Sample records for material shows stable

  1. Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry SHARE Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: New Material Tests Show Biaxial...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate Creep Is Important for Large Wind-Turbine Blades...

  3. Physically and chemically stable ionic liquid-infused textured surfaces showing excellent dynamic omniphobicity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miranda, Daniel F.; Urata, Chihiro; Masheder, Benjamin; Dunderdale, Gary J.; Hozumi, Atsushi, E-mail: a.hozumi@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98, Anagahora, Shimo-Shidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 463-8560 (Japan); Yagihashi, Makoto [Nagoya Municipal Industrial Research Institute, Rokuban, Atsuta-ku, Nagoya 456-0058 (Japan)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorinated and hydrophobic ionic liquid (IL), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) imide, effectively served as an advantageous lubricating liquid for the preparation of physically and chemically stable omniphobic surfaces based on slippery liquid-infused porous surfaces. Here, we used particulate microstructures as supports, prepared by the chemical vapor deposition of 1,3,5,7-tetramethylcyclotetrasiloxane and subsequent surface modification with (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane. Confirmed by SEM and contact angle measurements, the resulting IL-infused microtextured surfaces are smooth and not only water but also various low surface tension liquids can easily slide off at low substrate tilt angles of <5°, even after exposure to high temperature, vacuum, and UV irradiation.

  4. & Surface Chemistry Water-Stable Zirconium-Based MetalOrganic Framework Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Surface Chemistry Water-Stable Zirconium-Based Metal­Organic Framework Material with High candidates as replacements for gasoline (petrol). However, their compact storage in molecular form, es Department of Chemistry and International Institute for Nanotechnology Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan

  5. Stable doped hybrid sol-gel materials for solid-state dye laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Stable doped hybrid sol-gel materials for solid-state dye laser Tran H. Nhung, Michael Canva have been obtained with dye-doped hybrid xerogel samples prepared several years ago and stored dye into a hybrid xerogel matrix and obtained good laser performances similar to the rest

  6. neutron scattering shows magnetic excitation mechanism at work in new materials.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    neutron scattering shows magnetic excitation mechanism at work in new materials. In 2008 dai of orNl and the university of tennes- see led early neutron scattering studies of the pnictides. dai ticks off four main things neutron scattering has revealed about superconducting iron com- pounds

  7. Simply AlF3-treated Li4Ti5O12 composite anode materials for stable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simply AlF3-treated Li4Ti5O12 composite anode materials for stable and ultrahigh power lithium-ion batteries. Simply AlF3-treated Li4Ti5O12 composite anode materials for stable and...

  8. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, L.J.H.; Singh, P.; Ruka, R.J.; Vasilow, T.R.; Bratton, R.J.

    1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators. 4 figs.

  9. Low cost stable air electrode material for high temperature solid oxide electrolyte electrochemical cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuo, Lewis J. H. (Monroeville, PA); Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Churchill Boro, PA); Vasilow, Theodore R. (Penn Township, PA); Bratton, Raymond J. (Delmont, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low cost, lanthanide-substituted, dimensionally and thermally stable, gas permeable, electrically conductive, porous ceramic air electrode composition of lanthanide-substituted doped lanthanum manganite is provided which is used as the cathode in high temperature, solid oxide electrolyte fuel cells and generators. The air electrode composition of this invention has a much lower fabrication cost as a result of using a lower cost lanthanide mixture, either a natural mixture or an unfinished lanthanide concentrate obtained from a natural mixture subjected to incomplete purification, as the raw material in place of part or all of the higher cost individual lanthanum. The mixed lanthanide primarily contains a mixture of at least La, Ce, Pr, and Nd, or at least La, Ce, Pr, Nd and Sm in its lanthanide content, but can also include minor amounts of other lanthanides and trace impurities. The use of lanthanides in place of some or all of the lanthanum also increases the dimensional stability of the air electrode. This low cost air electrode can be fabricated as a cathode for use in high temperature, solid oxide fuel cells and generators.

  10. Improving Corrosion Behavior in SCWR, LFR and VHTR Reactor Materials by Formation of a Stable Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur T. Motta; Robert Comstock; Ning Li; Todd Allen; Gary Was

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to understand the influence of the alloy microstructure and composition on the formation of a stable, protective oxide in the environments relevant to the SCWR and LFR reactor concepts, as well as to the VHTR. It is proposed to use state-of-the art techniques to study the fine structure of these oxides to identify the structural differences between stable and unstable oxide layers. The techniques to be used are microbeam synchrotron radiation diffraction and fluorescence, and cross-sectional transmission electron microcopy on samples prepared using focused ion beam.

  11. Lauric Acid/Wood Fiber Blends for Shape Stable Phase Change Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    of this would have been possible without them. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU Materials and Methods Materials ·Purity >99% Lauric Acid (Palmac 99-12, Acidchem International Sdn. Bhd

  12. Contested Material Interface Shows Mixing | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops 2008O"Program and Book of

  13. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

  14. Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContract Research Material

  15. Suppression of Stable Flies on Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K.

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    populations is sanitation. In confined animal facilities, a top priority should be to eliminate stable fly breeding sites as often as possible. To do this, remove and spread decomposing vegetation or bedding material that has become mixed with urine and feces... but in concert with other meth- ods, such as sanitation. Chemical control: If a stable fly problem persists, an insecticide can be used. Many compounds are available for suppressing adult and larval stable fly populations. Animals can be treated as needed...

  16. 2015 Washington Auto Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz attended the 2015 Washington Auto Show in Washington, DC on January 22, 2015. He delivered brief remarks on the Energy Department's role in electric and fuel cell vehicle technology, and visited several of the exhibits featuring recent additions to the vehicles market.

  17. Stable isotope enrichment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egle, Brian

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

  18. Stable isotope enrichment

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Egle, Brian

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Brian Egle is working to increase the nation's capacity to produce stable isotopes for use including medicine, industry and national security.

  19. Thermodynamically Stable Blue Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Castles; S. M. Morris; E. M. Terentjev; H. J. Coles

    2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We show theoretically that flexoelectricity stabilizes blue phases in chiral liquid crystals. Induced internal polarization reduces the elastic energy cost of splay and bend deformations surrounding singular lines in the director field. The energy of regions of double twist is unchanged. This in turn reduces the free energy of the blue phase with respect to that of the chiral nematic phase, leading to stability over a wider temperature range. The theory explains the discovery of large temperature range blue phases in highly flexoelectric "bimesogenic" and "bent-core" materials, and predicts how this range may be increased further.

  20. Nuclear materials safeguards for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tape, J.W.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic concepts of domestic and international safeguards are described, with an emphasis on safeguards systems for the fuel cycles of commercial power reactors. Future trends in institutional and technical measures for nuclear materials safeguards are outlined. The conclusion is that continued developments in safeguards approaches and technology, coupled with institutional measures that facilitate the global management and protection of nuclear materials, are up to the challenge of safeguarding the growing inventories of nuclear materials in commercial fuel cycles in technologically advanced States with stable governments that have signed the nonproliferation treaty. These same approaches also show promise for facilitating international inspection of excess weapons materials and verifying a fissile materials cutoff convention.

  1. Stable isotope studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishida, T.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research has been in four general areas: (1) correlation of isotope effects with molecular forces and molecular structures, (2) correlation of zero-point energy and its isotope effects with molecular structure and molecular forces, (3) vapor pressure isotope effects, and (4) fractionation of stable isotopes. 73 refs, 38 figs, 29 tabs.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: New Material Tests Show Biaxial Laminate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive SolarEducationStationCSP Resources On September 26, 2012,MoreCreep Is

  3. GENERAL THEORY OF COUPLED THERMALLY STABLE ANISOTROPIC LAMINATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of rotor blades of helicopters or of wind-mills. Usually, structural composite laminates are obtained material. The problem of obtaining coupled thermally stable laminates has a certain importance in practical

  4. Bi-stable optical actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holdener, Fred R. (Tracy, CA); Boyd, Robert D. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a bi-stable optical actuator device that is depowered in both stable positions. A bearing is used to transfer motion and smoothly transition from one state to another. The optical actuator device may be maintained in a stable position either by gravity or a restraining device.

  5. Stable local oscillator microcircuit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brocato, Robert Wesley

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report gives a description of the development of a Stable Local Oscillator (StaLO) Microcircuit. The StaLO accepts a 100MHz input signal and produces output signals at 1.2, 3.3, and 3.6 GHz. The circuit is built as a multi-chip module (MCM), since it makes use of integrated circuit technologies in silicon and lithium niobate as well as discrete passive components. The StaLO uses a comb generator followed by surface acoustic wave (SAW) filters. The comb generator creates a set of harmonic components of the 100MHz input signal. The SAW filters are narrow bandpass filters that are used to select the desired component and reject all others. The resulting circuit has very low sideband power levels and low phase noise (both less than -40dBc) that is limited primarily by the phase noise level of the input signal.

  6. Backstage at the Daily Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Backstage footage from Secretary Chu's appearance on the Daily Show where he discuses the green room candy dish and possible lighting considerations.

  7. NAIHC Convention and Trade Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC) most longstanding Annual Event, the 39th Annual NAIHC Convention and Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about tribal housing, attend...

  8. Transversely stable soliton trains in photonic lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Jianke [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05401 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the existence of transversely stable soliton trains in optics. These stable soliton trains are found in two-dimensional square photonic lattices when they bifurcate from X-symmetry points with saddle-shaped diffraction inside the first Bloch band and their amplitudes are above a certain threshold. We also show that soliton trains with low amplitudes or bifurcated from edges of the first Bloch band ({Gamma} and M points) still suffer transverse instability. These results are obtained in the continuous lattice model and are further corroborated by the discrete model.

  9. Diarrheal Disease in Show Swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawhorn, D. Bruce

    2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    cause disease in humans. Contaminated water is the main source of Giardia spp. Bacterial Causes Swine dysentery or ?bloody dysentery? from infec- tion with Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae is a major cause of diarrheal disease in show pigs... (the same area as whipworms) and prevents reabsorption of fluids. Affected pigs severe- ly dehydrate and up to 30 percent can die. Most affected pigs will drink but will not eat. Pigs that recover are intermittent shedders of B. hyodysenteriae and are a...

  10. Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

  11. Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries . Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries . Abstract:...

  12. A Stable Massive Charged Particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Rajasekaran

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the possibility of the existence of a stable massive charged particle by a minimal extension of the standard model particle content. Absolute stability in the case of singly charged particle is not possible if the usual doublet Higgs exists, unless a discrete symmetry is imposed.But a doubly charged particle is absolutely stable.

  13. 4-H Show Lamb Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Frank; Stultz, Ross

    1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    members in devoting many hours over several months to the proper care, feeding and management of a potentially award-winning lamb. Lambs may be purchased by private treaty at a producer?s ranch or through sales. During the late spring and summer..., there are usually one or more sales every week throughout the state. Information on lamb sales is available through magazines such as ?The Showbox,? ?Show Times? and ?The Purple Circle.? However, many of the decisions you make regarding the type of feeder lamb...

  14. Showing results, 3 Energy technology and energy planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    aspects of energy, industrial, and agricultural production Materials, 24 Materials and measuring materials, 8 Plasma and fluid dynamics, 9 ­ Energy planning, 10 Simulation and optimisation of energyShowing results, 3 Energy, 4 Energy technology and energy planning Environment, 12 Environmental

  15. Detonation of Meta-stable Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, Allen; Kuhl, Allen L.; Fried, Laurence E.; Howard, W. Michael; Seizew, Michael R.; Bell, John B.; Beckner, Vincent; Grcar, Joseph F.

    2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the energy accumulation in meta-stable clusters. This energy can be much larger than the typical chemical bond energy (~;;1 ev/atom). For example, polymeric nitrogen can accumulate 4 ev/atom in the N8 (fcc) structure, while helium can accumulate 9 ev/atom in the excited triplet state He2* . They release their energy by cluster fission: N8 -> 4N2 and He2* -> 2He. We study the locus of states in thermodynamic state space for the detonation of such meta-stable clusters. In particular, the equilibrium isentrope, starting at the Chapman-Jouguet state, and expanding down to 1 atmosphere was calculated with the Cheetah code. Large detonation pressures (3 and 16 Mbar), temperatures (12 and 34 kilo-K) and velocities (20 and 43 km/s) are a consequence of the large heats of detonation (6.6 and 50 kilo-cal/g) for nitrogen and helium clusters respectively. If such meta-stable clusters could be synthesized, they offer the potential for large increases in the energy density of materials.

  16. Unexpected, Stable Form of Uranium Detected | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Unexpected, Stable Form of Uranium Detected Unexpected, Stable Form of Uranium Detected Insights on underappreciated reaction could shed light on environmental cleanup options...

  17. Hydroconversion reactions catalyzed by highly stable pillared clays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, S.A.; Mosqueira, L.; Espinosa, J.; Fuentes, G.A. [Universidad A. Metropolitana-Iztapalapa (Mexico)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-pillared clays (Al-PILC) and Al-X-PILC (X = Ga, Ni), structurally stable at high temperature - in the case of Ga above 800{degrees}C-have been synthesized by controlling intercalation steps and stabilization procedures. New bidimensional materials with an interlaminar distance about 10-12{angstrom} and with different chemical reactivities in the pillars have thus been produced. The analytical techniques employed to characterize the materials and the processes involved during stabilization include N{sub 2} adsorption, AA, XRD, NH{sub 3}-TPD, TGA-DTA, HR- and MAS-NMR (Al, Si, and Ga) and in-situ IR and DRIFTS. Chemical characterization using high pressure reactions with probe molecules such as diphenylmethane and tert-butylbenzene shows selectivity patterns than can be clearly associated with the microstructure of the PILC used, as well as an effect due to the composition of the pillars. Similar studies with zeolites give patterns that differ from those of PILC, probably because of the change in dimensionality of the internal structure. Poisoning studies with metal porphyrins prove that PLIC have improved resistance compared to standard catalysts. Hydrotreatment of Maya crude results a significant reduction in total sulfur under conditions suitable for commercial operation.

  18. Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    characteristics of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure sufficient...

  19. Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

  20. Stable Mesh Decimation Chandrajit Bajaj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    . The choice of geometric error used to guide the reduction process is chosen independent of the function and Physical Modeling San Francisco, CA what is known as model error. Reducing to a linear sys- tem causesStable Mesh Decimation Chandrajit Bajaj Department of Computer Sciences University of Texas

  1. 13, 90179049, 2013 Stable atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 13, 9017­9049, 2013 Stable atmospheric methane in the 2000s I. Pison et al. Title Page Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands 3 SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands 4 Vrije Universiteit, Department of Systems Ecology, Amsterdam, the Netherlands 5

  2. Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing Zirconia NanoparticlesSmartAffects the Future EnergyEnol IntermediatesEnriched

  3. The Maximum Stable Broadcast Throughput for Wireless Line Networks with Network Coding and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanovic, Aleksandar

    Engineering and Computer Science, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL 60208, USA Intelligent Automation Inc cluster size. We show that network coding improves the stable rate over plain retransmissions

  4. Porous Materials Porous Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    1 Porous Materials x Porous Materials · Physical properties * Characteristic impedance p = p 0 e -jk xa- = vej[ ] p x - j ; Zc= p ve = c ka 0k = c 1-j #12;2 Porous Materials · Specific acoustic impedance Porous Materials · Finite thickness ­ blocked p e + -jk (x-d)a p e - jk (x-d)a d x #12

  5. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph; Setlur, Anant Achyut; Deshpande, Anirundha Rajendra; Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev

    2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor material radiationally coupled to the light source. The phosphor material includes a color-stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor prepared by a process including providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof.

  6. Stable reduction product of misonidazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panicucci, R.; McClelland, R.A.; Rauth, A.M.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The predominant stable product (greater than 80%) of the anaerobic radiation chemical reduction (pH 7, formate, N/sub 2/O) of misonidazole (MISO) has been identified as the cyclic guanidinium ion MISO-DDI, a 4,5-dihydro-4,5-dihydroxyimidazolium ion. This cation was prepared as its sulfate salt by the reaction of glyoxal and the appropriate N-substituted guanidinium sulfate. Its formation during MISO reduction was established by NMR spectral comparison and by derivatization as glyoxal bis-oxime, which was formed in 86% yield in fully reduced systems. The toxicity of pure MISO-DDI X sulfate was examined in vivo (C/sub 3/H mice) and in vitro (CHO cells). This product is less toxic than the parent MISO and free glyoxal. A reactive, short-lived, intermediate is suggested as the agent responsible for the toxicity of MISO under hypoxic conditions.

  7. Fissile material detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

  8. High-Order Energy Stable WENO Schemes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A third-order Energy Stable Weighted Essentially Non--Oscillatory (ESWENO) finite difference scheme developed by the authors of the paper [N. K. Yamaleev ...

  9. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schobert, H.H.

    1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

  10. Develop and Evaluate Materials and Additives that Enhance Thermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of different cell chemistries. Identify and develop more stable cell materials that will lead to more inherently abuse tolerant cell chemistries. Secure...

  11. Weighted multibody expansions for computing stable structures of multiatom systems Veera Sundararaghavan* and Nicholas Zabaras

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    is an important step towards the design of materials with exceptional prop- erties. Identification of stable alloy Sundararaghavan* and Nicholas Zabaras Materials Process Design and Control Laboratory, Sibley School of Mechanical to the method of cluster expansion, WMBE focuses on positional degrees of freedom and, hence, explicitly handles

  12. Restoration Ecology Stable states vs. classic succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    #12;Wetland restoration goals #12;Wetland restoration goals Restoration of stream meanders ­ majorRestoration Ecology #12;Stable states vs. classic succession #12;Stable states vs. classic succession Beisner et al., 2003 #12;Restoration can be difficult if an ecosystem has moved to a new state

  13. 2013 Washington Auto Show | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials Disposition#EnergyFaceoff12011-2020Energy2013the3

  14. MagLab - Science Show and Tell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arrow Meet the Magnets Arrow Q & A Arrow World Records Arrow By the Numbers Arrow Science Show & Tell Arrow Audio Slideshows Arrow History & Timeline Arrow Look Whos at the...

  15. Thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  16. Counting Bitangents with Stable Maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Ayala; Renzo Cavalieri

    2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an elementary introduction to the theory of moduli spaces of curves and maps. As an application to enumerative geometry, we show how to count the number of bitangent lines to a projective plane curve of degree $d$ by doing intersection theory on moduli spaces.

  17. Inside Gun Shows What Goes On

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Danh

    , particularly in Canada and Mexico. There is solid evidence, primarily from investigations of illegal gun trafficking, that gun shows are an important source of crime guns. But less than 2% of felons incarcerated as 40% of all gun sales. They are quick and convenient, and their anonymity will attract those who put

  18. Environmental application of stable xenon and radioxenonmonitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresel, P. Evan; Olsen, Khris B.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre,Justin I.; Waichler, Scott R.; Milbrath, Brian D.; Cooper, Matt; Kennedy,B. Mack

    2006-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of transuranic waste is needed to makedecisions about waste site remediation. Soil-gas sampling for xenonisotopes can be used to define the locations of spent fuel andtransuranic wastes. Radioxenon in the subsurface is characteristic oftransuranic waste and can be measured with extreme sensitivity usinglarge-volume soilgas samples. Measurements at the Hanford Site showed133Xe and 135Xe levels indicative of 240Pu spontaneous fission. Stablexenon isotopic ratios from fission are distinct from atmospheric xenonbackground. Neutron capture by 135Xe produces an excess of 136Xe inreactor-produced xenon providing a means of distinguishing spent fuelfrom separated transuranic materials.

  19. Material compatibility and thermal aging of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardea, Andrew D.; Nishimoto, Ryan; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Whalen, Scott A.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to design a thermoelectric (TE) module suitable for long-term elevated temperature use, the Department 8651 has conducted parametric experiments to study material compatibility and thermal aging of TE materials. In addition, a comprehensive material characterization has been preformed to examine thermal stability of P- and N-based alloys and their interaction with interconnect diffusion barrier(s) and solder. At present, we have completed the 7-days aging experiments for 36 tiles, from ambient to 250 C. The thermal behavior of P- and N-based alloys and their thermal interaction with both Ni and Co diffusion barriers and Au-Sn solder were examined. The preliminary results show the microstructure, texture, alloy composition, and hardness of P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} and N-Bi{sub 2}(Te,Se){sub 3} alloys are thermally stable up to 7 days annealing at 250 C. However, metallurgical reactions between the Ni-phosphor barriers and P-type base alloy were evident at temperatures {ge} 175 C. At 250 C, the depth (or distance) of the metallurgical reaction and/or Ni diffusion into P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} is approximately 10-15 {micro}m. This thermal instability makes the Ni-phosphor barrier unsuitable for use at temperatures {ge} 175 C. The Co barrier appeared to be thermally stable and compatible with P(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} at all annealing temperatures, with the exception of a minor Co diffusion into Au-Sn solder at {ge} 175 C. The effects of Co diffusion on long-term system reliability and/or the thermal stability of the Co barrier are yet to be determined. Te evaporation and its subsequent reaction with Au-Sn solder and Ni and Co barriers on the ends of the tiles at temperatures {ge} 175 C were evident. The Te loss and its effect on the long-term required stoichiometry of P-(Bi, Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} are yet to be understood. The aging experiments of 90 days and 180 days are ongoing and scheduled to be completed in 30 days and 150 days, respectively. Material characterization activities are continuing for the remaining tiles.

  20. Is the Solar System Stable ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacques Laskar

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the formulation of the problem by Newton, and during three centuries, astronomers and mathematicians have sought to demonstrate the stability of the Solar System. Thanks to the numerical experiments of the last two decades, we know now that the motion of the planets in the Solar System is chaotic, which prohibits any accurate prediction of their trajectories beyond a few tens of millions of years. The recent simulations even show that planetary collisions or ejections are possible on a period of less than 5 billion years, before the end of the life of the Sun.

  1. Approach to inherently stable interfaces for ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Besmann, T.M.; Kupp, E.R.; Stinton, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shanmugham, S. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Virtually all ceramic matrix composites require and interface coating between the fibers and matrix to achieve the desired mechanical performance. To date, the most effective interface materials for non- oxide matrix composites have been carbon and boron nitride. They are, however, susceptible to oxidation at elevated temperatures, and thus under many envisioned operating environments they will fail, possibly allowing oxidation of the fibers as well, adversely affecting mechanical behavior. Current efforts are directed toward developing stable interface coating, which include oxides and silicon carbide with appropriate thermomechanical properties.

  2. Theoretical construction of stable traversable wormholes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter K. F. Kuhfittig

    2013-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown in this paper that it is possible, at least in principle, to construct a traversable wormhole that is stable to linearized radial perturbations by specifying relatively simple conditions on the shape and redshift functions.

  3. Nutrition and Feeding of Show Poultry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cartwright, A. Lee

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    should be maintained. Feed quality also af_fects con- sumption. Birds given stale, ran- cid or moldy feed will stop eat- Nutrition and Feeding of Show Poultry L-5159 10/03 T he champion- ship potential of a chicken or turkey is determined by genetics..., it will only grow as well as you feed it and it cannot grow beyond its maximum potential. A. Lee Cartwright Associate Professor and Extension Poultry Specialist The Texas A&M University System ing. To keep feed fresh, store it properly away from exposure...

  4. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United Staes). Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences and Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple “weather regimes.” To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, “bred vectors” and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemble forecasts issued from “clouds” (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.

  5. Accelerator probes for new stable quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantin M. Belostky; Maxim Yu. Khlopov; Konstantin I. Shibaev

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonbaryonic dark matter of the Universe can consist of new stable double charged particles $O^{--}$, bound with primordial helium in heavy neutral O-helium (OHe)"atoms" by ordinary Coulomb interaction. O-helium dark atoms can play the role of specific nuclear interacting dark matter and provide solution for the puzzles of dark matter searches. The successful development of composite dark matter scenarios appeals to experimental search for the charged constituents of dark atoms. If $O^{--}$ is a "heavy quark cluster" $\\bar U \\bar U \\bar U$, its production at accelerators is virtually impossible and the strategy of heavy quark search is reduced to search for heavy stable hadrons, containing only single heavy quark (or antiquark). Estimates of production cross section of such particles at LHC are presented and the experimental signatures for new stable quarks are outlined.

