National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for material substitution ii

  1. Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Developing Substitutes diagram for focus area 2, developing substitutes (A click on the org chart image will lead to a pdf version that includes hotlinks for the e-mail addresses of the leaders.) The Critical Materials Institute uses the Materials Genome approach to accelerate rare-earth replacement. CMI has invented two new phosphors in one year of research, demonstrating the power of the Materials Genome Initiative method in a collaborative public-private approach to innovation

  2. LEAD SUBSTITUTION AND ELIMINATION STUDY, PART II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. MARTINEZ; M. COURNOYER

    2001-01-01

    Within the Nuclear Materials Technology Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory, lead is used as shielding for a variety of operations, including actinide chemistry, weapons production, radiochemistry, and analytical chemistry. In this study, waste minimization issues associated with replacing lead shielding with non-hazardous materials are addressed. These include institutional program available to support this effort, the hazards and accompanying controls grouped with lead shielding, operations that use lead bricks and how this effects the selection of the substitute. Life cycle management issues are also examined. As a final step, an approach to get buy-in from both technical and budget minded employees is presented.

  3. Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen Programs Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es052_doeff_2010_p.pdf More Documents & Publications Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Design of High Performance, High

  4. Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es_24_doeff.pdf More Documents & Publications Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials Development of High

  5. PARS II Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending Web classes should download these documents prior to attending...

  6. Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon es052_doeff_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Olivines and Substituted Layered Materials FY 2011 Annual Progress Report for Energy Storage R&D Olivines and Substituted Layered

  7. FA 2: Developing Substitutes | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2: Developing Substitutes Focus Area 2 - Schwatrz, Sales U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file March 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file March 2016 U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file January 2016 File: Publication Year: 2016 Read more about U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table pdf file January 2016 Image Lisa Savagian, Oak Ridge Science Semester, Fall 2015 File: Author: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Publication Year:

  8. Impacts of Vehicle Weight Reduction via Material Substitution on Life-Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, Jarod C.; Sullivan, John L.; Burnham, Andrew; Elgowainy, Amgad

    2015-10-20

    This study examines the vehicle-cycle impacts associated with substituting lightweight materials for those currently found in light-duty passenger vehicles. We determine part-based energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission ratios by collecting material substitution data from both the literature and automotive experts and evaluating that alongside known mass-based energy use and GHG emission ratios associated with material pair substitutions. Several vehicle parts, along with full vehicle systems, are examined for lightweighting via material substitution to observe the associated impact on GHG emissions. Results are contextualized by additionally examining fuel-cycle GHG reductions associated with mass reductions relative to the baseline vehicle during the use phase and also determining material pair breakeven driving distances for GHG emissions. The findings show that, while material substitution is useful in reducing vehicle weight, it often increases vehicle-cycle GHGs depending upon the material substitution pair. However, for a vehicles total life cycle, fuel economy benefits are greater than the increased burdens associated with the vehicle manufacturing cycle, resulting in a net total life-cycle GHG benefit. The vehicle cycle will become increasingly important in total vehicle life-cycle GHGs, since fuel-cycle GHGs will be gradually reduced as automakers ramp up vehicle efficiency to meet fuel economy standards.

  9. Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Decontamination and Demolition | Department of Energy Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During Decontamination and Demolition Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During Decontamination and Demolition August 2009 Presenter: Robert Devol, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Track 3-6 Topics Covered: ETTP Remaining Facilities D&D Project K-1320 K-1035 Regulations EPA Category I and II Materials Practical Application Controls Advantages to Approach PDF

  10. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    attachments, and running standard, pre-built reports. PARS 102 Presentation PARS 102 Workbook PARS 103 - Updating Projects and Reporting Introduction to PARS II, finding and...

  11. Technical evaluation of topsoil substitution practices and handling of potential acid/toxic-forming materials in Texas. Special study report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The Texas State program approved by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) under the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) allows that selected overburden materials may, if justified, be substituted for topsoil in mined land reclamation. The report presents the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement's (OSM's) findings regarding the practice of topsoil substitution under the approved Texas program and related reclamation problems with potential minesoil acidification. The purpose of the study was not to determine whether the substitution of overburden for topsoil should be approved or disapproved on any specific mine or soil series in Texas. The report presents a summary of pertinent technical considerations that need to be addressed in permit approvals for surface coal mines which (1) may encounter potentially acid/toxic-forming materials during mining or (2) intend to substitute overburden for topsoil as a plant growth material. The report summarizes the results of a special study OSM conducted to evaluate the technical basis and justification for reclamation plans and the substitution of overburden for topsoil as a plant growth material suitable for the reclamation of coal mines.

  12. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Materials Access to Hopper Phase II (Cray XE6) If you are a current NERSC user, you are enabled to use Hopper Phase II. Use your SSH client to connect to Hopper II:...

  13. Effect of substitutional defects on Kambersky damping in L1{sub 0} magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qu, T.; Victora, R. H.

    2015-02-16

    Kambersky damping, representing the loss of magnetic energy from the electrons to the lattice through the spin orbit interaction, is calculated for L1{sub 0} FePt, FePd, CoPt, and CoPd alloys versus chemical degree of order. When more substitutional defects exist in the alloys, damping is predicted to increase due to the increase of the spin-flip channels allowed by the broken symmetry. It is demonstrated that this corresponds to an enhanced density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level, owing to the rounding of the DOS with loss of long-range order. Both the damping and the DOS of the Co-based alloy are found to be less affected by the disorder. Pd-based alloys are predicted to have lower damping than Pt-based alloys, making them more suitable for high density spintronic applications.

  14. Solvent substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Office of Technology Development and the Air Force Engineering and Services Center convened the First Annual International Workshop on Solvent Substitution on December 4--7, 1990. The primary objectives of this joint effort were to share information and ideas among attendees in order to enhance the development and implementation of required new technologies for the elimination of pollutants associated with industrial use of hazardous and toxic solvents; and to aid in accelerating collaborative efforts and technology transfer between government and industry for solvent substitution. There were workshop sessions focusing on Alternative Technologies, Alternative Solvents, Recovery/Recycling, Low VOC Materials and Treatment for Environmentally Safe Disposal. The 35 invited papers presented covered a wide range of solvent substitution activities including: hardware and weapons production and maintenance, paint stripping, coating applications, printed circuit boards, metal cleaning, metal finishing, manufacturing, compliance monitoring and process control monitoring. This publication includes the majority of these presentations. In addition, in order to further facilitate information exchange and technology transfer, the US Air Force and DOE solicited additional papers under a general Call for Papers.'' These papers, which underwent review and final selection by a peer review committee, are also included in this combined Proceedings/Compendium. For those involved in handling, using or managing hazardous and toxic solvents, this document should prove to be a valuable resource, providing the most up-to-date information on current technologies and practices in solvent substitution. Individual papers are abstracted separated.

  15. American Material Culture: Investigating a World War II Trash Dump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Julie Braun

    2005-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory: An Historical Trash Trove Historians and archaeologists love trash, the older the better. Sometimes these researchers find their passion in unexpected places. In this presentation, the treasures found in a large historic dump that lies relatively untouched in the middle of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) will be described. The U.S. military used the central portion of the INL as one of only six naval proving grounds during World War II. They dumped trash in dry irrigation canals during and after their wartime activities and shortly before the federal government designated this arid and desolate place as the nations nuclear reactor testing station in 1949. When read critically and combined with memories and photographs, the 60-year old trash provides a glimpse into 1940s culture and the everyday lives of ordinary people who lived and worked during this time on Idahos desert. Thanks to priceless stories, hours of research, and the ability to read the language of historic artifacts, the dump was turned from just another trash heap into a treasure trove of 1940s memorabilia. Such studies of American material culture serve to fire our imaginations, enrich our understanding of past practices, and humanize history. Historical archaeology provides opportunities to integrate inanimate objects with animated narrative and, the more recent the artifacts, the more human the stories they can tell.

  16. Alkyl group substitution by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction): Alkly group selectivity and deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, A.P.; Kitching, W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides information regarding the selectivity of alkyl groups and the nature of the transition state for C-H palladation by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction). The kinetic deuterium isotope effects are also presented. 21 refs.

  17. Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AUG 0 3 1998 Mr. Donald II. Simpson Uranium and Special Projects Unit Hazardous Materials and Waste Management Division Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment 4300 Cherry Creek Dr. S. Denver, Colorado 80222-1530 _,l ' 7. ,;:""" I,!._ -~~ . Dear Mr. Simpson: We have reviewed your letter of July 10, 1998, requesting that the Department of Energy (DOE) reconsider its decision to exclude the Marion Millsite in Boulder County, Colorado, from remediation under the Formerly

  18. Stability and Rate Capability of Al Substituted Lithium-Rich High-Manganese Content Oxide Materials for Li-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zheng; Chernova, Natasha A.; Feng, Jijun; Upreti, Shailesh; Omenya, Fredrick; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2015-10-15

    The structures, electrochemical properties and thermal stability of Al-substituted lithium-excess oxides, Li{sub 1.2}Ni{sub 0.16} Mn{sub 0.56}Co{sub 0.08-y}Al{sub y}O{sub 2} (y = 0, 0.024, 0.048, 0.08), are reported, and compared to the stoichiometric compounds, LiNi{sub z}Mn{sub z}Co{sub 1-2z}O{sub 2}. A solid solution was found up to at least y = 0.06. Aluminum substitution improves the poor thermal stability while preserving the high energy density of lithium-excess oxides. However, these high manganese compositions are inferior to the lithium stoichiometric materials, LiNi{sub z}Mn{sub z}Co{sub 1-2z}O{sub 2} (z = 0.333, 0.4), in terms of both power and thermal stability.

  19. Novel Solar Energy Conversion Materials by Design of Mn(II) Oxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lany, S.; Peng, H.; Ndione, P.; Zakutayev, A.; Ginley, D. S.

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion materials need to fulfill simultaneously a number of requirements in regard of their band-structure, optical properties, carrier transport, and doping. Despite their desirable chemical properties, e.g., for photo-electrocatalysis, transition-metal oxides usually do not have desirable semiconducting properties. Instead, oxides with open cation d-shells are typically Mott or charge-transfer insulators with notoriously poor transport properties, resulting from large effective electron/hole masses or from carrier self-trapping. Based on the notion that the electronic structure features (p-d interaction) supporting the p-type conductivity in d10 oxides like Cu2O and CuAlO2 occurs in a similar fashion also in the d5 (high-spin) oxides, we recently studied theoretically the band-structure and transport properties of the prototypical binary d5 oxides MnO and Fe2O3 [PRB 85, 201202(R)]. We found that MnO tends to self-trap holes by forming Mn+III, whereas Fe2O3 self-traps electrons by forming Fe+II. However, the self-trapping of holes is suppressed by when Mn is tetrahedrally coordinated, which suggests specific routes to design novel solar conversion materials by considering ternary Mn(II) oxides or oxide alloys. We are presenting theory, synthesis, and initial characterization for these novel energy materials.

  20. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly MCLR Program technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.; Amrane, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. This report summarizes the research conducted during the third quarter of calendar year 1995 on the following projects: Thermophysical properties of HCFC alternatives; Compatibility of manufacturing process fluids with HFC refrigerants and ester lubricants; Compatibility of motor materials used in air-conditioning for retrofits with alternative refrigerants and lubricants; Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants; Products of motor burnouts; Accelerated test methods for predicting the life of motor materials exposed to refrigerant-lubricant mixtures; Investigation of flushing and clean-out methods; Investigation into the fractionation of refrigerant blends; Lean flammability limits as a fundamental refrigerant property; Effect of selected contaminants in AC and R equipment; Study of foaming characteristics; Study of lubricant circulation in systems; Evaluation of HFC-245ca for commercial use in low pressure chillers; Infrared analysis of refrigerant mixtures; Refrigerant database; Refrigerant toxicity survey; Thermophysical properties of HFC-32, HFC-123, HCFC-124 and HFC-125; Thermophysical properties of HFC-143a and HFC-152a; Theoretical evaluations of R-22 alternative fluids; Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals; Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants; Viscosity, solubility and density measurements of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures; Electrohydrodynamic enhancement of pool and in-tube boiling of alternative refrigerants; Accelerated screening methods; and more.

  1. Utilizing environmental friendly iron as a substitution element in spinel structured cathode materials for safer high energy lithium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong -Min; Liu, Yijin; Liu, Jue; Yu, Xiqian; Zhou, Yong -Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Khalifah, Peter; Ariyoshi, Kingo; Nam, Kyung -Wan; Yang, Xiao -Qing

    2015-12-03

    Suppressing oxygen release from lithium ion battery cathodes during heating is a critical issue for the improvement of the battery safety characteristics because oxygen can exothermically react with the flammable electrolyte and cause thermal runaway. Previous studies have shown that oxygen release can be reduced by the migration of transition metal cations from octahedral sites to tetrahedral sites during heating. Such site-preferred migration is determined by the electronic structure of cations. In addition, taking advantage of the unique electronic structure of the environmental friendly Fe, this is selected as substitution element in a high energy density material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 to improve the thermal stability. The optimized LiNi0.33Mn1.33Fe0.33O4 material shows significantly improved thermal stability compared with the unsubstituted one, demonstrated by no observed oxygen release at temperatures as high as 500C. Due to the electrochemical contribution of Fe, the high energy density feature of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is well preserved.

  2. Utilizing environmental friendly iron as a substitution element in spinel structured cathode materials for safer high energy lithium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Enyuan; Bak, Seong -Min; Liu, Yijin; Liu, Jue; Yu, Xiqian; Zhou, Yong -Ning; Zhou, Jigang; Khalifah, Peter; Ariyoshi, Kingo; Nam, Kyung -Wan; et al

    2015-12-03

    Suppressing oxygen release from lithium ion battery cathodes during heating is a critical issue for the improvement of the battery safety characteristics because oxygen can exothermically react with the flammable electrolyte and cause thermal runaway. Previous studies have shown that oxygen release can be reduced by the migration of transition metal cations from octahedral sites to tetrahedral sites during heating. Such site-preferred migration is determined by the electronic structure of cations. In addition, taking advantage of the unique electronic structure of the environmental friendly Fe, this is selected as substitution element in a high energy density material LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 to improvemore » the thermal stability. The optimized LiNi0.33Mn1.33Fe0.33O4 material shows significantly improved thermal stability compared with the unsubstituted one, demonstrated by no observed oxygen release at temperatures as high as 500°C. Due to the electrochemical contribution of Fe, the high energy density feature of LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 is well preserved.« less

  3. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    : " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s

  4. The Impact of Aluminum and Iron Substitution on the Structure and Electrochemistry of Li[Ni0.4Co0.2-yMyMn0.4]O2 Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIlcox, James D.; Rodriguez, Efrain E.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2009-07-23

    Li[Ni0.4Co0.2-yMyMn0.4]O2 (0<_y<_0.2) (M=Al) and Li[Ni0.4Co0.15Fe0.05Mn0.4]O2 compounds were prepared in order to investigate the effect of replacement of all or part of the cobalt on the structural and electrochemical properties. The impact of substitution on the structure has been examined by both x-ray and neutron diffraction experiments. The incorporation of aluminum has minimal effect on the anti-site defect concentration, but leads to structural changes that affect electrochemical performance. The most important effect is an opening of the lithium slab dimension upon substitution, which results in improved rate performance compared to the parent compound. In contrast, the lithium slab dimension is not affected by iron substitution and no rate enhancement effect is observed. The cycling stability of aluminum containing materials is superior to both the parent material and iron-substituted materials.

  5. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20

  6. Predicting critical temperatures of iron(II) spin crossover materials: Density functional theory plus U approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Yachao

    2014-12-07

    A first-principles study of critical temperatures (T{sub c}) of spin crossover (SCO) materials requires accurate description of the strongly correlated 3d electrons as well as much computational effort. This task is still a challenge for the widely used local density or generalized gradient approximations (LDA/GGA) and hybrid functionals. One remedy, termed density functional theory plus U (DFT+U) approach, introduces a Hubbard U term to deal with the localized electrons at marginal computational cost, while treats the delocalized electrons with LDA/GGA. Here, we employ the DFT+U approach to investigate the T{sub c} of a pair of iron(II) SCO molecular crystals (α and β phase), where identical constituent molecules are packed in different ways. We first calculate the adiabatic high spin-low spin energy splitting ΔE{sub HL} and molecular vibrational frequencies in both spin states, then obtain the temperature dependent enthalpy and entropy changes (ΔH and ΔS), and finally extract T{sub c} by exploiting the ΔH/T − T and ΔS − T relationships. The results are in agreement with experiment. Analysis of geometries and electronic structures shows that the local ligand field in the α phase is slightly weakened by the H-bondings involving the ligand atoms and the specific crystal packing style. We find that this effect is largely responsible for the difference in T{sub c} of the two phases. This study shows the applicability of the DFT+U approach for predicting T{sub c} of SCO materials, and provides a clear insight into the subtle influence of the crystal packing effects on SCO behavior.

  7. INFORMATION: Inspection Report on "Removal of Categories I and II Special Nuclear Material from Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Sandia National Laboratories-New Mexico (Sandia) develops science-based technologies in support of national security in areas such as nuclear weapons, nonproliferation, military technologies, and homeland security. Sandia's primary mission is ensuring that the U.S. nuclear arsenal is safe, secure, and reliable and can fully support the Nation's deterrence policy. Part of this mission includes systems engineering of nuclear weapons; research, design, and development of non-nuclear components; manufacturing of non-nuclear weapons components; the provision of safety, security, and reliability assessments of stockpile weapons; and the conduct of high-explosives research and development and environmental testing. Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, operates Sandia for the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). On May 7, 2004, the Secretary announced that the Department would evaluate missions at DOE sites to consolidate Special Nuclear Material (SNM) in the most secure environments possible. The Administrator of the NNSA said that this effort was a key part of an overall plan to transform the nuclear weapons complex into a smaller, safer, more secure, and more efficient national security enterprise. In February 2008, Sandia was the first site to report it had reduced its on-site inventory of nuclear material below 'Categories I and II' levels, which require the highest level of security to protect material such as plutonium and highly enriched uranium. The Office of Inspector General initiated an inspection to determine if Sandia made appropriate adjustments to its security posture in response to the removal of the Categories I and II SNM. We found that Sandia adjusted its security posture in response to the removal of Categories I and II SNM. For example, security posts were closed; unneeded protective force weapons and equipment were excessed from the site; and, Sandia's Site Safeguards and Security Plan was modified. We also found that some highly enriched uranium in a complex material configuration was not removed from Sandia. This material was designated as Category III material using a methodology for assessing the attractiveness of complex materials that was not specifically addressed in any current DOE directive. Although DOE and NNSA officials believed that this designation was appropriate, the methodology used to support this designation had not, as of the time of our review, been incorporated into the DOE directives system. Historically, the Department has considered the categorization of SNM to be an important national security and public policy issue. Consequently, we believe that expedited action should be taken to formalize this methodology in the DOE directives system and that it be disseminated throughout the Department of Energy complex.

  8. Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach-II Design Tim Skszek...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, ... Information * Composite material CAE cards for stiffness, durability, and fatigue ...

  9. Battery resource assessment. Subtask II. 5. Battery manufacturing capability recycling of battery materials. Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pemsler, P.

    1981-02-01

    Studies were conducted on the recycling of advanced battery system components for six different battery systems. These include: Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine, Zinc/Bromine, Sodium/Sulfur, and Lithium-Aluminum/Iron Sulfide. For each battery system, one or more processes has been developed which would permit recycling of the major or active materials. Each recycle process has been designed to produce a product material which can be used directly as a raw material by the battery manufacturer. Metal recoverabilities are in the range of 93 to 95% for all processes. In each case, capital and operating costs have been developed for a recycling plant which processes 100,000 electric vehicle batteries per year. These costs have been developed based on material and energy balances, equipment lists, factored installation costs, and manpower estimates. In general, there are no technological barriers for recycling in the Nickel/Zinc, Nickel/Iron, Zinc/Chlorine and Zinc/Bromine battery systems. The recycling processes are based on essentially conventional, demonstrate technology. The lead times required to build battery recycling plants based on these processes is comparable to that of any other new plant. The total elapsed time required from inception to plant operation is approximately 3 to 5 y. The recycling process for the sodium/sulfur and lithium-aluminum/sulfide battery systems are not based on conventional technology. In particular, mechanical systems for dismantling these batteries must be developed.

  10. Structural Dimensions, Fabrication, Materials, and Operational History for Types I and II Waste Tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiersma, B.J.

    2000-08-16

    Radioactive waste is confined in 48 underground storage tanks at the Savannah River Site. The waste will eventually be processed and transferred to other site facilities for stabilization. Based on waste removal and processing schedules, many of the tanks, including those with flaws and/or defects, will be required to be in service for another 15 to 20 years. Until the waste is removed from storage, transferred, and processed, the materials and structures of the tanks must maintain a confinement function by providing a leak-tight barrier to the environment and by maintaining acceptable structural stability during design basis event which include loading from both normal service and abnormal conditions.

  11. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  12. Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Propulsion Materials FY 2013 Progress Report ii CONTENTS INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................................... 1 Project 18516 - Materials for H1ybrid and Electric Drive Systems ...................................................... 4 Agreement 19201 - Non-Rare Earth Magnetic Materials ............................................................................ 4 Agreement 23278 - Low-Cost

  13. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  14. Structural Underpinnings of the Enhanced Cycling Stability upon Al-Substitution in LiNi[subscript 0.45]Mn[subscript 0.45]Co[subscript 0.1?y]Al[subscript y]O[subscript 2] Positive Electrode Materials for Li-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conry, Thomas E.; Mehta, Apurva; Cabana, Jordi; Doeff, Marca M.

    2012-10-23

    Single-phase LiNi{sub 0.45}Mn{sub 0.45}Co{sub 0.1-y}Al{sub y}O{sub 2} layered oxide materials with 0 {<=} y {<=} 0.10 were prepared using the glycine-nitrate combustion method. Al-substitution has a minimal effect on the defect concentration and rate capability of the materials, but raises the operating voltage and reduces the capacity fade of the materials during prolonged cycling compared to the unsubstituted system. In situ X-ray diffraction suggests the presence of Al has a significant structural impact during battery operation. It acts to limit the changes in lattice parameters observed during electrochemical charging and cycling of the materials. High-resolution X-ray diffraction reveals structural distortions in the transition metal layers of as-synthesized powders with high Al-contents, as well as a structural evolution seen in all materials after cycling.

  15. Computational insights on crystal structures of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II with either Ca²⁺ or Ca²⁺ substituted by Sr²⁺

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogt, Leslie; Ertem, Mehmed Z.; Pal, Rhitankar; Brudvig, Gary W.; Batista, Victor S.

    2015-01-15

    The oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II can function with either Ca²⁺ or Sr²⁺ as the heterocation, but the reason for differing turnover rates remains unresolved despite reported X-ray crystal structures for both forms. Using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations, we optimize structures with each cation in both the resting state (S₁) and in a series of reduced states (S₀, S₋₁, and S-₂). Through comparison with experimental data, we determine that X-ray crystal structures with either Ca²⁺ or Sr²⁺ are most consistent with the S-₂ state, Mn₄[III,III,III,II] with O4 and O5 protonated. As expected, the QM/MM models show that Ca²⁺/Sr²⁺ substitutionmore » results in elongation of the heterocation bonds and displaces terminal waters W3 and W4. The optimized structures also show that hydrogen-bonded W5 is displaced in all S states with Sr²⁺ as the heterocation, suggesting that this water may play a critical role during water oxidation.« less

  16. Conductive polymer-based material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, William F. (Utica, OH); Koren, Amy B. (Lansing, MI); Dourado, Sunil K. (Ann Arbor, MI); Dulebohn, Joel I. (Lansing, MI); Hanchar, Robert J. (Charlotte, MI)

    2007-04-17

    Disclosed are polymer-based coatings and materials comprising (i) a polymeric composition including a polymer having side chains along a backbone forming the polymer, at least two of the side chains being substituted with a heteroatom selected from oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and phosphorus and combinations thereof; and (ii) a plurality of metal species distributed within the polymer. At least a portion of the heteroatoms may form part of a chelation complex with some or all of the metal species. In many embodiments, the metal species are present in a sufficient concentration to provide a conductive material, e.g., as a conductive coating on a substrate. The conductive materials may be useful as the thin film conducting or semi-conducting layers in organic electronic devices such as organic electroluminescent devices and organic thin film transistors.

