National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for material substitution ii

  1. LEAD SUBSTITUTION AND ELIMINATION STUDY, PART II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. MARTINEZ; M. COURNOYER

    2001-01-01

    Within the Nuclear Materials Technology Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory, lead is used as shielding for a variety of operations, including actinide chemistry, weapons production, radiochemistry, and analytical chemistry. In this study, waste minimization issues associated with replacing lead shielding with non-hazardous materials are addressed. These include institutional program available to support this effort, the hazards and accompanying controls grouped with lead shielding, operations that use lead bricks and how this effects the selection of the substitute. Life cycle management issues are also examined. As a final step, an approach to get buy-in from both technical and budget minded employees is presented.

  2. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Training Materials PARS II Training Materials PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending...

  3. substitutions substitution?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lescanne, Pierre

    ) P ## M [P =] (B) introduces two new operators. The syntax is extended. = : T erm ## Substitution _[_] : T erm #2; Substitution ## T erm = and _[_] introduce a new sort Substitution. #12; 14 Closures _[_] must

  4. Design of I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductors through Element Substitution: The Thermodynamic Stability Limit and Chemical Trend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    Design of I2-II-IV-VI4 Semiconductors through Element Substitution: The Thermodynamic Stability that this element-substitution design is thermodynamically limited, that is, although I2-II-IV-VI4 with I = Cu, Ag for future design of new quaternary semiconductors. I. INTRODUCTION Because all component elements are earth

  5. Mn-Substituted Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials Based on ZnSe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Mn-Substituted Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Materials Based on ZnSe: Nanostructures That May Lead research that deals with synthesis, characterization, and modification of organic-inorganic hybrid to integrate functional materials that utilize both electron charge and spin.1 Thus, the introduction

  6. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAandSummary Areas of theConference on Fuel Cells |ActionSign up forPARS II

  7. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  8. Effect of substitutional defects on Kambersky damping in L1{sub 0} magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2015-02-16

    Kambersky damping, representing the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin orbit interaction, is calculated for L1{sub 0} FePt, FePd, CoPt, and CoPd alloys versus chemical degree of order. When more substitutional defects exist in the alloys, damping is predicted to increase due to the increase of the spin-flip channels allowed by the broken symmetry. It is demonstrated that this corresponds to an enhanced density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level, owing to the rounding of the DOS with loss of long-range order. Both the damping and the DOS of the Co-based alloy are found to be less affected by the disorder. Pd-based alloys are predicted to have lower damping than Pt-based alloys, making them more suitable for high density spintronic applications.

  9. SUBSTITUTED IRON OXIDES FOR THE GRANT ENTITLED LASER PROCESSING OF ADVANCED MAGNETIC MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monica Sorescu

    2004-03-01

    Structural and morphological characteristics of (1-x){alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xSnO{sub 2} (x = 0.0-1.0) nanoparticles obtained under hydrothermal conditions have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). On the basis of the Rietveld structure refinements of the XRD spectra at low tin concentrations, it was found that Sn{sup 4+} ions partially substitute for Fe{sup 3+} at the octahedral sites and also occupy the interstitial octahedral sites which are vacant in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} corundum structure. A phase separation of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SnO{sub 2} was observed for x {ge} 0.4: the {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} structure containing tin decreases simultaneously with the increase of the SnO{sub 2} phase containing substitutional iron ions. The mean particle dimension decreases from 70 nm to 6 nm, as the molar fraction x increases up to x = 1.0. The estimated solubility limits in the nanoparticle system (1-x){alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}-xSnO{sub 2} synthesized under hydrothermal conditions are: x {le} 0.2 for Sn{sup 4+} in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and x {ge} 0.7 for Fe{sup 3+} in SnO{sub 2}. These findings are in press in the Journal of Physics and Chemistry of Solids.

  10. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nation’s nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s’ culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idaho’s desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  11. Alkyl group substitution by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction): Alkly group selectivity and deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, A.P.; Kitching, W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides information regarding the selectivity of alkyl groups and the nature of the transition state for C-H palladation by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction). The kinetic deuterium isotope effects are also presented. 21 refs.

  12. Computational insights on crystal structures of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with either Ca²? or Ca²? substituted by Sr²?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogt, Leslie [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Ertem, Mehmed Z. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Pal, Rhitankar [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Brudvig, Gary W. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Batista, Victor S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-01-27

    The oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II can function with either Ca²? or Sr²? as the heterocation, but the reason for differing turnover rates remains unresolved despite reported X-ray crystal structures for both forms. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, we optimize structures with each cation in both the resting state (S?) and in a series of reduced states (S?, S??, and S-?). Through comparison with experimental data, we determine that X-ray crystal structures with either Ca²? or Sr²? are most consistent with the S-? state, Mn?[III,III,III,II] with O4 and O5 protonated. As expected, the QM/MM models show that Ca²?/Sr²? substitution results in elongation of the heterocation bonds and displaces terminal waters W3 and W4. The optimized structures also show that hydrogen-bonded W5 is displaced in all S states with Sr²? as the heterocation, suggesting that this water may play a critical role during water oxidation.

  13. Reactor materials study of EBR-II and BN350 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yilmaz, Fatma

    2002-01-01

    would lead to reviewing and combining the data from both sides as it concerns important issues for the Light Water Reactor (LWR) and fast reactor communities. The most important issue is the applicability of the BN350 and EBR-II data for the studies...

  14. Band-Gap Engineering of Zinc Oxide Colloids via Lattice Substitution with Sulfur Leading to Materials with Advanced Properties for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nabben, Reinhard

    Band-Gap Engineering of Zinc Oxide Colloids via Lattice Substitution with Sulfur Leading requires a precise control over electronic properties. Zinc oxide is favorable for large the full inorganic UV protection are made. KEYWORDS: metal oxides, semiconductors, band gap engineering

  15. Modeling rf breakdown arcs II: plasma / materials interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insepov, Zeke; Proslier, Thomas; Mahalingam, Sudhakar; Veitzer, S

    2010-01-01

    Continuing the description of rf vacuum arcs from an earlier paper, we describe some aspects of the interaction of vacuum arcs that involve the surface. This paper describes aspects of plasma materials interactions that affect the arc and models measurement of the surface field using the Tonks-Frenkel and the spinodal electrohydrodynamic instabilities, a realistic model for the generation and evaluation of high field enhancements, unipolar arcs, creep and other effects.

  16. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly MCLR Program technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.; Amrane, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. This report summarizes the research conducted during the third quarter of calendar year 1995 on the following projects: Thermophysical properties of HCFC alternatives; Compatibility of manufacturing process fluids with HFC refrigerants and ester lubricants; Compatibility of motor materials used in air-conditioning for retrofits with alternative refrigerants and lubricants; Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants; Products of motor burnouts; Accelerated test methods for predicting the life of motor materials exposed to refrigerant-lubricant mixtures; Investigation of flushing and clean-out methods; Investigation into the fractionation of refrigerant blends; Lean flammability limits as a fundamental refrigerant property; Effect of selected contaminants in AC and R equipment; Study of foaming characteristics; Study of lubricant circulation in systems; Evaluation of HFC-245ca for commercial use in low pressure chillers; Infrared analysis of refrigerant mixtures; Refrigerant database; Refrigerant toxicity survey; Thermophysical properties of HFC-32, HFC-123, HCFC-124 and HFC-125; Thermophysical properties of HFC-143a and HFC-152a; Theoretical evaluations of R-22 alternative fluids; Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals; Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants; Viscosity, solubility and density measurements of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures; Electrohydrodynamic enhancement of pool and in-tube boiling of alternative refrigerants; Accelerated screening methods; and more.

  17. Utilizing environmental friendly iron as a substitution element in spinel structured cathode materials for safer high energy lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong -Min; Liu, Yijin; Liu, Jue; Yu, Xiqian; Zhou, Yong -Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Khalifah, Peter; Ariyoshi, Kingo; Nam, Kyung -Wan; et al

    2015-12-03

    Suppressing oxygen release from lithium ion battery cathodes during heating is a critical issue for the improvement of the battery safety characteristics because oxygen can exothermically react with the flammable electrolyte and cause thermal runaway. Previous studies have shown that oxygen release can be reduced by the migration of transition metal cations from octahedral sites to tetrahedral sites during heating. Such site-preferred migration is determined by the electronic structure of cations. In addition, taking advantage of the unique electronic structure of the environmental friendly Fe, this is selected as substitution element in a high energy density material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 to improvemore »the thermal stability. The optimized LiNi0.33Mn1.33Fe0.33O4 material shows significantly improved thermal stability compared with the unsubstituted one, demonstrated by no observed oxygen release at temperatures as high as 500°C. Due to the electrochemical contribution of Fe, the high energy density feature of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is well preserved.« less

  18. The Impact of Aluminum and Iron Substitution on the Structure and Electrochemistry of Li[Ni0.4Co0.2-yMyMn0.4]O2 Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIlcox, James D.; Rodriguez, Efrain E.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2009-07-23

    Li[Ni0.4Co0.2-yMyMn0.4]O2 (0<_y<_0.2) (M=Al) and Li[Ni0.4Co0.15Fe0.05Mn0.4]O2 compounds were prepared in order to investigate the effect of replacement of all or part of the cobalt on the structural and electrochemical properties. The impact of substitution on the structure has been examined by both x-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The incorporation of aluminum has minimal effect on the anti-site defect concentration, but leads to structural changes that affect electrochemical performance. The most important effect is an opening of the lithium slab dimension upon substitution, which results in improved rate performance compared to the parent compound. In contrast, the lithium slab dimension is not affected by iron substitution and no rate enhancement effect is observed. The cycling stability of aluminum containing materials is superior to both the parent material and iron-substituted materials.

  19. Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Electrode Materials with the Na0.44MnO2 Structure: Effect ofTitanium Substitution on Physical and Electrochemical Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doeff, Marca M; Saint, Juliette A.; Doeff, Marca M; Wilcox, James D.

    2008-03-10

    The physical and electrochemical properties of LixMnO2 and LixTi0.11Mn0.89O2 synthesized from precursors made by glycine-nitrate combustion (GNC) and solid-state synthesis methods (SS) are examined in this paper. The highest specific capacities in lithium cells are obtained for SS-LixMnO2 electrodes at low current densities, but GNC-LixTi0.11Mn0.89O2 electrodes show the best high rate performance. These results can be explained by changes in the voltage characteristics and differences in the particle morphologies induced by the Ti-substitution and synthesis method. Ti-substitution also results in a decrease in the electronic conductivity, but greatly improves the thermal properties and imparts dissolution resistance to the electrode. For these reasons, it is preferable to use LixTi0.11MnO0.89O2 in lithium battery configurations rather than LixMnO2. Suggestions for improving the electrochemical performance of the Ti-substituted variant are given based on the results described herein.

  1. II*

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas2 II Now

  2. Computational insights on crystal structures of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with either Ca²? or Ca²? substituted by Sr²?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogt, Leslie; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Pal, Rhitankar; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-01-15

    The oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II can function with either Ca²? or Sr²? as the heterocation, but the reason for differing turnover rates remains unresolved despite reported X-ray crystal structures for both forms. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, we optimize structures with each cation in both the resting state (S?) and in a series of reduced states (S?, S??, and S-?). Through comparison with experimental data, we determine that X-ray crystal structures with either Ca²? or Sr²? are most consistent with the S-? state, Mn?[III,III,III,II] with O4 and O5 protonated. As expected, the QM/MM models show that Ca²?/Sr²? substitutionmore »results in elongation of the heterocation bonds and displaces terminal waters W3 and W4. The optimized structures also show that hydrogen-bonded W5 is displaced in all S states with Sr²? as the heterocation, suggesting that this water may play a critical role during water oxidation.« less

  3. Stability and Rate Capability of Al Substituted Lithium-Rich...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lithium-Rich High-Manganese Content Oxide Materials for Li-Ion Batteries The structures, electrochemical properties and thermal stability of Al-substituted lithium-excess...

  4. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  5. Mode II fracture mechanics of moso bamboo for application in novel engineering materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellison, Rachel (Rachel M.)

    2015-01-01

    Bamboo has been used as a structural material for thousands of years. Recently there has been increasing interest in its use as a modem construction material. In this study, as part of a larger project to characterize the ...

  6. INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and Security Plan was modified. We also found that some highly enriched uranium in a complex material configuration was not removed from Sandia. This material was designated as Category III material using a methodology for assessing the attractiveness of complex materials that was not specifically addressed in any current DOE directive. Although DOE and NNSA officials believed that this designation was appropriate, the methodology used to support this designation had not, as of the time of our review, been incorporated into the DOE directives system. Historically, the Department has considered the categorization of SNM to be an important national security and public policy issue. Consequently, we believe that expedited action should be taken to formalize this methodology in the DOE directives system and that it be disseminated throughout the Department of Energy complex.

  7. Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation *Preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:08:05 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section II.C. 1. Substitution for Anadromous Fish Losses Section II. D. 8

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles:...

  9. MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET Virex II 256 One-Step Disinfectant Cleaner & Deodorant (CAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    with good industrial hygiene and safety practice Corrosive material (See sections 8 and 10). Handling: Avoid be more susceptible to irritating effects Unusual hazards: Hygiene measures: Handle in accordance

  10. Growth, spectral and thermal studies of an efficient NLO material: Diaquadicinnamatocadmium(II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Sunalya M.; Sudarsanakumar, M. R.; Dhanya, V. S. [Department of Chemistry, Mahatma Gandhi College, Thiruvananthapuram 695004, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28

    A nonlinear metal–organic crystal, diaquadicinnamatocadmium(II) has been grown by controlled gel diffusion technique. Sodium metasilicate was used to prepare the gel. The chemical composition of the crystal has been determined by CHN analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction studies confirm the crystalline nature of the grown crystal. Functional groups present in the compound were identified by FT-IR spectral analysis. The thermal decomposition of the compound was studied using thermogravimetry (TG). The optical transparency range and the lower cut-off wavelength were identified from the UV-Visible-NIR spectrum. The NLO activity of the grown crystal was confirmed using Kurtz and Perry powder test.

  11. Battery resource assessment. Subtask II. 5. Battery manufacturing capability recycling of battery materials. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemsler, P.

    1981-02-01

    Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials. Each recycle process has been designed to produce a product material which can be used directly as a raw material by the battery manufacturer. Metal recoverabilities are in the range of 93 to 95% for all processes. In each case, capital and operating costs have been developed for a recycling plant which processes 100,000 electric vehicle batteries per year. These costs have been developed based on material and energy balances, equipment lists, factored installation costs, and manpower estimates. In general, there are no technological barriers for recycling in the Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine and Zinc/Bromine battery systems. The recycling processes are based on essentially conventional, demonstrate technology. The lead times required to build battery recycling plants based on these processes is comparable to that of any other new plant. The total elapsed time required from inception to plant operation is approximately 3 to 5 y. The recycling process for the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/sulfide battery systems are not based on conventional technology. In particular, mechanical systems for dismantling these batteries must be developed.

  12. Structural Dimensions, Fabrication, Materials, and Operational History for Types I and II Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    2000-08-16

    Radioactive waste is confined in 48 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste will eventually be processed and transferred to other site facilities for stabilization. Based on waste removal and processing schedules, many of the tanks, including those with flaws and/or defects, will be required to be in service for another 15 to 20 years. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a leak-tight barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during design basis event which include loading from both normal service and abnormal conditions.

  13. FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  14. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  15. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  16. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  17. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. System and method for producing substitute natural gas from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, Raymond (Avondale, AZ)

    2012-08-07

    The present invention provides a system and method for producing substitute natural gas and electricity, while mitigating production of any greenhouse gasses. The system includes a hydrogasification reactor, to form a gas stream including natural gas and a char stream, and an oxygen burner to combust the char material to form carbon oxides. The system also includes an algae farm to convert the carbon oxides to hydrocarbon material and oxygen.

  19. Structural Underpinnings of the Enhanced Cycling Stability upon Al-Substitution in LiNi0.45Mn0.45Co0.1-yAlyO2 Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conry, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    materials for Li-ion batteries Thomas E. Conry, a,b Apurvamaterials in Li-ion batteries. Synchrotron-based high-materials for Li-ion batteries. LiNi z Mn z Co 1-2z O 2 (NMC

  20. Emissive polymeric materials for optoelectronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Chichak, Kelly Scott (Clifton Park, NY); Cella, James Anthony (Clifton Park, NY); Lewis, Larry Neil (Scotia, NY); Janora, Kevin Henry (Schenectady, NY)

    2011-07-05

    Polymers including at least one structural unit derived from a compound of formula I or including at least one pendant group of formula II may be used in optoelectronic devices ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1, R.sup.3, R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are independently hydrogen, alkyl, alkoxy, oxaalkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, heteroaryl, substituted alkyl; substituted alkoxy, substituted oxaalkyl, substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted heteroaryl; R.sup.1a is hydrogen or alkyl; R.sup.2 is alkylene, substituted alkylene, oxaalkylene, CO, or CO.sub.2; R.sup.2a is alkylene; R.sup.5 is independently at each occurrence hydrogen, alkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, alkoxy, carboxy, substituted alkyl; substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted alkoxy, X is halo, triflate, --B(OR.sup.1a).sub.2, or ##STR00002## located at the 2, 5- or 2, 7-positions; and L is derived from phenylpyridine, tolylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, phenylisoquinoline, dibenzoquinozaline, fluorenylpyridine, ketopyrrole, 2-(1-naphthyl)benzoxazole)), 2-phenylbenzoxazole, 2-phenylbenzothiazole, coumarin, thienylpyridine, phenylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, 3-methoxy-2-phenylpyridine, thienylpyridine, phenylimine, vinylpyridine, pyridylnaphthalene, pyridylpyrrole, pyridylimidazole, phenylindole, derivatives thereof or combinations thereof.

  1. The contents of this article and referenced websites, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the site are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    The contents of this article and referenced websites, such as text, graphics, images, and other material contained on the site are for informational purposes only. The content is not intended for the contents of any "off-site" web page referenced from this server. © APS Healthcare, Inc., White Plains, NY

  2. Preparation and characterization of aryl-substituted polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, D.A.; Loy, D.A.; Baugher, B.M.; Wheeler, D.R.; Assink, R.A.; Alam, T.M.; Saunders, R.

    1998-09-01

    Polymerizations of aryltrialkoxysilanes generally afford soluble oligomeric or polymeric aryl-substituted silsesquioxanes. This is in spite of being based on trifunctional precursors capable of forming highly crosslinked and insoluble network polymers. In this study, soluble phenyl, benzyl, and phenethyl-substituted silsesquioxane oligomers and polymers were prepared by hydrolyzing their respective triethoxysilyl precursor with water or aqueous acid. Additional samples of the polymers were prepared by heating the materials at 100 C or 200 C under vacuum in order to drive the condensation chemistry. One sample of polybenzylsilsesquioxane was heated at 200 C with catalytic NaOH. The resulting materials were characterized using solution {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 29}Si NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography, and differential scanning calorimetry. Of particular interest was the effect of the aryl substituent, and processing conditions on the molecular weight and glass transition temperatures of the polysilsesquioxanes.

  3. Energy-substitution in the paper industry in Brazil: A translog function approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verillo, J.

    1988-01-01

    Unlike the majority of studies, this study focuses at the micro level instead of the aggregate. The method employed involves the use of econometric techniques to estimate translog cost and production functions, and the estimation of the Allen Elasticities of Substitution (AES) from the coefficients. The data used come from firms in the paper industry of Brazil during January, 1982 to December, 1987. When using aggregated data, findings concerning energy-capital substitution are often controversial. Some authors find substitutability, while others find complementarity between energy and capital. This study found that this ambiguity also appears at the micro level. Even when the firms belong to the same industry, two inputs can be complements in one firm and substitutes in another. The basic findings are: (1) Energy demand is found to be responsive to price changes, (2) Fossil fuels and biomass are substitutes, (3) Biomass and capital are substitutes, (4) Fossil fuels and hydroelectricity are complements, (5) Hydroelectricity and capital are complements, (6) Labor and materials are substitutes, and (7) Capital and labor are substitutes. The other elasticities are ambiguous, varying from firm to firm, or not significant at the 5% level.

  4. Published in 'Asian Ceramic Science for Electronics II and Electroceramics in Japan V', Year: 2002, pp: 15-20 Periodical: Key Engineering Materials Vols. 228-229

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Haydn H.

    Published in 'Asian Ceramic Science for Electronics II and Electroceramics in Japan V', Year: 2002://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Asian Ceramic Science for Electronics II and Electroceramics in Japan V', Year: 2002://www.ttp.net #12;Published in 'Asian Ceramic Science for Electronics II and Electroceramics in Japan V', Year: 2002

  5. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and...

  6. Polycyclic Aromatic Triptycenes: Oxygen Substitution Cyclization Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VanVeller, Brett

    The cyclization and planarization of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with concomitant oxygen substitution was achieved through acid catalyzed transetherification and oxygen-radical reactions. The triptycene scaffold ...

  7. The European Community feed grain substitute problem: an econometric analysis of import demand for feedstuffs in the European Community 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, James Leroy

    1981-01-01

    THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY FEED GRAIN SUBSTITUTE PROBLEM: AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OP IMPORT DEMAND FOR FEEDSTUFPS IN THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY A Thesis JAMES LEROY TUCEER, II Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial... fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1981 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY FEED GRAIN SUBSTITUTE PROBLEM: AN ECONOMETRIC ANALYSIS OF IMPORT DEMAND FOR FEEDSTUFFS IN THE EUROPEAN COMMUNITY A...

  8. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  9. Wet-Weather Pollution Prevention through Materials Substitution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    wool fiber, and/or polymers. · Road runoff has been shown to contain SVOCs, including PAHs;3 Eikelboom, Ruwiel, and Goumans (2001) · Late 1970s ­ early 1980s, Dutch began looking for ways to recycle

  10. Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovemberDOE'sManagement ofOh, theTransitOklahoma Tribe

  11. Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovemberDOE'sManagement ofOh, theTransitOklahoma Tribe10 DOE

  12. Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills and ReduceNovemberDOE'sManagement ofOh, theTransitOklahoma Tribe10

  13. Products having multiple-substituted polysiloxane monolayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wirth, M.J.; Fatunmbi, H.O.

