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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Feasibility study of prompt gamma neutron activation for NDT measurement of moisture in stone and brick  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conservation of stone and brick architecture or sculpture often involves damage caused by moisture. The feasibility of a NDT method based on prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA) for measuring the element hydrogen as an indication of water is being evaluated. This includes systematic characterization of the lithology and physical properties of seven building stones and one brick type used in the buildings of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. To determine the required dynamic range of the NDT method, moisture-related properties were measured by standard methods. Cold neutron PGNA was also used to determine chemically bound water (CBW) content. The CBW does not damage porous masonry, but creates an H background that defines the minimum level of detection of damaging moisture. The CBW was on the order of 0.5% for all the stones. This rules out the measurement of hygric processes in all of the stones and hydric processed for the stones with fine scale pore-size distributions The upper bound of moisture content, set by porosity through water immersion, was on the order of 5%. The dynamic range is about 10–20. The H count rates were roughly 1–3 cps. Taking into account differences in neutron energies and fluxes and sample volume between cold PGNA and a portable PGNA instrument, it appears that it is feasible to apply PGNA in the field.

Livingston, R. A.; Al-Sheikhly, M. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 (United States); Grissom, C.; Aloiz, E. [Museum Conservation Institute, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC 20746 (United States); Paul, R. [Chemical Sciences Division, NIST, Gaithersburg MD 20899 (United States)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

Stone-Wales defects in graphene and other planar sp2 -bonded materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stone-Wales defects in graphene and other planar sp2 -bonded materials Jie Ma,1,2,3 Dario Alfè,2 that the structure of the Stone-Wales SW defect in graphene is more complex than hitherto appreciated. Rather than of graphene and in so doing modify its chemical re- activity toward adsorbates, and likely impact upon its

Alfè, Dario

3

Feasibility evaluation of fired brick technology as a construction material and income-generating industry in Northern Ghana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work evaluates the potential to develop fired brick production in the Northern Region of Ghana. While several brick factories operate in southern Ghana, no factories are known to exist in northern Ghana, which remains ...

Bates, Caroline Nijole

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Method of forming ceramic bricks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

Poeppel, Roger B. (Glen Ellyn, IL); Claar, Terry D. (Newark, DE); Silkowski, Peter (Urbana, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Method of forming ceramic bricks  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for forming free standing ceramic bricks for use as tritium breeder material is disclosed. Aqueous solutions of sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate are mixed with an organic hydrocolloid dispersion and powdered lithium carbonate, spray dried, and ceramic bricks formed by molding in a die and firing.

Poeppel, R.B.; Claar, T.D.; Silkowski, P.

1987-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

6

Algorithms and Automated Material Handling Systems Design for Stacking 3D Irregular Stone Pieces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ALGORITHMS AND AUTOMATED MATERIAL HANDLING SYSTEMS DESIGN FOR STACKING 3D IRREGULAR STONE PIECES A Thesis by MING-CHENG KO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved by: Chair of Committee, Sheng-Jen (?Tony?) Hsieh Committee Members, Sai C...

Ko, Ming-Cheng

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3). Photographs by the author. Building Stones, Harrell, UEEOxford Short Citation: Harrell, 2012, Building Stones. UEE.Harrell, James A. , 2012, Building Stones. In Willeke

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Utilitarian Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 The flint quarries of Wadi El Sheikh (Eastern Desert ofto the flint mines of Wadi el-Scheikh. In Stone Age – Miningof grinding stones at Wadi Kubbaniya. In The prehistory of

Harrell, James A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was no good source of local building stone, rock was usuallyrock-cut shrines and especially tombs, and these are the sources

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Utilitarian Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An example from the West Bank quarries, Aswan, QuarryScapesthe significance of ancient quarry landscapes: Four conceptsQuarryScapes: Ancient stone quarry landscapes in the Eastern

Harrell, James A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Ornamental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ornamental stones of ancient Egypt comprise a large andknown, but certainly from Egypt’s limestone region in orroyal statues and stelae of Egypt’s 25 th Dynasty and, in

Harrell, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1992 Are the pyramids of Egypt built of poured concreteel-Anba’ut, Red Sea coast, Egypt. Marmora 6, pp. 45 - 56.building stones of ancient Egypt are those relatively soft,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling.

Lussiez, G.W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

known as “burnt gypsum” or “plaster of Paris. ” When mixedsolid material. Such “gypsum plaster” was produced from lateand painted. Gypsum plaster was also sometimes employed as a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

PCR - Ligation Assembly Standard for BioBrick Parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Request for Comments (RFC) describes a novel method for the assembly of standard BioBrick parts. This assembly method for BioBrick parts is an improvement upon the conventional methods of BioBrick part assembly. This ...

He, Tony PeiYuan

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Quarrying and Mining (Stone)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Springer. 2008 Stones and quarries in ancient Egypt. London:2001 The Roman Imperial quarries: Survey and excavation at1998. Vol. I: Topography and quarries. Excavation Memoir 67.

Bloxam, Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Quality Characterization of Silicon Bricks using Photoluminescence Imaging and Photoconductive Decay: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging techniques can be applied to multicrystalline silicon solar cells throughout the production process, which includes as early as when the bricks are cut from the cast ingot. Photoluminescence (PL) imaging of the band-to-band radiative recombination is used to characterize silicon quality and defects regions within the brick. PL images of the brick surfaces are compared to minority-carrier lifetimes measured by resonant-coupled photoconductive decay (RCPCD). Photoluminescence images on silicon bricks can be correlated to lifetime measured by photoconductive decay and could be used for high-resolution characterization of material before wafers are cut. The RCPCD technique has shown the longest lifetimes of any of the lifetime measurement techniques we have applied to the bricks. RCPCD benefits from the low-frequency and long-excitation wavelengths used. In addition, RCPCD is a transient technique that directly monitors the decay rate of photoconductivity and does not rely on models or calculations for lifetime. The measured lifetimes over brick surfaces have shown strong correlations to the PL image intensities; therefore, this correlation could then be used to transform the PL image into a high-resolution lifetime map.

Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Zaunbrecher, K.; Al-Jassim, M.; Sidelkheir, O.; Ounadjela, K.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

AEM/S ... Stepping Stone Bill Solitario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AEM/S ... Stepping Stone To Stealth Bill Solitario Professor Systems Engineering September 04, 2003/SENSOR AEM/S #12;TAILORED MATERIAL SYSTEMS #12;Manufacturing Process Seemann Composite Resin Infusion Molding Laminate ­ High Fiber to Resin Volume Ratio = High Strength to Weight CORE MATERIAL DRY FABRIC PEEL PLY

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

David Brick, MD, FAAP, FACC Image credit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;David Brick, MD, FAAP, FACC #12;Image credit: www.imagewisely.org #12;1) Understand why Adolescent medicine 12-24 years Brain scans show unique features. Adult congenital Brand new natural

22

Documentation of BioBrick parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose of this RFC is to improve the information supplied by BioBrick part vendors. Reason to have this RFC is that there would be much more information available which can help improve the search time of the user. ...

Slomp, Arend

2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

23

Olivine refractory bricks for heat storage applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This invention relates to an olivine refractory brick having thermal and physical properties suitable for use as a thermal energy storage unit in an electric thermal storage furnace and characterized by having excellent thermal shock properties and resistance to spalling. The brick consists essentially of densely compacted grains of olivine and a plastic refractory kaolin binder which effects a sintered, liquid assisted but substantially solid state grain-to-grain bonding of the olivine grains.

Cochrane, R.L.; Gay, B.M.; Palmour, H.I.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Modeling environmental impact of unfired bricks in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brick manufacturing requires a considerable amount of energy and land, but these numbers have been difficult to quantify in rural parts of the developing world. The environmental impact of unfired bricks in India is ...

Zachau Walker, Miriam E. (Miriam Elizabeth)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hunting for that one special brick? This is the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evolved over time. According to Boll, the bricks were originally made to be very porous and therefore their streets and sidewalks with asphalt or concrete. Boll expressed his admiration for the strength and many brick in a street, a brick street requires less maintenance than an asphalt road or concrete sidewalk

Li, Yang V.

26

Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saline absorption in calcium silicate brick observed by NMR scanning L. Pel #3; , K. Kopinga #3 in calcium-silicate brick was investigated by nuclear magnetic resonance scanning. This method hasCl solution in a calcium silicate brick will be discussed. 2 Theory If gravity is neglected, the isothermal

Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

27

Choosing and Growing Stone Fruits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shaped like a doughnut, melting sugary flesh, small fruit.particularly Emma Walden Plum fruit wood (laterals): left,Choosing and Growing Stone Fruits resistant to plain leaf

Martin, Orin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Brick Walls and AdS/CFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the relationship between the bulk-boundary correspondence in Rehren's algebraic holography (and in other 'fixed-background' approaches to holography) and in mainstream 'Maldacena AdS/CFT'. Especially, we contrast the understanding of black-hole entropy from the viewpoint of QFT in curved spacetime -- in the framework of 't Hooft's 'brick wall' model -- with the understanding based on Maldacena AdS/CFT. We show that the brick-wall modification of a Klein Gordon field in the Hartle-Hawking-Israel state on 1+2-Schwarzschild AdS (BTZ) has a well-defined boundary limit with the same temperature and entropy as the brick-wall-modified bulk theory. One of our main purposes is to point out a close connection, for general AdS/CFT situations, between the puzzle raised by Arnsdorf and Smolin regarding the relationship between Rehren's algebraic holography and mainstream AdS/CFT and the puzzle embodied in the 'correspondence principle' proposed by Mukohyama and Israel in their work on the brick-wall approach to black hole entropy. Working on the assumption that similar results will hold for bulk QFT other than the Klein Gordon field and for Schwarzschild AdS in other dimensions, and recalling the first author's proposed resolution to the Mukohyama-Israel puzzle based on his 'matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis', we argue that, in Maldacena AdS/CFT, the algebra of the boundary CFT is isomorphic only to a proper subalgebra of the bulk algebra, albeit (at non-zero temperature) the (GNS) Hilbert spaces of bulk and boundary theories are still the 'same' -- the total bulk state being pure, while the boundary state is mixed (thermal). We also argue from the finiteness of its boundary (and hence, on our assumptions, also bulk) entropy at finite temperature, that the Rehren dual of the Maldacena boundary CFT cannot itself be a QFT and must, instead, presumably be something like a string theory.

Bernard S. Kay; L. Ortiz

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

29

Properties of Roman bricks and mortars used in Serapis temple in the city of Pergamon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Serapis temple, which was constructed in the Roman period in the city of Pergamon (Bergama/Turkey), is one of the most important monuments of the world heritage. In this study, the characteristics of bricks and mortars used in the temple have been determined in order to define the necessary characteristics of the intervention materials, which will be used in the conservation works of the temple. Several analyses were carried out to determine their basic physical properties, raw material compositions, mineralogical and microstructural properties using X-ray diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscope and a Thermo Gravimetric Analyzer. Analysis results indicated that the mortars are stiff, compact and hydraulic due to the use of natural pozzolanic aggregates. The Roman bricks are of low density, high porosity and were produced from raw materials containing calcium poor clays fired at low temperatures.

Ozkaya, Ozlem Aslan [Architectural Restoration Department, Izmir Institute of Technology, 35430 Izmir (Turkey); Boeke, Hasan, E-mail: hasanboke@iyte.edu.tr [Architectural Restoration Department, Izmir Institute of Technology, 35430 Izmir (Turkey)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

30

Letter Report: LAW Simulant Development for Cast Stone Screening Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second facility will be needed for the expected volume of additional LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with waste acceptance criteria for the IDF disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long term performance of the waste form in the IDF disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. A testing program was developed in fiscal year (FY) 2012 describing in some detail the work needed to develop and qualify Cast Stone as a waste form for the solidification of Hanford LAW (Westsik et al. 2012). Included within Westsik et al. (2012) is a section on the near-term needs to address Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-062-40ZZ. The objectives of the testing program to be conducted in FY 2013 and FY 2014 are to: • Determine an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form. • Evaluate sources of dry materials for preparing the LAW Cast Stone. • Demonstrate the robustness of the Cast Stone waste form for a range of LAW compositions. • Demonstrate the robustness of the formulation for variability in the Cast Stone process. • Provide Cast Stone contaminant release data for PA and risk assessment evaluations. The first step in determining an acceptable formulation for the LAW Cast Stone waste form is to conduct screening tests to examine expected ranges in pretreated LAW composition, waste stream concentrations, dry-materials sources, and mix ratios of waste feed to dry blend. A statistically designed test matrix will be used to evaluate the effects of these key parameters on the properties of the Cast Stone as it is initially prepared and after curing. The second phase of testing will focus on selection of a baseline Cast Stone formulation for LAW and demonstrating that Cast Stone can meet expected waste form requirements for disposal in the IDF. It is expected that this testing will use the results of the screening tests to define a smaller suite of tests to refine the composition of the baseline Cast Stone formulation (e.g. waste concentration, water to dry mix ratio, waste loading).

Russell, Renee L.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Swanberg, David J.; Eibling, Russell E.; Cozzi, Alex; Lindberg, Michael J.; Josephson, Gary B.; Rinehart, Donald E.

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

31

2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2009 Voluntary Protection Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Follow The Yellow Brick Road to Safety

32

Two Milling Stone Inventories from Northern San Diego County, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1982). Two Milling Stone Inventories from Northern San DiegoRincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SAN DIEGO COUNTYRincon 301. MILLING STONE INVENTORIES FROM SAN DIEGO COUNTY

True, D. L; Beemer, Eleanor

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Y-12 and Stone & Webster`  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1ofRadiative1 Over the years at Y-12,Stone

34

BBF RFC 21: BglBricks Assembly Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The BglBricks standard has been developed as an alternative to the original XbaI/SpeI standard primarily to provide a solution to the issue of generating translational-fusion parts. When joined together in a standard ...

Anderson, J Christopher

2009-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

The promise of digital technology in brick and mortar retail  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis we discuss the profound impact that technology is having on brick-and-mortar fashion retail. Retailers that (i) understand the implications of these changes and (ii) can adapt their retail business models ...

Chan, José Pablo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY Blue-green Algae Bloom circa 1971, Lake Erie Photo: Forsythe and Reutter OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE Impacts on Lake Erie and Stone Lab Efforts to Address the Problem OHIO SEA GRANT AND STONE LABORATORY Jeffrey M. Reutter, Ph.D., Director ·1895--F.T. Stone Laboratory ·1970--Center for Lake Erie Area Research

Howat, Ian M.

37

A New Standard to Connect BioBrick Parts for Precise Extraction of an Enzyme Digestion Product  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This BioBricks Foundation Request for Comments (BBF RFC) introduces a new standard to connect BioBrick parts using BglI site.

Uekusa, Kousuke

2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Session 3353 LEGO Brick Sculptures and Robotics in Education  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-on creativity for students, we have started to incorporate LEGO bricks in engineering education from kindergarten to graduate school. The versatility and natural appeal of these toys have led to engineering a few engineering masters theses. Students at all levels have become excited about engineering and have

39

Characterization of Technetium Speciation in Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-31 Support Program (EMSP) subtask, “Production and Long-Term Performance of Low Temperature Waste Forms” to provide additional information on technetium (Tc) speciation characterization in the Cast Stone waste form. To support the use of Cast Stone as an alternative to vitrification for solidifying low-activity waste (LAW) and as the current baseline waste form for secondary waste streams at the Hanford Site, additional understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone is needed to predict the long-term Tc leachability from Cast Stone and to meet the regulatory disposal-facility performance requirements for the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Characterizations of the Tc speciation within the Cast Stone after leaching under various conditions provide insights into how the Tc is retained and released. The data generated by the laboratory tests described in this report provide both empirical and more scientific information to increase our understanding of Tc speciation in Cast Stone and its release mechanism under relevant leaching processes for the purpose of filling data gaps and to support the long-term risk and performance assessments of Cast Stone in the IDF at the Hanford Site.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Wang, Guohui; Westsik, Joseph H.; Peterson, Reid A.

2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

40

GreyStone Power- Photovoltaic Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative in Georgia, offers a rebate for solar photovoltaic (PV) systems to members. The one-time rebate is offered for PV installations that are interconnected...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Energy Efficiency Opportunities in the Stone and Asphalt Industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industries of the Future (DOE-IOF) initiative. In addition to being highly energy intensive, stone crushing currently produces 42% of the total material consumed by weight in the US, which is mainly used as highway aggregates. Based on GDP growth... Symon4-1/2 HP300 061 150 220 270 100 0.50 0.63 270 161 150 220 100% 100% 3/4 proc 220 150 427 703 Daily Energy Consumption Entering Screenhouse 1501 Run Hours per Day 15.5 Daily Production Stage kW kWh/dy Product Tons/dy Model Notes Primary 240 3,000 3...

Moray, S.; Throop, N.; Seryak, J.; Schmidt, C.; Fisher, C.; D'Antonio, M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Delayed Linear Expansion of Two Ultra-low Expansion Dental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study was to measure the linear setting expansion of two ultra-low expansion dental stones used in definitive cast/ prosthesis fabrication which claim to have very low to no setting expansion. Five specimens of each material...

Oppedisano, Michael

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

43

Evaluation of a stack: A concrete chimney with brick liner  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 200 ft. tall stack, consisting of a concrete chimney with an independent acid proof brick liner built in the 1950`s, serving the Separations facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS), was evaluated for the performance category 3 (PC3) level of Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPH) effects. The inelastic energy absorption capacity of the concrete chimney was considered in the evaluation of the earthquake resistance, in particular, to compute the F{sub {mu}} factor. The calculated value of F{sub {mu}} exceeded 3.0, while the seismic demand for the PC3 level, using an F{sub {mu}} value of 1.5, was found to be less than the capacity of the concrete chimney. The capacity formulation of ACI 307 was modified to incorporate the effect of an after design opening on the tension side. There are considerable uncertainties in determining the earthquake resistance of the independent brick liner. The critical liner section, located at the bottom of the breeching opening, does not meet the current recommendations. A discussion is provided for the possible acceptable values for the ``Moment Reduction Factor``, R{sub w} or F{sub {mu}} for the liner. Comments are provided on the comparison of stack demands using response spectra (RS) versus time history (TH) analysis, with and without soil structure interaction (SSI) effects.

Joshi, J.R.; Amin, J.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Porthouse, R.A. [Chimney Consultants, West Lebanon, NH (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Stone Age Distributed Computing (Extended Abstract)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the first page. Copyrights for components of this work owned by others than ACM must be honored. AbstractingStone Age Distributed Computing (Extended Abstract) Yuval Emek Distributed Computing Group ETH wattenhofer@ethz.ch ABSTRACT A new model that depicts a network of randomized finite state machines operating

45

Introduction of customized inserts for streamlined assembly and optimization of BioBrick synthetic genetic circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background: BioBrick standard biological parts are designed to make biological systems easier to engineer (e.g. assemble, manipulate, and modify). There are over 5,000 parts available in the Registry of Standard Biological ...

Norville, Julie E.

46

The Electric Analog Simulation of the Fire Testing of a Four-Inch Brick Wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2 0 The literature references on industrial furnaces suggests this figure (6) The resistance-capacitance network representing the brick wall consists of ten sections (See Figure 5) The overall resistance-capacitance product (RC product...

Sherman, Robert Miller

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assembly of BioBrick standard biological parts using three antibiotic assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An underlying goal of synthetic biology is to make the process of engineering biological systems easier and more reliable. In support of this goal, we developed BioBrick assembly standard 10 to enable the construction of ...

Shetty, Reshma

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

Jimmy Stone | ornl.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformation forTechnologies |Jennifer DunnEnergy MaterialsBehindJimmy

49

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leachability indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the l

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

50

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Roberts, K. A.; Edwards, T. B.

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

51

Cast Stone Formulation At Higher Sodium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low temperature waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide supplemental Low Activity Waste (LAW) immobilization capacity for the Hanford site. Formulation of Cast Stone at high sodium concentrations is of interest since a significant reduction in the necessary volume of Cast Stone and subsequent disposal costs could be achieved if an acceptable waste form can be produced with a high sodium molarity salt solution combined with a high water to premix (or dry blend) ratio. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the factors involved with increasing the sodium concentration in Cast Stone, including production and performance properties and the retention and release of specific components of interest. Three factors were identified for the experimental matrix: the concentration of sodium in the simulated salt solution, the water to premix ratio, and the blast furnace slag portion of the premix. The salt solution simulants used in this study were formulated to represent the overall average waste composition. The cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash were sourced from a supplier in the Hanford area in order to be representative. The test mixes were prepared in the laboratory and fresh properties were measured. Fresh density increased with increasing sodium molarity and with decreasing water to premix ratio, as expected given the individual densities of these components. Rheology measurements showed that all of the test mixes produced very fluid slurries. The fresh density and rheology data are of potential value in designing a future Cast Stone production facility. Standing water and density gradient testing showed that settling is not of particular concern for the high sodium compositions studied. Heat of hydration measurements may provide some insight into the reactions that occur within the test mixes, which may in turn be related to the properties and performance of the waste form. These measurements showed that increased sodium concentration in the salt solution reduced the time to peak heat flow, and reducing the amount of slag in the premix increased the time to peak heat flow. These observations may help to describe some of the cured properties of the samples, in particular the differences in compressive strength observed after 28 and 90 days of curing. Samples were cured for at least 28 days at ambient temperature in the laboratory prior to cured properties analyses. The low activity waste form for disposal at the Hanford Site is required to have a compressive strength of at least 500 psi. After 28 days of curing, several of the test mixes had mean compressive strengths that were below the 500 psi requirement. Higher sodium concentrations and higher water to premix ratios led to reduced compressive strength. Higher fly ash concentrations decreased the compressive strength after 28 days of curing. This may be explained in that the cementitious phases matured more quickly in the mixes with higher concentrations of slag, as evidenced by the data for the time to peak heat generation. All of the test mixes exhibited higher mean compressive strengths after 90 days of curing, with only one composition having a mean compressive strength of less than 500 psi. Leach indices were determined for the test mixes for contaminants of interest. The leaching performance of the mixes evaluated in this study was not particularly sensitive to the factors used in the experimental design. This may be beneficial in demonstrating that the performance of the waste form is robust with respect to changes in the mix composition. The results of this study demonstrate the potential to achieve significantly higher waste loadings in Cast Stone and other low temperature, cementitious waste forms. Additional work is needed to elucidate the hydration mechanisms occurring in Cast Stone formulated with highly concentrated salt solutions since these reactions are responsible for determining the performance of the cured waste form. The thermal analyses completed in this study provide some preliminary insight, although the limited

Fox, K. M.; Edwards, T. A.; Roberts, K. B.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

52

Materials Department Annual Report 1992  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Department Annual Report 1992 Published by the Materials Department Risø National and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 46 77 46 77 Fax: +4542351173 #12;Abstract Selected activities ot the Materials Department at Riso

53

Materials Department Annual Report 1991  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Department Annual Report 1991 Published by the Materials Department Risø National, iron and stone by Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen Materials Department Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark Tel.: +45 42 37 12 12 Fax: + 45 42 35 11 73 #12;Abstract Selected activities of the Materials

54

Engineering scale demonstration of a prospective Cast Stone process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an engineering-scale demonstration with non-radioactive simulants that was performed at SRNL using the Scaled Continuous Processing Facility (SCPF) to fill an 8.5 ft container with simulated Cast Stone grout. The Cast Stone formulation was chosen from the previous screening tests. Legacy salt solution from previous Hanford salt waste testing was adjusted to correspond to the average composition generated from the Hanford Tank Waste Operation Simulator (HTWOS). The dry blend materials, ordinary portland cement (OPC), Class F fly ash, and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS or BFS), were obtained from Lafarge North America in Pasco, WA. Over three days, the SCPF was used to fill a 1600 gallon container, staged outside the facility, with simulated Cast Stone grout. The container, staged outside the building approximately 60 ft from the SCPF, was instrumented with x-, y-, and z-axis thermocouples to monitor curing temperature. The container was also fitted with two formed core sampling vials. For the operation, the targeted grout production rate was 1.5 gpm. This required a salt solution flow rate of approximately 1 gpm and a premix feed rate of approximately 580 lb/h. During the final day of operation, the dry feed rate was increased to evaluate the ability of the system to handle increased throughput. Although non-steady state operational periods created free surface liquids, no bleed water was observed either before or after operations. The final surface slope at a fill height of 39.5 inches was 1-1.5 inches across the 8.5 foot diameter container, highest at the final fill point and lowest diametrically opposed to the fill point. During processing, grout was collected in cylindrical containers from both the mixer discharge and the discharge into the container. These samples were stored in a humid environment either in a closed box proximal to the container or inside the laboratory. Additional samples collected at these sampling points were analyzed for rheological properties and density. Both the rheological properties (plastic viscosity and yield strength) and density were consistent with previous and later SCPF runs.