  17. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  18. System and method for producing substitute natural gas from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, Raymond (Avondale, AZ)

    2012-08-07

    The present invention provides a system and method for producing substitute natural gas and electricity, while mitigating production of any greenhouse gasses. The system includes a hydrogasification reactor, to form a gas stream including natural gas and a char stream, and an oxygen burner to combust the char material to form carbon oxides. The system also includes an algae farm to convert the carbon oxides to hydrocarbon material and oxygen.

  19. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance of SubstitutedLiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2007-11-28

    A complete series of LiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) materials have been synthesized and investigated as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. When cycled between 2.0 and 4.3 V vs. Li/Li+ at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, stable capacities of ~;;160 mAh/g for y=0 to ~;;110 mAh/g for y=0.2 are achieved. Upon increasing the current density, it is found that all materials containing aluminum show reduced polarization and improved rate performance. The optimal performance at all current densities was found for the compound with y=0.05. The effect of aluminumsubstitution on the crystal structure of the host is discussed.

  20. Emissive polymeric materials for optoelectronic devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John; Chichak, Kelly Scott; Cella, James Anthony; Lewis, Larry Neil; Janora, Kevin Henry

    2011-07-05

    Polymers including at least one structural unit derived from a compound of formula I or including at least one pendant group of formula II may be used in optoelectronic devices ##STR00001## wherein R.sup.1, R.sup.3, R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are independently hydrogen, alkyl, alkoxy, oxaalkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, heteroaryl, substituted alkyl; substituted alkoxy, substituted oxaalkyl, substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted heteroaryl; R.sup.1a is hydrogen or alkyl; R.sup.2 is alkylene, substituted alkylene, oxaalkylene, CO, or CO.sub.2; R.sup.2a is alkylene; R.sup.5 is independently at each occurrence hydrogen, alkyl, alkylaryl, aryl, arylalkyl, alkoxy, carboxy, substituted alkyl; substituted alkylaryl, substituted aryl, substituted arylalkyl, or substituted alkoxy, X is halo, triflate, --B(OR.sup.1a).sub.2, or ##STR00002## located at the 2, 5- or 2, 7-positions; and L is derived from phenylpyridine, tolylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, phenylisoquinoline, dibenzoquinozaline, fluorenylpyridine, ketopyrrole, 2-(1-naphthyl)benzoxazole)), 2-phenylbenzoxazole, 2-phenylbenzothiazole, coumarin, thienylpyridine, phenylpyridine, benzothienylpyridine, 3-methoxy-2-phenylpyridine, thienylpyridine, phenylimine, vinylpyridine, pyridylnaphthalene, pyridylpyrrole, pyridylimidazole, phenylindole, derivatives thereof or combinations thereof.

  1. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  2. Materials Videos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Videos Materials

  3. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Presentation given by VEHMA ...

  5. Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, ...

  6. Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Substitute Water Supply Plans Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Colorado Division of Water Resources Substitute Water Supply...

  7. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene ...

  8. Products having multiple-substituted polysiloxane monolayer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wirth, M.J.; Fatunmbi, H.O.

    1998-02-10

    A protective monolayer is formed on e.g. silica gel and glass surfaces comprising a monolayer of silicon and oxygen atoms which is substituted with first and second hydrocarbyl substituents.

  9. Concepts and criteria for evaluating topsoil substitutes: The Texas experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askenasy, P.; Senkayi, A.L.; Joseph, W.L.

    1997-12-31

    Presented in this paper are: (1) historical background, (2) Federal and State regulatory basis and authority, and (3) justification for selected criteria and parameters which are currently used to evaluate the quality of topsoil-substitute materials and postmine soils in Texas. The specific parameters and concepts discussed include (1) acid- and toxic-forming materials (AFM and TFM), (2) quantification procedures for AFM and TFM, (3) procedures used to identify topsoil substitutes that are {open_quotes}equal to or more suitable than{close_quotes} existing premine native soils, and (4) current interpretations of what is meant by {open_quotes}the best available material to support revegetation{close_quotes} of surface-mined areas. To support these interpretations, reference is made throughout the paper to relevant sections of the (1) Texas Coal Mining Regulations (TCMR), (2) Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA), and (3) Federal regulations promulgated by the Office of Surface Mining (OSM) to implement SMCRA. The success of the Texas reclamation program, as indicated by the quality of the reclaimed soils is also discussed. This success is partly attributed to the rigorous application of the quantification concepts and parameters discussed in this paper.

  10. Preparation and characterization of cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saebel, Crystal E.; Carbone, Ryan; Dabous, John R.; Lo, Suet Y. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada); Siemann, Stefan, E-mail: ssiemann@laurentian.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)] [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Rd., Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2011-12-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt-substituted anthrax lethal factor (CoLF) is highly active. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CoLF can be prepared by bio-assimilation and direct exchange. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lethal factor binds cobalt tightly. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electronic spectrum of CoLF reveals penta-coordination. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Interaction of CoLF with thioglycolic acid follows a 2-step mechanism. -- Abstract: Anthrax lethal factor (LF) is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase involved in the cleavage of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinases near their N-termini. The current report concerns the preparation of cobalt-substituted LF (CoLF) and its characterization by electronic spectroscopy. Two strategies to produce CoLF were explored, including (i) a bio-assimilation approach involving the cultivation of LF-expressing Bacillus megaterium cells in the presence of CoCl{sub 2}, and (ii) direct exchange by treatment of zinc-LF with CoCl{sub 2}. Independent of the method employed, the protein was found to contain one Co{sup 2+} per LF molecule, and was shown to be twice as active as its native zinc counterpart. The electronic spectrum of CoLF suggests the Co{sup 2+} ion to be five-coordinate, an observation similar to that reported for other Co{sup 2+}-substituted gluzincins, but distinct from that documented for the crystal structure of native LF. Furthermore, spectroscopic studies following the exposure of CoLF to thioglycolic acid (TGA) revealed a sequential mechanism of metal removal from LF, which likely involves the formation of an enzyme: Co{sup 2+}:TGA ternary complex prior to demetallation of the active site. CoLF reported herein constitutes the first spectroscopic probe of LF's active site, which may be utilized in future studies to gain further insight into the enzyme's mechanism and inhibitor interactions.

  11. Oak Ridge Associated Universities II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities II Prepared for Division of Fuel - Cycle and Material Safety II U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission L RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W. R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY P. W. FRAME Radiological Site Assessment Program Manpower Education, Research, and Training Division FINAL REPORT January 1983 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE W.R. GRACE PROPERTY WAYNE, NEW JERSEY Prepared for Division of Fuel Cycle and Material Safety U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission P.

  12. Addendum to material selection guidelines for geothermal energy-utilization systems. Part I. Extension of the field experience data base. Part II. Proceedings of the geothermal engineering and materials (GEM) program conference (San Diego, CA, 6-8 October 1982)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C.S.; Ellis, P.F. II

    1983-05-01

    The extension of the field experience data base includes the following: key corrosive species, updated field experiences, corrosion of secondary loop components or geothermal binary power plants, and suitability of conventional water-source heat pump evaporator materials for geothermal heat pump service. Twenty-four conference papers are included. Three were abstracted previously for EDB. Separate abstracts were prepared for twenty-one. (MHR)

  13. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  14. PARS II

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... September 9, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 103 Project Updating and Reporting Page 49 4. Click to begin entering funding values. 5. Click + sign to expand detail for OPC, TEC, and UND, if ...

  15. Integrated systems approach to pollution prevention: A three-tier substitution strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, I.; Cunniff, E.; Patch, J.

    1995-12-01

    Current pollution prevention initiatives are reactive, not proactive. Most federal and state regulations and industry participation in pollution prevention projects focus on post-production cleanup. However, an integrated systems approach to design pollution prevention strategies based on substitution of entire classes of chemicals with bio-based alternatives would significantly enhance the impact of pollution prevention efforts. Industry`s current attempts at pollution prevention efforts primarily rely on recycling, modifying processes to reduce the use of certain chemicals, or substituting a petrochemical not listed on the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) for one currently listed. Such strategies may not constitute a long term solution to the pollution problem. A more durable and comprehensive strategy is to substitute renewable feedstock derived biochemicals for petrochemicals. The generation of pollution as driven by the consumer end-products industry occurs in three distinct levels; raw materials production (crude oil refining), commodity and intermediate chemicals production, a raw chemicals consumption. This paper suggests a three-tier substitution strategy based on the three levels of materials used in the chemical process industry with a goal of minimizing the pollution impact via substitutions. The substitution potential of each of the three tiers is determined based on the optimum impact criteria applicable to a given produce line or a process. The best existing pollution prevention initiatives should be incorporated in an integrated pollution management system. This system considers and includes long-term solutions to pollution problems faced both by the regulators and the chemical process industry. The role of existing production capacities that continue to produce toxic chemicals as a byproduct and their potential phase-out via biochemical substitution is also discussed.

  16. Amination of electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Alexander R. (Livermore, CA); Pagoria, Philip F. (Livermore, CA); Schmidt, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to a process to aminate electrophilic aromatic compounds by vicarious nucleophilic substitution of hydrogen using quaternary hydrazinium salts. The use of trialkylhydrazinium halide, e.g., trimethylhydrazinium iodide, as well as hydroxylamine, alkoxylamines, and 4-amino-1,2,4-triazole to produce aminated aromatic structures, such as 1,3-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (DATB), 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene (TATB) and 3,5-diamino-2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (DATNT), is described. DATB and TATB are useful insensitive high explosives. TATB is also used for the preparation of benzenehexamine, a starting material for the synthesis of novel materials (optical imaging devices, liquid crystals, ferromagnetic compounds).

  17. Sample-morphology effects on x-ray photoelectron peak intensities. II. Estimation of detection limits for thin-film materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Cedric J.; Werner, Wolfgang S. M.; Smekal, Werner

    2014-09-01

    The authors show that the National Institute of Standards and Technology database for the simulation of electron spectra for surface analysis (SESSA) can be used to determine detection limits for thin-film materials such as a thin film on a substrate or buried at varying depths in another material for common x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurement conditions. Illustrative simulations were made for a W film on or in a Ru matrix and for a Ru film on or in a W matrix. In the former case, the thickness of a W film at a given depth in the Ru matrix was varied so that the intensity of the W 4d{sub 5/2} peak was essentially the same as that for a homogeneous RuW{sub 0.001} alloy. Similarly, the thickness of a Ru film at a selected depth in the W matrix was varied so that the intensity of the Ru 3p{sub 3/2} peak matched that from a homogeneous WRu{sub 0.01} alloy. These film thicknesses correspond to the detection limits of each minor component for measurement conditions where the detection limits for a homogeneous sample varied between 0.1 at.?% (for the RuW{sub 0.001} alloy) and 1 at.?% (for the WRu{sub 0.01} alloy). SESSA can be similarly used to convert estimates of XPS detection limits for a minor species in a homogeneous solid to the corresponding XPS detection limits for that species as a thin film on or buried in the chosen solid.

  18. Using a profiling process to insure program quality: Volume II - support materials. Final progress report, May 15, 1991--November 14, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaser, J.S.; Roody, D.S.; Raizen, S.A.

    1996-11-01

    Between 1990 and 1995 the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Center for Improving Science Education (National Center) developed a system for ongoing evaluation of K-12 educational programs in the DOE-supported national energy Laboratories. As part of the formative evaluation component of this collaborative endeavor, field staff in the Laboratories began creating profiles of their programs. However, many individuals within DOE Headquarters were not familiar with this profiling process and were unprepared to use the valuable information that the profiles generated. This manual was produced to orient Headquarters staff to profiling. It focuses on how Headquarters staff can use the profiling process to help their funded programs establish and/or maintain high quality. Its purpose, then, is not to train Headquarters staff to become proficient in profiling, but to show them how to draw on the Laboratories` use of profiling to bring about program improvement. Profiling is the process of systematically examining and describing a program`s elements against a set of components that define Effective Practice. The instrument used to capture the data for analysis is called a template, and most of this manual focuses on the templates and how to read and interpret them. However, since it is important to understand these data in context, the authors also describe what should accompany each template in a complete profiling packet and offer guidelines for reviewing complete packets and providing feedback to program managers. This document consists of Support Materials for the manual: exercise answer keys; templates; guidelines for reviewing templates; a complete profiling packet; guidelines for the trainer.

  19. Impedance spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium substituted cobalt ferrite ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, Md. T. Ramana, C. V.

    2014-10-28

    Gadolinium (Gd) substituted cobalt ferrites (CoFe{sub 2?x}Gd{sub x}O{sub 4}, referred to CFGO) with variable Gd content (x?=?0.00.4) have been synthesized by solid state ceramic method. The crystal structure and impedance properties of CFGO compounds have been evaluated. X-ray diffraction measurements indicate that CFGO crystallize in the inverse spinel phase. The CFGO compounds exhibit lattice expansion due to substitution of larger Gd ions into the crystal lattice. Impedance spectroscopy analysis was performed under a wide range of frequency (f?=?20?Hz1?MHz) and temperature (T?=?303573?K). Electrical properties of Gd incorporated Co ferrite ceramics are enhanced compared to pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} due to the lattice distortion. Impedance spectroscopic analysis illustrates the variation of bulk grain and grain-boundary contributions towards the electrical resistance and capacitance of CFGO materials with temperature. A two-layer heterogeneous model consisting of moderately conducting grain interior (ferrite-phase) regions separated by insulating grain boundaries (resistive-phase) accurately account for the observed temperature and frequency dependent electrical characteristic of CFGO ceramics.

  20. BORE II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-08-01

    Bore II, co-developed by Berkeley Lab researchers Frank Hale, Chin-Fu Tsang, and Christine Doughty, provides vital information for solving water quality and supply problems and for improving remediation of contaminated sites. Termed "hydrophysical logging," this technology is based on the concept of measuring repeated depth profiles of fluid electric conductivity in a borehole that is pumping. As fluid enters the wellbore, its distinct electric conductivity causes peaks in the conductivity log that grow and migratemore » upward with time. Analysis of the evolution of the peaks enables characterization of groundwater flow distribution more quickly, more cost effectively, and with higher resolution than ever before. Combining the unique interpretation software Bore II with advanced downhole instrumentation (the hydrophysical logging tool), the method quantifies inflow and outflow locations, their associated flow rates, and the basic water quality parameters of the associated formation waters (e.g., pH, oxidation-reduction potential, temperature). In addition, when applied in conjunction with downhole fluid sampling, Bore II makes possible a complete assessment of contaminant concentration within groundwater.« less

  1. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending Web classes should download these documents prior to attending the class. Slides from the...

  2. Cationic Gold Clusters Ligated with Differently Substituted Phosphines: Effect of Substitution on Ligand Reactivity and Binding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Olivares, Astrid M.; Hill, David E.; Laskin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    We present a systematic study of the effect of the number of methyl (Me) and cyclohexyl (Cy) functional groups in monodentate phosphine ligands on the solution-phase synthesis of ligated sub-nanometer gold clusters and their gas-phase fragmentation pathways. Small mixed ligand cationic gold clusters were synthesized using ligand exchange reactions between pre-formed triphenylphosphine ligated (PPh3) gold clusters and monodentate Me- and Cy-substituted ligands in solution and characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments. Under the same experimental conditions, larger gold-PPh3 clusters undergo efficient exchange of unsubstituted PPh3 ligands for singly Me- and Cy-substituted PPh2Me and PPh2Cy ligands. The efficiency of ligand exchange decreases with an increasing number of Me or Cy groups in the substituted phosphine ligands. CID experiments performed for a series of ligand-exchanged gold clusters indicate that loss of a neutral Me-substituted ligand is preferred over loss of a neutral PPh3 ligand while the opposite trend is observed for Cy-substituted ligands. The branching ratio of the competing ligand loss channels is strongly correlated with the electron donating ability of the phosphorous lone pair as determined by the relative proton affinity of the ligand. The results indicate that the relative ligand binding energies increase in the order PMe3 < PPhMe2 < PPh2Me < PPh3< PPh2Cy < PPhCy2< PCy3. Furthermore, the difference in relative ligand binding energies increases with the number of substituted PPh3-mMem or PPh3-mCym ligands (L) exchanged onto each cluster. This study provides the first experimental determination of the relative binding energies of ligated gold clusters containing differently substituted monophosphine ligands, which are important to controlling their synthesis and reactivity in solution. The results also indicate that ligand substitution is an important parameter that must be considered in theoretical modeling of these complex systems

  3. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  4. Biofoam II

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, R.L.

    1994-11-01

    Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties. 1 fig.

  5. Biofoam II

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrison, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Biofoam is a rigid, microcellular organic foam made from organic materials derived from natural products and biological organisms. Starting materials include agar, agarose, gelatin, algin, alginates, gellan gum, and microcrystalline cellulose. The organic material is dissolved in a polar solvent, typically water, and the mixture is gelled. The water in the gel pores is replaced at least once with another solvent to reduce the pore size of the final biofoam. The solvent in the gel pores may be replaced several times. After the final replacement of solvent, the gel is frozen and freeze-dried to form a biofoam. Translucent biofoams are formed by selecting a final solvent that forms very small crystals. A variety of crystalline, fibrous, amorphous, or metallic additives may be incorporated into the foam structure to produce lightweight composite materials with enhanced strength and insulating properties.

  6. Part II

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Friday, No. 233 December 4, 2015 Part II Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration 48 CFR Chapter 1 Federal Acquisition Regulations; Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 15:22 Dec 03, 2015 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\04DER2.SGM 04DER2 wgreen on DSK2VPTVN1PROD with RULES2 75902 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 233 / Friday, December 4, 2015 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES

  7. Part II

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    251 December 31, 2015 Part II Department of Defense General Services Administration National Aeronautics and Space Administration 48 CFR Chapter 1 Federal Acquisition Regulations; Final Rules VerDate Sep<11>2014 17:22 Dec 30, 2015 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\31DER2.SGM 31DER2 tkelley on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with RULES2 81886 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 251 / Thursday, December 31, 2015 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

  8. Ii1

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and

  9. UTILIZATION OF LIGHTWEIGHT MATERIALS MADE FROM COAL GASIFICATION SLAGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vas Choudhry; Stephen Kwan; Steven R. Hadley

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the project entitled ''Utilization of Lightweight Materials Made from Coal Gasification Slags'' was to demonstrate the technical and economic viability of manufacturing low-unit-weight products from coal gasification slags which can be used as substitutes for conventional lightweight and ultra-lightweight aggregates. In Phase I, the technology developed by Praxis to produce lightweight aggregates from slag (termed SLA) was applied to produce a large batch (10 tons) of expanded slag using pilot direct-fired rotary kilns and a fluidized bed calciner. The expanded products were characterized using basic characterization and application-oriented tests. Phase II involved the demonstration and evaluation of the use of expanded slag aggregates to produce a number of end-use applications including lightweight roof tiles, lightweight precast products (e.g., masonry blocks), structural concrete, insulating concrete, loose fill insulation, and as a substitute for expanded perlite and vermiculite in horticultural applications. Prototypes of these end-use applications were made and tested with the assistance of commercial manufacturers. Finally, the economics of expanded slag production was determined and compared with the alternative of slag disposal. Production of value-added products from SLA has a significant potential to enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are considered.

  10. Enhanced O2 selectivity versus N2 by partial metal substitution in Cu-BTC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sava Gallis, Dorina F.; Parkes, Marie V.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Nenoff, Tina M.

    2015-03-05

    Here we describe the homogeneous substitution of Mn, Fe and Co at various levels into a prototypical metal-organic framework (MOF), namely Cu-BTC (HKUST-1), and the effect of that substitution on preferential gas sorption. Using a combination of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, postsynthetic metal substitutions, materials characterization, and gas sorption testing, we demonstrate that the identity of the metal ion has a quantifiable effect on their oxygen and nitrogen sorption properties at cryogenic temperatures. An excellent correlation is found between O2/N2 selectivities determined experimentally at 77 K and the difference in O2 and N2 binding energies calculated from DFT modelingmore » data: Mn > Fe > Co > Cu. Room temperature gas sorption studies were also performed and correlated with metal substitution. The Fe-exchanged sample shows a significantly higher nitrogen isosteric heat of adsorption at temperatures close to ambient conditions (273 K - 298 K) as compared to all other metals studied, indicative of favorable interactions between N2 and coordinatively unsaturated Fe metal centers. Furthermore, differences in gas adsorption results at cryogenic and room temperatures are evident; they are explained by comparing experimental results with DFT binding energies (0 K) and room temperature Grand Canonical Monte Carlo simulations.« less

  11. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal

  12. Activation of methane by transition metal-substituted aluminophosphate molecular sieves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Iton, Lennox E. (Downers Grove, IL); Maroni, Victor A. (Naperville, IL)

    1991-01-01

    Aluminophosphate molecular sieves substituted with cobalt, manganese or iron and having the AlPO.sub.4 -34 or AlPO.sub.4 -5, or related AlPO.sub.4 structure activate methane starting at approximately 350.degree. C. Between 400.degree. and 500.degree. C. and at methane pressures .ltoreq.1 atmosphere the rate of methane conversion increases steadily with typical conversion efficiencies at 500.degree. C. approaching 50% and selectivity to the production of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons approaching 100%. The activation mechanism is based on reduction of the transition metal(III) form of the molecular sieve to the transition metal(II) form with accompanying oxidative dehydrogenation of the methane. Reoxidation of the - transition metal(II) form to the transition metal(III) form can be done either chemically (e.g., using O.sub.2) or electrochemically.

  13. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es22whittingham.pdf More Documents & Publications The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and Layered Manganese Oxides The...

  14. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. PDF icon es050whittingham2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates and Layered Manganese Oxides The...

  15. Substituted 3-hydroxy-delta-lactones from epoxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Geoffrey W.; Kramer, John W.

    2013-09-10

    Catalysts and methods for the carbonylation of epoxides to substituted 3-hydroxy-.delta.-lactones and .beta.-lactones are disclosed.

  16. Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of vanadium-substitute...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of vanadium-substituted nickel chromium sulfide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural, magnetic, and electronic ...

  17. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The analytical methodology by which the energy and process substitution were evaluated is ... Resource Relation: Other Information: Portions of document are illegible Research Org: ...

  18. High pressure chemistry of substituted acetylenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chellappa, Raja; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Stephen; Robbins, David

    2011-01-25

    High pressure in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments were performed on substituted polyacetylenes: tert-butyl acetylene [TBA: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-C{triple_bond}CH] and ethynyl trimethylsilane [ETMS: (CH{sub 3}){sub 3}-Si{triple_bond}CH] to investigate pressure-induced chemical reactions. The starting samples were the low temperature crystalline phases which persisted metastably at room temperature and polymerized beyond 11 GPa and 26 GPa for TBA and ETMS respectively. These reaction onset pressures are considerably higher than what we observed in the shockwave studies (6.1 GPa for TBA and 6.6 GPa for ETMS). Interestingly, in the case of ETMS, it was observed with fluid ETMS as starting sample, reacts to form a semi-crystalline polymer (crystalline domains corresponding to the low-T phase) at pressures less than {approx}2 GPa. Further characterization using vibrational spectroscopy is in progress.

  19. Methods for preparation of cyclopentadienyliron (II) arenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keipert, Steven J. (Oakdale, MN)

    1991-01-01

    Two improved methods for preparation of compounds with the structure shown in equation X [(Cp)--Fe--(Ar)].sup.+.sub.b X.sup.b- (X) where Cp is an eta.sup.5 complexed, substituted or unsubstituted, cyclopentadienyl or indenyl anion, Ar is an eta.sup.6 complexed substituted or unsubstituted, pi-arene ligand anad X is a b-valent anion where b is an integer between 1 and 3. The two methods, which differ in the source of the cyclopentadienyl anion - Lewis acid complex, utilize a Lewis acid assisted ligand transfer reaction. The cyclopentadienyl anion ligand, assisted by a Lewis acid is transferred to ferrous ion in the presence of an arene. In the first method, the cyclopentadienyl anion is derived from ferrocene and ferrous chloride. In this reaction, the cyclopentadienyliron (II) arene product is derived partially from ferrocene and partially from the ferrous salt. In the second method, the cyclopentadienyl anion - Lewis acid complex is formed by direct reaction of the Lewis acid with an inorganic cyclopentadienide salt. The cyclopentadienyliron (II) arene product of this reaction is derived entirely from the ferrous salt. Cyclopentadienyliron (II) arene cations are of great interest due to their utility as photoactivatable catalysts for a variety of polymerization reactions.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Lessons Learned Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Laboratory is a highly optimized, third-generation synchrotron facility that will enable the study of material properties and...