    1998-02-10

    A protective monolayer is formed on e.g. silica gel and glass surfaces comprising a monolayer of silicon and oxygen atoms which is substituted with first and second hydrocarbyl substituents.

  14. Instruction Guide Temporary Substitution for Approvers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sin, Peter

    of 2 5. Search for the name of the temporary approver (enter the name or the first letter of the last. If a long term substitution needs to take place (more than two weeks) then a new Approver should

  15. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Siemann, Stefan, E-mail: ssiemann@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  16. Li ion migration in Li3PO4 electrolytes: Effects of O vacancies and N substitutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holzwarth, Natalie

    Li ion migration in Li3PO4 electrolytes: Effects of O vacancies and N substitutions Y. A. Dua and N an understanding of detailed mechanisms of Li ion migration in these materials. In previous work, (7) we used first-principles calculations to model Li ion migration in crystalline Li3PO4, finding very good agreement with the experimental

  17. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mohamad Sleiman

    2014-01-01

    thermal comfort conditions. Solar Energy 85, 3085-3102.surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance-Part I:of roofing product databases. . Solar Energy Materials and

  18. Amination of electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); Pagoria, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Schmidt, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process to aminate electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen using quaternary hydrazinium salts. The use of trialkylhydrazinium halide, e.g., trimethylhydrazinium iodide, as well as hydroxylamine, alkoxylamines, and 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole to produce aminated aromatic structures, such as 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB), 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 3,5-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (DATNT), is described. DATB and TATB are useful insensitive high explosives. TATB is also used for the preparation of benzenehexamine, a starting material for the synthesis of novel materials (optical imaging devices, liquid crystals, ferromagnetic compounds).

  19. Microwave and infrared dielectric response of monoclinic bismuth zinc niobate based pyrochlore ceramics with ion substitution in A site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KuÂ?el, Petr

    ceramics with ion substitution in A site Hong Wanga Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key and permittivity of Bi1.92M0.08 Zn0.64Nb1.36 O7 M=Zn,Ca,Cd,Sr,Ba ceramics remain almost the same as in Bi2Zn2/3Nb4/3O7; only the Ba substituted ceramics have higher permittivity due to multiphase structure. Microwave

  20. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2?x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x?=?0.0–0.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f?=?20?Hz–1?MHz) and temperature (T?=?303–573?K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  1. ASCE Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering, 21 (9), 512-517, 2009. Early-Age Properties of Cement-Based Materials: II. Influence of Water-to-Cement Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    potentially be major contributors to early-age cracking of cement-based materials (ACI 2008). This paper of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8615, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (301)975-5865, FAX: (301 Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Dr. Stop 8615, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (301)975-3175, E

  2. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sleiman, Mohamad; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Berdahl, Paul; Gilbert, Haley; Quelen, Sarah; Marlot, Lea; Preble, Chelsea; Chen, Sharon; Montalbano, Amadine; Rosseler, Olivier; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen; Destaillats, Hugo

    2013-11-18

    Highly reflective roofs can decrease the energy required for building air conditioning, help mitigate the urban heat island effect, and slow global warming. However, these benefits are diminished by soiling and weathering processes that reduce the solar reflectance of most roofing materials. Soiling results from the deposition of atmospheric particulate matter and the growth of microorganisms, each of which absorb sunlight. Weathering of materials occurs with exposure to water, sunlight, and high temperatures. This study developed an accelerated aging method that incorporates features of soiling and weathering. The method sprays a calibrated aqueous soiling mixture of dust minerals, black carbon, humic acid, and salts onto preconditioned coupons of roofing materials, then subjects the soiled coupons to cycles of ultraviolet radiation, heat and water in a commercial weatherometer. Three soiling mixtures were optimized to reproduce the site-specific solar spectral reflectance features of roofing products exposed for 3 years in a hot and humid climate (Miami, Florida); a hot and dry climate (Phoenix, Arizona); and a polluted atmosphere in a temperate climate (Cleveland, Ohio). A fourth mixture was designed to reproduce the three-site average values of solar reflectance and thermal emittance attained after 3 years of natural exposure, which the Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) uses to rate roofing products sold in the US. This accelerated aging method was applied to 25 products?single ply membranes, factory and field applied coatings, tiles, modified bitumen cap sheets, and asphalt shingles?and reproduced in 3 days the CRRC's 3-year aged values of solar reflectance. This accelerated aging method can be used to speed the evaluation and rating of new cool roofing materials.

  3. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  4. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at.?% (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at.?% (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  5. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh¬3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important parameter that must be considered in theoretical modeling of these complex systems

  6. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

  7. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials Reference

  8. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us HanfordReference Materials

  9. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  10. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume II - support materials. Final progress report, May 15, 1991--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers. This document consists of Support Materials for the manual: exercise answer keys; templates; guidelines for reviewing templates; a complete profiling packet; guidelines for the trainer.

  11. MATERIALS ENGINEERING (MATE) CLASS OF 2011 Name: Last, First, ID Minimum Hrs. 204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    Physical Metallurgy I .. 3 MTEN 342 Materials Thermo II .... 3 MTEN 431 Diffusion & Kinetics .... 3 COOP

  12. MATERIALS ENGINEERING (MATE) CLASS OF 2012 Name: Last, First, ID Minimum Hrs. 204

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    Physical Metallurgy I .. 3 MTEN 342 Materials Thermo II .... 3 MTEN 431 Diffusion & Kinetics .... 3 COOP

  13. MATERIALS ENGINEERING (MATE) CLASS OF 2013 Name: Last, First, ID Min 155 QH + 30 SH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    Physical Metallurgy I .. 3 MTEN 342 Materials Thermo II .... 3 MTEN 431 Diffusion & Kinetics .... 3 COOP

  14. Language Modeling with Tree Substitution Matt Post and Daniel Gildea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gildea, Daniel

    Language Modeling with Tree Substitution Grammars Matt Post and Daniel Gildea Department framework (Cohn et al., 2009; Post and Gildea, 2009). Compared to past heuristic approaches, these grammars

  15. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. es050whittingham2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and...

  16. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. es22whittingham.pdf More Documents & Publications The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and...

  17. Aliovalent Substitution in Mixed Ni-Mn-Co Oxide Cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kam, Kinson C.

    2012-01-01

    batteries, cathode, transition metal oxides, aliovalent substitution Acknowledgment This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable

  18. Substituted 3-hydroxy-delta-lactones from epoxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Geoffrey W.; Kramer, John W.

    2013-09-10

    Catalysts and methods for the carbonylation of epoxides to substituted 3-hydroxy-.delta.-lactones and .beta.-lactones are disclosed.

  19. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  20. Journal of Hazardous Materials 191 (2011) 190195 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daugulis, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Journal of Hazardous Materials 191 (2011) 190­195 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Journal of Hazardous Materials journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/jhazmat Treatment of substituted phenol

  1. High pressure chemistry of substituted acetylenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-01-25

    High pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on substituted polyacetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-C{triple_bond}CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-Si{triple_bond}CH] to investigate pressure-induced chemical reactions. The starting samples were the low temperature crystalline phases which persisted metastably at room temperature and polymerized beyond 11 GPa and 26 GPa for TBA and ETMS respectively. These reaction onset pressures are considerably higher than what we observed in the shockwave studies (6.1 GPa for TBA and 6.6 GPa for ETMS). Interestingly, in the case of ETMS, it was observed with fluid ETMS as starting sample, reacts to form a semi-crystalline polymer (crystalline domains corresponding to the low-T phase) at pressures less than {approx}2 GPa. Further characterization using vibrational spectroscopy is in progress.

  2. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1(0)-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manchanda, P; Skomski, R; Bordeaux, N; Lewis, LH; Kashyap, A

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1(0)-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe2XNi and 32-atom supercells (X = Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  3. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1{sub 0}-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph; Bordeaux, N.; Lewis, L. H.; Kashyap, Arti

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1{sub 0}-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe{sub 2}XNi and 32-atom supercells (X?=?Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  4. Interpretation of thermoelectric properties of Cu substituted LaCoO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kaurav, N.; Sharma, U.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2014-04-24

    The thermoelectric properties of LaCo{sub 1?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3??} is theoretically analyzed, it is observed that thermoelectric figure of merit ZT (=S{sup 2}?T/?) is maximized by Cu substitution in LaCoO{sub 3} Ceramics at x=0.15. The lattice thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power were estimated by the scattering of phonons with defects, grain boundaries, electrons and phonons to evaluate the thermoelectric properties. We found that Cu substitution increase the phonon scattering with grain boundaries and defects which significantly increase the thermoelectric power and decrease the thermal conductivity. The present numerical analysis will help in designing more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  5. Self-Regulation and Negotiated Agreements: Complements or Substitutes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyon, Thomas P.

    Self-Regulation and Negotiated Agreements: Complements or Substitutes? Thomas P. Lyon and John W the possibility of corporate self-regulation. Yet in practice firms may have incentives to self-regulate in order arises whether self-regulation and negotiated agreements are complements or substitutes. We present

  6. Highly Selective Acetate Aldol Additions Using Mesityl-Substituted Chiral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    been reported for acetate-type aldol additions involving the use of tin,7 lithium,8 boron,9Highly Selective Acetate Aldol Additions Using Mesityl-Substituted Chiral Auxiliaries Michael T Highly diastereoselective acetate aldol additions using chlorotitanium enolates of mesityl-substituted N

  7. Journal List Substitution Process Approved September 8, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selmic, Sandra

    Journal List Substitution Process Approved September 8, 2011 JOURNAL LIST SUBSTITUTION PROCESS Each discipline-specific journal list area can be amended after a new list is developed according to established a way to adjust the new journal list so that the journal list more closely matches the strengths

  8. Doping against the native propensity of MoS?: Degenerate hole doping by cation substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Joonki; Park, Tae-Eon; Lin, Der-Yuh; Fu, Deyi; Park, Joonsuk; Jung, Hee Joon; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Jang, Chaun; Sun, Yinghui; Sinclair, Robert; Chang, Joonyeon; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-12-10

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) draw much attention as the key semiconducting material for two-dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. For most of these applications, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction. However, typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS?) is natively an n-type presumably due to omnipresent electron-donating sulfur vacancies, and stable/controllable p-type doping has not been achieved. The lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p–n junctions of MoS?, as well as limits carrier conduction to spin-degenerate conduction bands instead of the more interesting, spin-polarized valence bands. Traditionally, extrinsic p-type doping in TMDs has been approached with surface adsorption or intercalation of electron-accepting molecules. However, practically stable doping requires substitution of host atoms with dopants where the doping is secured by covalent bonding. In this work, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS? by substitutional niobium (Nb) doping, leading to a degenerate hole density of ~3 × 10¹? cm?³. Structural and X-ray techniques reveal that the Nb atoms are indeed substitutionally incorporated into MoS? by replacing the Mo cations in the host lattice. van der Waals p–n homojunctions based on vertically stacked MoS? layers are fabricated, which enable gate-tunable current rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from the demonstrated substitutional bipolar doping of MoS?. From the miscibility of dopants with the host, it is also expected that the synthesis technique demonstrated here can be generally extended to other TMDs for doping against their native unipolar propensity.

  9. Composite bone substitutes prepared by two methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Hoe Yun; Lee, Hoe Yun

    2012-01-01

    Composites via Freeze Casting for Bone Tissue Engineering,”A.P. Tomsia, “Freeze casting of hydroxyapatite scaffolds forcamphene- based freeze casting,” Materials Letters 61(11-

  10. APPROVED MATERIALS FOR ALSEP EQUIPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    expanding Section I and Section II and adding Section III. New materials added in this revision are: 211 212#12;#12;: : . APPROVED MATERIALS FOR ALSEP EQUIPMENT NO. REV. NO. ATM 242 E PAGE COVER OF 54 DATE 213 322 323 324 417 418 419 612 613 806 1111 Materials reinstated (clarified type no.): 1009 Prepared

  11. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  12. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  13. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  14. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    Mn-Substituted Goethite Synthesis Manganese substituted (Mn-The laboratory synthesis of Mn-substituted goethite requiresgoethite existed as Mn(III), even though Mn was added during mineral synthesis

  15. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  16. Production of Substitute Natural Gas from Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-01-31

    The goal of this research program was to develop and demonstrate a novel gasification technology to produce substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. The technology relies on a continuous sequential processing method that differs substantially from the historic methanation or hydro-gasification processing technologies. The thermo-chemistry relies on all the same reactions, but the processing sequences are different. The proposed concept is appropriate for western sub-bituminous coals, which tend to be composed of about half fixed carbon and about half volatile matter (dry ash-free basis). In the most general terms the process requires four steps (1) separating the fixed carbon from the volatile matter (pyrolysis); (2) converting the volatile fraction into syngas (reforming); (3) reacting the syngas with heated carbon to make methane-rich fuel gas (methanation and hydro-gasification); and (4) generating process heat by combusting residual char (combustion). A key feature of this technology is that no oxygen plant is needed for char combustion.

  17. The SMART Platform: early experience enabling substitutable applications for electronic health records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Shawn N.

    Objective The Substitutable Medical Applications, Reusable Technologies (SMART) Platforms project seeks to develop a health information technology platform with substitutable applications (apps) constructed around core ...

  18. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    4.2 Goethite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .on Manganese-Substituted Goethite . . . . . . . . . 7.4.14.3 Manganese-Substituted Goethite . . 4.3.1

  19. LABORATORY II FORCE AND CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    on an object and its kinetic energy. · Define and use sine, cosine and tangent for a right triangleLABORATORY II FORCE AND CONSERVATION OF ENERGY Lab II - 1 After studying forces and material bodies the relationship between forces and energy conservation. Energy and forces, together, support an extremely

  20. Biofoam II

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Robert L. (Modesto, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties.

  1. Biofoam II

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties. 1 fig.

  2. Methods for preparation of cyclopentadienyliron (II) arenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keipert, Steven J. (Oakdale, MN)

    1991-01-01

    Two improved methods for preparation of compounds with the structure shown in equation X [(Cp)--Fe--(Ar)].sup.+.sub.b X.sup.b- (X) where Cp is an eta.sup.5 complexed, substituted or unsubstituted, cyclopentadienyl or indenyl anion, Ar is an eta.sup.6 complexed substituted or unsubstituted, pi-arene ligand anad X is a b-valent anion where b is an integer between 1 and 3. The two methods, which differ in the source of the cyclopentadienyl anion - Lewis acid complex, utilize a Lewis acid assisted ligand transfer reaction. The cyclopentadienyl anion ligand, assisted by a Lewis acid is transferred to ferrous ion in the presence of an arene. In the first method, the cyclopentadienyl anion is derived from ferrocene and ferrous chloride. In this reaction, the cyclopentadienyliron (II) arene product is derived partially from ferrocene and partially from the ferrous salt. In the second method, the cyclopentadienyl anion - Lewis acid complex is formed by direct reaction of the Lewis acid with an inorganic cyclopentadienide salt. The cyclopentadienyliron (II) arene product of this reaction is derived entirely from the ferrous salt. Cyclopentadienyliron (II) arene cations are of great interest due to their utility as photoactivatable catalysts for a variety of polymerization reactions.

  3. 155:407(01) Processing and Properties of Materials Fall 2013 Lectures: Mon. Wed. 5:00 -6:20 p.m., SEC 210

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muzzio, Fernando J.

    : Material Science Approach II. Cohesion in Materials: Thermodynamics (kinetics), State of Matter Bonding of Crystalline Materials Rubber Elasticity Plastic Deformation of Crystalline Materials Plastic Deformation

  4. Radon in the DRIFT-II directional dark matter TPC: emanation, detection and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battat, J B R; Daw, E; Dorofeev, A; Ezeribe, A C; Fox, J R; Gauvreau, J -L; Gold, M; Harmon, L J; Harton, J L; Landers, J M; Lee, E R; Loomba, D; Matthews, J A J; Miller, E H; Monte, A; Murphy, A StJ; Paling, S M; Phan, N; Pipe, M; Robinson, M; Sadler, S W; Scarff, A; Snowden-Ifft, D P; Spooner, N J C; Telfer, S; Walker, D; Warner, D; Yuriev, L

    2014-01-01

    Radon gas emanating from materials is of interest in environmental science and also a major concern in rare event non-accelerator particle physics experiments such as dark matter and double beta decay searches, where it is a major source of background. Notable for dark matter experiments is the production of radon progeny recoils (RPRs), the low energy (~100 keV) recoils of radon daughter isotopes, which can mimic the signal expected from WIMP interactions. Presented here are results of measurements of radon emanation from detector materials in the 1 metre cubed DRIFT-II directional dark matter gas time projection chamber experiment. Construction and operation of a radon emanation facility for this work is described, along with an analysis to continuously monitor DRIFT data for the presence of internal 222Rn and 218Po. Applying this analysis to historical DRIFT data, we show how systematic substitution of detector materials for alternatives, selected by this device for low radon emanation, has resulted in a f...

  5. Computational Modeling of Degradation of Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of cations on the alkaline exchange membranes is the major challenge for alkaline membrane fuel cells. In this paper, we investigated the degradation barriers by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations, which is one of the most commonly used cations for alkaline exchange membranes. We found that substituted cations with electron-releasing substituent groups at meta-position of the benzyl ring could result in improved degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations with ten different substituent groups, the largest improvement of degradation barriers is only 1.6 kcal/mol. This implies that the lifetime of alkaline membrane fuel cells could increase from a few months to a few years by using substituted BTMA+ cations, an encouraging but still limited improvement for real-world applications.

  6. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND...

  7. Search Engine Advertising: Channel Substitution when Pricing Ads to Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldfarb, Avi

    We explore substitution patterns across advertising platforms. Using data on the advertising prices paid by lawyers for 139 Google search terms in 195 locations, we exploit a natural experiment in “ambulance-chaser” ...

  8. Hydrology Days 2014 Thermally Enhanced Attenuation of Substituted Benzenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    at temperatures ranging from 10°C to 30°C, and biogas production has been monitored. Thus far, substituted benzene microcosms have produced less biogas than previous petroleum microcosm studies. This suggests

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  10. Copper-substituted perovskite compositions for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes and oxygen reduction electrodes in other electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieke, Peter C. (Pasco, WA); Coffey, Gregory W. (Richland, WA); Pederson, Larry R. (Kennewick, WA); Marina, Olga A. (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Singh, Prabhaker (Richland, WA); Thomsen, Edwin C. (Richland, WA)

    2010-07-20

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells. Also provided are electrochemical devices that include active oxygen reduction electrodes, such as solid oxide fuel cells, sensors, pumps and the like. The compositions comprises a copper-substituted ferrite perovskite material. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using the electrode compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having cathodes comprising the compositions.

  11. Microwave absorbance properties of zirconium–manganese substituted cobalt nanoferrite as electromagnetic (EM) wave absorbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Kishwar, E-mail: kknano@hotmail.com; Rehman, Sarish

    2014-02-01

    Highlights: • Good candidates for EM materials with low reflectivity. • Good candidates for broad bandwidth at microwave frequency. • Microwave absorbing bandwidth was modulated simply by manipulating the Zr–Mn. • Higher the Zr–Mn content, the higher absorption rates for the electromagnetic radiation. • The predicted reflection loss shows that this can be used for thin ferrite absorber. - Abstract: Nanocrystalline Zr–Mn (x) substituted Co ferrite having chemical formula CoFe{sub 2?2x}Zr{sub x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1–0.4) was prepared by co-precipitation technique. Combining properties such as structural, electrical, magnetic and reflection loss characteristics. Crystal structure and surface morphology of the calcined samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). By using two point probe homemade resistivity apparatus to find resistivity of the sample. Electromagnetic (EM) properties are measured through RF impedance/materials analyzer over 1 MHz–3 GHz. The room-temperature dielectric measurements show dispersion behavior with increasing frequency from 100 Hz to 3 MHz. Magnetic properties confirmed relatively strong dependence of saturation magnetization on Zr–Mn composition. Curie temperature is also found to decrease linearly with addition of Zr–Mn. Furthermore, comprehensive analysis of microwave reflection loss (RL) is carried out as a function of substitution, frequency, and thickness. Composition accompanying maximum microwave absorption is suggested.

  12. From Substitution to Coping: Developing and Testing a Leisure Constraints-Based Coping Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tseng, Yung-Ping

    2010-01-14

    ), providing another means of describing and examining behavioral choices available to recreationists relating to the resource, timing of participation (temporal substitution), and mode of participation (activity substitution). Based on this past work...) and behavioral (e.g., absolute displacement, temporal substitution, activity substitution, resource substitution, and direct action) coping mechanisms have been identified (Miller & McCool, 2003). However, both Iwasaki and Schneider (2003) and Schneider...

  13. Characterization of BoLA class II genes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherwood, Sidney James

    1989-01-01

    or growth of the tumors was attributed to a genetically inherited system of about fifteen dominant genes. The last major step leading to Borer defining of the mouse MHC was the work done on human blood groups by Landsteiner (1901) and others... antigen. Second an Ir gene mutation that affects Ir gene control also carries amino acid 10 substitutions in the class II but in no other molecule. Third, immune response in vitro and in vivo can be manipulated by class II specific antibodies. Last...