Cozzi, A.; Fowley, M.; Hansen, E.; Fox, K.; Miller, D.; Williams, M.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Characterization of aggregate resistance to degradation in stone matrix asphalt mixtures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stone matrix asphalt (SMA) mixtures rely on stone-on-stone contacts among particles to resist applied forces and permanent deformation. Aggregates in SMA should resist degradation (fracture and abrasion) under high stresses at the contact points...

Gatchalian, Dennis

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

56

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 MAG LAB REPORTS Volume 18 No. 1 CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

57

Slonakar carried out research to manufacture forty percent core area fly ash bricks using sodium silicate as the binder, and bottom as the coarse aggregate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

West Virginia fly ash in manufacture of fly ash bricks. The mix proportion for the bricks was composed silicate as the binder, and bottom as the coarse aggregate [4,5,6,13]. Slonakar [4] utilized a Southern

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

58

E-Print Network 3.0 - anti-weathering stone preservative Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

life settlements and their securitization. PATENT Inventors: Anne Zissu and Charles Stone have filed... Measures & Methodologies", with Charles A. Stone, Webinar...

59

An Evaluation of Ethyl Silicate-Based Grouts for Weathered Silicate Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Wheeler G.S. 2009. “Silicate Consolidants for Stone. ”4   2.2.   Ethyl Silicate: Chemistry and6   2.2.1.   Ethyl Silicates for Stone

Dolph, Brittany Helen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Cosmogenic 3 He surface-exposure dating of stone pavements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of closely packed angular to sub- rounded gravels that armor low-relief sur- faces (Fig. 1), stone pavements Mexico 87545 Chad T. Olinger ABSTRACT The formation of stone pavements, a ubiquitous gravel armor and water or alternating shrinking and swelling of soil horizons, implying that gravel is concentrated

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Injury experience in stone mining, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the United States for 1992. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

Kim, Young

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

Combined archaeomagnetic and thermoluminescence study of a brick kiln excavated at Fontanetto Po (Vercelli, Northern Italy)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Rescue excavation Archaeomagnetism Thermoluminescence dating Kiln Italy a b s t r a c t A combined 1511 to 1614 AD, and a second one from 1768 to 1872 AD. Thermoluminescence (TL) study has been also perCombined archaeomagnetic and thermoluminescence study of a brick kiln excavated at Fontanetto Po

Demouchy, Sylvie

64

Measure Guideline: Installing Rigid Foam Insulation on the Interior of Existing Brick Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline provides information on an effective method to insulate the interior of existing brick masonry walls with extruded polystyrene (XPS) insulation board. The guide outlines step-by-step design and installation procedures while explaining the benefits and tradeoffs where applicable. The authors intend that this document be useful to a varied audience that includes builders, remodelers, contractors and homeowners.

Natarajan, H.; Klocke, S.; Puttagunta, S.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A RESTful API for Supporting Automated BioBrick Model Assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Constructing simulatable models for BioBricks by hand is a complex and time-consuming task. The time taken could be reduced by using Computer Aided Design (CAD) tools to aid in designing models, but these tools need to be ...

Steyn, J S

2010-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

66

Supplemental DOME Documentation for Researchers with Bricks Version 1.6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the script /diesel/init.pl is executed. This is DOME's bootstrap script; it configures the brick, starts address so that it can be inherited by a VM. o Start a process to manage the 3G modem (/diesel/bustracker3gx.py). #12;2 o Start the gpsd daemon. o Start a process to install any updates (/diesel

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

67

Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContract Research Material

68

GreyStone Power- Solar Water Heating Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

GreyStone Power, an electricity cooperative serving 103,000 customers in Georgia, introduced a solar water heating rebate in March 2009. This $500 rebate is available to customers regardless of...

69

Stone Fruit Carlos H. Crisosto, Susan Lurie, and Julio Retamales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13 Stone Fruit Carlos H. Crisosto, Susan Lurie, and Julio Retamales CONTENTS 13.1 Introduction......................................................................................... 290 13.2.3 Fruit Biochemistry and Quality Attributes......................................................................................... 294 13.3.3 Fruit Biochemistry and Quality Attributes

Crisosto, Carlos H.

70

EIS-0377: Big Stone II Power Plant and Transmission Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A systems study was carried out to identify the most appropriate locations to interconnect the proposed Big Stone II power plant to the regional utility grid. The study also identified transmission...

71

Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

72

Linear Accelerator Facility, Kildee Hall aluminum, brick, concrete, rock, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and demonstration facility for the irradiation of food and non-food materials. It is primarily used for the reduction or elimination of bacteria from foods and feed. Interior Garden is an environmental installation) are examples of the types of foodstuff that is irradiated in the Linear Accelerator Facility. The table has

Mayfield, John

73

A composite material that consists essentially of a binding medium, such as a mixture of portland ce-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that of Type I cement. Aggregate. The aggregate is a granular material, such as sand, gravel, crushed stone to as coarse aggregate, gravel, or stone. By carefully grading the material and selecting an optimal particle size distribution, a maximum packing density can be achieved, where the smaller particles fill the void

Meyer, Christian

74

Usefulness of North Carolina olivine in heat storage bricks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sensible heat storage systems are available which make use of low cost electric energy during off-peak hours to heat ceramic refractories to approx. 1500/sup 0/F. Thereafter, heat is extracted as needed and without further energy demand (fan excluded) by controlled circulation of air through the core to meet residential or commercial space conditioning needs. Heat storage furnaces represent valuable load-leveling capabilities for central electric utilities and safe, convenient, reliable heat sources for consumers. The background of this new technology is reviewed, the different available types of heat storage furnaces are described, and attention is focused on materials selections, ceramic processing, thermal and mechanical properties and in-service performance factors for the ceramic refractories which make up the actual storage core. Prototype domestic heat storage refractories produced from North Carolina olivine (magnesium iron orthosilicate) are used as examples in discussing some of the available engineering options and tradeoffs, and their technical and economic consequences.

Palmour, H.; Gay, B.M.; Cochrane, R.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Kinetics of Swelling in Clay-Bearing Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutrality #12;Invasion of Water Water invades between the sheets The water molecules surround the ions (like salt dissolving) Thus the sheets are pushed apart by the water #12;Brownstone Larger Quartz Grains Clay-wc #12;Reasons... The stone has a lack of homogeneity Each sample varies based upon what part

Petta, Jason

76

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation and Radon from Natural Stone May 7, 2008 W.J. Llope Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 is "radiation" and the other is "radon." Radioactive elements, by their very nature, seek stability by decaying the outside and cause damage to cells and DNA, potentially causing cancer. Also, naturally occurring Uranium

Llope, William J.

77

Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone Commissioner of Agriculture Commissioner, Eagle County, Colorado Tom Borden Greg Walcher Private Landowner, Fort Collins, Colorado Director, Colorado Dept. of Natural Resources Nancy Fishering Al Yates Colorado Timber Industry Association President

78

Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Colorado Forestry Advisory Board Members: Don Ament Tom Stone Commissioner of Agriculture Commissioner, Eagle County, Colorado Tom Borden Greg Walcher Private Landowner, Fort Collins, Colorado Director, Colorado Dept. of Natural Resources Nancy Fishering Al Yates Colorado Timber Industry Association Former

79

In Search of Stepping Stones School of Natural Sciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such a stepping stone. Already famil- iar in science, philosophy, and personal paths of explorations, but under there clearly was room for mysticism. Not that they had it easy: every deep mystic ran the risk to be bran reality, in meditation and prayer and philosophy, in order to get deeper in touch with reality itself

Hut, Piet

80

Technetium and Iodine Getters to Improve Cast Stone Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To determine the effectiveness of the various getter materials prior to their solidification in Cast Stone, a series of batch sorption experiments was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. To quantify the effectiveness of the removal of Tc(VII) and I(I) from solution by getters, the distribution coefficient, Kd (mL/g), was calculated. Testing involved placing getter material in contact with spiked waste solutions at a 1:100 solid-to-solution ratio for periods up to 45 days with periodic solution sampling. One Tc getter was also tested at a 1:10 solid-to-solution ratio. Two different solution media, 18.2 M? deionized water (DI H2O) and a 7.8 M Na LAW simulant, were used in the batch sorption tests. Each test was conducted at room temperature in an anoxic chamber containing N2 with a small amount of H2 (0.7%) to maintain anoxic conditions. Each getter-solution combination was run in duplicate. Three Tc- and I-doping concentrations were used separately in aliquots of both the 18.2 M? DI H2O and a 7.8 M Na LAW waste simulant. The 1× concentration was developed based on Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model runs to support the River Protection Project System Plan Revision 6. The other two concentrations were 5× and 10× of the HTWOS values. The Tc and I tests were run separately (i.e., the solutions did not contain both solutes). Sampling of the solid-solution mixtures occurred nominally after 0.2, 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 days and ~35 to 45 days. Seven getter materials were tested for Tc and five materials were tested for I. The seven Tc getters were blast furnace slag 1 (BFS1) (northwest source), BFS2 (southeast source), Sn(II)-treated apatite, Sn(II) chloride, nano tin phosphate, KMS (a potassium-metal-sulfide), and tin hydroxapatite. The five iodine getters were layered bismuth hydroxide (LBH), argentite mineral, synthetic argentite, silver-treated carbon, and silver-treated zeolite. The Tc Kd values measured from experiments conducted using the 7.8 M Na LAW simulant (the simulant selected to represent LAW) for the first 15 days for four Tc getters (BFS1, BFS2, Sn(II)-treated apatite, and Sn(II) chloride) show no, to a very small, capacity to remove Tc from the LAW simulant. For the Tc-getter experiments in the 7.8 M LAW simulant, the majority of the effluent samples show very small drops in Tc concentrations for the 35-day compared to the 15-day samplings. However, the Tc concentration in the simulant blanks also dropped slightly during this period, so the effect of the getter contacting LAW simulant at 35 days compared to 15 days is minimal; except that the BFS1 1:10 test shows a slow but steady decrease in Tc concentration in the LAW simulant supernatant from the beginning to the 35 day contact at which point about 20% of the original Tc has been removed from solution. Lastly, the KMS getter gives the highest Kd value for Tc at 35 days where Kd values have increased to 104 mL/g. When considering the different I getters reacting with the 7.8 M LAW simulant, two getters are much more effective than the others: Ag zeolite and Syn Arg. The other getters have calculated iodide distribution coefficients that show very limited effectiveness in the caustic conditions created by the LAW simulant. These are preliminary results that will need more detailed analyses including both pre- and post-batch sorption getter solid-phase characterization using state-of-the-art instrumentation such as synchrotron X ray absorption spectroscopy, which can delineate the oxidation state of the Tc and likely iodine species as well as some of the getters key major components, sulfur and iron in the BFS, and tin and sulfur in the tin-bearing and sulfur-bearing getters. This report also describes future experimental studies to be performed to better elucidate the mechanisms controlling the Tc and I sequestration processes in the various getters and leach tests of getter-bearing Cast Stone monoliths.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Neeway, James J.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.; Snyder, Michelle MV

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

RECORDING OF THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF LIMESTONES UNDERGOING EXPERIMENTAL ACCELERATED AGEING TESTS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Abstract Sodium sulfates are widely regarded as the most destructive salts for porous stone, concrete destructive salts for porous stones, and other building materials such as concrete or brick (Goudie et al, 1997). It is important to fully understand their crystallization process in porous networks and

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

82

We are going to use a plank of wood, a brick, sandpaper, and an elastic cord to mimic earthquake mechanics. Although pulled with a constant velocity, the brick will repeatedly slide and then  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

earthquake mechanics. Although pulled with a constant velocity, the brick will repeatedly slide and then stop. This intermittent sliding motion mimics the intermittent fault slippage that characterizes the earthquake fault to mountain building, for example, or when one plate must slide past another, earthquakes are produced

Smith-Konter, Bridget

83

Data Package for Secondary Waste Form Down-Selection—Cast Stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Available literature on Cast Stone and Saltstone was reviewed with an emphasis on determining how Cast Stone and related grout waste forms performed in relationship to various criteria that will be used to decide whether a specific type of waste form meets acceptance criteria for disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) at Hanford. After the critical review of the Cast Stone/Saltstone literature, we conclude that Cast Stone is a good candidate waste form for further consideration. Cast stone meets the target IDF acceptance criteria for compressive strength, no free liquids, TCLP leachate are below the UTS permissible concentrations and leach rates for Na and Tc-99 are suiteably low. The cost of starting ingredients and equipment necessary to generate Cast Stone waste forms with secondary waste streams are low and the Cast Stone dry blend formulation can be tailored to accommodate variations in liquid waste stream compositions. The database for Cast Stone short-term performance is quite extensive compared to the other three candidate waste solidification processes. The solidification of liquid wastes in Cast Stone is a mature process in comparison to the other three candidates. Successful production of Cast Stone or Saltstone has been demonstrated from lab-scale monoliths with volumes of cm3 through m3 sized blocks to 210-liter sized drums all the way to the large pours into vaults at Savannah River. To date over 9 million gallons of low activity liquid waste has been solidified and disposed in concrete vaults at Savannah River.

Serne, R. Jeffrey; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Testing Stratigraphic Integrity of Upper and Middle Paleolithic Deposits in Vindija Cave (Croatia): A Chipped Stone Refitting Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: the wide-ranging Aurignacian techno-complex (Brantingham et al 2004a, Hays and Thacker 2001). The stratigraphic integrity and interpretation of the cultural materials and human skeletal remains from Level G1 at Vindija is a source of debate (d?Erico et... al 1998, Zilh?o and d?Erico 1999a, Karavani? and Smith 2000, Straus 1999). Artifacts from Level G1 include both Middle and Upper Paleolithic stone tool types (Karavani? 1995, Karavani? and Smith 1998) including a bifacial foliate point of possible...

Bruner, Kale

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

85

Absorbed Gamma-Ray Doses due to Natural Radionuclides in Building Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work is devoted to the application of high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry in the study of the effective dose coming from naturally occurring radionuclides, namely {sup 40}K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, present in building materials such as sand, cement, and granitic gravel. Four models were applied to estimate the effective dose and the hazard indices. The maximum estimated effective dose coming from the three reference rooms considered is 0.90(45) mSv/yr, and maximum internal hazard index is 0.77(24), both for the compact clay brick reference room. The principal gamma radiation sources are cement, sand and bricks.

Aguiar, Vitor A. P.; Medina, Nilberto H. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Moreira, Ramon H.; Silveira, Marcilei A. G. [Departamento de Fisica, Centro Universitario da FEI, Sao Bernardo do Campo, SP (Brazil)

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

86

Managing the almond and stone fruit replant disease complex with less soil fumigant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acre $/acre lb/acre Net fruit price and fumigant efficiencyeds. ). Compendium of Stone Fruit Dis- eases. St. Paul: APSField Office. 2011. Fruit and Nut Crops. California

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - abstract stone duality Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sam van... Duality Pointfree duality Stone ... Source: Bosma, Wieb - Department of Mathematics, Radboud Universiteit Collection: Mathematics 2 Sam van Gool Introduction Summary:...

88

Cementitious building material incorporating end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cementitious composition comprising a cementitious material and polyethylene glycol or end-capped polyethylene glycol as a phase change material, said polyethylene glycol and said end-capped polyethylene glycol having a molecular weight greater than about 400 and a heat of fusion greater than about 30 cal/g; the compositions are useful in making pre-formed building materials such as concrete blocks, brick, dry wall and the like or in making poured structures such as walls or floor pads; the glycols can be encapsulated to reduce their tendency to retard set.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH); Griffen, Charles W. (Mason, OH)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

CAST STONE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE TREATMENT AND IMMOBILIZATION OF LOW-ACTIVITY WASTE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cast stone technology is being evaluated for potential application in the treatment and immobilization of Hanford low-activity waste. The purpose of this document is to provide background information on cast stone technology. The information provided in the report is mainly based on a pre-conceptual design completed in 2003.

MINWALL HJ

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

90

Numerical evidence for nucleated self-assembly of DNA brick structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observation by Ke et al. [Science 338, 1177 (2012)] that large numbers of short, pre-designed DNA strands can assemble into three-dimensional target structures came as a great surprise, as no colloidal self-assembling system has ever achieved the same degree of complexity. That failure seemed easy to rationalise: the larger the number of distinct building blocks, the higher the expected error rate for self-assembly. The experiments of Ke et al. have disproved this argument. Here, we report Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly of a DNA brick cube, comprising approximately 1000 types of DNA strand, using a simple model. We model the DNA strands as lattice tetrahedra with attractive patches, the interaction strengths of which are computed using a standard thermodynamic model. We find that, within a narrow temperature window, the target structure assembles with high probability. Our simulations suggest that mis-assembly is disfavoured because of a slow nucleation step. As our model incorporates no aspect of DNA other than its binding properties, these simulations suggest that, with proper design of the building blocks, other systems, such as colloids, may also assemble into truly complex structures.

Aleks Reinhardt; Daan Frenkel

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

91

Injury experience in stone mining, 1991. Information report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of stone mining in the united States for 1991. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Effects of alternate fuels report No. 8: analysis of degradiation of magnesia-based refractory bricks from a residual oil-fired rotary cement kiln  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual oil was used as an alternate fuel to natural gas to supply heat in a rotary cement kiln. Principal impurities in the residual oil were Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Ni, P.S. and V. the kiln operators were concerned about the effects of these oil impurities on observed degradation of the magnesia-based bricks used as a liner in the burning zone of the kiln. Two degraded bricks, which had been in service for six to nine months, were analyzed to determine the role of fuel impurities on the observed degradation. The maximum hot-face temperature of the refractory during service was about 1500/sup 0/C. One brick had decreased in thickness about 45%, the about 15%. Various analytical measurements on these samples failed to reveal the presence of fuel impurities at or near the hot face of the bricks, and therefore it is concluded that the relatively short service life of these refractories was not due to use of residual oil as the fuel in the kiln. The observed degradation, therefore, was attributed to other reactions and to thermal mechanical conditions in the kiln, which inevitably resulted in extensive erosion of the bricks.

Federer, J.I.; Tennery, V.J.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO[sub 2] emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO[sub 2], this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO[sub 2] emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO[sub 2] emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.); Rosenbaum, D.I. (Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics); Ross, M.H. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics)

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Case studies of the potential effects of carbon taxation on the stone, clay, and glass industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This case study focuses on the potential for a carbon tax ($25 and $100 per metric ton of carbon) to reduce energy use and associated carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in three subsectors of the stone, clay, and glass industry: hydraulic cement, glass and glass products, and other products. A conservation supply curve analysis found that (1) opportunities for reducing fossil fuel use in the subsectors are limited (15% reduction under $100 tax) and (2) the relationship between the tax and reduced CO{sub 2} emissions is nonlinear and diminishing. Because cement manufacturing produces a significant amount of CO{sub 2}, this subsector was analyzed. A plant-level analysis found more opportunities to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions; under a $100 tax, fossil fuel use would decrease 52%. (A conservative estimate lies between 15% and 52%). It also confirmed the nonlinear relationship, suggesting significant benefits could result from small taxes (32% reduction under $25 tax). A fuel share analysis found the cement industry could reduce carbon loading 11% under a $100 tax if gas were substituted for coal. Under a $100 tax, cement demand would decrease 17% and its price would increase 32%, a substantial increase for a material commodity. Overall, CO{sub 2} emissions from cement manufacturing would decrease 24--33% under a $100 tax and 10--18% under a $25 tax. Much of the decrease would result from the reduced demand for cement.

Bock, M.J.; Boyd, G.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.; Rosenbaum, D.I. [Nebraska Univ., Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Economics; Ross, M.H. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

A reinterpretation of "sense of place" : a study of the Stone Town of Zanzibar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis attempts to understand the evolution of the Stone Town of Zanzibar, an urban fabric that had undergone a phase of upheaval that was brought about by a brief period of rapid change in its political, social and ...

De Costa, Alfred Franklin

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New age constraints on the Middle Stone Age occupations of Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt rocks, or tufas, exposed along the flanks of the Libyan Plateau near Kharga Oasis, Western Desert, Egypt

Asmerom, Yemane

97

TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TEXTUAL ECONOMY THROUGH CLOSE COUPLING OF SYNTAX AND SEMANTICS Matthew Stone Bonnie Webber Dept, thatexploitsthe hearer's recognitionof inferentiallinkstomaterial elsewhere withina sentence. Textual economy argue that achieving textual economy imposes strong requirements on the representation and reasoning

Stone, Matthew

98

SETTING IN STONE: A CULTURAL GEOGRAPHY OF THE DRY STANE SYKES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the new rural economy. Even so, the artistry and the industry necessary to build a dry stone dyke are less be influential in refining methodological approach and narrative style. Ultimately, the project will produce

Guo, Zaoyang

99

A study of the feasibility of the increased use of wage incentives in the brick manufacturing industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~, - ~'ajiilg~. i@gheg::. ~Q'$W'. :i?mm)sQLg:, tQ jj?"(t;, . ' '". ??Ir@y, . eaeor4img 4m, :)sam, ~ hmwm. hmea-m?i&Img. ':~-:hW:4'aL4', mt- yrme'~", eh'~; F igure 3. Typical Flow Process Chart of brick manufacture by continuous extrusion, tunnel kiln firing... of the convex or crown shape of the tunnel kiln, additional units are placed on the inside section of the hack as the final course. A worker selects and grasps four units (on the average) from those on the moving belt. Belt speed is 3 feet per se- cond...

Stringer, James Lewis

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbon 40 (2002) 781786 Copper and strontium adsorption by a novel carbon material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon 40 (2002) 781­786 Copper and strontium adsorption by a novel carbon material manufactured a significantly higher capacity for copper and strontium sorption than that of 21 21 a commercial material used and strontium. CAC can be produced from different types of raw materi- als, including wood, coal, fruit stones

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

102

Set in stone? A perspective on the concrete sustainability challenge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As the most abundant engineered material on Earth, concrete is essential to the physical infrastructure of all modern societies. There are no known materials that can replace concrete in terms of cost and availability. ...

Vliet, Krystyn Van J.

