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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

On neutron numbers and atomic masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On neutron numbers and atomic masses ... Assigning neutron numbers, correct neutron numbers, and atomic masses and nucleon numbers. ...

R. Heyrovská

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

3

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

4

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

5

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

6

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

7

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

8

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

9

,"New York Number of Natural Gas Consumers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Residential" "Sourcekey","NA1501SNY8","NA1508SNY8","NA1509SNY8" "Date","New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Count)","New York Natural Gas Number...

10

California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Residential

11

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

12

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

13

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

14

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

15

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

16

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

17

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

18

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

19

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

20

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

22

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

23

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

24

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

25

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

26

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

27

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

28

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

29

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

30

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

31

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

32

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

33

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

34

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

35

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

36

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

37

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

38

Colorado Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1986-2013 Sales 1,634,582 1,645,711 1,659,803 1,672,307 1997-2013 Transported 5 5 5 5 1997-2013 Commercial Number of...

39

Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

487,320 489,349 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 1986-2013 Sales 489,380 494,065 503,241 512,110 1997-2013 Transported 805 905 897 1,382 1997-2013 Commercial Number of Consumers...

40

Idaho Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36,191 342,277 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 1987-2013 Sales 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 1997-2013 Commercial Number of Consumers 37,320 38,245 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have made a new compilation of observations of maximum stellar mass versus cluster membership number from the literature, which we analyse for consistency with the predictions of a simple random drawing hypothesis for stellar mass selection in clusters. Previously, Weidner and Kroupa have suggested that the maximum stellar mass is lower, in low mass clusters, than would be expected on the basis of random drawing, and have pointed out that this could have important implications for steepening the integrated initial mass function of the Galaxy (the IGIMF) at high masses. Our compilation demonstrates how the observed distribution in the plane of maximum stellar mass versus membership number is affected by the method of target selection; in particular, rather low n clusters with large maximum stellar masses are abundant in observational datasets that specifically seek clusters in the environs of high mass stars. Although we do not consider our compilation to be either complete or unbiased, we discuss the method by which such data should be statistically analysed. Our very provisional conclusion is that the data is not indicating any striking deviation from the expectations of random drawing.

Th. Maschberger; C. J. Clarke

2008-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Families and clustering in a natural numbers network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We develop a network in which the natural numbers are the vertices. The decomposition of natural numbers by prime numbers is used to establish the connections. We perform data collapse and show that the degree distribution of these networks scales linearly with the number of vertices. We explore the families of vertices in connection with prime numbers decomposition. We compare the average distance of the network and the clustering coefficient with the distance and clustering coefficient of the corresponding random graph. In case we set connections among vertices each time the numbers share a common prime number the network has properties similar to a random graph. If the criterion for establishing links becomes more selective, only prime numbers greater than pl are used to establish links, where the network has high clustering coefficient.

Gilberto Corso

2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

43

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

44

SIMULTANEOUS CONSTRAINTS ON THE NUMBER AND MASS OF RELATIVISTIC SPECIES  

SciTech Connect

Recent indications from both particle physics and cosmology suggest the possible existence of more than three neutrino species. In cosmological analyses the effects of neutrino mass and number of species can in principle be disentangled for fixed cosmological parameters. However, since we do not have perfect measurements of the standard {Lambda} cold dark matter model parameters, some correlation remains between the neutrino mass and number of species, and both parameters should be included in the analysis. Combining the newest observations of several cosmological probes (cosmic microwave background, large-scale structure, expansion rate), we obtain N {sub eff} = 3.58{sup +0.15} {sub -0.16}(68% CL){sup +0.55} {sub -0.53}(95% CL) and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} < 0.60 eV(95% CL), which are currently the strongest constraints on N {sub eff} and {Sigma}m {sub {nu}} from an analysis including both parameters. The preference for N {sub eff} >3 is at the 2{sigma} level.

Riemer-Sorensen, Signe; Parkinson, David; Davis, Tamara M. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Blake, Chris, E-mail: signe@physics.uq.edu.au [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)] [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, VIC 3122 (Australia)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements)...

46

Altered solar wind -magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Altered solar wind - magnetosphere interaction at low Mach numbers: coronal mass ejections Benoit fundamental alterations of the solar wind ­ magnetosphere interaction that occur during low Mach number solar wind. We first show that low Mach number solar wind conditions are often characteristic of coronal mass

Boyer, Edmond

47

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

48

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

49

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

50

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

51

The Planck Length Scale and Einstein Mass-Energy Obtained from the Sciama-Mach Large Number Relationship  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If a physical significance should be attributed to the cosmological large number relationship obtained from Sciama's formulation of Mach's Principle, then a number of interesting physical conclusions may be drawn. The Planck length is naturally obtained as the amplitude of waves in a medium whose properties are implied by the relationship. The relativistic internal energy associated with a rest mass is explicitly related to the gravitational potential energy of the Universe, and consistency with the Einstein photon energy is demonstrated. Broader cosmological consequences of this formulation are addressed.

Scott Funkhouser

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

Wave?number solution for a string with distributed mass properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A structure with spatially variable properties when excited at a single frequency will excite many wave numbers. In this paper the vibration of a string with a mass distribution m(x) given by a Fourier series expansion is analyzed. The equation governing the wave?number solution w(k) for the string displacement is obtained via Fourier transform. The final result is a finite?difference equation. The finite?difference equation relates all of the displacement wave numbers to each other. The solution to this equation is obtained by rewriting it as a system of simultaneous equations that are then solved by standard linear algebra techniques. Wave?number spectral solutions are obtained for different mass distribution. In one case the mass distribution is assumed to vary in a discontinuous manner between adjacent bays in another case the mass is assumed to vary in a ‘‘triangular’’ manner. The wave?number solutions are presented in 3?D graphs so that the magnitude of the displacement can be seen as a function of the wave number and either the magnitude of the additional mass the area over which the mass is distributed or the length of the bay. In the limiting case as the mass distribution becomes very concentrated the classical pass/stop band familiar with periodic structures is recovered. ?

Mauro Pierucci

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

The Number of Information Bits Related to the Minimum Quantum and Gravitational Masses in a Vacuum Dominated Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wesson obtained a limit on quantum and gravitational mass in the universe by combining the cosmological constant Lambda, Planck constant, the speed of light c, and also the gravitational constant G. The corresponding masses are 2.0x10E-62 kg and 2.3E+54 kg respectively, and in general can be obtained with the help of a generic dimensional analysis, or from an analysis where the cosmological constant appears in a four dimensional space-time and as a result of a higher dimensional reduction. In this paper our goal is to establish a relation for both quantum and gravitational mass as function of the information number bit N. For this reason, we first derive an expression for the cosmological constant as a function of information bit, since both masses depend on it, and then various resulting relations are explored, in relation to information number of bits N. Fractional information bits imply no information extraction is possible. We see, that the order of magnitude of the various parameters as well as their ratios involve the large number 10E+122, that is produced naturally from the fundamental parameters of modern cosmology. Finally, we propose that in a complete quantum gravity theory the idea of information the might have to be included, with the quantum bits of information (q-bits) as one of its fundamental parameters, resulting thus to a more complete understanding of the universe, its laws, and its evolution.

Ioannis Haranas; Ioannis Gkigkitzis

2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

54

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 24 NUMBER 2 FEBRUARY 2006 139 A DNA flu vaccine in practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 24 NUMBER 2 FEBRUARY 2006 139 A DNA flu vaccine in practice in Biotechnology Progress (21, 1577­1592, 2005) and suggest that though challenging, it should be possible. However

Church, George M.

55

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2007 627 DNA synthesis and biological security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2007 627 DNA synthesis and biological security Hans Biotechnology; Han-Oh Park is at Bioneer; Bas Reichert is at BaseClear B.V.; Ralf Wagner is at the University

Church, George M.

56

Global energy gradients and size in colonial organisms: Worker mass and worker number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global energy gradients and size in colonial organisms: Worker mass and worker number in ant size varies globally is a key challenge to ecology. Solar energy may shape gradients of body size by its effects on local temperature and net primary productivity (16­20). Rising global temperatures (21

Kaspari, Mike

57

Measurement of number, mass and size distribution of particles in the atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...size-fractionated manner using cascade impactors, which depend...mean free path of the gas molecules o er a signi...5, tra c-related gases, particle number and...and contracts with the Natural Environment Research Council...this period, exhaust gas emissions will be rich...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Probing the geometric nature of particles mass in graphene systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to undulatory mechanics, the Compton periodicity, which is the intrinsic proper-time recurrence of a wave function, determines the mass of the corresponding elementary particles. This provides a geometric description of the rest mass which can be consistently applied to derive the effective mass spectrum and electronic properties of the elementary charge carriers in carbon nanotubes and other condensed matter systems. The Compton periodicity is determined by the boundary conditions associated to the curled-up dimension of carbon nanotubes or analogous constraints of the charge carrier wave function. This approach shows an interesting interplay between particle physics and relativistic space-time, as well as analogies with the Kaluza-Klein theory and Holography.

Donatello Dolce; Andrea Perali

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

59

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 24 NUMBER 5 MAY 2006 545 RNA synthetic biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synthetic biology efforts have focused on engineering gene cir- cuits that rely on protein-DNA interactionsNATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 24 NUMBER 5 MAY 2006 545 RNA synthetic biology Farren J Isaacs1, Daniel two years efforts in synthetic biology have produced novel, synthetic RNA components capable

Collins, James J.

60

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 26 NUMBER 2 FEBRUARY 2008 169 How biotech can transform biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 26 NUMBER 2 FEBRUARY 2008 169 How biotech can transform biofuels Lee R, biotechnological solutions should focus on optimizing the conversion of biomass to sugars. Enthusiasm for using- tional biotechnological paths to producing energy also receiving attention. The proposi- tion that energy

California at Riverside, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 5 MAY 2007 509 To the editor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of tests and regulatory scrutiny before commercialization. The associated processes of experimentationNATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 5 MAY 2007 509 To the editor: The regulatory approval process to the development and commercialization of new cropping technologies. For some crops these barriers may

Bradford, Kent

62

Nature Methods Minimalistic encapsulated proteomic sample processing applied to copy number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nature Methods Minimalistic encapsulated proteomic sample processing applied to copy number Supplementary Figure 1 Comparison of SILAC-based ratios using different sample processing conditions steps of the iST sample preparation workflow. It further shows how to troubleshoot the method in case

Cai, Long

63

Constraints on the dark matter particle mass from the number of Milky Way satellites  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted N-body simulations of the growth of Milky Way-sized halos in cold and warm dark matter cosmologies. The number of dark matter satellites in our simulated Milky Ways decreases with decreasing mass of the dark matter particle. Assuming that the number of dark matter satellites exceeds or equals the number of observed satellites of the Milky Way, we derive lower limits on the dark matter particle mass. We find with 95% confidence m{sub s}>13.3 keV for a sterile neutrino produced by the Dodelson and Widrow mechanism, m{sub s}>8.9 keV for the Shi and Fuller mechanism, m{sub s}>3.0 keV for the Higgs decay mechanism, and m{sub WDM}>2.3 keV for a thermal dark matter particle. The recent discovery of many new dark matter dominated satellites of the Milky Way in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey allows us to set lower limits comparable to constraints from the complementary methods of Lyman-{alpha} forest modeling and x-ray observations of the unresolved cosmic x-ray background and of dark matter halos from dwarf galaxy to cluster scales. Future surveys like LSST, DES, PanSTARRS, and SkyMapper have the potential to discover many more satellites and further improve constraints on the dark matter particle mass.

Polisensky, Emil [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20745 (United States); Ricotti, Massimo [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20745 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Turbulent natural convection in a horizontal layer of small-Prandtl-number fluid  

SciTech Connect

Turbulent natural convection in a horizontal layer of liquid metal confined between two infinite rigid plates is studied theoretically. The layer, with uniformly distributed energy sources in the fluid, is heated from below and cooled from above. An approximate analysis of the Boussinesq equations of motion is performed for the case of small-Prandtl-number fluids to determine the temperature profiles in three different thermal regions of the layer. By matching these profiles in the regions of overlap, analytical expressions are derived for the lower and upper surface Nusselt numbers and the dimensionless turbulent core temperature as functions of the internal and external Rayleigh numbers defined respectively in terms of the volumetric heating rate and surface-to-surface temperature difference of the layer. Comparison of the present results with heat transfer data for liquid mercury is made and found to be good.

Cheung, F.B.; Shiah, S.W. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (United States)); Cho, D.H.; Baker, L. Jr. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Natural convection with mixed insulating and conducting boundary conditions: low and high Rayleigh numbers regimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the stability and dynamics of natural convection in two dimensions, subject to inhomogeneous boundary conditions. In particular, we consider a Rayleigh-B\\`enard (RB) cell, where the horizontal top boundary contains a periodic sequence of alternating thermal insulating and conducting patches, and we study the effects of the heterogeneous pattern on the global heat exchange, both at low and high Rayleigh numbers. At low Rayleigh numbers, we determine numerically the transition from a regime characterized by the presence of small convective cells localized at the inhomogeneous boundary to the onset of bulk convective rolls spanning the entire domain. Such a transition is also controlled analytically in the limit when the boundary pattern length is small compared with the cell vertical size. At higher Rayleigh number, we use numerical simulations based on a lattice Boltzmann method to assess the impact of boundary inhomogeneities on the fully turbulent regime up to $Ra \\sim 10^{10}$.

Ripesi, P; Sbragaglia, M; Wirth, A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

nature biotechnology volume 30 number 5 mAY 2012 405 Ryan E. Cobb is in the Department of Chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nature biotechnology volume 30 number 5 mAY 2012 405 Ryan E. Cobb is in the Department of Chemical genomic sequences of interest are among the most important tools in biotechnology, but many requireAmerica,Inc.Allrightsreserved. #12;406 volume 30 number 5 mAY 2012 nature biotechnology DNA manipulation techniques. For example

Zhao, Huimin

67

Report number ex. Ris-R-1234(EN) 1 Local CHP Plants between the Natural Gas and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distributed generation in Denmark. This paper deals with the CHP as intermediary between the natural gas of natural gas from the North Sea of which much is used for electricity and heat generation purposesReport number ex. Risø-R-1234(EN) 1 Local CHP Plants between the Natural Gas and Electricity

68

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Acquifers Capacity (Count)" Acquifers Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Acquifers Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1392_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1392_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:23 PM"

69

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

70

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Depleted Fields Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1391_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1391_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:06 PM"

71

,"U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Number of Underground Storage Salt Caverns Capacity (Count)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1393_nus_8a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1393_nus_8a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:43:34 PM"

72

The effect of particle resuspension during walking activity to PM10 mass and number concentrations in an indoor microenvironment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Mass and number concentration of particulate matter (PM10) was measured during walking experiments inside a laboratory. In total 20 walking experiments were conducted in a period of 3 months. Particle number concentration was measured in the size range of 0.02–1 ?m, while, mass concentration was measured in the range 0.1–10 ?m. The PM10 mass increased during the activity, by average 84%, whereas, the walking activity had no impact on particle number concentration. Human induced resuspension rates were examined under different dust loadings. The different dust loadings used (25, 15, 5, 1 g/m2) in order to evaluate the impact of surface loading on the indoor PM10 mass concentration and on the resuspension rate. Walking style was the same in all experiments. Moreover, the experiments involved two different walking patterns inside the laboratory (rectangular and line). The impact of different speed was also examined. The average resuspension rate was calculated to be equal to 10?2–10?3 hr?1. No impact on resuspension rate was observed for different walking patterns or walking speed. On the other hand, the measured mass concentration inside the room was increased when using higher dust loading on the floor, although the estimated resuspension rate found independent on the initially deposited surface dust loading.

Norbert Serfozo; Sofia Eirini Chatoutsidou; Mihalis Lazaridis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

50 nature structural biology volume 6 number 1 january 1999 Understanding the nature of interactions between transmembrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential energy. Our primary objective is to find the global energy minimum on a potential energy surface with the large number of minima on multidimensional potential energy surfaces in order to converge to the global energy minimum. Here we show how our potential smoothing and search method succeeds in finding the global

Ponder, Jay

74

Mass number dependence of the Skyrme-force-induced nuclear symmetry energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global mass dependence of the nuclear symmetry energy and its two basic ingredients due to the mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential is studied within the Skyrme-Hartree-Fock model. In particular, our study determines the ratio of the surface-to-volume contributions to the nuclear symmetry energy to be ~1.6 and reveals that contributions due to mean-level spacing and effective strength of the isovector mean-potential are almost equal after removing momentum-dependent effects by rescaling them with isoscalar and isovector effective masses, respectively.

M. Rafalski; W. Satula; R. Wyss

2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

75

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 30 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2012 513 P E R S P E C T I V E  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 30 NUMBER 6 JUNE 2012 513 P E R S P E C T I V E Metagenomics holds in comparability of data will facilitate the study of biotechnologically relevant processes, such as bioprospecting, to date, played only a small role in biotechnological research, with the majority of novel developments

Fierer, Noah

76

Volume 170, number 5,6 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 20 July 1990 Nature of the red emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volume 170, number 5,6 CHEMICAL PHYSICS LETTERS 20 July 1990 Nature of the red emission Chemistry Stanford University,Stanford, CA 94305. USA Received 16April 1990 Intense red emission peaking solution of H202. Evidence is presented that strong red emission requires the presence of both O,( `A

Zare, Richard N.