  6. Low work function, stable thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  7. Novel carbonaceous materials for lithium secondary batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandi, G.; Winans, R.E.; Carrado, K.A.; Johnson, C.S.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonaceous materials have been synthesized using pillared clays (PILCs) as templates. The PILC was loaded with organic materials such as pyrene in the liquid and vapor phase, styrene in the vapor phase, trioxane, ethylene and propylene. The samples were then pyrolyzed at 700 C in an inert atmosphere, followed by dissolution of the inorganic template by conventional demineralization methods. X-ray powder diffraction of the carbons showed broad d{sub 002} peaks in the diffraction pattern, indicative of a disordered or turbostratic system. N{sub 2} BET surface areas of the carbonaceous materials range from 10 to 100 m{sup 2}/g. There is some microporosity (r < 1 nm) in the highest surface area carbons. Most of the surface area, however, comes from a mixture of micro and mesopores with radii of 2--5 nm. Electrochemical studies were performed on these carbons. Button cells were fabricated with capacity- limiting carbon pellets electrodes as the cathode a/nd metallic lithium foil as the anode. Large reversible capacities (up to 850 mAh/g) were achieved for most of the samples. The irreversible capacity loss was less than 180 mAh/g after the first cycle, suggesting that these types of carbon materials are very stable to lithium insertion and de-insertion reactions.

  8. Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions Stable Free Radicals and Potential Implications for Health Effects of Diesel Emissions 2005...

  9. Fact #766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    6: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices Fact 766: February 11, 2013 Electricity Prices are More Stable than Gasoline Prices All energy prices...

  10. IMPROVED CATALYSTS FOR HEAVY OIL UPGRADING BASED ON ZEOLITE Y NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED STABLE NANOPOROUS HOST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalysts with strong Broensted acid sites and Al stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination was synthesized from the addition of hydrothermally aged zeolite Y precursor to SBA-15 synthesis mixture under mildly acidic condition of pH 5.5. The materials possessed surface areas between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Up to 2 wt. % Al was present in the most aluminated sample that was investigated, and the Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination, even after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. The catalyst's activity was not affected by the aging time of the precursor for up to the 24 hr aging time investigated. This method of introducing Al and maintaining it in a total tetrahedral coordination is very effective, in comparison to other direct and post synthesis alumination methods reported. The catalytic performance of the zeolite Y/SBA-15 composite materials will be compared with that of pure SBA-15. The catalysts will then be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks.

  11. FORMATION OF STABLE MAGNETARS FROM BINARY NEUTRON STAR MERGERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giacomazzo, Bruno [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Perna, Rosalba [JILA and Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    By performing fully general relativistic magnetohydrodynamic simulations of binary neutron star mergers, we investigate the possibility that the end result of the merger is a stable magnetar. In particular, we show that, for a binary composed of two equal-mass neutron stars (NSs) of gravitational mass M {approx} 1.2 M{sub Sun} and equation of state similar to Shen et al. at high densities, the merger product is a stable NS. Such NS is found to be differentially rotating and ultraspinning with spin parameter J/M{sup 2} {approx} 0.86, where J is its total angular momentum, and it is surrounded by a disk of Almost-Equal-To 0.1 M{sub Sun }. While in our global simulations the magnetic field is amplified by about two orders of magnitude, local simulations have shown that hydrodynamic instabilities and the onset of the magnetorotational instability could further increase the magnetic field strength up to magnetar levels. This leads to the interesting possibility that, for some NS mergers, a stable and magnetized NS surrounded by an accretion disk could be formed. We discuss the impact of these new results for the emission of electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave signals and for the central engine of short gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Elastic-Plastic Models for Stable Crack Growtht *James R. Rice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elastic-Plastic Models for Stable Crack Growtht by *James R. Rice Mareh 1973 'PCAbh ~ ~ e c.\\. (n do not fully recover their strain upon unloading. The idealized non-linear elastic (left) and rigid-plastic,. there is ~ strain concentration created at the cut-ahead tip in the rigid-plastic material and the deformation field

  13. Materials Scientist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

  14. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw's Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements.

  15. Dynamically stable magnetic suspension/bearing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic bearing system contains magnetic subsystems which act together to support a rotating element in a state of dynamic equilibrium. However, owing to the limitations imposed by Earnshaw`s Theorem, the magnetic bearing systems to be described do not possess a stable equilibrium at zero rotational speed. Therefore, mechanical stabilizers are provided, in each case, to hold the suspended system in equilibrium until its speed has exceeded a low critical speed where dynamic effects take over, permitting the achievement of a stable equilibrium for the rotating object. A state of stable equilibrium is achieved above a critical speed by use of a collection of passive elements using permanent magnets to provide their magnetomotive excitation. The magnetic forces exerted by these elements, when taken together, levitate the rotating object in equilibrium against external forces, such as the force of gravity or forces arising from accelerations. At the same time, this equilibrium is made stable against displacements of the rotating object from its equilibrium position by using combinations of elements that possess force derivatives of such magnitudes and signs that they can satisfy the conditions required for a rotating body to be stably supported by a magnetic bearing system over a finite range of those displacements. 32 figs.

  16. Stable ideals and Arf rings.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by a regular element of AI (Proposition 1.1) it follows that aAI=IAI. Conversely if wAI =IA.' and I" is stable, i. e. InAr =1", then r1" = rI"AI= I"(IAI) = 1"“, proving (i) (of.

  17. Design of a stable nanocrystalline alloy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murdoch, Heather A. (Heather Ann)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystalline materials are inherently unstable due to their high material fraction of grain boundaries, preventing their improved properties from being used in application. To stabilize the nanoscale grain size against ...

  18. A review of stable water isotopeA review of stable water isotope modellingmodelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Christophe "Kristof"

    fractionation · Kinetic fractionation 2. Modelling the stable water isotope cycle · Rayleigh distillation model Institution of Oceanography) Harald SODEMANN (Norwegian Institute for Air Research) Kristof 18Ovapour=-40 18Oocean=0 18Osnow=-3018Orain=-2 Equilibrium fractionationEquilibrium fractionation

  19. Stable, free-standing Ge nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Liao, C.Y.; Yi, D.O.; Beeman, J.W.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Yu, K.M.; Zakharov, D.N.; Ager III, J.W.; Chrzan,D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Free-standing Ge nanocrystals that are stable under ambient conditions have been synthesized in a two-step process. First, nanocrystals with a mean diameter of 5 nm are grown in amorphous SiO{sub 2} by ion implantation followed by thermal annealing. The oxide matrix is then removed by selective etching in diluted HF to obtain free-standing nanocrystals on a Si wafer. After etching, nanocrystals are retained on the surface and the size distribution is not significantly altered. Free-standing nanocrystals are stable under ambient atmospheric conditions, suggesting formation of a self-limiting native oxide layer. For free-standing as opposed to embedded Ge nanocrystals, an additional amorphous-like contribution to the Raman spectrum is observed and is assigned to surface reconstruction-induced disordering of near-surface atoms.

  20. he stable-hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H or 2H/1H, conventionally expressed as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Andy J.

    T he stable-hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H or 2H/1H, conventionally expressed as D) in bird feathers; Bowen et al. 2005; Votier et al. 2009). Because hydrogen in consumer tissues can ultimately be traced feathers (showing stable-hydrogen isotope characteristics typical of Siberia) and first-winter feathers

  1. Charge Radii of beta-Stable Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. K. Nie

    2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In previous work it was shown that the radius of nucleus R is determined by the alpha-cluster structure and can be estimated on the number of alpha-clusters disregarding to the number of excess neutrons. A hypothesis also was made that the radius R_m of a beta-stable isotope, which is actually measured at electron scattering experiments, is determined by the volume occupied by the matter of the core plus the volume occupied by the peripheral alpha-clusters. In this paper it is shown that the condition R_m = R restricts the number of excess neutrons filling the core to provide the beta-stability. The number of peripheral clusters can vary from 1 to 5 and the value of R for heavy nuclei almost do not change, whereas the number of excess neutrons should change with the number of peripheral clusters to get the value of R_m close to R. It can explain the path of the beta-stability and its width. The radii R_m of the stable isotopes with 12 =< Z =< 83 and the alpha-decay isotopes with 84 =< Z =< 116 that are stable to beta-decay have been calculated.

  2. weapons material

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    2%2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

  3. Storage of nuclear materials by encapsulation in fullerenes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coppa, Nicholas V. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of encapsulating radioactive materials inside fullerenes for stable long-term storage. Fullerenes provide a safe and efficient means of disposing of nuclear waste which is extremely stable with respect to the environment. After encapsulation, a radioactive ion is essentially chemically isolated from its external environment.

  4. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  5. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

    1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

  6. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  7. Scintillator material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

  8. Critical Materials:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

  9. Color stable manganese-doped phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lyons, Robert Joseph (Burnt Hills, NY); Setlur, Anant Achyut (Niskayuna, NY); Deshpande, Anirudha Rajendra (Twinsburg, OH); Grigorov, Ljudmil Slavchev (Sofia, BG)

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphors includes providing a phosphor of formula I; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]:Mn.sup.+4 I and contacting the phosphor in particulate form with a saturated solution of a composition of formula II in aqueous hydrofluoric acid; A.sub.x[MF.sub.y]; II wherein A is Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs, NR.sub.4 or a combination thereof; M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, Al, Ga, In, Sc, Y, La, Nb, Ta, Bi, Gd, or a combination thereof; R is H, lower alkyl, or a combination thereof; x is the absolute value of the charge of the [MF.sub.y] ion; and y is 5, 6 or 7. In particular embodiments, M is Si, Ge, Sn, Ti, Zr, or a combination thereof. A lighting apparatus capable of emitting white light includes a semiconductor light source; and a phosphor composition radiationally coupled to the light source, and which includes a color stable Mn.sup.+4 doped phosphor.

  10. Stable N-CuInSe.sub.2 /iodide-iodine photoelectrochemical cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cahen, David (Rehovot, IL); Chen, Yih W. (Lakewood, CO)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a photoelectrochemical solar cell, stable output and solar efficiency in excess of 10% are achieved with a photoanode of n-CuInSe.sub.2 electrode material and an iodine/iodide redox couple used in a liquid electrolyte. The photoanode is prepared by treating the electrode material by chemical etching, for example in Br.sub.2 /MeOH; heating the etched electrode material in air or oxygen; depositing a surface film coating of indium on the electrode material after the initial heating; and thereafter again heating the electrode material in air or oxygen to oxidize the indium. The electrolyte is treated by the addition of Cu.sup.+ or Cu.sup.2+ salts and In.sup.3+ salts.

  11. Active Printed Materials for Complex Self-Evolving Deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Wei

    We propose a new design of complex self-evolving structures that vary over time due to environmental interaction. In conventional 3D printing systems, materials are meant to be stable rather than active and fabricated ...

  12. ENRICHED STABLE ISOTOPE TARGET PREPARATION AT THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaron, W Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Zevenbergen, Lee [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 1960s the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Program, through the Isotope Development Group at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has been developing and supplying, among other things, enriched stable isotope targets for nuclear research around the world. This group also maintains and distributes the DOE inventory of enriched stable isotopes. Chemical and pyrochemical techniques are used to prepare enriched stable isotopes from this inventory in the desired chemical form. Metallurgical, ceramic, or vacuum processing methods are then used to prepare the isotopes in a wide range of physical forms from thin films, foils, and coatings to large fabricated shapes to meet the needs of experimenters. Significant characterization capabilities are also available to assist in the preparation and evaluation of these custom materials. This work is part of the DOE Isotope Program, which recently transferred to the Office of Nuclear Physics, DOE Office of Science, resulting in a stronger emphasis on enabling R&D. This presentation will focus on the custom preparation of enriched stable isotope targets and other research materials.

  13. Cermet materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

  14. Option Pricing with Levy-Stable Processes Generated by Levy-Stable Integrated Variance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howison, Sam

    Cartea1 and Sam Howison2 1 Birkbeck, University of London 2 Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford hypothesis, stochastic volatil- ity, -stable processes, option pricing, time-changed Brownian motion. We of the underlying stochastic processes used in the financial literature were based on Brownian motion, modelling

  15. Stable operating regime for traveling wave devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlsten, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autophase stability is provided for a traveling wave device (TWD) electron beam for amplifying an RF electromagnetic wave in walls defining a waveguide for said electromagnetic wave. An off-axis electron beam is generated at a selected energy and has an energy noise inherently arising from electron gun. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide. The off-axis electron beam is introduced into the waveguide at a second radius. The waveguide structure is designed to obtain a selected detuning of the electron beam. The off-axis electron beam has a velocity and the second radius to place the electron beam at a selected distance from the walls defining the waveguide, wherein changes in a density of the electron beam due to the RF electromagnetic wave are independent of the energy of the electron beam to provide a concomitant stable operating regime relative to the energy noise.

  16. Preparation of stable crude oil transport emulsions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoli, A.A.; Hamshar, J.A.; Olah, A.M.; Riley, C.J.; Rimmer, D.P.

    1988-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for preparing an oil-in-water emulsion for pipeline transmission is described comprising: (a) shearing and mixing statically, without any dynamic shearing and mixing preceding or following the shearing and mixing statically, a hydrocarbon with an emulsifying composition comprising water and a minor amount of an emulsifying agent at a temperature of from about 100/sup 0/F. to about 200/sup 0/F. to form an oil-in-water emulsion having a viscosity sufficiently low for pipeline transmission, wherein the amount of water in the oil-in-water emulsion is from about 15% to about 60% by weight, and wherein the emulsifying agent is used in an amount sufficient to assist in the formation of the oil-in-water emulsion that is sufficiently stable for pipeline transmission; and wherein the emulsifying agent comprises about 50 percent by weight of an ethoxylated nonyl phenol compound.

  17. Stable quarks of the 4th family?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Belotsky; M. Khlopov; K. Shibaev

    2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Existence of metastable quarks of new generation can be embedded into phenomenology of heterotic string together with new long range interaction, which only this new generation possesses. We discuss primordial quark production in the early Universe, their successive cosmological evolution and astrophysical effects, as well as possible production in present or future accelerators. In case of a charge symmetry of 4th generation quarks in Universe, they can be stored in neutral mesons, doubly positively charged baryons, while all the doubly negatively charged "baryons" are combined with He-4 into neutral nucleus-size atom-like states. The existence of all these anomalous stable particles may escape present experimental limits, being close to present and future experimental test. Due to the nuclear binding with He-4 primordial lightest baryons of the 4th generation with charge +1 can also escape the experimental upper limits on anomalous isotopes of hydrogen, being compatible with upper limits on anomalous lithium. While 4th quark hadrons are rare, their presence may be nearly detectable in cosmic rays, muon and neutrino fluxes and cosmic electromagnetic spectra. In case of charge asymmetry, a nontrivial solution for the problem of dark matter (DM) can be provided by excessive (meta)stable anti-up quarks of 4th generation, bound with He-4 in specific nuclear-interacting form of dark matter. Such candidate to DM is surprisingly close to Warm Dark Matter by its role in large scale structure formation. It catalyzes primordial heavy element production in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis and new types of nuclear transformations around us.

  18. Nuclear-Fuel-Cycle Research Program: availability of geotoxic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachter, B.G.; Kresan, P.L.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report represents an analog approach to the characterization of the environmental behavior of geotoxic waste materials (toxic material emplaced in the earth's crust) as drawn from literature on the Oklo natural fission reactors and uranium ore deposits relative to radioactive wastes, and hydrothermal metal ore deposits relative to stable toxic wastes. The natural analog data were examined in terms of mobility and immobility of selected radioactive or stable waste elements and are presented in matrix relationship with their prime geochemical variables. A numerical system of ranking those relationships for purposes of hazard-indexing is proposed. Geochemical parameters (especially oxidation/reduction potential) are apparently more potent mobilizers/immobilizers than geological or hydrological conditions in many, if not most, geologic environments for most radioactive waste elements. Heavy metal wastes, by analogy to hydrothermal ore systems and geothermal systems, are less clear in their behavior but similar geochemical patterns do apply. Depth relationships between geochemical variables and waste element behavior show some surprises. It is significantly indicated that for waste isolation, deeper is not necessarily better geochemically. Relatively shallow isolation in host rocks such as shale could offer maximum immobility. This paper provides a geochemical outline for examining analog models as well as a departure point for improved quantification of geological and geochemical indexing of toxic waste hazards.

  19. Complex Materials

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  20. Complex Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Valentino

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

  1. Material Symbols 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Andy

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What is the relation between the material, conventional symbol structures that we encounter in the spoken and written word, and human thought? A common assumption, that structures a wide variety of otherwise competing ...

  2. Materializing Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Pierce; Eric Paulos

    Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of materializing energy. Three critical themes are presented: the intangibility of energy, the undifferentiatedness of energy, and the availability of energy. Each theme is developed through combination of critical investigation and design exploration, including the development and deployment of several novel design artifacts: Energy Mementos and The Local Energy Lamp. A framework for interacting with energy-as-materiality is proposed involving collecting, keeping, sharing, and activating energy. A number of additional concepts are also introduced, such as energy attachment, energy engagement, energy attunement, local energy and energy meta-data. Our work contributes both a broader, more integrative design perspective on energy and materiality as well as a diversity of more specific concepts and artifacts that may be of service to designers and researchers of interactive systems concerned with sustainability and energy. Author Keywords Sustainability, energy, materiality, design, design theory

  3. SPARTA: Stable and Efficient Spectrum Access in Next Generation Dynamic Spectrum Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almeroth, Kevin C.

    applications. Using dynamic spectrum access, each node's spectrum usage is inherently unpredictable. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can provide stable spectrum usage while improving its spectrum to each technology/network statically in peak-demand based long-term leases. Overtime, most

  4. Polyolefin composites containing a phase change material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite useful in thermal energy storage, said composite being formed of a polyolefin matrix having a phase change material such as a crystalline alkyl hydrocarbon incorporated therein, said polyolefin being thermally form stable; the composite is useful in forming pellets, sheets or fibers having thermal energy storage characteristics; methods for forming the composite are also disclosed.

  5. Hardfacing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

  6. Study Shows Active Power Controls from Wind May Increase Revenues...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Study Shows Active Power Controls from Wind May Increase Revenues and Improve System Reliability Study Shows Active Power Controls from Wind May Increase Revenues and Improve...

  7. Stable blue phosphorescent organic light emitting devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Thompson, Mark; Giebink, Noel

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel combination of materials and device architectures for organic light emitting devices is provided. An organic light emitting device, is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer includes a host and a phosphorescent emissive dopant having a peak emissive wavelength less than 500 nm, and a radiative phosphorescent lifetime less than 1 microsecond. Preferably, the phosphorescent emissive dopant includes a ligand having a carbazole group.

  8. Energy stable schemes and numerical simulations of two phase ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Energy stable schemes and numerical simulations of two phase complex fluids by the phase-field method Abstact: We present an energetic variational ...

  9. Efficient energy stable schemes with spectral discretization in space ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct energy stable schemes for the time discretization of the highly nonlinear ... shape) in order to achieve a well-defined energy for the system.

  10. Stable, Accelerating Universes in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon DeDeo; Dimitrios Psaltis

    2008-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications to gravity that add additional functions of the Ricci curvature to the Einstein-Hilbert action -- collectively known as $f(R)$ theories -- have been studied in great detail. When considered as complete theories of gravity they can generate non-perturbative deviations from the general relativistic predictions in the solar system, and the simplest models show instabilites on cosmological scales. Here we show that it is possible to treat $f(R)=R\\pm\\mu^4/R$ gravity in a perturbative fashion such that it shows no instabilities on cosmological scales and, in the solar system, is consistent with measurements of the PPN parameters. We show that such a theory produces a spatially flat, accelerating universe, even in the absence of dark energy and when the matter density is too small to close the universe in the general relativistic case.

  11. Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science and Technology SHARE Materials Science and Technology Division The Materials Science and Technology Division is unique within the Department of Energy (DOE)...

  12. Insights in fundamental scratch behavior of polymeric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moghbelli, Ehsan

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    of polymeric materials under scratch deformations are dependent on the type and physical nature of the material, whereas brittle and ductile materials show various behaviors under the specified conditions. Based on the failure mechanism which the material...

  13. Non-destructive radiocarbon and stable isotopic analyses of archaeological materials using plasma oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steelman, Karen Lynn

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma oxidation, an alternative to combustion, is shown to be a non-destructive method for obtaining radiocarbon dates on perishable organic artifacts. Electrically excited oxygen gently converts organic carbon to carbon dioxide. Radiocarbon...

  14. Stable configuration of ultrarelativistic material spheres: The solution for an extremely hot gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neslusan, Lubos [Astronomical Institute of the Slovak Academy of Sciences, 05960 Tatranska Lomnica (Slovakia)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last stage of collapse of a compact object into the horizon of events, the potential energy of its surface layer decreases to a negative value below all limits. The energy-conservation law requires an appearance of a positive-valued energy to balance the decrease. We derive the internal-state properties of the ideal gas situated in an extremely strong, ultrarelativistic gravitational field and suggest the application of our result to a compact object with a radius that is slightly larger than or equal to the Schwarzschild gravitational radius. On the surface of the object, we find that the extreme attractivity of the gravity is accompanied with an extremely high internal heat energy. This internal energy implies a correspondingly high pressure, the gradient of which has such a behavior that it can compete with the gravity. In more detail, we find the equation of state in the case when the magnitude of the potential-type energy of constituting gas particles is much larger than their rest energy. This equation appears to be identical with the general relativity condition of the equilibrium between the gravity and pressure gradient. The consequences of the identity are discussed.

  15. A LOW-VOLTAGE TEMPERATURE-STABLE MICROMECHANICAL PIEZOELECTRIC OSCILLATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayazi, Farrokh

    A LOW-VOLTAGE TEMPERATURE-STABLE MICROMECHANICAL PIEZOELECTRIC OSCILLATOR Reza Abdolvand, Hossein polarization voltages (5-20V) for operation, which complicates the design of the oscillator circuit in today reference oscillator that utilizes a temperature-stable thin- film piezoelectric-on-silicon resonator

  16. Differentially Flat Trajectory Generation for a Dynamically Stable Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the ballbot, a dynamically stable mobile robot which balances on a single spherical wheel. To this end, assumptions are made to form the system as differentially flat, and a method of deriving feasible trajectories, dynamically stable mobile robot. It is a human-sized robot that balances on a single spherical wheel

  17. Human-Robot Physical Interaction with Dynamically Stable Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the ballbot as an example. The ballbot is a dynamically stable mobile robot moving on a single spherical wheel single spherical wheeled mobile robot capable of omnidirec- tional motion. Unlike statically stable The ballbot uses a four-motor inverse mouse-ball drive unit for actuating the ball. The ballbot has

  18. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeigler, John M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  19. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeigler, J.M.

    1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  20. Hybrid sol-gel optical materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zeigler, John M. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid sol-gel materials comprise silicate sols cross-linked with linear polysilane, polygermane, or poly(silane-germane). The sol-gel materials are useful as optical identifiers in tagging and verification applications and, in a different aspect, as stable, visible light transparent non-linear optical materials. Methyl or phenyl silicones, polyaryl sulfides, polyaryl ethers, and rubbery polysilanes may be used in addition to the linear polysilane. The linear polymers cross-link with the sol to form a matrix having high optical transparency, resistance to thermooxidative aging, adherence to a variety of substrates, brittleness, and a resistance to cracking during thermal cycling.

  1. Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support 23,500 Jobs Energy Innovation Hub Report Shows Philadelphia-area Building Retrofits Could Support 23,500...

  2. The design of stable high nitrogen systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tartakovsky, V.A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Inst. of Organic Chemistry

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general strategy for the design of high nitrogen systems with an adequate degree of stability has been elaborated. The design of nitro compounds in which terminal nitro groups are bonded to the chain of several heteroatoms is a specific case within the strategy. In the process of working out the strategy a number of new high nitrogen systems (dinitrazenic acid or dinitroamide HN{sub 3}O{sub 4} and its salts, nitrodiazene oxides RN{sub 3}O{sub 3} and tetrazine dioxides) were discovered. A new of new types of nitro compounds (bicyclo nitro-bis-hydroxylamine, nitrohydrazine, nitrohydroxylamine, sulfo-N-nitroimide and bis-N-nitroimide) were synthesized. This study opens new prospects in the field of the synthesis of high energy materials.

  3. Casting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

  4. Reference Material

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53Reference Materials There are a variety of

  5. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90 4.86(NHMFL)X-RayMaterials

  6. Photovoltaic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

  7. Use of Preventative and Therapeutic Drugs in Show Market Animals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faries Jr., Floron C.