103

Spatial and Temporal Variation in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivay Obsidian Source Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems. In Prehis- toric Quarries and Lithic Production,Industrial organization at the Melos obsidian quarries.In Prehistoric Quarries and Lithic Production, edited by

Tripcevich, Nicholas; MacKay, Alex

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Spatial and Temporal Variation in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivay Obsidian Source Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

we go: A llama caravan in Bolivia. Llama World Spring:10–15.Interaction in Peru and Bolivia LBL6343. Lawrence BerkeleyPeru and northern Bolivia. Journal of World Prehistory 14(

Tripcevich, Nicholas; MacKay, Alex

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

A Case for Safer Building Materials: Lifecycle Concerns, Data Gaps, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Conventional Building Materials · Wood · Stone · Cement · Metal · Glass · Straw · Ceramics #12;Synthetic Building Materials · Adhesives · Sealants · Caulks · Paints · Foams · Binders · Insulation · Wood additives (rapidly growing), grout and mortar, polymer flooring, sprayed polyurethane foam · $7.7 billion

Lee, Seung-Wuk

106

Waste Acceptance Testing of Secondary Waste Forms: Cast Stone, Ceramicrete and DuraLith  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support the selection of a waste form for the liquid secondary wastes from WTP, Washington River Protection Solutions has initiated secondary-waste-form testing work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). In anticipation of a down-selection process for a waste form for the Solidification Treatment Unit to be added to the ETF, PNNL is conducting tests on four candidate waste forms to evaluate their ability to meet potential waste acceptance criteria for immobilized secondary wastes that would be placed in the IDF. All three waste forms demonstrated compressive strengths above the minimum 3.45 MPa (500 psi) set as a target for cement-based waste forms. Further, none of the waste forms showed any significant degradation in compressive strength after undergoing thermal cycling (30 cycles in a 10 day period) between -40 C and 60 C or water immersion for 90 days. The three leach test methods are intended to measure the diffusion rates of contaminants from the waste forms. Results are reported in terms of diffusion coefficients and a leachability index (LI) calculated based on the diffusion coefficients. A smaller diffusion coefficient and a larger LI are desired. The NRC, in its Waste Form Technical Position (NRC 1991), provides recommendations and guidance regarding methods to demonstrate waste stability for land disposal of radioactive waste. Included is a recommendation to conduct leach tests using the ANS 16.1 method. The resulting leachability index (LI) should be greater than 6.0. For Hanford secondary wastes, the LI > 6.0 criterion applies to sodium leached from the waste form. For technetium and iodine, higher targets of LI > 9 for Tc and LI > 11 for iodine have been set based on early waste-disposal risk and performance assessment analyses. The results of these three leach tests conducted for a total time between 11days (ASTM C1308) to 90 days (ANS 16.1) showed: (1) Technetium diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that all the waste forms had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium; (2) Rhenium diffusivity: Cast Stone 2M specimens, when tested using EPA 1315 protocol, had leachability indices better than the target LI > 9 for technetium based on rhenium as a surrogate for technetium. All other waste forms tested by ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 test methods had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 9 for Tc based on rhenium release. These studies indicated that use of Re(VII) as a surrogate for 99Tc(VII) in low temperature secondary waste forms containing reductants will provide overestimated diffusivity values for 99Tc. Therefore, it is not appropriate to use Re as a surrogate 99Tc in future low temperature waste form studies. (3) Iodine diffusivity: ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315 tests indicated that the three waste forms had leachability indices that were below the target LI > 11 for iodine. Therefore, it may be necessary to use a more effective sequestering material than silver zeolite used in two of the waste forms (Ceramicrete and DuraLith); (4) Sodium diffusivity: All the waste form specimens tested by the three leach methods (ANSI/ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308, and EPA 1315) exceeded the target LI value of 6; (5) All three leach methods (ANS 16.1, ASTM C1308 and EPA 1315) provided similar 99Tc diffusivity values for both short-time transient diffusivity effects as well as long-term ({approx}90 days) steady diffusivity from each of the three tested waste forms (Cast Stone 2M, Ceramicrete and DuraLith). Therefore, any one of the three methods can be used to determine the contaminant diffusivities from a selected waste form.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Lindberg, Michael J.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

107

The aim of the present work is to propose a new micro-mechanical model in the con-text of the deductive approach used to derive interface models. This model, based on a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] to evaluate the global behaviour of the dam- aged HEM-1 defining thus a second equivalent homogeneous medium to model HEM-2 as an interface or a joint. The properties of this joint are deduced from those of the HEM-2 as a composite material formed by units (bricks, natural stones, marble, granite, limestone, concrete block, etc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

108

Evidence of a bacterial carbonate coating on plaster samples subjected to the Calcite Bioconcept biomineralization technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

made of concrete as well as historic buildings made of stone or brick. These porous materials on concrete and on limestone samples in an aqueous environment. However, the carbonate production was measured and biological) [1, 2]. In all cases, water transfer within the whole volume of the porous media is the common

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

JOURNAL OF IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING 2 A mixed model of active geodesic contours with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerns buildings made with concrete as well as historical buildings made with stones or bricks. Indeed, these porous materials are subjected to deterioration due to the action of external environmental (physical, chemical and biological) agents [8], [14]. In all cases, water transfer within the whole volume

Boyer, Edmond

110

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was carried out to utilize wood ash in making self- compacting controlled low-strength materials (CLSM), air and Presentation at the Seventh CANMET/ACI International Conference on Recent Advances in Concrete Technology, Las-entrained and non-air- entrained concretes, and bricks/blocks/paving stones. Initial test results indicated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

111

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of consistency and fluidity, self-leveling and self-compacting, contain very little portland cement, and large applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, materials handling yards, parking lots quantities of ash and water. It is believed that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

112

Performance analysis of boron nitride embedded armchair graphene nanoribbon metal–oxide–semiconductor field effect transistor with Stone Wales defects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the performance of a hybrid Graphene-Boron Nitride armchair nanoribbon (a-GNR-BN) n-MOSFET at its ballistic transport limit. We consider three geometric configurations 3p, 3p + 1, and 3p + 2 of a-GNR-BN with BN atoms embedded on either side (2, 4, and 6 BN) on the GNR. Material properties like band gap, effective mass, and density of states of these H-passivated structures are evaluated using the Density Functional Theory. Using these material parameters, self-consistent Poisson-Schrodinger simulations are carried out under the Non Equilibrium Green's Function formalism to calculate the ballistic n-MOSFET device characteristics. For a hybrid nanoribbon of width ?5?nm, the simulated ON current is found to be in the range of 265??A–280??A with an ON/OFF ratio 7.1 × 10{sup 6}–7.4 × 10{sup 6} for a V{sub DD}?=?0.68?V corresponding to 10?nm technology node. We further study the impact of randomly distributed Stone Wales (SW) defects in these hybrid structures and only 2.5% degradation of ON current is observed for SW defect density of 3.18%.

Chanana, Anuja; Sengupta, Amretashis; Mahapatra, Santanu [Nano Scale Device Research Laboratory, Department of Electronic Systems Engineering, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short communication Control of brown rot of stone fruits by brief heated water immersion treatments. Several studies have shown that hot water treatments by themselves or in combination with other treatments they require are an issue that has hindered the commercial adoption of hot water treatments. While higher water

Crisosto, Carlos H.

114

Topological description of the Stone-Wales defect formation energy in carbon nanotubes and graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Topological description of the Stone-Wales defect formation energy in carbon nanotubes and graphene,10,12,16,18,26 The reported values for SW defect formation energies both in carbon nanotubes and graphene8 energies depend largely on the nanotube radius, the orientation of the dislocation dipole, and, to a lesser

Daw, Murray S.

115

Cellular studies of auditory hair cell regeneration Jennifer S. Stone and Edwin W Rubel*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colloquium Cellular studies of auditory hair cell regeneration in birds Jennifer S. Stone and Edwin that mature birds are able to regenerate hair cells, the receptors for auditory perception. This surprising finding generated hope in the field of auditory neuro- science that new hair cells someday may be coaxed

Rubel, Edwin

116

Self-Assembly of Molecular Brick Wall and Molecular Honeycomb from Nickel(II) Macrocycle and 1,3,5-Benzenetricarboxylate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-Assembly of Molecular Brick Wall and Molecular Honeycomb from Nickel(II) Macrocycle and 130N6O2)]3[C6H3(COO)3]2,14H2O,2C5H5N (2), respec- tively, have been constructed by the self-assembly anti-ferromagnetic interactions between the S ) 1 Ni(II) paramagnetic centers. Introduction Self-assembled

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

117

Porous Materials Porous Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Porous Materials x Porous Materials · Physical properties * Characteristic impedance p = p 0 e -jk xa- = vej[ ] p x - j ; Zc= p ve = c ka 0k = c 1-j #12;2 Porous Materials · Specific acoustic impedance Porous Materials · Finite thickness ­ blocked p e + -jk (x-d)a p e - jk (x-d)a d x #12

Berlin,Technische Universität

118

The effect of stone retention walls on soil productivity and crop performance on selected hillside farms in southern Honduras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC ELLERY THOMPSON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject Soil Science THE EFFECT OF STONE RETENTION WALLS ON SOIL PRODUCTIVITY AND CROP PERFORMANCE ON SELECTED HILLSIDE FARMS IN SOUTHERN HONDURAS A Thesis by MARC...

Thompson, Marc Ellery

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Sedimentary and faunal analysis of a marginal marine section, the Stone City Member (middle eocene), Crockett Formation, Burleson County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

partial fulf1llment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subiect: Geology SEDIMENTARY AND FAUNAL ANALYSIS OF A MARGINAL MARINE SECTION, THE STONE CITY MEMBER (MIDDLE EOCENE), CROCKETT FORMATION, BURLESON COUNTY..., TEXAS A Thesis by KATHERINE CURRIER NELMS Approved as to style and content by: Chairman Cemmittek Head of par ment Member Member December 1979 ABSTRACT SEDIMENTARY AND FAUNAL ANALYSIS OF A MARGINAL MARINE SECTION, THE STONE CITY MEMBER (MIDDLE...

Nelms, Katherine Currier

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Crystal Growth Inhibitors for the Prevention of L-Cystine Kidney Stones Through Molecular Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crystallization of L-cystine is a critical step in the pathogenesis of cystine kidney stones. Treatments for this disease are somewhat effective but often lead to adverse side effects. Real-time in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that L-cystine dimethylester (L-CDME) and L-cystine methylester (L-CME) dramatically reduce the growth velocity of the six symmetry-equivalent {l_brace}100{r_brace} steps because of specific binding at the crystal surface, which frustrates the attachment of L-cystine molecules. L-CDME and L-CME produce L-cystine crystals with different habits that reveal distinct binding modes at the crystal surfaces. The AFM observations are mirrored by reduced crystal yield and crystal size in the presence of L-CDME and L-CME, collectively suggesting a new pathway to the prevention of L-cystine stones by rational design of crystal growth inhibitors.

Rimer, Jeffrey D.; An, Zhihua; Zhu, Zina; Lee, Michael H.; Goldfarb, David S.; Wesson, Jeffrey A.; Ward, Michael D. (NY Univ.); (MCW)

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The provenance of the stone ballast from the Molasses Reef Wreck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

would limit the sources for ballast to the Old World and the Caribbean Basin of the New World. 5econd, the bailast was sampled systematically in the field which decreased the level of bias in the data collection. Third, the overall diversity... ballast Iithologfes with source locations, particularly when metamorphic and igneous rocks are under study. Paleontology is instrumental for provenance correlations of sedimentary lithologies. Fossils found in ballast stones can give geological dates...

Lamb, William Reginald

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. The PA is needed to satisfy both Washington State IDF Permit and DOE Order requirements. Cast Stone has been selected for solidification of radioactive wastes including WTP aqueous secondary wastes treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. A similar waste form called Saltstone is used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to solidify its LAW tank wastes.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—Cast Stone and Alkali Alumino-Silicate Geopolymer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PNNL is conducting screening tests on the candidate waste forms to provide a basis for comparison and to resolve the formulation and data needs identified in the literature review. This report documents the screening test results on the Cast Stone cementitious waste form and the Geopolymer waste form. Test results suggest that both the Cast Stone and Geopolymer appear to be viable waste forms for the solidification of the secondary liquid wastes to be treated in the ETF. The diffusivity for technetium from the Cast Stone monoliths was in the range of 1.2 × 10-11 to 2.3 × 10-13 cm2/s during the 63 days of testing. The diffusivity for technetium from the Geopolymer was in the range of 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s through the 63 days of the test. These values compare with a target of 1 × 10-9 cm2/s or less. The Geopolymer continues to show some fabrication issues with the diffusivities ranging from 1.7 × 10-10 to 3.8 × 10-12 cm2/s for the better-performing batch to from 1.2 × 10-9 to 1.8 × 10-11 cm2/s for the poorer-performing batch. In the future more comprehensive and longer term performance testing will be conducted, to further evaluate whether or not these waste forms will meet the regulation and performance criteria needed to cost-effectively dispose of secondary wastes.

Pierce, Eric M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Parker, Kent E.; Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improved Materials for High-Temperature Black Liquor Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The laboratory immersion test system built and operated at ORNL was found to successfully screen samples from numerous refractory suppliers, including both commercially available and experimental materials. This system was found to provide an accurate prediction of how these materials would perform in the actual gasifier environment. Test materials included mullites, alumino-silicate bricks, fusion-cast aluminas, alumina-based and chrome-containing mortars, phosphate-bonded mortars, coated samples provided under an MPLUS-funded project, bonded spinels, different fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinels with magnesia content ranging from 2.5% to about 60%, high-MgO castable and brick materials, spinel castables, and alkali-aluminate materials. This testing identified several candidate material systems that perform well in the New Bern gasifier. Fusion-cast aluminas were found to survive for nearly one year, and magnesia-alumina spinels have operated successfully for 18 months and are expected to survive for two years. Alkali-aluminates and high-MgO-content materials have also been identified for backup lining applications. No other material with a similar structure and chemical composition to that of the fusion-cast magnesium-aluminum spinel brick currently being used for the hot-face lining is commercially available. Other materials used for this application have been found to have inferior service lives, as previously discussed. Further, over 100 laboratory immersion tests have been performed on other materials (both commercial and experimental), but none to date has performed as well as the material currently being used for the hot-face lining. Operating experience accumulated with the high-temperature gasifier at New Bern, North Carolina, has confirmed that the molten alkali salts degrade many types of refractories. Fusion-cast alumina materials were shown to provide a great improvement in lifetime over materials used previously. Further improvement was realized with fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinel refractory, which appears to be the most resistant to degradation found to date, exhibiting over a year of service life and expected to be capable of over two years of service life. Regarding the use of refractory mortar, it was found that expansion of the current chrome-alumina mortar when subjected to black liquor smelt is likely contributing to the strains seen on the vessel shell. Additionally, the candidate high-alumina mortar that was originally proposed as a replacement for the current chrome-alumina mortar also showed a large amount of expansion when subjected to molten smelt. A UMR experimental mortar, composed of a phosphate bonded system specifically designed for use with fusion-cast magnesium-aluminum spinel, was found to perform well in the molten smelt environment. Strain gauges installed on the gasifier vessel shell provided valuable information about the expansion of the refractory, and a new set of strain gauges and thermocouples has been installed in order to monitor the loading caused by the currently installed spinel refractory. These results provide information for a direct comparison of the expansion of the two refractories. Measurements to date suggest that the fusion-cast magnesia-alumina spinel is expanding less than the fusion-cast {alpha}/{beta}-alumina used previously. A modified liquor nozzle was designed and constructed to test a number of materials that should be more resistant to erosion and corrosion than the material currently used. Inserts made of three erosion-resistant metallic materials were fabricated, along with inserts made of three ceramic materials. The assembled system was sent to the New Bern mill for installation in the gasifer in 2005. Following operation of the gasifier using the modified nozzle, inserts should be removed and analyzed for wear by erosion/corrosion. Although no materials have been directly identified for sensor/thermocouple protection tubes, several of the refractory material systems identified for lining material applications may be applicable for use in this

Keiser, J.R.; Hemrick, J.G.; Gorog, J.P.; Leary, R.

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Cast Stone Oxidation Front Evaluation: Preliminary Results For Samples Exposed To Moist Air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rate of oxidation is important to the long-term performance of reducing salt waste forms because the solubility of some contaminants, e.g., technetium, is a function of oxidation state. TcO{sub 4}{sup ?} in the salt solution is reduced to Tc(IV) and has been shown to react with ingredients in the waste form to precipitate low solubility sulfide and/or oxide phases. Upon exposure to oxygen, the compounds containing Tc(IV) oxidize to the pertechnetate ion, Tc(VII)O{sub 4}{sup ?}, which is very soluble. Consequently the rate of technetium oxidation front advancement into a monolith and the technetium leaching profile as a function of depth from an exposed surface are important to waste form performance and ground water concentration predictions. An approach for measuring contaminant oxidation rate (effective contaminant specific oxidation rate) based on leaching of select contaminants of concern is described in this report. In addition, the relationship between reduction capacity and contaminant oxidation is addressed. Chromate (Cr(VI) was used as a non-radioactive surrogate for pertechnetate, Tc(VII), in Cast Stone samples prepared with 5 M Simulant. Cast Stone spiked with pertechnetate was also prepared and tested. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Cr were cut from Cast Stone exposed to Savannah River Site (SRS) outdoor ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Depth discrete subsamples spiked with Tc-99 were cut from Cast Stone exposed to laboratory ambient temperature fluctuations and moist air. Similar conditions are expected to be encountered in the Cast Stone curing container. The leachability of Cr and Tc-99 and the reduction capacities, measured by the Angus-Glasser method, were determined for each subsample as a function of depth from the exposed surface. The results obtained to date were focused on continued method development and are preliminary and apply to the sample composition and curing / exposure conditions described in this report. The Cr oxidation front (depth to which soluble Cr was detected) for the Cast Stone sample exposed for 68 days to ambient outdoor temperatures and humid air (total age of sample was 131 days) was determined to be about 35 mm below the top sample surface exposed. The Tc oxidation front, depth at which Tc was insoluble, was not determined. Interpretation of the results indicates that the oxidation front is at least 38 mm below the exposed surface. The sample used for this measurement was exposed to ambient laboratory conditions and humid air for 50 days. The total age of the sample was 98 days. Technetium appears to be more easily oxidized than Cr in the Cast Stone matrix. The oxidized forms of Tc and Cr are soluble and therefore leachable. Longer exposure times are required for both the Cr and Tc spiked samples to better interpret the rate of oxidation. Tc spiked subsamples need to be taken further from the exposed surface to better define and interpret the leachable Tc profile. Finally Tc(VII) reduction to Tc(IV) appears to occur relatively fast. Results demonstrated that about 95 percent of the Tc(VII) was reduced to Tc(IV) during the setting and very early stage setting for a Cast Stone sample cured 10 days. Additional testing at longer curing times is required to determine whether additional time is required to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII) in Cast Stone or whether the Tc loading exceeded the ability of the waste form to reduce 100 % of the Tc(VII). Additional testing is required for samples cured for longer times. Depth discrete subsampling in a nitrogen glove box is also required to determine whether the 5 percent Tc extracted from the subsamples was the result of the sampling process which took place in air. Reduction capacity measurements (per the Angus-Glasser method) performed on depth discrete samples could not be correlated with the amount of chromium or technetium leached from the depth discrete subsamples or with the oxidation front inferred from soluble chromium and technetium (i.e., effective Cr and Tc oxidation fronts). Residual reduction capacity

Langton, C. A.; Almond, P. M.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

An evaluation of Stones method to determinte pseudo-relative permeability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be evaluated to calculate the pseudo-relative permeability. The equation used for pseudo oil viscosity is given by Eq. 2-6. This equation is derived in Appendix A and is based on equations presented by Stone. 7 This equation will be discussed later. Kk Z (q... pressure. (4) Pseudo oil viscosity is calculated as the sum of the oil viscosities for each fine grid block at the outlet face of the upstream equivalent coarse grid block, using oil flow rates as the weighting factor. This oil flow rates are calculated...

Permadi, Asep Kurnia

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

#WomenInSTEM: Stepping Stones From One Career to Another | Department of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNG IHDR€ÍSolar Energy41 (Dollars and Sense Committee)Energy Stepping Stones

128

Three-dimensional fracture and fragmentation of artificial kidney stones This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional fracture and fragmentation of artificial kidney stones This article has been IOPscience #12;Three-dimensional fracture and fragmentation of artificial kidney stones Alejandro Mota1 Laboratory Livermore, CA 94550, USA July 25, 2006 Abstract The brittle fracture of a gypsum cylinder, which

Ortiz, Michael

129

Utilitarian Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

encyclopedia of ancient Egypt, Vol. 3, ed. Donald Redford,archaeology of ancient Egypt, ed. Kathryn Bard, and Stevenarchaeology of ancient Egypt, ed. Kathryn Bard and Steven

Harrell, James A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tumbled blocks of Aswan granite and granodiorite from lowertumbled blocks of Aswan granite and granodiorite from lowerstones, most notably granite and granodiorite from Aswan (

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Utilitarian Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pounders in the Gebel el-Granite metadolerite quarry, Newthe Unfinished Obelisk granite quarry, Dynasties 18 - 19 (were chert, dolerite, granite, metagraywacke, and silicified

Harrell, James A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ornamental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limestone (var. 1), granite (var. 1), and granodiorite (var.porphyry (vars. 1-3), granite (var. 1), granodiorite (vars.Basins: Roman Period—granite (var. 1), andesite-dacite

Harrell, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ornamental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.

Harrell, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Utilitarian Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.

Harrell, James A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.Geological Survey of Norway, Special Publication 12, ed.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ancient Egyptian limestone quarries: A petrological survey.pp. 195 - 212. 2001 Ancient quarries near Amarna. Egyptian36 - 38. 2010 An early Roman quarry for anhydrite and gypsum

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ornamental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

e), which have no known quarries. Photograph (a) courtesy ofRoman Period. Sources: four quarries in the Nile Valley, onPeriods. Sources: nine quarries in the Eastern Desert and

Harrell, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Building Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anhydrite and gypsum near Wadi el-Anba’ut, Red Sea coast,West Bank (ED:3; small) Wadi Rayan Formation of the MokattamNK & Pt-R? ; medium) 21. in Wadi Sheikh Yasin east of Zawyet

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ornamental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

near Cairo (no. 1 in fig. 1), in Wadi Abu Subeira (no. 39in fig. 1), near Wadi Abu Aggag (no. 40 in fig. 1), and onstill undiscovered, in Wadi el-Garawi near Helwan city (no.

Harrell, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Ornamental Stones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ian Shaw, Richard Lee, and Abdou Salem 2009b GPS and GISBloxam, Tom Heldal, and Abdou Salem 2002 Survey at Chephren’

Harrell, James A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

A garden mulch is any material spread on the soil surface to modify the environment where the plant is growing. The materials used can be natural or synthetic and can be used in any number of combinations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic mulching materials include crushed corn cobs, peanut hulls, buckwheat hulls, bark and wood chips, wood shavings, seaweed and peat moss. All natural mulches should be applied after the crop has begun, as this increases the risk of disease. The soil should also be weed-free and moist. Pebbles, stone chips, gravel

New Hampshire, University of

142

Mud-Brick Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this layer with mud plaster (fig. 2; Arnold 2003: 47;with reeds coated in mud plaster, were the source of many ofprehistoric period, mud plaster increasingly was employed

Emery, Virginia L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mud-Brick Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architecture in ancient Egypt. Warminster: Aris & Phillips.In Glimpses of ancient Egypt: Studies in honour of H. W.organization in ancient Egypt more generally. References

Emery, Virginia L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Mud-Brick Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Publishers. Minault-Gout, Anne, and Patrick Deleuze 1992at Balat/Ain Asil (Minault-Gout and Deleuze 1992: 15 - 30,

Emery, Virginia L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Mr. William E. Mott, Acting Director Environmental Control Technology...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

brick and mill con- struction building of the light manufacturing type; foundation wails were in general made of stone, and all exterior walls and main interior walls...

146

Uncovering the Microbial Diversity of the Alberta Oil Sands through Metagenomics: A Stepping Stone for Enhanced Oil Recovery and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Uncovering the Microbial Diversity of the Alberta Oil Sands through Metagenomics: A Stepping Stone for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Environmental Solutions Writing Team: Julia Foght1 , Robert Holt2 Agency; 3 Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary; 4 Department of Geology

Voordouw, Gerrit

147

Microfluidics for block polymer shells (DMR 0819860) SEED :H.A. Stone, R.A. Register and Janine Nunes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Microfluidics for block polymer shells (DMR 0819860) SEED :H.A. Stone, R.A. Register and Janine. We utilized microfluidic methods to investigate the role of geometric structures, e.g. thin spherical, microfluidic devices with two consecutive flow-focusing junctions were used to generate air bubble

Petta, Jason

148

Injury experience in nonmetallic mineral mining (except stone and coal), 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) informational report reviews in detail the occupational injury and illness experience of nonmetallic mineral mining (except stone and coal) in the United States for 1989. Data reported by operators of mining establishments concerning work injuries are summarized by work location, accident classification, part of body injured, nature of injury, occupation, and principal type of mineral. Related information on employment, worktime, and operating activity also is presented. Data reported by independent contractors performing certain work at mining locations are depicted separately in this report. For ease of comparison with other metal and nonmetallic mineral mining industries and with coal mining, summary reference tabulations are included at the end of both the operator and the contractor sections of this report. 3 figs., 46 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Effects of Stone-Wales and vacancy defects in atomic-scale friction on defective graphite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphite is an excellent solid lubricant for surface coating, but its performance is significantly weakened by the vacancy or Stone-Wales (SW) defect. This study uses molecular dynamics simulations to explore the frictional behavior of a diamond tip sliding over a graphite which contains a single defect or stacked defects. Our results suggest that the friction on defective graphite shows a strong dependence on defect location and type. The 5-7-7-5 structure of SW defect results in an effectively negative slope of friction. For defective graphite containing a defect in the surface, adding a single vacancy in the interior layer will decrease the friction coefficients, while setting a SW defect in the interior layer may increase the friction coefficients. Our obtained results may provide useful information for understanding the atomic-scale friction properties of defective graphite.