77

The redox nature of copper is utilized in a large number of enzymatic processes, including that catalysed by mitochondrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The redox nature of copper is utilized in a large number of enzymatic processes, including that catalysed by mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase, which makes copper an essential element for all aerobic organisms (Soloman and Lowery, 1993). However, the redox properties of copper can cause rapid generation

Grosell, Martin

78

news and views 994 nature structural biology volume 6 number 11 november 1999  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.ellington@mail.utexas.edu 1. Pace, N.R. & Marsh, T.L. Orig. Life Evol. Biosph. 16, 97-116 (1985). 2. Torres, R.A. & Bruice, T, R.R. Nature Struct. Biol. 6, 1062­1071 (1999). 4. Robertson, M.P. & Ellington, A.D. Nature Biotechnol. 17, 62-66 (1999). 5. Tang, J. & Breaker, R.R. Chem. Biol. 4, 453-459 (1997). 6. Jiang, F., Kumar

Chan, Hue Sun

79

A newsletter of the Kemp Natural Resources Station Volume 3, Number 2 -Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

th century, and the subsequent political, legal and environmental forces that helped shape forest recovery during the 20th century. According to Dr. Langston, natural resource professionals cannot manage@calshp.cals.wisc.edu The group explores the area where a logging camp once bustled with activity. shaped land settlement

80

On the nature of the extragalactic number counts in the K-band  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the causes of the different shape of the $K$-band number counts when compared to other bands, analyzing in detail the presence of a change in the slope around $K\\sim17.5$. We present a near-infrared imaging survey, conducted at the 3.5m telescope of the Calar Alto Spanish-German Astronomical Center (CAHA), covering two separated fields centered on the HFDN and the Groth field, with a total combined area of $\\sim0.27$deg$^{2}$ to a depth of $K\\sim19$ ($3\\sigma$,Vega). We derive luminosity functions from the observed $K$-band in the redshift range [0.25-1.25], that are combined with data from the references in multiple bands and redshifts, to build up the $K$-band number count distribution. We find that the overall shape of the number counts can be grouped into three regimes: the classic Euclidean slope regime ($d\\log N/dm\\sim0.6$) at bright magnitudes; a transition regime at intermediate magnitudes, dominated by $M^{\\ast}$ galaxies at the redshift that maximizes the product $\\phi^{\\ast}\\frac{dV_{c}}{d\\Omega}$; and an $\\alpha$ dominated regime at faint magnitudes, where the slope asymptotically approaches -0.4($\\alpha$+1) controlled by post-$M^{\\ast}$ galaxies. The slope of the $K$-band number counts presents an averaged decrement of $\\sim50%$ in the range $15.5

G. Barro; J. Gallego; P. G. Pérez-González; C. Eliche-Moral; M. Balcells; V. Villar; N. Cardiel; D. Cristobal-Hornillos; A. Gil de Paz; R. Gúzman; R. Pelló; M. Prieto; J. Zamorano

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

paper-number : V11D-2318 abstract-number : 949668 Mass-conservative numerical scheme of bubble growth in incompressible viscous magmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pa(0) C : water concentration : surface tension i : Pa(0) M GT M : water molar mass G : gas constant scale decompression time scale = 2 RiPa(0) : dimensionless surface tension : porosity R S r P C(t,r) m is refined at the bubble boundary Scheme stability Constraint on the time step by physical considera- tion

d'Orléans, Université

82

co r r e s p on d e n c e nature medicine volume 17 | number 1 | january 2011 33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

co r r e s p on d e n c e nature medicine volume 17 | number 1 | january 2011 33 Triclosan type I (FAS-I) protein. The finding that the microbicide triclosan, a chlorinated hydroxyl- diphenyl of its effect on Plasmodium. An article published in 2001 in Nature Medicine4 reported that triclosan

Schnaufer, Achim

83

Natural predictions for the Higgs boson mass and supersymmetric contributions to rare processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the context of No-Scale F - SU ( 5 ) , a model defined by the convergence of the F -lipped SU ( 5 ) Grand Unified Theory, two pairs of hypothetical TeV scale vector-like supersymmetric multiplets with origins in F -theory, and the dynamically established boundary conditions of No-Scale Supergravity, we predict that the lightest CP-even Higgs boson mass lies within the range of 119.0 GeV to 123.5 GeV, exclusive of the vector-like particle contribution to the mass. With reports by the CMS, ATLAS, CDF, and DØ Collaborations detailing enticing statistical excesses in the vicinity of 120 GeV in searches for the Standard Model Higgs boson, all signs point to an imminent discovery. While basic supersymmetric constructions such as mSUGRA and the CMSSM have already suffered overwhelming reductions in viable parameterization during the LHC?s initial year of operation, about 80% of the original No-Scale F - SU ( 5 ) model space remains viable after analysis of the first 1.1 fb ? 1 of integrated luminosity. This model is moreover capable of handily explaining the small excesses recently reported in the CMS multijet supersymmetry search, and also features a highly favorable “golden” subspace which may simultaneously account for the key rare process limits on the muon anomalous magnetic moment ( g ? 2 ) ? and the branching ratio of the flavor-changing neutral current decay b ? s ? . In addition, the isolated mass parameter responsible for the global particle mass normalization, the gaugino boundary mass M 1 / 2 , is dynamically determined at a secondary local minimization of the minimum of the Higgs potential V min , in a manner which is deeply consistent with all precision measurements at the physical electroweak scale.

Tianjun Li; James A. Maxin; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Joel W. Walker

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Application of numerical methods in solving problems of interrelated heat and mass transfer and transformation of structure in easily deformable natural systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The article considers processes of heat and mass transfer with transformation of structure in easily deformable natural disperse systems. A numerical method is used to solve such problems. With this method as ...

V. A. Sychevskii

85

Improvement of industrial drying of natural rubber through analysis of heat and mass transfers  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of convective drying of natural rubber in granule form. Exploitation of the mathematical model developed from analysis of internal transfers requires determination of the drying rate and the energy exchange coefficient between the material and the drying air. This was performed using a portable laboratory dryer at the production site, avoiding the problem of changes in the material during transport. Analysis of the drying kinetics of material in thin layers led to modelling the drying rate at the temperatures, rates and relative humidity values encountered in industrial dryers. The energy exchange coefficient was found by measurement of air and granule temperatures. Thick layer trials showed the suitability of the model for simulation of changes in moisture content and temperature of air and granules in a granular environment. The study as a whole led to the development of a computer program for simulating a zone dryer. This software can be used to optimize the management of an industrial natural rubber drying installation.

Naon, B.; Berthomieu, G.; Benet, J.C.; Saix, C. [Univ. Montpellier II (France). Laboratoire de Mecanique et Genie Civil

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

86

Uncertainty in Particle Number Modal Analysis during Transient Operation of Compressed Natural Gas, Diesel, and Trap-Equipped Diesel Transit Buses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of recent studies have examined the mass- and number-weighted particulate emissions from diesel engines and vehicles, chiefly using laboratory tests under steady-state vehicle or engine operation. ... However, there remains little fundamental data on the relationships between vehicle operating mode (cruise, idle, acceleration, decelera tion) and ultrafine particle emissions, both for diesel and especially for diesel alternatives. ... The number of ELPI data points measured for individual test cycles ranged from 120 to 1000, depending on the recorded ELPI time resolution and overall length of the driving cycle (?10?35 min). ...

Britt A. Holmén; Yingge Qu

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

87

Natural  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Summary of U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Imports Volume (million cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 2,094,387 2,266,751 2,566,049 2,816,408 2,883,277 Mexico .............................. 0 1,678 7,013 6,722 13,862 Total Pipeline Imports....... 2,094,387 2,268,429 2,573,061 2,823,130 2,897,138 LNG Algeria .............................. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 35,325 United Arab Emirates ....... 0 0 0 0 4,949 Total LNG Imports............. 43,116 81,685 50,778 17,918 40,274 Total Imports......................... 2,137,504 2,350,115 2,623,839 2,841,048 2,937,413 Average Price (dollars per thousand cubic feet) Pipeline Canada............................. 1.84 2.02 1.86 1.48 1.96 Mexico .............................. - 1.94 1.99 1.53 2.25 Total Pipeline Imports.......

88

Associative memory storing an extensive number of patterns based on a network of oscillators with distributed natural frequencies in the presence of external white noise  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We study associative memory based on temporal coding in which successful retrieval is realized as an entrainment in a network of simple phase oscillators with distributed natural frequencies under the influence of white noise. The memory patterns are assumed to be given by uniformly distributed random numbers on [0, 2?) so that the patterns encode the phase differences of the oscillators. To derive the macroscopic order parameter equations for the network with an extensive number of stored patterns, we introduce an effective transfer function by assuming a fixed-point equation of the form of the Thouless-Anderson-Palmer equation, which describes the time-averaged output as a function of the effective time-averaged local field. Properties of the networks associated with synchronization phenomena for a discrete symmetric natural frequency distribution with three frequency components are studied based on the order parameter equations, and are shown to be in good agreement with the results of numerical simulations. Two types of retrieval states are found to occur with respect to the degree of synchronization, when the size of the width of the natural frequency distribution is changed.

Masahiko Yoshioka and Masatoshi Shiino

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

NACRE II: an update of the NACRE compilation of charged-particle-induced thermonuclear reaction rates for nuclei with mass number $A < 16$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An update of the NACRE compilation [Angulo et al., Nucl. Phys. A 656 (1999) 3] is presented. This new compilation, referred to as NACRE II, reports thermonuclear reaction rates for 34 charged-particle induced, two-body exoergic reactions on nuclides with mass number $A<16$, of which fifteen are particle-transfer reactions and the rest radiative capture reactions. When compared with NACRE, NACRE II features in particular (1) the addition to the experimental data collected in NACRE of those reported later, preferentially in the major journals of the field by early 2013, and (2) the adoption of potential models as the primary tool for extrapolation to very low energies of astrophysical $S$-factors, with a systematic evaluation of uncertainties. As in NACRE, the rates are presented in tabular form for temperatures in the $10^{6}$ $\\simeq\\leq$ T $\\leq$ $10^{10}$ K range. Along with the 'adopted' rates, their low and high limits are provided. The new rates are available in electronic form as part of the Brussels Library (BRUSLIB) of nuclear data. The NACRE II rates also supersede the previous NACRE rates in the Nuclear Network Generator (NETGEN) for astrophysics. [http://www.astro.ulb.ac.be/databases.html.

Yi Xu; Kohji Takahashi; Stephane Goriely; Marcel Arnould; Masahisa Ohta; Hiroaki Utsunomiya

2013-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effects of oxyanions, natural organic matter, and bacterial cell numbers on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH) and the formation of secondary mineralization products.  

SciTech Connect

Microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxides results in the production of Fe(II) and may lead to the subsequent formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products including magnetite, siderite, vivianite, chukanovite (ferrous hydroxy carbonate (FHC)), and green rust; however, the factors controlling the formation of specific Fe(II) phases are often not well-defined. This study examined effects of (i) a range of inorganic oxyanions (arsenate, borate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, and tungstate), (ii) natural organic matter (citrate, oxalate, microbial extracellular polymeric substances [EPS], and humic substances), and (iii) the type and number of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite and formation of Fe(II)-bearing secondary mineralization products. The bioreduction kinetics clustered into two distinct Fe(II) production profiles. 'Fast' Fe(II) production kinetics [19-24 mM Fe(II) d-1] were accompanied by formation of magnetite and FHC in the unamended control and in systems amended with borate, oxalate, gellan EPS, or Pony Lake fulvic acid or having 'low' cell numbers. Systems amended with arsenate, citrate, molybdate, phosphate, silicate, tungstate, EPS from Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, or humic substances derived from terrestrial plant material or with 'high' cell numbers exhibited comparatively slow Fe(II) production kinetics [1.8-4.0 mM Fe(II) d-1] and the formation of green rust. The results are consistent with a conceptual model whereby competitive sorption of more strongly bound anions blocks access of bacterial cells and reduced electron-shuttling compounds to sites on the iron oxide surface, thereby limiting the rate of bioreduction.

O'Loughlin, E. J.; Gorski, C. A.; Scherer, M. M.; Boyanov, M. I.; Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Iowa

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

91

nature biotechnology volume 27 number 12 december 2009 1 half-life for indications when an extended residence time in the cir-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and can complicate tight control over plasma Focus on synthetic biology This issue of Nature Biotechnology

Cai, Long

92

The Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the project is to conduct research at an Integrated Field-Scale Research Challenge Site in the Hanford Site 300 Area, CERCLA OU 300-FF-5 (Figure 1), to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The project will investigate a series of science questions posed for research related to the effect of spatial heterogeneities, the importance of scale, coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes, and measurements/approaches needed to characterize a mass-transfer dominated system. The research will be conducted by evaluating three (3) different hypotheses focused on multi-scale mass transfer processes in the vadose zone and groundwater, their influence on field-scale U(VI) biogeochemistry and transport, and their implications to natural systems and remediation. The project also includes goals to 1) provide relevant materials and field experimental opportunities for other ERSD researchers and 2) generate a lasting, accessible, and high-quality field experimental database that can be used by the scientific community for testing and validation of new conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reactive transport.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

KEPLER CYCLE 1 OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-MASS STARS: NEW ECLIPSING BINARIES, SINGLE STAR ROTATION RATES, AND THE NATURE AND FREQUENCY OF STARSPOTS  

SciTech Connect

We have analyzed Kepler light curves for 849 stars with T{sub eff} {<=} 5200 K from our Cycle 1 Guest Observer program. We identify six new eclipsing binaries, one of which has an orbital period of 29.91 days and two of which are probably W UMa variables. In addition, we identify a candidate 'warm Jupiter' exoplanet. We further examine a subset of 670 sources for variability. Of these objects, 265 stars clearly show periodic variability that we assign to rotation of the low-mass star. At the photometric precision level provided by Kepler, 251 of our objects showed no evidence for variability. We were unable to determine periods for 154 variable objects. We find that 79% of stars with T{sub eff} {<=} 5200 K are variable. The rotation periods we derive for the periodic variables span the range 0.31 days {<=} P{sub rot} {<=} 126.5 days. A considerable number of stars with rotation periods similar to the solar value show activity levels that are 100 times higher than the Sun. This is consistent with results for solar-like field stars. As has been found in previous studies, stars with shorter rotation periods generally exhibit larger modulations. This trend flattens beyond P{sub rot} = 25 days, demonstrating that even long-period binaries may still have components with high levels of activity and investigating whether the masses and radii of the stellar components in these systems are consistent with stellar models could remain problematic. Surprisingly, our modeling of the light curves suggests that the active regions on these cool stars are either preferentially located near the rotational poles, or that there are two spot groups located at lower latitudes, but in opposing hemispheres.

Harrison, T. E.; Coughlin, J. L.; Ule, N. M. [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, MSC 4500, Las Cruces, NM 88003-8001 (United States); Lopez-Morales, M., E-mail: tharriso@nmsu.edu, E-mail: jlcough@nmsu.edu, E-mail: nmule@nmsu.edu, E-mail: mlopez@ieec.uab.es [Institut de Ciencies de L'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciencies. Torre C5 parell 2, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gauge Fields, Sources, and Electromagnetic Masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hypothesis of strong-interaction gauge fields, with non-Abelian gauge invariance broken only by the 1- particle mass terms, gives a natural source theory setting for the introduction of electromagnetic effects. The electromagnetic potential vector appears as a compensating field in the mass terms of the neutral 1- particles. The resulting electromagnetic self-action is used to discuss mass displacements. The pion electro-magnetic mass is computed in a number of ways—by direct calculation of various processes and by chiral methods, in two variants. The relationship of these approaches is established. A phenomenological modification of the chiral evaluation gives perfect agreement with the observed value. It is found, however, that the (m?m?)2 terms, which are neglected in this method, are not very small. Baryon electromagnetic mass splittings are described by a simple adaptation of gross mass-spectrum empirics. Agreement with the data is excellent.

Julian Schwinger

1968-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

Mass, quark-number, and sqrt sNN dependence of the second andfourth flow harmonics in ultra-relativistic nucleus-nucleuscollisions  

SciTech Connect

We present STAR measurements of the azimuthal anisotropyparameter v_2 for pions, kaons, protons, Lambda, bar Lambda, Xi+bar Xi,and \\Omega + bar Omega, along with v_4 for pions, kaons, protons, andLambda + bar Lambda at mid-rapidity for Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4and 200 GeV. The v_2(p_T) values for all hadron species at 62.4 GeV aresimilar to those observed in 130 and 200 GeV collisions. For observedkinematic ranges, v_2 values at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV are as little as10 percent-15 percent larger than those in Pb+Pb collisions at sqrt s NN=17.3 GeV. At intermediate transverse momentum (p_T from 1.5-5 GeV/c),the 62.4 GeV v_2(p_T) and v_4(p_T) values are consistent with thequark-number scaling first observed at 200 GeV. A four-particle cumulantanalysis is used to assess the non-flow contributions to pions andprotons and some indications are found for a smaller non-flowcontribution to protons than pions. Baryon v_2 is larger than anti-baryonv_2 at 62.4 and 200 GeV perhaps indicating either that the initialspatial net-baryon distribution is anisotropic, that the mechanismleading to transport of baryon number from beam- to mid-rapidity enhancesv_2, or that anti-baryon and baryon annihilation is larger in thein-plane direction.

Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

Kepler Cycle 1 Observations of Low Mass Stars: New Eclipsing Binaries, Single Star Rotation Rates, and the Nature and Frequency of Starspots  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have analyzed Kepler light curves for 849 stars with T_eff < 5200 K from our Cycle 1 Guest Observer program. We identify six new eclipsing binaries, one of which has an orbital period of 29.91 d, and two of which are probably W UMa variables. In addition, we identify a candidate "warm Jupiter" exoplanet. We further examine a subset of 670 sources for variability. Of these objects, 265 stars clearly show periodic variability that we assign to rotation of the low-mass star. At the photometric precision level provided by Kepler, 251 of our objects showed no evidence for variability. We were unable to determine periods for 154 variable objects. We find that 79% of stars with T_eff < 5200 K are variable. The rotation periods we derive for the periodic variables span the range 0.31 < P_rot < 126.5 d. A considerable number of stars with rotation periods similar to the solar value show activity levels that are 100 times higher than the Sun. This is consistent with results for solar-like field stars. As...