    2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Various preventive and therapeutic medicines may be used for disease management in show mar- ket livestock and poultry. These include vaccines and bacterins, antibiotics and antibacterials, para- siticides and corticosteroids. Exhibitors of show ani.... These instructions are to be followed precisely. L-2335 2-01 Use of Preventive and Therapeutic Drugs in Show Market Animals F.C. Faries, Jr. Associate Professor and Extension Program Leader for Veterinary Medicine The Texas A&M University System Testing The Food...

  8. High-power TSP bits. [Thermally Stable Polycrystalline diamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, J.H.; Maurer, W.C. (Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)); Westcott, P.A. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a three-year R D project to develop advanced thermally stable polycrystalline diamond (TSP) bits that can operate at power levels 5 to 10 times greater than those typically delivered by rotary rigs. These bits are designed to operate on advanced drilling motors that drill 3 to 6 times faster than rotary rigs. TSP bit design parameters that were varied during these tests include cutter size, shape, density, and orientation. Drilling tests conducted in limestone, sandstone, marble, and granite blocks showed that these optimized bits drilled many of these rocks at 500 to 1,000 ft/hr (150 to 300 m/h), compared to 50 to 100 ft/hr (15 to 30 m/h) for roller bits. These tests demonstrated that TSP bits are capable of operating at the high speeds and high torques delivered by advanced drilling motors now being developed. These advanced bits and motors are designed for use in slim-hole and horizontal drilling applications.

  9. abeta oligomers show: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creek showing (Candy and Deep Purple claims) is hosted by Middle Devonian carbonate rocks in the southem Rocky Mountains oi British Columbia. The property lies near the...

  10. alfa show improved: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy Program Format AZ Town Hall president, Tara Jackson Reisslein, Martin 299 Seismic tomography shows that upwelling beneath Iceland is confined to the upper mantle...

  11. ORISE: Report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates on the...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows nuclear engineering graduation rates on the rise in 2013 Number of graduate degrees expected to remain consistent, but undergraduate degrees could see decrease...

  12. Tests show benefits of new polished rod lubricator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, M.R.; Khatib, A. [Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center, Casper, WY (United States)

    1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests with beam-pumped oil wells, completed over 7-months at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (Rmotc), indicated that a new lubricator supplying supplementary grease to polished rods lowered operating costs by reducing maintenance, material costs, and electrical requirements. It also minimized polished rod corrosion and enhanced pollution control. The lubricator worked with extremely hot fluids and in adverse weather conditions. The paper describes Rmotc, the new lubrication, the test wells, and cost reduction.

  13. 2014 Washington Auto Show Slideshow | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014 Chief Freedom of Information20144 Smart Grid

  14. 2015 ACI National Home Performance Conference and Trade Show | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014 Chief Freedom of Information20144Industrial Naturalof

  15. A Stable Magnetic Background in SU(2) QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. M. Cho; D. G. Pak

    2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the instability of the Savvidy-Nielsen-Olesen (SNO) vacuum we make a systematic search for a stable magnetic background in pure SU(2) QCD. It is shown that Wu-Yang monopole-antimonopole pair is unstable under vacuum fluctuations. However, it is shown that a pair of axially symmetric monopole-antimonopole string configuration is stable, provided the distance between the two strings is small enough (less than a critical value). The existence of a stable monopole-antimonopole string background strongly supports that a magnetic condensation of monopole-antimonopole pairs can indeed generate a dynamical symmetry breaking, and thus a desired magnetic confinement of color, in QCD.

  16. ShowFlow: A practical interface for groundwater modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tauxe, J.D.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ShowFlow was created to provide a user-friendly, intuitive environment for researchers and students who use computer modeling software. What traditionally has been a workplace available only to those familiar with command-line based computer systems is now within reach of almost anyone interested in the subject of modeling. In the case of this edition of ShowFlow, the user can easily experiment with simulations using the steady state gaussian plume groundwater pollutant transport model SSGPLUME, though ShowFlow can be rewritten to provide a similar interface for any computer model. Included in this thesis is all the source code for both the ShowFlow application for Microsoft{reg sign} Windows{trademark} and the SSGPLUME model, a User's Guide, and a Developer's Guide for converting ShowFlow to run other model programs. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  17. Inflation with stable anisotropic hair: is it cosmologically viable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigbjørn Hervik; David F. Mota; Mikjel Thorsrud

    2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently an inflationary model with a vector field coupled to the inflaton was proposed and the phenomenology studied for the Bianchi type I spacetime. It was found that the model demonstrates a counter-example to the cosmic no-hair theorem since there exists a stable anisotropically inflationary fix-point. One of the great triumphs of inflation, however, is that it explains the observed flatness and isotropy of the universe today without requiring special initial conditions. Any acceptable model for inflation should thus explain these observations in a satisfactory way. To check whether the model meets this requirement, we introduce curvature to the background geometry and consider axisymmetric spacetimes of Bianchi type II,III and the Kantowski-Sachs metric. We show that the anisotropic Bianchi type I fix-point is an attractor for the entire family of such spacetimes. The model is predictive in the sense that the universe gets close to this fix-point after a few e-folds for a wide range of initial conditions. If inflation lasts for N e-folds, the curvature at the end of inflation is typically of order exp(-2N). The anisotropy in the expansion rate at the end of inflation, on the other hand, while being small on the one-percent level, is highly significant. We show that after the end of inflation there will be a period of isotropization lasting for about 2N/3 e-folds. After that the shear scales as the curvature and becomes dominant around N e-folds after the end of inflation. For plausible bounds on the reheat temperature the minimum number of e-folds during inflation, required for consistency with the isotropy of the supernova Ia data, lays in the interval (21,48). Thus the results obtained for our restricted class of spacetimes indicates that inflation with anisotropic hair is cosmologically viable.

  18. Radiation-Dominated Disks Are Thermally Stable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigenobu Hirose; Julian H. Krolik; Omer Blaes

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    When the accretion rate is more than a small fraction of Eddington, the inner regions of accretion disks around black holes are expected to be radiation-dominated. However, in the alpha-model, these regions are also expected to be thermally unstable. In this paper, we report two 3-d radiation MHD simulations of a vertically-stratified shearing box in which the ratio of radiation to gas pressure is ~ 10, and yet no thermal runaway occurs over a timespan ~ 40 cooling times. Where the time-averaged dissipation rate is greater than the critical dissipation rate that creates hydrostatic equilibrium by diffusive radiation flux, the time-averaged radiation flux is held to the critical value, with the excess dissipated energy transported by radiative advection. Although the stress and total pressure are well-correlated as predicted by the alpha-model, we show that stress fluctuations precede pressure fluctuations, contrary to the usual supposition that the pressure controls the saturation level of the magnetic energy. This fact explains the thermal stability. Using a simple toy-model, we show that independently-generated magnetic fluctuations can drive radiation pressure fluctuations, creating a correlation between the two while maintaining thermal stability.

  19. Critical Materials Institute

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alex King

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

  20. STABLE FILTERING SCHEMES WITH RATIONAL DILATIONS BRODY DYLAN JOHNSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Brody Dylan

    STABLE FILTERING SCHEMES WITH RATIONAL DILATIONS BRODY DYLAN JOHNSON Abstract. The relationship Services Administration at St. Louis University. 1 #12;2 BRODY DYLAN JOHNSON If is a scaling function

  1. Stable nonlinear identification from noisy repeated experiments via convex optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobenkin, Mark M.

    This paper introduces new techniques for using convex optimization to fit input-output data to a class of stable nonlinear dynamical models. We present an algorithm that guarantees consistent estimates of models in this ...

  2. Intraseasonal variability in South America recorded in stable water isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturm, Christophe "Kristof"

    Intraseasonal variability in South America recorded in stable water isotopes Christophe Sturm,1 cores (South America) has illustrated the key role such archives can play in past climate South America, highlighting the internal atmospheric variability, as opposed to external forcing

  3. Secretary Chu Speaks at the 2010 Washington Auto Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    at the 2010 Washington Auto Show, Secretary Chu lays out a roadmap for how the U.S. can lead the world in making the clean vehicles we need. He also announced that the Department of Energy had...

  4. Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Global Climate Change Assessment Report Shows Nations Not Doing Enough Home > Blogs > Dc's blog Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(107) Contributor 5 November, 2014 - 14:49 The latest...

  5. Considering removing "Show Preview" button on utility rate form...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rmckeel's picture Submitted by Rmckeel(297) Contributor 22 April, 2013 - 13:55 Utility Rates I'm considering removing the "Show Preview" button, since it does not work (javascript...

  6. Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynein Motor Domain Shows Ring-Shaped Motor, Buttress Print Movement is fundamental to life. It takes place even at the cellular level where cargo is continually being transported...

  7. Biological Monitoring at Amchitka Appears to Show Impacts from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of the monitoring showed that Dolly Varden (a type of freshwater char, a trout-like fish), rockweed (littoral-zone algae), and to a lesser extent, Irish Lord (a small...

  8. Enlightening lightning! Producing and directing a multimedia planetarium show

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Sarah Marie

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    is middle school aged children. The goal of the show is to teach lightning safety and lightning facts in an immersive environment. Through the use of video, an animated character, and a meteorologist, the curriculum is presented to the audience. I...! by starting with outlining the curriculum and finishing with putting it all together at the planetarium. The goal of this paper is to discuss the techniques and organizational methods used to manage a diverse group and produce a multimedia show. iv...

  9. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

  10. Material Stabilization Project Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SPEER, D.R.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Materials Stabilization project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the Plutonium Finishing Plant Integrated Project Management Plan (IPMP), HNF-3617, Rev. 0. This is the top-level definitive project management document that specifies the technical (work scope), schedule, and cost baselines to manager the execution of this project. It describes the organizational approach and roles/responsibilities to be implemented to execute the project. This plan is under configuration management and any deviations must be authorized by appropriate change control action. Materials stabilization is designated the responsibility to open and stabilize containers of plutonium metal, oxides, alloys, compounds, and sources. Each of these items is at least 30 weight percent plutonium/uranium. The output of this project will be containers of materials in a safe and stable form suitable for storage pending final packaging and/or transportation offsite. The corrosion products along with oxides and compounds will be stabilized via muffle furnaces to reduce the materials to high fired oxides.

  11. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  12. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  13. Development of Dodecaniobate Keggin Chain Materials as Alternative Sorbents for SR and Actinide Removal from High-Level Nuclear Waste Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, May; Bonhomme, Francois

    2004-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The current baseline sorbent (monosodium titanate) for Sr and actinide removal from Savannah River Site's high level wastes has excellent adsorption capabilities for Sr but poor performance for the actinides. We are currently investigating the development of alternative materials that sorb radionuclides based on chemical affinity and/or size selectivity. The polyoxometalates, negatively-charged metal oxo clusters, have known metal binding properties and are of interest for radionuclide sequestration. We have developed a class of Keggin-ion based materials, where the Keggin ions are linked in 1- dimensional chains separated by hydrated, charge-balancing cations. These Nb-based materials are stable in the highly basic nuclear waste solutions and show good selectivity for Sr and Pu. Synthesis, characterization and structure of these materials in their native forms and Sr-exchanged forms will be presented.

  14. Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at...

  15. Figures of the World Healthcare Organisation show that stroke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figures of the World Healthcare Organisation show that stroke is currently the leading cause disabilities following a stroke, the economic burden and shortage of rehabilitation therapists are also developed a robotic exoskeleton system that meets the requirements of effective post-stroke upper

  16. Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ceder, Gerbrand (MIT); Persson, Kristin (LBNL)

    Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

  17. Secretary Chu Speaks at the 2010 Washington Auto Show

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Secretary Chu

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Chu lays out a roadmap for how the U.S. can lead the world in making the clean vehicles we need at the 2010 Washington Auto Show. He also announced that the Department of Energy had closed on a $1.4 billion loan to Nissan to build the all-electric LEAF in Tennessee and create up to 1,300 American jobs.

  18. Secretary Chu Speaks at the 2010 Washington Auto Show

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Secretary Chu

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Secretary Chu lays out a roadmap for how the U.S. can lead the world in making the clean vehicles we need at the 2010 Washington Auto Show. He also announced that the Department of Energy had closed on a $1.4 billion loan to Nissan to build the all-electric LEAF in Tennessee and create up to 1,300 American jobs.

  19. JSON shows incomplete info | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climate compatibleInformation offApproach toJSON shows

  20. FIVE KEPLER TARGET STARS THAT SHOW MULTIPLE TRANSITING EXOPLANET CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Astronomy and Physics, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Borucki, William J.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Haas, Michael J.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Latham, David W. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-2059 (United States); Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Howell, Steve B. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Isaacson, Howard [Astronomy Department, University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 9472 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and discuss five candidate exoplanetary systems identified with the Kepler spacecraft. These five systems show transits from multiple exoplanet candidates. Should these objects prove to be planetary in nature, then these five systems open new opportunities for the field of exoplanets and provide new insights into the formation and dynamical evolution of planetary systems. We discuss the methods used to identify multiple transiting objects from the Kepler photometry as well as the false-positive rejection methods that have been applied to these data. One system shows transits from three distinct objects while the remaining four systems show transits from two objects. Three systems have planet candidates that are near mean motion commensurabilities-two near 2:1 and one just outside 5:2. We discuss the implications that multi-transiting systems have on the distribution of orbital inclinations in planetary systems, and hence their dynamical histories, as well as their likely masses and chemical compositions. A Monte Carlo study indicates that, with additional data, most of these systems should exhibit detectable transit timing variations (TTVs) due to gravitational interactions, though none are apparent in these data. We also discuss new challenges that arise in TTV analyses due to the presence of more than two planets in a system.

  1. MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL NOTICE OF DESIGNATED DEPARTMENTAL OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS 1. Include a copy of any relevant documents. 2. Item MATERIALS COORDINATOR ­ IC-8 Mail, Fax or PDF the entire package to: MC 2010 Fax: 679-4240 REFERENCE # DMC

  2. Organic pollutants and their correlation with stable isotopes in1 vegetation from King George Island, Antarctica2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Rochelle,15 2 rue Olympe de Gouges 17042 La Rochelle Cedex 01, France16 17 4 Geochemical and Environmental stable isotopes. The following contaminants were found above the25 method detection limit (MDL): HCB (0 different animal-derived sources. Pearson's correlation showed34 significant results for some contaminants

  3. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarb...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate CoatedCarbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate...

  4. Decoupled energy stable schemes for phase-field models of two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jie Shen

    2015-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 7, 2015 ... Efficient energy stable numerical schemes for a phase field ... conditions and a linear decoupled energy stable scheme for systems with static ...

  5. Kuwaiti oil sector shows more signs of recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that Kuwait's oil sector continues to show signs of recovery from the Persian Gulf war. On Mar. 23 Kuwait Petroleum Co. (KPC) loaded the country's first shipment of liquefied petroleum gas for export since the Iraqi invasion in August 1990. In addition, the first shipment of Kuwaiti crude recovered from giant oil lakes formed by hundreds of wild wells sabotaged in the war was to arrive by tanker in Naples, Italy, late last month. The tanker is carrying 210,000 bbl of crude. However, the project to clean up the lakes and recover more oil, undertaken by Bechtel Corp. with Kuwait Oil Co. (KOC), has reached a stand still.

  6. Line tests show DRA's don't cross-contaminate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudy, C.F.L.; Muth, C.I.

    1989-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pipeline tests with a commercially available drag-reducing agent (DRA) show that such agents can be injected into one product in a multiproduct pipeline without cross-contamination from one batch to another. The tests were conducted in the Cherokee system, a three-segment Ponca City-to-Oklahoma City products line operated by Conoco Pipe Line Co. A batch of gasoline treated with a DRA, Conoco's CDR Flow Improver, preceded an untreated jet-fuel batch. The amount of DRA in the gasoline was measured as the tenders were transported through the pipeline system.

  7. Thermally stable surfactants and compositions and methods of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J. (Woodridge, IL)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    There are provided novel thermally stable surfactants for use with fillers in the preparation of polymer composites and nanocomposites. Typically, surfactants of the invention are urethanes, ureas or esters of thiocarbamic acid having a hydrocarbyl group of from 10 to 50 carbons and optionally including an ionizable or charged group (e.g., carboxyl group or quaternary amine). Thus, there are provided surfactants having Formula I: ##STR00001## wherein the variables are as defined herein. Further provided are methods of making thermally stable surfactants and compositions, including composites and nanocomposites, using fillers coated with the surfactants.

  8. Method for forming materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

  9. Nanostructure material for supercapacitor application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Y.; Chu, C.T.; Wei, Q.; Zheng, H.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transition metal nitrides and carbonitride materials were fabricated via sol-gel technology. The transition metal amides were synthesized by two methods: chemical route and electrolysis. The transition metal amides were then further polymerized, sintering to high temperature in an inert or reduced atmosphere. Transition metal nitrides and carbonitrides powders with surface area up to 160 m{sup 2}/g were obtained. The resultant electrode material showed high specific capacitance as crystalline ruthenium oxide.

  10. Thermal stability of MnBi magnetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jinfang [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Choi, J. P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Li, G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Polikarpov, E. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Darsell, J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Overman, N. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Olszta, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Schreiber, D. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Bowden, M. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory; Droubay, T. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Kramer, Matthew J. [Ames Laboratory; Zarkevich, Nikolay A. [Ames Laboratory; Wang, L L. [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Laboratory; Marinescu, M. [Electron Energy Corporation; Takeuchi, I. [University of Maryland; Huang, Q. Z. [National Institute of Standards and Technology; Wu, H. [University of Maryland; Reeve, H. [United Technologies Research Center; Vuong, N. V. [University of Texas; Liu, J P. [University of Texas

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    MnBi has attracted much attention in recent years due to its potential as a rare-earth-free permanent magnet material. It is unique because its coercivity increases with increasing temperature, which makes it a good hard phase material for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnets. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain, partly because the reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, and partly because Mn reacts readily with oxygen. MnO formation is irreversible and harmful to magnet performance. In this paper, we report our efforts toward developing MnBi permanent magnets. To date, high purity MnBi (>90%) can be routinely produced in large quantities. The produced powder exhibits 74:6 emu g1 saturation magnetization at room temperature with 9 T applied field. After proper alignment, the maximum energy product (BH) max of the powder reached 11.9 MGOe, and that of the sintered bulk magnet reached 7.8 MGOe at room temperature. A comprehensive study of thermal stability shows that MnBi powder is stable up to 473 K in air.

  11. Volume 1, 1st Edition, Multiscale Tailoring of Highly Active and Stable Nanocomposite Catalysts, Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veser, Goetz

    2009-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomaterials have gained much attention as catalysts since the discovery of exceptional CO oxidation activity of nanoscale gold by Haruta. However, many studies avoid testing nanomaterials at the high-temperatures relevant to reactions of interest for the production of clean energy (T > 700°C). The generally poor thermal stability of catalytically active noble metals has thus far prevented significant progress in this area. We have recently overcome the poor thermal stability of nanoparticles by synthesizing a platinum barium-hexaaluminate (Pt-BHA) nanocomposite which combines the high activity of noble metal nanoparticles with the thermal stability of hexaaluminates. This Pt-BHA nanocomposite demonstrates excellent activity, selectivity, and long-term stability in CPOM. Pt-BHA is anchored onto a variety of support structures in order to improve the accessibility, safety, and reactivity of the nanocatalyst. Silica felts prove to be particularly amenable to this supporting procedure, with the resulting supported nanocatalyst proving to be as active and stable for CPOM as its unsupported counterpart. Various pre-treatment conditions are evaluated to determine their effectiveness in removing residual surfactant from the active nanoscale platinum particles. The size of these particles is measured across a wide temperature range, and the resulting “plateau” of stability from 600-900°C can be linked to a particle caging effect due to the structure of the supporting ceramic framework. The nanocomposites are used to catalyze the combustion of a dilute methane stream, and the results indicate enhanced activity for both Pt-BHA as well as ceria-doped BHA, as well as an absence of internal mass transfer limitations at the conditions tested. In water-gas shift reaction, nanocomposite Pt-BHA shows stability during prolonged WGS reaction and no signs of deactivation during start-up/shut-down of the reactor. The chemical and thermal stability, low molecular weight, and wealth of literature on the formation of mesoporous silica materials motivated investigations of nanocomposite silica catalysts. High surface area silicas are synthesized via sol-gel methods, and the addition of metal-salts lead to the formation of stable nanocomposite Ni- and Fe- silicates. The results of these investigations have increased the fundamental understanding and improved the applicability of nanocatalysts for clean energy applications.

  12. Nonasymptotically stable attractors in O(2) mode interactions \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    z August 3, 1993 Abstract Heteroclinic cycles are a natural source of nonasymptotically sta­ ble for a large class of heteroclinic cycles. In particular, we establish the existence of several nonasymp heteroclinic cycles can coexist as nonasymptotically stable attractors. 1 Introduction It is now well

  13. COMMUNICATION Formation of a Stable Oligomer of -2 Microglobulin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miranker, Andrew

    amyloidosis. © 2007 Published by Elsevier Ltd. *Corresponding author Keywords: -2 microglobulin; amyloidCOMMUNICATION Formation of a Stable Oligomer of -2 Microglobulin Requires only Transient Encounter and Biochemistry, Yale University, 260 Whitney Avenue, New Haven, CT 06520-8114, USA -2 Microglobulin (2m

  14. STABLE POLYNOMIALS FROM TRUNCATIONS AND ARCHITECTURE-DRIVEN FILTER TRANSFORMATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boston, Nigel

    or sums of a few such powers. We also ask that the roots of D(z) all lie inside the unit circleSTABLE POLYNOMIALS FROM TRUNCATIONS AND ARCHITECTURE-DRIVEN FILTER TRANSFORMATIONS Nigel Boston Abstract. An extension of a polynomial consists of the polynomial plus higher power terms. Given

  15. Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neutron Stimulated Emission Computed Tomography of Stable Isotopes Carey E. Floyd Jr.*ab , Calvin North Carolina Keywords: imaging, neutrons, tomography, spectroscopy ABSTRACT Here we report on the development of a new molecular imaging technique using inelastic scattering of fast neutrons. Earlier studies

  16. Apparatus and method for monitoring of gas having stable isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clegg, Samuel M; Fessenden-Rahn, Julianna E

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas having stable isotopes is monitored continuously by using a system that sends a modulated laser beam to the gas and collects and transmits the light not absorbed by the gas to a detector. Gas from geological storage, or from the atmosphere can be monitored continuously without collecting samples and transporting them to a lab.

  17. Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarens, Andres

    Design of Hard Water Stable Emulsifier Systems for Petroleum- and Bio-based Semi for petroleum and bio-based MWFs that improve fluid lifetime by providing emulsion stability under hard water. The newly developed petroleum and bio-based formulations with improved hard water stability are competitive

  18. Stable plateau formation and Brillouin suppression in laser plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulser, P. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Weng, S. M. [Theoretical Quantum Electronics (TQE), Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, D-64289 Darmstadt (Germany); Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, D-80333 Munich (Germany)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the variety of ponderomotively induced density structures in laser produced plasmas in one dimension, it is shown by particle-in-cell simulations that the stable plateau formation at critical, subcritical, and above critical density is possible. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering is suppressed with increasing laser intensity.

  19. A Stable Primal-Dual Approach for Linear Programming under ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    computations in this section were done on a Sun-Fire-480R running SunOS 5.8. ... negative effect that the loss of sparsity has on the stable direct solver, since ..... centiat thesis, Department of Mathematics, Linköping University, Sweden, 1991.