  1. The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and Layered

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Manganese Oxides | Department of Energy 09 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon es_22_whittingham.pdf More Documents & Publications The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Olivines and Layered Manganese Oxides The Synthesis and Characterization of Substituted Phosphates

  2. ARM - RHUBC II Instruments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Instruments RHUBC-II Instruments - Cerro Toco, Chile Guest Instruments Instrument

  3. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  4. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  5. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  6. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  7. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1(0)-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manchanda, P; Skomski, R; Bordeaux, N; Lewis, LH; Kashyap, A

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1(0)-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe2XNi and 32-atom supercells (X = Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. (C) 2014 AIP Publishing LLC.

  8. Transition-metal and metalloid substitutions in L1{sub 0}-ordered FeNi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manchanda, Priyanka; Skomski, Ralph; Bordeaux, N.; Lewis, L. H.; Kashyap, Arti

    2014-05-07

    The effect of atomic substitutions on the magnetization, exchange, and magnetocrystalline anisotropy energy of L1{sub 0}-ordered FeNi (tetrataenite) is computationally investigated. The compound naturally occurs in meteorites but has attracted renewed attention as a potential material for permanent magnets, and elemental additives will likely be necessary to facilitate the phase formation. Our density functional theory calculations use the Vienna ab-initio simulation package, applied to 4-atom unit cells of Fe{sub 2}XNi and 32-atom supercells (X?=?Al, P, S, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co). While it is found that most additives deteriorate the magnetic properties, there are exceptions: excess substitutional Fe and Co additions improve the magnetization, whereas Cr, S, and interstitial B additions improve the magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  9. Interpretation of thermoelectric properties of Cu substituted LaCoO{sub 3} ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhary, K. K.; Kaurav, N.; Sharma, U.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2014-04-24

    The thermoelectric properties of LaCo{sub 1?x}Cu{sub x}O{sub 3??} is theoretically analyzed, it is observed that thermoelectric figure of merit ZT (=S{sup 2}?T/?) is maximized by Cu substitution in LaCoO{sub 3} Ceramics at x=0.15. The lattice thermal conductivity and thermoelectric power were estimated by the scattering of phonons with defects, grain boundaries, electrons and phonons to evaluate the thermoelectric properties. We found that Cu substitution increase the phonon scattering with grain boundaries and defects which significantly increase the thermoelectric power and decrease the thermal conductivity. The present numerical analysis will help in designing more efficient thermoelectric materials.

  10. Meet CMI Researcher Brian Sales | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brian Sales CMI focus area deputy leader Brian Sales CMI researcher Brian Sales is the Deputy Lead for Focus Area 2, Developing Substitutes. In this role, he assists Adam Schwartz in overseeing projects that reduce the usage of critical rare earth elements by developing substitute materials with equivalent or superior properties. Dr. Sales' research has focused on the discovery, synthesis, and development of new materials with potential to impact advanced energy technologies. He has made

  11. Doping against the native propensity of MoS₂: Degenerate hole doping by cation substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Joonki; Park, Tae-Eon; Lin, Der-Yuh; Fu, Deyi; Park, Joonsuk; Jung, Hee Joon; Chen, Yabin; Ko, Changhyun; Jang, Chaun; Sun, Yinghui; Sinclair, Robert; Chang, Joonyeon; Tongay, Sefaattin; Wu, Junqiao

    2014-12-10

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) draw much attention as the key semiconducting material for two-dimensional electrical, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices. For most of these applications, both n- and p-type materials are needed to form junctions and support bipolar carrier conduction. However, typically only one type of doping is stable for a particular TMD. For example, molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) is natively an n-type presumably due to omnipresent electron-donating sulfur vacancies, and stable/controllable p-type doping has not been achieved. The lack of p-type doping hampers the development of charge-splitting p–n junctions of MoS₂, as well as limits carrier conduction to spin-degenerate conduction bands instead of the more interesting, spin-polarized valence bands. Traditionally, extrinsic p-type doping in TMDs has been approached with surface adsorption or intercalation of electron-accepting molecules. However, practically stable doping requires substitution of host atoms with dopants where the doping is secured by covalent bonding. In this work, we demonstrate stable p-type conduction in MoS₂ by substitutional niobium (Nb) doping, leading to a degenerate hole density of ~3 × 10¹⁹ cm⁻³. Structural and X-ray techniques reveal that the Nb atoms are indeed substitutionally incorporated into MoS₂ by replacing the Mo cations in the host lattice. van der Waals p–n homojunctions based on vertically stacked MoS₂ layers are fabricated, which enable gate-tunable current rectification. A wide range of microelectronic, optoelectronic, and spintronic devices can be envisioned from the demonstrated substitutional bipolar doping of MoS₂. From the miscibility of dopants with the host, it is also expected that the synthesis technique demonstrated here can be generally extended to other TMDs for doping against their native unipolar propensity.

  12. Production of Substitute Natural Gas from Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Lucero

    2009-01-31

    The goal of this research program was to develop and demonstrate a novel gasification technology to produce substitute natural gas (SNG) from coal. The technology relies on a continuous sequential processing method that differs substantially from the historic methanation or hydro-gasification processing technologies. The thermo-chemistry relies on all the same reactions, but the processing sequences are different. The proposed concept is appropriate for western sub-bituminous coals, which tend to be composed of about half fixed carbon and about half volatile matter (dry ash-free basis). In the most general terms the process requires four steps (1) separating the fixed carbon from the volatile matter (pyrolysis); (2) converting the volatile fraction into syngas (reforming); (3) reacting the syngas with heated carbon to make methane-rich fuel gas (methanation and hydro-gasification); and (4) generating process heat by combusting residual char (combustion). A key feature of this technology is that no oxygen plant is needed for char combustion.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicles: Mach II Design | Department of Energy Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Multi-Material Lightweight Vehicles: Mach II Design Presentation given by VEHMA at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about multi-material lightweight vehicles: Mach II design. PDF icon lm088_skszek_2014_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Vehicle

  14. BEATRIX-II, phase II: Data summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W.

    1996-05-01

    The BEATRIX-II experimental program was an International Energy Agency sponsored collaborative effort between Japan, Canada, and the United States to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast-neutron environment at high burnup levels. This report addresses the Phase II activities, which included two in situ tritium-recovery canisters: temperature-change and temperature-gradient. The temperature-change canister contained a Li{sub 2}O ring specimen that had a nearly uniform temperature profile and was capable of temperature changes between 530 and 640{degrees}C. The temperature-gradient canister contained a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} pebble bed operating under a thermal gradient of 440 to 1100{degrees}C. Postirradiation examination was carried out to characterize the Phase II in situ specimens and a series of nonvented capsules designed to address the compatibility of beryllium with lithium-ceramic solid-breeder materials. The results of the BEATRIX-II, Phase II, irradiation experiment provided an extensive data base on the in situ tritium-release characteristics of Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} for lithium burnups near 5%. The composition of the sweep gas was found to be a critical parameter in the recovery of tritium from both Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3}. Tritium inventories measured confirmed that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} exhibited very low tritium retention during the Phase II irradiation. Tritium inventories in Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} after Phase II tended to be larger than those found for Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} in other in situ experiments, but the larger values may reflect the larger generation rates in BEATRIX-II. A series of 20 capsules was irradiated to determine the compatibility of lithium ceramics and beryllium under conditions similar to a fusion blanket. It is concluded that Li{sub 2}O and Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} should remain leading candidates for use in a solid-breeder fusion-blanket application.

  15. PARS II TRAINING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project

  16. Energy and process substitution in the frozen-food industry:...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and process substitution in the frozen-food industry: geothermal energy and the retortable pouch Stern, M.W.; Hanemann, W.M.; Eckhouse, K. 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND...

  17. Computational Modeling of Degradation of Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, H.; Pivovar, B. S.

    2014-09-01

    The degradation of cations on the alkaline exchange membranes is the major challenge for alkaline membrane fuel cells. In this paper, we investigated the degradation barriers by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations, which is one of the most commonly used cations for alkaline exchange membranes. We found that substituted cations with electron-releasing substituent groups at meta-position of the benzyl ring could result in improved degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations with ten different substituent groups, the largest improvement of degradation barriers is only 1.6 kcal/mol. This implies that the lifetime of alkaline membrane fuel cells could increase from a few months to a few years by using substituted BTMA+ cations, an encouraging but still limited improvement for real-world applications.

  18. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  19. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    open Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene Received: 23 December 2014 Accepted- 24 June 2015 Charles B. Crook1, Costel Constantin1, Towfiq Ahmed2, Jian-Xin Zhu2-3, Alexander V. Balatsky4,5 & Jason T. Haraldsen1 Published: 03 August 2015 We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal

  20. Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Atomic substitution reveals the structural basis for substrate adenine recognition and removal by adenine DNA glycosylase Adenine DNA glycosylase catalyzes the glycolytic removal of adenine from the promutagenic A {center_dot} oxoG base pair in

  1. Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue:Mar. 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Coming up with platinum substitutes may be elemental Lab researchers are working with an abundant element to take their place: cobalt. February 1, 2013 dummy image Read our archives. Contacts Editor Linda Anderman Email Community Programs Office Kurt Steinhaus Email Initial findings by a Los

  2. Microsoft Word - Fuel Substitution Elasticities final.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Competition in Power Generation and Elasticities of Substitution June 2012 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Fuel Competition in Power Generation and Elasticities of Substitution i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are

  3. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on April 28, 2016 Title: Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent In this study, an efficient

  4. I IIII1IiI II1Ii

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', %

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

    2010-12-01

    This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

  6. Material Misfits

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Issues submit Material Misfits How well nanocomposite materials align at their interfaces determines what properties they have, opening broad new avenues of materials-science...

  7. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  8. Aegir II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aegir II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates...

  9. Penascal II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola...

  10. Glacier II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Glacier II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer...

  11. Copper-substituted perovskite compositions for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes and oxygen reduction electrodes in other electrochemical devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rieke, Peter C. (Pasco, WA); Coffey, Gregory W. (Richland, WA); Pederson, Larry R. (Kennewick, WA); Marina, Olga A. (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Singh, Prabhaker (Richland, WA); Thomsen, Edwin C. (Richland, WA)

    2010-07-20

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells. Also provided are electrochemical devices that include active oxygen reduction electrodes, such as solid oxide fuel cells, sensors, pumps and the like. The compositions comprises a copper-substituted ferrite perovskite material. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using the electrode compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having cathodes comprising the compositions.

  12. Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  13. Complete Project List | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complete Project List Researchers at the Critical Materials Institute work to find ways to diversify supplies of critical materials, develop substitutes, improve reuse and recycling, enable research, sustain the environment, study the supply chain and analyze economics. The institute started with more than 30 projects. Over time, some have merged or ended and others have been added. This page provides a list of the current CMI projects, which can be sorted by clicking on a column header. Project

  14. Electronic and magnetic properties of Si substituted Fe3Ge

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shanavas, Kavungal Veedu; McGuire, Michael A.; Parker, David S.

    2015-09-23

    Using first principles calculations we studied the effect of Si substitution in the hexagonal Fe3Ge. We find the low temperature magnetic anisotropy in this system to be planar and originating mostly from the spin-orbit coupling in Fe-d states. Reduction of the unitcell volume reduces the in-plane magnetic anisotropy, eventually turning it positive which reorients the magnetic moments to the axial direction. We find that substituting Ge with the smaller Si ions also reduces the anisotropy, potentially enhancing the region of stability of the axial magnetization, which is beneficial for magnetic applications. Thus our experimental measurements on samples of Fe3Ge1–xSix confirmmore » these predictions and show that substitution of about 6% of the Ge with Si increases by approximately 35 K the temperature range over which anisotropy is uniaxial.« less

  15. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS Experimental Determination of the Symmetry Energy of a Low Density Nuclear Gas ...II-1 S....

  16. Hydroxide Degradation Pathways for Substituted Benzyltrimethyl Ammonium: A DFT Study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Long, Hai; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2014-11-01

    The stability of cations used in the alkaline exchange membranes has been a major challenge. In this paper, degradation energy barriers were investigated by density functional theory for substituted benzyltrimethyl ammonium (BTMA+) cations. Findings show that electron-donating substituent groups at meta-position(s) of the benzyl ring could result in increased degradation barriers. However, after investigating more than thirty substituted BTMA+ cations, the largest improvement in degradation barrier found was only 6.7 kJ/mol. This suggests a modest (8×) improvement in stability for this type of approach may be possible, but for anything greater other approaches will need to be pursued.

  17. Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of vanadium-substituted

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    nickel chromium sulfide (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of vanadium-substituted nickel chromium sulfide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of vanadium-substituted nickel chromium sulfide A series of sulfides NiCr{sub 2{minus}x}V{sub x}S{sub 4} (0 < x < 2.0) has been synthesized at high temperatures. All products are isostructural with Cr{sub 3}S{sub 4} (space group I2/m; a

  18. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  19. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  20. TRUPACT-II, a regulatory perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, P.C.; Spooner, O.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Transuranic Package Transporter II (TRUPACT-II) is a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) certified Type B packaging for the shipment of contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) material by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The NRC approved the TRUPACT-II design as meeting the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71 (10 CFR 71) and issued Certificate of Compliance (CofC) Number 9218 to the DOE. There are currently 15 certified TRUPACT-IIs. Additional TRUPACT-IIs will be required to make more than 15,000 shipments of CH-TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The TRUPACT-II may also be used for the DOE inter-site and intra-site shipments of CH-TRU waste. The Land Withdrawal Act (Public Law 102-579), enacted by the US Congress, October 30, 1992, and an agreement between the DOE and the State of New Mexico, signed August 4, 1987, both stipulate that only NRC approved packaging may be used for shipments of TRU waste to the WIPP. Early in the TRUPACT-II development phase it was decided that the transportation system (tractor, trailer, and TRUPACT-II) should be highway legal on all routes without the need for oversize and/or overweight permits. In large measure, public acceptance of the DOE`s efforts to safely transport CH-TRU waste depends on the public`s perception that the TRUPACT-II is in compliance with all applicable regulations, standards, and quality assurance requirements. This paper addresses some of the numerous regulations applicable to Type B packaging, and it describes how the TRUPACT-II complies with these regulations.

  1. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science /science-innovation/_assets/images/icon-science.jpg Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Materials Physics and Applications» Materials Science and Technology» Institute for Materials Science» Materials Science Rob Dickerson uses a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope at

  2. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter...

  3. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation...

  4. An unusual mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based 3D framework with 24-membered macrocycles as linker units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang Haijun; Ma Huiyuan; Yu Yan; Yang Ming; Xun Ye; Liu Bo

    2012-02-15

    A new compound, [Cu{sup I}(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] Subset-Of {l_brace}[Cu{sup I}(bpp)]{sub 2}[PW{sub 11}Cu{sup II}O{sub 39}]{r_brace} (1) (bpp=1,3-bis(4-pyridyl)propane), has been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In compound 1, the unusual -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains and 24-membered (Cubpp){sub 2} cation-macrocycles are linked together to form a (2, 4) connected 3D framework with channels of ca. 9.784 Multiplication-Sign 7.771 A{sup 2} along two directions, in which the [Cu(H{sub 2}O)(Hbpp){sub 2}] coordination fragments as guest components are trapped. The photocatalytic experiments of compound 1 were performed, which show a good catalytic activity of compound 1 for photodegradation of RhB. Furthermore, the IR, TGA and electrochemical properties of compound 1 were investigated. - Graphical abstract: An unusual example of mono-substituted Keggin anion-chain based hybrid compound that possesses a 3D structure has been synthesized, which offers a feasible route for synthesis of such compounds. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first example of -A-B-A-B- array mono-substituted Keggin chain is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An unusual three dimensional structure based mono-substituted Keggin anion-chains. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalysis and electrochemical properties of the title compound were studied.

  5. Solvent Refined Coal-II (SRC-II) detailed environmental plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-10-01

    This document describes environmental research which will: aid in the development of an environmentally acceptable SRC-II process; and provide data for environmental assessment of the process. The SRC-II process is described, criteria for selection of samples to undergo environmental analyses are given, and approximate timelines are presented for obtaining pertinent samples. At this time, the SRC-II process is at the pilot-plant stage of development and a demonstration facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1984. Since design criteria may change, the environmental research described in this document is organized in four phases which correlate with and will provide information early in process development. Phase I research (screening) evaluates samples from existing SRC-II facilities (pilot, process demonstration unit (PDU), bench) which may bracket potential demonstration/commercial practice in terms of physical and chemical criteria. The samples are being subjected to a battery of short-term biomedical and ecological assays. Chemical fractionation and analysis are being performed to determine compounds and compound classes of potential concern. Phase II (baseline) research will evaluate SRC-II materials which are considered most representative of potential demonstration/commercial practice. These materials will be subjected to longer-term, more-extensive biological and ecological analyses relative to effects and environmental fate. Phase III research will examine effects of process modification, control technologies and changing operational conditions on potential environmental properties of SRC-II materials. Phase IV research (onsite monitoring) will develop methods and initiate environmental monitoring for effects at the SRC-II demonstration facility and potential commercial sites. This document also describes industrial hygiene programs which must occur throughout SRC-II process development.

  6. Redox chromophore compounds and electrodes of metal containing substituted bipyridines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Cecil M. (Fort Collins, CO); Redepenning, Jody G. (Fort Collins, CO)

    1986-01-01

    Chromophoric compounds, each having a wide range of distinct color changes in response to changes in the oxidation states thereof, are provided in the form of polymerizable monomers, and polymers thereof, of certain metal containing, and electron group substituted, 2,2'-bipyridine compounds.

  7. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident

  8. Alamos National Laboratory] Materials Science(36) Abstract Not...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Co-Design at the Mesoscale: Opportunities for NSLS-II Sarrao, John L. Los Alamos National Laboratory Materials Science(36) Abstract Not Provided Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  9. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  10. material protection

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  11. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  12. Substituted copper phthalocyanine/multiwalled carbon nanotubes hybrid material for Cl{sub 2} sensing application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Anshul Kumar, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Saini, Rajan, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Singh, Rajinder, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Mahajan, Aman, E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in; Bedi, R. K., E-mail: dramanmahajan@yahoo.co.in [Material Science Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India); Aswal, D. K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2014-04-24

    In this work, hybrid of soluble copper phthalocyanine (CuPcOC{sub 8}) and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) has been synthesized. The formation of CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid is confirmed by atomic force microscopy, UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopy. Subsequently, a chemi-resistive sensor is fabricated by drop casting CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid onto glass substrate. It has been demonstrated that CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid is highly selective towards Cl{sub 2} gas with minimum detection limit of 100 ppb. The response of sensor increases linearly with increase in the concentration of Cl{sub 2} gas. For 2000 ppb of Cl{sub 2}, CuPcOC{sub 8}-MWCNTs hybrid gives a response as large as 53% in 40 seconds.

  13. Can Vanadium Be Substituted into LiFePO[subscript 4]?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omenya, Fredrick; Chernova, Natasha A.; Upreti, Shailesh; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Nam, Kyung-Wan; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    2015-10-15

    Vanadium is shown to substitute for iron in the olivine LiFePO{sub 4} up to at least 10 mol %, when the synthesis is carried out at 550 C. In the solid solution LiFe{sub 1-3y/2}V{sub y}PO{sub 4}, the a and b lattice parameters and cell volume decrease with increasing vanadium content, while the c lattice parameter increases slightly. However, when the synthesis is performed at 650 C, a NASICON phase, Li{sub 3}V{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3}, is also formed, showing that solid solution is a function of the synthesis temperature. X-ray absorption near-edge structure indicates vanadium is in the 3+ oxidation state and in an octahedral environment. Magnetic studies reveal a shift of the antiferromagnetic ordering transition toward lower temperatures with increasing vanadium substitution, confirming solid solution formation. The addition of vanadium enhances the electrochemical performance of the materials especially at high current densities.

  14. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Institute for Materials Science x

  15. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Basic Energy Sciences February 9-10, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:17

  16. Substituted 6-nitroquipazines, methods of preparation, and methods of use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathis, Jr., Chester A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Biegon, Anat (Rohovot, IL); Taylor, Scott E. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Enas, Joel D. (Pittsburg, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed is a substituted 6-nitroquipazine of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, and R.sub.4 are each selected from the group consisting of H, Fl, CL, Br, I, CF.sub.3, CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 F, CH.sub.3, CH.sub.2 CH.sub.3, and --CH(CH.sub.3).sub.2, and wherein one of R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, and R.sub.4 is other than H. Also disclosed is a method for measurement of serotonin uptake sites in a sample, in which a radioligand is incubated with a sample and then the radioactivity of the radioligand bound to the sample is determined, utilizing a radio labeled substituted 6-nitroquipazine as the radioligand. Also disclosed is a method of manufacture and method of use.

  17. Carboxy, carboalkoxy and carbamile substituted isonitrile radionuclide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Kronauge, James; Abrams, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    A coordination complex comprising a radionuclide selected from the class consisting of radioactive isotopes of Tc, Ru, Co, Pt and Re and an isonitrile ligand of the formula: (CNX)R, where X is a lower alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, wherein R is selected from the group consisting of COOR.sup.1 and CONR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.1 can be H, a pharmaceutically acceptable cation, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms. R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 can be H, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, and R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 can be the same of different is disclosed. Kits that can be used to form these complexes are also disclosed.

  18. Carboxy, carboalkoxy and carbamile substituted isonitrile radionuclide complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Alun G.; Davison, Alan; Kronauge, James; Abrams, Michael J.

    1988-04-05

    A coordination complex comprising a radionuclide selected from the class consisting of radioactive isotopes of Tc, Ru, Co, Pt and Re and an isonitrile ligand of the formula: (CNX)R, where X is a lower alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, wherein R is selected from the group consisting of COOR.sup.1 and CONR.sup.2 R.sup.3 where R.sup.1 can be H, a pharmaceutically acceptable cation, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 can be H, or a substituted or unsubstituted alkyl group having 1 to 4 carbon atoms, and R.sup.2 and R.sup.3 can be the same or different is disclosed. Kits that can be used to form these complexes are also disclosed.

  19. Effect of isoelectronic substitution on phase transition and magnetic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    properties of Ni{sub 57}Mn{sub 18}Ga{sub 25-x}In{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 8) alloys with Ni excess (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effect of isoelectronic substitution on phase transition and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 57}Mn{sub 18}Ga{sub 25-x}In{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 8) alloys with Ni excess Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of isoelectronic substitution on phase transition and magnetic properties of Ni{sub 57}Mn{sub 18}Ga{sub 25-x}In{sub x} (0 ≤ x ≤ 8) alloys with Ni

  20. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, where the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.

  1. Bridging-ligand-substitution strategy for the preparation of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    metal-organic polyhedra | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Bridging-ligand-substitution strategy for the preparation of metal-organic polyhedra Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li & Hong-Cai Zhou, Nature Chemistry 2, 893-898 (2010) DOI: 10.1038/nchem.803 Abstract: Metal-organic polyhedra-discrete molecular architectures constructed through the coordination of metal ions and organic linkers-have recently attracted considerable attention due to

  2. Limon II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources...

  3. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  4. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Liu, Jue; Lee, Byungju; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Shuyin; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli; et al

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accuratelymore » identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.« less

  5. PARS II | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and

  6. Luz II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name: Luz II Place: Jerusalem, Israel Zip: 91450 Sector: Solar Product: Jerusalem-based utility-scale solar power plant developer. Coordinates:...