Harrison, T E; Ule, N M; Lopez-Morales, M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The role of the acquisition methods in the analysis of natural and synthetic steroids and cholic acids by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An exhaustive GC–MS acquisition study was performed, for the simultaneous analysis of natural and synthetic steroids and cholic acids (in order to insert them into the last tierce of our multiresidue analysis system), such as androsterone, ?-estradiol, transdehydroandro-sterone, transdehyroandrosterone, mestranol, dihydrotestosterone, ethinylestradiol, testosterone, norethisterone, estriol, 4-androstene-3,17-dione, gestodene, levonorgestrel, etonogestrel, coprostanol, progesterone, cholesterol, medroxyprogesterone-acetate, lithocholic acid, stigmasterol, cholic acid, chenodeoxycholic acid, ?-sitosterol, ursodeoxycholic acid, 3-hydroxy-7-ketocholic acid and dehydrocholic acid, in total 26 compounds. As novelties to the field, for the trimethylsilyl (TMS) oxime ether/ester derivatives of steroids and cholic acids, at first, a tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS), multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) type acquisition method has been developed in a single run; also for the first time, the three acquisition techniques, the full scan (FS), the selective ion monitoring (SIM), in our case the multiple ion monitoring (MIM) and the currently optimized MRM methods, have been compared; all three, in parallel, under strictly the same derivatization/instrumental conditions, both in matrix free solutions and municipal wastewater from two Hungarian wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Critical evaluation of the three acquisition protocols was collated on their analytical performances and validated under the same conditions. The data of six point calibration curves for FS, MIM and MRM methods, showed that both R2 (0.9995, 0.9858, 0.9975) and RSD (5.3, 5.8, 5.0), for two parallel derivatizations, each injected three times, proved to be independent of the acquisition processes. Whereas, for the method limit of quantification (LOQ) and the instrument limit of quantification (ILQ) values showed considerable differences. LOQ data, were decreasing in the FS, MIM, MRM line (expressed in ng/L), for all steroids and cholic acids. The same trend was determined in terms of the ILQ values. The practical utility of the optimized acquisition techniques was confirmed by the quantitation of the steroids and cholic acids contents of wastewater samples. Results confirmed the importance of the MRM acquisition method, even in comparison to the MIM one: with particular interest in selected cases: avoiding the extreme overestimation of the ?-estradiol (156–1325%) and that of the ethinylestradiol (582–831%) concentrations in the wastewater samples.

N. Andrási; A. Helenkár; A. Vasanits-Zsigrai; Gy. Záray; I. Molnár-Perl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

North Carolina Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

777,805 815,908 2000's 858,004 891,227 905,816 953,732 948,283 992,906 1,022,430 1,063,871 1,095,362 1,102,001 2010's 1,115,532 1,128,963 1,142,947 1,161,398 - No Data...

99

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1980's 755,294 760,754 767,219 1990's 774,707 782,373 894,677 807,204 824,137 841,772 871,012 890,195 901,455 939,029 2000's 941,384 959,772 978,319 987,863 1,009,455 1,024,955...

100

Idaho Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

261,219 274,481 288,380 301,357 316,915 323,114 336,191 342,277 2010's 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 - No Data Reported; -- Not Applicable; NA Not Available; W ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NATURE STUDY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

E. C. CASE

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Boston forum is open to the public. Additional information is available at http:www.energy.govnews3197.htm. Natural Gas Rig Count: The number of rigs drilling for natural...

103

Number of Natural Gas Residential Transported Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4,037,233 5,274,697 5,531,680 6,604,403 1997-2012 4,037,233 5,274,697 5,531,680 6,604,403 1997-2012 Alabama 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Arizona 0 0 6 6 1997-2012 California 29,240 72,850 79,605 134,210 1997-2012 Colorado 3 5 5 5 1997-2012 Connecticut 492 805 905 897 1997-2012 District of Columbia 13,933 14,103 14,636 16,264 1997-2012 Florida 13,789 13,783 14,635 14,861 1997-2012 Georgia 1,397,247 1,419,297 1,418,491 1,420,364 1997-2012 Illinois 192,493 274,086 261,895 273,010 1997-2012 Indiana 49,397 89,675 93,106 88,977 1997-2012 Kansas 0 0 0 21 2004-2012 Kentucky 26,823 29,189 28,982 27,606 1997-2012 Louisiana 0 0 0 0 1997-2012 Maine 1 0 0 2010-2012 Maryland 117,206 147,696 184,324 211,351 1997-2012 Massachusetts 523 1,750 1,867 2,013 1997-2012 Michigan 127,378 199,918 207,388 464,001 1997-2012

104

Number of Natural Gas Residential Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

64,964,769 65,073,996 65,329,582 65,542,345 65,940,522 66,624,457 64,964,769 65,073,996 65,329,582 65,542,345 65,940,522 66,624,457 1987-2012 Alabama 796,476 792,236 785,005 778,985 772,892 767,412 1986-2012 Alaska 115,500 119,039 120,124 121,166 121,736 122,983 1986-2012 Arizona 1,119,266 1,128,264 1,130,047 1,138,448 1,146,286 1,157,688 1986-2012 Arkansas 557,966 556,746 557,355 549,970 551,795 549,959 1986-2012 California 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 1986-2012 Colorado 1,583,945 1,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1986-2012 Connecticut 482,902 487,320 489,349 490,185 494,970 504,138 1986-2012 Delaware 145,010 147,541 149,006 150,458 152,005 153,307 1986-2012 District of Columbia 142,384 142,819 143,436 144,151 145,524 145,938 1986-2012

105

Number of Natural Gas Commercial Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5,308,785 5,444,335 5,322,332 5,301,576 5,319,817 5,355,613 5,308,785 5,444,335 5,322,332 5,301,576 5,319,817 5,355,613 1987-2012 Alabama 65,879 65,313 67,674 68,163 67,696 67,234 1986-2012 Alaska 13,408 12,764 13,215 12,998 13,027 13,134 1986-2012 Arizona 57,169 57,586 57,191 56,676 56,547 56,532 1986-2012 Arkansas 69,495 69,144 69,043 67,987 67,815 68,765 1986-2012 California 446,267 447,160 441,806 439,572 440,990 442,708 1986-2012 Colorado 141,420 144,719 145,624 145,460 145,837 145,960 1986-2012 Connecticut 52,389 53,903 54,510 54,842 55,028 55,407 1986-2012 Delaware 12,576 12,703 12,839 12,861 12,931 12,997 1986-2012 District of Columbia 9,915 10,024 10,288 9,879 10,050 9,771 1986-2012 Florida 57,320 58,125 59,549 60,854 61,582 63,450 1986-2012 Georgia

106

Number of Natural Gas Residential Sales Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

60,129,047 60,267,648 60,408,842 60,020,054 1997-2012 60,129,047 60,267,648 60,408,842 60,020,054 1997-2012 Alabama 808,801 778,985 772,892 767,412 1997-2012 Alaska 112,269 121,166 121,736 122,983 1997-2012 Arizona 1,088,574 1,138,448 1,146,280 1,157,682 1997-2012 Arkansas 555,905 549,970 551,795 549,959 1997-2012 California 10,299,984 10,469,734 10,545,585 10,547,706 1997-2012 Colorado 1,558,908 1,634,582 1,645,711 1,659,803 1997-2012 Connecticut 478,357 489,380 494,065 503,241 1997-2012 Delaware 141,276 150,458 152,005 153,307 1997-2012 District of Columbia 128,020 130,048 130,888 129,674 1997-2012 Florida 659,333 661,768 664,564 672,160 1997-2012 Georgia 328,992 321,290 321,515 319,179 1997-2012 Hawaii 25,982 25,389 25,305 25,184 1998-2012 Idaho 316,915 346,602 350,871 353,963 1997-2012

107

Number of Natural Gas Commercial Transported Consumer  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

39,557 716,692 763,597 837,365 1998-2012 39,557 716,692 763,597 837,365 1998-2012 Alabama 115 146 135 135 1998-2012 Alaska 1,526 325 303 61 1998-2012 Arizona 136 166 198 280 1998-2012 Arkansas 157 311 361 614 1998-2012 California 15,673 40,282 50,443 54,948 1998-2012 Colorado 180 224 280 397 1998-2012 Connecticut 3,926 4,710 4,858 5,095 1998-2012 Delaware 57 155 275 353 1999-2012 District of Columbia 3,406 3,450 3,556 3,293 1998-2012 Florida 14,069 19,104 20,514 22,375 1998-2012 Georgia 94,391 92,441 91,292 89,488 1998-2012 Idaho 36 38 40 42 1998-2012 Illinois 58,515 51,198 51,631 53,043 1998-2012 Indiana 12,627 17,499 18,066 18,537 1998-2012 Iowa 1,382 1,400 1,466 1,533 1998-2012 Kansas 5,440 6,136 6,315 6,443 1998-2012 Kentucky 3,729 4,166 4,585 4,485 1998-2012

108

California Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,515,162 10,510,950 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 10,754,908 1986-2013 Sales 10,469,734 10,545,585 10,547,706 10,471,814 1997-2013 Transported 72,850 79,605 134,210 283,094...

109

Mass transfer experiments on single irregular-shaped particles  

SciTech Connect

Mass transfer from irregular-shaped naphthalene particles (100-200 {mu}m in size) was studied in an electrodynamic balance. Charged particles were suspended in an electrostatic field directly in line with a calibrated air jet. Mass and size change histories were obtained under ambient conditions, and under steady- and pulsed-flow conditions. For natural convection, the time-averaged Sherwood number was similar to that for spheres. Forced-convection Sherwood number under steady-flow conditions was strongly dependent on particle shape and particle Reynolds number, and was consistently higher than values predicted for spheres at comparable Reynolds numbers. This paper validates the technique and indicates the shape effect on mass transfer from single particles.

Ramezan, M. (Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (US)); Kale, S.R. (Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (US)); Anderson, R.J. (Dept. of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV (US))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

111

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

112

New Paradigm for Baryon and Lepton Number Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possible discovery of proton decay, neutron-antineutron oscillation, neutrinoless beta decay in low energy experiments, and exotic signals related to the violation of the baryon and lepton numbers at collider experiments will change our understanding of the conservation of fundamental symmetries in nature. In this review we discuss the rare processes due to the existence of baryon and lepton number violating interactions. The simplest grand unified theories and the neutrino mass generation mechanisms are discussed. The theories where the baryon and lepton numbers are defined as local gauge symmetries spontaneously broken at the low scale are discussed in detail. The simplest supersymmetric gauge theory which predicts the existence of lepton number violating processes at the low scale is investigated. The main goal of this review is to discuss the main implications of baryon and lepton number violation in physics beyond the Standard Model.

Perez, Pavel Fileviez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Nature of Nearby Counterparts to Intermediate Redshift Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies I. Optical/H I Properties and Dynamical Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present single-dish H I spectra obtained with the Green Bank Telescope, along with optical photometric properties from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, of 20 nearby (D < 70 Mpc) Luminous Compact Blue Galaxies (LCBGs). These ~L*, blue, high surface brightness, starbursting galaxies were selected with the same criteria used to define LCBGs at higher redshifts. We find these galaxies are gas-rich, with M(HI) ranging from 5*10^8 to 8*10^9 M_sun, and M(HI)/L_B ranging from 0.2 to 2 M_sun/L_sun, consistent with a variety of morphological types of galaxies. We find the dynamical masses (measured within R_25) span a wide range, from 3*10^9 to 1*10^11 M_sun. However, at least half have dynamical mass-to-light ratios smaller than nearby galaxies of all Hubble types, as found for LCBGs at intermediate redshifts. By comparing line widths and effective radii with local galaxy populations, we find that LCBGs are consistent with the dynamical mass properties of Magellanic (low luminosity) spirals, and the more massive irregulars and dwarf ellipticals, such as NGC 205.

C. A. Garland; D. J. Pisano; J. P. Williams; R. Guzman; F. J. Castander

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Natural Gas Natural Gas Many heavy-duty fleets depend on diesel fuel. But an increasing number of trucking companies are transitioning their vehicles to run on liquefied natural...

115

Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on Hanford’s 300 Area Uranium Plume  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) at the Hanford Site 300 Area uranium (U) plume addresses multi-scale mass transfer processes in a complex hydrogeologic setting where groundwater and riverwater interact. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research which relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements and approaches needed to characterize and model a mass-transfer dominated system. The project was initiated in February 2007, with CY 2007 and CY 2008 progress summarized in preceding reports. The site has 35 instrumented wells, and an extensive monitoring system. It includes a deep borehole for microbiologic and biogeochemical research that sampled the entire thickness of the unconfined 300 A aquifer. Significant, impactful progress has been made in CY 2009 with completion of extensive laboratory measurements on field sediments, field hydrologic and geophysical characterization, four field experiments, and modeling. The laboratory characterization results are being subjected to geostatistical analyses to develop spatial heterogeneity models of U concentration and chemical, physical, and hydrologic properties needed for reactive transport modeling. The field experiments focused on: (1) physical characterization of the groundwater flow field during a period of stable hydrologic conditions in early spring, (2) comprehensive groundwater monitoring during spring to characterize the release of U(VI) from the lower vadose zone to the aquifer during water table rise and fall, (3) dynamic geophysical monitoring of salt-plume migration during summer, and (4) a U reactive tracer experiment (desorption) during the fall. Geophysical characterization of the well field was completed using the down-well Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) array, with results subjected to robust, geostatistically constrained inversion analyses. These measurements along with hydrologic characterization have yielded 3D distributions of hydraulic properties that have been incorporated into an updated and increasingly robust hydrologic model. Based on significant findings from the microbiologic characterization of deep borehole sediments in CY 2008, down-hole biogeochemistry studies were initiated where colonization substrates and spatially discrete water and gas samplers were deployed to select wells. The increasingly comprehensive field experimental results, along with the field and laboratory characterization, are leading to a new conceptual model of U(VI) flow and transport in the IFRC footprint and the 300 Area in general, and insights on the microbiological community and associated biogeochemical processes. A significant issue related to vertical flow in the IFRC wells was identified and evaluated during the spring and fall field experimental campaigns. Both upward and downward flows were observed in response to dynamic Columbia River stage. The vertical flows are caused by the interaction of pressure gradients with our heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity field. These impacts are being evaluated with additional modeling and field activities to facilitate interpretation and mitigation. The project moves into CY 2010 with ambitious plans for a drilling additional wells for the IFRC well field, additional experiments, and modeling. This research is part of the ERSP Hanford IFRC at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Zachara, John M.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Christensen, John N.; Conrad, Mark E.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Freshley, Mark D.; Haggerty, Roy; Hammon, Glenn; Kent, Douglas B.; Konopka, Allan; Lichtner, Peter C.; Liu, Chongxuan; McKinley, James P.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Rubin, Yoram; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Versteeg, Roelof J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Zheng, Chunmiao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

On the Nature of the Strong Emission-Line Galaxies in Cluster Cl 0024+1654: Are Some the Progenitors of Low Mass Spheroidals?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new size, line ratio, and velocity width measurements for six strong emission-line galaxies in the galaxy cluster, Cl 0024+1654, at redshift z~0.4. The velocity widths from Keck spectra are all narrow (30masses (M<10^{10} Mo). Whereas three galaxies were previously reported to be possible AGNs, none exhibit AGN-like emission line ratios or velocity widths. Two or three appear as very blue spirals with the remainder more akin to luminous H-II galaxies undergoing a strong burst of star formation. We propose that after the burst subsides, these galaxies will transform into quiescent dwarfs, and are thus progenitors of some cluster spheroidals (We adopt the nomenclature suggested by Kormendy & Bender (1994), i.e., low-density, dwarf ellipsoidal galaxies like NGC 205 are called `spheroidals' instead of `dwarf ellipticals') seen today.

David C. Koo; Rafael Guzman; Jesus Gallego; Greg D. Wirth

1997-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

117

Oklo-natural fission reactor program. Progress report, October 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect

The study of lead, ruthenium, and technetium transport in nature requires the mass spectrometric analyses of large numbers of geologic samples. This quarter about 200 samples arrived from Gabon, which were collected at the Oklo mine in September. Work was performed to improve the lead and ruthenium chemical procedures and the mass spectrometric instrumentation in preparation for analyzing many of the Oklo samples and a large number of the 402 samples on hand from Key Lake, Canada. Data concerning ruthenium isotopic alterations from samples near an Oklo natural fission reactor zone indicated that ruthenium or technetium were not transported to distances greater than the 10 meters detected previously.

Norris, A.E.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Chemometric optimization of dispersive suspended microextraction followed by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in natural waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A dispersive suspended microextraction (DSME) method coupled with gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) was developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of ten polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in real water samples. The optimization of the method was achieved with a 27–4 Plackett–Burman design, while the significant factors were optimized using a central composite design (CCD). The parameters that were studied included the sample volume, organic solvent volume, extraction time, restoration time and organic solvent. The optimum experimental conditions for the proposed method comprised 4.3 mL of the water sample, 93 ?L of toluene as the extraction solvent, a 104-s extraction time and a 10-min restoration time. The recoveries varied from 70 to 111%. Chrysene was the least recovered compound, while anthracene displayed the highest extraction efficiency. The analytical method (DSME) was shown to be linear (R2 > 0.993) over the studied range of concentrations, exhibiting satisfactory precision (RSD% < 10.6%) and reaching limits of detection between 8 and 46 ng L?1.