  20. news and views A key issue for hydrogen storage materi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palumbi, Stephen

    news and views A key issue for hydrogen storage materi- als is that the hydrogenation and dehydro be possible to discover stable hydrogen hydrates with higher storage Hydrogen Posture Plan www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/ hydrogen_posture_plan.pdf 7. Kuhs, W

  1. Transporting particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  2. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Chunlong; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic interactions (EI) and hydrophobic interactions (HI), with HI playing the dominant role. While either strong EI or HI inhibit growth and suppress (104) face expression, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate EI allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate HI cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of (104) faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  3. Construction of energy-stable Galerkin reduced order models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalashnikova, Irina; Barone, Matthew Franklin; Arunajatesan, Srinivasan; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report aims to unify several approaches for building stable projection-based reduced order models (ROMs). Attention is focused on linear time-invariant (LTI) systems. The model reduction procedure consists of two steps: the computation of a reduced basis, and the projection of the governing partial differential equations (PDEs) onto this reduced basis. Two kinds of reduced bases are considered: the proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) basis and the balanced truncation basis. The projection step of the model reduction can be done in two ways: via continuous projection or via discrete projection. First, an approach for building energy-stable Galerkin ROMs for linear hyperbolic or incompletely parabolic systems of PDEs using continuous projection is proposed. The idea is to apply to the set of PDEs a transformation induced by the Lyapunov function for the system, and to build the ROM in the transformed variables. The resulting ROM will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. It is shown that, for many PDE systems, the desired transformation is induced by a special weighted L2 inner product, termed the %E2%80%9Csymmetry inner product%E2%80%9D. Attention is then turned to building energy-stable ROMs via discrete projection. A discrete counterpart of the continuous symmetry inner product, a weighted L2 inner product termed the %E2%80%9CLyapunov inner product%E2%80%9D, is derived. The weighting matrix that defines the Lyapunov inner product can be computed in a black-box fashion for a stable LTI system arising from the discretization of a system of PDEs in space. It is shown that a ROM constructed via discrete projection using the Lyapunov inner product will be energy-stable for any choice of reduced basis. Connections between the Lyapunov inner product and the inner product induced by the balanced truncation algorithm are made. Comparisons are also made between the symmetry inner product and the Lyapunov inner product. The performance of ROMs constructed using these inner products is evaluated on several benchmark test cases.

  4. Nanostructured magnetic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Keith T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

  5. More stable hybrid organic solar cells deposited on amorphous Si electron transfer layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samiee, Mehran; Modtland, Brian; Dalal, Vikram L., E-mail: vdalal@iastate.edu [Iowa State University, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Aidarkhanov, Damir [Nazarbayev University, Astana (Kazakhstan)

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on defect densities, performance, and stability of organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells produced using n-doped inorganic amorphous silicon-carbide layers as the electron transport layer (ETL). The organic material was poly-3-hexyl-thiophene (P3HT) and heterojunction was formed using phenyl-C{sub 71}-Butyric-Acid-Methyl Ester (PCBM). For comparison, inverted solar cells fabricated using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} as ETL were fabricated. Defect densities and subgap quantum efficiency curves were found to be nearly identical for both types of cells. The cells were subjected to 2xsun illumination and it was found that the cells produced using doped a-Si as ETL were much more stable than the cells produced using Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}.

  6. Double Macdonald polynomials as the stable limit of Macdonald superpolynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blondeau-Fournier, O; Mathieu, P

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Macdonald superpolynomials provide a remarkably rich generalization of the usual Macdonald polynomials. The starting point of this work is the observation of a previously unnoticed stability property of the Macdonald superpolynomials when the fermionic sector m is sufficiently large: their decomposition in the monomial basis is then independent of m. These stable superpolynomials are readily mapped into bisymmetric polynomials, an operation that spoils the ring structure but drastically simplifies the associated vector space. Our main result is a factorization of the (stable) bisymmetric Macdonald polynomials, called double Macdonald polynomials and indexed by pairs of partitions, into a product of Macdonald polynomials (albeit subject to non-trivial plethystic transformations). As an off-shoot, we note that, after multiplication by a t-Vandermonde determinant, this provides explicit formulas for a large class of Macdonald polynomials with prescribed symmetry. The factorization of the double Macdonald polynom...

  7. Searching Stable CuxS Structures for Photovoltaic Application (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Xu, O.; Huang, B.; Yan, Y.; Noufi, R,; Wei, S-H

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The crystal and electronic band structures of CuxS (1.25 < x ? 2) are systematically studied using the density-functional theory method. For Cu2S, all the three chalcocite phases, i.e., the low-chalcocite, the high-chalcocite, and the cubic-chalcocite phases have direct band gaps around 1.3-1.5 eV, with the low-chalcocite being the most stable one. However, Cu vacancies can form spontaneously in these compounds, causing instability of Cu2S. We find that under Cu-rich condition, the anilite Cu1.75S is the most stable structure. It has a predicted band gap of 1.4 eV and is a promising solar cell absorber.

  8. MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

  9. battery materials | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery materials battery materials Leads No leads are available at this time. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract: The...

  10. Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in catalysts and energy materials needed to design new materials and systems for sustainable energy applications. By facilitating the development and rapid dissemination...

  11. Polyimide-based electrooptic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cahill, P.A.; Seager, C.H.; Meinhardt, M.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Beuhler, A.J.; Wargowski, D.A. [Amoco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States); Singer, K.D.; Kowalczyk, T.C.; Kosc, T.Z. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The properties of new, high temperature optical materials based on dye-doped Ultradel{reg_sign} 9000D{sup 1} polyimides are presented. Ultradel 9000D is a soluble, pre-imidized, fluorinated polymer with properties optimized for integrated optical applications. When thermally or photochemically cross-linked, it has a Tg approaching 400{degree}C and retains excellent optical transparency as measured by both waveguide loss spectroscopy (WLS) and photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS). The agreement between WLS and PDS data indicates that losses in polyimides are due to absorption, not scattering. Two thermally stable, donor-acceptor oxazole-based dyes were designed, synthesized, and doped into the polyimide at concentrations up to 25 percent by weight. The Tg of the doped polymers decreased from the neat polymer, but remained above 300 {degree}C. The effects of doping on the dielectric constant, refractive index, and coefficient of thermal expansion of the polyamide are presented. The oxazoles also photobleach and thereby provide an additional means of photodefining waveguides in these materials.

  12. Electrochemically Stable Cathode Current Collectors for Rechargeable Magnesium Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yingwen; Liu, Tianbiao L.; Shao, Yuyan; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Jun; Li, Guosheng

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rechargeable Mg batteries are attractive energy storage systems and could bring cost-effective energy solutions. Currently, however, no practical cathode current collectors that can withstand high voltages in Mg2+ electrolytes has been identified and therefore cathode research is greatly hindered. Here we identified that two metals, Mo and W, are electrochemically stable through formation of surface passive layers. The presented results could have significant impacts on the developments of high voltage Mg batteries.

  13. Development of Stable Solidification Method for Insoluble Ferrocyanides-13170

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikarashi, Yuki; Masud, Rana Syed; Mimura, Hitoshi [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)] [Dept. of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba6-6-01-2, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Ishizaki, Eiji; Matsukura, Minoru [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)] [UNION SHOWA K.K. 17-20, Mita 2-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 108-0073 (Japan)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of stable solidification method of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge is an important subject for the safety decontamination in Fukushima NPP-1. By using the excellent immobilizing properties of zeolites such as gas trapping ability and self-sintering properties, the stable solidification of insoluble ferrocyanides was accomplished. The immobilization ratio of Cs for K{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O saturated with Cs{sup +} ions (Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O) was estimated to be less than 0.1% above 1,000 deg. C; the adsorbed Cs{sup +} ions are completely volatilized. In contrast, the novel stable solid form was produced by the press-sintering of the mixture of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O and zeolites at higher temperature of 1,000 deg. C and 1,100 deg. C; Cs volatilization and cyanide release were completely depressed. The immobilization ratio of Cs, under the mixing conditions of Cs{sub 2}[CoFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O:CP= 1:1 and calcining temperature: 1,000 deg. C, was estimated to be nearly 100%. As for the kinds of zeolites, natural mordenite (NM), clinoptilolite (CP) and Chabazite tended to have higher immobilization ratio compared to zeolite A. This may be due to the difference in the phase transformation between natural zeolites and synthetic zeolite A. In the case of the composites (K{sub 2-X}Ni{sub X/2}[NiFe(CN){sub 6}].nH{sub 2}O loaded natural mordenite), relatively high immobilization ratio of Cs was also obtained. This method using zeolite matrices can be applied to the stable solidification of the solid wastes of insoluble ferrocyanides sludge. (authors)

  14. This book describes the responsibilities of show personnel and outlines the job descriptions of various positions for the NH 4-H State Horse Show (or any other 4-H horse show).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of various positions for the NH 4-H State Horse Show (or any other 4-H horse show). June 2013 #12;Table of Contents Organizing a 4-H Horse Show ........................................................................................... 1 State 4-H Horse Show Philosophy................................................................ 1

  15. Direct Access to Mesoporous Crystalline TiO2/Carbon Composites with Large and Uniform Pores for Use as Anode Materials in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Jung, Yoon S.; Warren, Scott C.; Kamperman, Marleen; Oh, Seung M.; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous and highly crystalline TiO{sub 2} (anatase)/carbon composites with large (>5?nm) and uniform pores were synthesized using PI-b-PEO block copolymers as structure directing agents. Pore sizes could be tuned by utilizing block copolymers with different molecular weights. The resulting mesoporous TiO{sub 2}/carbon was successfully used as an anode material for Li ion batteries. Without addition of conducting aid (Super P), the electrode showed high capacity during the first insertion/desertion cycle due to carbon wiring inside the walls of mesoporous TiO{sub 2}/carbon. The electrode further showed stable cycle performance up to 50 cycles and the specific charge capacity at 30?C was 38?mA h (g of TiO{sub 2}){sup ?1}, which indicates CCM-TiO{sub 2}/carbon can be used as a material for high rate use.

  16. Light Show

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceEfeedstocks and the climateLife a9

  17. Thermal Performance of a Novel Heat Transfer Fluid Containing Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tumuluri, Kalpana

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research work aims to develop a new heat transfer fluid by combining multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCMs). Stable nanofluids have been prepared using different sizes of multiwalled...

  18. Coated ceramic breeder materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

  19. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

  20. UNDERGRADUATE Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Materials Science & Engineering 2013 2014 #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

  1. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simons, Jack

    Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

  2. A Materials Facilities Initiative -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

  3. Computational Chemical Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

  4. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, T.D.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

  5. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  6. Corrosion resistant ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

  7. ICT Conference on Energetic Materials June 24-27, 2008 Karlsruhe, Germany

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    39th ICT Conference on Energetic Materials June 24-27, 2008 Karlsruhe, Germany 1 Detonation of Meta on Energetic Materials June 24-27, 2008 Karlsruhe, Germany 2 The smallest meta-stable carbon cluster found-27, 2008 Karlsruhe, Germany 3 accumulated energy is released upon fission of the boat ensemble

  8. CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

  9. Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfe, Cecily J.

    1 Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods (15) For all possible earthquake pairs. The parameters chosen for window length, filter bandpass, negative sidelobe identification, and cross-correlation threshold are appropriate for high-frequency earthquakes. In order to remove false positives or poor data

  10. SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newsome, William

    SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods Two adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta with a head-holding device (S1), scleral search coil for monitoring eye position (S2) and a recording chamber monkeys remain actively engaged in experiments, so precise histological identification of recording sites

  11. Puncture detecting barrier materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

    1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

  12. A product involving the $\\beta$-family in stable homotopy theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Xiugui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the stable homotopy groups $\\pi_{q(p^n+p^m+1)-3}(S)$ of the sphere spectrum $S$ localized at the prime $p$ greater than three, J. Lin constructed an essential family $\\xi_{m,n}$ for $n \\geq m + 2 >5$. In this paper, the authors show that the composite $\\xi_{m,n}\\beta_{s}\\in \\pi_{q(p^n+p^m+sp+s)-5}(S)$ for $2 \\leq s < p$ is non-trivial, where $q=2(p-1)$ and $\\beta_s \\in \\pi_{q(sp+s-1)-2}(S)$ is the known $\\beta$-family. We show our result by explicit combinatorial analysis of the (modified) May spectral sequence.

  13. Double Macdonald polynomials as the stable limit of Macdonald superpolynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Blondeau-Fournier; L. Lapointe; P. Mathieu

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Macdonald superpolynomials provide a remarkably rich generalization of the usual Macdonald polynomials. The starting point of this work is the observation of a previously unnoticed stability property of the Macdonald superpolynomials when the fermionic sector m is sufficiently large: their decomposition in the monomial basis is then independent of m. These stable superpolynomials are readily mapped into bisymmetric polynomials, an operation that spoils the ring structure but drastically simplifies the associated vector space. Our main result is a factorization of the (stable) bisymmetric Macdonald polynomials, called double Macdonald polynomials and indexed by pairs of partitions, into a product of Macdonald polynomials (albeit subject to non-trivial plethystic transformations). As an off-shoot, we note that, after multiplication by a t-Vandermonde determinant, this provides explicit formulas for a large class of Macdonald polynomials with prescribed symmetry. The factorization of the double Macdonald polynomials leads immediately to the generalization of basically every elementary properties of the Macdonald polynomials to the double case (norm, kernel, duality, positivity, etc). When lifted back to superspace, this validates various previously formulated conjectures in the stable regime. The q,t-Kostka coefficients associated to the double Macdonald polynomials are shown to be q,t-analogs of the dimensions of the irreducible representations of the hyperoctahedral group B_n. Moreover, a Nabla operator on the double Macdonald polynomials is defined and its action on a certain bisymmetric Schur function can be interpreted as the Frobenius series of a bigraded module of dimension (2n+1)^n, a formula again characteristic of the Coxeter group of type B_n. Finally, as a side result, we obtain a simple identity involving products of four Littlewood-Richardson coefficients.

  14. Stable levitation and dynamics of ice particles at low pressures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Kowalski; Bernard Xie; Colin V. Parker; Cheng Chin

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate stable levitation and trapping of ice particles of 30~200 micon at low background gas pressures in the presence of a temperature gradient. The thermophoretic force levitates the particles, which have long lifetimes of over an hour. The equilibrium position depends on the background pressure and temperature gradient, which is consistent with theoretical expectations. Furthermore, we investigate interesting launching and merging dynamics of the levitated particles, as well as the development of instability at high background pressures. Our system provides a robust platform to investigate the aggregation of floating ice particles in air, and potentially chemical and biological processes in a microgravity environment.

  15. Engineering fast and stable splitting of matter waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Torrontegui; S. Martínez-Garaot; M. Modugno; Xi Chen; J. G. Muga

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    When attempting to split coherent cold atom clouds or a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) by bifurcation of the trap into a double well, slow adiabatic following is unstable with respect to any slight asymmetry, and the wave "collapses" to the lower well, whereas a generic fast chopping splits the wave but it also excites it. Shortcuts to adiabaticity engineered to speed up the adiabatic process through non-adiabatic transients, provide instead quiet and robust fast splitting. The non-linearity of the BEC makes the proposed shortcut even more stable.

  16. Stable atomic structure of NiTi austenite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarkevich, Nikolai A [Ames Laboratory; Johnson, Duane D [Ames Laboratory

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitinol (NiTi), the most widely used shape-memory alloy, exhibits an austenite phase that has yet to be identified. The usually assumed austenitic structure is cubic B2, which has imaginary phonon modes, hence it is unstable. We suggest a stable austenitic structure that “on average” has B2 symmetry (observed by x-ray and neutron diffraction), but it exhibits finite atomic displacements from the ideal B2 sites. The proposed structure has a phonon spectrum that agrees with that from neutron scattering, has diffraction spectra in agreement with x-ray diffraction, and has an energy relative to the ground state that agrees with calorimetry data.

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Hydrous Silicate Glasses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stolper, Edward

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this DOE-funded project has been the study of volatile components in magmas and the atmosphere. Over the twenty-one year period of this project, we have used experimental petrology and stable isotope geochemistry to study the behavior and properties of volatile components dissolved in silicate minerals and melts and glasses. More recently, we have also studied the concentration and isotopic composition of CO2 in the atmosphere, especially in relation to air quality issues in the Los Angeles basin.

  18. Joining of dissimilar materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

  19. High-Efficiency and Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Efficiency and Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using a Single Emitter High-Efficiency and Stable White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Using a Single Emitter Presenter: Jian...

  20. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy Storage. A Stable Vanadium Redox-Flow Battery with High Energy Density for Large-scale Energy...

  1. A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction. A Radar-like Iron based Nanohybrid as an Efficient and Stable Electrocatalyst for...

  2. Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson to render the electromechanical valve actuator (EVA) globally asymptotically stable (GAS). Elec model. Here, we demonstrate and prove that our controller renders the system GAS without any assumption

  3. Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction of water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deymier, Pierre

    Electrochemical investigations of stable cavitation from bubbles generated during reduction April 2014 Keywords: Megasonic cleaning Stable cavitation Microstreaming Hydrogen bubbles Water on wafers without affect- ing the transient cavitation responsible for feature damage. Ã? 2014 Elsevier B

  4. Materials for breeding blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified.

  5. Mesogen-jacketed liquid crystalline polymers via stable free radical polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mather, Patrick T.

    polymers have been prepared using multi- site initiators. Unusual monomers such as vinylbenzyl chloride main chain9) . In these materials, the side group was attached to a vinyl phenol group, a monomer showed that the PBBOS polymerized with a significantly higher reaction rate and monomer conversion

  6. STABLE MAPS: EXAMPLES WITHOUT SADDLES. J. IGLESIAS, A. PORTELA, AND A. ROVELLA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    points that are Cr structurally stable (r > 1) and have nontrivial nonwandering sets, see [IPR1] and [IPR

  7. Phase Stable RF-over-fiber Transmission using Heterodyne Interferometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, R.; Byrd, J. M.; Doolittle, L.; Huang, G.; Staples, J. W.

    2010-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    New scientific applications require phase-stabilized RF distribution to multiple remote locations. These include phased-array radio telescopes and short pulse free electron lasers. RF modulated onto a CW optical carrier and transmitted via fiber is capable of low noise, but commercially available systems aren't long term stable enough for these applications. Typical requirements are for less than 50fs long term temporal stability between receivers, which is 0.05 degrees at 3GHz. Good results have been demonstrated for RF distribution schemes based on transmission of short pulses, but these require specialized free-space optics and high stability mechanical infrastructure. We report a method which uses only standard telecom optical and RF components, and achieves less than 20fs RMS error over 300m of standard single-mode fiber. We demonstrate stable transmission of 3GHz over 300m of fiber with less than 0.017 degree (17fs) RMS phase error. An interferometer measures optical phase delay, providing information to a feed-forward correction of RF phase.

  8. Genetic and Epigenetic Changes in Chromosomally Stable and Unstable Progeny of Irradiated Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baulch, Janet E.; Aypar, Umut; Waters, Katrina M.; Yang, Austin; Morgan, William F.

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation induced genomic instability is a well-studied phenomenon, the underlying mechanisms of which are poorly understood. Persistent oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, elevated cytokine levels and epigenetic changes are among the mechanisms invoked in the perpetuation of the phenotype. To determine whether epigenetic aberrations affect genomic instability we measured DNA methylation, mRNA and microRNA (miR) levels in well characterized chromosomally stable and unstable clonally expanded single cell survivors of irradiation. While no changes in DNA methylation were observed for the gene promoters evaluated, increased LINE-1 methylation was observed for two unstable clones (LS12, CS9) and decreased Alu element methylation was observed for the other two unstable clones (115, Fe5.0-8). These relationships also manifested for mRNA and miR expression. mRNA identified for the LS12 and CS9 clones were most similar to each other (261 mRNA), while the 115 and Fe5.0-8 clones were more similar to each other, and surprisingly also similar to the two stable clones, 114 and 118 (286 mRNA among these four clones). Pathway analysis showed enrichment for pathways involved in mitochondrial function and cellular redox, themes routinely invoked in genomic instability. The commonalities between the two subgroups of clones were also observed for miR. The number of miR for which anti-correlated mRNA were identified suggests that these miR exert functional effects in each clone. The results of this study demonstrate significant genetic and epigenetic changes in unstable cells, but similar changes almost equally common in chromosomally stable cells. Possible conclusions might be that the chromosomally stable clones have some other form of instability, or that some of the observed changes represent a sort of radiation signature for and that other changes are related to genomic instability. Irrespective, these findings again suggest that a spectrum of changes both drive genomic instability and permit unstable cells to persist and proliferate.

  9. Displacement cascades in diatomic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parkin, D.M.; Coulter, C.A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new function, the specified-projectile displacement function p/sub ijk/ (E), is introduced to describe displacement cascades in polyatomic materials. This function describes the specific collision events that produce displacements and hence adds new information not previously available. Calculations of p/sub ijk/ (E) for MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and TaO are presented and discussed. Results show that the parameters that have the largest effect on displacement collision events are the PKA energy and the mass ratio of the atom types in the material. It is further shown that the microscopic nature of the displacement events changes over the entire recoil energy range relevant to fusion neutron spectra and that these changes are different in materials whose mass ratio is near one than in those where it is far from one.

  10. hal-00187600,version1-14Nov2007 Models for dependent extremes using stable mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    hal-00187600,version1-14Nov2007 Models for dependent extremes using stable mixtures Running/short title: Models for dependent extremes Anne-Laure Foug`eres ´Equipe Modal'X, Universit´e Paris X-stable, multivariate extreme value distribu- tion, pitting corrosion, random effect, positive stable variables

  11. Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    water; (2) there is a single deep hot water, and the range of chloride concentrations is produced by the water passing through a zone of highly soluble materials (most likely in...

  12. FORMATION OF A PHYSICALLY STABLE AMORPHOUS DRUG COMPLEX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLean, Jenifer Anne

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    8 Conclusion 9 References 11 Chapter 2. Formation and Stabilization of Amorphous Solids Introduction 13 Stabilization of Amorphous Solids 14 Using... Experimental a. Materials 25 b. Methods 29 Conclusion 33 References 37...

  13. Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao, Qing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

  14. Factors of material consumption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

  15. Earth-Abundant Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Below are a list...

  16. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  17. Institute for Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute for Material Science Who we are and what we do 2:23 Institute for Materials Science: Alexander V. Balatsky IMS is an interdisciplinary research and educational center...

  18. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

  19. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

  20. Thermal Stability of MnBi Magnetic Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cui, Jun; Choi, Jung-Pyung; Li, Guosheng; Polikarpov, Evgueni; Darsell, Jens T.; Overman, Nicole R.; Olszta, Matthew J.; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Bowden, Mark E.; Droubay, Timothy C.; Kramer, Matthew J.; Zarkevich, Nikolai; Wang, L. L.; Johnson, Duane D.; Marinescu, Melania; Takeuchi, Ichiro; Huang, Qingzhen; Wu, Hui; Reeve, Hayden; Vuong, Nguyen V.; Liu, J.Ping

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MnBi attracts great attention in recent years for its great potential as permanent magnet materials. It is unique because its coercivity increases with increasing temperature, which makes it a good hard phase for exchange coupling nanocomposite magnet. MnBi phase is difficult to obtain, partly because the reaction between Mn and Bi is peritectic, and partly because Mn is easy to react with oxygen. MnO formation is irreversible and causes degradation to the magnetic properties. In this paper, we report our effort on developing MnBi permanent magnet. High purity MnBi (>90%) can be routinely produced in large quantity. The obtained powder exhibit 74 emu/g saturation magnetization at room temperature with 9 T applied field. After alignment, the powder exhibits 11.6 MGOe, and the sintered bulk magnet exhibit 7.8 MGOe at room temperature. Thermal stability study shows that the MnBi is stable up to 473 K in air.

  1. Stable isotopes in late Pennsylvanian brachiopods: stratigraphic and paleoenvironmental implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Chuanlun

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HORIZON DEEP ~ ?h SHALLOW M~~M MATERIALS AND METHODS Sampling Methods and Criteria Before collecting any samples from the shales, weathered surface material was removed from the sampling intervals. In the Necessity cycle, shale samples were taken... Upper Pennsylvanian sections (Necessity cycle, NC; upper Winchell cycle, UWC; and the Finis Shale, FS) in north-central Texas in order to relate isotopic shifts to paleoenvironment and sea level change. Most samples are from shales that are similar...