  14. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  15. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  16. Atomic oxygen in crystalline Kr and Xe. II. Adiabatic potential energy surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Atomic oxygen in crystalline Kr and Xe. II. Adiabatic potential energy surfaces A. V. Danilychev, `S), trapped in crystalline Kr and Xe are developed based on known angularly anisotropic pair to reproduce the experimental O(`S+`D) emissions in substitutional and interstitial sites of crystalline Kr

  17. An unusual mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based 3D framework with 24-membered macrocycles as linker units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang Haijun; Ma Huiyuan; Yu Yan; Yang Ming; Xun Ye; Liu Bo

    2012-02-15

    A new compound, [Cu{sup I}(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] Subset-Of {l_brace}[Cu{sup I}(bpp)]{sub 2}[PW{sub 11}Cu{sup II}O{sub 39}]{r_brace} (1) (bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane), has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, the unusual -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains and 24-membered (Cubpp){sub 2} cation-macrocycles are linked together to form a (2, 4) connected 3D framework with channels of ca. 9.784 Multiplication-Sign 7.771 A{sup 2} along two directions, in which the [Cu(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] coordination fragments as guest components are trapped. The photocatalytic experiments of compound 1 were performed, which show a good catalytic activity of compound 1 for photodegradation of RhB. Furthermore, the IR, TGA and electrochemical properties of compound 1 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: An unusual example of mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based hybrid compound that possesses a 3D structure has been synthesized, which offers a feasible route for synthesis of such compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first example of -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin chain is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An unusual three dimensional structure based mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalysis and electrochemical properties of the title compound were studied.

  18. SUSTAINABILITY, RESOURCE SUBSTITUTION IN ENERGY INPUTS AND LEARNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUSTAINABILITY, RESOURCE SUBSTITUTION IN ENERGY INPUTS AND LEARNING Pierre-André JOUVET Ingmar resources (in the sense of non-depletable energy which also includes hydro power, wind energy, solar energy non- renewable fossil fuels and renewable energy resources. As said Andr´e and Cerda (2006), the main

  19. Dramatically elevated rate of mitochondrial substitution in lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clayton, Dale H.

    mitochondrial DNA, compared to comparable nuclear genes (Brown et al., 1979; Johnson and Clayton, 2000; MiyataDramatically elevated rate of mitochondrial substitution in lice (Insecta: Phthiraptera) Kevin P. Johnson,a,* Robert H. Cruickshank,b Richard J. Adams,c Vincent S. Smith,b Roderic D.M. Page,b and Dale H

  20. On the practical limits to substitution Robert U. Ayres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Keywords: Weak sustainability Strong sustainability Substitution Resources Technology 1. Introduction to assume­basical- ly for convenience­that every technology can be improved upon and every barrier can "Limits to Growth (Meadows, 1972). The Solow paper "The economics or resources, or the resources

  1. CAPITAL FOR ENERGY AND INTER-FUEL ELASTICITIES OF SUBSTITUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CAPITAL FOR ENERGY AND INTER- FUEL ELASTICITIES OF SUBSTITUTION FROM A TECHNOLOGY SIMULATION MODEL: Christopher G.F. Bataille Energy Research Group School of Resource and Environmental Management Simon Fraser to make a cost comparison of potential greenhouse gas (GHG) abatement policies. Our primary tools

  2. Superconductivity in gallium-substituted Ba8Si46 clathrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Ruihong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Ning; Luo, Z. P.; Ma, Xingqiao; Cao, Guohui; Feng, Z. S.; Hu, Chia-Ren; Ross, Joseph H., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superconductivity in Ga-substituted type-I silicon clathrates. We prepared samples of the general formula Ba8Si46-xGax, with different values of x. We show that Ba8Si40Ga6 is a bulk...

  3. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  4. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  5. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Liu, Jue; Lee, Byungju; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Shuyin; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli; et al

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accuratelymore »identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.« less

  6. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Liu, Jue [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lee, Byungju [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Qiao, Ruimin [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source; Yang, Zhenzhong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Xu, Shuyin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Yu, Xiqian [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)] (ORCID:000000018513518X); Gu, Lin [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Hu, Yong-Sheng [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)] (ORCID:0000000284306474); Yang, Wanli [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Advanced Light Source] (ORCID:0000000306668063); Kang, Kisuk [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of); Li, Hong [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)] (ORCID:000000028659086X); Yang, Xiao-Qing [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Chen, Liquan [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP); Huang, Xuejie [Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Beijing (China). Inst. of High Energy Physics (IHEP)

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accurately identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.

  7. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  8. Alamos National Laboratory] Materials Science(36) Abstract Not...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Sarrao, John L. Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) Abstract Not Provided Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  9. Military Formations: Mexican American Civil Rights And Community Belonging During The World War II Era

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bueno, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Force Material Command Cold War Context, 1945-1991, vol. 2,and Job Politics during World War II. Austin: University ofin Earnings during World War II: New Evidence." Industrial

  10. The autofluorescence of plastic materials and chips measured under laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cincinnati, University of

    autofluorescence than the raw plastic materials from which they had been made. Introduction There can be littleThe autofluorescence of plastic materials and chips measured under laser irradiation Aigars Piruska on the web 1st November 2005 DOI: 10.1039/b508288a Plastic materials have the potential to substitute

  11. Covetic Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Can re-melt, dilute, alloy... Fabrication of Covetic Materials - Nanocarbon Infusion 3 4 Technical Approach Unusual Characteristics of Covetic Materials ("covalent" &...

  12. Instruction Guide Temporary Substitution for Approvers in myUF Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheremet, Alexandru

    a Substitute to All Requisition Folders button o Search for the name of the temporary approver (enter the name select someone who is NOT a requestor as a substitute. If a long term substitution needs to take place to different folders. a. To search for and assign an approver to all your folders at once, click the Assign

  13. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  14. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  15. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore »the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  16. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  17. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extraction Separation Processes for Critical Materials in 30- 21 Stage Test Facility (Bruce Moyer) ......

  18. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  19. Chap. II : Les structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot 12 f´evrier 2009 #12;Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Les objets structur´es Pour de types "structur´es". #12;Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Les objets structur´es

  20. Rapid Microwave Preparation of Highly Efficient Ce[superscript 3+]-Substituted Garnet Phosphors for Solid State White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkel, Alexander; Denault, Kristin A.; George, Nathan C.; Doll, Courtney E.; Héry, Bathylle; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Birkel, Christina S.; Hong, Byung-Chul; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB); (Mitsubishi)

    2012-04-30

    Ce{sup 3+}-substituted aluminum garnet compounds of yttrium (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and lutetium (Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) - both important compounds in the generation of (In,Ga)N-based solid state white lighting - have been prepared using a simple microwave heating technique involving the use of a microwave susceptor to provide the initial heat source. Carbon used as the susceptor additionally creates a reducing atmosphere around the sample that helps stabilize the desired luminescent compound. High quality, phase-pure materials are prepared within a fraction of the time and using a fraction of the energy required in a conventional ceramic preparation; the microwave technique allows for a reduction of about 95% in preparation time, making it possible to obtain phase pure, Ce{sup 3+}-substituted garnet compounds in under 20 min of reaction time. It is estimated that the overall reduction in energy compared with ceramic routes as practiced in the lab is close to 99%. Conventionally prepared material is compared with material prepared using microwave heating in terms of structure, morphology, and optical properties, including quantum yield and thermal quenching of luminescence. Finally, the microwave-prepared compounds have been incorporated into light-emitting diode 'caps' to test their performance characteristics in a real device, in terms of their photon efficiency and color coordinates.

  1. Substituted copper phthalocyanine/multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrid material for Cl{sub 2} sensing application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Saini, Rajan, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Singh, Rajinder, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Mahajan, Aman, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Bedi, R. K., E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India); Aswal, D. K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    In this work, hybrid of soluble copper phthalocyanine (CuPcOC{sub 8}) and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been synthesized. The formation of CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid is confirmed by atomic force microscopy, UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopy. Subsequently, a chemi-resistive sensor is fabricated by drop casting CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid onto glass substrate. It has been demonstrated that CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid is highly selective towards Cl{sub 2} gas with minimum detection limit of 100 ppb. The response of sensor increases linearly with increase in the concentration of Cl{sub 2} gas. For 2000 ppb of Cl{sub 2}, CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid gives a response as large as 53% in 40 seconds.

  2. The influence of fuel price on an automaker's decision to lightweight cars via materials substitution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jennifer C

    2009-01-01

    The following study examines how the costs and benefits of improving fuel economy of vehicles via lightweighting with aluminum closures change with gas price. A process-based cost model is used to evaluate the costs of ...

  3. Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

  4. Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Jon

    Vortex pinning by inhomogeneities in type-II superconductors S.J. Chapman #3;y G. Richardson zx of a curvilinear vortex in an inhomogeneous type-II superconducting material in the limit as the vortex core radius of the superconducting electrons acts as a pinning potential for the vortex, so that vortices will be attracted

  5. Analise Matematica II Semestre 2005/06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    propostos, exerc´icios resolvidos, enunciados e resolu¸c~oes de testes e exames. AVALIAC¸ ~AO Provas, John Wiley, 1976. - "Exerc´icios de An´alise Matem´atica I e II", Dep. Matem´atica IST, IST Press 2003. Material de Estudo na internet Consulte os links na p´agina da cadeira que incluem muitos exerc´icios

  6. Supporting Infrastructure and Acceptability Issues for Materials Used in New Generation Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Jones, D.W.; Leiby, P.E.; Rubin, J.D.; Schexnayder, S.M.; Vogt, D.P.; Wolfe, A.K.

    1999-03-01

    To achieve its goal of producing vehicles that use two thirds less fuel than current vehicles, the Partnership of a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) is designing vehicles that will use lightweight materials in place of heavier materials used in current vehicles. using new materials in automobiles will require the development of a supporting infrastructure to produce both the substitute materials and the components of the substitute materials, as well as the automotive parts constructed from the new materials. This report documents a set of analyses that attempt to identify potential barriers--economic, infrastructure, and public acceptance barriers--to the materials substitution in New Generation Vehicles. The analyses rely on hypothetical vehicle market penetration scenarios and material composition. The approach is comprehensive, examining issues ranging from materials availability to their eventual disposition and its effect on the automobile recycling industry, and from supporting industries' capacity to the public acceptability of these vehicles. The analyses focus on two likely substitute materials, aluminum and glass-reinforced polymer composites.

  7. Solution Synthesis and Processing of PZT Materials for Neutron Generator Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.A.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Montoya, T.V.; Moore, R.H.; Sipola, D.L.; Tuttle, B.A.; Voigt, J.A.

    1998-12-01

    A new solution synthesis route has been developed for the preparation of lead-based ferroelectric materials (patent filed). The process produces controlled stoichiometry precursor powders by non-aqueous precipitation. For a given ferroelectric material to be prepared, a metal acetate/alkoxide solution containing constituent metal species in the appropriate ratio is mixed with an oxalic acid/n-propanol precipitant solution. An oxalate coprecipitate is instantly fonned upon mixing that quantitatively removes the metals from solution. Most of the process development was focused on the synthesis and processing of niobium-substituted lead zirconate titanate with a Zr-to-Ti ratio of 95:5 (PNZT 95/5) that has an application in neutron generator power supplies. The process was scaled to produce 1.6 kg of the PNZT 95/5 powder using either a sen-ii-batch or a continuous precipitation scheme. Several of the PNZT 95/5 powder lots were processed into ceramic slug form. The slugs in turn were processed into components and characterized. The physical properties and electrical performance (including explosive functional testing of the components met the requirements set for the neutron generator application. Also, it has been demonstrated that the process is highly reproducible with respect to the properties of the powders it produces and the properties of the ceramics prepared from its powders. The work described in this report was funded by Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program.

  8. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Database (TPMD) Aerospace Structural Metals Database (ASMD) Damage Tolerant Design Handbook (DTDH) Microelectronics Packaging Materials Database (MPMD) Structural Alloys...

  9. Nd–Co substituted strontium hexaferrite powders with enhanced coercivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herme, C.A.; Bercoff, P.G.; Jacobo, S.E.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Sr{sub 1?x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 11?x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} was prepared by sol–gel auto-combustion method with 0 ? x ? 0.4. ? Coercivity increases 11% with 0.2 Nd–Co substitution, reaching a value of 68.9 A/m. ? The appearance of two magnetic orderings is noticed in susceptibility measurements. ? This is supported by Curie temperature and susceptibility data. -- Abstract: In this work we report the synthesis of Nd–Co substituted strontium hexaferrites of composition Sr{sub 1?x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 11?x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} by the sol–gel auto-combustion method with further heat treatment. The analysis of the X-ray diffraction spectra shows the M-type hexagonal structure in samples treated at 1100 °C for 2 h. Coercivity increases 11% with 0.2 Nd–Co substitution, reaching a value of 68.9 A/m (5480 Oe) while saturation magnetization is reduced 6% to 91 A m{sup 2}/kg (91 emu/g). The behavior of magnetic susceptibility with an applied field shows two different maxima which are assigned to different magnetic orderings. This assumption is supported by the appearance of two experimental values of Curie temperatures (T{sub C}) for all the prepared samples. Magnetic susceptibility ? and T{sub C} measurements suggest an uneven distribution of the iron vacancies.

  10. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  11. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watkin, David C. (Clinton, TN); Walton, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  12. Sandia Energy - Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power& SF-BREEZE HomeMarketMaterials

  13. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

  14. Evaluation of advanced materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, I.G.; Clauer, A.H.; Shetty, D.K.; Tucker, T.R.; Stropki, J.T.

    1982-11-18

    Cemented tungsten carbides with a binder level in the range of 5 to 6 percent exhibited the best resistance to erosion for this class of materials. Other practical cermet meterials were diamond - Si/SiC, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-B/sub 4/C-Cr, and B/sub 4/C-Co. SiAlON exhibited erosion resistance equivalent to the best WC-cermet. The only coating system to show promise of improved erosion resistance was CVD TiB/sub 2/ on cemented TiB/sub 2/-Ni. Cracking and/or spalling of a TiC coating and a proprietary TMT coating occurred in the standard slurry erosion test. Ranking of cemented tungsten carbide materials in the laboratory erosion test was the same as that found in service in the Wilsonville pilot plant. Specimens from the Fort Lewis pilot plant which performed well in service exhibited low erosion in the laboratory test. A substitute slurry, was found to be 2 to 4 times more erosive than the coal-derived slurry 8 wt% solids. Ranking of materials in the substitute slurry was nearly identical to that in the coal-derived slurry. Three modes of erosion were: ductile cutting; elastic-plastic indentation and fracture; and intergranular fracture. Erosion of a given material was closely related to its microstructure. In the substitute slurry, the angle-dependence of erosion of two forms of SiC, hot-pressed and sintered, were similar, but the sintered material eroded slower. Laser fusing of preplaced powder mixtures can produce cermet-like structures with potential for erosive and sliding wear resistance. TiC particles in Stellite 6 matrix proved less prone to cracking than WC particles in the same matrix. 74 figures, 14 tables.

  15. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  16. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  17. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  18. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  19. Electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical characterisation of cyano and trifluoromethyl substituted polypyridines and their transition metal complexes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delf, Alexander Robert L.

    2011-06-27

    This thesis is concerned with the electrochemical and spectroelectrochemical characterisation of cyano (CN) and trifluoromethyl (CF3) substituted polypyridine ligands and their metal complexes. The ligands investigated ...

  20. Molecular Interactions of Plutonium(VI) with Synthetic Manganese-Substituted Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin

    2011-01-01

    VI) with the Iron Oxide Goethite, University of California,Values for Synthetic Goethite and Pyrolusite" submitted tothe two Mn-substituted goethite minerals used in this study.

  1. Reaction of Plutonium(VI) with the Manganese-Substituted Iron Oxide Mineral Goethite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Yung-Jin Hu

    2011-01-01

    Plutonium(VI) Sorption on Manganese-SubstitutedX-ray Beam-Induced Chemistry on Plutonium Sorbed on Variousof Plutonium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .159 v E Anion

  2. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  3. LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS Most of the laboratory problems so far have was constant. In this set of laboratory problems, the total force acting on an object, and thus its's oscillation frequency. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to

  4. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  5. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  6. Substitutional Nitrogen in Nanodiamond and Bucky-Diamond Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2005-09-15

    The inclusion of dopants (such as nitrogen) in diamond nanoparticles is expected to be important for use in future nanodevices, such as qubits for quantum computing. Although most commercial diamond nanoparticles contain a small fraction of nitrogen, it is still unclear whether it is located within the core or at the surface of the nanoparticle. Presented here are density functional tight binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional nitrogen in nanodiamond and bucky-diamond particles. The results predict that nitrogen is likely to be positioned at the surface of both hydrogenated nanodiamond and (dehydrogenated) bucky-diamond, and that the coordination of the dopants within the particles is dependent upon the surface structure.

  7. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  8. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  9. A Space-For-Time (SFT) Substitution Approach to Studying Historical Phenological Changes in Urban

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianguo "Jingle"

    A Space-For-Time (SFT) Substitution Approach to Studying Historical Phenological Changes in Urban-US Center for Conservation, Energy, and Sustainability Science, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, China, 2 developed a space-for-time (SFT) substitution method that uses spatial phenology and temperature data

  10. Trans beta substituted chlorins and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan

    2003-05-06

    Trans beta substituted chlorins and methods of making the same are disclosed, along with polymers formed from or containing such trans beta substituted chlorins as one or more monomeric units therein, light harvesting rods formed from such polymers, and electrodes carrying such polymers.

  11. Synthesis, characterisation and modelling of zinc and silicate co?substituted hydroxyapatite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederichs, Robert J.; Chappell, Helen F.; Shepherd, David V.; Best, Serena M.

    2015-06-19

      of   HA   (P63/m   space   group)   allows   for   ionic  substitution   or   interstitial   site   insertion   depending   on   the   substituting   ion,  thermodynamic  formation  energies,  kinetics  of  ion...  formation,  act  as  an  anti-­?microbial  and  slow  osteoclast  (OC)  resorption.  Yamaguchi  et  al.  found   that   solubilised   zinc   (zinc   sulphate)   between   10-­?6-­?10-­?3   M   increased   bone...

  12. Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Input Substitution and Business Energy Consumption: Evidence from ABS Energy Survey Data Kay Cao applies the system of equations approach to energy consumption modelling using the ABS 2008-09 Energy of equations, energy consumption modelling, elasticity of substitution JEL codes: C51, D24 * Please do

  13. Mechanistic Analysis of Iridium Heteroatom C-H Activation: Evidence for an Internal Electrophilic Substitution Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Substitution Mechanism Jonas Oxgaard,*, William J. Tenn, III, Robert J. Nielsen, Roy A. Periana, and William A: The mechanism responsible for C-H actiVation in Ir(acac)2(OCH3)(C6H6) has been identified and described as an internal electrophilic substitution (IES) mechanism, on the basis of orbital changes and predicted reacti

  14. Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-04-17

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  15. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  16. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  17. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  18. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M0572 dated 3215 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012)...

  19. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford SiteRecoveryWaterthe

  20. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford SiteRecoveryWatertheReference

  1. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAbout Us Hanford

  2. Anisotropic scattering rate in Fe-substituted Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca ( Cu 1 - x Fe x ) 2 O 8 + ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Naamneh, M.; Lubashevsky, Y.; Lahoud, E.; Gu, G. D.; Kanigel, A.

    2015-05-01

    We measured the electronic structure of Fe-substituted Bi2212 using angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. We find that the substitution does not change the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap but induces a very anisotropic enhancement of the scattering rate. A comparison of the effect of Fe substitution to that of Zn substitution suggests that the Fe reduces Tc so effectively because it suppresses very strongly the coherence weight around the antinodes.

  3. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  4. Effect Of Neodymium Substitution In Structural Characteristics Of Magnesium Ferrite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thankachan, Smitha; Binu, P. J.; Xavier, Sheena; Mohammed, E. M. [Department of Physics, Maharaja's College, Ernakulam (India)

    2011-10-20

    The effect of Nd{sup 3+} substitution on the structural properties of Magnesium ferrite was studied in the series MgNd{sub x}Fe{sub 2-x}O{sub 4}, where x = 0 to 0.3 in steps of 0.05. The series was prepared by sol-gel technique which is one of the novel technique to prepare nanosized samples. Structural characterization was done using X-ray diffractometer and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer. XRD analysis reveals the prepared samples are single phasic till x = 0.2. From x0 = .25, a secondary phase of iron neodymium oxide appears along with the spinel phase. Particle size calculation shows the prepared samples are in the 9nm to 11 nm regime. Lattice parameter was found to increase with concentration of Nd. XRD and FTIR analysis confirmed spinel structure of the prepared samples. XRF result shows the expected composition of prepared samples. The frequency dependence of the dielectric constant in the range 100 Hz--120MHz was also studied

  5. Ambi-site substitution of Mn in lanthanum germanate apatites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kendrick, E. [Chemical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Knight, K.S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Slater, P.R., E-mail: p.r.slater@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-05

    A neutron diffraction study at 4 K of the Mn doped lanthanum germanate apatite-type oxide ion conductor of nominal starting composition 'La{sub 9.5}Mn{sub 0.5}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 6}O{sub 2.75}' is reported. The structure was refined in space group P6{sub 3}/m, although high thermal displacement parameters were observed for the oxide ion sites (particularly O3, and O4). Reduced thermal displacement parameters were obtained by splitting the O3 site, and allowing the O4 oxygen to move off site, which may indicate local regions of lower symmetry within the structure. In addition, the data suggested ambi-site substitution of Mn, with it being present on both the Ge site and the La site. Assuming no change in La:Mn:Ge ratio, a composition of La{sub 9.18}Mn{sub 0.28}(GeO{sub 4}){sub 5.8}(MnO{sub 4}){sub 0.2}O{sub 2} was determined. As such there are nominally no interstitial oxide ions, but rather cation vacancies on the La site. Therefore, the high conductivity for this sample is most likely related to the introduction of Frenkel-type defects at higher temperature, as previously proposed for other apatite-type systems containing vacancies on the La site.