  7. Network II Database

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1994-11-07

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Rail and Barge Network II Database is a representation of the rail and barge system of the United States. The network is derived from the Federal Rail Administration (FRA) rail database.

  8. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M0572 dated 3215 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012)...

  9. Materials Physics | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate In materials physics, NREL focuses on realizing materials that transcend the present constraints of photovoltaic (PV) and solid-state lighting technologies. Through materials growth and characterization, coupled with theoretical modeling, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. Capabilities Optimizing New Materials An illustration showing

  10. Older Public Presentations | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Older Public Presentations CMI leaders and scientists have given public presentations about rare earths and critical materials. Here are a few of their older presentations. CMI Kickoff Meeting Plenary Sessions, September 2013: Alex King, director: CMI Welcome Karl Gschneidner, chief science officer: CMI Overview Bruce Moyer, leader for Diversifying Supply Adam Schwartz, leader for Developing Substitutes Eric Peterson, leader for Improving Reuse and Recycling Tom Lograsso, leader for Crosscutting

  11. Effect of isoelectronic substitution on phase transition and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Key Laboratory of Aerospace Materials and Performance (Ministry of Education), School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China) Publication ...

  12. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  13. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  14. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  15. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  16. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials (continued) * Generators are required to avoid Las Vegas metropolitan area and Hoover Dam (Section 6.4 of NNSS Waste Acceptance Criteria, available at ...

  17. material recovery

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    dispose of dangerous nuclear and radiological material, and detect and control the proliferation of related WMD technology and expertise.

  18. Rapid Microwave Preparation of Highly Efficient Ce[superscript 3+]-Substituted Garnet Phosphors for Solid State White Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birkel, Alexander; Denault, Kristin A.; George, Nathan C.; Doll, Courtney E.; Hry, Bathylle; Mikhailovsky, Alexander A.; Birkel, Christina S.; Hong, Byung-Chul; Seshadri, Ram (UCSB); (Mitsubishi)

    2012-04-30

    Ce{sup 3+}-substituted aluminum garnet compounds of yttrium (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) and lutetium (Lu{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) - both important compounds in the generation of (In,Ga)N-based solid state white lighting - have been prepared using a simple microwave heating technique involving the use of a microwave susceptor to provide the initial heat source. Carbon used as the susceptor additionally creates a reducing atmosphere around the sample that helps stabilize the desired luminescent compound. High quality, phase-pure materials are prepared within a fraction of the time and using a fraction of the energy required in a conventional ceramic preparation; the microwave technique allows for a reduction of about 95% in preparation time, making it possible to obtain phase pure, Ce{sup 3+}-substituted garnet compounds in under 20 min of reaction time. It is estimated that the overall reduction in energy compared with ceramic routes as practiced in the lab is close to 99%. Conventionally prepared material is compared with material prepared using microwave heating in terms of structure, morphology, and optical properties, including quantum yield and thermal quenching of luminescence. Finally, the microwave-prepared compounds have been incorporated into light-emitting diode 'caps' to test their performance characteristics in a real device, in terms of their photon efficiency and color coordinates.

  19. Composite materials formed with anchored nanostructures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D; Menchhofer, Paul A; Howe, Jane Y; Wang, Wei

    2015-03-10

    A method of forming nano-structure composite materials that have a binder material and a nanostructure fiber material is described. A precursor material may be formed using a mixture of at least one metal powder and anchored nanostructure materials. The metal powder mixture may be (a) Ni powder and (b) NiAl powder. The anchored nanostructure materials may comprise (i) NiAl powder as a support material and (ii) carbon nanotubes attached to nanoparticles adjacent to a surface of the support material. The process of forming nano-structure composite materials typically involves sintering the mixture under vacuum in a die. When Ni and NiAl are used in the metal powder mixture Ni.sub.3Al may form as the binder material after sintering. The mixture is sintered until it consolidates to form the nano-structure composite material.

  20. NdCo substituted strontium hexaferrite powders with enhanced coercivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herme, C.A.; Bercoff, P.G.; Jacobo, S.E.

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Sr{sub 1?x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 11?x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} was prepared by solgel auto-combustion method with 0 ? x ? 0.4. ? Coercivity increases 11% with 0.2 NdCo substitution, reaching a value of 68.9 A/m. ? The appearance of two magnetic orderings is noticed in susceptibility measurements. ? This is supported by Curie temperature and susceptibility data. -- Abstract: In this work we report the synthesis of NdCo substituted strontium hexaferrites of composition Sr{sub 1?x}Nd{sub x}Fe{sub 11?x}Co{sub x}O{sub 19} by the solgel auto-combustion method with further heat treatment. The analysis of the X-ray diffraction spectra shows the M-type hexagonal structure in samples treated at 1100 C for 2 h. Coercivity increases 11% with 0.2 NdCo substitution, reaching a value of 68.9 A/m (5480 Oe) while saturation magnetization is reduced 6% to 91 A m{sup 2}/kg (91 emu/g). The behavior of magnetic susceptibility with an applied field shows two different maxima which are assigned to different magnetic orderings. This assumption is supported by the appearance of two experimental values of Curie temperatures (T{sub C}) for all the prepared samples. Magnetic susceptibility ? and T{sub C} measurements suggest an uneven distribution of the iron vacancies.

  1. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research January 5-6, 2011 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  2. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Biological and Environmental Research May 7-8, 2009 Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE ASCR Program Manager Yukiko Sekine Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:5

  3. Engineered Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Engineered Materials Materials design, fabrication, assembly, and characterization for national security needs. Contact Us Group Leader Ross Muenchausen Email Deputy Group Leader Dominic Peterson Email Group Office (505)-667-6887 We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly, characterization, and field support. We perform polymer science and engineering, including ultra-precision target design, fabrication, assembly,

  4. Composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hutchens, Stacy A. (Knoxville, TN); Woodward, Jonathan (Solihull, GB); Evans, Barbara R. (Oak Ridge, TN); O'Neill, Hugh M. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-07

    A composite biocompatible hydrogel material includes a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa. A calcium comprising salt is disposed in at least some of the pores. The porous polymer matrix can comprise cellulose, including bacterial cellulose. The composite can be used as a bone graft material. A method of tissue repair within the body of animals includes the steps of providing a composite biocompatible hydrogel material including a porous polymer matrix, the polymer matrix including a plurality of pores and providing a Young's modulus of at least 10 GPa, and inserting the hydrogel material into cartilage or bone tissue of an animal, wherein the hydrogel material supports cell colonization in vitro for autologous cell seeding.

  5. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  6. Materials Discovery | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discovery Images of red and yellow particles NREL's research in materials discovery serves as a foundation for technological progress in renewable energies. Our experimental activities in inorganic solid-state materials innovation span a broad range of technological readiness levels-from basic science through applied research to device development-relying on a high-throughput combinatorial materials science approach, followed by traditional targeted experiments. In addition, our researchers work

  7. ARM - RHUBC II Science Objectives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Objectives Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Science Objectives To conduct clear-sky radiative closure studies in order to reduce the

  8. ARM - RHUBC II Science Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Team Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II Science Team Principal Investigators Eli Mlawer, Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc.

  9. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  10. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, G.M.; Kollie, T.G.; Watkin, D.C.; Walton, D.G.

    1998-05-12

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the ``body-filled panel.`` Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials. 4 figs.

  11. Gas permeability measurements for film envelope materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Watkin, David C. (Clinton, TN); Walton, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for measuring the permeability of polymer film materials such as used in super-insulation powder-filled evacuated panels (PEPs) reduce the time required for testing from several years to weeks or months. The method involves substitution of a solid non-outgassing body having a free volume of between 0% and 25% of its total volume for the usual powder in the PEP to control the free volume of the "body-filled panel". Pressure versus time data for the test piece permit extrapolation to obtain long term performance of the candidate materials.

  12. Structure and electrochemical properties of nanometer Cu substituted ?-nickel hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao, Jie; Zhu, Yanjuan; Zhang, Zhongju; Xu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Weiren; Chen, Jian; Zhang, Wei; Han, Quanyong

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Cu substituted ?-nickel hydroxide was prepared by ultrasonic assisted precipitation. ? The XRD peaks are anisotropic broadening. ? The electrode for 0.9 wt.% Cu has the highest capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C. -- Abstract: Nanometer Cu-substituted ?-nickel hydroxide was synthesized by means of ultrasonic-assisted precipitation. Particle size distribution (PSD) measurement, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) were used to characterize the physical properties of the synthesized samples. The results indicate that the average particle size of the samples is about 96110 nm and the XRD diffraction peaks are anisotropic broadening. The crystal grains are mainly polycrystal structure with columnar or needle-like morphology, containing many defects. With increase of Cu content, the shape of primary particles transform from columnar to needle-like. The influences of doping amounts of Cu on the electrochemical performance were investigated through constant current charge/discharge and cyclic voltammetric measurements. The specific capacity increases initially and then decreases with increasing Cu-doping ratio, the electrode C containing 0.9 wt.% Cu shows the maximum discharge capacity of 310 mAh/g at 0.2 C, and it has the lowest charging voltage, higher discharge voltage plateau, better cycle performance and larger proton diffusion coefficient than the other electrodes.

  13. Proximity-induced magnetism in transition-metal substituted graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Crook, Charles B.; Constantin, Costel; Ahmed, Towfiq; Zhu, Jian -Xin; Balatsky, Alexander V.; Haraldsen, Jason T.

    2015-08-03

    We investigate the interactions between two identical magnetic impurities substituted into a graphene superlattice. Using a first-principles approach, we calculate the electronic and magnetic properties for transition-metal substituted graphene systems with varying spatial separation. These calculations are compared for three different magnetic impurities, manganese, chromium, and vanadium. We determine the electronic band structure, density of states, and Millikan populations (magnetic moment) for each atom, as well as calculate the exchange parameter between the two magnetic atoms as a function of spatial separation. We find that the presence of magnetic impurities establishes a distinct magnetic moment in the graphene lattice, wheremore » the interactions are highly dependent on the spatial and magnetic characteristic between the magnetic and carbon atoms, which leads to either ferromagnetic or antiferromagnetic behavior. Furthermore, through an analysis of the calculated exchange energies and partial density of states, it is determined that interactions between the magnetic atoms can be classified as an RKKY interaction.« less

  14. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Page...

  15. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  16. material removal

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    %2A en Nuclear Material Removal http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdnnm3remove

    Pag...

  17. Propulsion materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Edward J.; Sullivan, Rogelio A.; Gibbs, Jerry L.

    2008-01-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Office of Vehicle Technologies (OVT) is pleased to introduce the FY 2007 Annual Progress Report for the Propulsion Materials Research and Development Program. Together with DOE national laboratories and in partnership with private industry and universities across the United States, the program continues to engage in research and development (R&D) that provides enabling materials technology for fuel-efficient and environmentally friendly commercial and passenger vehicles.

  18. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences August 3-4, 2010 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors [not available] NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion

  19. Reference Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials Reference Materials Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics November 12-13, 2009 Official DOE Invitation Workshop Invitation Letter from DOE Associate Directors NERSC Documents NERSC science requirements home page NERSC science requirements workshop page NERSC science requirements case study FAQ Workshop Agenda Previous NERSC Requirements Workshops Biological and Environmental Research (BER) Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Fusion Energy Sciences

  20. Meeting Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BER Meeting Materials Meeting Materials Here you will find various items to be used before and during the requirements review. The following documents are included: Case study worksheet to be filled in by meeting participants Sample of a completed case study from a Nuclear Physics requirements workshop held in 2011 A graph of NERSC and BER usage as a function of time A powerpoint template you can use at the requirements review Downloads RequirementsWorkshopCaseStudyTemplate.doc | Word document

  1. Meeting Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HEP Meeting Materials Meeting Materials Here you will find various items to be used before and during the requirements review. The following documents are included: Case study worksheet to be filled in by meeting participants Sample of a completed case study from a Nuclear Physics requirements workshop held in 2011 A graph of NERSC and HEP usage as a function of time A powerpoint template you can use at the requirements review Downloads CaseStudyTemplate.docx | unknown Case Study Worksheet -

  2. Managing Category I and II Asbestos-Containing Materials During...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    August 2009 Presenter: Robert Devol, Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC Track 3-6 Topics Covered: ... Activities on May 14, 2004, Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC, Oak Ridge, Tennessee ...

  3. A MATERIAL WORLD Tailoring Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WINTER* 2000-2001 A MATERIAL WORLD Tailoring Materials for the Future A QUARTERLY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT JOURNAL VOLUME 2, NO. 4 ALSO: New Materials for Microsystems Predictive Modeling Meets the Challenge S A N D I A T E C H N O L O G Y ON THE COVER: Bonnie Mckenzie operates a dual beam Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscope (FIB/SEM). The image on the computer screen shows a cross section of a radiation-hardened device. The cross section was rendered with the FIB/SEM and allowed the

  4. Meet CMI Researcher Tom Lograsso | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tom Lograsso CMI focus area leader Tom Lograsso CMI Researcher Thomas Lograsso leads Focus Area 2, Developing Substitutes. He started this role in May 2014. Previously he led Focus Area 4, Crosscutting Research while serving as the interim director of The Ames Laboratory. Also at Ames Lab, Tom leads a BES Synthesis & Processing effort on Novel Materials Preparation and Processing Methodology, whose goal is to develop synthesis protocols for new materials including quasicrystals,

  5. Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy Increasing Access to Materials Critical to the Clean Energy Economy January 9, 2013 - 12:30pm Addthis Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness of lead, is used to create fluorescent lightbulbs. With no proven substitutes, europium is considered critical to the clean energy economy. | Photo courtesy of the Ames Laboratory. Europium, a rare earth element that has the same relative hardness

  6. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  7. Substitutional Nitrogen in Nanodiamond and Bucky-Diamond Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnard, Amanda S.; Sternberg, Michael G.

    2005-09-15

    The inclusion of dopants (such as nitrogen) in diamond nanoparticles is expected to be important for use in future nanodevices, such as qubits for quantum computing. Although most commercial diamond nanoparticles contain a small fraction of nitrogen, it is still unclear whether it is located within the core or at the surface of the nanoparticle. Presented here are density functional tight binding simulations examining the configuration, potential energy surface, and electronic charge of substitutional nitrogen in nanodiamond and bucky-diamond particles. The results predict that nitrogen is likely to be positioned at the surface of both hydrogenated nanodiamond and (dehydrogenated) bucky-diamond, and that the coordination of the dopants within the particles is dependent upon the surface structure.

  8. Green Dream II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-07-07

    This case study describes construction of a high-performance home in New Orleans designed to withstand 130 mph winds and built with flood-recoverable materials.

  9. Reference Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reference Materials There are a variety of reference materials the NSSAB utilizes and have been made available on its website. Documents Fact Sheets - links to Department of Energy Nevada Field Office webpage Public Reading Room NTA Public Reading Facility Open Monday through Friday, 7:30 am to 4:30 pm (except holidays) 755C East Flamingo Road Las Vegas, Nevada 89119 Phone (702) 794-5106 http://www.nv.doe.gov/library/testingarchive.aspx DOE Electronic Database Also available to the public is an

  10. Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research

  11. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  12. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    09/30/2015 to Mod 0588 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................. 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................................. 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ........................................... 9

  13. Enclosure II June

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enclosure II June 10,2010 Hanford Radiological Health and Safety Document 1 Forward The Richland Operations Office and the Office of River Protection have established a supplemental set of contractual requirements and an expectation that the contractor organizations establish the mechanisms necessary to maintain site consistency, optimize site-wide radiological programs to provide an overall benefit to the government, and support DOE in the management oflong-term risks relative to radiological

  14. MS, II-J

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these

  15. PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PDF icon PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103)

  16. Ashtabula II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Ashtabula II Wind Farm Facility Ashtabula II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  17. Heber II Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heber II Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Heber II Geothermal Facility General Information Name Heber II Geothermal Facility...

  18. Kibby Mountain II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Kibby Mountain II Jump to: navigation, search Name Kibby Mountain II Facility Kibby Mountain II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status Under...

  19. Papalote Creek II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Papalote Creek II Jump to: navigation, search Name Papalote Creek II Facility Papalote Creek II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  20. Marengo II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Marengo II Wind Farm Facility Marengo II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  1. Springview II Wind Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Springview II Wind Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Springview II Wind Project Facility Springview II Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  2. Meadow Lake II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Meadow Lake II Facility Meadow Lake II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind...

  3. Klondike II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Klondike II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Klondike II Wind Farm Facility Klondike II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  4. Vansycle Ridge II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vansycle Ridge II Jump to: navigation, search Name Vansycle Ridge II Facility Vansycle Ridge II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  5. Carleton College II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carleton College II Jump to: navigation, search Name Carleton College II Facility Carleton College II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  6. Little Pringle II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Little Pringle II Facility Little Pringle II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SWI Wind...

  7. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    REACTIONS Temperature dependence of the isospin distillation in nuclear fragmentation ................................ II-1 D. V. Shetty for the NIMROD Collaboration Midrapidity emission in nuclear fragmentation .................................................................................. II-2 D. V. Shetty for the NIMROD Collaboration Isospin dependence of the <N/Z> in nuclear fragmentation .............................................................. II-3 D. V. Shetty, for the

  8. Critical Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Critical Materials: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 2 4 2. Technology Assessment and Potential ................................................................................................. 5 5 2.1 Major Trends in Selected Clean Energy Application Areas ........................................................... 5 6 2.1.1 Permanent Magnets for Wind

  9. Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 | Department of Energy Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 Volume II, Environment, Safety, and Health Special Review of Work Practices for Nanoscale Material Activities at Department of Energy Laboratories, August 2008 At the request of the Secretary of Energy, the U.S. Department of

  10. Enhancement in magnetic properties of magnesium substituted bismuth...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for Information Science and Technology (TNList), Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) Institute for Advanced Materials and Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum...

  11. Effects of isomorphous substitution of a coordination polymer on the properties and its application in electrochemical sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Bo; Liang, Li-Mei; Yao, Jie

    2014-07-01

    This work concerns the isomorphous substitution of coordination polymers (CPs) and its effect on the optical and electrochemical properties. The application of CPs in electrochemical sensing was studied as well. Isomorphous coordination polymers, [Co{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}tyr]{sub n} (tyr=L-tyrosine), where x (01) was controlled by the Co/Zn ratios of raw materials, were successfully synthesized via a hydrothermal method, as proved by XRD and EDS results. Their UVvis DRS and fluorescence spectra change gradually along with the composition. Cyclic voltammograms of modified electrodes, [Co{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}tyr]{sub n}/GCE, show that as more and more Zn replaced Co, the current signal decreases greatly and the potential shifts negatively. Much attention was paid to [Cotyr]{sub n} due to its highest sensitivity. Refreshable modified carbon paste electrode, [Cotyr]{sub n}-CPE, was used to determine nitrite, and showed pretty good performance as evidenced by chronoamperometry. The response was made very fast within mere 5 s. The linear detection range was from 5.0010{sup ?5} to 3.4510{sup ?3} M, with sensitivity of 263.4 mA mol{sup ?1} L cm{sup ?2}. The detection limit was found to be 2.0010{sup ?5} M. The sensor also showed good antiinterference and reproducibility. - Graphical abstract: Evolution of the optical and electrochemical properties of isomorphic coordination polymers [Co{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}tyr]{sub n} along with the changing of x was studied. The CP also showed perfect performance in the electrochemical determination of nitrite. - Highlights: Isomorphous substitution of coordination polymers (CPs). Substitution-caused evolution of optical and electrochemical properties of CPs. Application of CPs in electrochemical sensing, an incipient area. Perfect performance of CPs in electrochemical determination of nitrite.

  12. Trans beta substituted chlorins and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Jonathan S.; Balasubramanian, Thiagarajan

    2003-05-06

    Trans beta substituted chlorins and methods of making the same are disclosed, along with polymers formed from or containing such trans beta substituted chlorins as one or more monomeric units therein, light harvesting rods formed from such polymers, and electrodes carrying such polymers.

  13. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysis variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.

  14. BLOT II Ver.1.39

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-06-03

    BLOT II is a graphic program for post-processing finite element analyses output in the EXODUS II database format. It is command driven with free-format input and can drive graphics devices supported by the Sandia Virtual Device Interface. BLOT produces mesh plots of the analysis output variables including deformed mesh plots, line contours, filled (painted) contours, vector plots of two/three variables (velocity vectors), and symbol plots of scalar variables (discrete cracks). Features include pathlines of analysismore » variables drawn on the mesh, element selection by material, element birth and death, multiple views combining several displays on each plot, symmetry mirroring, and node and element numbering. X-Y plots of the analysis variables include time vs. variable plots or variable vs. variable plots, and distance vs. variable plots at selected time stips where distance is the accumulated distance between pairs of nodes or element centers.« less

  15. Breezy Bucks II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Breezy Bucks II Facility Breezy Bucks II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Breezy Bucks II...

  16. Salty Dog II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Salty Dog II Facility Salty Dog II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Salty Dog II LLC...

  17. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 407 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2, CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This Contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be accessed electronically at these addresses: http://www.arnet.gov/far/

  18. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 479 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This Contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be accessed electronically at these addresses: https://www.acquisition.gov/far/index.html

  19. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 330 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES I.1 FAR 52.252-2 CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FEB 1998) This Contract incorporates one or more clauses by reference, with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be accessed electronically at these addresses: http://www.arnet.gov/far/

  20. L I II C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l

  1. II.1 Itic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is

  2. Alloy materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hans Thieme, Cornelis Leo; Thompson, Elliott D.; Fritzemeier, Leslie G.; Cameron, Robert D.; Siegal, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    An alloy that contains at least two metals and can be used as a substrate for a superconductor is disclosed. The alloy can contain an oxide former. The alloy can have a biaxial or cube texture. The substrate can be used in a multilayer superconductor, which can further include one or more buffer layers disposed between the substrate and the superconductor material. The alloys can be made a by process that involves first rolling the alloy then annealing the alloy. A relatively large volume percentage of the alloy can be formed of grains having a biaxial or cube texture.

  3. Construction material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2008-07-22

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  4. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  5. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNLs unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporations Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (ECGM) business unit is currently the worlds largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferros ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  6. Project Home Again Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-30

    Phase II is a continuation of a charitable residential community project in New Orleans that builds affordable and energy efficient single detached residences that are storm resistant.

  7. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for heavy element production...II-1 P. K.Sahu, J. B. Natowitz, R. Wada, K. Hagel, T. Materna, Z. Chen, L. Qin, M. Barbui,...

  8. Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Pre-Developmental INL EBR-II Wash Water Treatment Technologies (PBS # ADSHQTD0100 (0003199)) EBR-II Wash Water Workshop - The majority of the sodium has been removed, remaining material is mostly passivated. Similar closure projects have been successfully completed. Engineering needs to be developed to apply the OBA path. Page 1 of 2 Idaho National Laboratory Idaho Experimental Breeder Reactor-II Primary Tank System Wash Water Workshop Challenge In 1994 Congress ordered the shutdown of the

  9. The crystal and magnetic structure of Ti-substituted LaCrO{sub 3} (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect The crystal and magnetic structure of Ti-substituted LaCrO{sub 3} Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The crystal and magnetic structure of Ti-substituted LaCrO{sub 3} Graphical abstract: Rietveld refinement plot of La(Cr{sub 0.90}Ti{sub 0.10})O{sub 3}; the inset shows the antiferromagnetic G{sub x}-type structure occurring at the Cr sub-lattice. Research highlights: {yields} Magnetic structure of Ti-substituted LaCrO{sub 3}. {yields} Spins on the Cr-site

  10. Triazolium based ionic liquid crystals: Effect of asymmetric substitution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stappert, K.; Mudring, A. -V.