  2. Instructions and Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

  3. Superconductive materials and devices. (Latest citations from the US Patent database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations of selected patents concerning the design and methods employed in the manufacture of superconductive materials and devices. Methods of fabricating composite materials that are stable under high field strength and high current conditions are discussed. Production of materials used in superconductive winding and switching mechanisms is considered. Superconducting wires used in cryogenic systems and methods of cooling superconductor devices are included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Advanced neutron absorber materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

  5. Magnetocaloric Materials Stinus Jeppesen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnetocaloric Materials Stinus Jeppesen Risø-PhD-43(EN) Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Jeppesen Title: Magnetocaloric Materials Division: Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division Risø.D. degree at The University of Copenhagen Abstract: New and improved magnetocaloric materials are one

  6. Radioactive Materials License Commitments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radioactive Materials License Commitments for The University of Texas at Austin May 2009 July 2009 in the use of radioactive materials. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means

  7. HIGH-PERFORMANCE COATING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion, erosion, oxidation, and fouling by scale deposits impose critical issues in selecting the metal components used at geothermal power plants operating at brine temperatures up to 300 C. Replacing these components is very costly and time consuming. Currently, components made of titanium alloy and stainless steel commonly are employed for dealing with these problems. However, another major consideration in using these metals is not only that they are considerably more expensive than carbon steel, but also the susceptibility of corrosion-preventing passive oxide layers that develop on their outermost surface sites to reactions with brine-induced scales, such as silicate, silica, and calcite. Such reactions lead to the formation of strong interfacial bonds between the scales and oxide layers, causing the accumulation of multiple layers of scales, and the impairment of the plant component's function and efficacy; furthermore, a substantial amount of time is entailed in removing them. This cleaning operation essential for reusing the components is one of the factors causing the increase in the plant's maintenance costs. If inexpensive carbon steel components could be coated and lined with cost-effective high-hydrothermal temperature stable, anti-corrosion, -oxidation, and -fouling materials, this would improve the power plant's economic factors by engendering a considerable reduction in capital investment, and a decrease in the costs of operations and maintenance through optimized maintenance schedules.

  8. anodic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anode materia.l1-9 These materials have been showed large-14 the use of metal and carbon composites,15-20 and the introduction of nano- sized metals,21-25 have been Cho,...

  9. advanced anodic materials: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anode materia.l1-9 These materials have been showed large-14 the use of metal and carbon composites,15-20 and the introduction of nano- sized metals,21-25 have been Cho,...

  10. Stable heteronuclear few-atom bound states in mixed dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin Tao; Zhang Peng; Zhang Wei [Department of Physics, Renmin University of China, Beijing 100872 (China)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study few-body problems in mixed dimensions where two or three heavy atoms are trapped individually in parallel one-dimensional tubes or two-dimensional disks and a single light atom travels freely in three dimensions. Using the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, we find three- and four-body bound states for a broad parameter region. Specifically, the existence of trimer and tetramer states persists to the negative scattering length regime, where no two-body bound state is present. As pointed out by Y. Nishida in an earlier work [Phys. Rev. A 82, 011605(R) (2010)], these few-body bound states are stable against three-body recombination due to geometric separation. In addition, we find that the binding energy of the ground trimer and tetramer state reaches its maximum value when the scattering lengths are comparable to the separation between the low-dimensional traps.

  11. Ignitor with stable low-energy thermite igniting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kelly, Michael D. (West Alexandria, OH); Munger, Alan C. (Miamisburg, OH)

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A stable compact low-energy igniting system in an ignitor utilizes two components, an initiating charge and an output charge. The initiating charge is a thermite in ultra-fine powder form compacted to 50-70% of theoretical maximum density and disposed in a cavity of a header of the ignitor adjacent to an electrical ignition device, or bridgewire, mounted in the header cavity. The initiating charge is ignitable by operation of the ignition device in a hot-wire mode. The output charge is a thermite in high-density consoladated form compacted to 90-99% of theoretical maximum density and disposed adjacent to the initiating charge on an opposite end thereof from the electrical ignition device and ignitable by the initiating charge. A sleeve is provided for mounting the output charge to the ignitor header with the initiating charge confined therebetween in the cavity.

  12. Stable laser–plasma accelerators at low densities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Song; Hafz, Nasr A. M., E-mail: nasr@sjtu.edu.cn; Mirzaie, Mohammad; Ge, Xulei; Sokollik, Thomas; Chen, Min; Sheng, Zhengming; Zhang, Jie, E-mail: jzhang1@sjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Laser Plasmas (Ministry of Education) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report stable laser wakefield acceleration using 17–50 TW laser pulses interacting with 4?mm-long helium gas jet. The initial laser spot size was relatively large (28??m) and the plasma densities were 0.48–2.0?×?10{sup 19?}cm{sup ?3}. High-quality 100–MeV electron beams were generated at the plasma density of 7.5?×?10{sup 18?}cm{sup ?3}, at which the beam parameters (pointing angle, energy spectrum, charge, and divergence angle) were measured and stabilized. At higher densities, filamentation instability of the laser-plasma interaction was observed and it has led to multiple wakefield accelerated electron beams. The experimental results are supported by 2D particle-in-cell simulations. The achievement presented here is an important step toward the use of laser-driven accelerators in real applications.

  13. Seismic pulse propagation with constant Q and stable probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Mainardi; Massimo Tomirotti

    2010-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The one-dimensional propagation of seismic waves with constant Q is shown to be governed by an evolution equation of fractional order in time, which interpolates the heat equation and the wave equation. The fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are expressed in terms of entire functions (of Wright type) in the similarity variable and their behaviours turn out to be intermediate between those for the limiting cases of a perfectly viscous fluid and a perfectly elastic solid. In view of the small dissipation exhibited by the seismic pulses, the nearly elastic limit is considered. Furthermore, the fundamental solutions for the Cauchy and Signalling problems are shown to be related to stable probability distributions with index of stability determined by the order of the fractional time derivative in the evolution equation.

  14. Air-stable droplet interface bilayers on oil-infused surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL] [ORNL; Polizos, Georgios [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Datskos, Panos G [ORNL] [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL] [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are versatile model membranes useful for synthetic biology and biosensing; however, to date they have always been confined to fluid reservoirs. Here, we demonstrate that when two or more water droplets collide on an oil-infused substrate, they exhibit non-coalescence due to the formation of a thin oil film that gets squeezed between the droplets from the bottom-up. We show that when phospholipids are included in the water droplets, a stable droplet interface bilayer forms between the non-coalescing water droplets. As with traditional oil-submerged DIBs, we were able to characterize ion channel transport by incorporating peptides into each droplet. Our findings reveal that droplet interface bilayers can function in air environments, which could potentially enable biosensing of atmospheric particulates.

  15. FUNCTIONALIZED SILICA AEROGELS: ADVANCED MATERIALS TO CAPTURE AND IMMOBILIZE RADIOACTIVE IODINE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Josef; Fryxell, Glen E.; Busche, Brad J.; Wallace, Krys; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To support the future expansion of nuclear energy, an effective method is needed to capture and safely store radiological iodine-129 released during reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. Various materials have been investigated to capture and immobilize iodine. In most cases, however, the materials that are effective for capturing iodine cannot subsequently be sintered/densified to create a stable composite that could be a viable waste form. We have developed chemically modified, highly porous, silica aerogels that show sorption capacities higher than 440 mg of I2 per gram at 150 C. An iodine uptake test in dry air containing 4.2 ppm of iodine demonstrated no breakthrough after 3.5 h and indicated a decontamination factor in excess of 310. Preliminary densification tests showed that the I2-loaded aerogels retained more than 92 wt% of I2 after thermal sintering with pressure assistance at 1200 C for 30 min. These high capture and retention efficiencies for I2 can be further improved by optimizing the functionalization process and the chemistry as well as the sintering conditions.

  16. Characterization and Electrochemical Performance of SubstitutedLiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) Cathode Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilcox, James D.; Doeff, Marca M.

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete series of LiNi0.4Co0.2-yAlyMn0.4O2 (0<_y<_0.2) materials have been synthesized and investigated as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries. When cycled between 2.0 and 4.3 V vs. Li/Li+ at a current density of 0.1 mA/cm2, stable capacities of ~;;160 mAh/g for y=0 to ~;;110 mAh/g for y=0.2 are achieved. Upon increasing the current density, it is found that all materials containing aluminum show reduced polarization and improved rate performance. The optimal performance at all current densities was found for the compound with y=0.05. The effect of aluminumsubstitution on the crystal structure of the host is discussed.

  17. Stable and metastable nanowires displaying locally controllable properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Eli Anguelova; Sutter, Peter Werner

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor-liquid-solid growth of nanowires is tailored to achieve complex one-dimensional material geometries using phase diagrams determined for nanoscale materials. Segmented one-dimensional nanowires having constant composition display locally variable electronic band structures that are determined by the diameter of the nanowires. The unique electrical and optical properties of the segmented nanowires are exploited to form electronic and optoelectronic devices. Using gold-germanium as a model system, in situ transmission electron microscopy establishes, for nanometer-sized Au--Ge alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs), the parts of the phase diagram that determine their temperature-dependent equilibrium composition. The nanoscale phase diagram is then used to determine the exchange of material between the NW and the drop. The phase diagram for the nanoscale drop deviates significantly from that of the bulk alloy.

  18. A highly stable zirconium-based metal-organic framework material with high surface area and gas storage capacities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutov, Oleksii V.; Bury, Wojciech; Gomez-Gualdron, Diego A.; Krungleviciute, Vaiva; Fairen-Jimenez, David; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Snurr, Randall Q.; Hupp, Joseph T.; Yildirim, Taner; Farha, Omar K.

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , MOFs have attracted much interest for on-board hydrogen or methane storage in vehicles. Both methane and hydrogen are promising candidates as replacements for gasoline (petrol). However, their compact storage in molecular form, especially...

  19. Simply AlF3-treated Li4Ti5O12 composite anode materials for stable and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2)Sharing Smart GridShiftMethod for EstimatingSimplifying

  20. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Huang, Yin-Yan (Evanston, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physisorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics.

  1. Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

    1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

  2. Lightweight materials for transportation: Program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Program Plan has been prepared by the Office of Transportation Materials in response to a request by the House Committee on Appropriations. It recognizes that a significant commitment to long-term, stable materials research and development (R&D) is required to realize the benefits of lighter weight vehicles, including economic, environmental and energy related benefits. Extensive input was obtained from the major US automakers and from representative materials and component suppliers. Considerable interaction with the key members of the US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) has ensured consistency of technical direction. The program will support R&D activity at industrial sites through competitively bid subcontracts with cost sharing anticipated at 30--50%, with the higher amounts in process scale-up and manufacturing technology development. The recommended LWM Program will enable industry to develop pecessary technology by utilizing their capabilities as well as accessing supporting technology at national laboratories, universities, ongoing program activity at NASA, DoD, DOT, NIST, etc., and thereby leverage industry resources through integrated team approaches. Many individual program efforts are currently in place that address small portions of the overall needs of the LWM Program, both within DOE and in other agencies. Cognizance of these and overall integration of research activities are planned as significant program management tasks. Because of the international nature of the automobile business, benchmarking of foreign technology and tracking of worldwide developments are also key program elements.

  3. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

  4. Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material Supplemental Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Matthew A.

    Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 1 Supplemental Material A. Entropy, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 2 occupied, it is ambiguous whether

  5. Assembly of biological building blocks for nano- and micro-fabrication of materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Chung-Yi

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies were performed to fabricate various material structures using genetically engineered M13 bacteriophage. This virus template showed superior controls of material syntheses from nanoscale to microscale. ...

  6. DUF6 Materials Use Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haire, M.J.

    2002-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. government has {approx}500,000 metric tons (MT) of surplus depleted uranium (DU) in various chemical forms stored at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the United States. This DU, most of which is DU hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) resulting from uranium enrichment operations, is the largest amount of nuclear material in DOE's inventory. On July 6, 1999, DOE issued the ''Final Plan for the Conversion of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride as required by Public Law 105-204'', in which DOE committed to develop a ''Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Materials Use Roadmap'' in order to establish a strategy for the products resulting from conversion of DUF{sub 6} to a stable form. This report meets the commitment in the Final Plan by providing a comprehensive roadmap that DOE will use to guide any future research and development activities for the materials associated with its DUF{sub 6} inventory. The Roadmap supports the decision presented in the ''Record of Decision for Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride'', namely to begin conversion of the DUF{sub 6} inventory as soon as possible, either to uranium oxide, uranium metal, or a combination of both, while allowing for future uses of as much of this inventory as possible. In particular, the Roadmap is intended to explore potential uses for the DUF{sub 6} conversion products and to identify areas where further development work is needed. It focuses on potential governmental uses of DUF{sub 6} conversion products but also incorporates limited analysis of using the products in the private sector. The Roadmap builds on the analyses summarized in the recent ''Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride''. It also addresses other surplus DU, primarily in the form of DU trioxide and DU tetrafluoride. The DU-related inventory considered here includes the following: (1) Components directly associated with the DUF{sub 6} presently being stored at gaseous diffusion plant sites in Paducah, Kentucky; Portsmouth, Ohio; and Oak Ridge, Tennessee--470,500 MT of DU, 225,000 MT of fluorine chemically combined with the DU, and 74,000 MT of carbon steel comprising the storage cylinders; (2) Approximately 27,860 MT of DU in the form of uranium trioxide, tetrafluoride, and various other forms containing varying amounts of radioactive and chemical impurities, presently stored primarily at DOE's Savannah River Site. This Roadmap characterizes and analyzes alternative paths for eventual disposition of these materials, identifies the barriers that exist to implementing the paths, and makes recommendations concerning the activities that should be undertaken to overcome the barriers. The disposition paths considered in this roadmap and shown in Fig. ES.1 are (a) implementation of cost-effective and institutionally feasible beneficial uses of DU using the products of DUF{sub 6} conversion and other forms of DU in DOE's inventory, (b) processing the fluorine product resulting from DUF{sub 6} conversion to yield an optimal mix of valuable fluorine compounds [e.g., hydrogen fluoride (hydrofluoric acid), boron trifluoride] for industrial use, and (c) processing emptied cylinders to yield intact cylinders that are suitable for reuse, while maintaining an assured and cost-effective direct disposal path for all of the DU-related materials. Most paths consider the potential beneficial use of the DU and other DUF{sub 6} conversion products for the purpose of achieving overall benefits, including cost savings to the federal government, compared with simply disposing of the materials. However, the paths provide for assured direct disposal of these products if cost-effective and institutionally feasible beneficial uses are not found.

  7. SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL Auxiliary Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    run [Ammann et al., 2007; hereinafter CCSM] and the GKSS ECHO-g ERIK2 run [González-Rouco et al., 2006; hereinafter ECHO-g]. The annual means of the modeled temperature fields are interpolated to 5° latitude;SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL 2 ECHO-g simulations, respectively. The above conventions

  8. Uncertainty Quantification of the Homogeneity of Granular Materials through Discrete Element Modeling and X-Ray Computed Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, Patrick

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    nearly identical void ratios, the behavior of the samples varied greatly depending on the preparation method for both triaxial compression and extension tests. Samples prepared with the moist tamped technique showed a liquefaction behavior, while... grain to grain contacts which resulted in these samples undergoing temporary 3 liquefaction under shearing, while pluviated samples had more stable grain contacts which resulted in a stable response. Yammamuro et al. [14] defined a stable grain...

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

    1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  11. Radiation Safety Training Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

  12. Materials Research Staff

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    generation and detection, this approach naturally lends itself to in situ monitoring of material property evolution. The temporal laser pulse length and the corresponding...

  13. Webinar: Materials Genome Initative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

  14. Composite of refractory material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

  15. Geopolymer Sealing Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geopolymer Sealing Materials PI : Dr. Tomas Butcher Presenter: Dr. Toshi Sugama Brookhaven National Laboratory May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

  16. Materials for MA 182.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials for MA 182. INSTRUCTOR: Richard Penney. Office: MATH 822: Telephone: 494-1968: e-mail: rcp@math.purdue.edu: Office Hours: Mon, Tu, Fri,

  17. Layered Cathode Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Layered Cathode Materials presented by Michael Thackeray Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne Annual Merit Review DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Washington, D.C....

  18. EMSL - battery materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    battery-materials en Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmodeling-interfacial-glass-wa...

  19. Thermoelectric materials having porosity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

    2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

  20. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

  1. Radioactive Material Transportation Practices

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

  2. Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

  3. An Assessment of the Current Day Impact of Various Materials Associated with the U.S. Nuclear Test Program in the Marshall Island

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Noshkin, V E; Hamilton, T F; Conrado, C L; Bogen, K T

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Different stable elements, and some natural and man-made radionuclides, were used as tracers or associated in other ways with nuclear devices that were detonated at Bikini and Enewetak Atolls as part of the U.S. nuclear testing program from 1946 through 1958. The question has been raised whether any of these materials dispersed by the explosions could be of sufficient concentration in either the marine environment or on the coral islands to be of a health concern to people living, or planning to live, on the atolls. This report addresses that concern. An inventory of the materials involved during the test period was prepared and provided to us by the Office of Defense Programs (DP) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE). The materials that the DOE and the Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI) ask to be evaluated are--sulfur, arsenic, yttrium, tantalum, gold, rhodium, indium, tungsten, thallium, thorium-230,232 ({sup 230,232}Th), uranium-233,238 ({sup 233,238}U), polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po), curium-232 ({sup 232}Cu), and americium-241 ({sup 241}Am). The stable elements were used primarily as tracers for determining neutron energy and flux, and for other diagnostic purposes in the larger yield, multistage devices. It is reasonable to assume that these materials would be distributed in a similar manner as the fission products subsequent to detonation. A large inventory of fission product and uranium data was available for assessment. Detailed calculations show only a very small fraction of the fission products produced during the entire test series remain at the test site atolls. Consequently, based on the information provided, we conclude that the concentration of these materials in the atoll environment pose no adverse health effects to humans.

  4. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

  5. Deformation Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohamed, Farghalli A.; Yang, Heather

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2010 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A 47. F.A.12. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 41A,of Slip: Progress in Materials Science, Pergamon Press,

  6. Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advanced Materials SHARE Advanced Materials ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of...

  7. On self-sustaining processes in Rayleigh-stable rotating plane Couette flows and subcritical transition to turbulence in accretion disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; G. I. Ogilvie; C. Cossu

    2006-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcritical transition to turbulence in Keplerian accretion disks is still a controversial issue and some theoretical progress is required in order to determine whether or not this scenario provides a plausible explanation for the origin of angular momentum transport in non-magnetized accretion disks. Motivated by the recent discoveries of exact nonlinear steady self-sustaining solutions in linearly stable non-rotating shear flows, we attempt to compute similar solutions in Rayleigh-stable rotating plane Couette flows and to identify transition mechanisms in such flows by combining nonlinear continuation methods and asymptotic theory. We obtain exact nonlinear solutions for Rayleigh-stable cyclonic regimes but show that it is not possible to compute solutions for Rayleigh-stable anticyclonic regimes, including Keplerian flow, using similar techniques. We also present asymptotic descriptions of these various problems at large Reynolds numbers that provide some insight into the differences between the non-rotating and Rayleigh-stable anticyclonic regimes and derive some necessary conditions for mechanisms analogous to the non-rotating self-sustaining process to be present in flows on the Rayleigh line. Our results demonstrate that subcritical transition mechanisms cannot be identified in wall-bounded Rayleigh-stable anticyclonic shear flows by transposing directly the phenomenology of subcritical transition in cyclonic and non-rotating wall-bounded shear flows. Asymptotic developments, however, leave open the possibility that nonlinear self-sustaining solutions may exist in unbounded or periodic flows on the Rayleigh line. These could serve as a starting point to discover solutions in Rayleigh-stable flows, but the nonlinear stability of Keplerian accretion disks remains to be determined.

  8. Mechanically stable, high aspect ratio, multifilar, wound, ribbon-type conductor and method for manufacturing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cottingham, James G. (Center Moriches, NY)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanically stable, wound, multifilar, ribbon-type conductor having a cross-sectional aspect ratio which may be greater than 12:1, comprising a plurality of conductive strands wound to form a flattened helix containing a plastic strip into which the strands have been pressed so as to form a bond between the strip and the strands. The bond mechanically stabilizes the conductor under tension, preventing it from collapsing into a tubular configuration. In preferred embodiments the plastic strip may be polytetrafluoroethylene, and the conductive strands may be formed from a superconductive material. Conductors in accordance with the present invention may be manufactured by winding a plurality of conductive strands around a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of a hollow mandrel; the cross-section of the mandrel continuously varying from substantially circular to a high aspect ratio elipse while maintaining a constant circumference. The wound conductive strands are drawn from the mandrel as a multifilar helix while simultaneously a plastic strip is fed through the hollow mandrel so that it is contained within the helix as it is withdrawn from the mandrel. The helical conductor is then compressed into a ribbon-like form and the strands are bonded to the plastic strip by a combination of heat and pressure.

  9. Mines Welcomes Middle School Students | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Science and Technology. The students spent the day at Mines to learn about Earth, energy, the environment, critical materials and mining. The students enjoyed a chemistry show...

  10. Weeks Island gravity stable CO2 pilot: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.R.; Perry, G.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Weeks Island ''S'' sand Reservoir B (''S'' RB) gravity-stable CO2 field test was completed during February 1988. Injection started in October 1978 and production began in January 1981 in this high-permeability, steeply-dipping sandstone reservoir. About 264,000 barrels of oil or 65 percent of the starting volume has been recovered. A 24-percent pore-volume slug of CO2 mixed with about six mole percent of natural gas (mostly methane) was injected at the start of the pilot. Since 1983, produced CO2 plus hydrocarbon gases have been recycled. CO2 usage statistics are 9.34 MCF/BO with recycle and 3.24 MCF/BO based on purchased CO2. Previous annual reports document the pilot design, implementation, and early results for the 1977 to June 1981 time period. This report is a review of early pilot history and a more detailed account of the post June 1981 results and overall interpretation. A reservoir-simulation history match of pilot performance plus core and log data from a 1983 swept-zone evaluation well are described in this report. A brief description of the production facility and an account of the corrosion control program are also included. 11 refs., 34 figs.

  11. Evolutionary stable strategies in networked games: the influence of topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasthurirathna, Dharshana; Uddin, Shahadat

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evolutionary game theory is used to model the evolution of competing strategies in a population of players. Evolutionary stability of a strategy is a dynamic equilibrium, in which any competing mutated strategy would be wiped out from a population. If a strategy is weak evolutionarily stable, the competing strategy may manage to survive within the network. Understanding the network-related factors that affect the evolutionary stability of a strategy would be critical in making accurate predictions about the behaviour of a strategy in a real-world strategic decision making environment. In this work, we evaluate the effect of network topology on the evolutionary stability of a strategy. We focus on two well-known strategies known as the Zero-determinant strategy and the Pavlov strategy. Zero-determinant strategies have been shown to be evolutionarily unstable in a well-mixed population of players. We identify that the Zero-determinant strategy may survive, and may even dominate in a population of players connec...

  12. MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. BISHOP

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

  13. Impacted material placement plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickey, M.J.

    1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

  14. Nanocrystalline heterojunction materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H.; Su, Yali; Gao, Yufei; Heald, Steve M.

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  15. Materials for Information Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Ben Zhong

    on thin-film and nano-scale materials. The papers include content ranging from materials-related aspects for these fascinating and useful mate- rials. /jr Adv. Eng. Mater. 2009, 11, Issue 4 Colloidal Hollow Spheres Colloidal hollow spheres of conduct- ing polymers such as polypyrrole (PPy) or polyaniline (PAni) are produced

  16. Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

  17. AN EFFICIENT AND STABLE SPECTRAL-ELEMENT METHOD FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    harmonic sound waves in a homogeneous compressible fluid by an obstacle is de- veloped in this ... sented to show the accuracy and stability of the method. 1.

  18. Materials Science and Technology Mechanical and Materials Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Materials Science and Technology Metallurgy Mechanical and Materials Engineering Materials Science with Energy Engineering Materials Science with Business Management Course Prospectus School of Metallurgy for Metallurgy and Materials What difference will you make? #12;2 School of Metallurgy and Materials Contents

  19. Materials of Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

  20. Stable carbon isotope ratio of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the environment: validation of isolation and stable carbon isotope analysis methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Moon Koo

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    , purification and compound specific isotope analysis methods were developed to accurately measure the stable carbon isotope ratio of individual PAHs. Development of the method included improving accuracy and precision of the isotopic measurement by producing...

  1. Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Relations (865) 574-7308 Super stable garnet ceramics may be ideal for high-energy lithium batteries ORNL researchers used scanning transmission electron microscopy to take an...

  2. An Efficient, Energy Stable Scheme for the Cahn-Hilliard-Brinkman ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an unconditionally energy stable and uniquely solvable finite difference ... The scheme is based on a convex splitting of the discrete CH energy and.

  3. Energy Stable Schemes for Cahn-Hilliard phase-field model of two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 25, 2010 ... Several efficient and energy stable time discretization schemes for the coupled nonlinear Cahn-Hilliard phase-field system for both the matched ...

  4. Decoupled energy stable schemes for phase-field models of two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    decoupled, unconditionally energy stable schemes for Cahn-Hilliard phase-field models of two-phase incompressible flows. At each time step, these schemes ...