  6. Influence of oxide impurities on the chemical tuning of the thermoelectric properties of substitution derivatives of RuIn{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner-Reetz, Maik, E-mail: Maik.Wagner@cpfs.mpg.de; Cardoso-Gil, Raul; Schmidt, Marcus; Grin, Yuri, E-mail: Juri.Grin@cpfs.mpg.de

    2014-07-01

    A systematic investigation on tuning the charge carrier concentration by substitution of the Ru position in RuIn{sub 3} is performed. Samples with nominal composition Ru{sub 0.95}T{sub 0.05}In{sub 3} (T=Re, Rh, Ir) were synthesized via liquid–solid-reaction and subsequent spark plasma sintering treatment. The chemical composition was characterized by X-ray, metallographic and microstructure analysis revealing solid solutions in the samples with Rh and Ir, whereas Re cannot be incorporated in RuIn{sub 3}. Minor oxide impurities in the commercially available starting elements, the homogeneity range of RuIn{sub 3} and the redox potentials of the participating elements are the key for interpreting the observed lattice parameters and the corresponding composition. Both, substitutions with Rh or Ir and Re inclusions in RuIn{sub 3} lead independently to a significant decrease of the total thermal conductivity down to approximately one half of the value observed for binary RuIn{sub 3}, prepared with commercially available starting materials. The electrical resistivity was reduced by substitution and the temperature dependence changes from semiconductor-like, for RuIn{sub 3}, to metal-like in the substitution derivatives. At the same time the sign change in the thermopower at high temperatures, characteristic for binary RuIn{sub 3}, is suppressed, attaining only electrons as majority carriers. - Graphical abstract: Microstructure (perpendicular to the pressure axis; polarized light) of polycrystalline Ru{sub 0.95}Rh{sub 0.05}In{sub 3} (a), Ru{sub 0.95}Ir{sub 0.05}In{sub 3} (b) and Ru{sub 0.95}Re{sub 0.05}In{sub 3} (c) samples after SPS treatment. - Highlights: • Substitution solid solutions of RuIn{sub 3} were prepared via liquid–solid-reaction. • Chemistry of oxide impurities is crucial for explanation of experimental results. • Thermodynamic calculations support the observation of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} or ZnO as impurities. • Electrical resistivity is reduced by substitution. • Temperature dependence of resistivity changes from semiconductor- to metal-like.

  7. Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schexnayder, S.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

  8. Materials compatibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerday, Brian P.

    2010-04-01

    Objectives are to enable development and implementation of codes and standards for H{sub 2} containment components: (1) Evaluate data on mechanical properties of materials in H{sub 2} gas - Technical Reference on Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials; (2) Generate new benchmark data on high-priority materials - Pressure vessel steels, stainless steels; and (3) Establish procedures for reliable materials testing - Sustained-load cracking, fatigue crack propagation. Summary of this presentation are: (1) Completed measurement of cracking thresholds (K{sub TH}) for Ni-Cr-Mo pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - K{sub TH} measurements required in ASME Article KD-10 (2) Crack arrest test methods appear to yield non-conservative results compared to crack initiation test methods - (a) Proposal to insert crack initiation test methods in Article KD-10 will be presented to ASME Project Team on Hydrogen Tanks, and (b) Crack initiation methods require test apparatus designed for dynamic loading of specimens in H{sub 2} gas; and (3) Demonstrated ability to measure fatigue crack growth of pressure vessel steels in high-pressure H{sub 2} gas - (a) Fatigue crack growth data in H{sub 2} required in ASME Article KD-10, and (b) Test apparatus is one of few in U.S. or abroad for measuring fatigue crack growth in >100 MPa H{sub 2} gas.

  9. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  10. Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    18, 2003, at the East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Type B Accident Investigation Board Report Subcontractor Radioactive Release During Transportation...

  11. MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET EXPOSE II 256 (US)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    measures: Avoid contact with skin, eyes and clothing . Handle in accordance with good industrial hygiene use: Ethylene glycol 107-21-1 5 - 10% 4000 9530 µL/kg Not available ·Industrial whenever workplace conditions warrant a respirator's use. No special methods required. Ingestion: Hygiene

  12. Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPA PublicLED1,400 JobsDepartment5Decontamination and Demolition |

  13. Synthesis and evaluation of optical and electrochemical properties of a new conjugated polymer containing substituted thiophene and non-conjugation linkers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R, Prashanth Kumar K D, Udayakumar; K, Siji Narendran N; K, Chandrasekharan

    2014-10-15

    Conjugated polymers have been developed in a variety of applied fields owing to their promising optoelectronic properties. These are pursuing considerable interest as opto-electrical material because of their chemical stability and processability. This paper describes the synthesis and study of electro-optical properties of a new donoracceptor polymer composed of substituted thiophene and 4,4?-propane-2,2-diyldiphenol units as electron rich moieties and 1,3,4-oxadiazole unit as electron deficient moiety. The optical properties of the polymer are studied using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and fluorescent emission spectroscopy. From the electrochemical data, HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the polymer are calculated.

  14. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  15. Benzannulation via the Reaction of Ynamides and Vinylketenes. Application to the Synthesis of Highly Substituted Indoles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Tin Yiu

    A two-stage “tandem strategy” for the synthesis of indoles with a high level of substitution on the six-membered ring is described. Benzannulation based on the reaction of cyclobutenones with ynamides proceeds via a cascade ...

  16. Palladium-catalyzed substitution of (coumarinyl)methyl acetates with C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chattopadhyay, Kalicharan; Fenster, Erik; Grenning, Alexander James; Tunge, Jon A.

    2012-07-27

    The palladium-catalyzed nucleophilic substitution of (coumarinyl)methyl acetates is described. The reaction proceeds though a palladium ?-benzyl-like complex and allows for many different types of C-, N-, and S-nucleophiles to be regioselectively...

  17. Volunteering for market-based environmental regulation : the substitution provision of the SO? emissions trading program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montero, Juan Pablo

    In this paper we explore the practical and welfare implications of a system of voluntary compliance within a market-based environmental regulation. The Substitution Provision of the SO2 emissions trading program allows the ...

  18. Distinguishing and understanding thermogenic and biogenic sources of methane using multiply substituted isotopologues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Doubly C-substituted ethane in shale gases, Goldschmidtoxidation of methane, ethane, propane and butane. Geochimicameasured ? 13 C values of ethane (? 13 C C2H6 ) for some

  19. Industrial Potential for Substitution of Electricity for Oil and Natural Gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, S. D.; Gardner, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    outlook for electric utilities. By and large, energy substitution decisions will be based on their economic and technical feasibility. In view of projections of the long-term price escalations of oil and natural gas, the economic of choosing electricity...

  20. R&D carries cerium substitute for rare-earth magnets story |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D carries cerium substitute for rare-earth magnets story R&D Magazine carried a story about Ames Laboratory research that uses cheaper and readily available cerium to replace...

  1. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2008-02-19

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  2. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerata, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  3. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2012-03-06

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  4. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  5. Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Söderholm, Patrik

    1999-01-01

    This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

  6. Policy 2003-2 Implementation of CRS 37-92-308 Regarding Substitute...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policy 2003-2 Implementation of CRS 37-92-308 Regarding Substitute Water Supply Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther:...

  7. Electronic, vibrational, and transport properties of pnictogen-substituted ternary skutterudites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volja, Dmitri

    First principles calculations are used to investigate electronic band structure and vibrational spectra of pnictogen-substituted ternary skutterudites. We compare the results with the prototypical binary composition CoSb3 ...

  8. Shock compression and dynamic fragmentation of geological materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Simon

    2014-11-11

    alloy Al6082 AMU Atomic mass units ANFO Ammonium Nitrate fuel oil CJ Chapman-Jouguet point Cu Copper C101 EBW Electric bridge wire EDX Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy EoS Equation of state E-SEM Environmental scanning electron microscope FFT Fast... and mining. De- spite their involvement in so many important applications, the behaviour of geological materials are not well understood. Empirically found relation- ships and extensive datasets of experimental results are commonly used in substitute...

  9. (MATH 1302) Calculus II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    (MATH 1302) MATH 1426 Calculus I MATH 2425 Calculus II MATH 2326 Calculus III IE 3312 PHYS 1443 PHYS 1444 IE 3301 EE 2440 Circuits MATH 3319 ENGL 1301 ENGL 1302 (1310) (Intro) 1320 C/C++ 2312 Ass Sw Des Pat *4321 Testing *4322 Sw Mgmt (CHEM 1300) CHEM 1441 Math Placement Test / Advising (MATH

  10. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 ___________________________________ 12 7. Emissions of Individual Vehicles Vary from Test to Test ________ 15 8. Total Emissions

  11. Depression among abused or neglected children in substitute care 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, Gail Cohn

    1985-01-01

    CJ I OI CJ CO COCh 0?0?Q Q HIO 0 4J V t0 00 0 N t0 0 Cl 4J 0 Cl nl~ JO g 0 ttt 0 ?0 R M mW ?II M&?CI CJQYI NQN0?I 0 V t0 0 0 4J CJ I/I Q A ?a IOI 0?CO MCJ COI 0?mQ~ OC Cl 44 CI 4J 44 m04~ CO 4J 4J 44 5 A CI 0 Q... Ch CJ CO t?t U1 Cl '0 Q 00 0 44 IJ 0, 44 44 0 84?04 84A' 4J 44 0 IH 6 A t0 44 0 Q CO Q 4J JJ 0 8)8 ttl 44 CI Q 0 0 4J 0 al Cl 0 ?0 0 CI 44 04 M t0 A I A V ?n Cl o 0 0 C4 [00 A 26 the clinical group scores. Each...

  12. The substitution of sodium for calcium in the mineral nutrition of cotton 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitenberg, David Calvin

    1959-01-01

    LIBRARY A & M O' LLEOE OF TEXA5 THE SUBSTITUTION OF SODIUM FOR CALCIUM IN THE MINERAL NUTRITION OF COTTON A Thesis By DAVID CALVIN WHITENBERG Submit. ted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 19 59 Major Subject: Plant Physiology THE SUBSTITUTION OF SODIUM FOR CALCIUM IN THE MINERAL NUTRITION OF COTTON A Thesis By DAVID CALVIN WHITENBERG Approved as to style...

  13. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, T.P.; Wagner, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH-R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  14. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak P. (Glen Mills, PA); Wagner, Richard W. (Murrysville, PA)

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH--R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  15. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

  16. A feasibility study of a gelatin-based tissue substitute 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Jody Lee

    1993-01-01

    to reliquify rather easily to allow for recovery of the TLD powder with little or no loss of thermoluminesence. Of the three materials selected for evaluation, a 10% gelatin mixture provided the closest match to Reference Man tissue. The gelatin mixture...

  17. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  18. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  19. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  20. 5) Management ii) Mechanical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods = manually or mechanically damaging plants #12;5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods Advantages · Generally much less public opposition #12;5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods Advantages · Generally much less public opposition · Works well

  1. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  2. Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

  3. Bridged polygermsesquioxanes. Organically modified germanium oxide materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamison, G.M.; Loy, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Shea, K.J. (Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Sol-gel processed polysilsesquioxanes are hybrid organic-inorganic materials with potential applications as photoresists, membranes, or catalytic supports. Hydrolytic conversion of trichloro- or trialkoxysilanes often leads to amorphous or crystalline oligosilsesquioxanes instead of high polymers. In light of the intimate dependence of polysilsesquioxane properties of tightly controlled reaction conditions and processing, recent emphasis has been placed on control of polymer microarchitecture via the introduction of arylene-, acetylene-, and alkylene-bridging groups. Another strategy for modifying the properties of hybrid organic-inorganic polymers is to substitute a group IVA metal, such as germanium, for silicon. The authors report the synthesis and characterization of bifunctional hexylene-bridged organogermanium monomers X[sub 3]Ge-(CH[sub 2])[sub 6]GeX[sub 3] (X = Cl; OEt) and the formation of polymeric materials through sol-gel hydrolysis-condensation of the monomers. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  5. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  6. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering The development of new high-performance materials for energy Use of Advanced Characterization Techniques for Materials Development in Energy and Transportation and composition of materials at higher spatial resolution, with greater efficiency, and on real materials

  7. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals, accidentally spilled, or released. In addition to laboratory chemicals, hazardous materials may include common not involve highly toxic or noxious hazardous materials, a fire, or an injury requiring medical attention

  8. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up, or there is a small spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  9. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up spill where personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit

  10. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INCIDENTS What are hazardous materials? Hazardous materials are chemicals I do if there is a small spill in the area and personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up personnel trained in Hazardous Material clean up or an appropriate spill kit is not available? Call 561

  11. ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Stephen A.

    ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008 INDIANA JONES AND THE SECRET vendors, etc., or as credit towards the use of parts and materials that are stocked in the mechatronics/credits/donations. #12;ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008 INDIANA JONES AND THE SECRET

  12. -STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spirn, Daniel

    -STABILITY AND VORTEX MOTION IN TYPE II SUPERCONDUCTORS MATTHIAS KURZKE AND DANIEL SPIRN Abstract. 1. Introduction 1.1. Physical background. The evolution of a superconducting material is usu- ally of the magnetic field and the electric field potential for a superconducting sample R2 . The parameter

  13. Materials Science and Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    Materials Science and Engineering BS, 2015-2016 Name ID# Date Course Number and Title Credits or ECE 210 3 ENGR 245, 245L Intro to Materials Science & Engineering & Lab 4 MATH 175 Calculus II 4 MATH Engineering Statistics 3 CID MSE 215 Materials Processing 3 MSE 305 Structure of Materials 3 MSE 308

  14. Structure-toxicity assessment of metabolites of the aerobic bacterial transformation of substituted naphthalenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlond, J.D.; Applegate, B.M.; Menn, F.M.; Schultz, T.W.; Sayler, G.S.

    2000-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 5R, a naphthalene-degrading bacterium isolated from manufactured gas plant soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, was examined for its degradative capacity of a number of substituted naphthalenes. In general, those compounds substituted on only one ring with an electrically neutral substituent were found to be transformed primarily to substituted salicylic acids according to the classical (NAH7) naphthalene dioxygenase-initiated upper pathway reactions of the naphthalene degradative pathway (i.e., the NAH system). Dimethylnaphthalenes with a substituent on each ring, and certain halogenated naphthalenes, were transformed via a monohydroxylation reaction to form hydroxylated dead-end products. Of the substituted salicylic acids examined, only 3- and 4-methylsalicylic acid, the respective products of the degradation of 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, were further degraded by salicylate hydroxylase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, the first two enzymes of the NAH lower pathway. Using the Tetrahymena pyriformis acute toxicity assay, many of the monohydroxylated products of incomplete biodegradation were found to be polar narcotics. Substituted salicylic acids that are not further degraded by the NAH lower pathway were found to be toxic via carboxylic acid narcosis.

  15. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  16. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  17. Geomaterials Research Project The Evolution of Generic Material Standards for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    Geomaterials Research Project The Evolution of Generic Material Standards for Block Manhattan College School of Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Department Bronx, New York, U.S.A. May 2012 #12;ii Geomaterials Research Project The Evolution of Generic Material Standards for Block

  18. Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    applied materials science and technology. One key component of the division is a strong Basic Energy Sciences (BES) portfolio that pushes the frontiers of materials theory,...

  19. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredE Contract No.No. 330 J.2-1 ContractII

  20. PARS II TRAINING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more than 20-yearPAE EvaluationPARS II13,

  1. Questions about Cori II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and RemovalQuantumdefault Sign In About

  2. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials Manufacturing New materials drive the development of innovative products. Building upon a rich history in materials science, ORNL is discovering and developing...

  3. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  4. Cation-substituted spinel oxide and oxyfluoride cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Choi, Wongchang

    2014-05-13

    The present invention includes compositions and methods of making cation-substituted and fluorine-substituted spinel cathode compositions by firing a LiMn.sub.2-y-zLi.sub.yM.sub.zO.sub.4 oxide with NH.sub.4HF.sub.2 at low temperatures of between about 300 and 700.degree. C. for 2 to 8 hours and a .eta. of more than 0 and less than about 0.50, mixed two-phase compositions consisting of a spinel cathode and a layered oxide cathode, and coupling them with unmodified or surface modified graphite anodes in lithium ion cells.

  5. Multi-Component Copper Catalyzed Methods to Access Highly-Substituted Amine-Bearing Carbon Centers from Simple Starting Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Conor John

    2013-01-01

    synthesis with an eco- friendly framework. V. Literatureachieve the primary goal of an eco-friendly KA 2 reaction ofnot for the goal of an eco-friendly solvent free synthesis,

  6. Multi-Component Copper Catalyzed Methods to Access Highly-Substituted Amine-Bearing Carbon Centers from Simple Starting Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Conor John

    2013-01-01

    enamine attack 1-amino-1,3-butadienes are difficult toprovides a 1-amino-1,3-butadiene in one step from simple

  7. Multi-Component Copper Catalyzed Methods to Access Highly-Substituted Amine-Bearing Carbon Centers from Simple Starting Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Conor John

    2013-01-01

    instrument using direct injection of samples in acetonitrileinstrument using direct injection of samples in acetonitrileinstrument using direct injection of samples in acetonitrile

  8. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1983-01-01

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  9. Influence of cationic substitutions on the first charge and reversible capacities of lithium-rich layered oxide cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-06-24

    The reversible capacity values of lithium-rich layered oxide cathodes depend on the length (capacity) of the plateau region during the first charge. With an aim to understand the factors that control the length of the plateau region and thereby enhance the reversible capacity, the effects of various cationic substitutions in Li1.2Mn0.6Ni0.2O2 have been investigated systematically. Specifically, substitutions of (i) M3+ = Al3+, Cr3+, Fe3+, Co3+, and Ga3+ for equal amounts of Mn4+and Ni2+ in Li1.2Mn0.6-0.5xNi0.2-0.5xMxO2 with x = 0.06, 0.13, and 0.2, (ii) Ti4+ for Mn4+ in Li1.2Mn0.6-xTixNi0.2O2 with x = 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1, and (iii) Mg2+ for Ni2+ in Li1.2Mn0.6Ni0.2-xMgxO2 with x = 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 have been investigated. The cationic substitutions affect the first charge capacity values both in the sloping region corresponding to the oxidation of the transition-metal ions to the 4+ state and in the plateau region corresponding to the oxidation of O2- ions to O2 and/or transition-metal ions beyond 4+, which control the reversible capacity values in subsequent cycles. While the changes in the sloping-region capacity could be readily understood by considering the redox activities of the transition-metal ions, the plateau-region capacity is found to depend sensitively on the metal–oxygen covalence, which is dictated by the relative positions of the metal:3d band with respect to the top of the O2-:2p band, and electron delocalization. For instance, an overlap of the Co3+/4+:t2g band with the top of the O2-:2p band along with a partially filled t 2g band across the shared octahedral edges makes the oxygen loss from the lattice and/or oxidation beyond 4+ much more facile.

  10. Methylocystis strain SB2 materials and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semrau, Jeremy D; Gallagher, Warren; Yoon, Sukhwan; Im, Jeongdae; DiSpririto, Alan A; Lee, Sung-Woo; Hartsel, Scott; McEllistrem, Marcus T

    2014-01-14

    The present disclosures provides isolated or purified compounds, each of which bind to a metal atom. Generally, the compounds are small in size (e.g., molecular weight of less than about 1 kDa) and peptidic in nature, inasmuch as the compounds comprise amino acids. In some embodiments, the compound comprises a structure of Formula I; M.sub.1-P.sub.1-M.sub.2-P.sub.2 wherein each of P.sub.1 and P.sub.2 is a peptide comprising at least two amino acids, M.sub.1 is a first metal binding moiety comprising a substituted imidazolone ring, M.sub.2 is a second metal binding moiety comprising a substituted oxazolone ring, and wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 bind to a single metal atom. Also provided are related complexes, conjugates, cells which synthesize the compounds of the present disclosures, substantially homogenous cultures thereof, kits and compositions, and methods of making or using the materials of the present disclosures.

  11. Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Binding ORNL discovery holds potential for separations, sensors, batteries, biotech and more Home | Science & Discovery | Advanced Materials Advanced Materials |...

  12. 8. SQL II 8-1 Part 8: SQL II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brass, Stefan

    8. SQL II 8-1 Part 8: SQL II References: · Elmasri/Navathe:Fundamentals of Database Systems, 3rd Edition, 1999. Chap. 8, "SQL -- The Relational Database Standard" (Sect. 8.2, 8.3.3, part of 8.3.4.) · Silberschatz/Korth/Sudarshan: Database System Concepts, 3rd Edition. McGraw-Hill, 1999: Chapter 4: "SQL

  13. Composite material dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  14. BOAST II for the IBM 3090 and RISC 6000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebert, P.; Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Tyler, J.

    1993-05-01

    BOAST II simulates isothermal, darcy flow in three dimensions. It assumes that reservoir liquids can be described in three fluid phases (oil, gas, and water) of constant composition, with physical properties that depend on pressure, only. These reservoir fluid approximations are acceptable for a large percentage of the world's oil and gas reservoirs. Consequently, BOAST II has a wide range of applicability. BOAST II can simulate oil and/or gas recovery by fluid expansion, displacement, gravity drainage, and capillary imbibition mechanisms. Typical field production problems that BOAST II can handle include primary depletion studies, pressure maintenance by water and/or gas injection, and evaluation of secondary recovery waterflooding and displacement operations. Technically, BOAST II is a finite, implicit pressure, explicit saturation (IMPES) numerical simulator. It applies both direct and iterative solution techniques for solving systems of algebraic equations. The well model allows specification of rate or pressure constraints on well performance, and the user is free to add or to recomplete wells during the simulation. In addition, the user can define multiple rock and PVT regions and can choose from three aquifer models. BOAST II also provides flexible initialization, a bubble-point tracking scheme, automatic time-step control, and a material balance check on solution stability. The user controls output, which includes a run summary and line-printer plots of fieldwide performance.