    2015-01-27

    A new series of ten different asymmetrical 1-dodecyl-3-alkyl-triazolium bromides, [C12CnTr][Br], has been synthesized and their mesomorphic behavior studied by DSC (differential scanning calorimetry), POM (polarizing optical microscopy) and SAXS (small angle X-ray scattering). The influence of the chain length of the triazolium salts is investigated to explore the effect of asymmetric substitution on the phase behaviour of these compounds. For that reason, the length of one alkyl chain was varied from 14 to 1 carbon atoms (n = 14, 12, 10, 8–4, 2, 1) while the other alkyl chain was kept at 12 carbon. Single crystal X-ray structure analysis ofmore » compounds [C12C12Tr][Br] and [C12C5Tr][Br] reveal that the cations adopt a U-shaped conformation with head-to-head arranged triazolium cores. In contrast, for [C12C1Tr][Br], a rod like shape of the cation with interdigitated alkyl chains is found. All investigated compounds are thermotropic liquid crystals. Higher ordered smectic phases, smectic C as well as smectic A phases were found depending on the chain length of the cation. Moreover, the clearing point temperature decreases with decreasing chain length with exception for the n-dodecyl-3-alkyltrizoliumbromides with the two shortest alkyl chains, [C12C2Tr][Br] and [C12C1Tr][Br], which present higher clearing temperatures (86 and 156 °C) and are structurally distinctly different.« less

  11. Sodium channel activation mechanisms. Insights from deuterium oxide substitution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alicata, D.A.; Rayner, M.D.; Starkus, J.G. )

    1990-04-01

    Schauf and Bullock, using Myxicola giant axons, demonstrated that solvent substitution with deuterium oxide (D2O) significantly affects both sodium channel activation and inactivation kinetics without corresponding changes in gating current or tail current rates. They concluded that (a) no significant component of gating current derives from the final channel opening step, and (b) channels must deactivate (during tail currents) by a different pathway from that used in channel opening. By contrast, Oxford found in squid axons that when a depolarizing pulse is interrupted by a brief (approximately 100 microseconds) return to holding potential, subsequent reactivation (secondary activation) is very rapid and shows almost monoexponential kinetics. Increasing the interpulse interval resulted in secondary activation rate returning towards control, sigmoid (primary activation) kinetics. He concluded that channels open and close (deactivate) via the same pathway. We have repeated both sets of observations in crayfish axons, confirming the results obtained in both previous studies, despite the apparently contradictory conclusions reached by these authors. On the other hand, we find that secondary activation after a brief interpulse interval (50 microseconds) is insensitive to D2O, although reactivation after longer interpulse intervals (approximately 400 microseconds) returns towards a D2O sensitivity similar to that of primary activation. We conclude that D2O-sensitive primary activation and D2O-insensitive tail current deactivation involve separate pathways. However, D2O-insensitive secondary activation involves reversal of the D2O-insensitive deactivation step. These conclusions are consistent with parallel gate models, provided that one gating particle has a substantially reduced effective valence.

  12. Ti-substituted tunnel-type Na0.44MnO2 oxide as a negative electrode for aqueous sodium-ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuesheng; Liu, Jue; Lee, Byungju; Qiao, Ruimin; Yang, Zhenzhong; Xu, Shuyin; Yu, Xiqian; Gu, Lin; Hu, Yong-Sheng; Yang, Wanli; Kang, Kisuk; Li, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Liquan; Huang, Xuejie

    2015-03-25

    The aqueous sodium-ion battery system is a safe and low-cost solution for large-scale energy storage, due to the abundance of sodium and inexpensive aqueous electrolytes. Although several positive electrode materials, e.g., Na0.44MnO2, were proposed, few negative electrode materials, e.g., activated carbon and NaTi2(PO4)3, are available. Here we show that Ti-substituted Na0.44MnO2 (Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2) with tunnel structure can be used as a negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries. This material exhibits superior cyclability even without the special treatment of oxygen removal from the aqueous solution. Atomic-scale characterizations based on spherical aberration-corrected electron microscopy and ab initio calculations are utilized to accurately identify the Ti substitution sites and sodium storage mechanism. Ti substitution tunes the charge ordering property and reaction pathway, significantly smoothing the discharge/charge profiles and lowering the storage voltage. Both the fundamental understanding and practical demonstrations suggest that Na0.44[Mn1-xTix]O2 is a promising negative electrode material for aqueous sodium-ion batteries.

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  14. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2008-02-19

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  15. Policy 2003-2 Implementation of CRS 37-92-308 Regarding Substitute...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2003-2 Implementation of CRS 37-92-308 Regarding Substitute Water Supply Plans Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Policy...

  16. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe; Muthukumaran, Kannan; Sreedharan, Prathapan; Lindsey, Jonathan S.

    2010-05-25

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  17. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerata, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2011-05-24

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  18. Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

    2012-03-06

    The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

  19. C.R.S. 37-92-308 - Substitute Water Supply Plans | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: C.R.S. 37-92-308 - Substitute Water Supply PlansLegal Abstract This statutory provision...

  20. Materials used in new generation vehicles: supplies, shifts, and supporting infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, S.; Curlee, T.R.; Schexnayder, S.M.

    1997-08-01

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) program intends to develop new designs for automobiles that will reduce fuel consumption by two thirds but otherwise have price, comfort, safety, and other measures of performance similar to the typical automobile now on the market. PNGV vehicle designs are expected to substitute lightweight materials, such as aluminum, magnesium, carbon-reinforced polymer composites, glass-reinforced polymer composites, and ultra- light steel, for heavier materials such as steel and iron in automobile components. The target mass of a PNGV vehicle is 1,960 pounds, as compared to the average current vehicle that weights 3,240 pounds. Other changes could include the use of different ferrous alloys, engineering changes, or incorporation of advanced ceramic components. Widespread adoption of these vehicle designs would affect materials markets and require concurrent development and adoption of supporting technologies to supply the materials and to use and maintain them in automobiles. This report identifies what would be required to bring about these changes and developments in materials substitution; identifies reasons that might make these substitutions difficult to accomplish within the overall objectives and timetable of the PNGV program; and identifies any issues arising from the substitution that could prompt consideration of policies to deal with them. The analysis in this paper uses scenarios that assume the production of new generation vehicles will begin in 2007 and that their market share will increase gradually over the following 25 years. The scenarios on which the analysis is based assume a maximum substitution of each potential replacement material considered. This maximum substitution of individual materials (i.e., the amount of replacement material by weight that would be added to the baseline vehicle`s composition) is as follows: ULSAB (high strength steel), 298 lbs.; glass-reinforced composites, 653 lbs.; carbon-reinforced composites, 379 lbs.; aluminum, 926 lbs.; and magnesium, 216 lbs. The substitutions (and the steel and iron they replace) are multiplied by the number of new generation vehicles produced on an annual basis out to 2030 to determine the total quantity of material used in new generation vehicles and the quantity of steel that would be displaced. We identified six stages in the life cycle of materials--mining or extraction of resources; smelting or other processing to produce the material from the resource; producing components from the material; assembling the components into vehicles, using, maintaining, and repairing vehicles; and disposing of the vehicle, including any recycling of materials for automotive or other use--and identified what might be required to supply and use the substitute materials at different life cycle stages. The variables considered are the mineral or material supply, the capital and equipment (including necessary capacity, technical changes, cost, and location), labor and employment, energy, material complements, and environmental emissions and impacts. The analysis shows that raw materials to produce each of the replacement materials are sufficiently available, and adequate mining or extraction capacity exists for each. However, challenges are possible at the material production stage for three of the four materials. For aluminum and magnesium the difficulties are associated with requirements for significant new production capacity, necessary for aluminum because new production equipment will be needed to produce the material in a cost-effective manner and for magnesium because current production capacity is inadequate. The required capacity investment for magnesium to meet demand in 2030 is $13.1 billion. Both materials also would sharply increase energy requirements, and both industries would likely develop mostly--if not entirely--outside the United States. To produce the carbon-based fiber to meet PNGV demand in 2015, an entire new industry must be developed--a $4.6 billion investment. Significant environmental concerns

  1. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, T.P.; Wagner, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH-R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  2. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak P.; Wagner, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH--R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  3. The effects of substituting Ag for In on the magnetoresistance and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Published Article: The effects of substituting Ag for In on the magnetoresistance and magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys « Prev Next » Title: The effects of substituting Ag for In on the magnetoresistance and magnetocaloric properties of Ni-Mn-In Heusler alloys Authors: Pandey, Sudip [1] ; Quetz, Abdiel [1] ; Aryal, Anil [1] ; Dubenko, Igor [1] ; Samanta, Tapas [2] ; Mazumdar, Dipanjan [1]

  4. Nuclear Concrete Materials Database Phase I Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju; Naus, Dan J

    2012-05-01

    The FY 2011 accomplishments in Phase I development of the Nuclear Concrete Materials Database to support the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program are summarized. The database has been developed using the ORNL materials database infrastructure established for the Gen IV Materials Handbook to achieve cost reduction and development efficiency. In this Phase I development, the database has been successfully designed and constructed to manage documents in the Portable Document Format generated from the Structural Materials Handbook that contains nuclear concrete materials data and related information. The completion of the Phase I database has established a solid foundation for Phase II development, in which a digital database will be designed and constructed to manage nuclear concrete materials data in various digitized formats to facilitate electronic and mathematical processing for analysis, modeling, and design applications.

  5. Synthesis and evaluation of optical and electrochemical properties of a new conjugated polymer containing substituted thiophene and non-conjugation linkers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R, Prashanth Kumar K D, Udayakumar; K, Siji Narendran N; K, Chandrasekharan

    2014-10-15

    Conjugated polymers have been developed in a variety of applied fields owing to their promising optoelectronic properties. These are pursuing considerable interest as opto-electrical material because of their chemical stability and processability. This paper describes the synthesis and study of electro-optical properties of a new donoracceptor polymer composed of substituted thiophene and 4,4?-propane-2,2-diyldiphenol units as electron rich moieties and 1,3,4-oxadiazole unit as electron deficient moiety. The optical properties of the polymer are studied using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and fluorescent emission spectroscopy. From the electrochemical data, HOMO and LUMO energy levels of the polymer are calculated.

  6. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  7. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  8. Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-10-01

    The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

  9. Critical parameters of superconducting materials and structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fluss, M.J.; Howell, R.H.; Sterne, P.A.; Dykes, J.W.; Mosley, W.D.; Chaiken, A.; Ralls, K.; Radousky, H.

    1995-02-01

    We report here the completion of a one year project to investigate the synthesis, electronic structure, defect structure, and physical transport properties of high temperature superconducting oxide materials. During the course of this project we produced some of the finest samples of single crystal detwinned YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, and stoichiometrically perfect (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3}. We deduced the Fermi surface of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, (La,Sr){sub 2}CuO{sub 4}, and (Ba,K)BiO{sub 3} through the recording of the electron momentum density in these materials as measured by positron annihilation spectroscopy and angle resolved photoemission. We also performed extensive studies on Pr substituted (Y,Pr)Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} so as to further understand the origin of the electron pairing leading to superconductivity.

  10. Timber Road II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Road II Jump to: navigation, search Name Timber Road II Facility Timber Road II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Horizon Wind...

  11. Nobles Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farm II Jump to: navigation, search Name Nobles Wind Farm II Facility Nobles Wind Farm II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  12. Shiloh II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shiloh II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Shiloh II Wind Farm Facility Shiloh II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  13. Oliver II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Oliver II Wind Farm Facility Oliver II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra...

  14. CWES II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name CWES II Wind Farm Facility CWES II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner SeaWest...

  15. Overview of Propulsion Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office of Vehicles Technologies Materials Program Jerry Gibbs Technology Development Manager Propulsion Materials Vehicle Technologies Program Overview of Propulsion Materials Project ID PM000 Vehicle Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Materials for Combustion Systems / High Efficiency Engines Turbocharger, Valve Train, Fuel Injection, Structural Components Head/Block, Sensors, Materials/Fuel Compatibility Materials for Exhaust and Energy Recovery DPFs, Catalysts, Thermoelectric Materials,

  16. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand [MIT; Persson, Kristin [LBNL

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  17. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes...

  18. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program ...

  19. Cinergy Ventures II LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cinergy Ventures II LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Cinergy Ventures II, LLC Place: Cincinnati, Ohio Zip: OH 45202 Product: The venture capital arm of Cinergy Corp....

  20. Harvest Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Harvest Wind Farm II Facility Harvest Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner John...

  1. Kotzebue Wind Project II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project II Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  2. Tatanka Wind Project II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Tatanka Wind Project II Facility Tatanka Wind Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner...

  3. Endicott Biofuels II LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Endicott Biofuels II LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Endicott Biofuels II, LLC Place: Houston, Texas Zip: 77060-3235 Sector: Biofuels Product: Houston-based biofuels producer...

  4. Cabazon Wind Farm II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cabazon Wind Farm II Facility Cabazon Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldman Sachs...

  5. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly...

  6. SECTION II: HEAVY ION REACTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... L. W. May, S. Wuenschel, B. Stein, and S. J. Yennello Analysis of 86,78Kr + 64,58Ni data taken on the upgraded NIMROD-ISiS...... II-28 S. Wuenschel, S. ...

  7. EA-1831: Phase II ICCS Initiative Funding Award for Calera Corporation, Moss Landing, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide American Recovery and Reinvestment Act funds for a project that would receive flue gas from the gas-fired Moss Landing, CA power plant and capture CO2 for permanent storage in a cementitious substitute material and process useless byproducts into useable chemicals. NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. NEPA coverage for this project is now a CX as of 9/17/2012.

  8. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes for nanoscience, coherent imaging of the structure and dynamics of disordered materials, greatly increased applicability of inelastic x-ray scattering, and properties of materials under extreme conditions. Commissioned in 1982, the existing National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) provides essential scientific tools for 2,300 scientists per year from more than 400 academic, industrial, and government institutions. Their myriad research programs produce about 800 publications per year, with more than 130 appearing in premier journals. It was designed in the 1970s and is now in its third decade of service. It has been continually upgraded over the years, with the brightness increasing fully five orders of magnitude. However, it has reached the theoretical limits of performance given its small circumference and small periodicity, and only a small number of insertion devices are possible.

  9. Materials selection for automotive engines. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning material selection and substitution for automobile engines. Mechanical properties, including dimensional stability, are reviewed. Machined parts, castings, forgings, and extrusions are examined. Citations concerning automotive bodies, frames, and structures are presented in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  10. Materials selection for automotive engines. (Latest citations from Metadex). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning material selection and substitution for automobile engines. Mechanical properties, including dimensional stability, are reviewed. Machined parts, castings, forgings, and extrusions are examined. Citations concerning automotive bodies, frames, and structures are presented in a separate bibliography.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  11. Materials selection for automotive engines. (Latest citations from Metadex). NewSearch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning material selection and substitution for automobile engines. Mechanical properties, including dimensional stability, are reviewed. Machined parts, castings, forgings, and extrusions are examined. Citations concerning automotive bodies, frames, and structures are presented in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 165 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. What is a CriticalMaterial

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A N E N E R G Y I N N O V A T I O N H U B This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. What is a "Critical Material?" * Any substance used in technology that is subject to supply risks, and for which there are no easy substitutes. * Or, in plain English - stuff you really need but can't always get. * The list of materials that are considered critical depends on who, where and when you ask. * CMI focuses on clean energy

  13. Structure-toxicity assessment of metabolites of the aerobic bacterial transformation of substituted naphthalenes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeBlond, J.D.; Applegate, B.M.; Menn, F.M.; Schultz, T.W.; Sayler, G.S.

    2000-05-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens 5R, a naphthalene-degrading bacterium isolated from manufactured gas plant soil contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, was examined for its degradative capacity of a number of substituted naphthalenes. In general, those compounds substituted on only one ring with an electrically neutral substituent were found to be transformed primarily to substituted salicylic acids according to the classical (NAH7) naphthalene dioxygenase-initiated upper pathway reactions of the naphthalene degradative pathway (i.e., the NAH system). Dimethylnaphthalenes with a substituent on each ring, and certain halogenated naphthalenes, were transformed via a monohydroxylation reaction to form hydroxylated dead-end products. Of the substituted salicylic acids examined, only 3- and 4-methylsalicylic acid, the respective products of the degradation of 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene, were further degraded by salicylate hydroxylase and catechol 2,3-dioxygenase, the first two enzymes of the NAH lower pathway. Using the Tetrahymena pyriformis acute toxicity assay, many of the monohydroxylated products of incomplete biodegradation were found to be polar narcotics. Substituted salicylic acids that are not further degraded by the NAH lower pathway were found to be toxic via carboxylic acid narcosis.

  14. Chapter 6: Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    : Materials Material Selection Sustainable Building Materials System Integration Issues | Chapter 6 Material Selection Materials The use of durable, attractive, and environmentally responsible building materials is a key element of any high-performance building effort. The use of natural and healthy materials contributes to the well-being of the occupants and to a feeling of connection with the bounty of the natural world. Many construction materials have significant environ- mental impacts from

  15. Chapter 6: Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Chapter 6 of the LANL Sustainable Design Guide contains information on material selection, sustainable building materials, and system integration issues.

  16. Synthesis and structural characterisation of iron(II) and copper(II) diphosphates containing flattened metal oxotetrahedra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keates, Adam C.; Wang, Qianlong; Weller, Mark T.

    2014-02-15

    Single crystal and bulk polycrystalline forms of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M=Fe(II), Cu(II)) have been synthesised and their structures determined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data. Both compounds crystallize in the tetragonal system, space group P-42{sub 1}m. Their structures are formed from infinite sheets of linked oxopolyhedra of the stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?} with potassium cations situated between the layers. The MO{sub 4} tetrahedra share oxygen atoms with [P{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 4?} diphosphate groups and the potassium ions have KO{sub 8} square prismatic geometry. In both compounds the M(II) centre has an unusual strongly flattened, tetrahedral coordination to oxygen, as a result of the JahnTeller (JT) effect for the high spin d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing or a second order JT effect for d{sup 9} Cu(II) centres in four fold coordination. The uncommon transition metal ion environments found in these materials are reflected in their optical absorption spectra and magnetism data. - Graphical abstract: The structures of the tetragonal polymorphs of K{sub 2}MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, M=Cu(II), Fe(II), consist of infinite sheets of stoichiometry [MP{sub 2}O{sub 7}]{sup 2?}, formed from linked pyrophosphate groups and MO{sub 4} tetrahedra, separated by potassium ions. In both compounds the unusual tetrahedral coordination of the M(II) centre is strongly flattened as a result of JahnTeller (JT) effects for high spin, d{sup 6} Fe(II) and p-orbital mixing and second-order JT effects for d{sup 9} Cu(II). Display Omitted - Highlights: Tetrahedral copper and iron(II) coordinated by oxygen. New layered phosphate structure. JahnTeller and d{sup 10} distorted coordinations.

  17. Composite material dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven D. (Richland, WA)

    1996-01-01

    The present invention is a composite material containing a mix of dosimeter material powder and a polymer powder wherein the polymer is transparent to the photon emission of the dosimeter material powder. By mixing dosimeter material powder with polymer powder, less dosimeter material is needed compared to a monolithic dosimeter material chip. Interrogation is done with excitation by visible light.

  18. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R.; Clark, Denis E.; Smartt, Herschel B.; Miller, Karen S.

    2009-10-06

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  19. LCLS-II New Instruments Workshops Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baradaran, Samira; Bergmann, Uwe; Durr, Herrmann; Gaffney, Kelley; Goldstein, Julia; Guehr, Markus; Hastings, Jerome; Heimann, Philip; Lee, Richard; Seibert, Marvin; Stohr, Joachim; ,

    2012-08-08

    The LCLS-II New Instruments workshops chaired by Phil Heimann and Jerry Hastings were held on March 19-22, 2012 at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. The goal of the workshops was to identify the most exciting science and corresponding parameters which will help define the LCLS-II instrumentation. This report gives a synopsis of the proposed investigations and an account of the workshop. Scientists from around the world have provided short descriptions of the scientific opportunities they envision at LCLS-II. The workshops focused on four broadly defined science areas: biology, materials sciences, chemistry and atomic, molecular and optical physics (AMO). Below we summarize the identified science opportunities in the four areas. The frontiers of structural biology lie in solving the structures of large macromolecular biological systems. Most large protein assemblies are inherently difficult to crystallize due to their numerous degrees of freedom. Serial femtosecond protein nanocrystallography, using the 'diffraction-before-destruction' approach to outrun radiation damage has been very successfully pioneered at LCLS and diffraction patterns were obtained from some of the smallest protein crystals ever. The combination of femtosecond x-ray pulses of high intensity and nanosized protein crystals avoids the radiation damage encountered by conventional x-ray crystallography with focused beams and opens the door for atomic structure determinations of the previously largely inaccessible class of membrane proteins that are notoriously difficult to crystallize. The obtained structures will allow the identification of key protein functions and help in understanding the origin and control of diseases. Three dimensional coherent x-ray imaging at somewhat lower resolution may be used for larger objects such as viruses. The chemistry research areas of primary focus are the predictive understanding of catalytic mechanisms, with particular emphasis on photo- and heterogeneous catalysis. Of particular interest is the efficient conversion of light to electrical or chemical energy, which requires understanding the non-adiabatic dynamics of electronic excited states. Ultrafast x-ray scattering presents an excellent opportunity to investigate structural dynamics of molecular systems with atomic resolution, and x-ray scattering and spectroscopy present an excellent opportunity to investigating the dynamics of the electronic charge distribution. Harnessing solar energy to generate fuels, either indirectly with photovoltaics and electrochemical catalysis or directly with photocatalysts, presents a critical technological challenge that will require the use of forefront scientific tools such as ultrafast x-rays. At the center of this technical challenge is the rational design of efficient and cost effective catalysts. Important materials science opportunities relate to information technology applications, in particular the transport and storage of information on increasingly smaller length- and faster time-scales. Of interest are the understanding of the intrinsic size limits associated with the storage of information bits and the speed limits of information or bit processing. Key questions revolve about how electronic charges and spins of materials can be manipulated by electric and magnetic fields. This requires the exploration of speed limits subject to the fundamental conservation laws of energy and linear and angular momentum and the different coupling of polar electric and axial magnetic fields to charge and spin. Of interest are novel composite materials, including molecular systems combining multi electric and magnetic functionality. Ultrafast x-rays offer the required probing speed, can probe either the charge or spin properties through polarization control and through scattering and spectroscopy cover the entire energy-time-momentum-distance phase space. In the field of atomic and molecular science, LCLS II promises to elucidate the fundamental interactions among electrons and between electrons and nuclei, and to explore the fron

  20. EBR-II Data Digitization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Rabiti, Cristian; Sackett, John

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  1. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 9. Joining FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining The primary Lightweight Materials activity goal is to validate a cost-effective weight reduction in total vehicle weight while maintaining safety, performance, and reliability. PDF icon 9_joining.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 Annual Progress Report for

  2. Methylocystis strain SB2 materials and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semrau, Jeremy D; Gallagher, Warren; Yoon, Sukhwan; Im, Jeongdae; DiSpririto, Alan A; Lee, Sung-Woo; Hartsel, Scott; McEllistrem, Marcus T

    2014-01-14

    The present disclosures provides isolated or purified compounds, each of which bind to a metal atom. Generally, the compounds are small in size (e.g., molecular weight of less than about 1 kDa) and peptidic in nature, inasmuch as the compounds comprise amino acids. In some embodiments, the compound comprises a structure of Formula I; M.sub.1-P.sub.1-M.sub.2-P.sub.2 wherein each of P.sub.1 and P.sub.2 is a peptide comprising at least two amino acids, M.sub.1 is a first metal binding moiety comprising a substituted imidazolone ring, M.sub.2 is a second metal binding moiety comprising a substituted oxazolone ring, and wherein M.sub.1 and M.sub.2 bind to a single metal atom. Also provided are related complexes, conjugates, cells which synthesize the compounds of the present disclosures, substantially homogenous cultures thereof, kits and compositions, and methods of making or using the materials of the present disclosures.

  3. Cation-substituted spinel oxide and oxyfluoride cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Choi, Wongchang

    2014-05-13

    The present invention includes compositions and methods of making cation-substituted and fluorine-substituted spinel cathode compositions by firing a LiMn.sub.2-y-zLi.sub.yM.sub.zO.sub.4 oxide with NH.sub.4HF.sub.2 at low temperatures of between about 300 and 700.degree. C. for 2 to 8 hours and a .eta. of more than 0 and less than about 0.50, mixed two-phase compositions consisting of a spinel cathode and a layered oxide cathode, and coupling them with unmodified or surface modified graphite anodes in lithium ion cells.