Nikolaos P. Petridis; Vasilios A. Sakkas; Triantafyllos A. Albanis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

120

JOB NUMBER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

KPA Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

122

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

123

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

124

Nuclear Masses in Astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among all nuclear ground-state properties, atomic masses are highly specific for each particular combination of N and Z and the data obtained apply to a variety of physics topics. One of the most crucial questions to be addressed in mass spectrometry of unstable radionuclides is the one of understanding the processes of element formation in the Universe. To this end, accurate atomic mass values of a large number of exotic nuclei participating in nucleosynthesis are among the key input data in large-scale reaction network calculations. In this paper, a review on the latest achievements in mass spectrometry for nuclear astrophysics is given.

Christine Weber; Klaus Blaum; Hendrik Schatz

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

Global phenomenological descriptions of nuclear odd-even mass staggering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the general nature of nuclear odd-even mass differences by employing neutron and proton mass relations that emphasize these effects. The most recent mass tables are used. The possibility of a neutron excess dependence of the staggering is examined in detail in separate regions defined by the main nuclear shells, and a clear change in this dependency is found at $Z=50$ for both neutrons and protons. A further separation into odd and even neutron (proton) number produces very accurate local descriptions of the mass differences for each type of nucleons. These odd-even effects are combined into a global phenomenological expression, ready to use in a binding energy formula. The results deviate from previous parametrizations, and in particular found to be significantly superior to a recent two term, $A^{-1}$ dependence.

D. Hove; A. S. Jensen; K. Riisager

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

127

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

128

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

129

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

130

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

131

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

132

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

133

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

134

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

135

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

136

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

137

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

138

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

139

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

140

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

142

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Some Data Analysis Some Data Analysis The Tevatron produces millions of collisions each second in CDF and DZero. The detectors have hardware triggers to decide if a collision is "interesting," that is it contains a candidate event for any one of a number studies. Our dataset contains 48,844 candidate events for a W mass study. There are other datasets to study Z mass, top and b quarks, QCD, etc. Why don't all the W decays give exactly the same mass? Are all these candidates really Ws? What if we chose only some of these data. How would our choice effect the value of the transverse mass? Work with your classmates. Test the data to see what you can learn. Help with data analysis. Record the best estimate of the W transverse mass from your data analysis. Explain which data you used and why. Check with your classmates and explain any differences between your estimate and theirs.

143

VOLUME 85, NUMBER 9 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 28 AUGUST 2000 Nature, Strength, and Consequences of Indirect Adsorbate Interactions on Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and Consequences of Indirect Adsorbate Interactions on Metals A. Bogicevic,1, * S. Ovesson,2 P. Hyldgaard,2 B. I adsorbed on metals affect each other indirectly even over considerable distances. Via systematic density-functional calculations, we establish the nature and strength of such interactions, and explain for what adsorbate systems

Brune, Harald

144

A garden mulch is any material spread on the soil surface to modify the environment where the plant is growing. The materials used can be natural or synthetic and can be used in any number of combinations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organic mulching materials include crushed corn cobs, peanut hulls, buckwheat hulls, bark and wood chips, wood shavings, seaweed and peat moss. All natural mulches should be applied after the crop has begun, as this increases the risk of disease. The soil should also be weed-free and moist. Pebbles, stone chips, gravel

New Hampshire, University of

145

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Heat and Mass Transfer Wrme-und Stoffbertragung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Heat and Mass Transfer Wärme- und Stoffübertragung ISSN 0947-7411 Volume 49 Number 3 Heat Mass

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

147

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... CHOOSING an awkward moment, Phillips Petroleum Exploration have announced a new find of natural ...naturalgas ...

1967-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

148

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

149

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

150

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

151

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

152

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

153

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

154

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

155

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

156

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

157

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

158

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

159

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

160

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

162

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

163

The mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mass of the charged Higgs boson at the 1-loop level is investigated, assuming the CP symmetry to be violated explicitly in the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM). It is found that there is a parameter region of the MSSM where the presence of explicit CP violation in the Higgs sector yields negative radiative corrections to the charged Higgs boson mass. Thus, the charged Higgs boson in the MSSM may have as low a mass as 60 GeV at the 1-loop level, if the CP symmetry is violated. This lower bound may be improved by the Higgs search at LEP2, which imposes experimental constraints on the charged Higgs mass, as well as on the masses of the neutral Higgs bosons. Hence, LEP2 can constrain experimentally the charged Higgs mass to be not smaller than 109 GeV under our assumption. In addition, it sets 75 GeV as the lower bound on the mass of the lightest neutral Higgs boson, and 84 GeV for that of the next-to-lightest neutral Higgs boson.

Seung Woo Ham; Sun Kun Oh; Eun Jong Yoo; Hyun Kyu Lee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

W Transverse Mass  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transverse Mass Histogram Transverse Mass Histogram Data for 49,844 candidate W events are in an Excel spreadsheet with the following data as shown in the table below: A B C D 1 Run No Event No W TMass GeV/c2 Bins 2 55237 19588 68.71732 3 55237 30799 72.19464 Get the data. Sort the data by ascending mass. Be sure to sort all the data in the first three columns! Make a histogram of the data. Rather than graphing the data as individual points, physicists group the data by mass. They consider the full range of the data and divide it into "bins" of equal range size. A histogram is a graph of the number of events in each bin vs. the bin range. They are looking for a peak in the data where most of the masses fall. This will be the value of the mass as detemined by that dataset, and the width of the distribution is a reflection of the errors in the measurements.

165

Spin Singularities: Clifford Kaleidoscopes and Particle Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Are particles singularities- vortex lines, tubes, or sheets in some global ocean of dark energy? We visit the zoo of Lagrangian singularities, or caustics in a spin(4,C) phase flow over compactifed Minkowsky space, and find that their varieties and energies parallel the families and masses of the elementary particles. Singularities are classified by tensor products of J Coxeter groups s generated by reflections. The multiplicity, s, is the number reflections needed to close a cycle of null zigzags: nonlinear resonances of J chiral pairs of lightlike matter spinors with (4-J) Clifford mirrors: dyads in the remaining unperturbed vacuum pairs. Using singular perturbations to "peel" phase-space singularities by orders in the vacuum intensity, we find that singular varieties with quantized mass, charge, and spin parallel the families of leptons (J=1), mesons (J=2), and hadrons (J=3). Taking the symplectic 4 form - the volume element in the 8- spinor phase space- as a natural Lagrangian, these singularities turn out to have rest energies within a few percent of the observed particle masses.

Marcus S. Cohen

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

166

GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST ISBN Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FALL 2013 GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST Course Number ISBN Number Title of Text and/or Material Edition Author Publishers 11100 978-1-2591-9687-4 Introduction to Chemistry, 3rd ed. (packaged w 978-1-2591-6192-6 Chemistry, The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6e (packaged w

Jiang, Wen

167

Mass Balance of Gaseous and Particulate Products from ?-Pinene/O3/Air in the Absence of Light and ?-Pinene/NOx/Air in the Presence of Natural Sunlight  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gas and particle phase products from the reaction of ?-pinene with the atmospheric oxidants O3 and OH radicals in the presence of NOx were investigated using both gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) ...

M. Jaoui; R. M. Kamens

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Rapid scanning mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Mass spectrometers and residual gas analyzers (RGA) are used in a variety of applications for analysis of volatile and semi-volatile materials. Analysis is performed by detecting fragments of gas molecules, based on their mass to charge ratio, which are generated in the mass spectrometer. When used as a detector for a gas chromatograph, they function as a means to quantitatively identify isolated volatile species which have been separated from other species via the gas chromatograph. Vacuum Technology, Inc., (VTI) produces a magnetic sector mass spectrometer/RGA which is used in many industrial and laboratory environments. In order to increase the utility of this instrument, it is desirable to increase the mass scanning speed, thereby increasing the number of applications for which it is suited. This project performed the following three upgrades on the computer interface. (1) A new electrometer was designed and built to process the signal from the detector. This new electrometer is more sensitive, over 10 times faster, and over 100 times more stable than the electrometer it will replace. (2) The controller EPROM was reprogrammed with new firmware. This firmware acts as an operating system for the interface and is used to shuttle communications between the PC and the AEROVAC mass spectrometer. (3) The voltage regulator which causes the ion selector voltage to ramp to allow ions of selected mass to be sequentially detected was redesigned and prototyped. The redesigned voltage regulator can be ramped up or down more than 100 times faster than the existing regulator. These changes were incorporated into a prototype unit and preliminary performance testing conducted. Results indicated that scanning speed was significantly increased over the unmodified version.

Leckey, J.H. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Boeckmann, M.D. [Vacuum Technology, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Natural Gas Exports from Iran  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This assessment of the natural gas sector in Iran, with a focus on Iran’s natural gas exports, was prepared pursuant to section 505 (a) of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syria Human Rights Act of 2012 (Public Law No: 112-158). As requested, it includes: (1) an assessment of exports of natural gas from Iran; (2) an identification of the countries that purchase the most natural gas from Iran; (3) an assessment of alternative supplies of natural gas available to those countries; (4) an assessment of the impact a reduction in exports of natural gas from Iran would have on global natural gas supplies and the price of natural gas, especially in countries identified under number (2); and (5) such other information as the Administrator considers appropriate.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Neutrino mass, lepton number, and the origin of matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

antiparticles? And many other things% Do neutrinos violate CP? #12;Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay W. Rodejohann? #12;Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay 1 sigma W. Rodejohann, 1206.2560 #12;14 F. Iachello #12;15 Regions

172

Mass Market Demand Response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response Mass Market Demand Response Speaker(s): Karen Herter Date: July 24, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory,

173

California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Count of Underground Storage Capacity (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

174

Elements of number theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

natural gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

natural gasoline, condensate, distillate [Liquid hydrocarbons, generally clear or pale straw-coloured and of high API gravity (above 6o°), that are produced with wet gas] ? Gasbenzin n, Gasolin n ...

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes  

SciTech Connect

Four long-lived neutron-deficient Th isotopes with atomic mass numbers 211 to 218 and abundances of (1-10)x10{sup -11} relative to {sup 232}Th have been found in a study of naturally-occurring Th using inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometry. It is deduced that long-lived isomeric states exist in these isotopes. The hypothesis that they might belong to a new class of long-lived high spin super- and hyperdeformed isomeric states is discussed.

Marinov, A.; Kashiv, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Rodushkin, I. [Analytica AB, Aurorum 10, S-977 75 Luleaa (Sweden); Halicz, L.; Segal, I. [Geological Survey of Israel, 30 Malkhei Israel St., Jerusalem 95501 (Israel); Pape, A. [IPHC-UMR7178, IN2P3-CNRS/ULP, BP 28, F-67037 Strasbourg cedex 2 (France); Gentry, R. V. [Earth Science Associates, P.O. Box 12067, Knoxville, Tennessee 37912-0067 (United States); Miller, H. W. [P. O. Box 1092, Boulder, Colorado 80306-1092 (United States); Kolb, D. [Department of Physics, University GH Kassel, D-34109 Kassel (Germany); Brandt, R. [Kernchemie, Philipps University, D-35041 Marburg (Germany)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Number of Existing Natural Gas Depleted Fields Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

326 324 331 331 329 330 1999-2012 326 324 331 331 329 330 1999-2012 Alabama 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 1999-2012 California 12 12 13 13 13 14 1999-2012 Colorado 8 8 9 9 9 10 1999-2012 Illinois 11 10 10 11 11 11 1999-2012 Indiana 10 10 10 9 9 10 1999-2012 Kansas 18 18 18 18 18 18 1999-2012 Kentucky 20 20 20 20 20 20 1999-2012 Louisiana 8 8 8 8 8 7 1999-2012 Maryland 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 Michigan 43 43 43 43 43 43 1999-2012 Mississippi 5 5 6 6 6 6 1999-2012 Montana 5 5 5 5 5 5 1999-2012 Nebraska 1 1 1 1 1 1 1999-2012 New Mexico 2 2 2 2 2 2 1999-2012 New York 23 23 25 25 25 26 1999-2012 Ohio 24 24 24 24 24 24 1999-2012 Oklahoma 13 13 13 13 13 12 1999-2012 Oregon 7 7 7 7 7 7 1999-2012

178

The Natural Number of Forward Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is generated from hydroelectric resources, supply of whichsuch as nuclear and hydroelectric plants whose availabilityrelevance are the hydroelectric units, which serve 40% of

Suenaga, Hiroaki; Williams, Jeffrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Natural Number of Forward Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model: Price-load curve: Fuel price equation: P 0 t = bw t Qfactors, such as weather and fuel price, and is determinedhour t. In (1), only the fuel price and the load level vary

Suenaga, Hiroaki; Williams, Jeffrey

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Total Number of Existing Underground Natural Gas Storage Fields  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Annual Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 400 401 409 411 410 414 1989-2012 Alabama 2 2 2 2 2 2 1995-2012 Arkansas 2 2 2 2 2 2 1989-2012 California 12 12 13 13 13 14 1989-2012 Colorado 8 8 9 9 9 10 1989-2012 Illinois 29 28 28 28 28 28 1989-2012 Indiana 22 22 22 22 22 22 1989-2012 Iowa 4 4 4 4 4 4 1989-2012 Kansas 19 19 19 19 19 19 1989-2012 Kentucky 23 23 23 23 23 23 1989-2012 Louisiana 15 17 18 18 18 18 1989-2012 Maryland 1 1 1 1 1 1 1989-2012 Michigan 45 45 45 45 45 45 1989-2012 Minnesota 1 1 1 1 1 1 1989-2012

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Mass Operator and Gauge Field Theory with Five-variable Field Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To investigate the mass generating problem without Higgs mechanism we present a model in which a new scalar gauge coupling is naturally introduced. Because of the existence of production and annihilation for particles in quantum field theory, we extend the number of independent variables from conventional four space-time dimensions to five ones in order to describe all degrees of freedom for field functions while the conventional space-time is still retained to be the background. The potential fifth variable is nothing but the proper time of particles. In response, a mass operator $(\\hat{m}=-i\\hbar \\frac{\\partial}{\\partial\\tau})$ should be introduced. After that, the lagrangian for free fermion fields in terms of five independent variables and mass operator is written down. By applying the gauge principle, three kinds of vector gauge couplings and one kind of scalar gauge coupling are naturally introduced. In the current scenario, the mass spectrum for all fundamental particles is accounted for in principle by solving the eigenvalue of mass operator under the function of all kinds of interactions. Moreover, there no any auxiliary mechanism including spontaneous symmetry breaking get involved in the model. Therefore, traditional problems in the standard model such as the vacuum energy problem are removed from our model, as well as the hierarchy problem on the mass spectrum for fundamental particles.

ChiYi Chen

2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

182

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, December 16, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, December 8, 2010) In response to cold weather across much of the United States, natural gas spot prices increased across the board this report week (December 1 – December 8). Though most increases were less than 50 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), prices at a number of trading points (notably in the Northeast and Florida) increased by several dollars. The Henry Hub spot price rose 25 cents, from $4.21 per MMBtu to $4.46 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the natural gas near-month contract (January 2011) also increased, rising from $4.269 per MMBtu on December 1 to $4.606 per MMBtu on December 8.

183

Mass of Si-24  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 22, NUMBER 1 JULY 1980 Mass of Si R. E. Tribble, D. M. Tanner, and A. F. Zeller* Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 11 January 1980) The Si( He, 'He... quintet. The theoretical predictions are from Ref. 14. Nuclides +Si- 4AI Al Mg +Mg 24Na +Na- 4Ne Experimental 4&, 5661(24) 5179(9) 4735(2) 42840. 0) Predicted &&, 5646 5184 4722 4260 15 -5 12 24 +37 +12 -12 -37 ay g@eXQ ~~ thearC C...

Tribble, Robert E.; Tanner, D. M.; Zeller, A. F.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Natural System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural System Natural System Evaluation and Tool Development - FY11 Progress Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Program Yifeng Wang (SNL) Michael Simpson (INL) Scott Painter (LANL) Hui-Hai Liu (LBNL) Annie B. Kersting (LLNL) July 15, 2011 FCRD-USED-2011-000223 UFD Natural System Evaluation - FY11 Year-End Report July 15, 2011 2 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe

185

Spin Singularities: Clifford Kaleidoscopes and Particle Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Are particles singularities- vortex lines, tubes, or sheets in some global ocean of dark energy? We visit the zoo of Lagrangian singularities, or caustics in a spin(4,C) phase flow over compactifed Minkowsky space, and find that their varieties and energies parallel the families and masses of the elementary particles. Singularities are classified by tensor products of J Coxeter groups s generated by reflections. The multiplicity, s, is the number reflections needed to close a cycle of null zigzags: nonlinear resonances of J chiral pairs of lightlike matter spinors with (4-J) Clifford mirrors: dyads in the remaining unperturbed vacuum pairs. Using singular perturbations to "peel" phase-space singularities by orders in the vacuum intensity, we find that singular varieties with quantized mass, charge, and spin parallel the families of leptons (J=1), mesons (J=2), and hadrons (J=3). Taking the symplectic 4 form - the volume element in the 8- spinor phase space- as a natural Lagrangian, these singularities turn ou...

Cohen, Marcus S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

DOE/ID-Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of primary energy resources in the forms of coal, natural gas, wind, uranium, and oil shale. Most of Wyoming's coal and gas resources are exported from the state in their...

187

DOE/ID-Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of synthetic fuels from natural gas, cogeneration of electricity and steam, and oil shale and oil sand processing varies from 750 to 950C. Additional study is required to...