  15. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  16. Wave Propagation in Multiferroic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Scott Macklin

    2013-01-01

    Waves in Magnetoelectric Materials . . . Need forApplication of Multiferroic Materials to Receive AntennaMaterials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  17. Simultaneous optimization and heat integration for the co-production of diesel substitutes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    consumption of the resulting process. The production of glycerol ethers increases the yield of diesel1 Simultaneous optimization and heat integration for the co-production of diesel substitutes the integration of the etherification of glycerol for the production of tert butyl glycerol with the production

  18. CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} reforming over Ni-substituted barium hexaaluminate catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE; Spivey, James J. [ORISE; Kugler, Edwin L.; Pakhare, Devendra

    2013-03-30

    A series of Ni-substituted barium hexaaluminate catalysts, Ba{sub 0.75}Ni{sub y}Al{sub 12?y}O{sub 19??} (y = 0.4, 0.6 and 1.0), were tested for CO{sub 2} reforming of CH{sub 4} at temperatures between 200 and 900 °C. Temperature programmed surface reaction results show that the reaction lights-off in a temperature range between 448 and 503 °C with a consistent decrease in light-off temperature with increasing Ni substitution. Isothermal runs performed at 900 °C show near equilibrium conversion and stable product concentrations for 18 h on all catalysts. Temperature programmed oxidation of the used catalysts show that the amount of carbon deposited on the catalyst increases with Ni substitution. High resolution XRD of the used Ba{sub 0.75}Ni{sub 0.4}Al{sub 11.6}O{sub 19??} catalyst shows a statistically significant contraction of the unit cell which is the result of NiO reduction from the lattice. XRD of the used catalyst also confirms the presence of graphitic carbon. XPS and ICP measurements of the as prepared catalysts show that lower levels of Ni substitution result in an increasing proportion of Ba at the surface.

  19. The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elena, Santiago F.

    The distribution of fitness effects caused by single-nucleotide substitutions in an RNA virus of each mutant. The distribution of nonlethal deleterious effects was highly skewed and had a long, flat-normal distribution, with 19% reduction of average fitness; the effects distribution of preobserved deleterious

  20. Thermodynamic extrapolation and martensite-start temperature of substitutionally alloyed steels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Thermodynamic extrapolation and martensite-start temperature of substitutionally alloyed steels H appraisethe superelementtechniqueby considering martensitic transformations in low-alloy steels. K. D. H. Bhadeshia +AFt;'{T-l00~ }jATmag,}I +Af* (1) The martensite-start temperature M, of any

  1. MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 2002, VOL. 100, NO. 11, 16591675 Key properties of monohalogen substituted phenols: interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Minh Tho

    MOLECULAR PHYSICS, 2002, VOL. 100, NO. 11, 1659±1675 Key properties of monohalogen substituted August 2001; accepted 31 December 2001) This paper is an attempt to bridge the key properties by Runge from coal tar [1] in 1834 and named pheÂnol by Gerhardt in 1843 [2] (see also Laurent [3

  2. Long-range interactions between substitutional nitrogen dopants in graphene: electronic properties calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    vanishes. The tight-binding Hamiltonian is used to calculate the STM image of graphene around an isolated N atom. STM images are also calculated for graphene doped with 0.5 at% concentration of nitrogen)sensing,2 lithium incorporation battery,3,4 and in other fields. Ni- trogen (N) is a natural substitute

  3. Computational Study of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies for Substituted $\\beta$-O-4 Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, Jarod M; Beste, Ariana; Buchanan III, A C

    2011-01-01

    The biopolymer lignin is a potential source of valuable chemicals. Phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) is representative of the dominant $\\beta$-O-4 ether linkage. Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the Boltzmann-weighted carbon-oxygen and carbon-carbon bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of substituted PPE. These values are important in order to understand lignin decomposition. Exclusion of all conformers that have distributions of less than 5\\% at 298 K impacts the BDE by less than 1 kcal mol$^{-1}$. We find that aliphatic hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents introduce only small changes to the BDEs (0-3 kcal mol$^{-1}$). Substitution on the phenyl ring at the $ortho$ position substantially lowers the C-O BDE, except in combination with the hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents, where the effect of methoxy substitution is reduced by hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding between the aliphatic substituents and the ether oxygen in the PPE derivatives has a significant influence on the BDE. CCSD(T)-calculated BDEs and hydrogen bond strengths of $ortho$-substituted anisoles when compared with M06-2X values confirm that the latter method is sufficient to describe the molecules studied and provide an important benchmark for lignin model compounds.

  4. Economic implications of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, R.C.; Collins, G.S.; Lacewell, R.D.; Chang, H.C.

    1983-08-01

    This study of expected economic impacts of substituting plant oils for diesel fuel consisted of two components: (1) analysis of oilseed production and oilseed crushing capacity in the US and Texas and (2) simulation of impacts on US cropping patterns, crop prices, producer rent, and consumer surplus. The primary oilseed crops considered were soybeans, cottonseed, sunflowers, and peanuts. 19 references, 2 figures, 14 tables.

  5. QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342 KPTC 103 9:00 ­ 10:20 a.m. 1 Tues., Thurs. ­ Winter Quarter 2011 quantum mechanics at the graduate level. The text for Quantum Mechanics II will be J. J. Sakurai and Jim Napolitano, Modern Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley, San Francisco, 2011). For supplemental

  6. II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS DE IMPACTO" 20 de Septiembre 2011 Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud #12;Taller: "Elaboración de Manuscritos y Proceso Editorial en Revistas Indexadas: el Caso del: Secretaría. Departamento de Psicología de la Salud II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS DE IMPACTO" 20 de

  7. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  8. Sist. Lin. II Aps Escalonamento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Marco

    Lineares ­ 2a Parte Paulo Goldfeld Marco Cabral Departamento de Matemática Aplicada Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 1 conjunto-solução = { } sistema inconsistente Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo

  9. Unit II-5 Interpolation 1 Interpolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit II-5 Interpolation 1 Unit II-5 Interpolation Unit II-5 Interpolation 2 Interpolation outside the range of values of xi use extrapolation Unit II-5 Interpolation 3 Basic ideas · given: n+1 in tabular format Unit II-5 Interpolation 4 Basis functions · n basis functions 1, 2, ... , n can be used

  10. A High-Conduction Ge Substituted Li3AsS4 Solid Electrolyte with Exceptional Low Activation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL; Chen, Yan [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes show potential to enable high-energy-density secondary batteries and offer distinctive safety features as an advantage over traditional liquid electrolytes. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity, low activation energy, and outstanding electrochemical stability in crystalline solid electrolytes is a challenge for the synthesis of novel solid electrolytes. Herein we report an exceptionally low activation energy (Ea) and high room temperature superionic conductivity via facile aliovalent substitution of Li3AsS4 by Ge, which increased the conductivity by two orders of magnitude as compared to the parent compound. The composition Li3.334Ge0.334As0.666S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.12 mScm-1 at 27oC. Local Li+ hopping in this material is accompanied by distinctive low activation energy Ea of 0.17 eV being the lowest of Li+ solid conductors. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the efficacy of surface passivation of solid electrolyte to achieve compatibility with metallic lithium electrodes.

  11. Unusual magnetic hysteresis and the weakened transition behavior induced by Sn substitution in Mn{sub 3}SbN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Ying, E-mail: sunying@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Xia [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro [Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Wang, Cong [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Hai L.; Sathish, Clastin I.; Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: yamaura.kazunari@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [Analysis Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    Substitution of Sb with Sn was achieved in ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}SbN. The experimental results indicate that with an increase in Sn concentration, the magnetization continuously decreases and the crystal structure of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N changes from tetragonal to cubic phase at around x of 0.8. In the doping series, step-like anomaly in the isothermal magnetization was found and this behavior was highlighted at x?=?0.4. The anomaly could be attributed to the magnetic frustration, resulting from competition between the multiple spin configurations in the antiperovskite lattice. Meantime, H{sub c} of 18 kOe was observed at x?=?0.3, which is probably the highest among those of manganese antiperovskite materials reported so far. With increasing Sn content, the abrupt change of resistivity and the sharp peak of heat capacity in Mn{sub 3}SbN were gradually weakened. The crystal structure refinements indicate the weakened change at the magnetic transition is close related to the change of c/a ratio variation from tetragonal to cubic with Sn content. The results derived from this study indicate that the behavior of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N could potentially enhance its scientific and technical applications, such as spin torque transfer and hard magnets.

  12. Shape and Topology Optimization for Periodic Problems Part II: Optimization algorithm and numerical examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisbon, University of

    Regeneration · Shape Optimization · Topology Optimization · Auxetic Materials 1 Introduction The main of the effective material are optimized by minimizing a cost functional (6) under a volume constraintShape and Topology Optimization for Periodic Problems Part II: Optimization algorithm and numerical

  13. Longer-term domestic supply problems for nonrenewable materials with special emphasis on energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goeller, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made on how materials are used in present and future energy production and use. Problem areas which are discussed include by-products production, import limitations, substitution and recycle, accelerated use, synthesis, and the adequacy of the data bases availability. (FS)

  14. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A; Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  15. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  16. Synthesis of 5-Substituted Isoxazolidines by [3 plus 2] Cycloaddition of Nitrones Generated in an Unusual Way from Nitrosobenzene and Styrene 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jun Yong

    2010-01-20

    A new synthetic method toward 5-substituted isoxazolidines by [3 plus 2] cycloaddition of nitrones generated from nitrosobenzene and styrene was discovered. The formation of nitrones from nitrosobenzene and mono-substituted aromatic styrenes...

  17. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL); Nieman, G. William (Evanston, IL); Weertman, Julia R. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  18. Enclosure II June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas NuclearElectronic StructureEly M.EmilioDaveAdvanced MaterialsC) 00 0

  19. Anisotropic scattering rate in Fe-substituted Bi2Sr2Ca(Cu1-xFex)2O8+?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Naamneh, M.; Lubashevsky, Y.; Lahoud, E.; Gu, G.; Kanigel, A.

    2015-05-27

    We measured the electronic structure of Fe substituted Bi2212 using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). We find that the substitution does not change the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap but induces a very anisotropic enhancement of the scattering rate. A comparison of the effect of Fe substitution to that of Zn substitution suggests that the Fe reduces Tc so effectively because it supresses very strongly the coherence weight around the anti-nodes.

  20. Phase II Planning for Niall Gaffney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase II Planning for the HET Niall Gaffney March 6, 1997 #12;#12;Phase II Planning for the HET 3 ................................................................................................................................. 38 Plan Templates .............................................................................................................................................. 47 Example Plans

  1. Phase II Planning for Niall Gaffney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase II Planning for the HET Niall Gaffney March 6, 1997 #12; #12; Phase II Planning for the HET 3 ................................................................................................................................. 38 Plan Templates .............................................................................................................................................. 47 Example Plans

  2. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keates, Adam C.; Wang, Qianlong; Weller, Mark T.

    2014-02-15

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42{sub 1}m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?} with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO{sub 4} tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 4?} diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO{sub 8} square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the Jahn–Teller (JT) effect for the high spin d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d{sup 9} Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?}, formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO{sub 4} tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of Jahn–Teller (JT) effects for high spin, d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d{sup 9} Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: • Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. • New layered phosphate structure. • Jahn–Teller and d{sup 10} distorted coordinations.

  3. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  4. Department of Materials Science &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    Developing Leaders of Innovation Department of Materials Science & Engineering #12;At the University of Virginia, students in materials science, engineering physics and engineering science choose to tackle compelling issues in materials science and engineering or engineering science

  5. Sandia Energy - Materials Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Chemistry Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Clean FuelsPower Materials Chemistry Materials ChemistryAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:42:21+00:00...

  6. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  7. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.; Allen, L.C.; Marshall, C.; Murphy, R.C.; Marshall, T.

    1998-05-26

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby. 44 figs.

  8. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Allen, Larry C. (Arvada, CO); Marshall, Craig (Littleton, CO); Murphy, Robert C. (Golden, CO); Marshall, Todd (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby.

  9. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-02-16

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group.

  10. Transporting Hazardous Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transporting Hazardous Materials The procedures given below apply to all materials that are considered to be hazardous by the U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). Consult your...

  11. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Security Education Center About Us Conferences and Workshops Advanced Qualification of Additive Manufacturing Materials Workshop Quantum and Dirac Materials for Energy...

  12. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MPA Materials Physics and Applications We develop new technologies that solve pressing national energy and security challenges by exploring and exploiting materials and their...

  13. by popular demand: Addiction II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niv, Yael

    by popular demand: Addiction II PSY/NEU338:Animal learning and decision making: Psychological, size of other non-drug rewards, and cost (but ultimately the demand is inelastic, or at least

  14. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  15. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St. Michel, W. (INEEL); Lott, S. (LANL-Carlsbad Operations)

    2002-05-16

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repack aging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

  16. Expanding the Allowable TRUPACT-II Payload

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    St Michel, Whitney Dorothea; Lott, Sheila

    2002-08-01

    The partnership between the Carlsbad Field Office (CBFO) and the TRU and Mixed Waste Focus Area (TMFA) was rewarded when several long-term projects came to fruition. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) removed some of the conservatism in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) with their approval of Revision 19. The SARP strictly limits the payload constituents to ensure that hydrogen gas and other flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) don't build up to flammable/explosive levels while the transuranic (TRU) waste is sealed in the container during shipment. The CBFO/TMFA development program was based on laboratory experiments with surrogate waste materials, real waste experiments, and theoretical modeling that were used to justify payload expansion. Future work to expand the shipping envelope of the TRUPACT-II focuses on increasing the throughput through the waste certification process and reducing the waste operations costs by removing the need for a repackaging and/or treatment capability or reducing the size of the needed repackaging/treatment capability.

  17. Phase II Accident Investigation Board Briefing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCTCritical Materials UsePhase II Accident

  18. Phase II Smart Grid Data Access Funding Opportunity Winner Announced |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCTCritical Materials UsePhase II

  19. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; ,

    2012-08-08

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  20. Effect of La{sup 3+} substitution with Gd{sup 3+} on the resistive switching properties of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Chang-Sun; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2014-05-12

    This study demonstrated that the resistive switching voltage of perovskite manganite material could be controlled by A-site cation substitution in “A” MnO{sub 3} perovskite manganite structure. A partial substitution of La{sup 3+} in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} with smaller cation Gd{sup 3+} induced A-site vacancy of the largest Sr{sup 2+} cation with surface segregation of SrO{sub y} due to ionic size mismatch, and the induced vacancies reduced migration energy barrier. The operating voltage decreased from 3.5?V to 2.5?V due to a favorable condition for electrochemical migration and redox of oxygen ions. Moreover, surface-segregated SrO{sub y} was enhanced with Gd-substitution and the SrO{sub y} reduced Schottky-like barrier height and resistive switching ratio from the potential drop and screening effect. The relationship between A-site vacancy generation resulting in surface segregation of SrO{sub y} and resistive switching behavior was also investigated by energy resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, O 1s near edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and current voltage measurement.

  1. ALT-II armor tile design for upgraded TEXTOR operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newberry, B.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McGrath, R.T.; Watson, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohlhaas, W.; Finken, K.H. [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Noda, N. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    The upgrade of the TEXTOR tokamak at KFA Juelich was recently completed. This upgrade extended the TEXTOR pulse length from 5 seconds to 10 seconds. The auxiliary heating was increased to a total of 8.0 MW through a combination of neutral beam injection and radio frequency heating. Originally, the inertially cooled armor tiles of the full toroidal belt Advanced Limiter Test -- II (ALT-II) were designed for a 5-second operation with total heating of 6.0 MW. The upgrade of TEXTOR will increase the energy deposited per pulse onto the ALT-II by about 300%. Consequently, the graphite armor tiles for the ALT-II had to be redesigned to avoid excessively high graphite armor surface temperatures that would lead to unacceptable contamination of the plasma. This redesign took the form of two major changes in the ALT-II armor tile geometry. The first design change was an increase of the armor tile thermal mass, primarily by increasing the radial thickness of each tile from 17 mm to 20 mm. This increase in the radial tile dimension reduces the overall pumping efficiency of the ALT-II pump limiter by about 30%. The reduction in exhaust efficiency is unfortunate, but could be avoided only by active cooling of the ALT-II armor tiles. The active cooling option was too complicated and expensive to be considered at this time. The second design change involved redefining the plasma facing surface of each armor tile in order to fully utilize the entire surface area. The incident charged particle heat flux was distributed uniformly over the armor tile surfaces by carefully matching the radial, poloidal and toroidal curvature of each tile to the plasma flow in the TEXTOR boundary layer. This geometry redefinition complicates the manufacturing of the armor tiles, but results in significant thermal performance gains. In addition to these geometry upgrades, several material options were analyzed and evaluated.

  2. Mössbauer spectroscopy, magnetic characteristics, and reflection loss analysis of nickel-strontium substituted cobalt ferrite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghasemi, Ali, E-mail: ali13912001@yahoo.com [Materials Engineering Department, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Shahin Shahr (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Paesano, Andrea; Cerqueira Machado, Carla Fabiana [Departamento de Física, Centro de Ciências Exatas, Universidade Estadual de Maringá, Maringá (Brazil); Shirsath, Sagar E. [Department of Physics, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University, Aurangabad (India); Spin Device Technology Center, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan); Liu, Xiaoxi; Morisako, Akimitsu [Spin Device Technology Center, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, Nagano (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    In current research work, Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x/2}Sr{sub x/2}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x?=?0–1 in a step of 0.2) ferrite nanoparticles were synthesized by a sol-gel method. According to the evolution in the subspectral areas obtained from Mössbauer spectroscopy, it was found that the relaxing iron belongs mostly to the site B, since the Mössbauer fraction of site A does not vary appreciably. With an increase in Ni-Sr substitution contents in cobalt ferrite, the coercivity and saturation of magnetization decrease. Variation of reflection loss versus frequency in microwave X-band demonstrates that the reflection peak shifts to lower frequency by adding substituted cations and the synthesized nanoparticles can be considered for application in electromagnetic wave absorber technology.

  3. Cation-substituted spinel oxide and oxyfluoride cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Choi, Wonchang

    2010-05-18

    The present invention includes compositions and methods of making cation-substituted and fluorine-substituted spinel cathode compositions by firing a LiMn2-y-zLiyMzO4 oxide with NH4HF2 at low temperatures of between about 300 and 700.degree. C. for 2 to 8 hours and a .eta. of more than 0 and less than about 0.50, mixed two-phase compositions consisting of a spinel cathode and a layered oxide cathode, and coupling them with unmodified or surface modified graphite anodes in lithium ion cells.

  4. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Parks, Derek J.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  5. Influence of Y substitutions on the magnetism of Gd5Ge4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paudyal, Durga; Mudryk, Y.; Pecharsky, V.K.; Misra, S.; Miller, G.J.; and Gschneidner, Jr., K.A.

    2010-04-21

    The interrelation between the specific crystallographic positions and their influence on the magnetism of neighboring atoms is examined from first principles electronic structure calculations using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} compound as a model system. The predicted preferences of the specific occupations by nonmagnetic yttrium atoms and the resulting magnetism of substituted Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} have been confirmed, respectively, by single crystal x-ray diffraction and magnetization experiments.

  6. Quantitative solubility-structure relationships for some meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, John Norman

    1963-01-01

    OVANTITATIVE SOLVBILITV-STRVCTVRE RELATIONSHIPR FOR SOME META- AND FARAMUBSTITDTED BENZOIC ACIDS A Thesis by JOHN NORMAN PAWLOSKI Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the re- quirements;for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Augus t 1963 Ma)or Sub)ect: Chemistry QUANTITATIVE SOLUBILITY-STRUCTURE RELATIONSHIPS POR SOME META- AND PARA-SUBSTITUTED BENZGIC ACIDS A Thesis JOHN NORMAN PAWLOSKI Approved as to style...

  7. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oda, Michael N. (Benicia, CA); Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  8. Polymeric media comprising polybenzimidazoles N-substituted with organic-inorganic hybrid moiety

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID) [Shelley, ID; Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

    2009-12-15

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be included in a separator medium. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The separatory medium may exhibit an H.sub.2, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, CH.sub.3, or CO.sub.2 gas permeability greater than the gas permeability of a comparable separatory medium comprising the PBI compound without substitution. The separatory medium may further include an electronically conductive medium and/or ionically conductive medium. The separatory medium may be used as a membrane (semi-permeable, permeable, and non-permeable), a barrier, an ion exhcange media, a filter, a gas chromatography coating (such as stationary phase coating in affinity chromatography), etc.

  9. Helium generation in fusion reactor materials. Progress report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneff, D W; Farrar, H IV

    1981-01-14

    Helium analyses have been initiated for the helium accumulation dosimetry materials irradiated in the neutron characterization experiment at RTNS-II. Analyses of the separated isotopes of molybdenum irradiated in the RTNS-I, RTNS-II, and Be(d,n) neutron fields are in progress. The emphasis during the present period was on improving the gas mass spectrometer sensitivity for these samples.

  10. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  11. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering In this presentation the role of materials in power generation sector is about 20%, opportunities for materials-based technologies to improve energy efficiency (e Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). He is also the Director of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory

  12. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  13. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  14. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

  15. Explaining the increase of competitiveness in the Colombian car industry after the end of import substitution industralization [sic] policies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrillo-Mora, Felipe, 1972-

    2003-01-01

    At the beginning of the decade of the nineties, Import Substitution Industrialization - ISI- policies were dismantled all over Latin America, including Colombia. This meant that tariff protection for locally produced ...