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - aquifer stable isotopes Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    results for: aquifer stable isotopes Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Treated domestic wastewater traditionally has been discharged offshore in coastal areas via ocean outfalls. In...

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - age mammal stable Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: age mammal stable Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Biogerontology 4: 119120, 2003. 2003 Kluwer Academic...

  7. Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Course outline School of Metallurgy and Materials Materials us? Dr Alessandro Mottura Undergraduate Admissions Tutor for Metallurgy and Materials What difference will you make? #12;Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Understanding the properties of new materials

  8. Fitting random stable solar systems to Titius-Bode laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wayne Hayes; Scott Tremaine

    1997-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ``solar systems'' are generated with planetary orbital radii r distributed uniformly random in log(r) between 0.2 and 50 AU. A conservative stability criterion is imposed by requiring that adjacent planets are separated by a minimum distance of k Hill radii, for values of k ranging from 1 to 8. Least-squares fits of these systems to generalized Bode laws are performed, and compared to the fit of our own Solar System. We find that this stability criterion, and other ``radius-exclusion'' laws, generally produce approximately geometrically spaced planets that fit a Titius-Bode law about as well as our own Solar System. We then allow the random systems the same exceptions that have historically been applied to our own Solar System. Namely, one gap may be inserted, similar to the gap between Mars and Jupiter, and up to 3 planets may be ``ignored'', similar to how some forms of Bode's law ignore Mercury, Neptune, and Pluto. With these particular exceptions, we find that our Solar System fits significantly better than the random ones. However, we believe that this choice of exceptions, designed specifically to give our own Solar System a better fit, gives it an unfair advantage that would be lost if other exception rules were used. We conclude that the significance of Bode's law is simply that stable planetary systems tend to be regularly spaced; this conclusion could be strengthened by the use of more stringent methods of rejecting unstable solar systems, such as long-term orbit integrations.

  9. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  10. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

    1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

  11. Electrically conductive composite material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

  12. Critical Materials Hub

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

  13. ATS materials/manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Materials at LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

  15. Super-Stable, Highly Monodisperse Plasmonic Nanocrystals with 500 Gold Atoms: Au~500(SR)~120

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumara, Chanaka [University of Mississippi, The; Zuo, Xiaobing [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ilavsky, Dr. Jan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Chapman, Karena [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Cullen, David A [ORNL; Dass, Amala [University of Mississippi, The

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining the composition of plasmonic nanoparticles is challenging due to a deficiency in tools capable of accurately evaluating the number of atoms. Mass spectrometry plays a significant role in determining nanoparticle composition at the atomic level. Significant progress has been made in understanding ultra-small gold nanoparticles, like Au25(SR)18 and Au38(SR)24, with a Au core diameter of 0.97 and 1.3 nm, respectively. However, progress in small plasmonic nanoparticles (2 - 5 nm) is currently challenging, due in part to limitations in synthesizing monodisperse nanoparticles. Here, we report a plasmonic nanocrystal that is highly monodisperse, with an unprecedented variation of less than 20 gold atoms. The composition of the super-stable plasmonic nanocrystals at 115 kDa was determined to contain Au500 10SR120 3. The Au~500 system, named Faraduarate-500, is the largest size to be characterized using high resolution ESI mass spectrometry. Atomic pair distribution function (PDF) data shows that the local atomic structure is consistent with a face-centered cubic (fcc) or Marks decahedral arrangement. High resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images show that the diameter is 2.4 0.1 nm. The radius of gyration measured by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), is 1.05 0.05 nm, and the size and the shape of SAXS molecular envelope are in agreement with TEM and PDF measurements.

  16. Refraction of shear zones in granular materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Unger

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We study strain localization in slow shear flow focusing on layered granular materials. A heretofore unknown effect is presented here. We show that shear zones are refracted at material interfaces in analogy with refraction of light beams in optics. This phenomenon can be obtained as a consequence of a recent variational model of shear zones. The predictions of the model are tested and confirmed by 3D discrete element simulations. We found that shear zones follow Snell's law of light refraction.

  17. Development of Spintronic Bandgap Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, Jeremy; Awschalom, David; Floro, Jerrold

    2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of Ge/Si quantum dots with high spatial precision has been pursued, with the goal of developing a platform for “spintronics bandgap materials”. Quantum dots assemblies were grown by molecular beam epitaxy on carbon-templated silicon substrates. These structures were characterized by atomic force microscopy. Vertically gated structures were created on systems with up to six well-defined quantum dots with a controlled geometric arrangement, and low-temperature (mK) transport experiments were performed. These experiments showed evidence for a crossover from diamagnetic to Zeeman energy shifts in resonant tunneling of electrons through electronic states in the quantum dots.

  18. Thermally Stable Ultra-Low Temperature Oxidation Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF; Howden, Ken; Kim, Chang H.; Oh, Se H.; Schmieg, Steven J.

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This annual reports describes recent results of a CRADA between General Motors Company (GM) and Battelle/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In the CRADA, we are investigating a number of candidate low temperature oxidation catalysts as fresh materials, and after realistic laboratory- and engine-aging. These studies will lead to a better understanding of fundamental characteristics and various aging factors that impact the long-term performance of catalysts, while also providing an assessment of the appropriateness of the laboratory conditions in realistically reproducing the effects of actual engine aging conditions.

  19. The development of structural materials for reduced long-term activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehrlich, K.; Cierjacks, S.W.; Kelzenberg, S.; Moeslang, A. [Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A reliable calculation of neutron-induced activation of materials requires the inclusion of all kinematically allowed reactions and subsequent reaction chains. While neutron-induced reactions have been sufficiently covered in the past, sequential (x,n) reactions with charged particles x, produced in a first-step reaction, were neglected. To include this type of reaction three new libraries and a preparatory code were developed to produce pseudo cross sections for the European reference code FISPACT. Inventory calculations with the updated FISPACT code, done for all stable elements, showed for 30 elements an increase of at least one of the radiological quantities activity, dose rate and decay heat. Two types of candidate structural materials were investigated: ferritic-martensitic steels and vanadium-based alloys. While V-Cr-Ti alloys without impurities are known to have far superior long-term activation properties, a realistic assumption of technically achievable amounts of tramp elements leads nearly to the same level of activation as for the optimized ferritic-martensitic steels.

  20. Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

  1. Foam composition for treating asbestos-containing materials and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Block, J.; Krupkin, N.V.; Kuespert, D.R.; Nishioka, G.M.; Lau, J.W.K.; Palmer, N.I.

    1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A composition for transforming a chrysotile asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material is disclosed. The composition comprises water, at least about 30% by weight of an acid component, at least about 0.1% by weight of a source of fluoride ions, and a stable foam forming amount of a foaming agent system having both cationic and non-ionic functionality. A method of transforming the asbestos-containing material into a non-asbestos material using the present composition in the form of a foam also disclosed.

  2. Materials Science & Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Aucierllo has edited 19 books, published about 450 articles, holds 14 patents, and has organized, chaired and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics, new materials science and chemistry

  3. Microdrilling of Biocompatible Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Sankalp

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This research studies microdrilling of biocompatible materials including commercially pure titanium, 316L stainless steel, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and aluminum 6061-T6. A microdrilling technique that uses progressive pecking and micromist...

  4. Nuclear Material Packaging Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. No cancellation. Certified 11-18-10.

  5. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  6. Critical Materials Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

  7. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

  8. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL Recovery of Critical Materials from Consumer Devices 3 3-2 3.2.6 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 McGuire, Michael ORNL...

  9. CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Payne, Steve LLNL New Efficient...

  10. MATERIALS SCIENCE HEALTHCARE POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falge, Eva

    for Polymer Research are paving the way to optimizing organic substances for use in solar cells, light-emitting diodes and memory chips, and are using molecular materials to develop electronic components

  11. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

  12. Electrically conductive material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

    1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

  13. Management of Nuclear Materials

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

  14. Nuclear material operations manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.P.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

  15. Reversible hydrogen storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

  16. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  17. Nano-composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

    2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

  18. Piston actuated nastic materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shah, Viral

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    PISTON ACTUATED NASTIC MATERIALS A Thesis by VIRAL SHAH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2008... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PISTON ACTUATED NASTIC MATERIALS A Thesis by VIRAL SHAH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  19. Biomimetic hydrogel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  20. Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

  1. The use of carbon stable isotope ratios in drugs characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magdas, D. A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Cristea, G., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Bot, A., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro; Mirel, V., E-mail: gabriela.cristea@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath Str., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopic Ratio Mass Spectrometry (IRMS) is an effective toll to be used for drug product authentication. The isotopic composition could be used to assist in the differentiation between batches of drugs and assist in the identification of counterfeit materials on the market. Only two factors affect the isotopic ratios in pharmaceutical components: the isotopic composition of the raw materials and the synthetic processes performed upon them. Counterfeiting of pharmaceutical drugs threatens consumer confidence in drug products companies' economical well-being. In this preliminary study, the analyzed samples consist in two types of commercially available analgesics, which were purchases from Romanian pharmacies. Differences in ?{sup 13}C between batches from ?29.7 to ?31.6% were observed, demonstrating that this method can be used to differentiate among individual drug batches and subsequently identify counterfeits on the market. On the other hand, carbon isotopic ratios differences among producers were recorded, the variations being between ?31.3 to ?34.9% for the same type of analgesic, but from different manufactures.

  2. Research on stable, high-efficiency, amorphous silicon multijunction modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catalano, A.; Bennet, M.; Chen, L.; Fieselmann, B.; Li, Y.; Newton, J.; Podlesny, R.; Wiedeman, S.; Yang, L. (Solarex Corp., Newtown, PA (United States). Thin Film Div.)

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present effort seeks to develop modules with a stabilized performance of 8.8% aperture area conversion after 600 hours light exposure (AM1.5) at 50{degrees}C in modules with aperture areas over 900 cm{sup 2}. Good progress towards this goal has been obtained with the demonstration of 9.8% initial performance in a submodule incorporating devices with relatively thin middle junction i-layer thickness of 4000{Angstrom}. Devices with this design have been shown to lose about 10% of their initial performance after 1000 hours of exposure. Modules lose between 18--23% largely due to light induced shunting, probably related to the contact metallization. Achieving long-term stabilized efficiencies of 12% or more requires substantial improvements in materials and devices. Our analysis has shown that substantial optical losses occur at both front and rear contacts which we hope to address with ZnO films prepared by CVD and sputtering processes now under development. Further progress is doped layers and alloys are also needed. Fundamental studies of the relationship between material structure and processes (particularly the effect of hydrogen dilution) are reported here. 32 refs., 28 figs., 9 tabs.

  3. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    xi Material CharacterizationThermoelectric Materials . . . . . . . . Graphene-Like5 Nanostructured Materials for Electrochemical Energy

  4. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman

    2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible CO, HC, or NOx and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at lower temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued, not the least of which is reduced cost. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (>0.05 S cm{sup -1} at 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of bismuth oxide on the air side and ceria on the fuel side. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based electrolytes are the only known solid oxide electrolytes to have an ionic conductivity that meets the program conductivity goal. We have previously demonstrated that this concept works, that a bismuth oxide/ceria bilayer electrolyte provides near theoretical open circuit potential (OCP) and is stable for 1400 h of fuel cell operation under both open circuit and maximum power conditions. More recently, we developed a computer model to determine the defect transport in this bilayer and have found that a bilayer comprised primarily of the more conductive component (bismuth oxide) is stable for 500 C operation. In this first year of the project we are obtaining necessary thermochemical data to complete the computer model as well as initial SOFC results based on thick 1-2 mm single and bilayer ceria/bismuth oxide electrolytes. We will use the computer model to obtain the optimum relative layer thickness as a function of temperature and air/fuel conditions. SOFCs will be fabricated with 1-2 mm single and bilayer electrolytes based on the modeling results, tested for OCP, conductivity, and stability and compared against the predictions. The computer modeling is a continuation of previous work under support from GRI and the student was available at the inception of the contract. However, the experimental effort was delayed until the beginning of the Spring Semester because the contract was started in October, 2 months after the start of our Fall Semester, and after all of the graduate students were committed to other projects. The results from both of these efforts are described in the following two sections: (1) Experimental; and (2) Computer Modeling.

  5. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  6. Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

    1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

  7. Analysis of reactor material experiments investigating oxide fuel crust stability and heat transfer in jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Spencer, B.W.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis is presented of the crust stability and heat transfer behavior in the CSTI-1, CSTI-3, and CWTI-11 reactor material experiments in which a jet of molten oxide fuel at approx. 160/sup 0/K above its freezing temperature was impinged normally upon stainless steel plates initially at 300 and 385 K. The major issue is the existence of nonexistence of a stable solidified layer of fuel, or crust, interstitial to the flowing hot fuel and the steel substrate, tending to insulate the steel from the hot molten fuel. A computer model was developed to predict the heatup of thermocouples imbedded immediately beneath the surface of the plate for both of the cases in which a stable crust is assumed to be either present or absent during the impingement phase. Comparison of the model calculations with the measured thermocouple temperatures indicates that a protective crust was present over nearly all of the plate surface area throughout the impingement process precluding major melting of the plate steel. However, the experiments also show evidence for very localized and isolated steel melting as revealed by localized and isolated pitting of the steel surface and the response of thermocouples located within the pitted region.

  8. Abstract.-Stable nitrogen (/ll5Nl and carbon (/ll3CI isotope measure-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    540 Abstract.-Stable nitrogen (/ll5Nl and carbon (/ll3CI isotope measure- ments were used and the Gulfof Mexico Loop Current. Use of stable isotopes to assess groups of king mackerel, Scomberomorus caval), the carbon isotopic composition of a food source is not substantially altered during assimilation. De

  9. Stable High Beta Plasmas Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field D. T. Garnier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    Stable High Beta Plasmas Confined by a Dipole Magnetic Field D. T. Garnier, A. Hansen, M. E. Mauel Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (Dated: October 21, 2005) Abstract Stable high-beta plasma is created we report the first production of high beta plasma confined by a laboratory dipole using neutral gas

  10. Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Ian L.

    Variations in the diet of introduced Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) inferred using stable isotope predators; island ecosystem conservation; stable isotope analysis; Norway rats; diet. Correspondence Heather of introduced Norway rats Rattus norvegicus has raised concerns for the fate of the large least auklet Aethia

  11. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Connor, P.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit. 11 figs.

  12. Monolithic amplifier with stable, high resistance feedback element and method for fabricating the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Connor, Paul (Bellport, NY)

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic amplifier includes a stable, high resistance feedback circuit and a dynamic bias circuit. The dynamic bias circuit is formed with active elements matched to those in the amplifier and feedback circuit to compensate for variations in the operating and threshold voltages thereby maintaining a stable resistance in the feedback circuit.

  13. Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson and Anna G. Stefanopoulou*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sontag, Eduardo

    Rendering the Electromechanical Valve Actuator Globally Asymptotically Stable Katherine S. Peterson on Sontag's feedback to render the electromechanical valve actuator (EVA) globally asymptotically stable on a linearized plant model. Here, we demonstrate and prove that our controller renders the system GAS without any

  14. Theoretical Population Biology 53, 216 235 (1998) Evolutionary Stable Strategies and Trade-Offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getz, Wayne M.

    Theoretical Population Biology 53, 216 235 (1998) Evolutionary Stable Strategies and Trade Mathematics, University of the Orange Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300, South Africa and Wayne M in which a parameter # characterizes the onset of density dependence. An evolutionary stable strategy

  15. Trajectory Planning and Control of an Underactuated Dynamically Stable Single Spherical Wheeled Mobile Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajectory Planning and Control of an Underactuated Dynamically Stable Single Spherical Wheeled is a dynamically stable mobile robot that moves on a single spherical wheel and is capable of omni- directional movement. The ballbot is an underactuated system with nonholonomic dynamic constraints. The authors propose

  16. Modeling Dynamics and Exploring Control of a Single-Wheeled Dynamically Stable Mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Dynamics and Exploring Control of a Single-Wheeled Dynamically Stable Mobile Robot. It actively balances and moves on a single wheel using closed loop feedback, making it dynamically stable it a good candidate for operating in human environments. Balancing on a ball allows Ballbot to be omni

  17. STABLE MAPS AND QUASIMAPS TO TORIC FANO VARIETIES TOM COATES AND CRISTINA MANOLACHE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STABLE MAPS AND QUASIMAPS TO TORIC FANO VARIETIES TOM COATES AND CRISTINA MANOLACHE Abstract. We analyze the relationship between two compactifications of the moduli space of maps from curves to a toric fano varieties: the Kontsevich moduli space of stable maps and the Ciocan-Fontanine­Kim moduli space

  18. Using phylogenetic probes for quantification of stable isotope labeling and microbial community analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brodie, Eoin L; DeSantis, Todd Z; Karaoz, Ulas; Andersen, Gary L

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Herein is described methods for a high-sensitivity means to measure the incorporation of stable isotope labeled substrates into RNA following stable isotope probing experiments (SIP). RNA is hybridized to a set of probes such as phylogenetic microarrays and isotope incorporation is quantified such as by secondary ion mass spectrometer imaging (NanoSIMS).

  19. Green Pacific Biologicals Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to Investors · Rapid & stable nuclear genetic engineering of eukaryotic algae · WW exclusive license Max Planck's competitive advantage? Rapid & stable algae nuclear genetic engineering Wild-typeWild-typeWild-type GPBStrainGPBStrainGPBStrain #12;Green Pacific Biologicals Organism with high levels of oils Powerful genetic engineering GPB [no

  20. Journal de la Socit Franaise de Statistique Spatial extremes: Max-stable processes at work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    and conditional simulation of max-stable processes. The paper ends with the modeling of extreme wind gustsSubmission Journal de la Société Française de Statistique Spatial extremes: Max-stable processes many developments to the functional extreme value theory have been made during the last decades

  1. Asbestos-free brake-lining materials for hydrogenerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lalonde, S.; Lanteigne, J. [Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three different asbestos-free materials currently considered as new lining materials for hydrogenerator brakes were tested and compared to the original asbestos lining. Results show that these substitutes not only vary greatly from the original material in terms of mechanical properties and physical characteristics but also exhibit significantly different performances in braking tests. Consequently, these new materials are not entirely suitable for the intended application.

  2. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 13881391 Bifacial configurations for CdTe solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 91 (2007) 1388­1391 Bifacial configurations for CdTe solar We present a different back contact for CdTe solar cell by the application of only a transparent that acts as a free-Cu stable back contact and at the same time allows to realize bifacial CdTe solar cells

  3. * Corresponding author. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 209}218

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romeo, Alessandro

    * Corresponding author. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells 58 (1999) 209}218 A highly e solar cells based on the CdTe/CdS heterojunction still exhibits quite a few open problems$cient and stable CdTe/CdS thin "lm solar cell N. Romeo, A. Bosio, R. Tedeschi*, A. Romeo, V. Canevari Dipartimento

  4. Thermodynamic stability of oxide, nitride, and carbide coating materials in liquid Sn25Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, Nasr M.

    Thermodynamic stability of oxide, nitride, and carbide coating materials in liquid Sn­25Li S of various oxides, carbides, and nitrides in Sn­Li is estimated as a function of lithium composition K most of the studied nitrides, carbides, and some oxides were found to be stable (DrG > 0). However

  5. ALCOJET MSDS -ALCOJET MSDS -ALCOJET MSDS -ALCOJET MSDS MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerson, Russell R.

    remainder to sewer. Material is biodegradable. Wear dust mask to prevent inhalation. Waste Disposal Method% at ambient conditions Appearance: White powder and grandules - slight acrid odor. IV. FIRE AND EXPLOSION DATA Fire and Explosion Hazards: None V. REACTIVITY DATA Stability: Stable- loses available chlorine at high

  6. BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

  7. Method for forming thermally stable nanoparticles on supports

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Naitabdi, Ahmed R.; Behafarid, Farzad

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An inverse micelle-based method for forming nanoparticles on supports includes dissolving a polymeric material in a solvent to provide a micelle solution. A nanoparticle source is dissolved in the micelle solution. A plurality of micelles having a nanoparticle in their core and an outer polymeric coating layer are formed in the micelle solution. The micelles are applied to a support. The polymeric coating layer is then removed from the micelles to expose the nanoparticles. A supported catalyst includes a nanocrystalline powder, thin film, or single crystal support. Metal nanoparticles having a median size from 0.5 nm to 25 nm, a size distribution having a standard deviation .ltoreq.0.1 of their median size are on or embedded in the support. The plurality of metal nanoparticles are dispersed and in a periodic arrangement. The metal nanoparticles maintain their periodic arrangement and size distribution following heat treatments of at least 1,000.degree. C.

  8. Stable thermal oscillations in columns of partially supercool water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    theoretical and experimental studies of the phenomenon described by Veronis, heat was supplied from below. Here we cool from below and used either heavy water (D2O) and or sugar as the solute. We show several of cooling or during cooling. However, the effects are quite different. The oscillations often (but

  9. Stable radial distortion calibration by polynomial matrix inequalities programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrion, Didier

    polynomials. Further, we show how to model these nonnegativities using polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI) and how to estimate the radial distortion parameters subject to PMI constraints using semidefinite to stabilize the shape of the distortion function. It is based on polynomial matrix inequalities (PMI

  10. Stable pseudoanalytical computation of electromagnetic fields from arbitrarily-oriented dipoles in cylindrically stratified media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Moon; F. L. Teixeira; B. Donderici

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Computation of electromagnetic fields due to point sources (Hertzian dipoles) in cylindrically stratified media is a classical problem for which analytical expressions of the associated tensor Green's function have been long known. However, under finite-precision arithmetic, direct numerical computations based on the application of such analytical (canonical) expressions invariably lead to underflow and overflow problems related to the poor scaling of the eigenfunctions (cylindrical Bessel and Hankel functions) for extreme arguments and/or high-order, as well as convergence problems related to the numerical integration over the spectral wavenumber and to the truncation of the infinite series over the azimuth mode number. These problems are exacerbated when a disparate range of values is to be considered for the layers' thicknesses and material properties (resistivities, permittivities, and permeabilities), the transverse and longitudinal distances between source and observation points, as well as the source frequency. To overcome these challenges in a systematic fashion, we introduce herein different sets of range-conditioned, modified cylindrical functions (in lieu of standard cylindrical eigenfunctions), each associated with non-overlapped subdomains of (numerical) evaluation to allow for stable computations under any range of physical parameters. In addition adaptively-chosen integration contours are employed in the complex spectral wavenumber plane to ensure convergent numerical integration in all cases. We illustrate the application of the algorithm to problems of geophysical interest involving layer resistivities ranging from 1000 $\\Omega \\cdot$m to 10$^{-8} \\Omega \\cdot$m, frequencies of operation ranging from 10 MHz down to the low magnetotelluric range of 0.01 Hz, and for various combinations of layer thicknesses.

  11. Porous material neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

  12. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  13. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  14. Apparatus for dispensing material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutter, Peter Werner (Beach, NY); Sutter, Eli Anguelova (Beach, NY)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus capable of dispensing drops of material with volumes on the order of zeptoliters is described. In some embodiments of the inventive pipette the size of the droplets so dispensed is determined by the size of a hole, or channel, through a carbon shell encapsulating a reservoir that contains material to be dispensed. The channel may be formed by irradiation with an electron beam or other high-energy beam capable of focusing to a spot size less than about 5 nanometers. In some embodiments, the dispensed droplet remains attached to the pipette by a small thread of material, an atomic scale meniscus, forming a virtually free-standing droplet. In some embodiments the droplet may wet the pipette tip and take on attributes of supported drops. Methods for fabricating and using the pipette are also described.