188

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Marketing Mother Nature’s Molecules ... Yet molecules made by Mother Nature, or derivatives thereof, still account for nearly half of the drugs on the market. ...

LISA JARVIS

2012-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

189

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: October 22, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, October 14, 2009) Natural gas spot prices increased this report week (October 7-14) as a cold-air mass moved over major consuming areas of the country, including the populous Northeast. The Henry Hub spot price increased by $0.12 to $3.82 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices decreased significantly after increasing for 5 consecutive weeks. The futures contract for November delivery decreased by $0.47 per MMBtu on the week to $4.436. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday (October 9) is estimated to have been 3,716 billion cubic feet (Bcf), a record high

190

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

55,263,673 56,186,958 57,321,746 58,223,229 2000's 59,252,728 60,286,364 61,107,254 61,871,450 62,496,134 63,616,827 64,166,280 64,964,769 65,073,996 65,329,582 2010's 65,542,345...

191

THE MASS DISTRIBUTION OF SUBGIANT PLANET HOSTS  

SciTech Connect

High mass stars are hostile to Doppler measurements due to rotation and activity on the main-sequence, so RV searches for planets around massive stars have relied on evolved stars. A large number of planets have been found around evolved stars with M > 1.5 M{sub Sun }. To test the robustness of mass determinations, Lloyd compared mass distributions of planet hosting subgiants with distributions from integrating isochrones and concluded that it is unlikely the subgiant planet hosts are this massive, but rather that the mass inferences are systematically in error. The conclusions of Lloyd have been called in to question by Johnson et al., who show TRILEGAL-based mass distributions that disagree with the mass distributions in Lloyd, which they attribute to Malmquist bias. Johnson et al. argue that the very small spectroscopic observational uncertainties favor high masses, and there are a large number of high mass sub giants in RV surveys. However, in this Letter, it is shown that Malmquist bias does not impact the mass distributions, but the mass distribution is sensitive to Galaxy model. The relationship needed to reconcile the subgiant planet host masses with any model of the Galactic stellar population is implausible, and the conclusion of Lloyd that spectroscopic mass determinations of subgiants are likely to have been overestimated is robust.

Lloyd, James P. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

N. Chandrachani Devi; H. A. Borges; S. Carneiro; J. S. Alcaniz

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

Devi, N Chandrachani; Carneiro, S; Alcaniz, J S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Observables in Neutrino Mass Spectroscopy Using Atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP.

D. N. Dinh; S. T. Petcov; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka; M. Yoshimura

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

195

Coronal structure of low-mass stars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure of low-mass stars Pauline Lang...loss in the stellar wind and X-ray emission...use reconstructed maps of the radial magnetic...strong as the stellar mass decreases, while...magnitude of the open (wind-bearing) magnetic...either rotational velocity or Rossby number......

Pauline Lang; Moira Jardine; Jean-François Donati; Julien Morin; Aline Vidotto

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy or Mass and Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A review. Problems: 1-Many empirical parameters and large dimension number; 2-Gravitation and Electrodynamics are challenged by dark matter and energy. Energy and nonlinear electrodynamics are fundamental in a unified nonlinear interaction. Nuclear energy appears as nonlinear SU(2) magnetic energy. Gravitation and electromagnetism are unified giving Einstein's equation and a geometric energy momentum tensor. A solution energy in the newtonian limit gives the gravitational constant G. Outside of this limit G is variable. May be interpreted as dark matter or energy. In vacuum, known gravitational solutions are obtained. Electromagnetism is an SU(2) subgroup. A U(1) limit gives Maxwell's equations. Geometric fields determine a generalized Dirac equation and are the germ of quantum physics. Planck's h and of Einstein's c are given by the potential and the metric. Excitations have quanta of charge, flux and spin determining the FQHE. There are only three stable 1/2 spin fermions. Mass is a form of energy. The rest energies of the fermions give the proton/electron mass ratio. Potential excitations have energies equal to the weak boson masses allowing a geometric interpretation of Weinberg's angle. SU(2) gives the anomalous magnetic moments of proton, electron, neutron and generates nuclear range attractive potentials strong enough to produce the binding energies of the deuteron and other nuclides. Lepton and meson masses are due to topological excitations. The geometric mass spectrum is satisfactory. The proton has a triple structure. The alpha constant is a geometric number.

Gustavo R Gonzalez-Martin

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 19, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 11, 2010) Summer heat and increased demand this week were insufficient to sustain the natural gas price level, as prices at trading locations across the lower 48 States posted decreases. Overall, spot price at most locations in the lower 48 States fell between 30 and 45 cents per million Btu (MMBtu), although a number of locations posted price decreases of as much as 52 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, August 11, 39 cents lower than the preceding week, at $4.38 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract

198

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 22, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 14, 2010) While natural gas spot prices inched lower at a number of market locations, prices at the majority of points in the lower 48 States increased since last Wednesday, April 7. Overall, spot prices in the lower 48 States varied between a 3-percent increase and a 3-percent decrease on the week. The Henry Hub spot price ended the report week yesterday, April 14, 7 cents higher than the preceding week, at $4.15 per million Btu (MMBtu). At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub ended trading yesterday at $4.199 per

199

Improving aerosol distributions below clouds by assimilating satellite-retrieved cloud droplet number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...remainder of the map to the...distributions for mass, number, composition...such as vertical velocity and aerosol composition...updated aerosol mass for each compound...aerosols in trade wind cumulus observed by...spectrum of updraft velocities and the internally...Starting from aerosol mass (M) and number...

Pablo E. Saide; Gregory R. Carmichael; Scott N. Spak; Patrick Minnis; J. Kirk Ayers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Geoelectrical Measurement of Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Parameters  

SciTech Connect

Mass transfer affects contaminant transport and is thought to control the efficiency of aquifer remediation at a number of sites within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. An improved understanding of mass transfer is critical to meeting the enormous scientific and engineering challenges currently facing DOE. Informed design of site remedies and long-term stewardship of radionuclide-contaminated sites will require new cost-effective laboratory and field techniques to measure the parameters controlling mass transfer spatially and across a range of scales. In this project, we sought to capitalize on the geophysical signatures of mass transfer. Previous numerical modeling and pilot-scale field experiments suggested that mass transfer produces a geoelectrical signature—a hysteretic relation between sampled (mobile-domain) fluid conductivity and bulk (mobile + immobile) conductivity—over a range of scales relevant to aquifer remediation. In this work, we investigated the geoelectrical signature of mass transfer during tracer transport in a series of controlled experiments to determine the operation of controlling parameters, and also investigated the use of complex-resistivity (CR) as a means of quantifying mass transfer parameters in situ without tracer experiments. In an add-on component to our grant, we additionally considered nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to help parse mobile from immobile porosities. Including the NMR component, our revised study objectives were to: 1. Develop and demonstrate geophysical approaches to measure mass-transfer parameters spatially and over a range of scales, including the combination of electrical resistivity monitoring, tracer tests, complex resistivity, nuclear magnetic resonance, and materials characterization; and 2. Provide mass-transfer estimates for improved understanding of contaminant fate and transport at DOE sites, such as uranium transport at the Hanford 300 Area. To achieve our objectives, we implemented a 3-part research plan involving (1) development of computer codes and techniques to estimate mass-transfer parameters from time-lapse electrical data; (2) bench-scale experiments on synthetic materials and materials from cores from the Hanford 300 Area; and (3) field demonstration experiments at the DOE’s Hanford 300 Area. In a synergistic add-on to our workplan, we analyzed data from field experiments performed at the DOE Naturita Site under a separate DOE SBR grant, on which PI Day-Lewis served as co-PI. Techniques developed for application to Hanford datasets also were applied to data from Naturita. 1. Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) faces enormous scientific and engineering challenges associated with the remediation of legacy contamination at former nuclear weapons production facilities. Selection, design and optimization of appropriate site remedies (e.g., pump-and-treat, biostimulation, or monitored natural attenuation) requires reliable predictive models of radionuclide fate and transport; however, our current modeling capabilities are limited by an incomplete understanding of multi-scale mass transfer—its rates, scales, and the heterogeneity of controlling parameters. At many DOE sites, long “tailing” behavior, concentration rebound, and slower-than-expected cleanup are observed; these observations are all consistent with multi-scale mass transfer [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1995; Haggerty et al., 2000; 2004], which renders pump-and-treat remediation and biotransformation inefficient and slow [Haggerty and Gorelick, 1994; Harvey et al., 1994; Wilson, 1997]. Despite the importance of mass transfer, there are significant uncertainties associated with controlling parameters, and the prevalence of mass transfer remains a point of debate [e.g., Hill et al., 2006; Molz et al., 2006] for lack of experimental methods to verify and measure it in situ or independently of tracer breakthrough. There is a critical need for new field-experimental techniques to measure mass transfer in-situ and estimate multi-scale and spatially variable mass-transfer parame

Day-Lewis, Frederick; Singha, Kamini; Haggerty, Roy; Johnson, Tim; Binley, Andrew; Lane, John

2014-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

202

ALARA notes, Number 8  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

CHROMOSOME NUMBERS IN MAMMALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variables for which the double inte-gral does not exist: R. L. JEFFERY. On the number of elements in a group which have a power in...society will meet at Columbia University, MA ay 2, 1925. W. BENJAMIN FITE Acting Secretary 424 SCIENCE

Theophilus S. Painter

1925-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

204

Baryon Number Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, prepared for the Community Planning Study - Snowmass 2013 - summarizes the theoretical motivations and the experimental efforts to search for baryon number violation, focussing on nucleon decay and neutron-antineutron oscillations. Present and future nucleon decay search experiments using large underground detectors, as well as planned neutron-antineutron oscillation search experiments with free neutron beams are highlighted.

K. S. Babu; E. Kearns; U. Al-Binni; S. Banerjee; D. V. Baxter; Z. Berezhiani; M. Bergevin; S. Bhattacharya; S. Brice; R. Brock; T. W. Burgess; L. Castellanos; S. Chattopadhyay; M-C. Chen; E. Church; C. E. Coppola; D. F. Cowen; R. Cowsik; J. A. Crabtree; H. Davoudiasl; R. Dermisek; A. Dolgov; B. Dutta; G. Dvali; P. Ferguson; P. Fileviez Perez; T. Gabriel; A. Gal; F. Gallmeier; K. S. Ganezer; I. Gogoladze; E. S. Golubeva; V. B. Graves; G. Greene; T. Handler; B. Hartfiel; A. Hawari; L. Heilbronn; J. Hill; D. Jaffe; C. Johnson; C. K. Jung; Y. Kamyshkov; B. Kerbikov; B. Z. Kopeliovich; V. B. Kopeliovich; W. Korsch; T. Lachenmaier; P. Langacker; C-Y. Liu; W. J. Marciano; M. Mocko; R. N. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; G. Muhrer; P. Mumm; P. Nath; Y. Obayashi; L. Okun; J. C. Pati; R. W. Pattie Jr.; D. G. Phillips II; C. Quigg; J. L. Raaf; S. Raby; E. Ramberg; A. Ray; A. Roy; A. Ruggles; U. Sarkar; A. Saunders; A. Serebrov; Q. Shafi; H. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; R. Shrock; A. K. Sikdar; W. M. Snow; A. Soha; S. Spanier; G. C. Stavenga; S. Striganov; R. Svoboda; Z. Tang; Z. Tavartkiladze; L. Townsend; S. Tulin; A. Vainshtein; R. Van Kooten; C. E. M. Wagner; Z. Wang; B. Wehring; R. J. Wilson; M. Wise; M. Yokoyama; A. R. Young

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

205

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

206

1074 volume 27 number 12 december 2009 nature biotechnology Improving on nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

large volumes of cellulosic ethanol will be used in the coming decade and beyond, its long-term,"saysVerdezyneCSOStephen Picataggio. Cellulosic ethanol, produced from plant waste and other nonfood sources, offers a more attractive, such as butanol and alkanes, which can be handled in the existing fuel storage and distribution infrastructure6

Cai, Long

207

NATURAL SELECTION IN KINETIC EVOLUTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...last two numbers of SCIENCE have appeared articles by Drs. Wheeler and Chapman on the abuses of nature writing as exemplified...imprint of Rand, IeNally and Co., 1903, and its author is Katherine E. Dopp, of the Extension Division of the Chicago University...

O. F. COOK

1904-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Metrics For Comparing Plasma Mass Filters  

SciTech Connect

High-throughput mass separation of nuclear waste may be useful for optimal storage, disposal, or environmental remediation. The most dangerous part of nuclear waste is the fission product, which produces most of the heat and medium-term radiation. Plasmas are well-suited to separating nuclear waste because they can separate many different species in a single step. A number of plasma devices have been designed for such mass separation, but there has been no standardized comparison between these devices. We define a standard metric, the separative power per unit volume, and derive it for three different plasma mass filters: the plasma centrifuge, Ohkawa filter, and the magnetic centrifugal mass filter. __________________________________________________

Abraham J. Fetterman and Nathaniel J. Fisch

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

210

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

211

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

212

Mass Spectrometer: Orbitrap | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance...

213

Mass Spectrometry | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Microfabrication Mass Spectrometry Microscopy Molecular Science Computing NMR and EPR Spectroscopy and Diffraction Subsurface Flow and Transport Mass Spectrometry Systems...

214

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

215

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

216

Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers  

SciTech Connect

Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Mass and fans in attached sunspaces  

SciTech Connect

The effect of thermal storage mass on the performance of an attached sunspace is investigated for a particular design in Boston. Mass in the sunspace and in the adjoining building are compared. Performance is evaluated in terms of temperature conditions in the sunspace and delivery of useful solar heat to the adjoining building. The dependence of the results on the manner of heat delivery is studied. Both natural convection and fan-forced air flow are included.

Jones, R.W.; McFarland, R.D.; Lazarus, G.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): ADDRESS: CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: CELL PHONE NUMBER of financial institution. 14 Cell Phone Expenses 15 Other ordinary and necessary living expenses. 16 TOTAL (add

220

Natural Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Solutions Natural Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Solutions Name Natural Solutions Address 3715 Briarwood Dr. Place Cedar Falls, Iowa Zip 50613 Sector Solar Product solar and wind systems Phone number 319-277-7842 Website http://www.naturalsolutions-sk Coordinates 42.5048475°, -92.434048° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.5048475,"lon":-92.434048,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Tool Development Integrated Tool Development for Used Fuel Disposition Natural System Evaluation - Phase I Report Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Yifeng Wang & Teklu Hadgu Sandia National Laboratories Scott Painter, Dylan R. Harp & Shaoping Chu Los Alamos National Laboratory Thomas Wolery Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Jim Houseworth Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory September 28, 2012 FCRD-UFD-2012-000229 SAND2012-7073P DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

222

Title Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research 2011 Yearly Review Meeting Project DE-FE0002128 Analysis of microbial activity under a supercritical CO 2 atmosphere Massachusetts Institute of Technology Prof. Janelle Thompson, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering February 24-26, 2011 Project Participants * Dr. Janelle Thompson, PhD, Assistant Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering (MIT) * Dr. Hector Hernandez, PhD, Martin Luther King Postdoctoral Fellow (MIT) * Mr. Kyle Peet, doctoral student, Civil and Environmental Engineering, MIT * 2 undergraduates Janelle Hector Kyle 3 Why do microbes matter? CO 2 "trapping" mechanisms -biofilm barriers -mineralization Natural and Engineered Systems Mitchell et al, 2009 dawsonite Biofilm Barriers Biological catalysis of mineral trapping Can we recover life forms that grow in supercritical CO

223

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W; Williams, Peter; Krone, Jennifer Reeve

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

224

Mass spectrometric immunoassay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rapid mass spectrometric immunoassay methods for detecting and/or quantifying antibody and antigen analytes utilizing affinity capture to isolate the analytes and internal reference species (for quantification) followed by mass spectrometric analysis of the isolated analyte/internal reference species. Quantification is obtained by normalizing and calibrating obtained mass spectrum against the mass spectrum obtained for an antibody/antigen of known concentration.

Nelson, Randall W (Phoenix, AZ); Williams, Peter (Phoenix, AZ); Krone, Jennifer Reeve (Granbury, TX)

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Western Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Western Region Western Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Western Region Overview | Transportation South | Transportation North | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Ten interstate and nine intrastate natural gas pipeline companies provide transportation services to and within the Western Region (Arizona, California, Idaho, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington), the fewest number serving any region (see Table below). Slightly more than half the capacity entering the region is on natural gas pipeline systems that carry natural gas from the Rocky Mountain area and the Permian and San Juan basins. These latter systems enter the region at the New Mexico-Arizona and Nevada-Utah State lines. The rest of the capacity arrives on natural gas pipelines that access Canadian natural gas at the Idaho and Washington State border crossings with British Columbia, Canada.

226

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Mass Transport within Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Upper bounds on the photon mass  

SciTech Connect

The effects of a nonzero photon rest mass can be incorporated into electromagnetism in a simple way using the Proca equations. In this vein, two interesting implications regarding the possible existence of a massive photon in nature, i.e., tiny alterations in the known values of both the anomalous magnetic moment of the electron and the gravitational deflection of electromagnetic radiation, are utilized to set upper limits on its mass. The bounds obtained are not as stringent as those recently found; nonetheless, they are comparable to other existing bounds and bring new elements to the issue of restricting the photon mass.