Sun, Xiao-Yu [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Wu, RunNi; Xia, Re [Key Laboratory of Hubei Province for Water Jet Theory and New Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chu, Xi-Hua; Xu, Yuan-Jie, E-mail: yj-xu@whu.edu.cn [Department of Engineering Mechanics, School of Civil Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

150

#WomenInSTEM: Stepping Stones From One Career to Another  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Meet Cheryl Martin, Acting Director of the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Energy (ARPA-E) and the latest profile in the Energy Department's #WomenInSTEM video series. Cheryl looks at transformational projects to explore the uncharted territories of energy technology to generate options for entirely new paths to create, store and use energy. There are many challenges to overcome in the energy field, and it's important to have a diverse set of voices in STEM careers to meet these demands. Cheryl recommends that young women include all the skills they have - those gained at formal jobs as well as through volunteering or nonprofit organizations - when they take their next career step. These skills form the stepping stones that lead from one career to the next. And with a solid grounding in STEM, the opportunities are endless.

Martin, Cheryl

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

151

Supplemental Immobilization Cast Stone Technology Development and Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment facility will have the capacity to separate all of the tank wastes into the HLW and LAW fractions, and the HLW Vitrification Facility will have the capacity to vitrify all of the HLW. However, a second immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A number of alternatives, including Cast Stone—a cementitious waste form—are being considered to provide the additional LAW immobilization capacity.

Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Pierce, Eric M.; Cozzi, Alex; Chung, Chul-Woo; Swanberg, David J.

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Percutaneous Transhepatic Endoscopic Holmium Laser Lithotripsy for Intrahepatic and Choledochal Biliary Stones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report our approach for treating complicated biliary calculi by percutaneous transhepatic endoscopic biliary holmium laser lithotripsy (PTBL). Patients and Methods: Twenty-two symptomatic patients (11 men and 11 women, age range 51 to 88 years) with intrahepatic or common bile duct calculi underwent PTBL. Nine patients had undergone previous gastrectomy and small-bowel anastomosis, thus precluding endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. In the other 13 patients, stone removal attempts by ERCP failed due to failed access or very large calculi. We used a 7.5F flexible ureteroscope and a 200-{mu}m holmium laser fiber by way of a percutaneous transhepatic tract, with graded fluoroscopy, to fragment the calculi with direct vision. Balloon dilatation was added when a stricture was seen. The procedure was performed with the patient under general anaesthesia. A biliary drainage tube was left at the end of the procedure. Results: All stones were completely fragmented and flushed into the small bowel under direct vision except for one patient in whom the procedure was aborted. In 18 patients, 1 session sufficed, and in 3 patients, 2 sessions were needed. In 7 patients, balloon dilatation was performed for benign stricture after Whipple operation (n = 3), for choledochalenteric anastomosis (n = 3), and for recurrent cholangitis (n = 1). Adjunctive 'balloon push' (n = 4) and 'rendezvous' (n = 1) procedures were needed to completely clean the biliary tree. None of these patients needed surgery. Conclusion: Complicated or large biliary calculi can be treated successfully using PTBL. We suggest that this approach should become the first choice of treatment before laparoscopic or open surgery is considered.

Rimon, Uri, E-mail: rimonu@sheba.health.gov.il [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the 'Sackler' School of Medicine (Israel); Kleinmann, Nir [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Urology, Section of Endourology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the 'Sackler' School of Medicine (Israel); Bensaid, Paul; Golan, Gil; Garniek, Alexander; Khaitovich, Boris [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the 'Sackler' School of Medicine (Israel); Winkler, Harry [Tel-Aviv University, Department of Urology, Section of Endourology, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer, Affiliated to the 'Sackler' School of Medicine (Israel)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Materials Scientist  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Alternate Title(s):Materials Research Engineer; Metallurgical/Chemical Engineer; Product Development Manager;

154

FutureGen: Stepping-Stone to Sustainable Fossil-Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation will highlight the U.S. Department of Energy's FutureGen Initiative. The nearly $1 billion government-industry project is a stepping-stone toward future coal-fired power plants that will produce hydrogen and electricity with zero-emissions, including carbon dioxide. The 275-megawatt FutureGen plant will initiate operations around 2012 and employ advanced coal gasification technology integrated with combined cycle electricity generation, hydrogen production, and carbon capture and sequestration. The initiative is a response to a presidential directive to develop a hydrogen economy by drawing upon the best scientific research to address the issue of global climate change. The FutureGen plant will be based on cutting-edge power generation technology as well as advanced carbon capture and sequestration systems. The centerpiece of the project will be coal gasification technology that can eliminate common air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides and convert them to useable by-products. Gasification will convert coal into a highly enriched hydrogen gas, which can be burned much more cleanly than directly burning the coal itself. Alternatively, the hydrogen can be used in a fuel cell to produce ultra-clean electricity, or fed to a refinery to help upgrade petroleum products. Carbon sequestration will also be a key feature that will set the Futuregen plant apart from other electric power plant projects. The initial goal will be to capture 90 percent of the plant's carbon dioxide, but capture of nearly 100 percent may be possible with advanced technologies. Once captured, the carbon dioxide will be injected as a compressed fluid deep underground, perhaps into saline reservoirs. It could even be injected into oil or gas reservoirs, or into unmineable coal seams, to enhance petroleum or coalbed methane recovery. The ultimate goal for the FutureGen plant is to show how new technology can eliminate environmental concerns over the future use of coal--the most abundant fossil fuel in the United States with supplies projected to last 250 years. FutureGen's co-production of power and hydrogen will also serve as a stepping-stone to an environmentally sustainable energy future.

Zitney, S.E.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Sol-gel preservation of mankind`s cultural heritage in objects constructed of stone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monuments, buildings, and works of art constructed of carbonate-based stone (calcite, e.g., limestone and marble) are subject to deterioration resulting from the effects of environmental exposure, granular disintegration, freeze/thaw cycles, and salt recrystallization. This damage can potentially be reversed by the use of mineral-specific chemical passivants and consolidants that prevent hydrolytic attack and mechanical weakening. The treatment strategy combined the use of calcite coupling molecules to passivate the surfaces against new weathering with alkoxysilane strengthening or consolidating layers to arrest physical deterioration. The authors report on the effectiveness of passivating agents designed through a combined approach of modeling their adhesive and passivating properties using computations at the molecular scale and testing those properties using simulated leaching tests, microscopic evaluation, and characterization of mechanical strength. The experimental results indicate that there may be a threshold binding energy for the passivant above which the dissolution rate of calcite is actually enhanced. Passivant/consolidant treatments were identified which showed substantial reductions in the leach rate of calcite exposed to simulated acid rain conditions.

Brinker, C.J.; Ashley, C.S.; Sellinger, A.S. [and others

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

weapons material  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

2%2A en Office of Weapons Material Protection http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsnonproliferationprogramofficesinternationalmaterialprotectionandcooperation-1

157

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1992-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

158

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography. 4 figs.

Anderson, D.F.; Kross, B.J.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Scintillator material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved scintillator material comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. Cerium fluoride has been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to known scintillator materials such as thallium-doped sodium iodide, barium fluoride and bismuth germanate. As a result, cerium fluoride is favorably suited for use as a scintillator material in positron emission tomography.

Anderson, David F. (Batavia, IL); Kross, Brian J. (Aurora, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Critical Materials:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

162

Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

Keiser, J.R.

2001-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

Improved Materials for Use as Components in Kraft Black Liquor Recovery Boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was undertaken to evaluate current and improved materials and materials processing conditions for use as components in kraft black liquor recovery boilers and other unit processes. The main areas addressed were: (1) Improved Black Liquor Nozzles, (2) Weld Overlay of Composite Floor Tubes, and (3) Materials for Lime Kilns. Iron aluminide was evaluated as an alternate material for the nozzles used to inject an aqueous solution known as black liquor into recovery boilers as well for the uncooled lining in the ports used for the nozzles. Although iron aluminide is known to have much better sulfidation resistance in gases than low alloy and stainless steels, it did not perform adequately in the environment where it came into contact with molten carbonate, sulfide and sulfate salts. Weld overlaying carbon steel tubes with a layer of stainless weld metal was a proposed method of extending the life of recovery boiler floor tubes that have experienced considerable fireside corrosion. After exposure under service conditions, sections of weld overlaid floor tubes were removed from a boiler floor and examined metallographically. Examination results indicated satisfactory performance of the tubes. Refractory-lined lime kilns are a critical component of the recovery process in kraft pulp mills, and the integrity of the lining is essential to the successful operation of the kiln. A modeling study was performed to determine the cause of, and possible solutions for, the repeated loss of the refractory lining from the cooled end of a particular kiln. The evaluation showed that the temperature, the brick shape and the coefficient of friction between the bricks were the most important parameters influencing the behavior of the refractory lining.

Keiser, J.R.

2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

164

Cermet materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A self-cleaning porous cermet material, filter and system utilizing the same may be used in filtering particulate and gaseous pollutants from internal combustion engines having intermetallic and ceramic phases. The porous cermet filter may be made from a transition metal aluminide phase and an alumina phase. Filler materials may be added to increase the porosity or tailor the catalytic properties of the cermet material. Additionally, the cermet material may be reinforced with fibers or screens. The porous filter may also be electrically conductive so that a current may be passed therethrough to heat the filter during use. Further, a heating element may be incorporated into the porous cermet filter during manufacture. This heating element can be coated with a ceramic material to electrically insulate the heating element. An external heating element may also be provided to heat the cermet filter during use.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

165

Complex Materials  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

Cooper, Valentino

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

166

Complex Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Valentino Cooper uses some of the world's most powerful computing to understand how materials work at subatomic levels, studying breakthroughs such as piezoelectrics, which convert mechanical stress to electrical energy.

Cooper, Valentino

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

167

Material Symbols   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the relation between the material, conventional symbol structures that we encounter in the spoken and written word, and human thought? A common assumption, that structures a wide variety of otherwise competing ...

Clark, Andy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Materializing Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated and informed by perspectives on sustainability and design, this paper draws on a diverse body of scholarly works related to energy and materiality to articulate a perspective on energy-as-materiality and propose a design approach of materializing energy. Three critical themes are presented: the intangibility of energy, the undifferentiatedness of energy, and the availability of energy. Each theme is developed through combination of critical investigation and design exploration, including the development and deployment of several novel design artifacts: Energy Mementos and The Local Energy Lamp. A framework for interacting with energy-as-materiality is proposed involving collecting, keeping, sharing, and activating energy. A number of additional concepts are also introduced, such as energy attachment, energy engagement, energy attunement, local energy and energy meta-data. Our work contributes both a broader, more integrative design perspective on energy and materiality as well as a diversity of more specific concepts and artifacts that may be of service to designers and researchers of interactive systems concerned with sustainability and energy. Author Keywords Sustainability, energy, materiality, design, design theory

James Pierce; Eric Paulos

169

Hardfacing material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing a hard metallic material by forming a mixture containing at least 55% iron and at least one of boron, carbon, silicon and phosphorus. The mixture is formed into an alloy and cooled to form a metallic material having a hardness of greater than about 9.2 GPa. The invention includes a method of forming a wire by combining a metal strip and a powder. The metal strip and the powder are rolled to form a wire containing at least 55% iron and from two to seven additional elements including at least one of C, Si and B. The invention also includes a method of forming a hardened surface on a substrate by processing a solid mass to form a powder, applying the powder to a surface to form a layer containing metallic glass, and converting the glass to a crystalline material having a nanocrystalline grain size.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Iona, ID)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

Refractory Materials based on Magnesia-Alumina Spinel for Improved Performance in Coal Gasification Environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of a larger project to develop novel refractory systems and techniques to reduce energy consumption of refractory lined vessels, a team composed of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, refractory manufacturer Minteq International, Inc., and academic partner Missouri University of Science and Technology have developed new refractory materials and coating systems specifically for application in coal gasification environments. Materials were developed under this U.S. DOE funded project to address the need for innovative refractory compositions by developing MgO-Al2O3 spinel gunnable refractory compositions utilizing new aggregate materials, bond systems, protective coatings, and phase formation techniques. Work was conducted to develop and deploy these new materials and to develop and apply low cost coatings using a colloidal approach for protection against attack of the refractory brick by the serviced environment. Additionally, a light-weight back-up refractory system was developed to help offset the high thermal conductivity inherent in spinel materials. This paper discusses the efforts involved in the development of these materials, along with the laboratory testing and evaluation of these materials leading to relevant results achieved toward the reduction of chemical reactions and mechanical degradation by the service environment though compositional and processing modifications.

Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Armstrong, Beth L [ORNL; Rodrigues-Schroer, Angela [Minteq International, Inc.; Colavito, [Minteq International, Inc.; Smith, Jeffrey D [ORNL; O'Hara, Kelley [University of Missouri, Rolla

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Mick Jagger Explains High Crude Oil Prices How can Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones help explain the current high crude oil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mick Jagger Explains High Crude Oil Prices How can Mick Jagger of The Rolling Stones help explain the current high crude oil price? It does not relate to Mick' short stint at the London School of Economics, the oil industry operates on the same principle, at least in the short run. The industry relies on proven

Ahmad, Sajjad

172

Nox2 redox signaling maintains essential cell populations in the Bryan C Dickinson1, Joseph Peltier2, Daniel Stone2, David V Schaffer2, and Christopher J  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nox2 redox signaling maintains essential cell populations in the brain Bryan C Dickinson1, Joseph Peltier2, Daniel Stone2, David V Schaffer2, and Christopher J Chang1,3 1Department of Chemistry indicator for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), we show that adult hippocampal stem/progenitor cells (AHPs) generate

Schaffer, David V.

173

Materials Science & Tech Division | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Science and Technology SHARE Materials Science and Technology Division The Materials Science and Technology Division is unique within the Department of Energy (DOE)...

174

Effects of boron-nitride substrates on Stone-Wales defect formation in graphene: An ab initio molecular dynamics study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the effects of a boron nitride (BN) substrate on Stone-Wales (SW) defect formation and recovery in graphene. It is found that SW defects can be created by an off-plane recoil atom that interacts with the BN substrate. A mechanism with complete bond breakage for formation of SW defects in suspended graphene is also revealed for recoils at large displacement angles. In addition, further irradiation can result in recovery of the SW defects through a bond rotation mechanism in both graphene and graphene/BN, and the substrate has little effect on the recovery process. This study indicates that the BN substrate enhances the irradiation resistance of graphene.

Jin, K.; Xiao, H. Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Zhang, Y. [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Weber, W. J., E-mail: wjweber@utk.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fulvio_Brick and Mortar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr Flickr Editor's note:Computing |Fuels for the final5 (U) April

176

Casting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A foam material comprises a liquid polymer and a liquid isocyanate which is mixed to make a solution that is poured, injected or otherwise deposited into a corresponding mold. A reaction from the mixture of the liquid polymer and liquid isocyanate inside the mold forms a thermally collapsible foam structure having a shape that corresponds to the inside surface configuration of the mold and a skin that is continuous and unbroken. Once the reaction is complete, the foam pattern is removed from the mold and may be used as a pattern in any number of conventional casting processes.

Chaudhry, Anil R. (Xenia, OH); Dzugan, Robert (Cincinnati, OH); Harrington, Richard M. (Cincinnati, OH); Neece, Faurice D. (Lyndurst, OH); Singh, Nipendra P. (Pepper Pike, OH)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reference Material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST 800-53Reference Materials There are a variety of

178

Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90 4.86(NHMFL)X-RayMaterials

179

Photovoltaic Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the current project was to help make the US solar industry a world leader in the manufacture of thin film photovoltaics. The overall approach was to leverage ORNL’s unique characterization and processing technologies to gain a better understanding of the fundamental challenges for solar cell processing and apply that knowledge to targeted projects with industry members. ORNL has the capabilities in place and the expertise required to understand how basic material properties including defects, impurities, and grain boundaries affect the solar cell performance. ORNL also has unique processing capabilities to optimize the manufacturing process for fabrication of high efficiency and low cost solar cells. ORNL recently established the Center for Advanced Thin-film Systems (CATS), which contains a suite of optical and electrical characterization equipment specifically focused on solar cell research. Under this project, ORNL made these facilities available to industrial partners who were interested in pursuing collaborative research toward the improvement of their product or manufacturing process. Four specific projects were pursued with industrial partners: Global Solar Energy is a solar industry leader in full scale production manufacturing highly-efficient Copper Indium Gallium diSelenide (CIGS) thin film solar material, cells and products. ORNL worked with GSE to develop a scalable, non-vacuum, solution technique to deposit amorphous or nanocrystalline conducting barrier layers on untextured stainless steel substrates for fabricating high efficiency flexible CIGS PV. Ferro Corporation’s Electronic, Color and Glass Materials (“ECGM”) business unit is currently the world’s largest supplier of metallic contact materials in the crystalline solar cell marketplace. Ferro’s ECGM business unit has been the world's leading supplier of thick film metal pastes to the crystalline silicon PV industry for more than 30 years, and has had operational cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These tools were combined with others to study the effect of defects on the performance of crystalline silicon and

Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Critical Materials Institute  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

Alex King

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL Record of Property Transferred from ______ ___________________________________ 2. DEAN (If Applies) ______ ___________________________________ 5. UNIVERSITY DIRECTOR OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ ___________________________________ 3. HOSPITAL DIRECTOR (If Applies) ______ IF YOU NEED

Oliver, Douglas L.

182

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

183

Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

184

Functional Materials for Energy | Advanced Materials | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Fuel Cells Thermoelectrics Separations Materials Catalysis Sensor Materials Polymers and Composites Carbon Fiber Related Research Chemistry and Physics at...

185

Materials Project: A Materials Genome Approach  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Technological innovation - faster computers, more efficient solar cells, more compact energy storage - is often enabled by materials advances. Yet, it takes an average of 18 years to move new materials discoveries from lab to market. This is largely because materials designers operate with very little information and must painstakingly tweak new materials in the lab. Computational materials science is now powerful enough that it can predict many properties of materials before those materials are ever synthesized in the lab. By scaling materials computations over supercomputing clusters, this project has computed some properties of over 80,000 materials and screened 25,000 of these for Li-ion batteries. The computations predicted several new battery materials which were made and tested in the lab and are now being patented. By computing properties of all known materials, the Materials Project aims to remove guesswork from materials design in a variety of applications. Experimental research can be targeted to the most promising compounds from computational data sets. Researchers will be able to data-mine scientific trends in materials properties. By providing materials researchers with the information they need to design better, the Materials Project aims to accelerate innovation in materials research.[copied from http://materialsproject.org/about] You will be asked to register to be granted free, full access.

Ceder, Gerbrand (MIT); Persson, Kristin (LBNL)

186

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT -INVENTORY CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATERIALS MANAGEMENT MATERIALS MANAGEMENT - INVENTORY CONTROL NOTICE OF DESIGNATED DEPARTMENTAL OF MATERIALS MANAGEMENT ______ FURTHER INSTRUCTIONS 1. Include a copy of any relevant documents. 2. Item MATERIALS COORDINATOR ­ IC-8 Mail, Fax or PDF the entire package to: MC 2010 Fax: 679-4240 REFERENCE # DMC

Oliver, Douglas L.

187

Method for forming materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material-forming tool and a method for forming a material are described including a shank portion; a shoulder portion that releasably engages the shank portion; a pin that releasably engages the shoulder portion, wherein the pin defines a passageway; and a source of a material coupled in material flowing relation relative to the pin and wherein the material-forming tool is utilized in methodology that includes providing a first material; providing a second material, and placing the second material into contact with the first material; and locally plastically deforming the first material with the material-forming tool so as mix the first material and second material together to form a resulting material having characteristics different from the respective first and second materials.

Tolle, Charles R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Clark, Denis E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Intensities for the Four Largest Shocks of the New Madrid Earthquake Sequence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or are heard to rustle. Weak plaster and masonry D cracked.at roof line. Fall of plaster, loose bricks, stones, tiles,limbs or fruit; cracking of plaster/stucco; some damage to

Agnew, Duncan C

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

IN-PORE TENSILE STRESS BY DRYING-INDUCED CAPILLARY BRIDGES INSIDE POROUS MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such systems are the building stones when extracted from natural quarries, and exposed to drying-wetting cycles

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

190

Transporting particulate material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

Aldred, Derek Leslie (North Hollywood, CA); Rader, Jeffrey A. (North Hollywood, CA); Saunders, Timothy W. (North Hollywood, CA)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

191

Baltimorethan you expect. f Baltimore's many nicknames,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performing at JHU's Chinese New Year celebration; Honfest; painted window screen of Patterson Park. I think that's why Baltimore is such a good place to live." -- John Waters, baltimore film director imitation of stone that covers brick roW homes throughout baltimore, as "the polyester of brick." #12;film

Niebur, Ernst

192

Scaling hard vertical surfaces with compliant microspine arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

has been developed that allows a robot to scale concrete, stucco, brick and masonry walls without vertical surfaces such as windows and interior walls. None of these approaches is suitable for porous and typically dusty exterior surfaces such as brick, concrete, stucco or stone. Other robots employ hand

Provancher, William

193

Comparison of glass surfaces as a countertop material to existing surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gleen Glass, a small production glass company that creates countertops, was selected for the Technology Assistance Program through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Gleen Glass was seeking material property analysis comparing glass as a countertop material to current surfaces (i.e. marble, granite and engineered stone). With samples provided from Gleen Glass, testing was done on granite, marble, and 3 different glass surfaces ('Journey,' 'Pebble,' and 'Gleen'). Results showed the glass surfaces have a lower density, lower water absorption, and are stronger in compressive and flexural tests as compared to granite and marble. Thermal shock tests showed the glass failed when objects with a high thermal mass are placed directly on them, whereas marble and granite did not fracture under these conditions.

Turo, Laura A.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nanostructured magnetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

Chan, Keith T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

MATERIALS TRANSFER AGREEMENT  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MTAXX-XXX 1 MATERIAL TRANSFER AGREEMENT for Manufacturing Demonstration Facility and Carbon Fiber Technology Facility In order for the RECIPIENT to obtain materials, the RECIPIENT...

196

battery materials | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

battery materials battery materials Leads No leads are available at this time. Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. Abstract: The...

197

Energy Materials & Processes | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in catalysts and energy materials needed to design new materials and systems for sustainable energy applications. By facilitating the development and rapid dissemination...

198

Quarrying and Mining (Stone)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and quarries in ancient Egypt. London: British Museum Press.Excavation Memoir 67. London: Egypt Exploration Society.Credits Figure 1. Map of Egypt showing ancient quarries and

Bloxam, Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industrie lithique In ancient Egypt, flint or chert was usedZooarchaeology in the Fayum, Egypt (ca. 8200-5000 bp).Between farmers and craftsmen. In Egypt at its origins 2:

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Quarrying and Mining (Stone)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological Survey of Norway Special Publication 12.Geological Survey of Norway. American Geological InstituteGeological Survey of Norway. (INCO-CT-2005- 015416-Project

Bloxam, Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

THE BANDEIRANTES STONES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hoards of mosquitoes and climate were almost unbearable for the bandeirantes ..... but none had witnessed it until that moment and none would soon forget.