  16. Hydroxylation of p-substituted phenols by tyrosinase: Further insight into the mechanism of tyrosinase activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz-Munoz, Jose Luis; Berna, Jose; Garcia-Molina, Maria del Mar; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Varon, Ramon [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Avda. Espana s and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action the copper complexes and tyrosinase on phenols is equivalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope effect showed that nucleophilic attack to copper atom may be the slower step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The value of {rho} (Hammett constant) supports an electrophilic aromatic substitution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data obtained in steady state pH 7 conditions support the mechanism of Scheme 1SM. -- Abstract: A study of the monophenolase activity of tyrosinase by measuring the steady state rate with a group of p-substituted monophenols provides the following kinetic information: k{sub cat}{sup m} and the Michaelis constant, K{sub M}{sup m}. Analysis of these data taking into account chemical shifts of the carbon atom supporting the hydroxyl group ({delta}) and {sigma}{sub p}{sup +}, enables a mechanism to be proposed for the transformation of monophenols into o-diphenols, in which the first step is a nucleophilic attack on the copper atom on the form E{sub ox} (attack of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of C-1 on the copper atom) followed by an electrophilic attack (attack of the hydroperoxide group on the ortho position with respect to the hydroxyl group of the benzene ring, electrophilic aromatic substitution with a reaction constant {rho} of -1.75). These steps show the same dependency on the electronic effect of the substituent groups in C-4. Furthermore, a study of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on the oxidation of monophenols by tyrosinase points to an appreciable isotopic effect. In a proton inventory study with a series of p-substituted phenols, the representation of k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}}/k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} against n (atom fractions of deuterium), where k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}} is the catalytic constant for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, was linear for all substrates. These results indicate that only one of the proton transfer processes from the hydroxyl groups involved the catalytic cycle is responsible for the isotope effects. We suggest that this step is the proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of C-1 to the peroxide of the oxytyrosinase form (E{sub ox}). After the nucleophilic attack, the incorporation of the oxygen in the benzene ring occurs by means of an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism in which there is no isotopic effect.

  17. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  18. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  19. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  20. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  1. MATERIALS ENGINEERING (MATE) CLASS OF 2014 Name: Last, First, ID Min 126 QH + 46 SH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    Materials I . 3 MTEN 315 Physical Metallurgy I .. 3 MTEN 342 Materials Thermo II ... 3 MTEN 431 Diffusion BoK 3 BoK 3 12U MTEN 415 Physical Metallurgy II 3 ENED 3061 Prob & Statistics 3 12FS MTEN 416 Metallurgy Lab 2 MATH 2076 Linear Algebra 3 13SS MTEN 424 X-Ray Diffraction 3 MTEN 6010LPhys Prop Solids

  2. Features of the spectral dependences of transmittance of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted lutetium phthalocyanine molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Tikhonov, E. V.; Dronov, M. A.; Belogorokhova, L. I.; Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2011-11-15

    Vibronic properties of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted phthalocyanine lutetium diphthalocyanine molecules are studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that substitution of several carbon atoms in initial phthalocyanine (Pc) ligands with {sup 13}C isotope atoms causes a spectral shift in the main absorption lines attributed to benzene, isoindol, and peripheral C-H groups. A comparison of spectral characteristics showed that the shift can vary from 3 to 1 cm{sup -1}.

  3. EBR-II Data Digitization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Rabiti, Cristian; Sackett, John

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  4. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A.; Williams, Paul T.

    2011-06-15

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275 deg. C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases.

  5. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  6. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  7. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  8. High capacity nickel battery material doped with alkali metal cations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackovitz, John F. (Monroeville, PA); Pantier, Earl A. (Penn Hills, PA)

    1982-05-18

    A high capacity battery material is made, consisting essentially of hydrated Ni(II) hydroxide, and about 5 wt. % to about 40 wt. % of Ni(IV) hydrated oxide interlayer doped with alkali metal cations selected from potassium, sodium and lithium cations.

  9. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  10. Critical magnetic fields of superconducting aluminum-substituted Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4} clathrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang Garcia, Jose; Lu, Kejie; Shafiq, Basir; Franco, Giovanni; Lu, Junqiang; Rong, Bo; Chen, Ning; Liu, Yang; Liu, Lihua; Song, Bensheng; Wei, Yuping; Johnson, Shardai S.; Luo, Zhiping; Feng, Zhaosheng

    2015-06-07

    In recent years, efforts have been made to explore the superconductivity of clathrates containing crystalline frameworks of group-IV elements. The superconducting silicon clathrate is unusual in that the structure is dominated by strong sp{sup 3} covalent bonds between silicon atoms, rather than the metallic bonding that is more typical of traditional superconductors. This paper reports on critical magnetic fields of superconducting Al-substituted silicon clathrates, which were investigated by transport, ac susceptibility, and dc magnetization measurements in magnetic fields up to 90 kOe. For the sample Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4}, the critical magnetic fields were measured to be H{sub C1}?=?40.2?Oe and H{sub C2}?=?66.4 kOe. The London penetration depth of 4360?Å and the coherence length 70?Å were obtained, whereas the estimated Ginzburg–Landau parameter of ??=?62 revealed that Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4} is a strong type-II superconductor.

  11. Earth-Abundant Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The sections below...

  12. Factors of material consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

    2012-01-01

    Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

  13. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

  14. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Turchi, Patrice LLNL Materials...

  15. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  16. Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Qing

    2010-01-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

  17. Karankawa linguistic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Anthony P.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper I present the available materials on the diverse dialectal forms of the extinct Karankawa language of coastal Texas in the form of an English-Karankawa vocabulary, together with the attested sentence and text material, a transcription...

  18. Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship ABackground Report for the National Dialogue...................................................................................................26 Low Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Regulations on Radioactive Materials Product Stewardship Prepared by the: Product Stewardship Institute University

  19. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  20. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li?MnO?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhital, Chetan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Huq, Ashfia [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Manivannan, Ayyakkannu [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); Torres-Castro, Loraine [Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Shojan, Jifi [Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico); Julien, Christian M. [Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Katiyar, Ram S. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico)

    2015-01-01

    Li?MnO? is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li?MnO?, Li1.5Al0.17MnO?, Li1.0Al0.33MnO? and Li0.5Al0.5MnO? were synthesized by a sol-gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with XRD, Raman, XPS, SEM, Tap density and BET analyzer. XRD patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li?MnO? and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2-xMn1-yAlx+yO3+z) for Al-substituted Li?MnO? compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. XPS analysis for Mn 2p orbital reveal a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO? and Li0.5Al0.5MnO? compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g?¹ for Li?MnO?, 68mAh g?¹ for Li1.5Al0.17MnO?, 58 mAh g?¹ for Li1.0Al0.33MnO? and 74 mAh g?¹ for Li0.5Al0.5MnO? were obtained. Aluminum substitutions increased the discharge capacity and the spinel phase.

  1. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li?MnO?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectronmore »spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. Aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.« less

  2. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio;...

  3. Novel Fabrication and Simple Hybridization of Exotic Material MEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1999-11-13

    Work in materials other than silicon for MEMS applications has typically been restricted to metals and metal oxides instead of more ''exotic'' semiconductors. However, group III-V and II-VI semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material and electronic parameters available to the MEMS and MOEMS designer. With these materials, not only are the traditional mechanical material variables (thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus, etc.) available, but also chemical constituents can be varied in ternary and quaternary materials. This flexibility can be extremely important for both friction and chemical compatibility issues for MEMS. In addition, the ability to continually vary the bandgap energy can be particularly useful for many electronics and infrared detection applications. However, there are two major obstacles associated with alternate semiconductor material MEMS. The first issue is the actual fabrication of non-silicon devices and the second impediment is communicating with these novel devices. We will describe an essentially material independent fabrication method that is amenable to most group III-V and II-VI semiconductors. This technique uses a combination of non-traditional direct write precision fabrication processes such as diamond turning, ion milling, laser ablation, etc. This type of deterministic fabrication approach lends itself to an almost trivial assembly process. We will also describe in detail the mechanical, electrical, and optical self-aligning hybridization technique used for these alternate-material MEMS.

  4. VHTR Materials Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-07-30

    The PowerPoint presentation was given at the DOE-NE Materials Crosscut Coordination Meeting, Tuesday, 30 July 2013.

  5. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Garritt Tucker Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Atomistic Methods to Quantify Nanoscale Strain and Deformation Mechanisms in Nanostructured Materials Thursday, August...

  6. HIGH PERFORMANCE MACROMOLECULAR MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Gregory Forest. Department of Mathematics. Institute for Advanced Materials, Nanoscience & Technology. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

  7. Instructions and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

  8. HELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    with the term "solar flare" dominate our thinking about energy conversion from magnetic storage to other formsHELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES edited by CAROLUS J. SCHRIJVER Lockheed Martin of a solar flare 11 2.3.1 Flare luminosity and mechanical energy 11 2.3.2 The impulsive phase (hard X

  9. Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations January 21, 2002 This assignment is meant to give you some practical experience in using the Saha and Boltzmann equations that govern the level populations in atoms;s =kT the partition function of ionization stage r. The Saha equation: N r+1 N r = 2U r+1 U r P e #18

  10. Deterrence of device counterfeiting, cloning, and subversion by substitution using hardware fingerprinting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Bauer, Todd M; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-09-30

    Deterrence of device subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a computing device for authenticating a hardware platform of the computing device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware platform. The PUF circuit is used to generate a PUF value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the PUF value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the computing device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  11. Ferromagnetism in Mn Substituted Zirconia: A Density-functional Theory Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xingtao Jia; Wei Yang; Minghui Qin; Xinglai Zhang; Mingai Sun; Jianping Li

    2008-09-05

    We study the electronic structure and magnetism of 25% Mn substituted cubic Zirconia (ZrO2) with several homogeneous and heterogeneous doping profiles using density-functional theory calculations. We find that all doping profiles show half-metallic ferromagnetism (HMF), and delta-doping is most energy favorable while homogeneous doping has largest ferromagnetic stabilization energy. Using crystal field theory, we discuss the formation scheme of HMF. Finally, we speculate the potential spintronics applications for Mn doped ZrO2, especially as spin direction controllment.

  12. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Science & Engineering New paradigms in the R&D of novel multifunctional oxide and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics, new materials science and chemistry Laboratory (ANL) during the past fifteen years. Also, the applications of these materials for a new

  13. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  14. Esselen Linguistic Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaul, David L.; Turner, Katherine; Collins, James D.

    1984-01-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to make a complete list of materials known on the Esselen language available in a single place. The existing lexical material has been organized into a lexicon which is followed by phrasal and sentence materials...

  15. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines, including chemistry, physics and engineering. It is the one discipline within the College of Engineering

  16. EBR-II Superheater Duplex Tube Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Dennis D. Keiser; Douglas L. Porter; Naoyuki Kisohara

    2008-12-01

    After 30 years of operation, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Superheater 710 at Argonne National Laboratory-West (now Idaho National Laboratory) was decommissioned. As part of its post-service examination, four duplex tube sections were removed and Charpy impact testing was performed to characterize the crack arresting ability of nickel-bonded tube interfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination was also performed to characterize and identify changes in bond material microstructure. From room temperature to 400 degrees C, all samples demonstrated ductility and crack-stopping ability similar to that exhibited by beginning-of-life samples. However, at low temperature (-5 degrees C), samples removed from the lower region of the superheater (near the sodium inlet) failed while those from the upper region (near the sodium outlet) did not. SEM analysis revealed that all the tube-tube interfaces showed evidence of iron diffusion into the nickel braze, which resulted in the formation of a multiphase diffusion structure. Yet, significant void formation was only observed in the bond layer of the tubes removed from the lower region. This may be due to a change in the crystal microstructure of one of the phases within the bond layer that occurs in the 350 to 450 degrees C temperature range, which results in a lower density and the formation of porosity. Apparently, only the samples from the higher temperature region were exposed to this transition temperature, and the resulting large voids that developed acted as stress concentrators that led to low-temperature embrittlement and failure of the Charpy impact specimens.

  17. The D1-173 amino acid is a structural determinant of the critical interaction between D1-Tyr161 (TyrZ) and D1-His190 in Photosystem II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TyrZ Proline The main cofactors of Photosystem II (PSII) are borne by the D1 and D2 subunits are located upstream of the -helix bearing TyrZ and between the two -helices bearing TyrZ and its hydrogen substitution in PsbA2-PSII versus PsbA3-PSII is shown to be the main structural determinant of the previously

  18. Mittwoch, 28.05.2014 Zeit H17, NW II H18, NW II H20, NW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    Beliefs and Fracking Gebäude Audimax 09:40 (Gebäudewechsel Audimax -> NW II) 10:00 "Hydrogeologie von

  19. Polymerization of bis(triethoxysilyl)ethenes. The impact of substitution geometry on the formation of ethenyl- and vinylidene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, J.P.; Yamanaka, S.A.; McClain, M.D.; Loy, D.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Encapsulants and Foams; Greaves, J.; Shea, K.J. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1998-07-01

    Preparation of organically-bridged polysilsesquioxanes has been achieved by polymerizing organic monomers with two or more trialkoxysilyl groups per monomer repeat unit. The nature of the organic bridging group has been shown to strongly impact the final properties (surface area, pore size, and thermal stability) of the end product. For example, rigid arylene bridging groups have been shown to give rise to materials with high surface areas with a relatively large contribution from micropores (< 20 {angstrom}). The length of alkylene-bridging groups can be used to control the size and dispersity of pores in hydrocarbon-bridged xerogels. In this study, the authors have examined the preparation of ethylene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes from the E-(1) and Z-(2) isomers of 1,2-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene and vinylidene-bridged polysilsesquioxanes from 1,1-bis(triethoxysilyl)ethene-(3). This study was intended to determine the effects of substitution geometry about the carbon-carbon double bond on the condensation chemistry of the monomers and on the resulting architectures of the final materials.

  20. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S--, --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group. The present invention is also directed to a process of preparing labeled compounds, e.g., process of preparing [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid by reacting a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13CH.sub.2)-- aryl sulfone precursor with .sup.13CHI to form a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate, and, reacting the (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by acid to form [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid. The present invention is further directed to a process of preparing [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate by reacting a (HOOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate with CD.sub.3I to form a (.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate, and heating the(.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate at temperatures and for time sufficient to form [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate.

  1. Tailored Porous Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTON,THOMAS J.; BULL,LUCY M.; KLEMPERER,WALTER G.; LOY,DOUGLAS A.; MCENANEY,BRIAN; MISONO,MAKOTO; MONSON,PETER A.; PEZ,GUIDO; SCHERER,GEORGE W.; VARTULI,JAMES C.; YAGHI,OMAR M.

    1999-11-09

    Tailoring of porous materials involves not only chemical synthetic techniques for tailoring microscopic properties such as pore size, pore shape, pore connectivity, and pore surface reactivity, but also materials processing techniques for tailoring the meso- and the macroscopic properties of bulk materials in the form of fibers, thin films and monoliths. These issues are addressed in the context of five specific classes of porous materials: oxide molecular sieves, porous coordination solids, porous carbons, sol-gel derived oxides, and porous heteropolyanion salts. Reviews of these specific areas are preceded by a presentation of background material and review of current theoretical approaches to adsorption phenomena. A concluding section outlines current research needs and opportunities.

  2. The California State University, Fullerton Emergency Management Plan establishes the framework for campus response to emergency situations. The Hazardous Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    the framework for campus response to emergency situations. The Hazardous Material Contingency Plan (plan) defines specific actions and information for responding to campus hazardous materials incidents. II personnel in the event of an unplanned release or spill of hazardous materials or hazardous waste. B

  3. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  4. Dosimetry and cross section measurements at RTNS II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Kneff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous measurements have been conducted at TRNS-II in order to map the neutron field for materials irradiations, to measure activation cross sections, and to measure helium production cross sections. Experiments of up to two weeks duration irradiated large numbers of activation dosimetry and helium samples both close to the source and throughout the target room. Many other samples have been irradiated in piggy-back positions over periods lasting many months. All of these experiments fall into four main classes, namely, fluence-mapping, activation dosimetry, the production of long-lived isotopes, and helium generation measurements. Radiometric dosimetry and activation cross section measurements were performed at Argonne National Laboratory; helium production was measured at Rockwell International Corporation. This paper briefly summarizes the principal results of our measurements at RTNS-II; references are given for more detailed publications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Sandia Energy - High-Temperature Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy & Drilling TechnologyHeavyHigh-Temperature Materials

  6. Structure and scintillation yield of Ce-doped Al–Ga substituted yttrium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidletskiy, Oleg; Kononets, Valerii; Lebbou, Kheirreddine; Neicheva, Svetlana; Voloshina, Olesya; Bondar, Valerii; Baumer, Vyacheslav; Belikov, Konstantin; Gektin, Alexander; Grinyov, Boris; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Range of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. ? Light yield of mixed crystals reaches 130% of the YAG:Ce value at x ? 0.4. ? ?1% of antisite defects is formed in YGG:Ce, but no evidence of this is obtained for the rest of crystals. -- Abstract: Structure and scintillation yield of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are studied. Crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. Distribution of host cations in crystal lattice is determined. Quantity of antisite defects in crystals is evaluated using XRD and atomic emission spectroscopy data. Trend of light output at Al/Ga substitution in Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce is determined for the first time. Light output in mixed crystals reaches 130% comparative to Ce-doped yttrium–aluminum garnet. Luminescence properties at Al/Ga substitution are evaluated.

  7. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  8. Nilpotence and Stable Homotopy Theory II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-12-14

    Nilpotence and Stable Homotopy. Theory II. Michael J. Hopkins. ?. Jeffrey H. Smith. †. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts.

  9. Development of Ceramic Interconnect Materials for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Kyung J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Marina, Olga A.

    2010-08-05

    Currently, acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite is the state-of-the-art ceramic interconnect material for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to its fairly good electronic conductivity and chemical stability in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres, and thermal compatibility with other cell components. The major challenge for acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite for SOFC interconnect applications is its inferior sintering behavior in air, which has been attributed to the development of a thin layer of Cr2O3 at the interparticle necks during the initial stages of sintering. In addition, lanthanum chromite is reactive with YSZ electrolyte at high temperatures, forming a highly resistive lanthanum zirconate phase (La2Zr2O7), which further complicates co-firing processes. Acceptor-doped yttrium chromite is considered to be one of the promising alternatives to acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite because it is more stable with respect to the formation of hydroxides in SOFC operating conditions, and the formation of impurity phases can be effectively avoided at co-firing temperatures. In addition, calcium-doped yttrium chromite exhibits higher mechanical strength than lanthanum chromite-based materials. The major drawback of yttrium chromite is considered to be its lower electrical conductivity than lanthanum chromite. The properties of yttrium chromites could possibly be improved and optimized by partial substitution of chromium with various transition metals. During FY10, PNNL investigated the effect of various transition metal doping on chemical stability, sintering and thermal expansion behavior, microstructure, electronic and ionic conductivity, and chemical compatibility with other cell components to develop the optimized ceramic interconnect material.

  10. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction...

  11. In vitro osteoclast formation and resorption of silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friederichs, Robert J.; Brooks, Roger A.; Ueda, Masato; Best, Serena M.

    2015-04-22

    Engineering, Faculty of Chemistry, Materials & Bioengineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho Suita Osaka 564-8680, Japan 2 ABSTRACT Materials that participate in bone remodelling at the implant / tissue interface represent a modern tissue engineering...

  12. MECHANICS OF MATERIALS WITH PERIODIC TRUSS OR FRAME MICRO-STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinsson, Gunnar

    energy in the material. Using these bounds, existence and uniqueness results for the equations of linear extreme or unusual properties but it is only during the last decade that manufacturing technology has], and Martinsson and Movchan [20], (ii) materials that have negative Poisson's ratios or negative thermal expansion

  13. Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-29

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Transportation Safeguards System (TSS) packaging and transportation and onsite transfer of nuclear explosives, nuclear components, Naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear materials, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels: DOE 5610.12 and DOE 5610.14.

  14. Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-26

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for offsite shipments of naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear material, nuclear explosives, nuclear components, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels DOE O 461.1. Canceled by DOE O 461.1B and DOE O 461.2.

  15. Second generation Research Reactor Fuel Container (RRFC-II).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhold, M. E.; Baker, M. C.; Bourret, S. C.; Harker, W. C.; Pelowitz, D. G.; Polk, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    The second generation Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC-II) has been developed to measure the remaining {sup 235}U content in foreign spent Material Test Reactor (MTR)-type fuel being returned to the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) for interim storage and subsequent disposal. The fuel to be measured started as fresh fuel nominally with 93% enriched Uraniuin alloyed with A1 clad in Al. The fuel was irradiated to levels of up to 65% burnup. The RRFC-II, which will be located in the L-Basin spent fuel pool, is intended to assay the {sup 235}U content using a combination of passive neutron coincidence counting, active neutron coincidence counting, and active-multiplicity analysis. Measurements will be done underwater, eliminating the need for costly and hazardous handling operations of spent fuel out of water. The underwater portion of the RRFC-II consists of a watertight stainless steel housing containing neutron and gamma detectors and a scanning active neutron source. The portion of the system that resides above water consists of data-processing electronics; electromechanical drive electronics; a computer to control the operation of the counter, to collect, and to analyze data; and a touch screen interface located at the equipment rack. The RRFC-II is an improved version of the Los Alamos-designed RRFC already installed in the SRS Receipts Basin for Offsite Fuel. The RRFC-II has been fabricated and is scheduled for installation in late FY 2001 pending acceptance testing by Savannah River Site personnel.

  16. A strong magneto-optical activity in rare-earth La{sup 3+} substituted M-type strontium ferrites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Feng; Liu Xiansong; Zhu Deru [Engineering Technology Research Center of Magnetic Materials, Anhui Province, School of Physics and Materials Science, Anhui University, Hefei 230039 (China); Fernandez-Garcia, Lucia; Suarez, Marta; Luis Menendez, Jose [Centro de Investigacion en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnologia (CINN), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) - Universidad de Oviedo - UO - Principado de Asturias, Parque Tecnologico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera, Asturias (Spain)

    2011-06-01

    M-type strontium ferrites with substitution of Sr{sup 2+} by rare-earth La{sup 3+} were prepared by conventional ceramic technology. The structure, magnetic properties, and magneto-optical Kerr activity of Sr{sub 1-x}La{sub x}Fe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (x = 0, 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, 0.20) were investigated by x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), and magneto-optical ellipsometry, respectively. X-ray diffraction showed that the samples sintered at 1290 deg. C for 3 h were single M-type hexagonal ferrites. The magnetic properties were remarkably changed due to the valence change of Fe ions induced by the substitution of La ions. Most significantly, an important magneto-optical activity was induced in the La{sup 3+} substituted M-type strontium ferrites around 3 eV.