Accioly, Antonio [Laboratorio de Fisica Experimental (LAFEX), Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Group of Field Theory from First Principles, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Helayeel-Neto, Jose [Laboratorio de Fisica Experimental (LAFEX), Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, Urca, 22290-180, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Group of Field Theory from First Principles, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Scatena, Eslley [Instituto de Fisica Teorica (IFT), Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Group of Field Theory from First Principles, Sao Paulo State University (UNESP), Rua Dr. Bento Teobaldo Ferraz 271, Bl. II-Barra Funda, 01140-070 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

230

KPA Activity Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

231

Chemical kinetics of cetane number improving agents  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for diesel fuels has resulted in the use of greater percentage of cracked distillates having poor ignition properties. The ignition properties of diesel fuels can be rated in terms of their cetane number and diesel fuels having low cetane number may have poor ignition properties such as diesel knock, difficulties to start engines in the cold weather and so on. Such diesel fuels need cetane number improving agents. In the 1940s and 1950s alkyl nitrates, alkyl nitrites and organic peroxides were found to be effective cetane number improving additives. Our recent study suggests that free radicals produced from thermal decomposition just before ignition should have an important role to improve their ignition properties. However no studies on the reaction mechanism for improving effect of these additives have been attempted because of complex nature of spontaneous ignition reaction of hydrocarbons. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism for improving effects of cetane number improving agents. We here have attempted to simulate the spontaneous ignition of n-butane as a model compound in the presence of alkyl nitrites as cetane number improving agents.

Hashimoto, K.; Akutsu, Y.; Arai, M.; Tamura, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Arizona - Natural Gas 2012 Million  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S3. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arizona, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6 6 5 5 5 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 523 711 183 168 117 From Oil Wells * * 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

233

THE ROLE OF CORE MASS IN CONTROLLING EVAPORATION: THE KEPLER RADIUS DISTRIBUTION AND THE KEPLER-36 DENSITY DICHOTOMY  

SciTech Connect

We use models of coupled thermal evolution and photo-evaporative mass loss to understand the formation and evolution of the Kepler-36 system. We show that the large contrast in mean planetary density observed by Carter et al. can be explained as a natural consequence of photo-evaporation from planets that formed with similar initial compositions. However, rather than being due to differences in XUV irradiation between the planets, we find that this contrast is due to the difference in the masses of the planets' rock/iron cores and the impact that this has on mass-loss evolution. We explore in detail how our coupled models depend on irradiation, mass, age, composition, and the efficiency of mass loss. Based on fits to large numbers of coupled evolution and mass-loss runs, we provide analytic fits to understand threshold XUV fluxes for significant atmospheric loss, as a function of core mass and mass-loss efficiency. Finally we discuss these results in the context of recent studies of the radius distribution of Kepler candidates. Using our parameter study, we make testable predictions for the frequency of sub-Neptune-sized planets. We show that 1.8-4.0 R{sub ?} planets should become significantly less common on orbits within 10 days and discuss the possibility of a narrow 'occurrence valley' in the radius-flux distribution. Moreover, we describe how photo-evaporation provides a natural explanation for the recent observations of Ciardi et al. that inner planets are preferentially smaller within the systems.

Lopez, Eric D.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Natural fourth generation of leptons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider implications of a fourth generation of leptons, allowing for the most general mass patterns for the fourth generation neutrino. We determine the constraints due to the precision electroweak measurements and outline the signatures to search for at the LHC experiments. As a concrete framework to apply these results we consider the minimal walking technicolor (MWTC) model where the matter content, regarding the electroweak quantum numbers, corresponds to a fourth generation.

Oleg Antipin; Matti Heikinheimo; Kimmo Tuominen

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Natural and Multi-Natural Inflation in Axion Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a landscape of many axions, where the axion potential receives various contributions from shift symmetry breaking effects. We show that the existence of the axion with a super-Planckian decay constant is very common in the axion landscape for a wide range of numbers of axions and shift symmetry breaking terms, because of the accidental alignment of axions. The effective inflation model is either natural or multi-natural inflation in the axion landscape, depending on the number of axions and the shift symmetry breaking terms. The tension between BICEP2 and Planck could be due to small modulations to the inflaton potential or steepening of the potential along the heavy axions after the tunneling. The total duration of the slow-roll inflation our universe experienced is not significantly larger than $60$ if the typical height of the axion potentials is of order $(10^{16-17}{\\rm \\,GeV})^4$.

Tetsutaro Higaki; Fuminobu Takahashi

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

EMSL - Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mass-spectrometry Proteomics Capabilities High resolution and mass accuracy Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectrometers, from 6 Tesla (T) to 15T and 21T in...

237

mass communication advertising &  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mass communication advertising & public relations introduction. Graduate programs in the Department of Mass Communication, Advertising, and Public Relations provide an entry to a wide spectrum of careers the opportunity to create content, campaigns, strategy, and research in public relations, advertising

Finzi, Adrien

238

Natural Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Power Place Castle Douglas, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip DG7 3XS Sector Services, Wind energy Product Specialists including project managers, ecologists, GIS and mapping experts, construction managers, wind farm designers, geotechnical engineers and land agents who deliver technical and management services. Number of employees 201-500 Phone number +1 (518) 308-0200 Website http://www.naturalpower.com/ References Natural Power[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Natural Power is a company located in Castle Douglas, Scotland, United Kingdom, Saratoga Springs, NY, and other locations worldwide. References Cite error: tags exist, but no tag was found

239

Optimizing the stroke of Purcell's rotator, a low Reynolds number swimmer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purcell's rotator is a theoretical low Reynolds number swimmer that can act as a model of more complex natural microorganisms, such as E.coli. Because of the low Reynolds number environment, the swimmer has approximately ...

Hammett, Victoria N. (Victoria Nicole)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

243

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

244

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

245

Natural Gas Rules (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Louisiana Department of Natural Resources administers the rules that govern natural gas exploration and extraction in the state. DNR works with the Louisiana Department of Environmental...

246

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

247

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

248

Remarks on Nondeterminism ffl Interesting Nondeterministic TM. A composite number is the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remarks on Nondeterminism ffl Interesting Nondeterministic TM. A composite number is the product of two natural numbers which are greater than one. That is, a composite number is a non­prime other than 1 or 0. Let C denote the set of composite numbers, and set L = f\\Lambda n : n 2 Cg. If restricted

Bringsjord, Selmer

249

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 9 | OCTOBER 2013 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 605 news & views  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NATURE PHYSICS | VOL 9 | OCTOBER 2013 | www.nature.com/naturephysics 605 news & views R ight after -- will then form. In our example, will have to change from +1 to -1, necessarily passing through zero as quantum phase transitions. The dependence of the number of defects on the cooling rate is governed

Loss, Daniel

250

nature nanotechnology | VOL 5 | DECEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 825 correspondence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nature nanotechnology | VOL 5 | DECEMBER 2010 | www.nature.com/naturenanotechnology 825 purpose of publishing research papers in various areas of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Many­4 . This article will quantify the growth over time in the number of nanotechnology journals using three databases

Zhang, Minghua

251

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question Thomas Schick G¨ottingen OA Chennai 2010 Thomas Schick (G¨ottingen) Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question OA Chennai 2010 1 / 24 #12 = ~M/) with fundamental domain F. L2-Betti numbers:= normalized dimension( space of L2-harmonic forms

Sunder, V S

252

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

253

USING CUMULATIVE NUMBER DENSITIES TO COMPARE GALAXIES ACROSS COSMIC TIME  

SciTech Connect

Comparing galaxies across redshifts at fixed cumulative number density is a popular way to estimate the evolution of specific galaxy populations. This method ignores scatter in mass accretion histories and galaxy-galaxy mergers, which can lead to errors when comparing galaxies over large redshift ranges (?z > 1). We use abundance matching in the ?CDM paradigm to estimate the median change in cumulative number density with redshift and provide a simple fit (+0.16 dex per unit ?z) for progenitors of z = 0 galaxies. We find that galaxy descendants do not evolve in the same way as galaxy progenitors, largely due to scatter in mass accretion histories. We also provide estimates for the 1? range of cumulative number densities corresponding to galaxy progenitors and descendants. Finally, we discuss some limits on cumulative number density comparisons, which arise due to difficulties measuring physical quantities (e.g., stellar mass) consistently across redshifts. A public tool to calculate cumulative number density evolution for galaxies, as well as approximate halo masses, is available online.

Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Marchesini, Danilo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tufts University, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Muzzin, Adam [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)] [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Papovich, Casey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Stefanon, Mauro [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)] [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Natural Gas Development and Grassland Songbird Abundance in Southwestern Saskatchewan: The Impact of Gas Wells and Cumulative Disturbance .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The quantity and quality of remaining grasslands in southwestern Saskatchewan, Canada, are threatened by expansion of natural gas development. The number of natural gas wells… (more)

Bogard, Holly Jayne Kalyn

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and

256

EIA - Natural Gas Production Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Production Gross Withdrawals and Production Components of natural gas production for the U.S., States and the Gulf of Mexico (monthly, annual). Number of Producing Gas Wells U.S. and State level data (annual). Wellhead Value & Marketed Production U.S. and State level natural gas wellhead values and prices of marketed production (annual). Offshore Gross Withdrawals U.S., State, and Gulf of Mexico gross withdrawals from oil and gas wells(annual). Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Production Production of crude oil, natural gas wet after lease separation, natural gas liquids, dry natural gas, and lease condensate (annual). Natural Gas Plant Liquids Production Production by U.S., region, and State (annual). Lease Condensate Production Production by U.S., region, and State (annual).

257

Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© 2009 APS Research Highlights Nature Nanotechnology Published online: 17 July 2009 | doi:10 perfect fluid. Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 025301 (2009). | Article |1. Nature Nanotechnology ISSN 1748 : Nature Nanotechnology http://www.nature.com/nnano/reshigh/2009/0709/full/nnano.2009.222.html 1 of 1 18

Müller, Markus

258

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

259

Impact of Natural Gas Infrastructure on Electric Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Impact of Natural Gas Infrastructure on Electric Power Systems MOHAMMAD SHAHIDEHPOUR, FELLOW, IEEE of electricity has introduced new risks associated with the security of natural gas infrastructure on a sig the essence of the natural gas infrastructure for sup- plying the ever-increasing number of gas-powered units

Fu, Yong

260

EVOLUTIONARY TRACKS OF TRAPPED, ACCRETING PROTOPLANETS: THE ORIGIN OF THE OBSERVED MASS-PERIOD RELATION  

SciTech Connect

The large number of observed exoplanets ({approx}>700) provides important constraints on their origin as deduced from the mass-period diagram of planets. The most surprising features in the diagram are (1) the (apparent) pileup of gas giants at a period of {approx}500 days ({approx}1 AU) and (2) the so-called mass-period relation, which indicates that planetary mass is an increasing function of orbital period. We construct the evolutionary tracks of growing planets at planet traps in evolving protoplanetary disks and show that they provide a good physical understanding of how these observational properties arise. The fundamental feature of our model is that inhomogeneities in protoplanetary disks give rise to multiple (up to 3) trapping sites for rapid (type I) planetary migration of planetary cores. The viscous evolution of disks results in the slow radial movement of the traps and their cores from large to small orbital periods. In our model, the slow inward motion of planet traps is coupled with the standard core accretion scenario for planetary growth. As planets grow, type II migration takes over. Planet growth and radial movement are ultimately stalled by the dispersal of gas disks via photoevaporation. Our model makes a number of important predictions: that distinct sub-populations of planets that reflect the properties of planet traps where they have grown result in the mass-period relation, that the presence of these sub-populations naturally explains a pileup of planets at {approx}1 AU, and that evolutionary tracks from the ice line do put planets at short periods and fill an earlier claimed {sup p}lanet desert{sup -}a sparse population of planets in the mass-semimajor axis diagram.

Hasegawa, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada); Pudritz, Ralph E., E-mail: hasegay@physics.mcmaster.ca, E-mail: pudritz@physics.mcmaster.ca [Origins Institute, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EMSL - Mass Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mass-spectrometer en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and...

262

Neutrino Masses in Flipped SU(5)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyse the fermion masses and mixings in the flipped SU(5) model. The fermion mass matrices are evolved from the GUT scale down to $m_W$ by solving the renormalization group equations for the Yukawa couplings. The constraints imposed by the charged fermion data are then utilised to make predictions about the neutrino properties . It is found that the {\\it generalized } see-saw mechanism which occurs naturally in this model can provide {\\it i})a solution to the solar neutrino problem via the MSW mechanism and {\\it ii})a sufficiently large $\

Leontaris, George K

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Title Rates and technologies for mass-market demand response Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-50626 Year of Publication 2002 Authors Herter, Karen, Roger Levy, John Wilson, and Arthur H. Rosenfeld Conference Name 2002 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Conference Location Pacific Grove, CA Keywords demand response, demand response and distributed energy resources center, demand response research center, rate programs & tariffs Abstract Demand response programs are often quickly and poorly crafted in reaction to an energy crisis and disappear once the crisis subsides, ensuring that the electricity system will be unprepared when the next crisis hits. In this paper, we propose to eliminate the event-driven nature of demand response programs by considering demand responsiveness a component of the utility obligation to serve. As such, demand response can be required as a condition of service, and the offering of demand response rates becomes a requirement of utilities as an element of customer service. Using this foundation, we explore the costs and benefits of a smart thermostat-based demand response system capable of two types of programs: (1) a mandatory, system-operator controlled, contingency program, and (2) a voluntary, customer controlled, bill management program with rate-based incentives. Any demand response program based on this system could consist of either or both of these components. Ideally, these programs would be bundled, providing automatic load management through customer-programmed price response, plus up to 10 GW of emergency load shedding capability in California. Finally, we discuss options for and barriers to implementation of such a program in California.

264

Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

265

NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWMU 161 C-743 Trainina Trailer Comolex- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: . REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of C-743 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 200 feet...

266

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

267

The Origins of Mass  

SciTech Connect

The Higgs boson was discovered in July of 2012 and is generally understood to be the origin of mass. While those statements are true, they are incomplete. It turns out that the Higgs boson is responsible for only about 2% of the mass of ordinary matter. In this dramatic new video, Dr. Don Lincoln of Fermilab tells us the rest of the story.

Lincoln, Don

2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Gas Chromatography -Mass Spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GCMS - 1 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS OF ETHANOL AND BENZENE IN GASOLINE Last updated: June 17, 2014 #12;GCMS - 2 Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry GC-MS ANALYSIS). The goal of this experiment is to separate the components in a sample of gasoline using Gas Chromatography

Nizkorodov, Sergey

269

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, and  the number of (liquefied natural gas, nitrogen  dioxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide, particle  number,  and 

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Betti number signatures of homogeneous Poisson point processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Betti numbers are fundamental topological quantities that describe the k-dimensional connectivity of an object: B_0 is the number of connected components and B_k effectively counts the number of k-dimensional holes. Although they are appealing natural descriptors of shape, the higher-order Betti numbers are more difficult to compute than other measures and so have not previously been studied per se in the context of stochastic geometry or statistical physics. As a mathematically tractable model, we consider the expected Betti numbers per unit volume of Poisson-centred spheres with radius alpha. We present results from simulations and derive analytic expressions for the low intensity, small radius limits of Betti numbers in one, two, and three dimensions. The algorithms and analysis depend on alpha-shapes, a construction from computational geometry that deserves to be more widely known in the physics community.

Vanessa Robins

2006-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Betti number signatures of homogeneous Poisson point processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Betti numbers are fundamental topological quantities that describe the k-dimensional connectivity of an object: ?0 is the number of connected components and ?k effectively counts the number of k-dimensional holes. Although they are appealing natural descriptors of shape, the higher-order Betti numbers are more difficult to compute than other measures and so have not previously been studied per se in the context of stochastic geometry or statistical physics. As a mathematically tractable model, we consider the expected Betti numbers per unit volume of Poisson-centered spheres with radius ?. We present results from simulations and derive analytic expressions for the low intensity, small radius limits of Betti numbers in one, two, and three dimensions. The algorithms and analysis depend on alpha shapes, a construction from computational geometry that deserves to be more widely known in the physics community.

Vanessa Robins

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

273

Iodine molecule for neutrino mass spectroscopy: ab initio calculation of spectral rate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......such as tritium for the measurement of an averaged absolute neutrino mass value, and (2) the search of neutrinoless double beta decay for verification of lepton number violation related to a finite Majorana type of masses. So far negative......