  4. Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of co-sputtered

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fe{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}Si epilayers (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of co-sputtered Fe{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}Si epilayers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of Mn substitution on the transport properties of co-sputtered Fe{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}Si epilayers Motivated by the theoretical calculations that Fe{sub 3-x}Mn{sub x}Si can simultaneously exhibit a high spin polarization with a high Curie temperature to be

  5. Influence of Y substitutions on the magnetism of Gd5Ge4 (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Influence of Y substitutions on the magnetism of Gd5Ge4 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Influence of Y substitutions on the magnetism of Gd5Ge4 The interrelation between the specific crystallographic positions and their influence on the magnetism of neighboring atoms is examined from first principles electronic structure calculations using the Gd{sub 5}Ge{sub 4} compound as a model system. The predicted preferences of the specific occupations by nonmagnetic yttrium

  6. RadSTraM: Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring, Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Tracy A; Walker, Randy M; Hill, David E; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Abercrombie, Robert K

    2008-12-01

    This report focuses on the technical information gained from the Radiological Source Tracking and Monitoring (RadSTraM) Phase II investigation and its implications. The intent of the RadSTraM project was to determine the feasibility of tracking radioactive materials in commerce, particularly International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Category 3 and 4 materials. Specifically, Phase II of the project addressed tracking radiological medical isotopes in commerce. These categories of materials are susceptible to loss or theft but the problem is not being addressed by other agencies.

  7. The Critical Materials Institute | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Critical Materials Institute Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Photo left to right: CMI Director Alex King, Operations Manager Cynthia Feller, Jenni Brockpahler and Melinda Thach. Not pictured: Carol Bergman. CMI staff phone 515-296-4500, e-mail CMIdirector@ameslab.gov The Critical Materials Institute focuses on technologies that make better use of materials and eliminate the need for materials that are subject to supply disruptions.

  8. About Critical Materials | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Critical Materials Critical materials are found in many commonly used tools, including batteries, cell phones and vehicles. 10 things you didn't know about critical materials Rare Earths -- The Fraternal Fifteen CMI factsheet What would we do without rare earths? The Ames Laboratory channel on YouTube Timelines related to rare earth elements and materials Other sources of information about rare earths: GE: Understanding rare earth metals, includes links to a whitepaper "Understanding

  9. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Wednesday, 23 February 2011 00:00 Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of

  10. ARM - RHUBC II News & Press

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News & Press Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator RHUBC II News & Press Media Coverage Pagosa Sun "Scientists Test Research Equipment

  11. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MST Materials Science and Technology Providing world-leading, innovative, and agile materials science and technology solutions for national security missions. MST is metallurgy. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and technology for Los Alamos National Laboratory. READ MORE MST is engineered materials. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and

  12. Influence of cationic substitutions on the first charge and reversible capacities of lithium-rich layered oxide cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chih-Chieh; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2013-06-24

    The reversible capacity values of lithium-rich layered oxide cathodes depend on the length (capacity) of the plateau region during the first charge. With an aim to understand the factors that control the length of the plateau region and thereby enhance the reversible capacity, the effects of various cationic substitutions in Li1.2Mn0.6Ni0.2O2 have been investigated systematically. Specifically, substitutions of (i) M3+ = Al3+, Cr3+, Fe3+, Co3+, and Ga3+ for equal amounts of Mn4+and Ni2+ in Li1.2Mn0.6-0.5xNi0.2-0.5xMxO2 with x = 0.06, 0.13, and 0.2, (ii) Ti4+ for Mn4+ in Li1.2Mn0.6-xTixNi0.2O2 with x = 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1, and (iii) Mg2+ for Ni2+ in Li1.2Mn0.6Ni0.2-xMgxO2 with x = 0.025, 0.05, and 0.1 have been investigated. The cationic substitutions affect the first charge capacity values both in the sloping region corresponding to the oxidation of the transition-metal ions to the 4+ state and in the plateau region corresponding to the oxidation of O2- ions to O2 and/or transition-metal ions beyond 4+, which control the reversible capacity values in subsequent cycles. While the changes in the sloping-region capacity could be readily understood by considering the redox activities of the transition-metal ions, the plateau-region capacity is found to depend sensitively on the metaloxygen covalence, which is dictated by the relative positions of the metal:3d band with respect to the top of the O2-:2p band, and electron delocalization. For instance, an overlap of the Co3+/4+:t2g band with the top of the O2-:2p band along with a partially filled t 2g band across the shared octahedral edges makes the oxygen loss from the lattice and/or oxidation beyond 4+ much more facile.

  13. PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    104 Contractor Monthly Upload PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload PDF icon PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II TRAINING

  14. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Richard W. (Hinsdale, IL); Nieman, G. William (Evanston, IL); Weertman, Julia R. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material.

  15. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Materials 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Vehicle Technologies Plenary PDF icon vtpn04_schutte_lm_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Overview of Lightweight Materials Lightweight Materials Overview Summary of the Output from the VTP Advanced Materials Workshop

  16. Zonald F. Musser, Chief, SF Materials

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TO : Zonald F. Musser, Chief, SF Materials DATE : ,"+itiLf 33m Accountability Branch, Division of Production, Oak Ridge PROM : V. i. Parsegioector. Research' Division, New York w b. 2 WBJE' T: ' 1RkllkR OF URANIUM~ACCOUNTABILITYI FROM NY00 TO ELECTRO ii CIRCUITS. IN' &, 401 EAST GREBN STREET, PASADENA 1, C&IF. 296.4 pounds of normal Uranium charged hccountability group has been shipped @' his material is being used for test purposes in the devkkopznt,' \ of non-destructive testing

  17. Computational Study of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies for Substituted $\\beta$-O-4 Lignin Model Compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Younker, Jarod M; Beste, Ariana; Buchanan III, A C

    2011-01-01

    The biopolymer lignin is a potential source of valuable chemicals. Phenethyl phenyl ether (PPE) is representative of the dominant $\\beta$-O-4 ether linkage. Density functional theory (DFT) is used to calculate the Boltzmann-weighted carbon-oxygen and carbon-carbon bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of substituted PPE. These values are important in order to understand lignin decomposition. Exclusion of all conformers that have distributions of less than 5\\% at 298 K impacts the BDE by less than 1 kcal mol$^{-1}$. We find that aliphatic hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents introduce only small changes to the BDEs (0-3 kcal mol$^{-1}$). Substitution on the phenyl ring at the $ortho$ position substantially lowers the C-O BDE, except in combination with the hydroxyl/methylhydroxyl substituents, where the effect of methoxy substitution is reduced by hydrogen bonding. Hydrogen bonding between the aliphatic substituents and the ether oxygen in the PPE derivatives has a significant influence on the BDE. CCSD(T)-calculated BDEs and hydrogen bond strengths of $ortho$-substituted anisoles when compared with M06-2X values confirm that the latter method is sufficient to describe the molecules studied and provide an important benchmark for lignin model compounds.

  18. PART II … CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities Modification # 0515 Conformed Copy Section I - Page 1 of 275 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS I 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) ............................................................................... 7 I 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................ 7 I 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ..................................... 8 I

  19. NSLS-II RF SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Holub, B.; Kawashima, Y.; Ma, H.; Towne, N.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    The NSLS-II is a new third generation light source being constructed at Brookhaven Lab. The storage ring is optimized for low emittance by use of damping wigglers to reduce the emittance to below 1 nm-rad. The RF systems are designed to provide stable beam through tight RF phase and amplitude stability requirements.

  20. Accelerating Advanced Material Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Kristin Persson is one of the founding scientists behind the Materials Project, a computational tool aimed at taking the guesswork out of new materials discoveries, especially those aimed at energy applications like batteries. (Roy Kaltschmidt, LBNL) New materials are crucial to building a clean energy

  1. Materials | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Innovating tomorrow's materials today New high-tech materials are the key to breakthroughs in biology, the environment, nuclear energy, transportation and national security. Argonne continues to make revolutionary advances in the science of materials discovery and synthesis, and is designing new materials with advantageous properties - one atom at a time. Examples of these include Argonne's patented technologies for nanoparticle applications, heat transfer and materials for advanced

  2. ARM - Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign-II (RHUBC-II)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC Home ARM Field Campaigns Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Instruments Science Team RHUBC-II Wiki Site Tour News RHUBC-II Backgrounder (PDF, 300K) News & Press Images Experiment Planning RHUBC-II Proposal Abstract Science Plan (PDF, 267KB) Science Objectives Contacts Eli Mlawer, Principal Investigator Dave Turner, Principal Investigator Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign-II (RHUBC-II) At an elevation of more than 5000 meters and

  3. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Co-ordinator & Visiting Professor Oxford University Materials United Kingdom "Magnetic" Molecular Dynamics and Other Models for Fusion Reactor Materials Tuesday, September 15,...

  4. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  5. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HPC Colony II: FASTOS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale HPC...

  6. Materials Science Research | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Research For photovoltaics and other energy applications, NREL's primary research in materials science includes the following core competencies. A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate Materials Physics Through materials growth and characterization, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. An image of multiple, interconnecting red and blue particles Electronic Structure Theory We

  7. Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels | Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science | NREL Materials Discovery across Technological Readiness Levels Materials discovery is important across technology readiness levels: basic science, applied research, and device development. Over the past several years, NREL has worked at each of these levels, demonstrating our competence in a broad range of materials discovery problems. Basic Science An image of a triangular diagram with tantalum-cobalt-tin at the top vertex, tantalum at the lower left vertex, and cobalt at the

  8. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  9. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels II 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation PDF icon lm030_hovanski_2011_o.pdf More Documents & Publications Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 9. Joining FY 2008

  10. FY2014 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-05-01

    The Propulsion Materials Program actively supports the energy security and reduction of greenhouse emissions goals of VTO by investigating and identifying the materials properties that are most essential for continued development of cost-effective, highly efficient, and environmentally friendly next-generation heavy and light-duty powertrains. The technical approaches available to enhance propulsion systems focus on improvements in both vehicle efficiency and fuel substitution, both of which must overcome the performance limitations of the materials currently in use. Propulsion Materials Program activities work with national laboratories, industry experts, and VTO powertrain systems (e.g., Advanced Combustion Engines [ACE], Advanced Power Electronics and Electrical Machines [APEEM], and fuels) teams to develop strategies that overcome materials limitations in future powertrain performance. The technical maturity of the portfolio of funded projects ranges from basic science to subsystem prototype validation. Projects within a Propulsion Materials Program activity address materials concerns that directly impact critical technology barriers within each of the above programs, including barriers that impact fuel efficiency, thermal management, emissions reduction, improved reliability, and reduced manufacturing costs. The program engages only the barriers that result from material property limitations and represent fundamental, high-risk materials issues.

  11. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  12. A High-Conduction Ge Substituted Li3AsS4 Solid Electrolyte with Exceptional Low Activation Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, Gayatri [ORNL; Rangasamy, Ezhiylmurugan [ORNL; Li, Juchuan [ORNL; Chen, Yan [ORNL; An, Ke [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Liang, Chengdu [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes show potential to enable high-energy-density secondary batteries and offer distinctive safety features as an advantage over traditional liquid electrolytes. Achieving the combination of high ionic conductivity, low activation energy, and outstanding electrochemical stability in crystalline solid electrolytes is a challenge for the synthesis of novel solid electrolytes. Herein we report an exceptionally low activation energy (Ea) and high room temperature superionic conductivity via facile aliovalent substitution of Li3AsS4 by Ge, which increased the conductivity by two orders of magnitude as compared to the parent compound. The composition Li3.334Ge0.334As0.666S4 has a high ionic conductivity of 1.12 mScm-1 at 27oC. Local Li+ hopping in this material is accompanied by distinctive low activation energy Ea of 0.17 eV being the lowest of Li+ solid conductors. Furthermore, this study demonstrates the efficacy of surface passivation of solid electrolyte to achieve compatibility with metallic lithium electrodes.

  13. Unusual magnetic hysteresis and the weakened transition behavior induced by Sn substitution in Mn{sub 3}SbN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Ying, E-mail: sunying@buaa.edu.cn [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (WPI-MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Guo, Yanfeng; Li, Jun; Wang, Xia [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Tsujimoto, Yoshihiro [Materials Processing Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Wang, Cong [Center for Condensed Matter and Materials Physics, Department of Physics, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Feng, Hai L.; Sathish, Clastin I.; Yamaura, Kazunari, E-mail: yamaura.kazunari@nims.go.jp [Superconducting Properties Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Graduate School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Matsushita, Yoshitaka [Analysis Station, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    Substitution of Sb with Sn was achieved in ferrimagnetic antiperovskite Mn{sub 3}SbN. The experimental results indicate that with an increase in Sn concentration, the magnetization continuously decreases and the crystal structure of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N changes from tetragonal to cubic phase at around x of 0.8. In the doping series, step-like anomaly in the isothermal magnetization was found and this behavior was highlighted at x?=?0.4. The anomaly could be attributed to the magnetic frustration, resulting from competition between the multiple spin configurations in the antiperovskite lattice. Meantime, H{sub c} of 18 kOe was observed at x?=?0.3, which is probably the highest among those of manganese antiperovskite materials reported so far. With increasing Sn content, the abrupt change of resistivity and the sharp peak of heat capacity in Mn{sub 3}SbN were gradually weakened. The crystal structure refinements indicate the weakened change at the magnetic transition is close related to the change of c/a ratio variation from tetragonal to cubic with Sn content. The results derived from this study indicate that the behavior of Mn{sub 3}Sb{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x}N could potentially enhance its scientific and technical applications, such as spin torque transfer and hard magnets.

  14. PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II 103 Updating Projects and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1), September, 2010. PDF icon Workbook More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly Upload

  15. GRED III Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for GRED III Phase II Citation Bernie Karl. 2010. GRED III Phase II. p....

  16. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  17. Destilaria Joao Paulo II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Joao Paulo II Jump to: navigation, search Name: Destilaria Joao Paulo II Place: Sao Simao, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 14200-000 Product: Brazil based ethanol producer located in Sao...

  18. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with...

  19. World War II | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    at NNSA Blog Home World War II World War II Keeping the "Spirit of '45 Alive" in Kansas City National Security Campus employees commemorated the 70th anniversary of the end...

  20. ARM - Field Campaign - IPASRC II Campaign

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsIPASRC II Campaign ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : IPASRC II...

  1. EBR-II Superheater Duplex Tube Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Dennis D. Keiser; Douglas L. Porter; Naoyuki Kisohara

    2008-12-01

    After 30 years of operation, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Superheater 710 at Argonne National Laboratory-West (now Idaho National Laboratory) was decommissioned. As part of its post-service examination, four duplex tube sections were removed and Charpy impact testing was performed to characterize the crack arresting ability of nickel-bonded tube interfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination was also performed to characterize and identify changes in bond material microstructure. From room temperature to 400 degrees C, all samples demonstrated ductility and crack-stopping ability similar to that exhibited by beginning-of-life samples. However, at low temperature (-5 degrees C), samples removed from the lower region of the superheater (near the sodium inlet) failed while those from the upper region (near the sodium outlet) did not. SEM analysis revealed that all the tube-tube interfaces showed evidence of iron diffusion into the nickel braze, which resulted in the formation of a multiphase diffusion structure. Yet, significant void formation was only observed in the bond layer of the tubes removed from the lower region. This may be due to a change in the crystal microstructure of one of the phases within the bond layer that occurs in the 350 to 450 degrees C temperature range, which results in a lower density and the formation of porosity. Apparently, only the samples from the higher temperature region were exposed to this transition temperature, and the resulting large voids that developed acted as stress concentrators that led to low-temperature embrittlement and failure of the Charpy impact specimens.

  2. High Performance Organic Photovoltaics via Novel Materials Combinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laird, Dr Darin; McGuiness, Dr Christine; Storch, Mark

    2011-01-20

    OPV cell efficiencies have increased significantly over the last decade and verified champion efficiencies are currently at 8.3% for both single and multi-junction device types. These increases in efficiency have been driven through the development and optimization of the donor and acceptor materials in bulk heterojunction active layers. Plextronics and Solarmer Energy Inc. are two of the world leading developers of these donor and acceptor materials. Solarmer Energy has reported NREL certified 6.77% efficiencies using optimized low band gap donor materials in combination with PC61BM and PC71BM acceptors and recently reported a champion NREL certified efficiency of 8.1%. Plextronics has reported Newport certified efficiencies of 6.7% using PC71BM acceptors with low band gap materials. In addition, Plextronics has also demonstrated that OPV efficiency of P3HT based materials can be improved by 50% by improving the Voc using alternative acceptors (indene substituted C60 and C70) to PC61BM and PC71BM. However, performance of these alternative acceptors in combination with low band gap materials has not been investigated and the potential for efficiency improvement is evident. In this collaboration, four low band gap donor materials from Solarmer Energy Inc were combined with Plextronics indene-class acceptors Plextronics indene substituted C60 and C70 acceptors to demonstrate OPV performance greater than 7%. Two main indene class C60 acceptors (codenamed Mono-indene[C60] Mono-indene[C60] , Bis-indene[C60] ) were screened with the Solarmer polymers. These four polymers were screened and optimized with the indene class acceptors at both Plextronics and Solarmer. A combination was identified which produced 6.7% (internal measurement) with a Solarmer polymer and a Plextronics fullerene acceptor. This was accomplished primarily by improving the Voc as well as improving the current (Jsc) and FF.

  3. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing; Johnson, Carl E.

    1987-01-01

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  4. Tritium breeding materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollenberg, G.W.; Johnson, C.E.; Abdou, M.

    1984-03-01

    Tritium breeding materials are essential to the operation of D-T fusion facilities. Both of the present options - solid ceramic breeding materials and liquid metal materials are reviewed with emphasis not only on their attractive features but also on critical materials issues which must be resolved.

  5. Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation slides from the Energy Department webinar, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, held August 13, 2013.

  6. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  7. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  8. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  9. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  10. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  11. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California,

  12. Materials Analysis and Modeling of Underfill Materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyatt, Nicholas B; Chambers, Robert S.

    2015-08-01

    The thermal-mechanical properties of three potential underfill candidate materials for PBGA applications are characterized and reported. Two of the materials are a formulations developed at Sandia for underfill applications while the third is a commercial product that utilizes a snap-cure chemistry to drastically reduce cure time. Viscoelastic models were calibrated and fit using the property data collected for one of the Sandia formulated materials. Along with the thermal-mechanical analyses performed, a series of simple bi-material strip tests were conducted to comparatively analyze the relative effects of cure and thermal shrinkage amongst the materials under consideration. Finally, current knowledge gaps as well as questions arising from the present study are identified and a path forward presented.

  13. II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION The objectives of most compliance requirements for DOE programs are generic in nature. For example, most programs have eligibility requirements. While the criteria for determining eligibility vary by program, the objective of the compliance requirement that only eligible entities participate is consistent across all programs. Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are

  14. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, David R. (Bothel, WA); Stampfer, Joseph F. (Santa Fe, NM); Macdonald, John M. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material.

  15. Nanocrystalline ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, R.W.; Nieman, G.W.; Weertman, J.R.

    1994-06-14

    A method is disclosed for preparing a treated nanocrystalline metallic material. The method of preparation includes providing a starting nanocrystalline metallic material with a grain size less than about 35 nm, compacting the starting nanocrystalline metallic material in an inert atmosphere and annealing the compacted metallic material at a temperature less than about one-half the melting point of the metallic material. 19 figs.

  16. Material Transfer Agreements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Transfer Agreements Material Transfer Agreements Enables the transfer of tangible consumable research materials between two organizations, when the recipient intends to use the material for research purposes Contact thumbnail of Marcus Lucero Head of Licensing Marcus Lucero Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 665-6569 Email Overview The ability to exchange materials freely and without delay is an important part of a healthy scientific laboratory. Los Alamos National

  17. Materials for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials for the Future Materials for the Future The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar Champion Mary Hockaday Email Pillar Contact Toni Taylor Email Pillar Contact David Teter Email Materials for the Future Science Overview At Los Alamos National Laboratory, we anticipate the advent of a new era in materials science, when we will transition from observing and exploiting the properties of materials to a science-based

  18. Multi Material Paradigm

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multi Material Paradigm Glenn S. Daehn Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University Advanced Composites (FRP) Steel Spaceframe Multi Material Concept Composites Advanced Steel body Coil-coated shell Steel thin wall casting High strength Steels Al-Spaceframe Steel Unibody Stainless Steel Spaceframe Affordability of weight reduction Design Materials Processes Approach Advanced M-Spaceframe L > 2012 Multi Material Paradigm Joining problems and methods f Joining

  19. Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Troy A. Semelsberger Los Alamos National Laboratory Hydrogen Storage Summit Jan 27-29, 2015 Denver, CO Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials 2 Objectives 1. Assess chemical hydrogen storage materials that can exceed 700 bar compressed hydrogen tanks 2. Status (state-of-the-art) of chemical hydrogen storage materials 3. Identify key material characteristics 4. Identify obstacles, challenges and risks for the successful deployment of chemical hydrogen materials in a practical on-board hydrogen

  20. Materials at the Mesoscale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    » Materials at the Mesoscale 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:October 2015 past issues All Issues » submit Materials at the Mesoscale Los Alamos's bold proposal to understand and control material properties December 12, 2015 Materials at the Mesoscale Between the atomic and macro scales lies a gap in our knowledge of materials known as the mesoscale. A gap remains in the understanding of mesoscale properties and responses, especially in extreme temperature,

  1. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  2. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-02-16

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group.

  3. Milford Wind Corridor Phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Jump to: navigation, search Name Milford Wind Corridor Phase II Facility Milford Wind Corridor Phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  4. Windland (Boxcar II) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Windland (Boxcar II) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Windland (Boxcar II) Wind Farm Facility Windland (Boxcar II) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  5. Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II & III Jump to: navigation, search Name Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Facility Kotzebue Wind Project Phase II & III Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  6. Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm Facility Champion (Roscoe II) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind...

  7. University of Minnesota Morris II - PES | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Morris II - PES Jump to: navigation, search Name University of Minnesota Morris II - PES Facility University of Minnesota Morris II - PES Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community...

  8. Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Mountain View Power Partners II Wind Farm Facility Mountain View Power Partners II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale...

  9. Langdon II - FPL Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Langdon II - FPL Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Langdon II - FPL Wind Farm Facility Langdon II - FPL Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility...

  10. Karen Avenue Wind Farm II (San Gorgonio Farms) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Farm II (San Gorgonio Farms) Jump to: navigation, search Name Karen Avenue Wind Farm II (San Gorgonio Farms) Facility Karen Avenue Windfarm II (San Gorgonio Farms) Sector Wind...

  11. AE Biofuels Inc formerly Marwich II Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Marwich II Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: AE Biofuels Inc. (formerly Marwich II Ltd.) Place: West Palm Beach, Florida Zip: 33414 Sector: Biofuels Product: Marwich II, Ltd....

  12. Buffalo Ridge II Wind Power Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Power Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Buffalo Ridge II Wind Power Project Facility Buffalo Ridge II Wind Power Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial...

  13. Condon Wind Project phase II | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project phase II Jump to: navigation, search Name Condon Wind Project phase II Facility Condon Wind Project phase II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility...

  14. II

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    describes the concen- 1) because control devices, such as baghouse filters and tration of hydrogen ions along a scale (from 0 to 14) that electrostatic precipitators, remove most...

  15. II*

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    alone. That number represents the net inflow of foreign oil as a percentage of total oil consumption. By this measure, U.S. Trends dependence has never reached 50.0 percent on...

  16. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    LIST OF FIGURES 1 General location of Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2 General location of the South Plant facility, Granite City Steel Division, Granite City, Illinois . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ' . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Diagram of the New Betatron Building, Granite City Steel facility, Granite City, Illinois. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4 View looking north northwest at the New

  17. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    l7aa AMY y ~UJs,bp 7 DOE/OR/20722-20 *1 F F c Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY REPORT FOR THE FORMER MIDDLESEX SAMPLING PLANT Middlesex, New Jersey Bechtel Job 14501 Bechtel National, Inc. Advanced Technology Division March 1985 Technical Information Center Office of Scientific and Technical Information U.S. Department of Energy ---___- __-_ __~__ .-_. ..__ - ~-___ LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an nccount of

  18. II

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 11 View looking west at scissors lift used to access top of shield wall and upper-level horizontal beams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

  19. Longer-term domestic supply problems for nonrenewable materials with special emphasis on energy-related applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goeller, H.E.