  17. Deformation Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Farghalli A.; Yang, Heather

    2010-01-01

    2010 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A 47. F.A.12. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 41A,of Slip: Progress in Materials Science, Pergamon Press,

  18. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01

    Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

  19. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Wavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion MaterialsAlyssa...

  20. ANS materials databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchbanks, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Technical development in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project is dynamic, and a continuously updated information source is necessary to provide readily usable materials data to the designer, analyst, and materials engineer. The Advanced Neutron Source Materials Databook (AMBK) is being developed as a part of the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Information System (AMIS). Its purpose is to provide urgently needed data on a quick-turnaround support basis for those design applications whose schedules demand immediate estimates of material properties. In addition to the need for quick materials information, there is a need for consistent application of data throughout the ANS Program, especially where only limited data exist. The AMBK is being developed to fill this need as well. It is the forerunner to the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Handbook (AMHB). The AMHB, as reviewed and approved by the ANS review process, will serve as a common authoritative source of materials data in support of the ANS Project. It will furnish documented evidence of the materials data used in the design and construction of the ANS system and will serve as a quality record during any review process whose objective is to establish the safety level of the ANS complex. The information in the AMBK and AMHB is also provided in electronic form in a dial-up computer database known as the ANS Materials Database (AMDB). A single consensus source of materials information prepared and used by all national program participants has several advantages. Overlapping requirements and data needs of various sub-projects and subcontractors can be met by a single document which is continuously revised. Preliminary and final safety analysis reports, stress analysis reports, equipment specifications, materials service reports, and many other project-related documents can be substantially reduced in size and scope by appropriate reference to a single data source.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  3. The nature of quasistatic deformation in granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Noël Roux

    2009-01-15

    Strain in granular materials in quasistatic conditions under varying stress originate in (I) contact deformation and (II) rearrangements of the contact network. Depending on sample history and applied load, either mechanism might dominate. One may thus define rheological regimes I and II accordingly. Their properties are presented and illustrated here with discrete numerical simulation results on sphere packings. Understanding the microscopic physical origin of strain enables one to clarify such issues as the existence of macroscopic elasticity, the approach to stress-strain relations in the large system limit and the sensitivity to noise.

  4. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and surveillance communities. Contact Us Group Leader David...

  5. Nanoscale Materials in Medicine

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanoparticle Technology for Drug Delivery. Gao, X., et al. 2002. Journal of Biomedical Optics 7: 532-537. Ferromagnetic materials become superparamagnetic below 20 nm Size...

  6. Webinar: Materials Genome Initative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

  7. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Thermodynamic and micromechanical analysis #12;Home Polyimide-nanotube composites for electro-active materials · (ß ­ CN)APB/ODPA Polyimide · Piezoelectric polyimide · Exceptional thermal, mechanical

  8. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain, Austin, TX 78731); Dumitru, Earl T. (10116 Aspen St., Austin, TX 78758)

    1986-11-04

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  9. Fluorinated elastomeric materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain, Austin, TX 78731); Dumitru, Earl T. (10116 Aspen St., Austin, TX 78758)

    1990-02-13

    This invention relates to a method of making perfluorinated elastomeric materials, and to materials made by such methods. In the full synthetic scheme, a partially fluorinated polymeric compound, with moieties to prevent crystallization, is created. It is then crosslinked to a desired degree, then perfluorinated. Various intermediate materials, such as partially fluorinated crosslinked polymers, have useful properties, and are or may become commercially available. One embodiment of this invention therefore relates to perfluorination of a selected partially fluorinated, crosslinked material, which is one step of the full synthetic scheme.

  10. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  11. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  12. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  13. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  14. Next Generation Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    databases for ICME Surface treatments User facility for remanufactured parts testing; lower-cost coating materials Low-cost laser processing; high accuracy non-planar surface...

  15. Phase Change Material Tower

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transfer of pulverized coal Assortment of available fabrication methods (shrink fit, adhesive, casting) & liner materials (i.e. alumina, SiC, etc.) Pyrotek molten metal transfer...

  16. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  17. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  18. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  19. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    America’s dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States’ most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Country’s electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  20. Structure and stability of Co(II)-complexes formed by wild-type and metal-ligand substitution mutants of T4 gene 32 protein 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Juqian

    1996-01-01

    Phage T4 gene 32 protein (gp32) is a zinc metalloprotein that binds cooperatively and preferentially to single-stranded nucleic acids and functions as a replication and recombination accessory protein. We have previously ...

  1. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu-Shin (Central Islip, NY); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  2. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  3. EPA Air Docket A-98-49, Item II-B1-32; August 2014 Environmental Protection Agency's Confirmatory Dose Calculations of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ............................................................................................. 7 Attachment I: Location of Nearby Residences and Communities in the Vicinity of WIPP Table II.1: Source Term Used in CAP88-PC........................................... 9 Table II.2: WIPP Plant (WIPP) that led to the release of a small but measurable amount of radioactive material

  4. SHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET (From STUDY II to IDS120f Geometries)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    COLLECTING TANK (BEAM DUMP) AND REMOVAL SYSTEM. 8. SHIELDING CONFIGURATIONS (WC BEADS+H2O). 2 #12;TARGETSHIELDING STUDIES FOR THE MUON COLLIDER TARGET (From STUDY II to IDS120f Geometries) NICHOLAS. RADIATION DAMAGE. STRUCTURAL/MECHANICAL LIMITS FOR SUPERCONDUCTING COILS. SHIELDING MATERIAL. RESULTS

  5. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  6. ECE 618 Renewable Energy II Instructor: Dr. George E. Georgiou, Physics Dept NJIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haimovich, Alexander

    ECE 618 ­ Renewable Energy II FMH 314 Instructor: Dr. George E. Georgiou, Physics Dept NJIT to implement renewable energy. assume knowledge of material in ECE 443 (Renewable Energy Systems with textbook "Renewable and Efficient Electric Power Systems" by Gilbert M. MastersWiley 2004) Textbook: "Renewable Energy

  7. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa AMY

  8. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa AMY

  9. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa

  10. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and700, 1.Reports1E~ S·D3GraniteS T A/ I' Il7aa :

  11. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N SGwen} ;im1 * I

  12. II

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas LiquidsENERGYww0,

  13. Improving the Performance of Lithium Manganese Phosphate Through Divalent Cation Substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Guoying; Richardson, Thomas J.

    2008-03-03

    Highly crystalline samples of LiMnPO{sub 4} and its analogs with partial substitution of Mn by divalent Mg, Cu, Zn, and Ni were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis and characterized by x-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. Chemical oxidation produced two-phase mixtures of the initial phases LiMn{sub (1-y)}M{sub y}PO{sub 4} and the delithiated forms, Li{sub y}Mn{sub (1-y)}M{sub y}PO{sub 4}, all with the olivine structure. The extent of oxidation depended upon the quantity of oxidizing agent used and on the identity of the substituent ions. Mg, Ni and Cu were found to increase the level of delithation relative to that in pure LiMnPO{sub 4}. Mg was also shown to reduce the tendency of the oxidized phase to absorb water.

  14. Reverse Monte Carlo investigations concerning recent isotopic substitution neutron diffraction data on liquid water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pethes, Ildikó

    2015-01-01

    Although liquid water has been studied for many decades by (X-ray and neutron) diffraction measurements, new experimental results keep appearing, virtually every year. The reason for this is that neither X-ray, nor neutron diffraction data are trivial to correct and interpret for this essential substance. Since X-rays are somewhat insensitive to hydrogen, neutron diffraction with (most frequently, H/D) isotopic substitution is vital for investigating the most important feature in water: hydrogen bonding. Here, the two very recent sets of neutron diffraction data are considered, both exploiting the contrast between light and heavy hydrogen, $^1$H and $^2$H, in different ways. Reverse Monte Carlo structural modeling is applied for constructing large structural models that are as consistent as possible with all experimental information, both in real and reciprocal space. The method has also proven to be useful for revealing where possible small inconsistencies appear during primary data processing: for one neutr...

  15. Substitutional Boron in Nanodiamond, Bucky-Diamond, and Nanocrystalline Diamond Grain Boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2006-10-05

    Although boron has been known for many years to be a successful dopant in bulk diamond, efficient doping of nanocrystalline diamond with boron is still being developed. In general, the location, configuration, and bonding structure of boron in nanodiamond is still unknown, including the fundamental question of whether it is located within grains or grain boundaries of thin films and whether it is within the core or at the surface of nanoparticles. Presented here are density functional tight-binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional boron in various types of nanocrystalline diamond. The results predict that boron is likely to be positioned at the surface of isolated particles and at the grain boundary of thin-film samples.

  16. Near fifty percent sodium substituted lanthanum manganites—A potential magnetic refrigerant for room temperature applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethulakshmi, N.; Anantharaman, M. R., E-mail: mraiyer@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin 682022, Kerala (India); Al-Omari, I. A. [Department of Physics, Sultan Qaboos University, PC 123 Muscat, Sultanate of Oman (Oman); Suresh, K. G. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400076 (India)

    2014-03-03

    Nearly half of lanthanum sites in lanthanum manganites were substituted with monovalent ion-sodium and the compound possessed distorted orthorhombic structure. Ferromagnetic ordering at 300?K and the magnetic isotherms at different temperature ranges were analyzed for estimating magnetic entropy variation. Magnetic entropy change of 1.5?J·kg{sup ?1}·K{sup ?1} was observed near 300?K. An appreciable magnetocaloric effect was also observed for a wide range of temperatures near 300?K for small magnetic field variation. Heat capacity was measured for temperatures lower than 300?K and the adiabatic temperature change increases with increase in temperature with a maximum of 0.62?K at 280?K.

  17. Temperature dependence of the vapour tension of methyl-substituted phenol derivatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.G. Gagarin [Institute of Mineral Fuels (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15

    Notable among the coking products of coal are phenol and its derivatives, derived for the coal tar and water layer above ht tar. Given that phenol an its derivatives are mainly extracted from coal tar fractions by rectification, information on how the vapor tension of the individual components depends on the temperature is of great importance. For phenol and various substituted alkylphenols there are tabular data. In the pre-computer era these data were sufficient for the separation of phenol mixtures. However, the development and introduction of information technology in the coal industry and in the design process demands the mathematical description of the physicochemical processes of coking products. The temperature dependence of the saturated vapor pressure for organic compounds is commonly described by the Antoine equation.

  18. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    -twines numerous disciplines, including chemistry, physics and engineering. It is the one discipline within an engineering degree. Materials Scientists apply the principles of physics and chemistry to engineering problemsMaterials Science & Engineering 2015-2016 Undergraduate Handbook The University of Utah #12

  19. Hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brecher, Lee E.; Mones, Charles G.; Guffey, Frank D.

    2015-06-02

    A hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method may involve a novel combination of heating, vaporizing and chemically reacting hydrocarbonaceous feedstock that is substantially unpumpable at pipeline conditions, and condensation of vapors yielded thereby, in order to upgrade that feedstock to a hydrocarbonaceous material condensate that meets crude oil pipeline specification.

  20. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-02-03

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  1. Measurements and material accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, G.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The DOE role for the NBL in safeguarding nuclear material into the 21st century is discussed. Development of measurement technology and reference materials supporting requirements of SDI, SIS, AVLIS, pyrochemical reprocessing, fusion, waste storage, plant modernization program, and improved tritium accounting are some of the suggested examples.

  2. Interfuel substitution model for institutions of higher education: implications for conservation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohn, S.M.; O'Neal, D.L.; Perry, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    A model of interfuel substitution is described for colleges and universities in the United States and its implications for conserving fossil fuel resources. There is a significant and growing interest among institutions of higher education in utilizing more efficiently their purchased as well as generated energy sources. An analysis of energy consumption patterns of colleges and universities shows a significant difference in how energy sources are being utilized. Smaller colleges and universities convert purchased fuels directly into end use services such as space heating, water heating, and lighting. The purchased fuels may include electricity and fossil fuels. A more varied fuel use situation exists for larger institutions where not only the above fuel consumption mixture exists, but a central generating plant operated by the university may exist which uses purchased fossil fuels in a primary energy use sense to generate electricity, steam, and chilled water for their own end use requirements. Results indicate that relative changes in fuel prices across a broad cross-section of colleges and universities have significant effects on primary and end-use consumption of fuels. Increasing prices of distillate and residual fuels have a greater energy conservation potential than do equal price increases for coal and natural gas. Electricity is found not to have significant substitution possibilities with the fossil fuels. The results have important overtones for public policy. The structure of the market system may be well suited to handle dislocations in energy price and supplies for colleges and universities; and future decisions by public policy makers may reflect this situation.

  3. Materials of Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-15

    The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

  4. Environmental and technical assessments of the potential utilization of sewage sludge ashes (SSAs) as secondary raw materials in construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Maozhe [Université de Lyon, INSA LYON, Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 20 avenue A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Blanc, Denise, E-mail: denise.blanc-biscarat@insa-lyon.fr [Université de Lyon, INSA LYON, Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 20 avenue A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Gautier, Mathieu; Mehu, Jacques; Gourdon, Rémy [Université de Lyon, INSA LYON, Laboratoire de Génie Civil et Ingénierie Environnementale (LGCIE), Bâtiment Sadi Carnot, 20 avenue A. Einstein, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ? We used sewage sludge ashes in ready-mix concrete recipe. ? SSAs were used as a substitution of cement. ? Compressive strength of ready-mix concrete incorporating SSAs were similar as blank one. ? Contaminants leaching from concrete monoliths were above threshold limits. - Abstract: Ashes produced by thermal treatments of sewage sludge exhibit common properties with cement. For example, major elements present in SSA are the same of major elements of cement. Hydraulic properties of SSA are quite the same of cement ones. They may therefore be used to substitute part of cement in concrete or other cementitious materials, provided that technical prescriptions are satisfied and that environmental risks are not significantly increased. The objective of the present study was to determine the appropriate substitution ratios to satisfy both technical and environmental criteria. In a first step, the elemental composition and particle size distribution of the ashes were measured. Then the ashes were used along with Portland cement and sand at different ratios of substitution to produce mortar and concrete which were cured for up to 90 days into parallelepipedic or cylindrical monoliths. The mechanical properties of the monoliths were measured using standard procedures for flexural and compressive strengths, and compared to blanks containing no ashes. The environmental criteria were assessed using leaching tests conducted according to standard protocols both on the ashes and the monoliths, and compared to the blanks. Results showed that the characteristics of the ashes ranged between those of cement and sand because of their larger particle size and higher content in SiO{sub 2} as compared to cement. The monoliths made with the highest substitution ratios exhibited a significant decrease in flexural and compressive strengths. However, when the ashes were used in partial substitution of cement at appropriate ratios, the concrete monoliths exhibited similar compressive strengths as the blank samples. The most appropriate ratios were found to be 10% substitution of cement and 2% substitution of sand. The leaching tests conducted on the ashes in their powdery form revealed that amongst the potential contaminants analyzed only Mo and Se were leached at concentrations above the threshold limits considered. The leaching tests conducted on concrete monoliths showed however that none of the contaminants monitored, including Mo and Se, were leached above the limits. In addition, whether concrete recipe incorporated ashes or not, similar concentrations were measured for each potential contaminant in the leachates. This result indicated that mixing ash with cement and sand to produce mortar or concrete induced a stabilization of Mo and Se and thereby constituted in itself a good treatment of the ashes.

  5. Belle II Technical Design Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abe; I. Adachi; K. Adamczyk; S. Ahn; H. Aihara; K. Akai; M. Aloi; L. Andricek; K. Aoki; Y. Arai; A. Arefiev; K. Arinstein; Y. Arita; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; T. Aziz; A. M. Bakich; V. Balagura; Y. Ban; E. Barberio; T. Barvich; K. Belous; T. Bergauer; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; S. Blyth; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bracko; J. Brodzicka; O. Brovchenko; T. E. Browder; G. Cao; M. -C. Chang; P. Chang; Y. Chao; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; K. -F. Chen; P. Chen; B. G. Cheon; C. -C. Chiang; R. Chistov; K. Cho; S. -K. Choi; K. Chung; A. Comerma; M. Cooney; D. E. Cowley; T. Critchlow; J. Dalseno; M. Danilov; A. Dieguez; A. Dierlamm; M. Dillon; J. Dingfelder; R. Dolenec; Z. Dolezal; Z. Drasal; A. Drutskoy; W. Dungel; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; A. Enomoto; D. Epifanov; S. Esen; J. E. Fast; M. Feindt; M. Fernandez Garcia; T. Fifield; P. Fischer; J. Flanagan; S. Fourletov; J. Fourletova; L. Freixas; A. Frey; M. Friedl; R. Fruehwirth; H. Fujii; M. Fujikawa; Y. Fukuma; Y. Funakoshi; K. Furukawa; J. Fuster; N. Gabyshev; A. Gaspar de Valenzuela Cueto; A. Garmash; L. Garrido; Ch. Geisler; I. Gfall; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; I. Gorton; R. Grzymkowski; H. Guo; H. Ha; J. Haba; K. Hara; T. Hara; T. Haruyama; K. Hayasaka; K. Hayashi; H. Hayashii; M. Heck; S. Heindl; C. Heller; T. Hemperek; T. Higuchi; Y. Horii; W. -S. Hou; Y. B. Hsiung; C. -H. Huang; S. Hwang; H. J. Hyun; Y. Igarashi; C. Iglesias; Y. Iida; T. Iijima; M. Imamura; K. Inami; C. Irmler; M. Ishizuka; K. Itagaki; R. Itoh; M. Iwabuchi; G. Iwai; M. Iwai; M. Iwasaki; M. Iwasaki; Y. Iwasaki; T. Iwashita; S. Iwata; H. Jang; X. Ji; T. Jinno; M. Jones; T. Julius; T. Kageyama; D. H. Kah; H. Kakuno; T. Kamitani; K. Kanazawa; P. Kapusta; S. U. Kataoka; N. Katayama; M. Kawai; Y. Kawai; T. Kawasaki; J. Kennedy; H. Kichimi; M. Kikuchi; C. Kiesling; B. K. Kim; G. N. Kim; H. J. Kim; H. O. Kim; J. -B. Kim; J. H. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. K. Kim; K. T. Kim; T. Y. Kim; K. Kinoshita; K. Kishi; B. Kisielewski; K. Kleese van Dam; J. Knopf; B. R. Ko; M. Koch; P. Kodys; C. Koffmane; Y. Koga; T. Kohriki; S. Koike; H. Koiso; Y. Kondo; S. Korpar; R. T. Kouzes; Ch. Kreidl; M. Kreps; P. Krizan; P. Krokovny; H. Krueger; A. Kruth; W. Kuhn; T. Kuhr; R. Kumar; T. Kumita; S. Kupper; A. Kuzmin; P. Kvasnicka; Y. -J. Kwon; C. Lacasta; J. S. Lange; I. -S. Lee; M. J. Lee; M. W. Lee; S. -H. Lee; M. Lemarenko; J. Li; W. D. Li; Y. Li; J. Libby; A. Limosani; C. Liu; H. Liu; Y. Liu; Z. Liu; D. Liventsev; A. Lopez Virto; Y. Makida; Z. P. Mao; C. Marinas; M. Masuzawa; D. Matvienko; W. Mitaroff; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; Y. Miyazaki; T. Miyoshi; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; D. Mohapatra; A. Moll; T. Mori; A. Morita; Y. Morita; H. -G. Moser; D. Moya Martin; T. Mueller; D. Muenchow; J. Murakami; S. S. Myung; T. Nagamine; I. Nakamura; T. T. Nakamura; E. Nakano; H. Nakano; M. Nakao; H. Nakazawa; S. -H. Nam; Z. Natkaniec; E. Nedelkovska; K. Negishi; S. Neubauer; C. Ng; J. Ninkovic; S. Nishida; K. Nishimura; E. Novikov; T. Nozaki; S. Ogawa; K. Ohmi; Y. Ohnishi; T. Ohshima; N. Ohuchi; K. Oide; S. L. Olsen; M. Ono; Y. Ono; Y. Onuki; W. Ostrowicz; H. Ozaki; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; H. Palka; H. Park; H. K. Park; L. S. Peak; T. Peng; I. Peric; M. Pernicka; R. Pestotnik; M. Petric; L. E. Piilonen; A. Poluektov; M. Prim; K. Prothmann; K. Regimbal; B. Reisert; R. H. Richter; J. Riera-Babures; A. Ritter; A. Ritter; M. Ritter; M. Roehrken; J. Rorie; M. Rosen; M. Rozanska; L. Ruckman; S. Rummel; V. Rusinov; R. M. Russell; S. Ryu; H. Sahoo; K. Sakai; Y. Sakai; L. Santelj; T. Sasaki; N. Sato; Y. Sato; J. Scheirich; J. Schieck; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; B. Schwenker; A. Seljak; K. Senyo; O. -S. Seon; M. E. Sevior; M. Shapkin; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; H. Shibuya; S. Shiizuka; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; F. Simon; H. J. Simonis; J. B. Singh; R. Sinha; M. Sitarz; P. Smerkol; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; S. Stanic; M. Staric; J. Stypula; Y. Suetsugu; S. Sugihara; T. Sugimura; K. Sumisawa; T. Sumiyoshi; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; H. Takagaki; F. Takasaki; H. Takeichi; Y. Takubo; M. Tanaka; S. Tanaka; N. Taniguchi; E. Tarkovsky; G. Tatishvili; M. Tawada; G. N. Taylor; Y. Teramoto; I. Tikhomirov; K. Trabelsi; T. Tsuboyama; K. Tsunada; Y. -C. Tu; T. Uchida; S. Uehara; K. Ueno; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; P. Urquijo; Y. Ushiroda; Y. Usov; S. Vahsen; M. Valentan; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; K. E. Varvell; P. Vazquez; I. Vila; E. Vilella; A. Vinokurova; J. Visniakov; M. Vos; C. H. Wang; J. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; A. Wassatch; M. Watanabe; Y. Watase; T. Weiler; N. Wermes; R. E. Wescott; E. White; J. Wicht; L. Widhalm; K. M. Williams; E. Won; H. Xu; B. D. Yabsley; H. Yamamoto; H. Yamaoka; Y. Yamaoka; M. Yamauchi; Y. Yin; H. Yoon; J. Yu; C. Z. Yuan; Y. Yusa; D. Zander; M. Zdybal; Z. P. Zhang; J. Zhao; L. Zhao; Z. Zhao; V. Zhilich; P. Zhou; V. Zhulanov; T. Zivko; A. Zupanc; O. Zyukova

    2010-11-01

    The Belle detector at the KEKB electron-positron collider has collected almost 1 billion Y(4S) events in its decade of operation. Super-KEKB, an upgrade of KEKB is under construction, to increase the luminosity by two orders of magnitude during a three-year shutdown, with an ultimate goal of 8E35 /cm^2 /s luminosity. To exploit the increased luminosity, an upgrade of the Belle detector has been proposed. A new international collaboration Belle-II, is being formed. The Technical Design Report presents physics motivation, basic methods of the accelerator upgrade, as well as key improvements of the detector.