Motomichi Tashiro; Masahiro Ehara; Susumu Kuma; Yuki Miyamoto; Noboru Sasao; Satoshi Uetake; Motohiko Yoshimura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Reynolds number effects on RayleighTaylor instability with possible  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­Taylor-driven turbulence as the dominant acceleration mechanism for thermonuclear flames in type-Ia supernovae7.4 solar masses, ignition occurs near the centre, thus generating a thermonuclear flame front with high Reynolds number turbulence. The thermonuclear flame varies in thickness, from 10-4 to 1 cm (ref. 8

Loss, Daniel

275

Chapter 9 - Natural Gas Dehydration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural, associated, or tail gas usually contains water, in liquid and/or vapor form, at source and/or as a result of sweetening with an aqueous solution. Operating experience and thorough engineering have proved that it is necessary to reduce and control the water content of gas to ensure safe processing and transmission. Pipeline drips installed near wellheads and at strategic locations along gathering and trunk lines will eliminate most of the free water lifted from the wells in the gas stream. Multistage separators can also be deployed to ensure the reduction of free water that may be present. However, the removal of the water vapor that exists in solution in natural gas requires a more complex treatment. This treatment consists of “dehydrating” the natural gas, which is accomplished by lowering the dew point temperature of the gas at which water vapor will condense from the gas. There are several methods of dehydrating natural gas. The most common of these are liquid desiccant (glycol) dehydration, solid desiccant dehydration, and cooling the gas. Any of these methods may be used to dry gas to a specific water content. Usually, the combination of the water content specification, initial water content, process character, operational nature, and economic factors determine the dehydration method to be utilized. However, the choice of dehydration method is usually between glycol and solid desiccants. These are presented in depth in subsequent portions of this chapter. Keywords: absorber, adsorption isotherm, bed loading, chemisorption, dehydration, desiccant, desiccant regeneration, equilibrium zone, flash tank, flow distribution, glycol circulation pump, glycol dehydration, inlet feed contamination, liquid carryover, mass transfer zone, molecular sieve, overcirculation, reboiler, solubility, still, surge tank, undercirculation.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Bio-oil Analysis Using Negative Electrospray Ionization: Comparative Study of High-Resolution Mass Spectrometers and Phenolic versus Sugaric Components  

SciTech Connect

We have previously demonstrated that a petroleomic analysis could be performed for bio-oils and revealed the complex nature of bio-oils for the nonvolatile phenolic compounds (Smith, E.; Lee, Y. J. Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 5190?5198). As a subsequent study, we have adapted electrospray ionization in negative-ion mode to characterize a wide variety of bio-oil compounds. A comparative study of three common high-resolution mass spectrometers was performed to validate the methodology and to investigate the differences in mass discrimination and resolution. The mass spectrum is dominated by low mass compounds with m/z of 100–250, with some compounds being analyzable by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). We could characterize over 800 chemical compositions, with only about 40 of them being previously known in GC–MS. This unveiled a much more complex nature of bio-oils than typically shown by GC–MS. The pyrolysis products of cellulose and hemicellulose, particularly polyhydroxy cyclic hydrocarbons (or what we call “sugaric” compounds), such as levoglucosan, could be effectively characterized with this approach. Phenolic compounds from lignin pyrolysis could be clearly distinguished in a contour map of double bond equivalent (DBE) versus the number of carbons from these sugaric compounds.

Smith, Erica A.; Park, Soojin; Klein, Adam T.; Lee, Young Jin

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

Formulation of functional theory for pairing with particle number restoration  

SciTech Connect

The restoration of particle number within energy density functional theory is analyzed. It is shown that the standard method based on configuration mixing leads to a functional of both the projected and nonprojected densities. As an alternative that might be advantageous for mass models, nuclear dynamics, and thermodynamics, we propose to formulate the functional in terms directly of the one-body and two-body density matrices of the state with good particle number. Our approach does not contain the pathologies recently observed when restoring the particle number in an energy density functional framework based on transition density matrices and can eventually be applied with functionals having arbitrary density dependencies.

Hupin, Guillaume; Lacroix, Denis [Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), CEA/DSM-CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, F-14076 Caen (France); Bender, Michael [Universite Bordeaux, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux Gradignan, UMR5797, F-33175 Gradignan (France)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

NETL: Natural Gas and Petroleum Storage Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Strategic Petroleum Reserve Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-FE0014830 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Core Laboratories Natural Gas Storage There are currently no active storage projects Storage - Completed Projects Click on project number for a more detailed description of the project Project Number Project Name Primary Performer DE-DT0000358 Strategic Petroleum Reserve Northrop Grumman Missions System DE-FC26-03NT41813 Geomechanical Analysis and Design Criteria Terralog Technologies DE-FC26-03NT41779 Natural Gas Storage Technology Consortium Pennsylvania State University (PSU) DE-FC26-03NT41743 Improved Deliverability in Gas Storage Fields by Identifying the Timing and Sources of Damage Using Smart Storage Technology Schlumberger Technology Corporation

279

Nucleon generalized form factors with twisted mass fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results on the nucleon form factors, momentum fraction and helicity moment for $N_f=2$ and $N_f=2+1+1$ twisted mass fermions for a number of lattice volumes and lattice spacings. First results for a new $N_f=2$ ensemble at the physical pion mass are also included. The implications of these results on the spin content of the nucleon are discussed taking into account the disconnected contributions at one pion mass.

C. Alexandrou; M. Constantinou; V. Drach; K. Jansen; Ch. Kallidonis; G. Koutsou

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

System parameters and measurement instrument parameters are not separately observable: Relational mass is observable while absolute mass is not  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A brief summary of the objections to the relational nature of inertial mass, gravitational mass and electric charge is presented. The objections are refuted by showing that the measurement process of comparing an instrument reference clock and a reference rod both obeying the laws of physics to a system obeying the same laws of physics results in relational quantities: inertial mass, gravitational mass and electric charge appear only as ratios. This means that scaling of the absolute inertial mass of every object in the universe by the same factor is unobservable (likewise for gravitational mass and electric charge). It is shown that the measurement process does not separate the instrument parameters from the system parameters. Instead a measurement produces functions of fundamental, dimensionless parameters such as the fine structure constant, electron-proton mass ratio and the proton gyro-magnetic factor. It is shown that the measurement of Planck's constant also results in such a function of these dimensio...

Holt, Craig R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Natural Gas Annual, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2001 The Natural Gas Annual, 2001 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2001. Summary data are presented for each State for 1997 to 2001. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2001 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2001, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1997-2001 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2001 (Table 2) ASCII TXT.

282

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"N3050MS3","N3010MS3","N3020MS3","N3035MS3","NA1570SMS3","N3045MS3" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Mississippi Natural Gas...

283

Nature/Culture/Seawater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay considers seawater as a substance and symbol in anthropological and social theory. Seawater has occupied an ambiguous place with respect to anthropological categories of nature and culture. Seawater as nature ...

Helmreich, Stefan

284

Natural Gas Monthly  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Highlights activities, events, and analyses associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer related activities and underground storage data are also reported.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Natural gas annual 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience. The 1996 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas from it`s production to it`s end use.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3010CT3","N3020CT3","N3035CT3","N3045CT3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Connecticut (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to...

287

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Rotary Rig Count Rises to Highest Level since February 2009. The natural gas rotary rig count was 992 as of Friday, August 13, according to data released by Baker...

288

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Home | Petroleum | Gasoline | Diesel | Propane | Natural Gas | Electricity | Coal | Nuclear Renewables | Alternative Fuels | Prices | States | International | Country Analysis...

289

Natural gas annual 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Natural gas annual 1995  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

FR Cnc Nature Revisited  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of FR Cnc reported a tricky nature. We carried out...

M. C. Gálvez; A. Golovin; M. Hernán-Obispo…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Natural Gas: More Gasbuggies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... first US experiment in the use of underground nuclear explosions to increase the recovery of natural ...naturalgas ...

1969-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

293

Geology of Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... to an accepted plan have produced a most comprehensive geological account of the occurrence of natural ...naturalgas ...

E. F. A.

1936-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

Mass of Ca-36  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PH YS ICA 1. RE VIK W C VO I. UMK 15, 5 UMBER 6 Mass of ~Cat R. E. Tribble, ~ J. D. Cossairt, and R. A. Kenefick Cyclotron Institute and Physics Department, Texas AChM University, College Station, Texas 77843 (Received 14 October 1976) The ' Ca...('He, He)' Ca reaction has been used to provide the first observation of the nuclide ' Ca. The Q value and mass excess were found to be ?57.58~0.04 and ?6.44+0.04 MeV, respectively. The new mass completes four members of the A = 36 isobaric quintet...

Tribble, Robert E.; Cossairt, J. D.; Kenefick, R. A.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Natural Gas Reforming  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Natural gas reforming is an advanced and mature production process that builds upon the existing natural gas pipeline delivery infrastructure. Today, 95% of the hydrogen produced in the United States is made by natural gas reforming in large central plants. This technology is an important pathway for near-term hydrogen production.

296

An avalanche-photodiode-based photon-number-resolving detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avalanche photodiodes are widely used as practical detectors of single photons.1 Although conventional devices respond to one or more photons, they cannot resolve the number in the incident pulse or short time interval. However, such photon number resolving detectors are urgently needed for applications in quantum computing,2-4 communications5 and interferometry,6 as well as for extending the applicability of quantum detection generally. Here we show that, contrary to current belief,3,4 avalanche photodiodes are capable of detecting photon number, using a technique to measure very weak avalanches at the early stage of their development. Under such conditions the output signal from the avalanche photodiode is proportional to the number of photons in the incident pulse. As a compact, mass-manufactured device, operating without cryogens and at telecom wavelengths, it offers a practical solution for photon number detection.

B. E. Kardynal; Z. L. Yuan; A. J. Shields

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

297

E-Print Network 3.0 - accreting small mass Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

momentum Omega Mach number 12;Mass accretion... of low-power radio galaxies accreting small fraction of Bondi estimates. http... Is perfectly spherical Bondi accretion generic...

298

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 17) 10 (next release 2:00 p.m. on June 17) Since Wednesday, June 2, natural gas spot prices have decreased at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States. For the week (Wednesday-Wednesday), prices at the Henry Hub decreased 46 cents or about 7 percent to $6.05 per MMBtu. Yesterday (June 9), the price of the NYMEX futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled at $6.082 per MMBtu, decreasing roughly 44 cents or nearly 7 percent since last Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,666 Bcf as of June 4, which is 0.2 percent below the 5-year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil fell $2.36 per barrel or nearly 6 percent on the week to $37.60 per barrel or $6.48 per MMBtu. Prices: Widespread moderate temperatures and falling crude oil prices contributed to price declines of 31 to 87 cents per MMBtu at virtually all market locations in the Lower 48 States since last Wednesday, June 2. The steepest declines occurred principally west of the Rockies, where prices fell more than 70 cents per MMBtu at most markets, with the largest declines in California. The lack of temperature-driven demand also caused operational difficulties, with a number of pipelines in the West issuing either high inventory OFOs or critical notices in response to high linepack on their systems. East of the Rockies, price decreases were widespread with declines ranging between 40 and 60 cents per MMBtu at most markets. These declines were more pronounced in the central regions of the Lower 48 States with declines averaging between 50 and 60 cents per MMBtu in the Midcontinent, Midwest, and Texas regions. In Louisiana and east of the Mississippi, prices fell less than 50 cents. With these widespread declines, prices have fallen below last year's levels by as much as 39 cents per MMBtu. For example, prices at the southern California border are 39 cents or nearly 7 percent below last year's level, while prices at the Henry Hubare 20 cents or 3 percent below last year's level.

299

Masses of Kr-77 and Kr-75  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHYSICAL REVIEW C VOLUME 35, NUMBER 4 Masses of Kr and Kr APRIL 1987 D. M. Moltz Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 A. C. Betker, J. P. Sullivan, R. H. Burch, C. A... determinations of neutron deficient nu- clei between the 1f7/2 and lg9/2 shells are hampered by low production cross sections and complex decay schemes. The direct mass measurements' of the rubidium isotopes have provided a substantial base for other...

Moltz, D. M.; Betker, A. C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Burch, R. H.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.; Toth, K. S.; Avignone, F. T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutrinoless double beta decay (0???) is a promising test for lepton number violating physics beyond the standard model (SM) of particle physics. There is a deep connection between this decay and the phenomenon of neutrino masses. In particular we will discuss the relation between 0??? and Majorana neutrino masses provided by the so-called Schechter-Valle theorem in a quantitative way. Furthermore we will present an experimental cross check to discriminate 0??? from unknown nuclear background using only one isotope i.e. within one experiment.

Michael Duerr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A question of mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a pedagogical discussion of spontaneous symmetry breaking the Goldstone theorem and the Higgs mechanism. If the Higgs boson is found it might provide an explanation of the origin of mass.

Jeremy Bernstein

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Heavy Hybrid mesons Masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate the ground state masses of the heavy hybrid mesons using a phenomenological QCD-type potential. 0^{- -},1^{- -},0^{- +},1^{- +} and 0^{+ -} J^{PC} states are considered.

F. Iddir; L. Semlala

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

303

MASS POLITICAL MOBILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

................................................................................................................................................... MASS POLITICAL MOBILIZATION ................................................................................................................................................... Boix & Stokes: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Boixandstokes-chap21 Revise Proof page 497 20.4.2007 12:41pm #12;Boix & Stokes: The Oxford Handbook of Comparative Politics Boixandstokes-chap21

304

Masses of Fundamental Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the original paper entitled, "Masses of Fundamental Particles"(arXiv:1109.3705v5, 10 Feb 2012), not only the masses of fundamental particles including the weak bosons, Higgs boson, quarks, and leptons, but also the mixing angles of quarks and those of neutrinos are all explained and/or predicted in the unified composite models of quarks and leptons successfully. In this addendum entitled, "Higgs Boson Mass in the Minimal Unified Subquark Model", it is emphasized that the Higgs boson mass is predicted to be about 130Gev in the minimal unified subquark model, which agrees well with the experimental values of 125-126GeV recently found by the ATLAS and CMS Collaborations at the LHC.

Hidezumi Terazawa

2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

305

Mass transfer effects in a gasification riser  

SciTech Connect

In the development of multiphase reacting computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, a number of simplifications were incorporated into the codes and models. One of these simplifications was the use of a simplistic mass transfer correlation for the faster reactions and omission of mass transfer effects completely on the moderate speed and slow speed reactions such as those in a fluidized bed gasifier. Another problem that has propagated is that the mass transfer correlation used in the codes is not universal and is being used far from its developed bubbling fluidized bed regime when applied to circulating fluidized bed (CFB) riser reactors. These problems are true for the major CFD codes. To alleviate this problem, a mechanistic based mass transfer coefficient algorithm has been developed based upon an earlier work by Breault et al. This fundamental approach uses the local hydrodynamics to predict a local, time varying mass transfer coefficient. The predicted mass transfer coefficients and the corresponding Sherwood numbers agree well with literature data and are typically about an order of magnitude lower than the correlation noted above. The incorporation of the new mass transfer model gives the expected behavior for all the gasification reactions evaluated in the paper. At the expected and typical design values for the solid flow rate in a CFB riser gasifier an ANOVA analysis has shown the predictions from the new code to be significantly different from the original code predictions. The new algorithm should be used such that the conversions are not over predicted. Additionally, its behaviors with changes in solid flow rate are consistent with the changes in the hydrodynamics.

Breault, Ronald W [U.S. DOE; Li, Tingwen [URS; Nicoletti, Phillip [URS

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation A Practitioner's Overview Prof. Michael and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Types of pseudorandom numbers Properties of these pseudorandom numbers Parallelization of pseudorandom number generators New directions for SPRNG Quasirandom

Mascagni, Michael

307

Mass of Cd104  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A quadrupole-dipole-dipole-dipole spectrograph has been used with a 34.6 MeV proton beam to observe the Cd106(p, t)Cd104 reaction. The Q value is measured and a mass excess of -83 963(14) keV is inferred for Cd104.NUCLEAR REACTIONS Cd106(p, t)Cd104, E=34.6 MeV; Q value measured; mass excess inferred.

R. A. Dewberry; R. T. Kouzes; R. A. Naumann

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Natural Gas Annual 2006  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Released: October 31, 2007 The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. The Natural Gas Annual 2006 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2006 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2006. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2006 and 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

309

L-THEORY OF 3-MANIFOLDS WITH NON-VANISHING FIRST BETTI NUMBER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-THEORY OF 3-MANIFOLDS WITH NON-VANISHING FIRST BETTI NUMBER Sayed K. Roushon Abstract;rst Betti number can be computed in terms of a generalized homology theory. A consequence compact irreducible 3-manifold M with nonempty boundary has nonzero #12;rst Betti number, it is natural

Roushon, S. K.

310

-Betti numbers of locally compact groups and their cross section equivalence relations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L2 -Betti numbers of locally compact groups and their cross section equivalence relations by David Mathematical Society. Abstract We prove that the L2 -Betti numbers of a unimodular locally compact group G coincide, up to a natural scaling constant, with the L2 -Betti numbers of the countable equivalence

Vaes, Stefaan

311

Natural Gas Annual, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2004 Natural Gas Annual 2004 Release date: December 19, 2005 Next release date: January 2007 The Natural Gas Annual, 2004 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2004. Summary data are presented for each State for 2000 to 2004. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2004 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2004, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

312

Laser interrogation of latent vehicle registration number  

SciTech Connect

A recent investigation involved automobile registration numbers as important evidentiary specimens. In California, as in most states, small, thin metallic decals are issued to owners of vehicles each year as the registration is renewed. The decals are applied directly to the license plate of the vehicle and typically on top of the previous year`s expired decal. To afford some degree of security, the individual registration decals have been designed to tear easily; they cannot be separated from each other, but can be carefully removed intact from the metal license plate by using a razor blade. In September 1993, the City of Livermore Police Department obtained a blue 1993 California decal that had been placed over an orange 1992 decal. The two decals were being investigated as possible evidence in a case involving vehicle registration fraud. To confirm the suspicion and implicate a suspect, the department needed to known the registration number on the bottom (completely covered) 1992 decal. The authors attempted to use intense and directed light to interrogate the colored stickers. Optical illumination using a filtered white-light source partially identified the latent number. However, the most successful technique used a tunable dye laser pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. By selectively tuning the wavelength and intensity of the dye laser, backlit illumination of the decals permitted visualization of the underlying registration number through the surface of the top sticker. With optimally-tuned wavelength and intensity, 100% accuracy was obtained in identifying the sequence of latent characters. The advantage of optical techniques is their completely nondestructive nature, thus preserving the evidence for further interrogation or courtroom presentation.