202

Stone Tool Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sites in the vicinity of Wadi Hof, Helwan. ArchäologischeAcademic Press. 1986 The Wadi Kubbaniya skeleton: A Late1986- The prehistory of Wadi Kubbaniya. (3 volumes: 1986 -

Hikade, Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Quarrying and Mining (Stone)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the amethyst quarries at Wadi el Hudi. Cairo: Governmentinscriptions rupestres du Wadi Hammamat. Paris: Imprimeriemining inscriptions of Wadi el-Hudi. Part I and II (1980 -

Bloxam, Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Coated ceramic breeder materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A breeder material for use in a breeder blanket of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The breeder material comprises a core material of lithium containing ceramic particles which has been coated with a neutron multiplier such as Be or BeO, which coating has a higher thermal conductivity than the core material.

Tam, Shiu-Wing (Downers Grove, IL); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNEX Q HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE #12;ANNEX Q - HAZARDOUS MATERIALS EMERGENCY RESPONSE 03/10/2014 v.2.0 Page Q-1 PROMULGATION STATEMENT Annex Q: Hazardous Materials Emergency Response, and contents within, is a guide to how the University conducts a response specific to a hazardous materials

206

UNDERGRADUATE Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK Materials Science & Engineering 2013 2014 #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

Tipple, Brett

207

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science & Engineering The University of Utah 2014-15 Undergraduate Handbook #12;STUDYING FOR A MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING DEGREE Materials Science and Engineering inter-twines numerous disciplines that still gives the students the opportunity to study science while earning an engineering degree. Materials

Simons, Jack

208

A Materials Facilities Initiative -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

209

Computational Chemical Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Thermal barrier coatings, wear resistance coatings, radiation resistant materials · Materials for opticalHome Computational Chemical and Materials Engineering Tahir Cagin Chemical Engineering Department to understand behavior and properties of materials as a function of ­ Chemical constitution ­ Composition

210

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of National Security Interest Assessment Plan CRAD, Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...

211

Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Supporting Online Material Materials and Methods (15) For all possible earthquake pairs. The parameters chosen for window length, filter bandpass, negative sidelobe identification, and cross-correlation threshold are appropriate for high-frequency earthquakes. In order to remove false positives or poor data

Wolfe, Cecily J.

212

SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SUPPORTING ONLINE MATERIAL Materials and Methods Two adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta with a head-holding device (S1), scleral search coil for monitoring eye position (S2) and a recording chamber monkeys remain actively engaged in experiments, so precise histological identification of recording sites

Newsome, William

213

Puncture detecting barrier materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for continuous real-time monitoring of the integrity of protective barrier materials, particularly protective barriers against toxic, radioactive and biologically hazardous materials has been developed. Conductivity, resistivity or capacitance between conductive layers in the multilayer protective materials is measured by using leads connected to electrically conductive layers in the protective barrier material. The measured conductivity, resistivity or capacitance significantly changes upon a physical breach of the protective barrier material. 4 figs.

Hermes, R.E.; Ramsey, D.R.; Stampfer, J.F.; Macdonald, J.M.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Joining of dissimilar materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of joining dissimilar materials having different ductility, involves two principal steps: Decoration of the more ductile material's surface with particles of a less ductile material to produce a composite; and, sinter-bonding the composite produced to a joining member of a less ductile material. The joining method is suitable for joining dissimilar materials that are chemically inert towards each other (e.g., metal and ceramic), while resulting in a strong bond with a sharp interface between the two materials. The joining materials may differ greatly in form or particle size. The method is applicable to various types of materials including ceramic, metal, glass, glass-ceramic, polymer, cermet, semiconductor, etc., and the materials can be in various geometrical forms, such as powders, fibers, or bulk bodies (foil, wire, plate, etc.). Composites and devices with a decorated/sintered interface are also provided.

Tucker, Michael C; Lau, Grace Y; Jacobson, Craig P

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

215

Materials for breeding blankets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several candidate concepts for tritium breeding blankets that make use of a number of special materials. These materials can be classified as Primary Blanket Materials, which have the greatest influence in determining the overall design and performance, and Secondary Blanket Materials, which have key functions in the operation of the blanket but are less important in establishing the overall design and performance. The issues associated with the blanket materials are specified and several examples of materials performance are given. Critical data needs are identified.

Mattas, R.F.; Billone, M.C.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Sediment diagenesis, fossil preservation, and depositional environment in the Stone City/Lower Cook Mountain transgression (Middle Eocene, southeast Texas): a test of chemical taphofacies in the rock record  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sediments, and there is a great need to test the taphofacies concept on the rock record. The taphofacies concept has been tested in the Stone City/Cook Mountain formations, middle Eocene, in Southeast Texas. The strata consist of brown shales, pelleted green...

Thornton, Charles Anthony

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Nanocomposites as thermoelectric materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric materials have attractive applications in electric power generation and solid-state cooling. The performance of a thermoelectric device depends on the dimensionless figure of merit (ZT) of the material, ...

Hao, Qing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Factors of material consumption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historic consumption trends for materials have been studied by many researchers, and, in order to identify the main drivers of consumption, special attention has been given to material intensity, which is the consumption ...

Silva Díaz, Pamela Cristina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Earth-Abundant Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE funds research into Earth-abundant materials for thin-film solar applications in response to the issue of materials scarcity surrounding other photovoltaic (PV) technologies. Below are a list...

220

Nanostructured composite reinforced material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Institute for Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Institute for Material Science Who we are and what we do 2:23 Institute for Materials Science: Alexander V. Balatsky IMS is an interdisciplinary research and educational center...

222

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Forensics team in the Polymers and Coatings Group, MST-7. He graduated from the University of Toledo, aerogels, carbon fiber composites, damaged materials, and low density materials examining defects

223

Geopolymer Sealing Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Develop and characterize field-applicable geopolymer temporary sealing materials in the laboratory and to transfer this developed material technology to geothermal drilling service companies as collaborators for field validation tests.

224

Instructions and Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following are 2012 Program Peer Review Meeting instructions, materials and resource links for presenters and reviewers.

225

Advanced neutron absorber materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron absorbing material and method utilizing rare earth elements such as gadolinium, europium and samarium to form metallic glasses and/or noble base nano/microcrystalline materials, the neutron absorbing material having a combination of superior neutron capture cross sections coupled with enhanced resistance to corrosion, oxidation and leaching.

Branagan, Daniel J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smolik, Galen R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Magnetocaloric Materials Stinus Jeppesen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetocaloric Materials Stinus Jeppesen Risø-PhD-43(EN) Risø National Laboratory for Sustainable Jeppesen Title: Magnetocaloric Materials Division: Fuel Cells and Solid State Chemistry Division Risø.D. degree at The University of Copenhagen Abstract: New and improved magnetocaloric materials are one

227

Radioactive Materials License Commitments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radioactive Materials License Commitments for The University of Texas at Austin May 2009 July 2009 in the use of radioactive materials. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means

228

Hillside C-type Renovation Issues and Remedies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concrete and masonry Overhang Outside Inside Tiles Outer Alu frame Drill drain holes here throughout length Exterior wall bricks concrete and masonry Stone slab does not cover sill width Drain channel Outer Alu with new Marbonite ­ Concealing pipes Stone up to guiderail Porous cracked plaster outside #12;To Deputy

California at Berkeley, University of

229

Copper, iron and stone sculpture placed in front of the Department. The artist is Chr. Dahlgaard Larsen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Dahlgaard Larsen #12;&*£>·- fc.-S^. Metallurgy Department Annual Progress Report for 1989 Edited by A of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells 31 4.3. Advanced Technical Ceramics 33 4.4. Powder Metallurgical Processing 33 4 in Nuclear Fuel Projects 28 3.4. Engineering Ceramics 28 4. Materials Technology - Fabrication and Processing

230

Preservation of limestone material culture with siloxanes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The dark area represents the siloxane penetration depth in the stone. 62 Figure 4. 3. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrograms of three different distances away from the penetration depth. All three measurements were taken at a magnification of X120, with a...

Miller, Ann Elizabeth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Defective graphene as promising anode material for Na-ion battery and Ca-ion battery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have investigated adsorption of Na and Ca on graphene with divacancy (DV) and Stone-Wales (SW) defect. Our results show that adsorption is not possible on pristine graphene. However, their adsorption on defective sheet is energetically favorable. The enhanced adsorption can be attributed to the increased charge transfer between adatoms and underlying defective sheet. With the increase in defect density until certain possible limit, maximum percentage of adsorption also increases giving higher battery capacity. For maximum possible DV defect, we can achieve maximum capacity of 1459 mAh/g for Na-ion batteries (NIBs) and 2900 mAh/g for Ca-ion batteries (CIBs). For graphene full of SW defect, we find the maximum capacity of NIBs and CIBs is around 1071 mAh/g and 2142 mAh/g respectively. Our results will help create better anode materials with much higher capacity and better cycling performance for NIBs and CIBs.

Datta, Dibakar; Shenoy, Vivek B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemi...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale...

233

Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material Supplemental Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Montani, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 1 Supplemental Material A. Entropy, Kohn, Smith and Schultz (2006), Supplemental Material 2 occupied, it is ambiguous whether

Smith, Matthew A.

234

SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL Auxiliary Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

run [Ammann et al., 2007; hereinafter CCSM] and the GKSS ECHO-g ERIK2 run [González-Rouco et al., 2006; hereinafter ECHO-g]. The annual means of the modeled temperature fields are interpolated to 5° latitude;SMERDON ET AL.: AUXILIARY MATERIAL 2 ECHO-g simulations, respectively. The above conventions

Smerdon, Jason E.

235

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 392: Spill Sites and Construction Materials, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Closure Report documents the closure activities that were conducted to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 392--Spill Sites and Construction Materials located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 392 is listed on in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 5 and 6 of the NTS: CAS 05-17-02 Construction Materials/Lead Bricks; CAS 06-17-03 Cement Mud Pit; CAS 06-1 9-01 Cable Pile; Powder Piles (3); CAS 06-44-02 Paint Spill; CAS 06-44-03 Plaster Spill; CAS 06-44-04 Cutting Fluid Discharge Ditch. Closure activities were performed in two phases. Phase 1 activities consisted of collecting waste characterization samples of soil and material present on-site, and where appropriate, performing radiological screening of debris at the six CASs. Results were used to determine how waste generated during closure activities would be handled and disposed of, i.e., as nonhazardous sanitary or hazardous waste, etc. Phase 2 activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or soil, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each CAS was clean closed by visual inspection and/or by the collecting soil verification samples for laboratory analysis. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix A. Copies of the Sectored Housekeeping Site Closure Verification Form for each of the six CASs are included in Appendix 8. Appendix C contains a copy of the Bechtel Nevada (BN) On-site Waste Transport Manifest for the hazardous waste generated during closure of CAS 06-44-02.

R. B. Jackson

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Composite of refractory material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

Holcombe, C.E.; Morrow, M.S.

1994-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Radiation Safety Training Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The following Handbooks and Standard provide recommended hazard specific training material for radiological workers at DOE facilities and for various activities.

239

Materials Research Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

generation and detection, this approach naturally lends itself to in situ monitoring of material property evolution. The temporal laser pulse length and the corresponding...

240

Webinar: Materials Genome Initative  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Audio recording and text version of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar titled "Materials Genome Initiative," originally presented on December 2, 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Composite of refractory material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A composite refractory material composition comprises a boron carbide matrix and minor constituents of yttrium-boron-oxygen-carbon phases uniformly distributed throughout the boron carbide matrix.

Holcombe, Cressie E. (Knoxville, TN); Morrow, Marvin S. (Kingston, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Geopolymer Sealing Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geopolymer Sealing Materials PI : Dr. Tomas Butcher Presenter: Dr. Toshi Sugama Brookhaven National Laboratory May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary...

243

Materials for MA 182.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials for MA 182. INSTRUCTOR: Richard Penney. Office: MATH 822: Telephone: 494-1968: e-mail: rcp@math.purdue.edu: Office Hours: Mon, Tu, Fri,

244

Layered Cathode Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Layered Cathode Materials presented by Michael Thackeray Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne Annual Merit Review DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Washington, D.C....

245

EMSL - battery materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

battery-materials en Modeling Interfacial Glass-Water Reactions: Recent Advances and Current Limitations. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmodeling-interfacial-glass-wa...

246

Thermoelectric materials having porosity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermoelectric material and a method of making a thermoelectric material are provided. In certain embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises at least 10 volume percent porosity. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material has a zT greater than about 1.2 at a temperature of about 375 K. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a topological thermoelectric material. In some embodiments, the thermoelectric material comprises a general composition of (Bi.sub.1-xSb.sub.x).sub.u(Te.sub.1-ySe.sub.y).sub.w, wherein 0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1, 0.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.1, 1.8.ltoreq.u.ltoreq.2.2, 2.8.ltoreq.w.ltoreq.3.2. In further embodiments, the thermoelectric material includes a compound having at least one group IV element and at least one group VI element. In certain embodiments, the method includes providing a powder comprising a thermoelectric composition, pressing the powder, and sintering the powder to form the thermoelectric material.

Heremans, Joseph P.; Jaworski, Christopher M.; Jovovic, Vladimir; Harris, Fred

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 5660.1B.

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

248

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes standard transportation practices for Departmental programs to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials including radioactive waste. Does not cancel other directives.

2002-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

249

Hazardous Material Security (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All facilities processing, storing, managing, or transporting hazardous materials must be evaluated every five years for security issues. A report must be submitted to the Department of the...

250

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Structures and Materials, 3989:531- 538. Biggerstaff,2002. “Electroviscoelastic Materials As Active Dampers”,Smart Structures and Materials, 4695:345-350. Biggerstaff,

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Deformation Mechanisms in Nanocrystalline Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A 47. F.A.12. METALLURGICAL AND MATERIALS TRANSACTIONS A VOLUME 41A,of Slip: Progress in Materials Science, Pergamon Press,

Mohamed, Farghalli A.; Yang, Heather

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Materials SHARE Advanced Materials ORNL has the nation's most comprehensive materials research program and is a world leader in research that supports the development of...

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - average fuel enrichment Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PRIMARY SIZE REDUCTION Stones Inert Soil Enricher COARSE FLUFF SORTING Large stone, Tyres etc. HOT AIR... SIZE REDUCTION 12;RDF Material BalanceRDF Material Balance A...

254

MULTISCALE PHENOMENA IN MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project developed and supported a technology base in nonequilibrium phenomena underpinning fundamental issues in condensed matter and materials science, and applied this technology to selected problems. In this way the increasingly sophisticated synthesis and characterization available for classes of complex electronic and structural materials provided a testbed for nonlinear science, while nonlinear and nonequilibrium techniques helped advance our understanding of the scientific principles underlying the control of material microstructure, their evolution, fundamental to macroscopic functionalities. The project focused on overlapping areas of emerging thrusts and programs in the Los Alamos materials community for which nonlinear and nonequilibrium approaches will have decisive roles and where productive teamwork among elements of modeling, simulations, synthesis, characterization and applications could be anticipated--particularly multiscale and nonequilibrium phenomena, and complex matter in and between fields of soft, hard and biomimetic materials. Principal topics were: (i) Complex organic and inorganic electronic materials, including hard, soft and biomimetic materials, self-assembly processes and photophysics; (ii) Microstructure and evolution in multiscale and hierarchical materials, including dynamic fracture and friction, dislocation and large-scale deformation, metastability, and inhomogeneity; and (iii) Equilibrium and nonequilibrium phases and phase transformations, emphasizing competing interactions, frustration, landscapes, glassy and stochastic dynamics, and energy focusing.

A. BISHOP

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Impacted material placement plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Impacted material placement plans (IMPP) are documents identifying the essential elements in placing remediation wastes into disposal facilities. Remediation wastes or impacted material(s) are those components used in the construction of the disposal facility exclusive of the liners and caps. The components might include soils, concrete, rubble, debris, and other regulatory approved materials. The IMPP provides the details necessary for interested parties to understand the management and construction practices at the disposal facility. The IMPP should identify the regulatory requirements from applicable DOE Orders, the ROD(s) (where a part of a CERCLA remedy), closure plans, or any other relevant agreements or regulations. Also, how the impacted material will be tracked should be described. Finally, detailed descriptions of what will be placed and how it will be placed should be included. The placement of impacted material into approved on-site disposal facilities (OSDF) is an integral part of gaining regulatory approval. To obtain this approval, a detailed plan (Impacted Material Placement Plan [IMPP]) was developed for the Fernald OSDF. The IMPP provides detailed information for the DOE, site generators, the stakeholders, regulatory community, and the construction subcontractor placing various types of impacted material within the disposal facility.

Hickey, M.J.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nanocrystalline heterojunction materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

Elder, Scott H.; Su, Yali; Gao, Yufei; Heald, Steve M.

2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

Materials for Information Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on thin-film and nano-scale materials. The papers include content ranging from materials-related aspects for these fascinating and useful mate- rials. /jr Adv. Eng. Mater. 2009, 11, Issue 4 Colloidal Hollow Spheres Colloidal hollow spheres of conduct- ing polymers such as polypyrrole (PPy) or polyaniline (PAni) are produced

Tang, Ben Zhong

258

Nanocrystalline Heterojunction Materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Mesoporous nanocrystalline titanium dioxide heterojunction materials and methods of making the same are disclosed. In one disclosed embodiment, materials comprising a core of titanium dioxide and a shell of a molybdenum oxide exhibit a decrease in their photoadsorption energy as the size of the titanium dioxide core decreases.

Elder, Scott H. (Portland, OR); Su, Yali (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Blue Bell, PA); Heald, Steve M. (Downers Grove, IL)

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

259

Materials Science and Technology Mechanical and Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Science and Technology Metallurgy Mechanical and Materials Engineering Materials Science with Energy Engineering Materials Science with Business Management Course Prospectus School of Metallurgy for Metallurgy and Materials What difference will you make? #12;2 School of Metallurgy and Materials Contents

Birmingham, University of

260

Materials of Gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to accumulate and establish a database of construction materials, coatings, refractory liners, and transitional materials that are appropriate for the hardware and scale-up facilities for atmospheric biomass and coal gasification processes. Cost, fabricability, survivability, contamination, modes of corrosion, failure modes, operational temperatures, strength, and compatibility are all areas of materials science for which relevant data would be appropriate. The goal will be an established expertise of materials for the fossil energy area within WRI. This would be an effort to narrow down the overwhelming array of materials information sources to the relevant set which provides current and accurate data for materials selection for fossil fuels processing plant. A significant amount of reference material on materials has been located, examined and compiled. The report that describes these resources is well under way. The reference material is in many forms including texts, periodicals, websites, software and expert systems. The most important part of the labor is to refine the vast array of available resources to information appropriate in content, size and reliability for the tasks conducted by WRI and its clients within the energy field. A significant has been made to collate and capture the best and most up to date references. The resources of the University of Wyoming have been used extensively as a local and assessable location of information. As such, the distribution of materials within the UW library has been added as a portion of the growing document. Literature from recent journals has been combed for all pertinent references to high temperature energy based applications. Several software packages have been examined for relevance and usefulness towards applications in coal gasification and coal fired plant. Collation of the many located resources has been ongoing. Some web-based resources have been examined.

None

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Course outline School of Metallurgy and Materials Materials us? Dr Alessandro Mottura Undergraduate Admissions Tutor for Metallurgy and Materials What difference will you make? #12;Degrees in Metallurgy and Materials Understanding the properties of new materials

Birmingham, University of

262

Electrically conductive composite material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

263

Electrically conductive composite material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistent pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like. 2 figs.

Clough, R.L.; Sylwester, A.P.

1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Electrically conductive composite material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive composite material is disclosed which comprises a conductive open-celled, low density, microcellular carbon foam filled with a non-conductive polymer or resin. The composite material is prepared in a two-step process consisting of first preparing the microcellular carbon foam from a carbonizable polymer or copolymer using a phase separation process, then filling the carbon foam with the desired non-conductive polymer or resin. The electrically conductive composites of the present invention has a uniform and consistant pattern of filler distribution, and as a result is superior over prior art materials when used in battery components, electrodes, and the like.

Clough, Roger L. (Albuquerque, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Critical Materials Hub  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

266

ATS materials/manufacturing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Materials/Manufacturing Technology subelement is a part of the base technology portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program. The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from national laboratories and universities. The projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. Work is currently ongoing on thermal barrier coatings (TBCs), the scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technologies, materials characterization, and technology information exchange. This paper presents highlights of the activities during the past year. 12 refs., 24 figs., 4 tabs.

Karnitz, M.A.; Wright, I.G.; Ferber, M.K. [and others

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Fissile material detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A detector for fissile materials which provides for integrity monitoring of fissile materials and can be used for nondestructive assay to confirm the presence of a stable content of fissile material in items. The detector has a sample cavity large enough to enable assay of large items of arbitrary configuration, utilizes neutron sources fabricated in spatially extended shapes mounted on the endcaps of the sample cavity, incorporates a thermal neutron filter insert with reflector properties, and the electronics module includes a neutron multiplicity coincidence counter.

Ivanov, Alexander I. (Dubna, RU); Lushchikov, Vladislav I. (Dubna, RU); Shabalin, Eugeny P. (Dubna, RU); Maznyy, Nikita G. (Dubna, RU); Khvastunov, Michael M. (Dubna, RU); Rowland, Mark (Alamo, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

RavenBrick LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to: navigation, search RAPIDColoradosourceRaus Power Ltd Jump to: navigation,Raven

269

Materials at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exploring the physics, chemistry, and metallurgy of materials has been a primary focus of Los Alamos National Laboratory since its inception. In the early 1940s, very little was known or understood about plutonium, uranium, or their alloys. In addition, several new ionic, polymeric, and energetic materials with unique properties were needed in the development of nuclear weapons. As the Laboratory has evolved, and as missions in threat reduction, defense, energy, and meeting other emerging national challenges have been added, the role of materials science has expanded with the need for continued improvement in our understanding of the structure and properties of materials and in our ability to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. Materials science and engineering continues to be central to this Laboratory's success, and the materials capability truly spans the entire laboratory - touching upon numerous divisions and directorates and estimated to include >1/3 of the lab's technical staff. In 2006, Los Alamos and LANS LLC began to redefine our future, building upon the laboratory's established strengths and promoted by strongly interdependent science, technology and engineering capabilities. Eight Grand Challenges for Science were set forth as a technical framework for bridging across capabilities. Two of these grand challenges, Fundamental Understanding of Materials and Superconductivity and Actinide Science. were clearly materials-centric and were led out of our organizations. The complexity of these scientific thrusts was fleshed out through workshops involving cross-disciplinary teams. These teams refined the grand challenge concepts into actionable descriptions to be used as guidance for decisions like our LDRD strategic investment strategies and as the organizing basis for our external review process. In 2008, the Laboratory published 'Building the Future of Los Alamos. The Premier National Security Science Laboratory,' LA-UR-08-1541. This document introduced three strategic thrusts that crosscut the Grand Challenges and define future laboratory directions and facilities: (1) Information Science and Technology enabl ing integrative and predictive science; (2) Experimental science focused on materials for the future; and (3) Fundamental forensic science for nuclear, biological, and chemical threats. The next step for the Materials Capability was to develop a strategic plan for the second thrust, Materials for the Future. within the context of a capabilities-based Laboratory. This work has involved extending our 2006-2007 Grand Challenge workshops, integrating materials fundamental challenges into the MaRIE definition, and capitalizing on the emerging materials-centric national security missions. Strategic planning workshops with broad leadership and staff participation continued to hone our scientific directions and reinforce our strength through interdependence. By the Fall of 2008, these workshops promoted our primary strength as the delivery of Predictive Performance in applications where Extreme Environments dominate and where the discovery of Emergent Phenomena is a critical. These planning efforts were put into action through the development of our FY10 LDRD Strategic Investment Plan where the Materials Category was defined to incorporate three central thrusts: Prediction and Control of Performance, Extreme Environments and Emergent Phenomena. As with all strategic planning, much of the benefit is in the dialogue and cross-fertilization of ideas that occurs during the process. By winter of 2008/09, there was much agreement on the evolving focus for the Materials Strategy, but there was some lingering doubt over Prediction and Control of Performance as one of the three central thrusts, because it overarches all we do and is, truly, the end goal for materials science and engineering. Therefore, we elevated this thrust within the overarching vision/mission and introduce the concept of Defects and Interfaces as a central thrust that had previously been implied but not clearly articulated.