  15. Oxygen ion conducting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

  16. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  17. Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

  18. MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasty, T.

    2009-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

  19. PLANETARY-SCALE STRONTIUM ISOTOPIC HETEROGENEITY AND THE AGE OF VOLATILE DEPLETION OF EARLY SOLAR SYSTEM MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moynier, Frederic; Podosek, Frank A. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science and McDonnell Center for Space Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Day, James M. D. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA 92093-0244 (United States); Okui, Wataru; Yokoyama, Tetsuya [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Bouvier, Audrey [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0231 (United States); Walker, Richard J., E-mail: moynier@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: fap@levee.wustl.edu, E-mail: jmdday@ucsd.edu, E-mail: rjwalker@umd.edu, E-mail: okui.w.aa@m.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: tetsuya.yoko@geo.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: abouvier@umn.edu [Department of Geology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Isotopic anomalies in planetary materials reflect both early solar nebular heterogeneity inherited from presolar stellar sources and processes that generated non-mass-dependent isotopic fractionations. The characterization of isotopic variations in heavy elements among early solar system materials yields important insight into the stellar environment and formation of the solar system, and about initial isotopic ratios relevant to long-term chronological applications. One such heavy element, strontium, is a central element in the geosciences due to wide application of the long-lived {sup 87}Rb-{sup 87}Sr radioactive as a chronometer. We show that the stable isotopes of Sr were heterogeneously distributed at both the mineral scale and the planetary scale in the early solar system, and also that the Sr isotopic heterogeneities correlate with mass-independent oxygen isotope variations, with only CI chondrites plotting outside of this correlation. The correlation implies that most solar system material formed by mixing of at least two isotopically distinct components: a CV-chondrite-like component and an O-chondrite-like component, and possibly a distinct CI-chondrite-like component. The heterogeneous distribution of Sr isotopes may indicate that variations in initial {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr of early solar system materials reflect isotopic heterogeneity instead of having chronological significance, as interpreted previously. For example, given the differences in {sup 84}Sr/{sup 86}Sr between calcium aluminum inclusions and eucrites ({epsilon}{sup 84}Sr > 2), the difference in age between these materials would be {approx}6 Ma shorter than previously interpreted, placing the Sr chronology in agreement with other long- and short-lived isotope systems, such as U-Pb and Mn-Cr.

  20. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

  1. Materials for geothermal production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

  2. Materials Under Extremes | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90Materials Porous Materials

  3. Materials at the Mesoscale

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContract ResearchMaterials andMaterials

  4. Materials for the Future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContract ResearchMaterialsMaterials for

  5. Container for radioactive materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fields, S.R.

    1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

  6. Short courses in Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, John N.

    Short courses in Composite Materials Overview The ability to tailor the material properties used. Combining the adaptability of composites with clear weight savings, whilst tailoring materials properties Airbus and Glyndr University, the Advanced Composites Training and Development Centre educates current

  7. Water and its relatives: the stable, supercooled and particularly the stretched, regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stacey L. Meadley; C. Austen Angell

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    While the water molecule is simple, its condensed phase liquid behavior is so complex that no consensus description has emerged despite three centuries of effort. Here we identify features of its behavior that are the most peculiar, hence suggest ways forward. We examine the properties of water at the boundaries of common experience, including stable states at high pressure, the supercooled state at normal and elevated pressure, and the stretched ("negative pressure") state, out to the limits of mechanical stability. The familiar anomalies at moderate pressures (viscosity and density (TMD) behavior, etc.), are not explained by H-bond breaking, according to common bond-breaking criteria. A comparison of data on the TMD, at both positive and negative pressures, with the predictions of popular pair potential models, shows dramatic discrepancies appearing in the stretched liquid domain. This prompts questions on the second critical point (TC2) hypothesis that has been guiding much current thinking. We turn to related systems for guidance, reviewing a hierarchy of water-like anomalies. We conclude that water models are far from complete and that proper understanding of water will depend on success in mastering the measurement of liquid behavior in the negative pressure domain - which we discuss.

  8. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, Al-SBA-15, containing strong Broensted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt% Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst will be evaluated for the conversion of heavy petroleum feedstocks to naphtha and middle distillates.

  9. Stable-isotope probe of nano-scale mineral-fluid redox interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kavner, Abby

    2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The project examined how stable isotopes fractionate at an aqueous/solid interface during electrochemical reduction reactions. Measurements in a wide variety of metal deposition systems including Fe, Zn, Li, Mo, and Cu, have led to observations of large isotope fractionations which strongly vary as a function of rate and temperature. For the Fe, Zn, and Li systems, our electrochemical deposition methods provide the largest single-pass fractionation factors that are observed for these systems. Based on these and other experiments and theory showing and predicting significant and rate-dependent fractionations of isotopes at reacting interfaces, we have developed a simple statistical mechanics framework that predicts the kinetic isotope effect accompanying phase transformations in condensed systems. In addition, we have begun to extend our studies of mineral-fluid redox interactions to high pressures and temperatures in the diamond anvil cell. We performed a series of experiments to determine solubilities of Cu and Ni at elevated pressure and temperature conditions relevant to ore-formation.

  10. Stable Isotopes (O, H, and S) in the Muteh Gold Deposit, Golpaygan Area, Iran

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdollahi, M. J. [Shahid Bahonar University, Department of Geology (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: kmgbkh@gmail.com; Karimpour, M. H. [Ferdousi University, Department of Geology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kheradmand, A. [Shahid Bahonar University, Department of Geology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zarasvandi, A. R. [Shahid Chamran University, Department of Geology (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muteh gold district with nine gold deposits is located in the Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone. Gold mineralization occurs in a pre-Permian complex which mainly consists of green schists, meta-volcanics, and gneiss rocks. Shear zones are the host of gold mineralization. Gold paragenesis minerals include pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and secondary minerals. Pyrites occur as pre-, syn-, and post-metamorphism minerals. To determine the source of the ore-bearing fluids, fifty samples were selected for petrographical and stable isotope studies. The mean values of 12.4 per mille , and -42 per mille for {delta}{sup 18}O and {delta}D isotopes, respectively, and a mean value of 7.75 per mille of calculated fractionation factors for {delta}{sup 18}O H{sub 2}O, from quartz veins indicate that metamorphic host rocks are the most important source for the fluids and gold mineralization. Three generations of pyrite can be distinguished showing a wide range of {delta}{sup 34}S. Gold mineralization is closely associated with intense hydrothermal alteration along the ductile shear zones. The characteristics of the gold mineralization in the study area are similar to those of orogenic gold deposits elsewhere.

  11. Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreja, Vasile V. N. [National Research and Development Institute for Microtechnologies (IMT-Bucuresti), Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

  12. Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggerstaff, Janet M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the damping material and epoxy resin. The surface of theinfiltration of the epoxy resin into the damping materialthe damping material and resin (epoxy) is occurring and is

  13. Materials and Manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environmental Assurance Anne Meinhold Unprecedented Accomplishments in the Use of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy Preston is the solution. Other times, the design must accommodate the limitations of materials properties. The design requirements, and written procedures. Nondestructive testing depends on incident or input energy that interacts

  14. Supplemental Material Supplemental methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Material (ESI) for Integrative Biology This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2009 #12;Computing counter and % ID/g calculated as (counts/weight tissue)/ total counts injected. Mass Spectrometry. To extract ACPPs to obtain electrospray (ESI) mass spectra, a solution of 9M guanidinium chloride (Gu

  15. Materials Safety Data Sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) MSDS contain chemical hazard information about substances compounds and solvents. MSDS data can be accessed from the following URLs http://www.ehs.umass.edu/ http://www.chem.umass.edu/Safety the "Important Safety Sites for the University" link to reach a variety of safety related information, including

  16. NMR imaging of materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

  17. Sustainable Materials Course Outline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    , embodied energy; environmental footprint, waste recycling and pollution minimization, life cycle assessment Science and Engineering (Building E8) Phone: 9385 5025 j.q.zhang@unsw.edu.au Consultation hours: by appointment To be advised School of Materials Science and Engineering (Building E8) Consultation hours

  18. Action Plan Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitze, Patrick

    sense, including all strata) has available to it a wide range of con- venient products which improve, improving companies' pros- pects and generating wealth without harming the environment. And allAction Plan 2010-2013 Materials Science Area EXECUTIVE SUMMARY #12;N.B.: If you require any further

  19. Measurement of the half-life of (198)Au in a nonmetal: High-precision measurement shows no host-material dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodwin, J. R.; Nica, N.; Iacob, V. E.; Dibidad, A.; Hardy, John C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ://www.ortec-online.com/Solutions/multichannel-analyzers. aspx]. [8] R. Jenkins, R. W. Gould, and D. Gedcke, Quantitative X-ray Spectrometry (Dekker, New York, 1981), p. 266. [9] D. Radford (private communication) [http://radware.phy. ornl.gov/main.html]. [10] R. Brun and F. Rademakers, Nucl. Instrum...

  20. 6/26/12 ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces: Most Read Articles (ACS Publications) 1/3pubs.acs.org/action/showMostReadArticles?journalCode=aamick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    , Chantal Andraud, and Stephane Parola High-Performance Asymmetric Supercapacitor Based on Graphene Hydrogel Incorporation of MnO2-Coated Carbon Nanotubes between Graphene Sheets as Supercapacitor Electrode Zhibin Lei

  1. From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials Requirements and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bremen, Universität

    From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials ­ Requirements and Challenges Lutz Frommberger (lutz construction, production engineer- ing, or wearable computing. Smart and sensorial materials provide a variety this application than the material itself that can be considered being "smart". In this contribution, we proceed

  2. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  3. Large-scale stable interacting dark energy model: Cosmological perturbations and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun-He Li; Xin Zhang

    2014-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Dark energy might interact with cold dark matter in a direct, nongravitational way. However, the usual interacting dark energy models (with constant $w$) suffer from some catastrophic difficulties. For example, the $Q\\propto\\rho_{\\rm c}$ model leads to an early-time large-scale instability, and the $Q\\propto\\rho_{\\rm de}$ model gives rise to the future unphysical result for cold dark matter density (in the case of a positive coupling). In order to overcome these fatal flaws, we propose in this paper an interacting dark energy model (with constant $w$) in which the interaction term is carefully designed to realize that $Q\\propto\\rho_{\\rm de}$ at the early times and $Q\\propto\\rho_{\\rm c}$ in the future, simultaneously solving the early-time superhorizon instability and future unphysical $\\rho_{\\rm c}$ problems. The concrete form of the interaction term in this model is $Q=3\\beta H \\frac{\\rho_{\\rm{de}}\\rho_{\\rm{c}}}{\\rho_{\\rm{de}}+\\rho_{\\rm{c}}}$, where $\\beta$ is the dimensionless coupling constant. We show that this model is actually equivalent to the decomposed new generalized Chaplygin gas (NGCG) model, with the relation $\\beta=-\\alpha w$. We calculate the cosmological perturbations in this model in a gauge-invariant way and show that the cosmological perturbations are stable during the whole expansion history provided that $\\beta>0$. Furthermore, we use the Planck data in conjunction with other astrophysical data to place stringent constraints on this model (with eight parameters), and we find that indeed $\\beta>0$ is supported by the joint constraint at more than 1$\\sigma$ level. The excellent theoretical features and the support from observations all indicate that the decomposed NGCG model deserves more attention and further investigation.

  4. Vibrational Thermodynamics of Materials Brent Fultz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent

    materials also contribute to the heat capacity. Lanthanides and actinides show a complex interplay with electronic excitations. In the classical high temperature limit, the adiabatic electron-phonon coupling can, and composition alter the conduction electron screening and the interatomic force constants. Phonon- phonon

  5. Materials Physics FirstPrinciple Simulations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maccabe, Barney

    . However, the best performing electrode materials for fuel cell applications currently rely heavily sintering. We investigate the possibility to anker palladium (Pd) atoms to a ZnO surface. The results show that Pd binds to a nondefective ZnO model surface (Fig. 1) with a desorption temperature

  6. E-Print Network 3.0 - angular stable plating Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: a glass plate with grooves, which allows a fast and precise placement of the coil used for calibrating... , the head and thorax are held almost stable, with the head...

  7. Using bioenergetics and stable isotopes to assess the trophic role of rusty crayfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vander Zanden, Jake

    Using bioenergetics and stable isotopes to assess the trophic role of rusty crayfish (Orconectes and implications of their foraging behavior on littoral ecosystems. We created a bioenergetics model for rusty

  8. Stable Isotope Dynamics in Cownose Rays (Rhinoptera bonasus) within the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    St. Clair, Katherine I

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    investigation, there is limited information available on feeding patterns of cownose rays in the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. Stable isotope analysis has been used to study the foraging ecology of various species, but only recently applied to elasmobranchs...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Thermally Stable Ultra-Low Temperature Oxidation Catalysts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by [company name] at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about thermally stable ultra-low...

  10. Global Climatic and Stable Isotopic Correlations During the Early Permian (Cisuralian)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noret, Jordan R.

    2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    and effects of global warming. This study presents new oxygen and carbon stable isotopic data (?18O and ?13C, VPDB) from carefully screened, early Permian brachiopod shells from the Ural Mountains. Using cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, 24 specimens were...

  11. Characterizing asymptotically anti-de Sitter black holes with abundant stable gauge field hair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben L. Shepherd; Elizabeth Winstanley

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of the "no-hair" conjecture, we revisit stable black holes in su(N) Einstein-Yang-Mills theory with a negative cosmological constant. These black holes are endowed with copious amounts of gauge field hair, and we address the question of whether these black holes can be uniquely characterized by their mass and a set of global non-Abelian charges defined far from the black hole. For the su(3) case, we present numerical evidence that stable black hole configurations are fixed by their mass and two non-Abelian charges. For general N, we argue that the mass and N-1 non-Abelian charges are sufficient to characterize large stable black holes, in keeping with the spirit of the "no-hair" conjecture, at least in the limit of very large magnitude cosmological constant and for a subspace containing stable black holes (and possibly some unstable ones as well).

  12. Is the Gini coefficient a stable measure of galaxy structure?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorsten Lisker

    2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gini coefficient, a non-parametric measure of galaxy morphology, has recently taken up an important role in the automated identification of galaxy mergers. I present a critical assessment of its stability, based on a comparison of HST/ACS imaging data from the GOODS and UDF surveys. Below a certain signal-to-noise level, the Gini coefficient depends strongly on the signal-to-noise ratio, and thus becomes useless for distinguishing different galaxy morphologies. Moreover, at all signal-to-noise levels the Gini coefficient shows a strong dependence on the choice of aperture within which it is measured. Consequently, quantitative selection criteria involving the Gini coefficient, such as a selection of merger candidates, cannot always be straightforwardly applied to different datasets. I discuss whether these effects could have affected previous studies that were based on the Gini coefficient, and establish signal-to-noise limits above which measured Gini values can be considered reliable.

  13. Solar Decathlon Homes -- They're Not Just for Show | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Homes -- They're Not Just for Show Solar Decathlon Homes -- They're Not Just for Show December 13, 2012 - 4:01pm Addthis Cornells 2009 Silo House is now a private residence...

  14. New York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for Geothermal Energy in America New York Event to Show Bi-Partisan, International Support for Geothermal Energy in...

  15. E-Print Network 3.0 - acid show improved Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    show improved Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: acid show improved Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Genetic Engineering of Plant Oils...

  16. Graphene: Materially Better Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuhrer, M. S.; Lau, C. N.; MacDonald, A. H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphene, a single atom–thick plane of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has captivated the attention of physicists, materials scientists, and engineers alike over the five years following its experimental isolation. Graphene is a fundamentally new type of electronic material whose electrons are strictly confined to a two-dimensional plane and exhibit properties akin to those of ultrarelativistic particles. Graphene's two-dimensional form suggests compatibility with conventional wafer processing technology. Extraordinary physical properties, including exceedingly high charge carrier mobility, current-carrying capacity, mechanical strength, and thermal conductivity, make it an enticing candidate for new electronic technologies both within and beyond complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). Immediate graphene applications include high-speed analog electronics and highly conductive, flexible, transparent thin films for displays and optoelectronics. Currently, much graphene research is focused on generating and tuning a bandgap and on novel device structures that exploit graphene's extraordinary electrical, optical, and mechanical properties.

  17. Geothermal materials development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

  18. Webinar: Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, originally presented on August 13, 2013.

  19. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  20. Materials Department Annual Report 1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Department Annual Report 1992 Published by the Materials Department Risø National and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 46 77 46 77 Fax: +4542351173 #12;Abstract Selected activities ot the Materials Department at Riso

  1. Materials Department Annual Report 1991

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Materials Department Annual Report 1991 Published by the Materials Department Risø National, iron and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 42 37 12 12 Fax: + 45 42 35 11 73 #12;Abstract Selected activities of the Materials

  2. MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

  3. George Smith, Department of Materials,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paxton, Anthony T.

    George Smith, Department of Materials, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH UK Email: george.smith@materials.ox.ac.uk URL: www.materials.ox.ac.uk The aims of the Department of Materials experienced one of the most successful years in its 46-year history, says head of department George Smith. Top

  4. Meta-Stable Vacua and D-Branes at the Conifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Argurio, Riccardo [Physique Theorique et Mathematique and International Solvay Institutes Universite Libre de Bruxelles, C.P. 231, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Bertolini, Matteo [SISSA/ISAS and INFN-Sezione di Trieste, Via Beirut 2, I 34014 Trieste (Italy); Franco, Sebastian [Joseph Henry Laboratories, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kachru, Shamit [Department of Physics and SLAC, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We study gauge theories arising on D-branes on quotients of the conifold. They exhibit meta-stable SUSY breaking along the lines of the model by Intriligator, Seiberg and Shih. We propose a candidate for the extrapolation to large't Hooft coupling of the meta-stable state. It involves anti D3-branes in a smooth gravity dual of a cascading gauge theory.

  5. Designing stable finite state machine behaviors using phase plane analysis and variable structure control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddema, J.T.; Robinett, R.D.; Driessen, B.J.

    1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses how phase plane analysis can be used to describe the overall behavior of single and multiple autonomous robotic vehicles with finite state machine rules. The importance of this result is that one can begin to design provably asymptotically stable group behaviors from a set of simple control laws and appropriate switching points with decentralized variable structure control. The ability to prove asymptotically stable group behavior is especially important for applications such as locating military targets or land mines.

  6. Materials in design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perata, Alfredo Ferando

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the strength, hardness and wear resistance has been increased. S rin Materials Since in many cases equipment requires that springs have to operate properly at conditions of excessive vibration, corrosive environment, extremes temperatures. A great care has...) It is considered a good long wearing bearing metal where good bearing conditions are present once the design has been done very good. (Accurate filling, good oil clearance; good lubrication, non-corrosive oil). It can be used with hardened shafts. B ' g B Tin...

  7. Materials Technical Team Roadmap

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergy Objective: DevelopMaterials

  8. Materials | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergy Objective:11 DOEMaterials Materials

  9. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  10. Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal Advanced Material

  11. Method for chemically inactivating energetic materials and forming a nondetonable product therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tadros, Maher E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for rendering nondetonble energetic materials, such as are contained in or removed from decommissioned ordnance. The energetic materials are either combined with epoxy hardener or are combined with other compounds, preferably amine compounds, to form a substance that functions as an epoxy hardener. According to the invention, energetic materials (including TNT, RDX and Composition B) that are treated according to the invention method yield a reaction product that is non-explosive, that serves to harden or cure conventional epoxy resin to form a stable, nonexplosive waste product. Epoxy hardener made using the method of the invention is also described.

  12. Horizontal-Velocity and Variance Measurements in the Stable Boundary Layer Using Doppler Lidar: Sensitivity to Averaging Procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichugina, Yelena L.; Banta, Robert M.; Kelley, Neil D.; Jonkman, Bonnie J.; Tucker, Sara C.; Newsom, Rob K.; Brewer, W. A.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative data on turbulence variables aloft--above the region of the atmosphere conveniently measured from towers--has been an important but difficult measurement need for advancing understanding and modeling of the stable boundary layer (SBL). Vertical profiles of streamwise velocity variances obtained from NOAA’s High Resolution Doppler Lidar (HRDL), which have been shown to be numerically equivalent to turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) for stable conditions, are a measure of the turbulence in the SBL. In the present study, the mean horizontal wind component U and variance ?u2 were computed from HRDL measurements of the line-of-sight (LOS) velocity using a technique described in Banta, et al. (2002). The technique was tested on datasets obtained during the Lamar Low-Level Jet Project (LLLJP) carried out in early September 2003, near the town of Lamar in southeastern Colorado. This paper compares U with mean wind speed obtained from sodar and sonic anemometer measurements. It then describes several series of averaging tests that produced the best correlation between TKE calculated from sonic anemometer data at several tower levels and lidar measurements of horizontal velocity variance ?u2. The results show high correlation (0.71-0.97) of the mean U and average wind speed measured by sodar and in-situ instruments, independent of sampling strategies and averaging procedures. Comparison of estimates of variance, on the other hand, proved sensitive to both the spatial and temporal averaging techniques.

  13. Self-consistent calculations of the strength function and radiative neutron capture cross section for stable and unstable tin isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Avdeenkov; S. Goriely; S. Kamerdzhiev; S. Krewald

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The E1 strength function for 15 stable and unstable Sn even-even isotopes from A=100 till A=176 are calculated using the self-consistent microscopic theory which, in addition to the standard (Q)RPA approach, takes into account the single-particle continuum and the phonon coupling. Our analysis shows two distinct regions for which the integral characteristics of both the giant and pygmy resonances behave rather differently. For neutron-rich nuclei, starting from $^{132}$Sn, we obtain a giant E1 resonance which significantly deviates from the widely-used systematics extrapolated from experimental data in the $\\beta$-stability valley. We show that the inclusion of the phonon coupling is necessary for a proper description of the low-energy pygmy resonances and the corresponding transition densities for $A132$ region the influence of phonon coupling is significantly smaller. The radiative neutron capture cross sections leading to the stable $^{124}$Sn and unstable $^{132}$Sn and $^{150}$Sn nuclei are calculated with both the (Q)RPA and the beyond-(Q)RPA strength functions and shown to be sensitive to both the predicted low-lying strength and the phonon coupling contribution. The comparison with the widely-used phenomenological Generalized Lorentzian approach shows considerable differences both for the strength function and the radiative neutron capture cross section. In particular, for the neutron-rich $^{150}$Sn, the reaction cross section is found to be increased by a factor greater than 20. We conclude that the present approach may provide a complete and coherent description of the $\\gamma$-ray strength function for astrophysics applications. In particular, such calculations are highly recommended for a reliable estimate of the electromagnetic properties of exotic nuclei.

  14. Magnetism reflectometer study shows LiF layers improve efficiency in spin valve devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bardoel, Agatha A [ORNL; Lauter, Valeria [ORNL; Szulczewski, Greg J [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New, more efficient materials for spin valves - a device used in magnetic sensors, random access memories, and hard disk drives - may be on the way based on research using the magnetism reflectometer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Spin valve devices work by means of two or more conducting magnetic material layers that alternate their electrical resistance depending on the layers alignment. Giant magnetoresistance is a quantum mechanical effect first observed in thin film structures about 20 years ago. The effect is observed as a significant change in electrical resistance, depending on whether the magnetization of adjacent ferromagnetic layers is in a parallel or an antiparallel magnetic alignment. 'What we are doing here is developing new materials. The search for new materials suitable for injecting and transferring carriers with a preferential spin orientation is most important for the development of spintronics,' said Valeria Lauter, lead instrument scientist on the magnetism reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), who collaborated on the experiment. The researchers discovered that the conductivity of such materials is improved when an organic polymer semiconductor layer is placed between the magnetic materials. Organic semiconductors are now the material of choice for future spin valve devices because they preserve spin coherence over longer times and distances than conventional semiconductors. While research into spin valves has been ongoing, research into organic semiconductors is recent. Previous research has shown that a 'conductivity mismatch' exists in spin valve systems in which ferromagnetic metal electrodes interface with such organic semiconductors as Alq3 ({pi}-conjugated molecule tris(8-hydroxy-quinoline) aluminium). This mismatch limits the efficient injection of the electrons from the electrodes at the interface with the semiconductor material. However, lithium fluoride (LiF), commonly used in light-emitting diodes, has been found to enhance the injection of electrons through the semiconductor. Researchers from the University of Alabama and ORNL used polarized neutrons at the magnetism reflectometer at SNS to investigate the electronic, magnetic, and structural properties of the electrodes in a novel system. In this system, the magnetic layers cobalt and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} are interfaced with spacer layers composed of the organic semiconductor Alq3. A coupling layer of LiF is inserted to separate the magnetized layers from the semiconductor. 'ALQ3 is an organic semiconductor material,' said Lauter. 'Normally in these systems a first magnetic layer is grown on a hard substrate so that one can get the controlled magnetic parameters. Then you grow the organic semiconductor layer, followed by another magnetic material layer, such as cobalt.' In addition to determining the effect of the LiF layers on the efficiency of the electron injection, the researchers wanted to determine the magnetic properties of the cobalt and Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} as well as the interfacial properties: whether there is interdiffusion of cobalt through the LiF layer to the semiconductor, for example. The researchers used polarized neutrons at beam line 4A to probe the entire, layer-by-layer assembly of the system. 'Reflectometry with polarized neutrons is a perfect method to study thin magnetic films,' Lauter said. 'These thin films - if you put one on a substrate, you see it just like a mirror. However, this mirror has a very complicated internal multilayer structure. The neutrons look inside this complicated structure and characterize each and every interface. Due to the depth sensitivity of the method, we measure the structural and magnetic properties of each layer with the resolution of 0.5 nm. The neutron scattering results found that inserting LiF as a barrier significantly improves the quality of the interface, increasing the injection of electrons from the magnetic layer through the organic semiconductor in the spin valve and enhancing the overall properties of the system. In related work the magneti

  15. Highly stable polarization independent Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mi?uda, Michal, E-mail: micuda@optics.upol.cz; Doláková, Ester; Straka, Ivo; Miková, Martina; Dušek, Miloslav; Fiurášek, Jaromír; Ježek, Miroslav, E-mail: jezek@optics.upol.cz [Department of Optics, Faculty of Science, Palacký University, 17. listopadu 1192/12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer utilizing displaced Sagnac configuration to enhance its phase stability. The interferometer with footprint of 27×40 cm offers individually accessible paths and shows phase deviation less than 0.4° during a 250 s long measurement. The phase drift, evaluated by means of Allan deviation, stays below 3° or 7 nm for 1.5 h without any active stabilization. The polarization insensitive design is verified by measuring interference visibility as a function of input polarization. For both interferometer's output ports and all tested polarization states the visibility stays above 93%. The discrepancy in visibility for horizontal and vertical polarization about 3.5% is caused mainly by undesired polarization dependence of splitting ratio of the beam splitter used. The presented interferometer device is suitable for quantum-information and other sensitive applications where active stabilization is complicated and common-mode interferometer is not an option as both the interferometer arms have to be accessible individually.

