecificity of HSD activity is achieved because the steroid flips over to present its {alpha}-face to the A-face of NADPH. This is in contrast to the AKR1C enzymes, which can invert stereochemistry when the steroid swings across the binding pocket. These studies show how a single point mutation in AKR1D1 can introduce HSD activity with unexpected configurational and stereochemical preference.

  10. Extended Rayleigh model of bubble evolution with material strength compared to detailed dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glinsky, M.E.; Amendt, P.A.; Bailey, D.S.; London, R.A.; Rubenchik, A.M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Strauss, M. [Israel Atomic Energy Commission, Beersheba (Israel). Nuclear Research Center-Negev

    1997-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The validity of an extended Rayleigh model for laser generated bubbles in soft tissue is examined. This model includes surface tension, viscosity, a realistic water equation of state, material strength and failure, stress wave emission, and linear growth of interface instabilities. It is compared to dynamic simulations using LATIS, which include stress wave propagation, water equation of state, material strength and failure, and viscosity. The model and the simulations are compared using 1-D spherical geometry with bubble in center and a 2-D cylindrical geometry of a laser fiber in water with a bubble formed at the end of the fiber. The model executes over 300x faster on computer than the dynamic simulations.

  11. Nuclear Material Control and Accountability

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

  12. Commercializationof Dredged-Material Decontamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Commercializationof Dredged- Material Decontamination Technologies Keitb U?Jones isa senior Keith375,000 mdmmnentalm@m*ng m3 of dredged material per year. The need to develop public-priuate p r o g r assessmentsand dredged materialmanagemart. He istbe tecbnfcalprogram managerfor tbe WRM NXm Harbor Sediment

  13. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

  14. Creating Wave-Focusing Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. G. Ramm

    2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

  15. Material stabilization characterization management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GIBSON, M.W.

    1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

  16. Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g. within high-Tc superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB2, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde, Denmark ISBN 87-550-3244-3 ISSN 0907-0079 #12;Superconductivity

  17. Reflectance Function Approximation for Material Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Charles R.

    Reflectance Function Approximation for Material Classification Edward Wild CS 766 Final Project This report summarizes the results of a project to approximate reflectance functions and classify materials to classify materials. Classification algorithms are proposed to deal with unseen materials. Experimental

  18. Materials Science and Engineering Program Objectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Materials Science and Engineering Program Objectives Within the scope of the MSE mission, the objectives of the Materials Engineering Program are to produce graduates who: A. practice materials engineering in a broad range of industries including materials production, semiconductors, medical

  19. Materials 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of --Materials This publication refers syllabuses Materials The Department occupies newly refurbished premises over four floors of the Royal School and research in materials science and engineering, in particular nanomaterials, structural ceramics, theory

  20. Advanced Materials Center of Excellence Jason Boehm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Materials Center of Excellence Webinar Jason Boehm Program Coordination Office National · Materials Genome Initiative · Advanced Materials Center of Excellence · Overview Federal Funding Opportunity one Center focused on Advanced Materials Depending on FY2014 Funding NIST expects to announce