    1980-01-01

    An examination is made on how materials are used in present and future energy production and use. Problem areas which are discussed include by-products production, import limitations, substitution and recycle, accelerated use, synthesis, and the adequacy of the data bases availability. (FS)

  20. Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Core Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Characterization Core materials characterization

  1. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  2. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Denver, CO); Allen, Larry C. (Arvada, CO); Marshall, Craig (Littleton, CO); Murphy, Robert C. (Golden, CO); Marshall, Todd (Littleton, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby.

  3. System for characterizing semiconductor materials and photovoltaic devices through calibration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.; Allen, L.C.; Marshall, C.; Murphy, R.C.; Marshall, T.

    1998-05-26

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for measuring characteristics of a piece of material, typically semiconductor materials including photovoltaic devices. The characteristics may include dislocation defect density, grain boundaries, reflectance, external LBIC, internal LBIC, and minority carrier diffusion length. The apparatus includes a light source, an integrating sphere, and a detector communicating with a computer. The measurement or calculation of the characteristics is calibrated to provide accurate, absolute values. The calibration is performed by substituting a standard sample for the piece of material, the sample having a known quantity of one or more of the relevant characteristics. The quantity measured by the system of the relevant characteristic is compared to the known quantity and a calibration constant is created thereby. 44 figs.

  4. Anisotropic scattering rate in Fe-substituted Bi2Sr2Ca(Cu1-xFex)2O8+δ

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Naamneh, M.; Lubashevsky, Y.; Lahoud, E.; Gu, G.; Kanigel, A.

    2015-05-27

    We measured the electronic structure of Fe substituted Bi2212 using Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES). We find that the substitution does not change the momentum dependence of the superconducting gap but induces a very anisotropic enhancement of the scattering rate. A comparison of the effect of Fe substitution to that of Zn substitution suggests that the Fe reduces Tc so effectively because it supresses very strongly the coherence weight around the anti-nodes.

  5. Enhanced magnetocaloric effect material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Laura J. H.

    2006-07-18

    A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure having a core layer of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, and a constricting material layer coated on at least one surface of the magnetocaloric material core layer. The constricting material layer may enhance the magnetocaloric effect by restriction of volume changes of the core layer during application of a magnetic field to the heterostructure. A magnetocaloric effect heterostructure powder comprising a plurality of core particles of a magnetostructural material with a giant magnetocaloric effect having a magnetic transition temperature equal to or greater than 150 K, wherein each of the core particles is encapsulated within a coating of a constricting material is also disclosed. A method for enhancing the magnetocaloric effect within a giant magnetocaloric material including the step of coating a surface of the magnetocaloric material with a constricting material is disclosed.

  6. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  7. Cation-substituted spinel oxide and oxyfluoride cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam; Choi, Wonchang

    2010-05-18

    The present invention includes compositions and methods of making cation-substituted and fluorine-substituted spinel cathode compositions by firing a LiMn2-y-zLiyMzO4 oxide with NH4HF2 at low temperatures of between about 300 and 700.degree. C. for 2 to 8 hours and a .eta. of more than 0 and less than about 0.50, mixed two-phase compositions consisting of a spinel cathode and a layered oxide cathode, and coupling them with unmodified or surface modified graphite anodes in lithium ion cells.

  8. Substituted isoxazole analogs of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonist GW4064

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, Jonathan Y.; Caldwell, Richard D.; Caravella, Justin A.; Chen, Lihong; Creech, Katrina L.; Deaton, David N.; Madauss, Kevin P.; Marr, Harry B.; McFadyen, Robert B.; Miller, Aaron B.; Parks, Derek J.; Todd, Dan; Williams, Shawn P.; Wisely, G. Bruce

    2010-09-27

    Starting from the known FXR agonist GW 4064 1a, a series of alternately 3,5-substituted isoxazoles was prepared. Several of these analogs were potent full FXR agonists. A subset of this series, with a tether between the isoxazole ring and the 3-position aryl substituent, were equipotent FXR agonists to GW 4064 1a, with the 2,6-dimethyl phenol analog 1t having greater FRET FXR potency than GW 4064 1a.

  9. Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins having cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oda, Michael N. (Benicia, CA); Forte, Trudy M. (Berkeley, CA)

    2007-05-29

    Functional Apolipoprotein A-I mutant proteins, having one or more cysteine substitutions and polynucleotides encoding same, can be used to modulate paraoxonase's arylesterase activity. These ApoA-I mutant proteins can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, atherosclerosis, acute phase response and other inflammatory related diseases. The invention also includes modifications and optimizations of the ApoA-I nucleotide sequence for purposes of increasing protein expression and optimization.

  10. Nondestructive material characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method and apparatus for nondestructive material characterization, such as identification of material flaws or defects, material thickness or uniformity and material properties such as acoustic velocity. The apparatus comprises a pulsed laser used to excite a piezoelectric (PZ) transducer, which sends acoustic waves through an acoustic coupling medium to the test material. The acoustic wave is absorbed and thereafter reflected by the test material, whereupon it impinges on the PZ transducer. The PZ transducer converts the acoustic wave to electrical impulses, which are conveyed to a monitor.

  11. Dosimetry and cross section measurements at RTNS II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Kneff, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Numerous measurements have been conducted at TRNS-II in order to map the neutron field for materials irradiations, to measure activation cross sections, and to measure helium production cross sections. Experiments of up to two weeks duration irradiated large numbers of activation dosimetry and helium samples both close to the source and throughout the target room. Many other samples have been irradiated in piggy-back positions over periods lasting many months. All of these experiments fall into four main classes, namely, fluence-mapping, activation dosimetry, the production of long-lived isotopes, and helium generation measurements. Radiometric dosimetry and activation cross section measurements were performed at Argonne National Laboratory; helium production was measured at Rockwell International Corporation. This paper briefly summarizes the principal results of our measurements at RTNS-II; references are given for more detailed publications. 14 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Polymeric media comprising polybenzimidazoles N-substituted with organic-inorganic hybrid moiety

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klaehn, John R. [Idaho Falls, ID; Peterson, Eric S. [Idaho Falls, ID; Wertsching, Alan K. [Idaho Falls, ID; Orme, Christopher J. [Shelley, ID; Luther, Thomas A. [Idaho Falls, ID; Jones, Michael G. [Pocatello, ID

    2009-12-15

    A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be included in a separator medium. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2-- where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The separatory medium may exhibit an H.sub.2, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, CH.sub.3, or CO.sub.2 gas permeability greater than the gas permeability of a comparable separatory medium comprising the PBI compound without substitution. The separatory medium may further include an electronically conductive medium and/or ionically conductive medium. The separatory medium may be used as a membrane (semi-permeable, permeable, and non-permeable), a barrier, an ion exhcange media, a filter, a gas chromatography coating (such as stationary phase coating in affinity chromatography), etc.

  13. PC-DYMAC: Personal Computer---DYnamic Materials ACcounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, B.G.

    1989-11-01

    This manual was designed to provide complete documentation for the computer system used by the EBR-II Fuels and Materials Department, Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) for accountability of special nuclear materials (SNM). This document includes background information on the operation of the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF), instructions on computer operations in correlation with production and a detailed manual for DYMAC operation. 60 figs.

  14. EC Transmission Line Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bigelow, Tim S

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify materials acceptable for use in the US ITER Project Office (USIPO)-supplied components for the ITER Electron cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) transmission lines (TL), PBS-52. The source of material property information for design analysis shall be either the applicable structural code or the ITER Material Properties Handbook. In the case of conflict, the ITER Material Properties Handbook shall take precedence. Materials selection, and use, shall follow the guidelines established in the Materials Assessment Report (MAR). Materials exposed to vacuum shall conform to the ITER Vacuum Handbook. [Ref. 2] Commercial materials shall conform to the applicable standard (e.g., ASTM, JIS, DIN) for the definition of their grade, physical, chemical and electrical properties and related testing. All materials for which a suitable certification from the supplier is not available shall be tested to determine the relevant properties, as part of the procurement. A complete traceability of all the materials including welding materials shall be provided. Halogenated materials (example: insulating materials) shall be forbidden in areas served by the detritiation systems. Exceptions must be approved by the Tritium System and Safety Section Responsible Officers.

  15. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  16. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  17. Cybersecurity Awareness Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The OCIO develops and distributes a variety of materials to enhance cyber awareness campaigns, address emerging cyber threats, and examine hot topics. These materials are available to all DOE organizations, and public and private institutions.

  18. Nuclear Materials Disposition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In fulfilling its mission, EM frequently manages and completes disposition of surplus nuclear materials and spent nuclear fuel.  These are not waste. They are nuclear materials no longer needed for...

  19. Second generation Research Reactor Fuel Container (RRFC-II).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhold, M. E.; Baker, M. C.; Bourret, S. C.; Harker, W. C.; Pelowitz, D. G.; Polk, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    The second generation Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC-II) has been developed to measure the remaining {sup 235}U content in foreign spent Material Test Reactor (MTR)-type fuel being returned to the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) for interim storage and subsequent disposal. The fuel to be measured started as fresh fuel nominally with 93% enriched Uraniuin alloyed with A1 clad in Al. The fuel was irradiated to levels of up to 65% burnup. The RRFC-II, which will be located in the L-Basin spent fuel pool, is intended to assay the {sup 235}U content using a combination of passive neutron coincidence counting, active neutron coincidence counting, and active-multiplicity analysis. Measurements will be done underwater, eliminating the need for costly and hazardous handling operations of spent fuel out of water. The underwater portion of the RRFC-II consists of a watertight stainless steel housing containing neutron and gamma detectors and a scanning active neutron source. The portion of the system that resides above water consists of data-processing electronics; electromechanical drive electronics; a computer to control the operation of the counter, to collect, and to analyze data; and a touch screen interface located at the equipment rack. The RRFC-II is an improved version of the Los Alamos-designed RRFC already installed in the SRS Receipts Basin for Offsite Fuel. The RRFC-II has been fabricated and is scheduled for installation in late FY 2001 pending acceptance testing by Savannah River Site personnel.

  20. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  1. II.CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 II.CONTRACT ID CODE ~AGE 1 of AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES AC 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 3. EFFECTNE DATE 2. AMENDMENTfMODIFICA TION NO. 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. See Block 16c. NOPR 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05008 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05008 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN

  2. HSWA Part II Permit Modification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PART II EPA AUTHORIZATION UNDER THE HAZARDOUS AND SOLID WASTE AMENDMENTS OF 1984 Pursuant to Section 227 of the Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments of 1984 (hereafter referred to as HSWA"), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (hereafter referred to as "EPA") is granted authority to issue or deny Permits or those portions of Permits affected by the requirements established by HSWA. By this authority and pursuant to Sections 3002(b), 3 004(d), and 3005 of the Resource

  3. Hydroxylation of p-substituted phenols by tyrosinase: Further insight into the mechanism of tyrosinase activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz-Munoz, Jose Luis; Berna, Jose; Garcia-Molina, Maria del Mar; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Varon, Ramon [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Avda. Espana s and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action the copper complexes and tyrosinase on phenols is equivalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope effect showed that nucleophilic attack to copper atom may be the slower step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The value of {rho} (Hammett constant) supports an electrophilic aromatic substitution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data obtained in steady state pH 7 conditions support the mechanism of Scheme 1SM. -- Abstract: A study of the monophenolase activity of tyrosinase by measuring the steady state rate with a group of p-substituted monophenols provides the following kinetic information: k{sub cat}{sup m} and the Michaelis constant, K{sub M}{sup m}. Analysis of these data taking into account chemical shifts of the carbon atom supporting the hydroxyl group ({delta}) and {sigma}{sub p}{sup +}, enables a mechanism to be proposed for the transformation of monophenols into o-diphenols, in which the first step is a nucleophilic attack on the copper atom on the form E{sub ox} (attack of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of C-1 on the copper atom) followed by an electrophilic attack (attack of the hydroperoxide group on the ortho position with respect to the hydroxyl group of the benzene ring, electrophilic aromatic substitution with a reaction constant {rho} of -1.75). These steps show the same dependency on the electronic effect of the substituent groups in C-4. Furthermore, a study of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on the oxidation of monophenols by tyrosinase points to an appreciable isotopic effect. In a proton inventory study with a series of p-substituted phenols, the representation of k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}}/k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} against n (atom fractions of deuterium), where k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}} is the catalytic constant for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, was linear for all substrates. These results indicate that only one of the proton transfer processes from the hydroxyl groups involved the catalytic cycle is responsible for the isotope effects. We suggest that this step is the proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of C-1 to the peroxide of the oxytyrosinase form (E{sub ox}). After the nucleophilic attack, the incorporation of the oxygen in the benzene ring occurs by means of an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism in which there is no isotopic effect.

  4. Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lyalpha EMITTERS IN HIERARCHICAL GALAXY FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY ... FORMATION. II. ULTRAVIOLET CONTINUUM LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AND EQUIVALENT WIDTH ...

  5. Instructions and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

  6. Materials Physics and Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADEPS » MPA Materials Physics and Applications We develop new technologies that solve pressing national energy and security challenges by exploring and exploiting materials and their properties; developing practical applications of materials, and providing world-class user facilities. Contact Us Division Leader (acting) Michael Hundley Email Deputy Division Leader Rick Martineau Email Chief of Staff Jeff Willis Email Division Office (505) 665-1131 Materials Physics Applications Division

  7. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials/Condensed Matter Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied

  8. ARM - Public Information Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govPublicationsPublic Information Materials Publications Journal Articles Conference Documents Program Documents Technical Reports Publications Database Public Information...

  9. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical materials, and the foundational aspects of Energy Innovation Hubs. Additionally, the workshop solicited input from the critical materials community on R&D gaps that could be addressed by DOE.

  10. A Google for Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kristin Persson A Google for Materials February 4, 2014 Kirstin Persson, Berkeley Lab Downloads Persson-Materials-NUG2014.pdf | Adobe Acrobat PDF file A Google For Materials? - Kirstin Persson, Berkeley Lab Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:07

  11. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  12. Effect of La{sup 3+} substitution with Gd{sup 3+} on the resistive switching properties of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hong-Sub; Park, Chang-Sun; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2014-05-12

    This study demonstrated that the resistive switching voltage of perovskite manganite material could be controlled by A-site cation substitution in A MnO{sub 3} perovskite manganite structure. A partial substitution of La{sup 3+} in La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} with smaller cation Gd{sup 3+} induced A-site vacancy of the largest Sr{sup 2+} cation with surface segregation of SrO{sub y} due to ionic size mismatch, and the induced vacancies reduced migration energy barrier. The operating voltage decreased from 3.5?V to 2.5?V due to a favorable condition for electrochemical migration and redox of oxygen ions. Moreover, surface-segregated SrO{sub y} was enhanced with Gd-substitution and the SrO{sub y} reduced Schottky-like barrier height and resistive switching ratio from the potential drop and screening effect. The relationship between A-site vacancy generation resulting in surface segregation of SrO{sub y} and resistive switching behavior was also investigated by energy resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, O 1s near edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy, and current voltage measurement.

  13. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  14. Material Disposal Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf).

  15. Features of the spectral dependences of transmittance of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted lutetium phthalocyanine molecules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Tikhonov, E. V.; Dronov, M. A.; Belogorokhova, L. I.; Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2011-11-15

    Vibronic properties of organic semiconductors based on tert-butyl substituted phthalocyanine lutetium diphthalocyanine molecules are studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. It is shown that substitution of several carbon atoms in initial phthalocyanine (Pc) ligands with {sup 13}C isotope atoms causes a spectral shift in the main absorption lines attributed to benzene, isoindol, and peripheral C-H groups. A comparison of spectral characteristics showed that the shift can vary from 3 to 1 cm{sup -1}.

  16. Novel Fabrication and Simple Hybridization of Exotic Material MEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Datskos, P.G.; Rajic, S.

    1999-11-13

    Work in materials other than silicon for MEMS applications has typically been restricted to metals and metal oxides instead of more ''exotic'' semiconductors. However, group III-V and II-VI semiconductors form a very important and versatile collection of material and electronic parameters available to the MEMS and MOEMS designer. With these materials, not only are the traditional mechanical material variables (thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, Young's modulus, etc.) available, but also chemical constituents can be varied in ternary and quaternary materials. This flexibility can be extremely important for both friction and chemical compatibility issues for MEMS. In addition, the ability to continually vary the bandgap energy can be particularly useful for many electronics and infrared detection applications. However, there are two major obstacles associated with alternate semiconductor material MEMS. The first issue is the actual fabrication of non-silicon devices and the second impediment is communicating with these novel devices. We will describe an essentially material independent fabrication method that is amenable to most group III-V and II-VI semiconductors. This technique uses a combination of non-traditional direct write precision fabrication processes such as diamond turning, ion milling, laser ablation, etc. This type of deterministic fabrication approach lends itself to an almost trivial assembly process. We will also describe in detail the mechanical, electrical, and optical self-aligning hybridization technique used for these alternate-material MEMS.

  17. Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

    2009-07-01

    The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

  18. ExodusII Finite Element Data Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-05-14

    EXODUS II is a model developed to store and retrieve data for finite element analyses. It is used for preprocessing (problem definition), postprocessing (results visualization), as well as code to code data transfer. An EXODUS II data file is a random access, machine independent, binary file that is written and read via C, C++, or Fortran library routines which comprise the Application Programming Interface. (exodus II is based on netcdf)

  19. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Liaison | Department of Energy Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and Liaison Form for the SES program emphasizes the range of communications and public relations aspects of executive positions as found in official correspondence and documentation, as well as, formal and informal verbal communications, and it describes the major competencies within this activity PDF icon Part II -

  20. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A.; Williams, Paul T.

    2011-06-15

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275 deg. C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 {mu}g I-TEQ kg{sup -1} in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases.

  1. Critical magnetic fields of superconducting aluminum-substituted Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4} clathrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Yang Garcia, Jose; Lu, Kejie; Shafiq, Basir; Franco, Giovanni; Lu, Junqiang; Rong, Bo; Chen, Ning; Liu, Yang; Liu, Lihua; Song, Bensheng; Wei, Yuping; Johnson, Shardai S.; Luo, Zhiping; Feng, Zhaosheng

    2015-06-07

    In recent years, efforts have been made to explore the superconductivity of clathrates containing crystalline frameworks of group-IV elements. The superconducting silicon clathrate is unusual in that the structure is dominated by strong sp{sup 3} covalent bonds between silicon atoms, rather than the metallic bonding that is more typical of traditional superconductors. This paper reports on critical magnetic fields of superconducting Al-substituted silicon clathrates, which were investigated by transport, ac susceptibility, and dc magnetization measurements in magnetic fields up to 90 kOe. For the sample Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4}, the critical magnetic fields were measured to be H{sub C1}?=?40.2?Oe and H{sub C2}?=?66.4 kOe. The London penetration depth of 4360? and the coherence length 70? were obtained, whereas the estimated GinzburgLandau parameter of ??=?62 revealed that Ba{sub 8}Si{sub 42}Al{sub 4} is a strong type-II superconductor.

  2. Concrete Pour in NSLS-II Ring

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Bruno Semon

    2013-07-22

    The mezzanine floor of the ring building tunnel for NSLS-II was completed when the last concrete was placed in February 2011.

  3. Bore II - Advanced Wellbore Technology Characterizes Groundwater...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This Return to Search Bore II - Advanced Wellbore Technology Characterizes Groundwater Flow and Contamination Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contact LBL About This...

  4. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and...

  5. Administrative Assistant II | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administrative Assistant II Department: ESH&S Supervisor(s): Rob Sheneman Requisition Number: 1600013 Position Summary: The successful candidate will manage critical data and...

  6. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  7. Synthesis, characterization and electrochemical performance of Al-substituted Li₂MnO₃

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dhital, Chetan; Huq, Ashfia; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Torres-Castro, Loraine; Shojan, Jifi; Julien, Christian M.; Katiyar, Ram S.

    2015-08-08

    Li2MnO3 is known to be electrochemically inactive due to Mn in tetravalent oxidation state. Several compositions such as Li2MnO3 , Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were synthesized by a sol–gel Pechini method. All the samples were characterized with x-ray diffraction, Raman, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Tap density and BET analyzer. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated the presence of monoclinic phase for pristine Li2MnO3and mixed monoclinic/spinel phases (Li2 - xMn1 - yAlx + yO3 + z) for Al-substituted Li2MnO3compounds. The Al substitution seems to occur both at Li and Mn sites, which could explain the presence of spinel phase. X-ray photoelectronmore » spectroscopy for Mn 2p orbital reveals a significant decrease in binding energy for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 compounds. Cyclic voltammetry, charge/discharge cycles and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were also performed. A discharge capacity of 24 mAh g-1 for Li2MnO3, 68 mAh g-1 for Li1.5Al0.17MnO3, 58 mAh g-1 for Li1.0Al0.33MnO3 and 74 mAh g-1 for Li0.5Al0.5MnO3 were obtained. As a result, aluminum substitutions increased the formation of spinel phase which is responsible for cycling.« less

  8. Synthesis and characterization of substituted garnet and perovskite-based lithium-ion conducting solid electrolytes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu-Sepúlveda, Maria; Huq, Ashfia; Dhital, Chetan; Dominique E. Williams; Li, Yunchao; Paranthaman, M. Parans; Zaghib, Karim; Manivannan, A.

    2015-09-30

    In this study, titanium, tantalum-substituted Li7La3Zr2-xAxO12 (LLZO, A = Ta, Ti) garnets, and chromium-substituted La(2/3)-xLi3xTi1-yCryO3 (LLTO) perovskites were prepared by a conventional solid-state reaction and the Pechini processes. The desired crystal phases were obtained by varying the calcination temperature and time, as well as the substitution concentration. All samples indicated decomposition of the precursors when heated above 750 °C and formation of the desired phase after heat treatment at higher temperatures. Neutron diffraction data shows the formation of a predominant cubic phase in the case of Ta-LLZO, and monoclinic phase with minor impurity phases for Cr-LLTO. Ionic conductivity for Ti-LLZOmore » (Li7La3Zr1.4Ti0.6O12), Ta-LLZO (Li6.03La3Zr1.533Ta0.46O12), and Cr-LLTO (La(2/3)-xLi3xTi0.9Cr0.1O3) at room temperature were found to be 5.21 × 10–6, 1.01 ×10–6, and 1.2 × 10–4 S cm–1, respectively. The activation energies of the compounds were determined from the Arrhenius plot and were 0.44 eV (Ti0.6-LLZO), 0.54 eV (Ta0.5-LLZO), and 0.20 eV (Cr0.1-LLTO).« less

  9. Results of site validation experiments. Volume II. Supporting documents 5 through 14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Volume II contains the following supporting documents: Summary of Geologic Mapping of Underground Investigations; Logging of Vertical Coreholes - ''Double Box'' Area and Exploratory Drift; WIPP High Precision Gravity Survey; Basic Data Reports for Drillholes, Brine Content of Facility Internal Strata; Mineralogical Content of Facility Interval Strata; Location and Characterization of Interbedded Materials; Characterization of Aquifers at Shaft Locations; and Permeability of Facility Interval Strate.

  10. Deterrence of device counterfeiting, cloning, and subversion by substitution using hardware fingerprinting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Jason R; Bauer, Todd M; Pierson, Lyndon G

    2014-09-30

    Deterrence of device subversion by substitution may be achieved by including a cryptographic fingerprint unit within a computing device for authenticating a hardware platform of the computing device. The cryptographic fingerprint unit includes a physically unclonable function ("PUF") circuit disposed in or on the hardware platform. The PUF circuit is used to generate a PUF value. A key generator is coupled to generate a private key and a public key based on the PUF value while a decryptor is coupled to receive an authentication challenge posed to the computing device and encrypted with the public key and coupled to output a response to the authentication challenge decrypted with the private key.