  16. Highly stable polarization independent Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Micuda; Ester Dolakova; Ivo Straka; Martina Mikova; Miloslav Dusek; Jaromir Fiurasek; Miroslav Jezek

    2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally demonstrate optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer utilizing displaced Sagnac configuration to enhance its phase stability. The interferometer with footprint of 27x40 cm offers individually accessible paths and shows phase deviation less than 0.4 deg during a 250 s long measurement. The phase drift, evaluated by means of Allan deviation, stays below 3 deg or 7 nm for 1.5 hours without any active stabilization. The polarization insensitive design is verified by measuring interference visibility as a function of input polarization. For both interferometer's output ports and all tested polarization states the visibility stays above 93%. The discrepancy in visibility for horizontal and vertical polarization about 3.5% is caused mainly by undesired polarization dependence of splitting ratio of the beam splitter used. The presented interferometer device is suitable for quantum-information and other sensitive applications where active stabilization is complicated and common-mode interferometer is not an option as both the interferometer arms have to be accessible individually.

  17. Mechanical properties of thermal protection system materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, Robert Douglas; Bronowski, David R.; Lee, Moo Yul; Hofer, John H.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the mechanical properties of the Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials used for the Space Shuttle. Three types of TPS materials (LI-900, LI-2200, and FRCI-12) were tested in 'in-plane' and 'out-of-plane' orientations. Four types of quasi-static mechanical tests (uniaxial tension, uniaxial compression, uniaxial strain, and shear) were performed under low (10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3}/s) and intermediate (1 to 10/s) strain rate conditions. In addition, split Hopkinson pressure bar tests were conducted to obtain the strength of the materials under a relatively higher strain rate ({approx}10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3}/s) condition. In general, TPS materials have higher strength and higher Young's modulus when tested in 'in-plane' than in 'through-the-thickness' orientation under compressive (unconfined and confined) and tensile stress conditions. In both stress conditions, the strength of the material increases as the strain rate increases. The rate of increase in LI-900 is relatively small compared to those for the other two TPS materials tested in this study. But, the Young's modulus appears to be insensitive to the different strain rates applied. The FRCI-12 material, designed to replace the heavier LI-2200, showed higher strengths under tensile and shear stress conditions. But, under a compressive stress condition, LI-2200 showed higher strength than FRCI-12. As far as the modulus is concerned, LI-2200 has higher Young's modulus both in compression and in tension. The shear modulus of FRCI-12 and LI-2200 fell in the same range.

  18. Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feser, Joseph Patrick

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    thermoelectric materials consisting of epitaxially-grownefficient thermoelectric materials," Nature, vol. 451, pp.superlattice thermoelectric materials and devices," Science,

  19. Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success...

  20. Materials Research in the Information Age

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 | Tags: Materials...

  1. RFI: DOE Materials Strategy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RFI: DOE Materials Strategy RFI: DOE Materials Strategy DOE Materials Strategy - request for information RFI: DOE Materials Strategy More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word -...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechnologiesLight Creation Materials Light Creation Materials Overview of SSL Light Creation Materials Different families of inorganic semiconductor materials can...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Light Creation Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EFRCOverviewLight Creation Materials Light Creation Materials Overview of SSL Light Creation Materials Different families of inorganic semiconductor materials can contribute to...

  4. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  5. Carbon capture by sorption-enhanced water-gas shift reaction process using hydrotalcite-based material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Selow, E.R.; Cobden, P.D.; Verbraeken, P.A.; Hufton, J.R.; van den Brink, R.W. [Energy research Center of the Netherlands, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel route for precombustion decarbonization is the sorption-enhanced water-gas shift (SEWGS) process. In this process carbon dioxide is removed from a synthesis gas at elevated temperature by adsorption. Simultaneously, carbon monoxide is converted to carbon dioxide by the water-gas shift reaction. The periodic adsorption and desorption of carbon dioxide is induced by a pressure swing cycle, and the cyclic capacity can be amplified by purging with steam. From previous studies is it known that for SEWGS applications, hydrotalcite-based materials are particularly attractive as sorbent, and commercial high-temperature shift catalysts can be used for the conversion of carbon monoxide. Tablets of a potassium promoted hydrotalcite-based material are characterized in both breakthrough and cyclic experiments in a 2 m tall fixed-bed reactor. When exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, steam, and nitrogen at 400{sup o}C, the material shows a breakthrough capacity of 1.4 mmol/g. In subsequent experiments the material was mixed with tablets of promoted iron-chromium shift catalyst and exposed to a mixture of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, steam, hydrogen, and nitrogen. It is demonstrated that carbon monoxide conversion can be enhanced to 100% in the presence of a carbon dioxide sorbent. At breakthrough, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide simultaneously appear at the end of the bed. During more than 300 cycles of adsorption/reaction and desorption, the capture rate, and carbon monoxide conversion are confirmed to be stable. Two different cycle types are investigated: one cycle with a CO{sub 2} rinse step and one cycle with a steam rinse step. The performance of both SEWGS cycles are discussed.

  6. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  7. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  8. Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

    1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  9. Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

    2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

  10. Center for Intelligent Fuel Cell Materials Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santurri, P.R., (Chemsultants International); Hartmann-Thompson, C.; Keinath, S.E. (Michigan Molecular Inst.)

    2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this work was to develop a composite proton exchange membrane utilizing 1) readily available, low cost materials 2) readily modified and 3) easily processed to meet the chemical, mechanical and electrical requirements of high temperature PEM fuel cells. One of the primary goals was to produce a conducting polymer that met the criteria for strength, binding capability for additives, chemical stability, dimensional stability and good conductivity. In addition compatible, specialty nanoparticles were synthesized to provide water management and enhanced conductivity. The combination of these components in a multilayered, composite PEM has demonstrated improved conductivity at high temperatures and low humidity over commercially available polymers. The research reported in this final document has greatly increased the knowledge base related to post sulfonation of chemically and mechanically stable engineered polymers (Radel). Both electrical and strength factors for the degree of post sulfonation far exceed previous data, indicating the potential use of these materials in suitable proton exchange membrane architectures for the development of fuel cells. In addition compatible, hydrophilic, conductive nano-structures have been synthesized and incorporated into unique proton exchange membrane architectures. The use of post sulfonation for the engineered polymer and nano-particle provide cost effective techniques to produce the required components of a proton exchange membrane. The development of a multilayer proton exchange membrane as described in our work has produced a highly stable membrane at 170°C with conductivities exceeding commercially available proton exchange membranes at high temperatures and low humidity. The components and architecture of the proton exchange membrane discussed will provide low cost components for the portable market and potentially the transportation market. The development of unique components and membrane architecture provides a key element for the United States: 1) to transition the country from a fossil fuel based energy economy to a renewable energy based economy, and 2) to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Developments of this program will serve as an important step toward continuing PEMFC technology and ultimately the broad-based commercial availability of this technology and its benefits.

  11. Optical limiting materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

    1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

  12. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogren. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN.sub.3. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

  13. Synthesis of refractory materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holt, J.B.

    1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

  14. Construction Material And Method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

  15. Careers | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAYCareers The Critical Materials Institute

  16. LANL: Materials Science Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  18. Work with Biological Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  19. Magnetic Materials (MM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  20. Material Point Methods

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Material Safety Data Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90 4.86 4.77ofMaterial Safety

  2. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContractMaterials/Condensed Matter Print

  3. Materials/Condensed Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContractMaterials/Condensed Matter

  4. Material efficiency in construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moynihan, Muiris

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , this generation must change its use of energy and materials. 1.1 The need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states as #16;unequivocal#17; that the Earth's atmosphere and oceans... in order to save energy and carbon. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ISBN 978-0- 903428-32-3 3. Allwood, J.M., Cullen, J.M., Patel, A.C.H., Cooper, D.R.,Moynihan, M.C., Milford, R.L., Carruth, M.A. and McBrien, M. 2011. Prolonging our metal life #22...

  5. Improved Catalysts for Heavy Oil Upgrading Based on Zeolite Y Nanoparticles Encapsulated Stable Nanoporous Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conrad Ingram; Mark Mitchell

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of hydrothermally-aged zeolite Y precursor to an SBA-15 synthesis mixture under a mildly acidic condition resulted in the formation of a mesoporous aluminosilicate catalyst, AlSBA-15. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst contains strong Br{umlt o}nsted acid sites and aluminum (Al) stabilized in a totally tetrahedral coordination. The physicochemical characteristics of the catalyst varied as a function of the synthesis conditions. The catalyst possessed surface areas ranging between 690 and 850 m{sup 2}/g, pore sizes ranging from 5.6 to 7.5 nm, and pore volumes up 1.03 cm{sup 3}, which were comparable to the parent SBA-15 synthesized under similar conditions. Two wt % Al was present in the catalyst that was obtained from the reaction mixture that contained the highest Al content. The Al remained stable in totally tetrahedral coordination after calcination at a temperature of 550 C. The Al-SBA-15 mesoporous catalyst showed significant catalytic activity for cumene dealkylation, and the activity increased as the amount of zeolite precursor added to the SBA-15 mixture was increased. In preparation for the final phase of the project, the catalyst was embedded into a psuedoboemite alumina (catapal B) matrix and then formed into pellets. In the final phase of the project, the pelletized catalyst is being evaluated for the conversion of a heavy petroleum feedstock to naphtha and middle distillates. This phase was significantly delayed during the past six months due to a serious malfunction of the fume hoods in the Clark Atlanta University's Research Center for Science and Technology, where the project is being conducted. The fume hood system was repaired and the catalyst evaluation is now underway.

  6. National American Indian Housing Council 38th Annual Convention and Trade Show

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National American Indian Housing Council's (NAIHC’s) most longstanding annual event, the Annual Convention & Trade Show is an opportunity to learn about Indian housing, attend training...

  7. apolipoprotein a-i showed: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creek showing (Candy and Deep Purple claims) is hosted by Middle Devonian carbonate rocks in the southem Rocky Mountains oi British Columbia. The property lies near the...

  8. anti-m2 scfv shows: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Creek showing (Candy and Deep Purple claims) is hosted by Middle Devonian carbonate rocks in the southem Rocky Mountains oi British Columbia. The property lies near the...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - array shows potential Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    COVERAGE Summary: , and then shows how to apply these concepts to the testing of software. Orthogonal arrays and covering arrays... the requirements of a covering array,...

  10. A new anthropometric phantom for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead in the human leg using X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spitz, H.; Jenkins, M.; Lodwick, J.; Bornschein, R.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new anthropometric phantom has been developed for calibrating in vivo measurements of stable lead deposited in bone using x-ray fluorescence. The phantom reproduces the shape of the mid shaft of the adult human leg and is fabricated using polyurethanes and calcium carbonate to produce materials that exhibit the same density, energy transmission, and calcium content as cortical bone, bone marrow, and muscle. The phantom includes a removable tibia fabricated using simulants for cortical bone and bone marrow to which a precise amount of stable lead has been added to cortical bone. The formulations used in fabricating the new anthropometric phantom are much more uniform in density and composition than the conventional phantom made from Plexiglas cylinders filled with plaster-of-Paris. The energy spectrum from an x-ray fluorescence measurement of the phantom using a {sup 109}Cd source is indistinguishable from an in vivo x-ray fluorescence measurement of the human leg, demonstrating that the materials used in the phantom exhibit the same radiological properties as human tissue. Likewise, results from x-ray fluorescence measurements of the phantom exhibit the same positional dependency as the human leg and vary by approximately 36% when, for example, the phantom containing 54 ppm of stable lead in the tibia was rotated by only 15 degrees. The detection limit for a 30 min {sup 109}Cd K shell x-ray fluorescence in vivo measurement is approximately 20 ppm determined from a background measurement using the new phantom containing no added lead in the muscle, bone, or bone marrow. The new anthropometric phantom significantly improves in vivo x-ray fluorescence calibration measurements by (1) faithfully reproducing the anatomy of the human leg, (2) having components that exhibit radiological properties similar to that of human tissue, and (3) providing a realistic calibration standard that can be used for in vivo x-ray fluorescence intercomparison measurements.

  11. Laser Plasma Material Interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

  12. Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

  13. Using Show Homes (and Sponsorships) to Persuade Commissioning Relevancy and Factory Crafted High Performance Modular Homes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas-Rees, S.; Chasar, D.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    products and the show home builders. At this past year's IBS show in February, Palm Harbor Homes build the GenX home that included an installed and operational 4.08kWp photovoltaic system with inverter and back up battery management system, a solar hot...

  14. Why Private Labels Show Long-Term Market Share Evolution Stephen J. Hoch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faloutsos, Christos

    Why Private Labels Show Long-Term Market Share Evolution Stephen J. Hoch Alan L. Montgomery Young School of Management, Cornell University. #12;2 Why Private Labels Show Long-Term Market Share Evolution brand to take unilateral action to increase share. We find a clear exception to this rule -- during

  15. Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhong, Lin

    Vision: Cloud-Powered Sight for All Showing the Cloud What You See Paramvir Bahl Matthai Philipose argue that for computers to do more for us, we need to show the cloud what we see and embrace cloud General Terms Algorithms, Design, Human Factors, Languages, Performance, Security Keywords Camera, cloud

  16. The Photorhabdus Pir toxins are similar to a developmentally regulated insect protein but show

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    The Photorhabdus Pir toxins are similar to a developmentally regulated insect protein but show relatedÃ? (Pir) proteins A and B, show similarity both to d-endotoxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bts of expression and the Photorhabdus proteins PirA and PirB have been proposed to be mimics of insect JHEs

  17. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  18. Additive assembly of digital materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

  19. STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, MECHANICS AND MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    of companies worldwide; cladding effects on, and hybrid control of, the response of tall buildings Buildings · Masonry Structures · Nano/Microstructure of Cement-based Materials · Polymeric Composite Systems · Reliable Engineering Computing · Risk Analysis · Seismic Hazard Mitigation · Smart Materials

  20. DPC materials and corrosion environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Bryan, Charles R.; Stephanie Teich-McGoldrick; Ernest Hardin

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This review focuses on the performance of basket materials that could be exposed to ground water over thousands of years, and prospective disposal overpack materials that could possibly be used to protect dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) in disposal environments.

  1. FURTHERING THE RECLAIMED MATERIALS EXPERIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartels, Robert A.

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive study of the reclaimed materials industry and ways it could be improved from a management standpoint by working through a Design Management problem solving approach. Project Objectives: To improve the sourcing of reclaimed materials...

  2. STABLE HIGH CONDUCTIVITY BILAYERED ELECTROLYTES FOR LOW TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Wachsman; Keith L. Duncan

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the future of energy production in America. They offer great promise as a clean and efficient process for directly converting chemical energy to electricity while providing significant environmental benefits (they produce negligible hydrocarbons, CO, or NO{sub x} and, as a result of their high efficiency, produce about one-third less CO{sub 2} per kilowatt hour than internal combustion engines). Unfortunately, the current SOFC technology, based on a stabilized zirconia electrolyte, must operate in the region of 1000 C to avoid unacceptably high ohmic losses. These high temperatures demand (a) specialized (expensive) materials for the fuel cell interconnects and insulation, (b) time to heat up to the operating temperature and (c) energy input to arrive at the operating temperature. Therefore, if fuel cells could be designed to give a reasonable power output at low to intermediate temperatures tremendous benefits may be accrued. At low temperatures, in particular, it becomes feasible to use ferritic steel for interconnects instead of expensive and brittle ceramic materials such as those based on LaCrO{sub 3}. In addition, sealing the fuel cell becomes easier and more reliable; rapid startup is facilitated; thermal stresses (e.g., those caused by thermal expansion mismatches) are reduced; radiative losses ({approx}T{sup 4}) become minimal; electrode sintering becomes negligible and (due to a smaller thermodynamic penalty) the SOFC operating cycle (heating from ambient) would be more efficient. Combined, all these improvements further result in reduced initial and operating costs. The problem is, at lower temperatures the conductivity of the conventional stabilized zirconia electrolyte decreases to the point where it cannot supply electrical current efficiently to an external load. The primary objectives of the proposed research is to develop a stable high conductivity (> 0.05 S cm{sup -1} at {le} 550 C) electrolyte for lower temperature SOFCs. This objective is specifically directed toward meeting the lowest (and most difficult) temperature criteria for the 21st Century Fuel Cell Program. Meeting this objective provides a potential for future transportation applications of SOFCs, where their ability to directly use hydrocarbon fuels could permit refueling within the existing transportation infrastructure. In order to meet this objective we are developing a functionally gradient bilayer electrolyte comprised of a layer of erbia-stabilized bismuth oxide (ESB) on the oxidizing side and a layer of SDC or GDC on the reducing side, see Fig. 1. Bismuth oxide and doped ceria are among the highest ionic conducting electrolytes and in fact bismuth oxide based electrolytes are the only known solid oxide electrolytes to have an ionic conductivity that meets the program conductivity goal. In this arrangement, the ceria layer protects the bismuth oxide layer from decomposing by shielding it from very low P{sub O{sub 2}}'s and the ESB layer serves to block electronic flux through the electrolyte. This arrangement has two significant advantages over the YSZ/SDC bilayers investigated by others [1, 2]. The first advantage is that SDC is conductive enough to serve as an intermediate temperature SOFC electrolyte. Moreover, ESB is conductive enough to serve as a low temperature electrolyte. Consequently, at worst an SDC/ESB bilayered SOFC should have the conductivity of SDC but with improved efficiency due to the electronic flux barrier provided by ESB. The second advantage is that small (dopant) concentrations of SDC in ESB or ESB in SDC, have been found to have conductivities comparable to the host lattice [3, 4]. Therefore, if solid solutioning occurs at the SDC-ESB interface, it should not be detrimental to the performance of the bilayer. In contrast, solid solutions of SDC and YSZ have been found to be significantly less conductive than SDC or YSZ. Thus, it bears emphasizing that, at this time, only SDC/ESB electrolytes have potential in low temperature SOFC applications.

  3. Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

  4. First Principles Modeling for Research and Design of New Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ceder, Gerbrand

    First principles computation can be used to investigate an design materials in ways that can not be achieved with experimental means. We show how computations can be used to rapidly capture the essential physics that ...

  5. Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

  6. Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    -DRAFT - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Thermoelectric Generation ......

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting Semiconductor nanowire lasers have attracted intense interest as...

  8. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  9. Reversible Hydrogen Storage Materials – Structure, Chemistry, and Electronic Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Ian M. [University of Wisconsin-Madison; Johnson, Duane D. [Ames Lab., Iowa

    2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand the processes involved in the uptake and release of hydrogen from candidate light-weight metal hydride storage systems, a combination of materials characterization techniques and first principle calculation methods have been employed. In addition to conventional microstructural characterization in the transmission electron microscope, which provides projected information about the through thickness microstructure, electron tomography methods were employed to determine the three-dimensional spatial distribution of catalyst species for select systems both before and after dehydrogenation. Catalyst species identification as well as compositional analysis of the storage material before and after hydrogen charging and discharging was performed using a combination of energy dispersive spectroscopy, EDS, and electron energy loss spectroscopy, EELS. The characterization effort was coupled with first-principles, electronic-structure and thermodynamic techniques to predict and assess meta-stable and stable phases, reaction pathways, and thermodynamic and kinetic barriers. Systems studied included:NaAlH4, CaH2/CaB6 and Ca(BH4)2, MgH2/MgB2, Ni-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, TiH2-Catalyzed Magnesium Hydride, LiBH4, Aluminum-based systems and Aluminum

  10. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  11. Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Walls, Claudia A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

  12. Preparation of asymmetric porous materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

  13. Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

  14. Frontiers of Fusion Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    migration Radiation damage accumulation kinetics · 1 D vs. 3D diffusion processes · ionization Insulators · Optical Materials *asterisk denotes Fusion Materials Task Group #12;Fusion Materials Sciences R Displacement cascades Quantification of displacement damage source term · Is the concept of a liquid valid

  15. Department of Advanced Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katsumoto, Shingo

    @k.u-tokyo.ac.jpe-mail 04-7136-3781T E L Environmental-friendly materials process, Metal smelting and re ning process of Advanced Materials Science masashi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jpe-mail 04-7136-3225T E L Nuclear magnetic resonance New Materials Synthesis, Superconductivity, Quantum Spin Liquid,Topological Hall Effect takatama

  16. Materials Performance in USC Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

    2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

  17. Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Fehring, Jr., Edward J. (Dublin, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation of low work function, stable compound thin films by laser ablation. Compound thin films with low work function can be synthesized by simultaneously laser ablating silicon, for example, and thermal evaporating an alkali metal into an oxygen environment. For example, the compound thin film may be composed of Si/Cs/O. The work functions of the thin films can be varied by changing the silicon/alkali metal/oxygen ratio. Low work functions of the compound thin films deposited on silicon substrates were confirmed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS). The compound thin films are stable up to 500.degree. C. as measured by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Tests have established that for certain chemical compositions and annealing temperatures of the compound thin films, negative electron affinity (NEA) was detected. The low work function, stable compound thin films can be utilized in solar cells, field emission flat panel displays, electron guns, and cold cathode electron guns.

  18. DOE-Sponsored Project Shows Huge Potential for Carbon Storage in Wyoming |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdfSTD-1040-93December 9,3009-2014973-96 DOE-STD-6003-96Department

  19. X-ray Method Shows How Frog Embryos Could Help Thwart Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1of EnergyX-ray Computed

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, J; Donald Anton, D

    2009-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In searching for high gravimetric and volumetric density hydrogen storage systems, it is inevitable that higher energy density materials will be used. In order to make safe and commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using and handling these materials and to develop appropriate mitigation strategies to handle potential material exposure events. A crucial aspect of the development of risk identification and mitigation strategies is the development of rigorous environmental reactivity testing standards and procedures. This will allow for the identification of potential risks and implementation of risk mitigation strategies. Modified testing procedures for shipping air and/or water sensitive materials, as codified by the United Nations, have been used to evaluate two potential hydrogen storage materials, 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3}. The modified U.N. procedures include identification of self-reactive substances, pyrophoric substances, and gas-emitting substances with water contact. The results of these tests for air and water contact sensitivity will be compared to the pure material components where appropriate (e.g. LiBH{sub 4} and MgH{sub 2}). The water contact tests are divided into two scenarios dependent on the hydride to water mole ratio and heat transport characteristics. Air contact tests were run to determine whether a substance will spontaneously react with air in a packed or dispersed form. In the case of the 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} material, the results from the hydride mixture compared to the pure materials results showed the MgH{sub 2} to be the least reactive component and LiBH{sub 4} the more reactive. The combined 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2} resulted in a material having environmental reactivity between these two materials. Relative to 2LiBH{sub 4} {center_dot} MgH{sub 2}, the chemical hydride NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} was observed to be less environmentally reactive.