  6. Luz II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma, Arizona:Oregon:Lowell Point, Alaska:Vermont:Lutz, Florida:II Jump to:

  7. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845* Storage Systems INTERACTIONSTemperatureII:

  8. Harvest II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energy Resources JumpConsultingHarfordHarvard,BioFuelsII

  9. Limon II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWinds JumpOxiranchem IncLighthouseLigninLimon I JumpII

  10. Majestic II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050EnermarGenerationMainsa Instalaciones JumpMajestic II

  11. Musselshell II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergyTexas: Energy Resources JumpMuskegonIII

  12. Penascal II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorth Carolina:ParamountEnergy GroupPeetz

  13. The Nature of the Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State in p-Pyrrolocyanobenzene (PBN) and Other Derivatives of Benzene Substituted by Electron Donor and Acceptor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haas, Yehuda

    -Pyrrolocyanobenzene (PBN) and Other Derivatives of Benzene Substituted by Electron Donor and Acceptor Groups Shmuel Zilberg analysis of these compounds, in which benzene is substituted by an electron withdrawing group of benzene and is of a covalent nature. Light emission from this state is due to local excitation

  14. Mechanism of Lithium Diisopropylamide-Mediated Substitution of 2,6-Difluoropyridine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collum, David B.

    ) with free energies (Hartrees), and cartesian coordinates (X,Y,Z) Table II Optimized geometries of reactants energies (Hartrees), and cartesian coordinates (X,Y,Z) Table IV Optimized geometries at B3LYP level), and cartesian coordinates (X,Y,Z) Table V Optimized geometries at B3LYP level of theory with 6-31G(d) basis set

  15. Chemical analysis and biological testing of materials from the EDS coal liquefaction process: a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Later, D.W.; Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1984-05-01

    Representative process materials were obtained from the EDS pilot plant for chemical and biological analyses. These materials were characterized for biological activity and chemical composition using a microbial mutagenicity assay and chromatographic and mass spectrometric analytical techniques. The two highest boiling distillation cuts, as well as process solvent (PS) obtained from the bottoms recycle mode operation, were tested for initiation of mouse skin tumorigenicity. All three materials were active; the crude 800/sup 0 +/F cut was substantially more potent than the crude bottoms recycle PS or 750 to 800/sup 0/F distillate cut. Results from chemical analyses showed the EDS materials, in general, to be more highly alkylated and have higher hydroaromatic content than analogous SRC II process materials (no in-line process hydrogenation) used for comparison. In the microbial mutagenicity assays the N-PAC fractions showed greater activity than did the aliphatic hydrocarbon, hydroxy-PAH, or PAH fractions, although mutagenicity was detected in certain PAH fractions by a modified version of the standard microbial mutagenicity assay. Mutagenic activities for the EDS materials were lower, overall, than those for the corresponding materials from the SRC II process. The EDS materials produced under different operational modes had distinguishable differences in both their chemical constituency and biological activity. The primary differences between the EDS materials studied here and their SRC II counterparts used for comparison are most likely attributable to the incorporation of catalytic hydrogenation in the EDS process. 27 references, 28 figures, 27 tables.

  16. Formation of non-substitutional ?-Sn defects in Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhr, J. D.; Ventura, C. I.; Barrio, R. A.

    2013-11-21

    Although group IV semiconductor alloys are expected to form substitutionally, in Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} this is true only for low concentrations (x?substitutional complex defect (?-Sn), consisting of a single Sn atom in the center of a Ge divacancy, which may account for the segregation of Sn at large x. Afterwards, the existence of this defect was confirmed experimentally. In this paper we study the local environment and the interactions of the substitutional defect (?-Sn), the vacancy in Ge, and the ?-Sn defect by performing extensive numerical ab initio calculations. Our results confirm that a ?-Sn defect can be formed by natural diffusion of a vacancy around the substitutional ?-Sn defect, since the energy barrier for the process is very small.

  17. Abstract--The substitution of non-renewable energy by renewable energy as electricity supply is an emerging trend for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Lei

    Abstract-- The substitution of non-renewable energy by renewable energy as electricity supply]. The transition from traditional energy to renewable energy has now become a real demand for sustainability pack. The electrical grid servers as back-up supplier in case energy stored in the battery is used up

  18. Carbon Powders Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Substituted Alkali Benzoates Sara E. Skrabalak and Kenneth S. Suslick*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suslick, Kenneth S.

    Carbon Powders Prepared by Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis of Substituted Alkali Benzoates Sara E Ultrasonic spray pyrolysis (USP) has been used to prepare carbon spheres from aqueous solutions direct hydro- carbon pyrolysis methods.15-18 While the former methods are potentially cost and scale

  19. Impact of Metal and Anion Substitutions on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MBTT Metal-Organic Frameworks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For high-pressure storage at ambient temperatures, the M3[(M4Cl)3(BTT)8]2 (M-BTT; BTT3- = 1 applications is of paramount importance due to the increasing atmospheric levels of CO2 resulting fromImpact of Metal and Anion Substitutions on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of MBTT Metal

  20. Predicting multidimensional distributive properties of hyperbranched polymer resulting from AB2 polymerization with substitution, cyclization and shielding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivan Kryven; Piet D. Iedema

    2013-05-05

    A deterministic mathematical model for the polymerization of hyperbranched molecules accounting for substitution, cyclization, and shielding effect has been developed as a system of nonlinear population balances. The solution obtained by a novel approximation method shows perfect agreement with the analytical solution in limiting cases and provides, for the first time in this class of polymerization problems, full multidimensional results.

  1. Doping against the Native Propensity of MoS2: Degenerate Hole Doping by Cation Substitution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    attention as the key semiconducting material for two- dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from

  2. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01

    xi Material CharacterizationThermoelectric Materials . . . . . . . . Graphene-Like5 Nanostructured Materials for Electrochemical Energy

  3. Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation Committee Agenda Midwestern Radioactive Materials Transportation...

  4. Electrically conductive composite material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  5. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials MANAGEMENT (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. it is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how ''what is and what if'' questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods.

  6. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. It is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how /open quotes/What is and what if/close quotes/ questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods. 2 refs.

  7. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  8. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  9. RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS SENSORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayo, Robert M.; Stephens, Daniel L.

    2009-09-15

    Providing technical means to detect, prevent, and reverse the threat of potential illicit use of radiological or nuclear materials is among the greatest challenges facing contemporary science and technology. In this short article, we provide brief description and overview of the state-of-the-art in sensor development for the detection of radioactive materials, as well as an identification of the technical needs and challenges faced by the detection community. We begin with a discussion of gamma-ray and neutron detectors and spectrometers, followed by a description of imaging sensors, active interrogation, and materials development, before closing with a brief discussion of the unique challenges posed in fielding sensor systems.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  11. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  12. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterialMaterials Materials

  13. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion toMSDS onBudgetMaterialMaterialsMST Materials

  14. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  15. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  16. Tailoring the surface properties of LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O? by titanium substitution for improved high voltage cycling performance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolff-Goodrich, Silas; Xin, Huolin L.; Lin, Feng; Markus, Isaac M.; Nordlund, Dennis; Asta, Mark; Doeff, Marca M.

    2015-07-30

    The present research aims to provide insights into the behavior of LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O2 (NMC442) and LiNi0.4Mn0.4Co0.2O? (NMC442-Ti02) cathode materials under galvanostatic cycling to high potentials, in the context of previous work which predicted that Ti-substituted variants should deliver higher capacities and exhibit better cycling stability than the unsubstituted compounds. It is found that NMC cathodes containing Ti show equivalent capacity fading but greater specific capacity than those without Ti in the same potential range. When repeatedly charged to the same degree of delithiation, NMC cathodes containing Ti showed better capacity retention. Soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) spectra for Mn and Comore »indicated increased reduction in these elements for NMC cathodes without Ti, indicating that the substitution of Ti for Co acts to suppress the formation of a high impedance rock salt phase at the surface of NMC cathode particles. The results of this study validate the adoption of a facile change to existing NMC chemistries to improve cathode capacity retention under high voltage cycling conditions.« less

  17. Final Report: Characterization of Hydrogen Adsorption in Carbon-Based Materials by NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yue; Kleinhammes, Alfred

    2011-07-11

    In support of DOE/EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Program Hydrogen Sorption Center of Excellence (HSCoE), UNC conducted Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) measurements that contributed spectroscopic information as well as quantitative analysis of adsorption processes. While NMR based Langmuir isotherms produce reliable H2 capacity measurements, the most astute contribution to the center is provided by information on dihydrogen adsorption on the scale of nanometers, including the molecular dynamics of hydrogen in micropores, and the diffusion of dihydrogen between macro and micro pores. A new method to assess the pore width using H2 as probe of the pore geometry was developed and is based on the variation of the observed chemical shift of adsorbed dihydrogen as function of H2 pressure. Adsorbents designed and synthesized by the Center were assessed for their H2 capacity, the binding energy of the adsorption site, their pore structure and their ability to release H2. Feedback to the materials groups was provided to improve the materials’ properties. To enable in situ NMR measurements as a function of H2 pressure and temperature, a unique, specialized NMR system was designed and built. Pressure can be varied between 10-4 and 107 Pa while the temperature can be controlled between 77K and room temperature. In addition to the 1H investigation of the H2 adsorption process, NMR was implemented to measure the atomic content of substituted elements, e.g. boron in boron substituted graphitic material as well as to determine the local environment and symmetry of these substituted nuclei. The primary findings by UNC are the following: • Boron substituted for carbon in graphitic material in the planar BC3 configuration enhances the binding energy for adsorbed hydrogen. • Arrested kinetics of H2 was observed below 130K in the same boron substituted carbon samples that combine enhanced binding energy with micropore structure. • Hydrogen storage material made from activated PEEK is well suited for hydrogen storage due to its controlled microporous structure and large surface area. • A new porosimetry method for evaluating the pore landscape using H2 as a probe was developed. 1H NMR can probe the nanoscale pore structure of synthesized material and can assess the pore dimension over a range covering 1.2 nm to 2.5 nm, the size that is desired for H2 adsorption. • Analysis of 1H NMR spectra in conjunction with the characterization of the bonding structure of the adsorbent by 13C NMR distinguishes between a heterogeneous and homogeneous pore structure as evidenced by the work on AX21 and activated PEEK. • Most of the sorbents studied are suited to hydrogen storage at low temperature (T < 100K). Of the materials investigated, only boron substituted graphite has the potential to work at higher temperatures if the boron content in the favorable planar BC3 configuration that actively contributes to adsorption can be increased.

  18. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  19. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  20. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  1. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  2. Critical Materials Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop Sheraton Crystal City 1800 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA April 3, 2012, 8 am - 5 pm Time (EDT) Activity Speaker 8:00 am - 9:00 am Registration...

  3. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, supersedes DOE O 410.2.

  4. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  5. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. Does not cancel/supersede other directives. Certified 11-18-10.

  6. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  7. Engineering Materials and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furui, Sadaoki

    Science Engineering Materials and Chemical Technology Computing Life Science and Technology Environment and Society Mathematics Physics Chemistry Earth and Planetary Sciences Mechanical Engineering Systems and Control Engineering Electrical and Electronic Engineering Information and Communications

  8. Cookoff of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.; Schmitt, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    An overview of cookoff modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented aimed at assessing the violence of reaction following cookoff of confined energetic materials. During cookoff, the response of energetic materials is known to involve coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical processes which induce thermal damage to the energetic material prior to the onset of ignition. These damaged states enhance shock sensitivity and lead to conditions favoring self-supported accelerated combustion. Thus, the level of violence depends on the competition between pressure buildup and stress release due to the loss of confinement. To model these complex processes, finite element-based analysis capabilities are being developed which can resolve coupled heat transfer with chemistry, quasi-static structural mechanics and dynamic response. Numerical simulations that assess the level of violence demonstrate the importance of determining material damage in pre- and post-ignition cookoff events.

  9. Small Building Material Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applicants may borrow up to $100,000 for projects that improve the livability of a home, improve energy efficiency or expand space. The loan can be applied toward building materials, freight or...

  10. Physical Education ! Teaching Materials!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burg, Theresa

    Physical Education ! Teaching Materials! !!! ! 1. PROGRAMS OF STUDY ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !P.E. Program Physical Activity (DPA) Initiative: Mandatory program introduced in 2005. Schools are required to create opportunities for students to engage in Physical activity. Administrators and all teachers are responsible

  11. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  12. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  13. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  14. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  15. Radiological Release Accident Investigation Report (Phase II...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Investigation Report (Phase II Report) More Documents & Publications Central Characterization Program (CCP) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Interface Document Oak Ridge...

  16. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  17. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    longer, and could lead to feeling satisfied after smaller portions, lowering overall food intake, which could help treat obesity. Knowing the mechanism of action for TPP II...

  18. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  19. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  20. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  1. Materials in design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perata, Alfredo Ferando

    1970-01-01

    gears so the alloy content has to be higher. Gear shape -17- $11 these considerations can be summarized in three reasons for selecting a terial. 1) The mechanical properties of the material selected had to satisfy the service requirements 2... of materials at the various temperatures encountered in service and during the process of manufacturing. He must know other properties such as resistance to corrosion in the expected environment and their rate of change in mechanical properties with time...

  2. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecial Report ManagementMarineLaboratory:Materials Materials 2011 DOE

  3. Materials Research Institute 199 Materials Research Institute Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dongwon

    promise to transform the field of materials research in areas such as energy, health, and the environment of Materials Research A New Building for the 21st Century he Materials Research Institute promotes interdisciMaterials Research Institute 199 Materials Research Institute Building The Pennsylvania State

  4. Smart Material Interfaces: "A Material Step to the Future"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    of smart materials in designing and building interfaces of everyday life. Inter- faces that communicateSmart Material Interfaces: "A Material Step to the Future" Anton Nijholt Human Media Interaction on the mar- ket many new smart materials. Smart Material Interfaces (SMIs) want to take advantage

  5. Enhanced electronic conductivity in Si-substituted calcium aluminate Mariana I. Bertoni and Thomas O. Mason

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    of 1.199 nm and space group I4¯3d.6 It possesses a cage structure with two formula units 12 cages per in the optical and electrical properties of the material. However, upon irradia- tion two optical absorption O. Mason Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston

  6. Aliovalent titanium substitution in layered mixed Li Ni-Mn-Co oxides for lithium battery applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kam, Kinson; Doeff, Marca M.

    2010-12-01

    Improved electrochemical characteristics are observed for Li[Ni1/3Co1/3-yMyMn1/3]O2 cathode materials when M=Ti and y<0.07, compared to the baseline material, with up to 15percent increased discharge capacity.

  7. Shear zone refraction and deflection in layered granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Borzsonyi; Tamas Unger; Balazs Szabo

    2009-12-09

    Refraction and deflection of shear zones in layered granular materials was studied experimentally and numerically. We show, that (i) according to a recent theoretical prediction [T. Unger, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 018301 (2007)] shear zones refract in layered systems in analogy with light refraction, (ii) zone refraction obeys Snell's law known from geometric optics and (iii) under natural pressure conditions (i.e. in the presence of gravity) the zone can also be deflected by the interface so that the deformation of the high friction material is avoided.

  8. Materials with low DC magnetic susceptibility for sensitive magnetic measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khatiwada, Rakshya; Kendrick, Rachel; Khosravi, Marjan; Peters, Michael; Smith, Erick; Snow, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Materials with very low DC magnetic susceptibility have many scientific applications. To our knowledge however, relatively little research has been conducted with the goal to produce a totally nonmagnetic material. This phrase in our case means after spatially averaging over macroscopic volumes, it possesses an average zero DC magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the DC magnetic susceptibility of three different types of nonmagnetic materials at room temperature: (I) solutions of paramagnetic salts and diamagnetic liquids, (II) liquid gallium-indium alloys and (III) pressed powder mixtures of tungsten and bismuth. The lowest measured magnetic susceptibility among these candidate materials is in the order of 10^-9 cgs volume susceptibility units, about two orders of magnitude smaller than distilled water. In all cases, the measured concentration dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is consistent with that expected for the weighted sum of the susceptibilities of the separate components within...

  9. BOAST II for the IBM 3090 and RISC 6000. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hebert, P.; Bourgoyne, A.T. Jr.; Tyler, J.

    1993-05-01

    BOAST II simulates isothermal, darcy flow in three dimensions. It assumes that reservoir liquids can be described in three fluid phases (oil, gas, and water) of constant composition, with physical properties that depend on pressure, only. These reservoir fluid approximations are acceptable for a large percentage of the world`s oil and gas reservoirs. Consequently, BOAST II has a wide range of applicability. BOAST II can simulate oil and/or gas recovery by fluid expansion, displacement, gravity drainage, and capillary imbibition mechanisms. Typical field production problems that BOAST II can handle include primary depletion studies, pressure maintenance by water and/or gas injection, and evaluation of secondary recovery waterflooding and displacement operations. Technically, BOAST II is a finite, implicit pressure, explicit saturation (IMPES) numerical simulator. It applies both direct and iterative solution techniques for solving systems of algebraic equations. The well model allows specification of rate or pressure constraints on well performance, and the user is free to add or to recomplete wells during the simulation. In addition, the user can define multiple rock and PVT regions and can choose from three aquifer models. BOAST II also provides flexible initialization, a bubble-point tracking scheme, automatic time-step control, and a material balance check on solution stability. The user controls output, which includes a run summary and line-printer plots of fieldwide performance.

  10. Supplemental Material for Ferreira and Stoltz 1 Supplemental Materials for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoltz, Brian M.

    Supplemental Material for Ferreira and Stoltz 1 Supplemental Materials for: The Palladium., Tweddell, J.; Fu, G. C. J. Org. Chem. 1998, 63, 2794. #12;Supplemental Material for Ferreira and Stoltz 2

  11. Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Chuan

    Lead(ii) Detection An Exceptionally Selective Lead(ii)-Regulatory Protein from Ralstonia Metallidurans: Development of a Fluorescent Lead(ii) Probe** Peng Chen, Bill Greenberg, Safiyh Taghavi, Christine Romano, Daniel van der Lelie, and Chuan He* Lead contamination is a serious threat to human health

  12. 9-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    9-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST II OR ASSOCIATE IN RESEARCH APPOINTMENT Dear Dr. xxx: I am pleased to offer you an ["in://facultyhandbook.fsu.edu/). This offer is also contingent upon your providing the necessary documents to prove your identity

  13. 12-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuade, D. Tyler

    12-MONTH SAMPLE MULTI-YEAR OFFER LETTER TEACHING FACULTY II, RESEARCH FACULTY II, INSTRUCTIONAL SPECIALIST II OR ASSOCIATE IN RESEARCH APPOINTMENT Dear Dr. xxx: I am pleased to offer you an ["in://facultyhandbook.fsu.edu). This offer is also contingent upon your providing the necessary documents to prove your identity

  14. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  15. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  16. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultiday ProductionDesigning ResilientResources AvailableResources

  17. Sandia Energy - Advanced Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumni >Scientific andInstituteAdvanced BitAdvanced

  18. Sandia Energy - Materials Chemistry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power& SF-BREEZE HomeMarket

  19. Material bagging device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wach, Charles G. (Oak Lawn, IL); Nelson, Robert E. (Lombard, IL); Brak, Stephen B. (Tinley Park, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A bagging device for transferring material from one chamber through an opening in a wall to a second chamber includes a cylindrical housing communicating with the opening and defining a passage between the chambers. A cylindrical cartridge is slidably received within the housing. The cartridge has a substantially rigid cylindrical sleeve to which is affixed a pliable tube. The pliable tube is positioned concentrically about the sleeve and has a pleated portion capable of unfolding from the sleeve and a closed end extending over a terminal end of the sleeve. Sealing means are interposed in sealed relationship between the cartridge and the housing. Material from one chamber is inserted into the cartridge secured in the housing and received in the closed end of the tube which unfolds into the other chamber enclosing the material therein. The tube may then be sealed behind the material and then severed to form a bag-like enclosure defined by the tube's closed terminal end and the new seal. The new seal then forms a terminal end for the unsevered portion of the pliable tube into which additional material may be placed and the bagging process repeated.

  20. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 2, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    This appendix determines the effective G values for payload shipping categories of contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste materials, based on the radiolytic G values for waste materials that are discussed in detail in Appendix 3.6.8 of the Safety Analysis Report for the TRUPACT-II Shipping Package. The effective G values take into account self-absorption of alpha decay energy inside particulate contamination and the fraction of energy absorbed by nongas-generating materials. As described in Appendix 3.6.8, an effective G value, G{sub eff}, is defined by: G{sub eff} - {Sigma}{sub M} (F{sub M} x G{sub M}) F{sub M}-fraction of energy absorbed by material maximum G value for a material where the sum is over all materials present inside a waste container. The G value itself is determined primarily by the chemical properties of the material and its temperature. The value of F is determined primarily by the size of the particles containing the radionuclides, the distribution of radioactivity on the various materials present inside the waste container, and the stopping distance of alpha particles in air, in the waste materials, or in the waste packaging materials.