Taylor, Antoinette J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Materials Science & Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Aucierllo has edited 19 books, published about 450 articles, holds 14 patents, and has organized, chaired and nanocarbon thin films are providing the bases for new physics, new materials science and chemistry

271

Microdrilling of Biocompatible Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research studies microdrilling of biocompatible materials including commercially pure titanium, 316L stainless steel, polyether ether ketone (PEEK) and aluminum 6061-T6. A microdrilling technique that uses progressive pecking and micromist...

Mohanty, Sankalp

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Nuclear Material Packaging Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual provides detailed packaging requirements for protecting workers from exposure to nuclear materials stored outside of an approved engineered contamination barrier. No cancellation. Certified 11-18-10.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

274

Critical Materials Workshop  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical...

275

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and procedures for the management of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy (DOE). Cancels DOE 5660.1A. Canceled by DOE O 410.2.

1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INL Recovery of Critical Materials from Consumer Devices 3 3-2 3.2.6 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 McGuire, Michael ORNL...

277

CRITICAL MATERIALS INSTITUTE PROJECTS  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INL National Technology Roadmap for Critical Materials 4 4-3 4.3.3 McCall, Scott LLNL Additive Manufacturing of Permanent Magnets 2 2-1 2.1.2 Payne, Steve LLNL New Efficient...

278

MATERIALS SCIENCE HEALTHCARE POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Polymer Research are paving the way to optimizing organic substances for use in solar cells, light-emitting diodes and memory chips, and are using molecular materials to develop electronic components

Falge, Eva

279

Electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive material for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO.sub.2 formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO.sub.2 as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns.

Singh, Jitendra P. (Bollingbrook, IL); Bosak, Andrea L. (Burnam, IL); McPheeters, Charles C. (Woodridge, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Woodridge, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Electrically conductive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrically conductive material is described for use in solid oxide fuel cells, electrochemical sensors for combustion exhaust, and various other applications possesses increased fracture toughness over available materials, while affording the same electrical conductivity. One embodiment of the sintered electrically conductive material consists essentially of cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 6-19 wt. % monoclinic ZrO[sub 2] formed from particles having an average size equal to or greater than about 0.23 microns. Another embodiment of the electrically conductive material consists essentially at cubic ZrO[sub 2] as a matrix and 10-30 wt. % partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ) formed from particles having an average size of approximately 3 microns. 8 figures.

Singh, J.P.; Bosak, A.L.; McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Management of Nuclear Materials  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements for the lifecycle management of DOE owned and/or managed accountable nuclear materials. Cancels DOE O 410.2. Admin Chg 1 dated 4-10-2014, cancels DOE O 410.2.

2009-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

282

Nuclear material operations manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This manual provides a concise and comprehensive documentation of the operating procedures currently practiced at Sandia National Laboratories with regard to the management, control, and accountability of nuclear materials. The manual is divided into chapters which are devoted to the separate functions performed in nuclear material operations-management, control, accountability, and safeguards, and the final two chapters comprise a document which is also issued separately to provide a summary of the information and operating procedures relevant to custodians and users of radioactive and nuclear materials. The manual also contains samples of the forms utilized in carrying out nuclear material activities. To enhance the clarity of presentation, operating procedures are presented in the form of playscripts in which the responsible organizations and necessary actions are clearly delineated in a chronological fashion from the initiation of a transaction to its completion.

Tyler, R.P.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Reversible hydrogen storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In accordance with the present disclosure, a process for synthesis of a complex hydride material for hydrogen storage is provided. The process includes mixing a borohydride with at least one additive agent and at least one catalyst and heating the mixture at a temperature of less than about 600.degree. C. and a pressure of H.sub.2 gas to form a complex hydride material. The complex hydride material comprises MAl.sub.xB.sub.yH.sub.z, wherein M is an alkali metal or group IIA metal, Al is the element aluminum, x is any number from 0 to 1, B is the element boron, y is a number from 0 to 13, and z is a number from 4 to 57 with the additive agent and catalyst still being present. The complex hydride material is capable of cyclic dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation and has a hydrogen capacity of at least about 4 weight percent.

Ritter, James A. (Lexington, SC); Wang, Tao (Columbia, SC); Ebner, Armin D. (Lexington, SC); Holland, Charles E. (Cayce, SC)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nano-composite materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Nano-composite materials are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a nano-composite material may comprise co-sputtering a transition metal and a refractory metal in a reactive atmosphere. The method may also comprise co-depositing a transition metal and a refractory metal composite structure on a substrate. The method may further comprise thermally annealing the deposited transition metal and refractory metal composite structure in a reactive atmosphere.

Lee, Se-Hee; Tracy, C. Edwin; Pitts, J. Roland

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

286

Piston actuated nastic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PISTON ACTUATED NASTIC MATERIALS A Thesis by VIRAL SHAH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2008... Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering PISTON ACTUATED NASTIC MATERIALS A Thesis by VIRAL SHAH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

Shah, Viral

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Biomimetic hydrogel materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA); Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX); Chen, Qing (Albany, CA); Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM); Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Biomimetic Hydrogel Materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Novel biomimetic hydrogel materials and methods for their preparation. Hydrogels containing acrylamide-functionalized carbohydrate, sulfoxide, sulfide or sulfone copolymerized with a hydrophilic or hydrophobic copolymerizing material selected from the group consisting of an acrylamide, methacrylamide, acrylate, methacrylate, vinyl and a derivative thereof present in concentration from about 1 to about 99 wt %. and methods for their preparation. The method of use of the new hydrogels for fabrication of soft contact lenses and biomedical implants.

Bertozzi, Carolyn (Albany, CA), Mukkamala, Ravindranath (Houston, TX), Chen, Oing (Albany, CA), Hu, Hopin (Albuquerque, NM), Baude, Dominique (Creteil, FR)

2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

289

Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

xi Material CharacterizationThermoelectric Materials . . . . . . . . Graphene-Like5 Nanostructured Materials for Electrochemical Energy

Khan, Javed Miller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy storage materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for impregnating a porous, non-metallic construction material with a solid phase-change material is described. The phase-change material in finely divided form is spread onto the surface of the porous material, after which the porous material is exposed to microwave energy for a time sufficient to melt the phase-change material. The melted material is spontaneously absorbed into the pores of the porous material. A sealing chemical may also be included with the phase-change material (or applied subsequent to the phase-change material) to seal the surface of the porous material. Fire retardant chemicals may also be included with the phase-change materials. The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.

1993-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

BUILDING MATERIALS RECLAMATION PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work conducted on the Building Materials Reclamation Program for the period of September 2008 to August 2010. The goals of the project included selecting materials from the local construction and demolition (C&D) waste stream and developing economically viable reprocessing, reuse or recycling schemes to divert them from landfill storage. Educational resources as well as conceptual designs and engineering feasibility demonstrations were provided for various aspects of the work. The project was divided into two distinct phases: Research and Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination. In the Research Phase, a literature review was initiated and data collection commenced, an advisory panel was organized, and research was conducted to evaluate high volume C&D materials for nontraditional use; five materials were selected for more detailed investigations. In the Engineering Feasibility and Dissemination Phase, a conceptual study for a regional (Mecklenburg and surrounding counties) collection and sorting facility was performed, an engineering feasibility project to demonstrate the viability of recycling or reuse schemes was created, the literature review was extended and completed, and pedagogical materials were developed. Over the two-year duration of the project, all of the tasks and subtasks outlined in the original project proposal have been completed. The Final Progress Report, which briefly describes actual project accomplishments versus the tasks/subtasks of the original project proposal, is included in Appendix A of this report. This report describes the scientific/technical aspects (hypotheses, research/testing, and findings) of six subprojects that investigated five common C&D materials. Table 1 summarizes the six subprojects, including the C&D material studied and the graduate student and the faculty advisor on each subproject.

David C. Weggel; Shen-En Chen; Helene Hilger; Fabien Besnard; Tara Cavalline; Brett Tempest; Adam Alvey; Madeleine Grimmer; Rebecca Turner

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Porous material neutron detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A neutron detector employs a porous material layer including pores between nanoparticles. The composition of the nanoparticles is selected to cause emission of electrons upon detection of a neutron. The nanoparticles have a maximum dimension that is in the range from 0.1 micron to 1 millimeter, and can be sintered with pores thereamongst. A passing radiation generates electrons at one or more nanoparticles, some of which are scattered into a pore and directed toward a direction opposite to the applied electrical field. These electrons travel through the pore and collide with additional nanoparticles, which generate more electrons. The electrons are amplified in a cascade reaction that occurs along the pores behind the initial detection point. An electron amplification device may be placed behind the porous material layer to further amplify the electrons exiting the porous material layer.

Diawara, Yacouba (Oak Ridge, TN); Kocsis, Menyhert (Venon, FR)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

294

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael; Wang, Xiaoping; Carter, J. David

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

295

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Carter, J. David; Wang, Xiaoping; Vaughey, John; Krumpelt, Michael

2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Apparatus for dispensing material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus capable of dispensing drops of material with volumes on the order of zeptoliters is described. In some embodiments of the inventive pipette the size of the droplets so dispensed is determined by the size of a hole, or channel, through a carbon shell encapsulating a reservoir that contains material to be dispensed. The channel may be formed by irradiation with an electron beam or other high-energy beam capable of focusing to a spot size less than about 5 nanometers. In some embodiments, the dispensed droplet remains attached to the pipette by a small thread of material, an atomic scale meniscus, forming a virtually free-standing droplet. In some embodiments the droplet may wet the pipette tip and take on attributes of supported drops. Methods for fabricating and using the pipette are also described.

Sutter, Peter Werner (Beach, NY); Sutter, Eli Anguelova (Beach, NY)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

297

Oxygen ion conducting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oxygen ion conducting ceramic oxide that has applications in industry including fuel cells, oxygen pumps, oxygen sensors, and separation membranes. The material is based on the idea that substituting a dopant into the host perovskite lattice of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 that prefers a coordination number lower than 6 will induce oxygen ion vacancies to form in the lattice. Because the oxygen ion conductivity of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3 is low over a very large temperature range, the material exhibits a high overpotential when used. The inclusion of oxygen vacancies into the lattice by doping the material has been found to maintain the desirable properties of (La,Sr)MnO.sub.3, while significantly decreasing the experimentally observed overpotential.

Vaughey, John (Elmhurst, IL); Krumpelt, Michael (Naperville, IL); Wang, Xiaoping (Downers Grove, IL); Carter, J. David (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Optimized nanoporous materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

Braun, Paul V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Pierson, Bonnie E. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Gittard, Shaun D. (North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC); Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Chae, Weon-Sik (Korea Basic Science Institute, Gangneung, South Korea); Gough, Dara V. (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Packaging and Transfer of Hazardous Materials and Materials of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PACKAGING AND TRANSFER OF HAZARDOUS MATERIALS AND MATERIALS OF NATIONAL SECURITY INTEREST Assessment Plan NNSANevada Site Office Facility Representative Division Performance...

300

MATERIAL CONTROL ACCOUNTING INMM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1996, the Mining and Chemical Combine (MCC - formerly known as K-26), and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) have been cooperating under the cooperative Nuclear Material Protection, Control and Accounting (MPC&A) Program between the Russian Federation and the U.S. Governments. Since MCC continues to operate a reactor for steam and electricity production for the site and city of Zheleznogorsk which results in production of the weapons grade plutonium, one of the goals of the MPC&A program is to support implementation of an expanded comprehensive nuclear material control and accounting (MC&A) program. To date MCC has completed upgrades identified in the initial gap analysis and documented in the site MC&A Plan and is implementing additional upgrades identified during an update to the gap analysis. The scope of these upgrades includes implementation of MCC organization structure relating to MC&A, establishing material balance area structure for special nuclear materials (SNM) storage and bulk processing areas, and material control functions including SNM portal monitors at target locations. Material accounting function upgrades include enhancements in the conduct of physical inventories, limit of error inventory difference procedure enhancements, implementation of basic computerized accounting system for four SNM storage areas, implementation of measurement equipment for improved accountability reporting, and both new and revised site-level MC&A procedures. This paper will discuss the implementation of MC&A upgrades at MCC based on the requirements established in the comprehensive MC&A plan developed by the Mining and Chemical Combine as part of the MPC&A Program.

Hasty, T.

2009-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optical limiting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Optical limiting materials. Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO.sub.2) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400-1100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes.

McBranch, Duncan W. (Santa Fe, NM); Mattes, Benjamin R. (Santa Fe, NM); Koskelo, Aaron C. (Los Alamos, NM); Heeger, Alan J. (Santa Barbara, CA); Robinson, Jeanne M. (Los Alamos, NM); Smilowitz, Laura B. (Los Alamos, NM); Klimov, Victor I. (Los Alamos, NM); Cha, Myoungsik (Goleta, CA); Sariciftci, N. Serdar (Santa Barbara, CA); Hummelen, Jan C. (Groningen, NL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Materials for geothermal production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advances in the development of new materials continue to be made in the geothermal materials project. Many successes have already been accrued and the results used commercially. In FY 1991, work was focused on reducing well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs. Specific activities performed included lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive and scale resistant protective liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, corrosion mitigation in process components at The Geysers, and elastomer-metal bonding systems. Efforts to transfer the technologies developed in these efforts to other energy-related sectors of the economy continued and considerable success was achieved.

Kukacka, L.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Materials Under Extremes | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the Nanoscale LandscapeImports 5.90Materials Porous Materials

304

Materials at the Mesoscale  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund LasDubey selectedContract ResearchMaterials andMaterials

305

Materials for the Future  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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306

Container for radioactive materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A container is claimed for housing a plurality of canister assemblies containing radioactive material. The several canister assemblies are stacked in a longitudinally spaced relation within a carrier to form a payload concentrically mounted within the container. The payload package includes a spacer for each canister assembly, said spacer comprising a base member longitudinally spacing adjacent canister assemblies from each other and sleeve surrounding the associated canister assembly for centering the same and conducting heat from the radioactive material in a desired flow path. 7 figures.

Fields, S.R.

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

Short courses in Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Short courses in Composite Materials Overview The ability to tailor the material properties used. Combining the adaptability of composites with clear weight savings, whilst tailoring materials properties Airbus and Glyndr University, the Advanced Composites Training and Development Centre educates current

Davies, John N.

308

Supercapacitors specialities - Materials review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrode material is a key component for supercapacitor cell performance. As it is known, performance comparison of commercial available batteries and supercapacitors reveals significantly lower energy storage capability for supercapacitor devices. The energy density of commercial supercapacitor cells is limited to 10 Wh/kg whereas that of common lead acid batteries reaches 35-40 Wh/kg. For lithium ion batteries a value higher than 100 Wh/kg is easily available. Nevertheless, supercapacitors also known as ultracapacitors or electrochemical capacitors have other advantages in comparison with batteries. As a consequence, many efforts have been made in the last years to increase the storage energy density of electrochemical capacitors. A lot of results from published work (research and review papers, patents and reports) are available at this time. The purpose of this review is a presentation of the progress to date for the use of new materials and approaches for supercapacitor electrodes, with focus on the energy storage capability for practical applications. Many reported results refer to nanostructured carbon based materials and the related composites, used for the manufacture of experimental electrodes. A specific capacitance and a specific energy are seldom revealed as the main result of the performed investigation. Thus for nanoprous (activated) carbon based electrodes a specific capacitance up to 200-220 F/g is mentioned for organic electrolyte, whereas for aqueous electrolyte, the value is limited to 400-500 F/g. Significant contribution to specific capacitance is possible from fast faradaic reactions at the electrode-electrolyte interface in addition to the electric double layer effect. The corresponding energy density is limited to 30-50 Wh/kg for organic electrolyte and to 12-17 Wh/kg for aqueous electrolyte. However such performance indicators are given only for the carbon material used in electrodes. For a supercapacitor cell, where two electrodes and also other materials for cell assembling and packaging are used, the above mentioned values have to be divided by a factor higher than four. As a consequence, the specific energy of a prototype cell, hardly could exceed 10 Wh/kg because of difficulties with the existing manufacturing technology. Graphene based materials and carbon nanotubes and different composites have been used in many experiments reported in the last years. Nevertheless in spite of the outstanding properties of these materials, significant increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy in comparison with activated or nanoporous carbon is not achieved. Use of redox materials as metal oxides or conducting polymers in combination with different nanostructured carbon materials (nanocomposite electrodes) has been found to contribute to further increase of the specific capacitance or of the specific energy. Nevertheless, few results are reported for practical cells with such materials. Many results are reported only for a three electrode system and significant difference is possible when the electrode is used in a practical supercapacitor cell. Further improvement in the electrode manufacture and more experiments with supercapacitor cells with the known electrochemical storage materials are required. Device prototypes and commercial products with an energy density towards 15-20 Wh/kg could be realized. These may be a milestone for further supercapacitor device research and development, to narrow the storage energy gap between batteries and supercapacitors.

Obreja, Vasile V. N. [National Research and Development Institute for Microtechnologies (IMT-Bucuresti), Bucharest, 126A Erou Iancu Nicolae Street, 077190 (Romania)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the damping material and epoxy resin. The surface of theinfiltration of the epoxy resin into the damping materialthe damping material and resin (epoxy) is occurring and is

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Materials and Manufacturing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Assurance Anne Meinhold Unprecedented Accomplishments in the Use of Aluminum-Lithium Alloy Preston is the solution. Other times, the design must accommodate the limitations of materials properties. The design requirements, and written procedures. Nondestructive testing depends on incident or input energy that interacts

311

Supplemental Material Supplemental methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Material (ESI) for Integrative Biology This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2009 #12;Computing counter and % ID/g calculated as (counts/weight tissue)/ total counts injected. Mass Spectrometry. To extract ACPPs to obtain electrospray (ESI) mass spectra, a solution of 9M guanidinium chloride (Gu

Tsien, Roger Y.

312

Materials Safety Data Sheets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) MSDS contain chemical hazard information about substances compounds and solvents. MSDS data can be accessed from the following URLs http://www.ehs.umass.edu/ http://www.chem.umass.edu/Safety the "Important Safety Sites for the University" link to reach a variety of safety related information, including

Schweik, Charles M.

313

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Sustainable Materials Course Outline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, embodied energy; environmental footprint, waste recycling and pollution minimization, life cycle assessment Science and Engineering (Building E8) Phone: 9385 5025 j.q.zhang@unsw.edu.au Consultation hours: by appointment To be advised School of Materials Science and Engineering (Building E8) Consultation hours

New South Wales, University of

315

Action Plan Materials Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sense, including all strata) has available to it a wide range of con- venient products which improve, improving companies' pros- pects and generating wealth without harming the environment. And allAction Plan 2010-2013 Materials Science Area EXECUTIVE SUMMARY #12;N.B.: If you require any further

Fitze, Patrick

316

From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials Requirements and Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From Smart Materials to Cognitive Materials ­ Requirements and Challenges Lutz Frommberger (lutz construction, production engineer- ing, or wearable computing. Smart and sensorial materials provide a variety this application than the material itself that can be considered being "smart". In this contribution, we proceed

Bremen, Universität

317

Graphene: Materially Better Carbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphene, a single atom–thick plane of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice, has captivated the attention of physicists, materials scientists, and engineers alike over the five years following its experimental isolation. Graphene is a fundamentally new type of electronic material whose electrons are strictly confined to a two-dimensional plane and exhibit properties akin to those of ultrarelativistic particles. Graphene's two-dimensional form suggests compatibility with conventional wafer processing technology. Extraordinary physical properties, including exceedingly high charge carrier mobility, current-carrying capacity, mechanical strength, and thermal conductivity, make it an enticing candidate for new electronic technologies both within and beyond complementary metal oxide semiconductors (CMOS). Immediate graphene applications include high-speed analog electronics and highly conductive, flexible, transparent thin films for displays and optoelectronics. Currently, much graphene research is focused on generating and tuning a bandgap and on novel device structures that exploit graphene's extraordinary electrical, optical, and mechanical properties.

Fuhrer, M. S.; Lau, C. N.; MacDonald, A. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Geothermal materials development activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ongoing R&D program is a part of the Core Research Category of the Department of Energy/Geothermal Division initiative to accelerate the utilization of geothermal resources. High risk materials problems that if successfully solved will result in significant reductions in well drilling, fluid transport and energy conversion costs, are emphasized. The project has already developed several advanced materials systems that are being used by the geothermal industry and by Northeastern Electric, Gas and Steam Utilities. Specific topics currently being addressed include lightweight C0{sub 2}-resistant well cements, thermally conductive scale and corrosion resistant liner systems, chemical systems for lost circulation control, elastomer-metal bonding systems, and corrosion mitigation at the Geysers. Efforts to enhance the transfer of the technologies developed in these activities to other sectors of the economy are also underway.

Kukacka, L.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Webinar: Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Compatibility of Materials, originally presented on August 13, 2013.

320

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials shall be stored in a manner that allows easy identification and access to labels, identification entering storage areas. All persons shall be in a safe position while materials are being loadedEM 385-1-1 XX Jun 13 14-1 SECTION 14 MATERIAL HANDLING, STORAGE, AND DISPOSAL 14.A MATERIAL

US Army Corps of Engineers

322

George Smith, Department of Materials,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

George Smith, Department of Materials, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH UK Email: george.smith@materials.ox.ac.uk URL: www.materials.ox.ac.uk The aims of the Department of Materials experienced one of the most successful years in its 46-year history, says head of department George Smith. Top

Paxton, Anthony T.

323

Materials in design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the strength, hardness and wear resistance has been increased. S rin Materials Since in many cases equipment requires that springs have to operate properly at conditions of excessive vibration, corrosive environment, extremes temperatures. A great care has...) It is considered a good long wearing bearing metal where good bearing conditions are present once the design has been done very good. (Accurate filling, good oil clearance; good lubrication, non-corrosive oil). It can be used with hardened shafts. B ' g B Tin...

Perata, Alfredo Ferando

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Materials Technical Team Roadmap  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergy Objective: DevelopMaterials

325

Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of EnergyDevelopment AccidentEnergy Objective:11 DOEMaterials Materials

326

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced Materials Manufacturing | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal Advanced Material

328

Scalable Routes to Efficient Thermoelectric Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermoelectric materials consisting of epitaxially-grownefficient thermoelectric materials," Nature, vol. 451, pp.superlattice thermoelectric materials and devices," Science,

Feser, Joseph Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success...

330

Materials Research in the Information Age  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Research in the Information Age Accelerating Advanced Material Development NERSC Science Gateway a 'Google of Material Properties' October 31, 2011 | Tags: Materials...

331

RFI: DOE Materials Strategy | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

RFI: DOE Materials Strategy RFI: DOE Materials Strategy DOE Materials Strategy - request for information RFI: DOE Materials Strategy More Documents & Publications Microsoft Word -...

332

Sandia National Laboratories: Light Creation Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TechnologiesLight Creation Materials Light Creation Materials Overview of SSL Light Creation Materials Different families of inorganic semiconductor materials can...

333

Sandia National Laboratories: Light Creation Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EFRCOverviewLight Creation Materials Light Creation Materials Overview of SSL Light Creation Materials Different families of inorganic semiconductor materials can contribute to...

334

Cathode materials review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

Combinatorial synthesis of novel materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Menlo Park, CA)

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

338

Combinatorial sythesis of organometallic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods and apparatus for the preparation and use of a substrate having an array of diverse materials in predefined regions thereon. A substrate having an array of diverse materials thereon is generally prepared by delivering components of materials to predefined regions on a substrate, and simultaneously reacting the components to form at least two materials. Materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, covalent network solids, ionic solids and molecular solids. More particularly, materials which can be prepared using the methods and apparatus of the present invention include, for example, inorganic materials, intermetallic materials, metal alloys, ceramic materials, organic materials, organometallic materials, non-biological organic polymers, composite materials (e.g., inorganic composites, organic composites, or combinations thereof), etc. Once prepared, these materials can be screened for useful properties including, for example, electrical, thermal, mechanical, morphological, optical, magnetic, chemical, or other properties. Thus, the present invention provides methods for the parallel synthesis and analysis of novel materials having useful properties.