  11. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, an efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  12. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    16 Nuclear Materials Science Our multidisciplinary expertise comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and surveillance communities. Contact Us Group Leader David Pugmire (acting) Email Group Office (505) 667-4665 The evaluations performed by our group are essential for the nuclear weapons program as well as nuclear materials storage, forensics, and actinide fundamental science. The evaluations performed by our group are

  13. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  14. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K.; Snyderman, Neal J.; Rowland, Mark S.

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  15. Materials Science Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Materials Science Applications VASP VASP is a plane wave ab initio code for quantum mechanical molecular dynamics. It is highly scalable and shows very good parallel performance for a variety of chemical and materials science calculations. VASP is available to NERSC users who already have a VASP license. Read More » Quantum ESPRESSO/PWscf Quantum Espresso is an integrated suite of computer codes for electronic structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It builds on

  16. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials/Condensed Matter Print Materials research provides the foundation on which the economic well being of our high-tech society rests. The impact of advanced materials ranges dramatically over every aspect of our modern world from the minutiae of daily life to the grand scale of our national economy. Invariably, however, breakthroughs to new technologies trace their origin both to fundamental research in the basic properties of condensed matter and to applied research aimed at manipulating

  17. ANS materials databook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchbanks, M.F.

    1995-08-01

    Technical development in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) project is dynamic, and a continuously updated information source is necessary to provide readily usable materials data to the designer, analyst, and materials engineer. The Advanced Neutron Source Materials Databook (AMBK) is being developed as a part of the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Information System (AMIS). Its purpose is to provide urgently needed data on a quick-turnaround support basis for those design applications whose schedules demand immediate estimates of material properties. In addition to the need for quick materials information, there is a need for consistent application of data throughout the ANS Program, especially where only limited data exist. The AMBK is being developed to fill this need as well. It is the forerunner to the Advanced Neutron Source Materials Handbook (AMHB). The AMHB, as reviewed and approved by the ANS review process, will serve as a common authoritative source of materials data in support of the ANS Project. It will furnish documented evidence of the materials data used in the design and construction of the ANS system and will serve as a quality record during any review process whose objective is to establish the safety level of the ANS complex. The information in the AMBK and AMHB is also provided in electronic form in a dial-up computer database known as the ANS Materials Database (AMDB). A single consensus source of materials information prepared and used by all national program participants has several advantages. Overlapping requirements and data needs of various sub-projects and subcontractors can be met by a single document which is continuously revised. Preliminary and final safety analysis reports, stress analysis reports, equipment specifications, materials service reports, and many other project-related documents can be substantially reduced in size and scope by appropriate reference to a single data source.

  18. Critical Materials Strategy Summary

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Critical Materials Strategy Summary 2010 T he United States is on the cusp of a clean energy rev- olution. In its first Critical Materials Strategy, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) focuses on materials used in four clean energy technologies: wind turbines, elec- tric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting (Table 1). The Strategy evaluates the extent to which widespread deployment of these technologies may increase worldwide demand for rare earth elements and certain other

  19. Materials in the news

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Materials in the news Discover more about the wide-ranging scope of materials research at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Contact Us ADEPS Communications Email Scientists Aditya Mohite, left, and Wanyi Nie are perfecting a crystal production technique to improve perovskite crystal production for solar cells Scientists Aditya Mohite, left, and Wanyi Nie are perfecting a crystal production technique to improve perovskite crystal production for solar cells Read more... Materials science at Los

  20. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  1. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  2. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  3. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  4. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  5. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal process or may be completed as an independent document. In the ESS, identify each material (including all biological materials) with which you will be working. The regulatory oversight for biological work is very complicated and we need to understand the risk levels involved with the material you plan to use at the ALS,

  6. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  7. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Critical Materials Workshop U.S. Department of Energy April 3, 2012 eere.energy.gov Dr. Leo Christodoulou Program Manager Advanced Manufacturing Office Energy Efficiency and...

  8. High Risk Material Studies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Spent Fuel Working Group Report on inventory and storage of the Department's spent nuclear fuel and other reactor irradiated nuclear materials and their environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities.

  9. Material Safety Data Sheets

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) provide workers and emergency personnel with ways for handling and working with a hazardous substance and other health and safety information.

  10. UNCLASSIFIED Institute for Materials ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    properties. In this talk, I will discuss our recent research in the area of nanoscale materials modeling, using various atomistic simulation techniques, aimed at uncovering the...

  11. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  12. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resources The Critical Materials Institute offers connections to resources, including: List of resources U.S. Rare Earth Magnet Patents Table Government agency contacts CMI unique...

  13. Aerogel Derived Nanostructured Thermoelectric Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendell E Rhine, PI; Dong, Wenting; Greg Caggiano, PM

    2010-10-08

    Americas dependence on foreign sources for fuel represents a economic and security threat for the country. These non renewable resources are depleting, and the effects of pollutants from fuels such as oil are reaching a problematic that affects the global community. Solar concentration power (SCP) production systems offer the opportunity to harness one of the United States most under utilized natural resources; sunlight. While commercialization of this technology is increasing, in order to become a significant source of electricity production in the United States the costs of deploying and operating SCP plants must be further reduced. Parabolic Trough SCP technologies are close to meeting energy production cost levels that would raise interest in the technology and help accelerate its adoption as a method to produce a significant portion of the Countrys electric power needs. During this program, Aspen Aerogels will develop a transparent aerogel insulation that can replace the costly vacuum insulation systems that are currently used in parabolic trough designs. During the Phase I program, Aspen Aerogels will optimize the optical and thermal properties of aerogel to meet the needs of this application. These properties will be tested, and the results will be used to model the performance of a parabolic trough HCE system which uses this novel material in place of vacuum. During the Phase II program, Aspen Aerogels will scale up this technology. Together with industry partners, Aspen Aerogels will build and test a prototype Heat Collection Element that is insulated with the novel transparent aerogel material. This new device will find use in parabolic trough SCP applications.

  14. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development FY 2008 Progress Report for ... Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials ...

  15. FY 2009 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development Overview of Lightweight Materials Technical Cost Modeling - Life Cycle Analysis Basis for Program Focus

  16. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extended Trispyrazolate Linker | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio; Masciocchi, Norberto; McDonald, Thomas M.; and Long, Jeffrey R. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker. Cryst. Eng. Comm., 17,

  17. Synthesis of [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methacrylic acid, [.sup.13C] and [.sup.2H] substituted methyl methacrylate and/or related compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Marc A. (Santa Fe, NM); Martinez, Rodolfo A. (Santa Fe, NM); Unkefer, Clifford J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-01-22

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds of the formulae ##STR00001## wherein Q is selected from the group consisting of --S--, --S(.dbd.O)--, and --S(.dbd.O).sub.2--, Z is selected from the group consisting of 1-naphthyl, substituted 1-naphthyl, 2-naphthyl, substituted 2-naphthyl, and phenyl groups with the structure ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4 and R.sub.5 are each independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, a halogen, and an amino group selected from the group consisting of NH.sub.2, NHR and NRR' where R and R' are each independently selected from the group consisting of a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl, an aryl, and an alkoxy group, and X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group, and a fully-deuterated C.sub.1-C.sub.4 lower alkyl group. The present invention is also directed to a process of preparing labeled compounds, e.g., process of preparing [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid by reacting a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13CH.sub.2)-- aryl sulfone precursor with .sup.13CHI to form a (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate, and, reacting the (CH.sub.3CH.sub.2O--.sup.13C(O)--.sup.13C(.sup.13CH.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfone intermediate with sodium hydroxide, followed by acid to form [.sup.13C]methacrylic acid. The present invention is further directed to a process of preparing [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate by reacting a (HOOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate with CD.sub.3I to form a (.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate, and heating the(.sup.2H.sub.3COOC--C(C.sup.2H.sub.3).sub.2)-- aryl sulfinyl intermediate at temperatures and for time sufficient to form [.sup.2H.sub.8]methyl methacrylate.

  18. Transition Metal Oxide Alloys as Potential Solar Energy Conversion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toroker, Maytal; Carter, Emily A.

    2013-02-21

    First-row transition metal oxides (TMOs) are inexpensive potentia alternative materials for solar energy conversion devices. However, some TMOs, such as manganese(II) oxide, have band gaps that are too large for efficiently absorbing solar energy. Other TMOs, such as iron(II) oxide, have conduction and valence band edges with the same orbital character that may lead to unfavorably high electronhole recombination rates. Another limitation of iron(II) oxide is that the calculated valence band edge is not positioned well for oxidizing water. We predict that key properties, including band gaps, band edge positions, and possibly electronhole recombination rates, may be improved by alloying TMOs that have different band alignments. A new metric, the band gap center offset, is introduced for simple screening of potential parent materials. The concept is illustrated by calculating the electronic structure of binary oxide alloys that contain manganese, nickel, iron, zinc, and/or magnesium, within density functional theory (DFT)+U and hybrid DFT theories. We conclude that alloys of iron(II) oxide are worth evaluating further as solar energy conversion materials.

  19. Development of Ceramic Interconnect Materials for SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Kyung J.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Marina, Olga A.

    2010-08-05

    Currently, acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite is the state-of-the-art ceramic interconnect material for high temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) due to its fairly good electronic conductivity and chemical stability in both oxidizing and reducing atmospheres, and thermal compatibility with other cell components. The major challenge for acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite for SOFC interconnect applications is its inferior sintering behavior in air, which has been attributed to the development of a thin layer of Cr2O3 at the interparticle necks during the initial stages of sintering. In addition, lanthanum chromite is reactive with YSZ electrolyte at high temperatures, forming a highly resistive lanthanum zirconate phase (La2Zr2O7), which further complicates co-firing processes. Acceptor-doped yttrium chromite is considered to be one of the promising alternatives to acceptor-doped lanthanum chromite because it is more stable with respect to the formation of hydroxides in SOFC operating conditions, and the formation of impurity phases can be effectively avoided at co-firing temperatures. In addition, calcium-doped yttrium chromite exhibits higher mechanical strength than lanthanum chromite-based materials. The major drawback of yttrium chromite is considered to be its lower electrical conductivity than lanthanum chromite. The properties of yttrium chromites could possibly be improved and optimized by partial substitution of chromium with various transition metals. During FY10, PNNL investigated the effect of various transition metal doping on chemical stability, sintering and thermal expansion behavior, microstructure, electronic and ionic conductivity, and chemical compatibility with other cell components to develop the optimized ceramic interconnect material.

  20. Hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brecher, Lee E.; Mones, Charles G.; Guffey, Frank D.

    2015-06-02

    A hydrocarbonaceous material upgrading method may involve a novel combination of heating, vaporizing and chemically reacting hydrocarbonaceous feedstock that is substantially unpumpable at pipeline conditions, and condensation of vapors yielded thereby, in order to upgrade that feedstock to a hydrocarbonaceous material condensate that meets crude oil pipeline specification.

  1. Measurements and material accounting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammond, G.A. )

    1989-11-01

    The DOE role for the NBL in safeguarding nuclear material into the 21st century is discussed. Development of measurement technology and reference materials supporting requirements of SDI, SIS, AVLIS, pyrochemical reprocessing, fusion, waste storage, plant modernization program, and improved tritium accounting are some of the suggested examples.

  2. Procurement and Materials Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Procurement and Materials Management U.S. Department of Energy | Who We Are | Current Requests for Proposal | Requests for Information | Expression of Interest | Subcontractor Information | Small Business Home Washington River Protection Solutions | Hanford.gov | Energy.gov Procurement and Materials Management Small Business Resources Small Business Calendar Terms & Conditions Procedures to Subcontractors Instructions Forms Vendor Registration Solicitations Small Bus. Events Procedures

  3. Energy Materials Network

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    High performance materials hold the key to innovation in many critical clean energy technologies. But with ambitious national targets to reduce America’s carbon footprint, advanced materials’ traditional 15-20 years-to-market timeframe isn’t keeping pace with America’s goals to achieve a clean energy economy. Through the Energy Materials Network (EMN), the Energy Department is taking a different approach to materials research and development (R&D) that aims to solve industry’s toughest clean energy materials challenges. EMN’s targeted, growing network of consortia led by the Energy Department’s national labs is better integrating all phases of R&D, from discovery through deployment, and facilitating industry access to its national laboratories’ capabilities, tools, and expertise to accelerate the materials development cycle and enable U.S. manufacturers to deliver innovative, made-in-America products to the world market. This effort supports the President’s Materials Genome Initiative, which is working to discover, manufacture, and deploy advanced materials twice as fast, at a fraction of the cost. EMN also supports the recommendations of the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership 2.0, a working group with leaders from industry, academia, and labor, which highlighted the importance of producing advanced materials for technologies critical to U.S. competitiveness in manufacturing.

  4. Nanocrystalline heterojunction materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H.; Su, Yali; Gao, Yufei; Heald, Steve M.

    2003-07-15

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  5. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-02-03

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  6. Sandia Energy - Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wavelength Conversion Materials Home Energy Research EFRCs Solid-State Lighting Science EFRC Overview Wavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion MaterialsTara...

  7. Structure and scintillation yield of Ce-doped AlGa substituted yttrium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidletskiy, Oleg; Kononets, Valerii; Lebbou, Kheirreddine; Neicheva, Svetlana; Voloshina, Olesya; Bondar, Valerii; Baumer, Vyacheslav; Belikov, Konstantin; Gektin, Alexander; Grinyov, Boris; Joubert, Marie-France

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? Range of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. ? Light yield of mixed crystals reaches 130% of the YAG:Ce value at x ? 0.4. ? ?1% of antisite defects is formed in YGG:Ce, but no evidence of this is obtained for the rest of crystals. -- Abstract: Structure and scintillation yield of Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce solid solution crystals are studied. Crystals are grown from melt by the Czochralski method. Distribution of host cations in crystal lattice is determined. Quantity of antisite defects in crystals is evaluated using XRD and atomic emission spectroscopy data. Trend of light output at Al/Ga substitution in Y{sub 3}(Al{sub 1?x}Ga{sub x}){sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce is determined for the first time. Light output in mixed crystals reaches 130% comparative to Ce-doped yttriumaluminum garnet. Luminescence properties at Al/Ga substitution are evaluated.

  8. Patent: Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    graphite network | DOEpatents Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network Citation Details Title: Electrode material comprising graphene-composite materials in a graphite network

  9. Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-09-29

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for the Transportation Safeguards System (TSS) packaging and transportation and onsite transfer of nuclear explosives, nuclear components, Naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear materials, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels: DOE 5610.12 and DOE 5610.14.

  10. Packaging and Transfer or Transportation of Materials of National Security Interest

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-26

    To establish requirements and responsibilities for offsite shipments of naval nuclear fuel elements, Category I and Category II special nuclear material, nuclear explosives, nuclear components, special assemblies, and other materials of national security interest. Cancels DOE O 461.1. Canceled by DOE O 461.1B and DOE O 461.2.

  11. Materials of Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2005-09-15

    The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

  12. HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scale (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale Citation Details In-Document Search Title: HPC Colony II: FAST_OS II: Operating Systems and Runtime Systems at Extreme Scale HPC Colony II has been a 36-month project focused on providing portable performance for leadership class machines-a task made difficult by the emerging variety of more complex computer architectures. The project attempts to move the burden of

  13. FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Crosscutting Research and Development | Department of Energy 2. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development FY 2008 Progress Report for Lightweighting Materials - 12. Materials Crosscutting Research and Development Lightweighting Materials focuses on the development and validation of advanced materials and manufacturing technologies to reduce automobile weight without compromising other attributes. PDF icon 12_materials_crosscutting_rd.pdf More Documents & Publications FY 2009

  14. Fractional distillation as a strategy for reducing the genotoxic potential of SRC-II coal liquids: a status report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pelroy, R.A.; Wilson, B.W.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents results of studies on the effects of fractional distillation on the genotoxic potential of Solvent Refined Coal (SRC-II) liquids. SRC-II source materials and distilled liquids were provided by Pittsburg and Midway Coal Mining Co. Fractional distillations were conducted on products from the P-99 process development unit operating under conditions approximating those anticipated at the SRC-II demonstration facility. Distillation cuts were subjected to chemical fractionation, in vitro bioassay and initial chemical analysis. Findings are discussed as they relate to the temperature at which various distillate cuts were produced. This document is the first of two status reports scheduled for 1981 describing these studies.

  15. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  16. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A. )

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials MANAGEMENT (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. it is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how ''what is and what if'' questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods.

  17. Nuclear materials management overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiGiallonardo, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The true goal of Nuclear Materials Management (NMM) is the strategical and economical management of all nuclear materials. Nuclear Materials Management's role involves near-term and long-term planning, reporting, forecasting, and reviewing of inventories. This function is administrative in nature. It is a growing area in need of future definition, direction, and development. Improvements are required in program structure, the way residues and wastes are determined, how /open quotes/What is and what if/close quotes/ questions are handled, and in overall decision-making methods. 2 refs.

  18. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  19. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  20. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  1. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  2. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J

    2010-01-01

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  3. Overview of VTO Material Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview of VTO Material Technologies Stephen Goguen, Jerry Gibbs, Carol Schutte, and Will Joost LM000 June 9, 2015 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $35.6 M Lightweight Materials $28.5 M Values are FY15 enacted Propulsion Materials $7.1 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials,

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office - Materials Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technologies Office Materials Technologies Ed Owens Jerry Gibbs Will Joost eere.energy.gov 2 | Vehicle Technologies Program Materials Technologies Materials Technologies $36.9 M Lightweight Materials $28.0 M Values are FY14 enacted Propulsion Materials $8.9 M Properties and Manufacturing Multi-Material Enabling Modeling & Computational Mat. Sci. Engine Materials, Cast Al & Fe High Temp Alloys Exhaust Sys. Materials, Low T Catalysts Lightweight Propulsion FY13 Enacted $27.5 M

  5. Reactor Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reactor Materials Reactor Materials The reactor materials crosscut effort will enable the development of innovative and revolutionary materials and provide broad-based, modern materials science that will benefit all four DOE-NE objectives. This will be accomplished through innovative materials development, promoting the use of modern materials science and establishing new, shared research partnerships. Research into specific degradation modes or material needs unique to a particular reactor

  6. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  7. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

    1993-01-01

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  8. Cookoff of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.; Schmitt, R.G.

    1998-09-01

    An overview of cookoff modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented aimed at assessing the violence of reaction following cookoff of confined energetic materials. During cookoff, the response of energetic materials is known to involve coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical processes which induce thermal damage to the energetic material prior to the onset of ignition. These damaged states enhance shock sensitivity and lead to conditions favoring self-supported accelerated combustion. Thus, the level of violence depends on the competition between pressure buildup and stress release due to the loss of confinement. To model these complex processes, finite element-based analysis capabilities are being developed which can resolve coupled heat transfer with chemistry, quasi-static structural mechanics and dynamic response. Numerical simulations that assess the level of violence demonstrate the importance of determining material damage in pre- and post-ignition cookoff events.

  9. Resources | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Notice of intent to issue FOA (December 2013) Energy Department Announces 3 Million to Lower Cost of Geothermal Energy and Boost U.S. Supply of Critical Materials, February 14,...

  10. Spectroscopy of semiconductor materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ag 3 VO 4 as a New p-Type Transparent Conducting Material Using systematic design principles, the Center for Inverse Design is exploring a new class of ternary p-type transparent...

  11. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  12. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work with Biological Materials Print Planning A complete Experiment Safety Sheet (ESS) is required before work can be done at the ALS. This ESS is either a part of the proposal...

  13. Small Building Material Loan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Applicants may borrow up to $100,000 for projects that improve the livability of a home, improve energy efficiency, or expand space. The loan can be applied toward building materials, freight or...

  14. Heavy Vehicle Propulsion Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ray Johnson

    2000-01-31

    The objectives are to Provide Key Enabling Materials Technologies to Increase Energy Efficiency and Reduce Exhaust Emissions. The following goals are listed: Goal 1: By 3rd quarter 2002, complete development of materials enabling the maintenance or improvement of fuel efficiency {ge} 45% of class 7-8 truck engines while meeting the EPA/Justice Department ''Consent Decree'' for emissions reduction. Goal 2: By 4th quarter 2004, complete development of enabling materials for light-duty (class 1-2) diesel truck engines with efficiency over 40%, over a wide range of loads and speeds, while meeting EPA Tier 2 emission regulations. Goal 3: By 4th quarter 2006, complete development of materials solutions to enable heavy-duty diesel engine efficiency of 50% while meeting the emission reduction goals identified in the EPA proposed rule for heavy-duty highway engines.''

  15. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS is risk group 1 or lower with few other complicating issues. ALS has created an umbrella authorization that most users can use for bio-safety level-1 materials. This...

  16. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the ALS is risk group 1 or lower with few other complicating issues. ALS has created an umbrella authorization that most users can use for bio-safety level-1 materials. This...

  17. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  18. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  19. Accelerating Advanced Material Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    this tool into a more permanent, flexible and scalable data service built on top of rich modern web interfaces and state-of-the-art NoSQL database technology." The Materials...

  20. Energy Materials Network News

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are news stories and blog posts related to the Energy Materials Network (EMN) from the Energy Department and the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Please see the Consortia and...

  1. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, supersedes DOE O 410.2.

  2. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. Does not cancel/supersede other directives. Certified 11-18-10.

  3. Next Generation Materials:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Next Generation Materials: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Introduction to the Technology/System ............................................................................................... 1 4 1.1 Overview ....................................................................................................................................... 1 5 1.2 Public and private roles and activities .......................................................................................... 3 6 2.

  4. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  5. Advanced Materials Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Advanced Materials Laboratory Home/Tag:Advanced Materials Laboratory - Structures of the zwitterionic coatings synthesized for this study. Permalink Gallery Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Analysis, Capabilities, Energy, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Investigations on Anti-biofouling Zwitterionic Coatings for MHK Is Now in Press Sandia's Marine

  6. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  7. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  8. CRITICAL MATERIALS MUSEUM DISPLAY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 04-01-2015 Introduction The Critical Materials display was initiated by the Outreach and Education Coordinator for the Critical Materials Institute (CMI) and the Director of the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) Geology Museum as an opportunity to leverage the relationship between CSM's very successful museum outreach and CMI's desire to reach audiences of all ages across the nation. The display will be designed to provide a visual outreach opportunity with visitors and guests to the Colorado

  9. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Point Methods and Multiphysics for Fracture and Multiphase Problems Joseph Teran, UCLA and Alice Koniges, LBL Contact: jteran@math.ucla.edu Material point methods (MPM) provide an intriguing new path for the design of algorithms that are poised to scale to billions of cores [4]. These methods are particularly important for simulating various phases in the presence of extreme deformation and topological change. This brings about the possibility of new simulations enabled at the exascale

  10. Materials processing with light

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials processing with light, plasmas and other sources of energy At the ARC various processing technologies are used to create materials, struc- tures, and devices that play an increasingly important role in high value-added manufacturing of computer and communications equipment, physical and chemical sensors, biomedical instruments and treatments, semiconductors, thin films, photovoltaics, electronic components and optical components. For example, making coatings, including paint, chrome,

  11. FERN Blue Ribbon Wind Farm II* | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II* Jump to: navigation, search Name FERN Blue Ribbon Wind Farm II* Facility FERN Blue Ribbon Wind Farm II* Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed...

  12. Hopkins Ridge II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Hopkins Ridge II Wind Farm Facility Hopkins Ridge II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  13. Panther Creek II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Panther Creek II Wind Farm Facility Panther Creek II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  14. Woodward Mountain I & II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mountain I & II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Woodward Mountain I & II Wind Farm Facility Woodward Mountain Wind Ranch I and II Sector Wind energy Facility Type...

  15. Michigan Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Michigan Wind II Wind Farm Facility Michigan Wind II Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status...

  16. North Dakota Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name North Dakota Wind II Wind Farm Facility North Dakota Wind II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  17. Lake Benton II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lake Benton II Wind Farm Facility Lake Benton II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  18. Smoky Hills II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Smoky Hills II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Smoky Hills II Wind Farm Facility Smoky Hills II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  19. Tres Vaqueros II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Tres Vaqueros II Wind Farm Facility Tres Vaqueros II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...

  20. Venture Wind II Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    II Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Venture Wind II Wind Farm Facility Venture Wind II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service...