Schultz, Peter G. (Oakland, CA); Xiang, Xiaodong (Alameda, CA); Goldwasser, Isy (Alameda, CA)

2002-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Optical limiting materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methanofullerenes, fulleroids and/or other fullerenes chemically altered for enhanced solubility, in liquid solution, and in solid blends with transparent glass (SiO{sub 2}) gels or polymers, or semiconducting (conjugated) polymers, are shown to be useful as optical limiters (optical surge protectors). The nonlinear absorption is tunable such that the energy transmitted through such blends saturates at high input energy per pulse over a wide range of wavelengths from 400--1,100 nm by selecting the host material for its absorption wavelength and ability to transfer the absorbed energy into the optical limiting composition dissolved therein. This phenomenon should be generalizable to other compositions than substituted fullerenes. 5 figs.

McBranch, D.W.; Mattes, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; Heeger, A.J.; Robinson, J.M.; Smilowitz, L.B.; Klimov, V.I.; Cha, M.; Sariciftci, N.S.; Hummelen, J.C.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

340

Synthesis of refractory materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogren. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN.sub.3. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

Holt, Joseph B. (San Jose, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Synthesis of refractory materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Refractory metal nitrides are synthesized during a self-propagating combustion process utilizing a solid source of nitrogen. For this purpose, a metal azide is employed, preferably NaN/sub 3/. The azide is combusted with Mg or Ca, and a metal oxide is selected from Groups III-A, IV-A, III-B, IV-B, or a rare earth metal oxide. The mixture of azide, Ca or Mg and metal oxide is heated to the mixture's ignition temperature. At that temperature the mixture is ignited and undergoes self-sustaining combustion until the starter materials are exhausted, producing the metal nitride.

Holt, J.B.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Construction Material And Method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A structural material of a polystyrene base and the reaction product of the polystyrene base and a solid phosphate ceramic. The ceramic is applied as a slurry which includes one or more of a metal oxide or a metal hydroxide with a source of phosphate to produce a phosphate ceramic and a poly (acrylic acid or acrylate) or combinations or salts thereof and polystyrene or MgO applied to the polystyrene base and allowed to cure so that the dried aqueous slurry chemically bonds to the polystyrene base. A method is also disclosed of applying the slurry to the polystyrene base.

Wagh, Arun S. (Orland Park, IL); Antink, Allison L. (Bolingbrook, IL)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

343

Careers | Critical Materials Institute  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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344

LANL: Materials Science Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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345

Work with Biological Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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346

Work with Biological Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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347

Magnetic Materials (MM)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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348

Material Point Methods  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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349

Material Safety Data Sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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350

Materials/Condensed Matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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351

Materials/Condensed Matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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352

Material efficiency in construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this generation must change its use of energy and materials. 1.1 The need to reduce carbon dioxide emissions The Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) states as #16;unequivocal#17; that the Earth's atmosphere and oceans... in order to save energy and carbon. University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK. ISBN 978-0- 903428-32-3 3. Allwood, J.M., Cullen, J.M., Patel, A.C.H., Cooper, D.R.,Moynihan, M.C., Milford, R.L., Carruth, M.A. and McBrien, M. 2011. Prolonging our metal life #22...

Moynihan, Muiris

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

353

Laser Plasma Material Interactions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Surface treatment by means of pulsed laser beams in reactive atmospheres is an attractive technique to enhance the surface features, such as corrosion and wear resistance or the hardness. Many carbides and nitrides play an important role for technological applications, requiring the mentioned property improvements. Here we present a new promising fast, flexible and clean technique for a direct laser synthesis of carbide and nitride surface films by short pulsed laser irradiation in reactive atmospheres (e.g. methane, nitrogen). The corresponding material is treated by short intense laser pulses involving plasma formation just above the irradiated surface. Gas-Plasma-Surface reactions lead to a fast incorporation of the gas species into the material and subsequently the desired coating formation if the treatment parameters are chosen properly. A number of laser types have been used for that (Excimer Laser, Nd:YAG, Ti:sapphire, Free Electron Laser) and a number of different nitride and carbide films have been successfully produced. The mechanisms and some examples will be presented for Fe treated in nitrogen and Si irradiated in methane.

Schaaf, Peter; Carpene, Ettore [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, 37077 Goettingen (Germany)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Stone's code reveals Earth's processes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849 127,174 126,924 128,941

355

Additive assembly of digital materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis develops the use of additive assembly of press-fit digital materials as a new rapid-prototyping process. Digital materials consist of a finite set of parts that have discrete connections and occupy discrete ...

Ward, Jonathan (Jonathan Daniel)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING, MECHANICS AND MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of companies worldwide; cladding effects on, and hybrid control of, the response of tall buildings Buildings · Masonry Structures · Nano/Microstructure of Cement-based Materials · Polymeric Composite Systems · Reliable Engineering Computing · Risk Analysis · Seismic Hazard Mitigation · Smart Materials

Wang, Yuhang

357

DPC materials and corrosion environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This review focuses on the performance of basket materials that could be exposed to ground water over thousands of years, and prospective disposal overpack materials that could possibly be used to protect dual-purpose canisters (DPCs) in disposal environments.

Ilgen, Anastasia G.; Bryan, Charles R.; Stephanie Teich-McGoldrick; Ernest Hardin

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

FURTHERING THE RECLAIMED MATERIALS EXPERIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comprehensive study of the reclaimed materials industry and ways it could be improved from a management standpoint by working through a Design Management problem solving approach. Project Objectives: To improve the sourcing of reclaimed materials...

Bartels, Robert A.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Management of Transuranic Contaminated Material  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish guidelines for the generation, treatment, packaging, storage, transportation, and disposal of transuranic (TRU) contaminated material.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-DRAFT - FOR OFFICIAL USE ONLY - DRAFT Thermoelectric Materials, Devices and Systems: 1 Technology Assessment 2 Contents 3 1. Thermoelectric Generation ......

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Facilities, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Research & Capabilities, Solid-State Lighting Semiconductor nanowire lasers have attracted intense interest as...

362

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

363

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic materials are disclosed which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200--550 C or organic salt (including SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) at temperatures of 25--200 C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components. 1 fig.

Kaun, T.D.

1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

364

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Corrosion resistant ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Ceramic materials which exhibit stability in severely-corrosive environments having high alkali-metal activity, high sulfur/sulfide activity and/or molten halides at temperatures of 200.degree.-550.degree. C. or organic salt (including SO.sub.2 and SO.sub.2 Cl.sub.2) at temperatures of 25.degree.-200.degree. C. These sulfide ceramics form stoichiometric (single-phase) compounds with sulfides of Ca, Li, Na, K, Al, Mg, Si, Y, La, Ce, Ga, Ba, Zr and Sr and show melting-points that are sufficiently low and have excellent wettability with many metals (Fe, Ni, Mo) to easily form metal/ceramic seals. Ceramic compositions are also formulated to adequately match thermal expansion coefficient of adjacent metal components.

Kaun, Thomas D. (320 Willow St., New Lenox, IL 60451)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

Lauf, Robert J.; Walls, Claudia A.; Boatner, Lynn A.

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

Combinatorial synthesis of ceramic materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combinatorial library includes a gelcast substrate defining a plurality of cavities in at least one surface thereof; and a plurality of gelcast test materials in the cavities, at least two of the test materials differing from the substrate in at least one compositional characteristic, the two test materials differing from each other in at least one compositional characteristic.

Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Walls, Claudia A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN; Boatner, Lynn A. (Oak Ridge, TN) [Oak Ridge, TN

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

368

Preparation of asymmetric porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for preparing an asymmetric porous material by depositing a porous material film on a flexible substrate, and applying an anisotropic stress to the porous media on the flexible substrate, where the anisotropic stress results from a stress such as an applied mechanical force, a thermal gradient, and an applied voltage, to form an asymmetric porous material.

Coker, Eric N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nanostructured materials for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for hydrogen storage comprising a porous nano-structured material with hydrogen absorbed on the surfaces of the porous nano-structured material. The system of hydrogen storage comprises absorbing hydrogen on the surfaces of a porous nano-structured semiconductor material.

Williamson, Andrew J. (Pleasanton, CA); Reboredo, Fernando A. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

370

Frontiers of Fusion Materials Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

migration Radiation damage accumulation kinetics · 1 D vs. 3D diffusion processes · ionization Insulators · Optical Materials *asterisk denotes Fusion Materials Task Group #12;Fusion Materials Sciences R Displacement cascades Quantification of displacement damage source term · Is the concept of a liquid valid

371

Department of Advanced Materials Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

@k.u-tokyo.ac.jpe-mail 04-7136-3781T E L Environmental-friendly materials process, Metal smelting and re ning process of Advanced Materials Science masashi@issp.u-tokyo.ac.jpe-mail 04-7136-3225T E L Nuclear magnetic resonance New Materials Synthesis, Superconductivity, Quantum Spin Liquid,Topological Hall Effect takatama

Katsumoto, Shingo

372

Materials Performance in USC Steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials Performance in USC Steam: (1) pressure effects on steam oxidation - unique capability coming on-line; (2) hydrogen evolution - hydrogen permeability apparatus to determine where hydrogen goes during steam oxidation; and (3) NETL materials development - steam oxidation resource for NETL developed materials.

G. R. Holcomb; J. Tylczak; G. H. Meier; N. M. Yanar

2011-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

373

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathematical modelings of smart materials and structures Christian Licht , Thibaut Weller mathematical models of smart materials and smart structures. Smart materials are materials which present perturbations methods, asymptotic analysis, plates and rods models. 1 Introduction Smart materials present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

374

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

376

Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;#12;Material Standards for EHS for Engineered Nanoscale Materials Material Standards of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD Workshop Co-Chairs and Principle Report Editors Dianne L. Poster, John A. Small, Michael T. Postek National Institute of Standards and Technology Sponsored by U

Magee, Joseph W.

377

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-18, 184-B Powerhouse Debris Pile, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-B-18 Powerhouse Debris Pile contained miscellaneous demolition waste from the decommissioning activities of the 184-B Powerhouse. The debris covered an area roughly 15 m by 30 m and included materials such as concrete blocks, mixed aggregate/concrete slabs, stone rubble, asphalt rubble, traces of tar/coal, broken fluorescent lights, brick chimney remnants, and rubber hoses. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fossil energy materials needs assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment of needs for materials of construction for fossil energy systems was prepared by ORNL staff members who conducted a literature search and interviewed various individuals and organizations that are active in the area of fossil energy technology. Critical materials problems associated with fossil energy systems are identified. Background information relative to the various technologies is given and materials research needed to enhance the viability and improve the economics of fossil energy processes is discussed. The assessment is presented on the basis of materials-related disciplines that impact fossil energy material development. These disciplines include the design-materials interface, materials fabrication technology, corrosion and materials compatibility, wear phenomena, ceramic materials, and nondestructive testing. The needs of these various disciplines are correlated with the emerging fossil energy technologies that require materials consideration. Greater emphasis is given to coal technology - particularly liquefaction, gasification, and fluidized bed combustion - than to oil and gas technologies because of the perceived inevitability of US dependence on coal conversion and utilization systems as a major part of our total energy production.

King, R.T.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Catalyzed Ceramic Burner Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalyzed combustion offers the advantages of increased fuel efficiency, decreased emissions (both NOx and CO), and an expanded operating range. These performance improvements are related to the ability of the catalyst to stabilize a flame at or within the burner media and to combust fuel at much lower temperatures. This technology has a diverse set of applications in industrial and commercial heating, including boilers for the paper, food and chemical industries. However, wide spread adoption of catalyzed combustion has been limited by the high cost of precious metals needed for the catalyst materials. The primary objective of this project was the development of an innovative catalyzed burner media for commercial and small industrial boiler applications that drastically reduce the unit cost of the catalyzed media without sacrificing the benefits associated with catalyzed combustion. The scope of this program was to identify both the optimum substrate material as well as the best performing catalyst construction to meet or exceed industry standards for durability, cost, energy efficiency, and emissions. It was anticipated that commercial implementation of this technology would result in significant energy savings and reduced emissions. Based on demonstrated achievements, there is a potential to reduce NOx emissions by 40,000 TPY and natural gas consumption by 8.9 TBtu in industries that heavily utilize natural gas for process heating. These industries include food manufacturing, polymer processing, and pulp and paper manufacturing. Initial evaluation of commercial solutions and upcoming EPA regulations suggests that small to midsized boilers in industrial and commercial markets could possibly see the greatest benefit from this technology. While out of scope for the current program, an extension of this technology could also be applied to catalytic oxidation for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Considerable progress has been made over the course of the grant period in accomplishing these objectives. Our work in the area of Pd-based, methane oxidation catalysts has led to the development of highly active catalysts with relatively low loadings of Pd metal using proprietary coating methods. The thermal stability of these Pd-based catalysts were characterized using SEM and BET analyses, further demonstrating that certain catalyst supports offer enhanced stability toward both PdO decomposition and/or thermal sintering/growth of Pd particles. When applied to commercially available fiber mesh substrates (both metallic and ceramic) and tested in an open-air burner, these catalyst-support chemistries showed modest improvements in the NOx emissions and radiant output compared to uncatalyzed substrates. More significant, though, was the performance of the catalyst-support chemistries on novel media substrates. These substrates were developed to overcome the limitations that are present with commercially available substrate designs and increase the gas-catalyst contact time. When catalyzed, these substrates demonstrated a 65-75% reduction in NOx emissions across the firing range when tested in an open air burner. In testing in a residential boiler, this translated into NOx emissions of <15 ppm over the 15-150 kBtu/hr firing range.

Barnes, Amy S., Dr.

2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

380

Piezoresistive Cement-based Materials for Strain Sensing D. D. L. CHUNG*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). The fine aggregate is typically sand. The coarse aggregate is typically stones such as gravel aggregates allows dense packing of the aggregates, as the fine aggregate fills the space between the units

Chung, Deborah D.L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Material-based design computation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The institutionalized separation between form, structure and material, deeply embedded in modernist design theory, paralleled by a methodological partitioning between modeling, analysis and fabrication, resulted in ...

Oxman, Neri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

MULTIDISCIPLINARY FREE MATERIAL OPTIMIZATION 1 ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear Anal. and Mech., Pitman, London, pages 136–212, 1979. [22] R. Werner. Free Material Optimization. PhD thesis, Institute of Applied Mathematics II, ...

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

383

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the Damping of Composite Laminates”, SPIE Proceedings onpublication to Journal of Composite Materials Biggerstaff,submitted for publication to Composites, Part A Biggerstaff,

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Toda Cathode Materials Production Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cathode Materials Production Facility 2013 DOE Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 13-17, 2013 David Han, Yasuhiro Abe Toda America Inc. Project ID: ARRAVT017...

385

Nanostructured Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and batteries/fuel cells. Nanostructured electrode materials have demonstrated superior electrochemical of polymethine dyes electronic spectra is crucial for successful design of the new molecules with optimized

Wu, Shin-Tson

386

Lightweighting Materials | Clean Energy | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with lightweight materials can directly reduce fuel consump-tion. It also allows cars to carry advanced emissions control equipment, safety devices, and integrated...

387

Interim Management of Nuclear Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

containing dissolved nuclear materials and recovered isotopes in stainless-steel tanks; and product and scrap forms of metals or oxides in containers (cans, drums, etc.)...

388

NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE & CENTER FOR NANOHYBRID FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NEBRASKA CENTER FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE & CENTER FOR NANOHYBRID FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS PRESENT FOR MATERIALS AND NANOSCIENCE & CENTER FOR NANOHYBRID FUNCTIONAL MATERIALS PRESENT Graphene Colloquium

Farritor, Shane

389

Materials and Methods Strain construction, materials, and Net1 mutagenesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials and Methods Strain construction, materials, and Net1 mutagenesis All strains used and destruction boxes (Clb2C2DK100)HA3 was used in over-expression experiments with Clb2 (1). Net1 mutant constructs were created as previously described (2). Briefly, a wild type NET1-myc9 epitope tagged construct

Shou, Wenying

390

Material Safety Data Sheets | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Material Safety Data Sheets Material Safety Data Sheets Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDSs) provide workers and emergency personnel with ways for handling and working with a...

391

Materials Sciences and Engineering Program | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Sciences and Engineering Program SHARE BES Materials Sciences and Engineering Program The ORNL materials sciences and engineering program supported by the Department of...

392

NUCLEAR MATERIALS PROGRESS REPORTS FOR 1980  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ceramics", Progress in Material Science 21, 307 (1976}. S. -heating techniques in material processing. Thermal analysisIrreversible Thermodynamics in Materials Problems", in Mass

Olander, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

On the fracture toughness of advanced materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

toughness of advanced materials ?? By Maximilien E. LauneyAbstract: Few engineering materials are limited by theirare manufactured from materials that are comparatively low

Launey, Maximilien E.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cybersecurity Awareness Materials | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cybersecurity Awareness Materials Cybersecurity Awareness Materials The OCIO develops and distributes a variety of awareness material to be used during cyber awareness campaigns or...

395

Materials Theory, Modeling and Simulation | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials Characterization Materials Theory and Simulation Quantum Monte Carlo Density Functional Theory Monte Carlo Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Chemical and Materials Theory...

396

Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disordered materials hold promise for better batteries Disordered Materials Hold Promise for Better Batteries February 21, 2014 | Tags: Chemistry, Hopper, Materials Science,...

397

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483-Fall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemistry of Organic Electronic Materials 6483- Fall Tuesdays organic materials. The discussion will include aspects of synthesis General introduction to the electronic structure of organic materials with connection

Sherrill, David

398

Computational materials: Embedding Computation into the Everyday  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational materials: Embedding Computation into thepaper presents research into material design merging thean integrated part of our material surroundings. Rather than

Thomsen, Mette Ramsgard; Karmon, Ayelet

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Chemical & Engineering Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical & Engineering Materials SHARE Chemical and Engineering Materials Neutron-based research at SNS and HFIR in Chemical and Engineering Materials strives to understand the...

400

Sandia National Laboratories: Wavelength Conversion Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TechnologiesWavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion Materials Overview of SSL Wavelength Conversion Materials Rare-Earth Phosphors Inorganic phosphors doped with...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3,...

402

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Helpful links for materials transport, safety, etc. relating to experiment safety at the APS. Internal Reference Material: Transporting Hazardous Materials "Natural" radioactivity...

403

Sandia National Laboratories: understanding of composite material...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of composite material behavior in realistic wind applications Composite-Materials Fatigue Database Updated On January 22, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events,...

404

PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS, STABILITY AND MATERIALS INTERACTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mechanisms of turbine materials in this environment, whichTurbines Research Opportunities: •Thermodynamics and kinetics of material-for designing improved materials. Gas turbines of the closed

Morris, Jr., J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Computational materials: Embedding Computation into the Everyday  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building forces, smart materials are dynamic in that theymaterial With a smart material, we should be clearly1] Addington, M. 2001 Smart Materials and Technologies. In A

Thomsen, Mette Ramsgard; Karmon, Ayelet

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Sandia National Laboratories: Wavelength Conversion Materials  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EFRCOverviewWavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion Materials Overview of SSL Wavelength Conversion Materials Rare-Earth Phosphors Inorganic phosphors doped with...

407

Material selection for electrooptic deflectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The selection of a material for a practical device is generally guided by a number of criteria, including cost, size, difficulty of fabrication, durability, driver requirements, and system constraints. A quantitative analysis can usually be made for comparison, or a figure of merit can be computed. In the case of materials for electrooptical (EO) devices the choice is often made based on the availability of materials meeting some minimum system requirement. For fast EO deflectors, where a large number of resolvable spots is required, the choice of materials is quite limited. A model of just such a device is proposed; it is based on the resolution of 400 spots and reasonable boundary conditions. The model predicts that to be successful, an EO material must be chosen that has a linear EO coefficient (r/sub 33/) of at least 336 pm/V. A survey was conducted of the EO materials which are generally available. Based on the model and the survey, Czochralski crystal growth of strontium barium niobate (SBN:60) is recommended. Although SBN:60 does not have the largest EO coefficient, it may be the easiest to grow in the required size and optical quality, thus satisfying the availability criterion. It should be borne in mind that many materials may be grown by this technique and there are many new and potential applications for EO materials. 92 refs., 18 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Materials science Nanotubes get hard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials science Nanotubes get hard under pressure Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA doi:10.1073/pnas.0405877101 (2004) When Zhongwu Wang et al. squeezed carbon nanotubes in a diamond anvil cell, they made nanotubes into diamond itself: the carbon material formed under compression at room temperature seems

Downs, Robert T.

409

Creating Wave-Focusing Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basic ideas for creating wave-focusing materials by injecting small particles in a given material are described. The number of small particles to be injected around any point is calculated. Inverse scattering problem with fixed wavenumber and fixed incident direction of the plane acoustic wave is formulated and solved.

A. G. Ramm

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Field of Expertise Materials Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

structure-property relationships through the characterisation of diverse materials to process optimisation and international research partners in order to keep Austrian high-technology industry, scientific production semiconductors Paper and physical chemistry principles of paper strength Metallic materials for energy applica

411

Material stabilization characterization management plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents overall direction for characterization needs during stabilization of SNM at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). Technical issues for needed data and equipment are identified. Information on material categories and links to vulnerabilities are given. Comparison data on the material categories is discussed to assist in assessing the relative risks and desired processing priority.

GIBSON, M.W.

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. within high-Tc superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB2, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde, Denmark ISBN 87-550-3244-3 ISSN 0907-0079 #12;Superconductivity

413

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6. Admin Chg 1, 8-3-11.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

414

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Pawel, "Assessment of Cavitation-Erosion Resistance of Potential Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury of Cavitation Resistant Modifications to Type 316LN Stainless Steel in a Mercury Thermal Convection Loop," OakMercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010

McDonald, Kirk

415

Mercury-Related Materials Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercury-Related Materials Studies Van Graves IDS NF Ph M tiIDS-NF Phone Meeting Jan 26, 2010 #12 Evaluation of Cavitation Resistance of Type 316LN Stainless Steel in Mercury Using a Vibratory Horn," J. Nucl Pump Impeller Materials for Mercury Service at the Spallation Neutron Source," Oak Ridge National

McDonald, Kirk

416

Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Manual establishes standard transportation practices for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration to use in planning and executing offsite shipments of radioactive materials and waste. The revision reflects ongoing collaboration of DOE and outside organizations on the transportation of radioactive material and waste. Cancels DOE M 460.2-1.

2008-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another.

Newman, Darrell F. (Richland, WA); Ross, Wayne A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radioactive waste material melter apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for preparing metallic radioactive waste material for storage is disclosed. The radioactive waste material is placed in a radiation shielded enclosure. The waste material is then melted with a plasma torch and cast into a plurality of successive horizontal layers in a mold to form a radioactive ingot in the shape of a spent nuclear fuel rod storage canister. The apparatus comprises a radiation shielded enclosure having an opening adapted for receiving a conventional transfer cask within which radioactive waste material is transferred to the apparatus. A plasma torch is mounted within the enclosure. A mold is also received within the enclosure for receiving the melted waste material and cooling it to form an ingot. The enclosure is preferably constructed in at least two parts to enable easy transport of the apparatus from one nuclear site to another. 8 figs.

Newman, D.F.; Ross, W.A.

1990-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

420

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft by 100 ft FUNCTION: Storage area -used concrete, brick. amd other material placed here for future use. OPERATIONAL STATUS: In place...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Microsoft Word - GM Maryland Revised Sup-Pre-final-EA 9-6-2011...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plain are chiefly sand and gravel, and are used as aggregate materials by the construction industry. Clay for brick and other ceramic uses is also important. Small deposits...

422

Materials 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials 1 Faculty of Engineering, Department of --Materials This publication refers syllabuses Materials The Department occupies newly refurbished premises over four floors of the Royal School and research in materials science and engineering, in particular nanomaterials, structural ceramics, theory

423

Reflectance Function Approximation for Material Classification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reflectance Function Approximation for Material Classification Edward Wild CS 766 Final Project This report summarizes the results of a project to approximate reflectance functions and classify materials to classify materials. Classification algorithms are proposed to deal with unseen materials. Experimental

Dyer, Charles R.

424

Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approaches for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presentation on NIST Combinatorial Methods at the...

425

Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration |...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Storage Materials Database Demonstration Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Database Demonstration Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar "Hydrogen...

426

CHARACTERIZATION OF SIALON-TYPE MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

testing of ceramic materials. crucihle Thermal Shock Tests.and thermal shock. Among the various ceramic materials being

Spencer, P.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Materials Technologies: Goals, Strategies, and Top Accomplishments...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Materials Technologies: Goals, Strategies, and Top Accomplishments (Brochure), Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) Materials Technologies: Goals, Strategies, and Top Accomplishments...

428

ITP Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Industrial Materials: Development and Commercialization of Alternative Carbon Fiber Precursors and Conversion Technologies ITP Industrial Materials: Development and...

429

Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Characterization of Lightweight Materials: Success Stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Evaluation and Characterization of Lightweight...

430

Materials Synthesis from Atoms to Systems | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Porous Materials Thin Film Deposition Single Crystal Growth Texture Control Additive Manufacturing Nanomaterials Synthesis Designer Organic Molecules Related Research Materials...

431

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Enhancing Railroad Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Rail Routing Presentation made by Kevin...

432

Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Engineering and Materials for Automotive Thermoelectric Applications Design and optimization of TE exhaust generator,...

433

Catalyst material and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The material of the present invention is a mixture of catalytically active material and carrier materials, which may be catalytically active themselves. Hence, the material of the present invention provides a catalyst particle that has catalytically active material throughout its bulk volume as well as on its surface. The presence of the catalytically active material throughout the bulk volume is achieved by chemical combination of catalytically active materials with carrier materials prior to or simultaneously with crystallite formation.

Matson, Dean W. (Kennewick, WA); Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Linehan, John C. (Richland, WA); Bean, Roger M. (Richland, WA); Brewer, Thomas D. (Richland, WA); Werpy, Todd A. (Richland, WA); Darab, John G. (Richland, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Recent Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Materials Recent Theoretical Results for Advanced Thermoelectric Materials Transport theory and first principles calculations applied to oxides, chalcogenides and...

435

Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Publications Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation Proactive Strategies for Designing Thermoelectric Materials for Power Generation...

436

High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films. High Pressure Hydrogen Materials Compatibility of Piezoelectric Films. Abstract: Abstract: Hydrogen is being...

437

Transformed materials : a material research center in Milan, Italy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Transformed Materials] is an exploration into today's design methodologies of architecture production. The emergence of architectural form is questioned in relation to the temporal state of design intent and the physical ...

Skerry, Nathaniel S. (Nathaniel Standish), 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Storage depot for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Vertical drilling of cylindrical holes in the soil, and the lining of such holes, provides storage vaults called caissons. A guarded depot is provided with a plurality of such caissons covered by shielded closures preventing radiation from penetrating through any linear gap to the atmosphere. The heat generated by the radioactive material is dissipated through the vertical liner of the well into the adjacent soil and thus to the ground surface so that most of the heat from the radioactive material is dissipated into the atmosphere in a manner involving no significant amount of biologically harmful radiation. The passive cooling of the radioactive material without reliance upon pumps, personnel, or other factor which might fail, constitutes one of the most advantageous features of this system. Moreover this system is resistant to damage from tornadoes or earthquakes. Hermetically sealed containers of radioactive material may be positioned in the caissons. Loading vehicles can travel throughout the depot to permit great flexibility of loading and unloading radioactive materials. Radioactive material can be shifted to a more closely spaced caisson after ageing sufficiently to generate much less heat. The quantity of material stored in a caisson is restricted by the average capacity for heat dissipation of the soil adjacent such caisson.

Szulinski, Milton J. (Richland, WA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Materials for solid state lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dramatic improvement in the efficiency of inorganic and organic light emitting diodes (LEDs and OLEDs) within the last decade has made these devices viable future energy efficient replacements for current light sources. However, both technologies must overcome major technical barriers, requiring significant advances in material science, before this goal can be achieved. Attention will be given to each technology associated with the following major areas of material research: (1) material synthesis, (2) process development, (3) device and defect physics, and (4) packaging. The discussion on material synthesis will emphasize the need for further development of component materials, including substrates and electrodes, necessary for improving device performance. The process technology associated with the LEDs and OLEDs is very different, but in both cases it is one factor limiting device performance. Improvements in process control and methodology are expected to lead to additional benefits of higher yield, greater reliability and lower costs. Since reliability and performance are critical to these devices, an understanding of the basic physics of the devices and device failure mechanisms is necessary to effectively improve the product. The discussion will highlight some of the more basic material science problems remaining to be solved. In addition, consideration will be given to packaging technology and the need for the development of novel materials and geometries to increase the efficiencies and reliability of the devices. The discussion will emphasize the performance criteria necessary to meet lighting applications, in order to illustrate the gap between current status and market expectations for future product.

Johnson, S.G.; Simmons, J.A.

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Materials Challenges in Nuclear Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power currently provides about 13% of the worldwide electrical power, and has emerged as a reliable baseload source of electricity. A number of materials challenges must be successfully resolved for nuclear energy to continue to make further improvements in reliability, safety and economics. The operating environment for materials in current and proposed future nuclear energy systems is summarized, along with a description of materials used for the main operating components. Materials challenges associated with power uprates and extensions of the operating lifetimes of reactors are described. The three major materials challenges for the current and next generation of water-cooled fission reactors are centered on two structural materials aging degradation issues (corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of structural materials and neutron-induced embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels), along with improved fuel system reliability and accident tolerance issues. The major corrosion and stress corrosion cracking degradation mechanisms for light water reactors are reviewed. The materials degradation issues for the Zr alloy clad UO2 fuel system currently utilized in the majority of commercial nuclear power plants is discussed for normal and off-normal operating conditions. Looking to proposed future (Generation IV) fission and fusion energy systems, there are 5 key bulk radiation degradation effects (low temperature radiation hardening and embrittlement, radiation-induced and modified solute segregation and phase stability, irradiation creep, void swelling, and high temperature helium embrittlement) and a multitude of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking effects (including irradiation-assisted phenomena) that can have a major impact on the performance of structural materials.

Zinkle, Steven J [ORNL] [ORNL; Was, Gary [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF.sub.4 and HNO.sub.3 and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200.degree. C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

Sturcken, Edward F. (P.O. Box 900, Isle of Palms, SC 29451)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

MSE 410: Materials Foundations for Energy Applications MSE 810: Materials for Energy Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; materials for future wind energy needs; thermoelectric materials for solid state energy conversion II: thermoelectric materials Introduction; the design of thermoelectric materials Morelli Jan 31, Feb 2 Module II: thermoelectric materials Thermal and electrical transport properties; model systems

443

2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Materials Technologies...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Materials Technologies: Propulsion Materials 2014 Annual Merit Review Results Report - Materials Technologies: Propulsion Materials Merit review of DOE Vehicle Technologies...

444

ATOMISTIC MODELING OF ELECTRODE MATERIALS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

life and rate * High cost of electrode materials * Project lead: Venkat Srinivasan (LBNL) * Marca Doeff (LBNL): Al-substituted layered Li-TM-O 2 * Phil Ross (LBNL) and Gerbrand...

445

Atomistic Modeling of Electrode Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and rate * High cost of electrode materials * Project lead: John Newman * Marca Doeff (LBNL) on layered Li-TM-O 2 for effects of Al substitution * Phil Ross (LBNL) on nano-LiFePO...

446

Filter casting nanoscale porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of producing nanoporous material includes the steps of providing a liquid, providing nanoparticles, producing a slurry of the liquid and the nanoparticles, removing the liquid from the slurry, and producing monolith.

Hayes, Joel Ryan; Nyce, Gregory Walker; Kuntz, Jushua David

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

447

Energetic materials at extreme conditions   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to effectively model the behaviour of energetic materials under operational conditions it is essential to obtain detailed structural information for these compounds at elevated temperature and/or pressures. The ...

Millar, David Iain Archibald

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

448

Herty Advanced Materials Development Center  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

449

SIDEWALL MATERIALS FOR ALUMINIUM SMELTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIDEWALL MATERIALS FOR ALUMINIUM SMELTER Reiza Zakia Mukhlis Supervisors: Dr. M. Akbar Rhamdhani heat losses *Grjotheim et al., 1988, Aluminium smelter technology #12;Reducing energy consumption anode cell* *Mukhlis, Rhamdhani and Brooks, TMS 2010 **Grjotheim et al., 1988, Aluminium smelter

Liley, David

450

Optimal Design of Heterogeneous Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are granular media, soils, polycrystals, sandstone, wood, bone, lungs, blood, animal and plant tissue, cell, electromagnetic, and mechanical properties of heterogeneous materials has a long and venerable history, attracting

Torquato, Salvatore

451

SHORT PROGRAMS Materials By Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

techniques including 3D printing, self-assembly, microfluidics and other technologies. We will distribute and analyze material samples designed based on multiscale simulations and manufactured using 3D printing

Entekhabi, Dara

452

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Cancels: DOE M 474.1-1B DOE M 474.1-2A

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

453

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The manual establishes a program for the control and accountability of nuclear materials within the Department of Energy. Chg 1, dated 8-14-06. Canceled by DOE O 474.2.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

454

Strategic raw material inventory optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of aerospace grade titanium alloys is concentrated in a relatively small number of producers. The market for these materials has always been cyclical in nature. During periods of high demand, metal producers ...

Vacha, Robin L. (Robin Lee)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Momentive Performance Materials Distillation Intercharger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Presenter: Nicki (Collins) Boucher Project Team: T. Baisley, C. Beers, R. Cameron, K. Holman, T. Kotkoskie, K. Norris Momentive Performance Materials Inc. Waterford, NY May 23, 2013 Industrial Energy Technology Conference ACC Responsible... Care? Energy Efficiency Program Momentive Performance Materials Distillation Interchanger ESL-IE-13-05-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Fifth Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. May 21-24, 2013 Copyright 2013 Momentive Performance...

Boucher, N.; Baisley, T.; Beers, C.; Cameron, R.; Holman, K.; Kotkoskie, T.; Norris, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges.

Hildebrand, Bernard P. (Richland, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Nuclear Material Control and Accountability  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes performance objectives, metrics, and requirements for developing, implementing, and maintaining a nuclear material control and accountability program within DOE/NNSA and for DOE-owned materials at other facilities that are exempt from licensing by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Cancels DOE M 470.4-6, Admin Chg 1, 8-26-05. Admin Chg 2, dated 11-19-12, cancels DOE M 474.2 Admin Chg 1.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

458

Particle Suspension Mechanisms - Supplemental Material  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This supplemental material provides a brief introduction to particle suspension mechanisms that cause exfoliated skin cells to become and remain airborne. The material presented here provides additional context to the primary manuscript and serves as background for designing possible future studies to assess the impact of skin cells as a source of infectious aerosols. This introduction is not intended to be comprehensive and interested readers are encouraged to consult the references cited.

Dillon, M B

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

459

Nanostructure material for supercapacitor application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transition metal nitrides and carbonitride materials were fabricated via sol-gel technology. The transition metal amides were synthesized by two methods: chemical route and electrolysis. The transition metal amides were then further polymerized, sintering to high temperature in an inert or reduced atmosphere. Transition metal nitrides and carbonitrides powders with surface area up to 160 m{sup 2}/g were obtained. The resultant electrode material showed high specific capacitance as crystalline ruthenium oxide.

Huang, Y.; Chu, C.T.; Wei, Q.; Zheng, H.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges. 4 figs.

Hildebrand, B.P.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Methods for degrading lignocellulosic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for degrading a lignocellulosic material, comprising: treating the lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying a lignocellulosic material with an effective amount of one or more cellulolytic enzymes in the presence of at least one surfactant selected from the group consisting of a secondary alcohol ethoxylate, fatty alcohol ethoxylate, nonylphenol ethoxylate, tridecyl ethoxylate, and polyoxyethylene ether, wherein the presence of the surfactant increases the degradation of lignocellulosic material compared to the absence of the surfactant; (b) fermenting the saccharified lignocellulosic material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microorganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

Vlasenko, Elena (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA); Xu, Feng (Davis, CA)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

462

1. Noah's Bagels 2. Pete's Coffee & Tea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Noah's Bagels 2. Pete's Coffee & Tea 3. Pie 'N Burger 4. Noda Sushi 5. Subway 6. Madres 7. Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf 14. Cold Stone Creamery 15. Macy's 16. Red Brick Pizza 17. Trader Joe's 18. Green Street Restaurant 42. Radhika's Cuisine of India 43. Crocodile Cafe 44. California Skewers 45

Weinreb, Sander

463

"Are you in or out?" How working in woodlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/brick/stone constructions, mountain-bike trails, tree planting, tree pruning, fencing, coppicing, rhododendron-clearing · FC, literature 6 Prison/Openprison Probation #12;Identity Issues: How to `operationalise' desistance? "to desist from crime, ex-offenders need to develop a coherent pro-social identity for themselves" (Maruna 2001: 7

464

--No Title--  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Brick, Stone or Stucco ... 846 46.4 40.8 17.0 36.6 72.5 6.5 0.36 7.69 Concrete (Block or Poured) ... 803 46.4 47.2 21.7 41.3 77.9 6.2 0.36 7.71 Concrete...

465

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash. Paving applications, such as Roller Compacted Concrete for industrial plants, parking lots be used in Self-Consolidating Concrete applications. This type of concrete requires additional fines that concrete Bricks, Blocks, and Paving Stones can also be made with the Corn Products' coal ash. Additionally

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

466

Thermoelectric materials development. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic search for advanced thermoelectric materials was initiated at JPL several years ago to evaluate candidate materials which includes consideration of the following property attributes: (1) semiconducting properties; (2) large Seebeck coefficient; (3) high carrier mobility and high electrical conductivity; (4) low lattice thermal conductivity; and (5) chemical stability and low vapor pressure. Through this candidate screening process, JPL identified several families of materials as promising candidates for improved thermoelectric materials including the skutterudite family. There are several programs supporting various phases of the effort on these materials. As part of an ongoing effort to develop skutterudite materials with lower thermal conductivity values, several solid solutions and filled skutterudite materials were investigated under the effort sponsored by DOE. The efforts have primarily focused on: (1) study of existence and properties of solid solutions between the binary compounds CoSb{sub 3} and IrSb{sub 3}, and RuSb{sub 2}Te, and (2) CeFe{sub 4{minus}x}Sb{sub 12} based filled compositions. For the solid solutions, the lattice thermal conductivity reduction was expected to be reduced by the introduction of the Te and Ru atoms while in the case of CeFe{sub 4{minus}x}Ru{sub x}Sb{sub 12} based filled compositions. For the solid solutions, the lattice thermal conductivity reduction was expected to be reduced by the introduction of the Te and Ru atoms while in the case of CeFe{sub 4{minus}x}Ru{sub x}Sb{sub 12} filled compositions, the reduction would be caused by the rattling of Ce atoms located in the empty voids of the skutterudite structure and the substitution of Fe for Ru. The details of the sample preparation and characterization of their thermoelectric properties are reported in this report.

Fleurial, J.P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Radioactive material package seal tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The two-and-a-half day symposium on the "Quantitative Characterization of Nanostructured Materials" will be the first comprehensive meeting on this topic held under the auspices of a major U.S. professional society. Spring MRS Meetings provide a natural venue for this symposium as they attract a broad audience of researchers that represents a cross-section of the state-of-the-art regarding synthesis, structure-property relations, and applications of nanostructured materials. Close interactions among the experts in local structure measurements and materials researchers will help both to identify measurement needs pertinent to â??real-worldâ?ť materials problems and to familiarize the materials research community with the state-of-the-art local structure measurement techniques. We have chosen invited speakers that reflect the multidisciplinary and international nature of this topic and the need to continually nurture productive interfaces among university, government and industrial laboratories. The intent of the symposium is to provide an interdisciplinary forum for discussion and exchange of ideas on the recent progress in quantitative characterization of structural order in nanomaterials using different experimental techniques and theory. The symposium is expected to facilitate discussions on optimal approaches for determining atomic structure at the nanoscale using combined inputs from multiple measurement techniques.

Dr. Frank (Bud) Bridges, University of California-Santa Cruz

2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

469

Level 3 2013/14 Materials Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Worsley EGA301 Composite Materials 10 Credits Dr. JC Arnold EG-353 Research Project 30 Credits Dr. CPLevel 3 2013/14 Materials Engineering BEng Materials Science and Engineering[J500,J502,J505] BEng Materials Science and Engineering with a year abroad[J510] MEng Materials Science and Engineering[J504] MEng

Harman, Neal.A.

470

Characterizing artificial electromagnetic materials and their hybridization with fundamentally resonant magnetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4 Ferromagnetic Materials in Microstrip Structures . . . 4.1Ferromagnetic Materials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4.3 The1: positive material 1 , µ 1 > 0 . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Gollub, Jonah Nathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Python Materials Genomics (pymatgen): A robust, open-source python library for materials analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interface (API). As an example, using pymatgen's interface to the Materials Project's RESTful API materials data via the Materials Pro- ject's REpresentational State Transfer (REST) Application Programming

Southern California, University of

472

Displacement cascades in diatomic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new function, the specified-projectile displacement function p/sub ijk/ (E), is introduced to describe displacement cascades in polyatomic materials. This function describes the specific collision events that produce displacements and hence adds new information not previously available. Calculations of p/sub ijk/ (E) for MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and TaO are presented and discussed. Results show that the parameters that have the largest effect on displacement collision events are the PKA energy and the mass ratio of the atom types in the material. It is further shown that the microscopic nature of the displacement events changes over the entire recoil energy range relevant to fusion neutron spectra and that these changes are different in materials whose mass ratio is near one than in those where it is far from one.

Parkin, D.M.; Coulter, C.A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Metal recovery from porous materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for recovering plutonium and other metals from materials by leaching comprising the steps of incinerating the materials to form a porous matrix as the residue of incineration, immersing the matrix into acid in a microwave-transparent pressure vessel, sealing the pressure vessel, and applying microwaves so that the temperature and the pressure in the pressure vessel increase. The acid for recovering plutonium can be a mixture of HBF[sub 4] and HNO[sub 3] and preferably the pressure is increased to at least 100 PSI and the temperature to at least 200 C. The porous material can be pulverized before immersion to further increase the leach rate.

Sturcken, E.F.

1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

474

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive material storage system for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together, whereby the plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or

Groh, Edward F. (Naperville, IL); Cassidy, Dale A. (Valparaiso, IN); Dates, Leon R. (Elmwood Park, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Microrheological Characterisation of Anisotropic Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the measurement of anisotropic viscoelastic moduli in complex soft materials, such as biopolymer gels, via video particle tracking microrheology of colloid tracer particles. The use of a correlation tensor to find the axes of maximum anisotropy, and hence the mechanical director, is described. The moduli of an aligned DNA gel are reported, as a test of the technique; this may have implications for high DNA concentrations in vivo. We also discuss the errors in microrheological measurement, and describe the use of frequency space filtering to improve displacement resolution, and hence probe these typically high modulus materials.

I A Hasnain; A M Donald

2006-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

476

Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compounds of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved.

Iverson, Daniel C. (Aiken, SC)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

Moses, W.W.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

479

Storage containers for radioactive material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive material storage system is claimed for use in the laboratory having a flat base plate with a groove in one surface thereof and a hollow pedestal extending perpendicularly away from the other surface thereof, a sealing gasket in the groove, a cover having a filter therein and an outwardly extending flange which fits over the plate, the groove and the gasket, and a clamp for maintaining the cover and the plate sealed together. The plate and the cover and the clamp cooperate to provide a storage area for radioactive material readily accessible for use or inventory. Wall mounts are provided to prevent accidental formation of critical masses during storage.

Groh, E.F.; Cassidy, D.A.; Dates, L.R.

1980-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

480

Advanced Materials | More Science | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout the BuildingInnovation Portal Advanced MaterialMaterialsAdvanced

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "material brick stone" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

Porcelain enamel neutron absorbing material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A porcelain enamel composition as a neutron absorbing material can be prepared of a major proportion by weight of a cadmium compound and a minor proportion of compound of boron, lithium and silicon. These compounds in the form of a porcelain enamel coating or layer on several alloys has been found to be particularly effective in enhancing the nuclear safety of equipment for use in the processing and storage of fissile material. The composition of the porcelain enamel coating can be tailored to match the coefficient of thermal expansion of the equipment to be coated and excellent coating adhesion can be achieved. 2 figs.

Iverson, D.C.

1987-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

482

Towards an integrated materials characterization toolbox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The material characterization toolbox has recently experienced a number of parallel revolutionary advances, foreshadowing a time in the near future when material scientists can quantify material structure evolution across ...

Robertson, Ian M.

483

Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the classical Heusler material Co 2 FeSi (Appendix B).plated self-assembly. Nature Materials, 3:823–828, 2004.1 Concepts Functional materials are those with an industrial

Jenkins, C.A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MANUFACTURING ACCELERATING THE INCORPORATION OF MATERIALS ADVANCES INTO MANUFACTURING PROCESSES NATIONAL NEED The proposed topic "Accelerating the Incorporation of Materials Advances into Manufacturing organizations, leading researchers from academic institutions, and others. Materials performance is often

Magee, Joseph W.

485

Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Magonov, B. Ozturk, Nature Materials 2, 413 (Jun, L. J.Ager, R. O. Ritchie, Nature Materials 7, 672 (Aug, 2008). A.Guiden, Journal of Composite Materials D. R. Johnson, X. F.

Munch, Etienne

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Carbon-based Materials for Energy Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

K. and Beguin, F. et. al Materials Science and Engineering BF. Advanced Functional Materials 17, 11, 1828-1836 (2007)and Silicone- Modified Materials ch7, 82-99 (2007) 3. Gädda,

Rice, Lynn Margaret

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

CHARACTERIZATION OF SIALON-TYPE MATERIALS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Economical Refractory Material", Industrial Heating, 50-of Sialon-Type Materials Newman Spencer Lawrence BerkeleyEXPERIHENTAL PROCEDURES A. The Material L Ml H2 M3 and M4 B.

Spencer, P.N.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Systems and methods for treating material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems for treating material are provided that can include a vessel defining a volume, at least one conduit coupled to the vessel and in fluid communication with the vessel, material within the vessel, and NF.sub.3 material within the conduit. Methods for fluorinating material are provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to fluorinate at least a portion of the material. Methods for separating components of material are also provided that can include exposing the material to NF.sub.3 to at least partially fluorinate a portion of the material, and separating at least one fluorinated component of the fluorinated portion from the material. The materials exposed to the NF.sub.3 material can include but are not limited to one or more of U, Ru, Rh, Mo, Tc, Np, Pu, Sb, Ag, Am, Sn, Zr, Cs, Th, and/or Rb.

Scheele, Randall D; McNamara, Bruce K

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

489

Managing Research Materials and Data: Recordkeeping Guidelines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing Research Materials and Data: Recordkeeping Guidelines 1. Introduction Research Council and Universities Australia Managing Research Materials and Data: Recordkeeping Guidelines the management and disposal of research materials and data in accordance with the requirements

490

Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Combinatorial Approach for Hydrogen Storage Materials (presentation) Presented at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hydrogen...

491

Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ti010mallick2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and...

492

Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

D.C. ti06mallick.pdf More Documents & Publications Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and Processing Center for Lightweighting Automotive Materials and...

493

Sandia National Laboratories: Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials with Solar Cells for Increased Photovoltaic Efficiency On December 4, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic, Renewable Energy,...

494

Composite materials with integrated embedded sensing networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interlaminar Response of Composite Materials , ed. N. J.in fibre-reinforced composite structures with embedded fibreDutton, and D. Kelly. 2004. Composite Materials for Aircraft

Schaaf, Kristin Leigh

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2010 -- Washington D.C. lm028laracurzio2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

496

Advanced Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Battery Materials Characterization: Success stories from the High Temperature Materials Laboratory (HTML) User Program Dr. E. Andrew Payzant, ORNL Project ID lmp02payzant This...

497

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Review and Peer Evaluation lm028laracurzio2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

498

Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm028laracurzio2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature Materials Laboratory and HTML...

499

Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM...

500

Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment:...