Russo, R.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Forensic Science Center; Pelkey, G.E. [City of Livermore Police Dept., CA (United States); Grant, P.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Forensic Science Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Underground Natural Gas Storage Capacity by State, December 31, 1996 (Capacity in Billion Cubic Feet) Table State Interstate Companies Intrastate Companies Independent Companies Total Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Number of Active Fields Capacity Percent of U.S. Capacity Alabama................. 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 3 0.04 Arkansas ................ 0 0 3 32 0 0 3 32 0.40 California................ 0 0 10 470 0 0 10 470 5.89 Colorado ................ 4 66 5 34 0 0 9 100 1.25 Illinois ..................... 6 259 24 639 0 0 30 898 11.26 Indiana ................... 6 16 22 97 0 0 28 113 1.42 Iowa ....................... 4 270 0 0 0 0 4 270 3.39 Kansas ................... 16 279 2 6 0 0 18 285 3.57 Kentucky ................ 6 167 18 49 0 0 24 216 2.71 Louisiana................ 8 530 4 25 0 0 12 555 6.95 Maryland ................ 1 62

314

Motion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

316

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

317

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

19, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) 19, 2002 (next release 2:00 p.m. on September 26) Spot and futures prices surged upward as two tropical storms in close succession made their presence felt in gas markets over the past week. At the Henry Hub, the average spot price rose 47 cents week-to-week (Wednesday, September 11 to Wednesday, September 18) to $3.79 per MMBtu, which is at its highest level since May 1. In addition to some production shut-ins from Tropical Storm Hanna's arrival in the Gulf of Mexico on Friday (September 13), spot prices were also bolstered somewhat by warmer-than-normal temperatures in most regions since last Wednesday, as well as by outages of a number of nuclear-fired electric plants for routine maintenance. On the NYMEX, the settlement price of the futures contract for October delivery rose in five consecutive trading sessions, reaching a 4-month high yesterday at $3.787 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage increased by 69 Bcf to 2,924 Bcf, 12 percent above the 5-year average. After falling 82 cents on Thursday (September 12) to dip below $29 per barrel, the spot price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil rebounded strongly on Friday and remained above the $29 per barrel mark for the rest of the week, ending trading yesterday at $29.57 per barrel, or $5.10 per MMBtu. This is a decline of 20 cents per barrel from the WTI spot price of last Wednesday.

318

Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$, in the RGI scheme, 0.750(15) and the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

RBC; UKQCD collaborations; :; T. Blum; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; J. Frison; N. Garron; R. J. Hudspith; T. Izubuchi; T. Janowski; C. Jung; A. Juettner; C. Kelly; R. D. Kenway; C. Lehner; M. Marinkovic; R. D. Mawhinney; G. McGlynn; D. J. Murphy; S. Ohta; A. Portelli; C. T. Sachrajda; A. Soni

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Largest Natural Gas Pipeline...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Interstate Pipelines Table About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates Thirty Largest U.S. Interstate Natural...

320

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Natural Gas Pipeline Compressor...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Compressor Stations Illustration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 20072008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of Fuel Wobbe Number on Pollutant Emissions from Advanced Technology Residential Water Heaters: Results of Controlled Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table 8. Calibration gases used for LNG interchangeabilityof liquefied natural gas (LNG) in California. The currentnumbers associated with many LNG supplies. Wobbe number is a

Rapp, VH

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

COLORADO NATURAL HERITAGE PROGRAM Position Announcement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COLORADO NATURAL HERITAGE PROGRAM Position Announcement: Title: Zoology Field Technicians ­ Research Associate I Number of Positions: 1-12 (temporary) Work Location: Field sites throughout Colorado Pay Rate: $1800 - $2500/month plus per diem Duration: 3-6 months Summary of Positions The Colorado

323

Natural Gas Annual 2007  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Released: January 28, 2009 The Natural Gas Annual 2007 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2007. Summary data are presented for each State for 2003 to 2007. The Natural Gas Annual 2007 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2007 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2007. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2007) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2007) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

324

Natural Gas Annual, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2003 Natural Gas Annual 2003 Release date: December 22, 2004 Next release date: January 2006 The Natural Gas Annual, 2003 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2003. Summary data are presented for each State for 1999 to 2003. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2003” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2003 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2003. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2003 is available as self-extracting executable file or CSV file format. This volume emphasizes information for 2003, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

325

Natural Gas Annual, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications Natural Gas Annual, 2002 Natural Gas Annual 2002 Release date: January 29, 2004 Next release date: January 2005 The Natural Gas Annual, 2002 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2002. Summary data are presented for each State for 1998 to 2002. “The Natural Gas Industry and Markets in 2002” is a special report that provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2002 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2002. Changes to data sources for this Natural Gas Annual, as a result of ongoing data quality efforts, have resulted in revisions to several data series. Production volumes have been revised for the Federal offshore and several States. Several data series based on the Form EIA-176, including deliveries to end-users in several States, were also revised. Additionally, revisions have been made to include updates to the electric power and vehicle fuel end-use sectors.

326

Natural Gas Annual 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Released: December 28, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2009 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2009. Summary data are presented for each State for 2005 to 2009. The Natural Gas Annual 2009 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2009 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2009. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2009) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2009) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

327

Natural Gas Annual 2008  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Released: March 2, 2010 The Natural Gas Annual 2008 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2008. Summary data are presented for each State for 2004 to 2008. The Natural Gas Annual 2008 Summary Highlights provides an overview of the supply and disposition of natural gas in 2008 and is intended as a supplement to the Natural Gas Annual 2008. Natural Gas Annual --- Full report in PDF (5 MB) Special Files --- All CSV files contained in a self-extracting executable file. Respondent/Company Level Natural Gas Data Files Annual Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition Company level data (1996 to 2008) as reported on Form EIA-176 are provided in the EIA-176 Query System and selected data files. EIA-191A Field Level Underground Natural Gas Storage Data: Detailed annual data (2005 to 2008) of storage field capacity, field type, and maximum deliverability as of December 31st of the report year, as reported by operators of all U.S. underground natural gas storage fields.

328

The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Analysis > The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage The Basics of Underground Natural Gas Storage Latest update: August 2004 Printer-Friendly Version Natural gas-a colorless, odorless, gaseous hydrocarbon-may be stored in a number of different ways. It is most commonly held in inventory underground under pressure in three types of facilities. These are: (1) depleted reservoirs in oil and/or gas fields, (2) aquifers, and (3) salt cavern formations. (Natural gas is also stored in liquid form in above-ground tanks. A discussion of liquefied natural gas (LNG) is beyond the scope of this report. For more information about LNG, please see the EIA report, The Global Liquefied Natural Gas Market: Status & Outlook.) Each storage type has its own physical characteristics (porosity, permeability, retention capability) and economics (site preparation and maintenance costs, deliverability rates, and cycling capability), which govern its suitability to particular applications. Two of the most important characteristics of an underground storage reservoir are its capacity to hold natural gas for future use and the rate at which gas inventory can be withdrawn-its deliverability rate (see Storage Measures, below, for key definitions).

329

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

330

EIA - Natural Gas Consumption Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption Consumption Consumption by End Use U.S. and State consumption by lease and plant, pipeline, and delivered to consumers by sector (monthly, annual). Number of Consumers Number of sales and transported consumers for residential, commercial, and industrial sectors by State (monthly, annual). State Shares of U.S. Deliveries By sector and total consumption (annual). Delivered for the Account of Others Commercial, industrial and electric utility deliveries; percentage of total deliveries by State (annual). Heat Content of Natural Gas Consumed Btu per cubic foot of natural gas delivered to consumers by State (annual) and other components of consumption for U.S. (annual). Natural Gas Weekly Update Analysis of current price, supply, and storage data; and a weather snapshot.

331

Effect of bubble interactions on mass transfer in bubbly flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The effect of bubble interactions on mass transfer in a multi-bubble system is examined by numerical simulations. Since mass transfer in the liquid phase of gas–liquid multiphase flows usually takes place at a considerably slower rate than the transfer of momentum, the mass flux boundary layers are much thinner than the momentum boundary layers. In direct numerical simulations the resolution requirements for flows with mass transfer are therefore considerably higher than for flows without mass transfer. Here, we use a multiscale approach for the computations of the mass transfer near the bubble surface, in order to reduce the cost, and examine the effect of void fraction and bubble Reynolds number on the mass transfer from bubbles in periodic domains. Specifically, we compare results for a single bubble in a periodic domain with results for several bubbles in a larger domain with the same void fraction. It is shown that even though the average Reynolds number of freely moving bubbles drops after a while, in most cases the mass transfer from the bubbles increases slightly. When the bubbles start to wobble, in most cases the increase in bubble–bubble interactions compensate for the reduction in Reynolds number.

B. Aboulhasanzadeh; G. Tryggvason

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Atomic mass compilation 2012  

SciTech Connect

Atomic mass reflects the total binding energy of all nucleons in an atomic nucleus. Compilations and evaluations of atomic masses and derived quantities, such as neutron or proton separation energies, are indispensable tools for research and applications. In the last decade, the field has evolved rapidly after the advent of new production and measuring techniques for stable and unstable nuclei resulting in substantial ameliorations concerning the body of data and their precision. Here, we present a compilation of atomic masses comprising the data from the evaluation of 2003 as well as the results of new measurements performed. The relevant literature in refereed journals and reports as far as available, was scanned for the period beginning 2003 up to and including April 2012. Overall, 5750 new data points have been collected. Recommended values for the relative atomic masses have been derived and a comparison with the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation has been performed. This work has been carried out in collaboration with and as a contribution to the European Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Network of Evaluations.

Pfeiffer, B., E-mail: bpfeiffe@uni-mainz.de [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); Venkataramaniah, K. [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India)] [Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam (India); Czok, U. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)] [II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany); Scheidenberger, C. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany) [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt (Germany); II. Physikalisches Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, Gießen (Germany)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nature: Earth's Atmosphere and Beyond ... The column summarizes research articles from Nature that report on anthropogenic activities and natural phenomena that influence the chemical composition of Earth's atmosphere. ...

Sabine Heinhorst; Gordon Cannon

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 19, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, May 11, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board as oil prices dropped steeply along with most other major commodities. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas spot price fell 36 cents from $4.59 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, May 4, to $4.23 per MMBtu on Wednesday, May 11. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (June 2011) dropped almost 9 percent, falling from $4.577 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $4.181 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose by 70 billion cubic feet (Bcf) to 1,827 Bcf, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report.

335

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 29, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 21, 2010) Natural gas prices rose across market locations in the lower 48 States during the report week. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose 31 cents, or 7 percent, during the week, averaging $4.70 per million Btu (MMBtu) yesterday, July 21. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the August 2010 natural gas futures contract for delivery at the Henry Hub rose about 21 cents, or 5 percent, ending the report week at $4.513 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage increased to 2,891 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

336

Mass and Lifetime Measurements in Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect

Masses of nuclides covering a large area of the chart of nuclides can be measured in storage rings where many ions circulate at the same time. In this paper the recent progress in the analysis of Schottky mass spectrometry data is presented as well as the technical improvements leading to higher accuracy for isochronous mass measurements with a time-of-flight detector. The high sensitivity of the Schottky method down to single ions allows to measure lifetimes of nuclides by observing mother and daughter nucleus simultaneously. In this way we investigated the decay of bare and H-like 140Pr. As we could show the lifetime can be even shortened compared to those of atomic nuclei despite of a lower number of electrons available for internal conversion or electron capture.All these techniques will be implemented with further improvements at the storage rings of the new FAIR facility at GSI in the future.

Weick, H.; Beckert, K.; Beller, P.; Bosch, F.; Dimopoulou, C.; Kozhuharov, C.; Kurcewicz, J.; Mazzocco, M.; Nociforo, C.; Nolden, F.; Steck, M.; Sun, B.; Winkler, M. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Brandau, C.; Chen, L.; Geissel, H.; Knoebel, R.; Litvinov, S. A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Scheidenberger, C. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); II. Phys. Institut, Justus-Liebig-Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany)] (and others)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

,"Colorado Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Prices",8,"Monthly","112014","1151989" ,"Release Date:","1302015"...

338

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

339

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

340

,"Georgia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1999" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

342

,"Oregon Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1979" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

343

,"Texas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",1,"Annual",2013,"6302012" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

344

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

345

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

346

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

347

,"Alaska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",6,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301969" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

348

,"Maine Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Imports and Exports",2,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

349

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301973" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

350

,"Idaho Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",2,"Annual",1975,"6301974" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301981" ,"Data 5","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

351

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

352

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1982" ,"Data 5","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 6","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 7","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

353

,"Delaware Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1975,"6301967" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",9,"Annual",2013,"...

354

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",2,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

355

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

356

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

357

,"Nevada Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

301967" ,"Data 2","Production",11,"Annual",2013,"6301991" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301982" ,"Data 4","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

358

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 2","Underground Storage",3,"Annual",1996,"6301973" ,"Data 3","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 4","Consumption",8,"Annual",2013,"...

359

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

360

,"Alabama Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 4","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301968" ,"Data 5","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 6","Consumption",11,"Annual",2013,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

,"Indiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1967" ,"Data 3","Underground Storage",4,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Data 4","Liquefied Natural Gas Storage",3,"Annual",2013,"6301980" ,"Data 5","Consumption",10,"Annual",2013,...

362

Natural Resources Specialist  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

(See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working ? Western Area Power Administration, Corporate Services Office, Office of the Chief Operating Officer, Natural...

363

Assessment in natural sciences.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research study focusses on assessment in the Natural Sciences learning area in grades 8 and 9. The aspect under focus is the extent to… (more)

Singh, Suresh Kamar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Unconventional Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(NETL) Anthony Zammerilli General Engineer Strategic Center for Natural Gas and Oil Energy Sector Planning and Analysis (ESPA) Robert C. Murray, Thomas Davis, and James...

365

Natural gas annual 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

,"California Natural Gas Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Prices",13,"Annual",2013,"6301967" ,"Release Date:","10312014"...

367

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

368

NETL: Natural Gas Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Resources Significant volumes of natural gas can also be produced from tight (low permeability) sandstone reservoirs and coal seams, both unconventional reservoir rocks. NETL...

369

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

imbalances. Northern Natural Gas Company declared a force majeure after an unplanned repair issue at the Spearman Compressor Station in Ochiltree County, Texas, on Friday,...

370

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Gwinville, Mississippi. The pipeline company has isolated the affected section of pipeline and taken it out of service. Southern Natural intends to prepare a plan for...

371

Natural Cooling Retrofit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the most important design considerations for any method of Natural Cool ing is the chil led water temperature range selected for use during Natural Cool ing. Figure VI shows that for a hypo thetical Chicago plant, the hours of operation for a Natural..." system on the Natural Cool ing cycle. As the pressures and flow rates of the condenser and chil led water systems are seldom the same, the designer must pay careful attention to the cross over system design to ensure harmonious operations on both...

Fenster, L. C.; Grantier, A. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

MIMICKING NATURAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

MIMICKING NATURAL PHOTOSYNTHESIS ... O2 Evolution from the Manganese?Oxo Cubane Core Mn4O46+:? A Molecular Mimic of the Photosynthetic Water Oxidation Enzyme? ...

MICHAEL FREEMANTLE

1998-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

374

On rings of structural numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structural numbers over the set X, and let B(X) have the operations defined above with equality also as before. Theorem I. l. If X is any set, then B(X) is a commutative ring with identity. Proof. The structural number 0 is the additive identity element... with identity g. Definition I. 7. If A, B e S(X) then A'B = (P U q ( p e A, q e B, p Il q = &f and p U q can be formed in an odd number of ways). ~E1 t. 4. L t A = (( . b), (bj. 7 )) 4 B = ((b, c), (b), (a)) be in S(X) for some X. Then AD B = {{b, a), {a...

Powell, Wayne Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

375

A natural Little Hierarchy for SUSY from radiative breaking of PQ symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While LHC8 Higgs mass and sparticle search constraints favor a multi-TeV value of gravitino mass m_{3/2}, electroweak naturalness favors a superpotential higgsino mass \\mu ~100-200 GeV: the mis-match results in an apparent Little Hierarchy characterized by \\mu 2m({\\rm higgsino}).

Kyu Jung Bae; Howard Baer; Hasan Serce

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

376

Warner College of Natural Resources Warner College of Natural  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and scientific investigation of renewable and nonrenewable natural resources. Programs include the study of everyWarner College of Natural Resources Warner College of Natural Resources Office in Natural Resources, and Conservation Biology Forestry Geology Natural Resource Recreation and Tourism Natural Resources Management

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

377

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

the report week at 80.30 per barrel, or 13.84 per MMBtu. The number of natural gas rotary rigs rose by 3 to 728, according to data Baker Hughes Incorporated released on...

378

EIA - Natural Gas Storage Data & Analysis  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Storage Storage Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage U.S. Natural gas inventories held in underground storage facilities by East, West, and Producing regions (weekly). Underground Storage - All Operators Total storage by base gas and working gas, and storage activity by State (monthly, annual). Underground Storage by Type U.S. storage and storage activity by all operators, salt cavern fields and nonsalt cavern (monthly, annual). Underground Storage Capacity Storage capacity, working gas capacity, and number of active fields for salt caverns, aquifers, and depleted fields by State (monthly, annual). Liquefied Natural Gas Additions to and Withdrawals from Storage By State (annual). Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report Estimates of natural gas in underground storage for the U.S. and three regions of the U.S.

379

Comparison of NTIMS and ICP-OES methods for the determination of boron concentrations in natural fresh and saline waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determination of B concentrations in natural fresh and ... the NTIMS (Negative Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry) isotope dilution technique which is virtually unaffected by such effects. NTIMS isotope diluti...

S. Barth

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Origin of the narrow, single peak in the fission-fragment mass distribution for 258Fm  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the origin of the narrowness of the single peak at mass-symmetric division in the fragment mass-yield curve for spontaneous fission of {sup 258}Fm. For this purpose, we employ the macroscopic-microscopic model and calculate a potential-energy curve at the mass-symmetric compact scission configuration, as a function of the fragment mass number, which is obtained from the single-particle wave-function densities. In the calculations, we minimize total energies by varying the deformations of the two fragments, with constraints on the mass quadrupole moment, and by keeping the neck radius zero. The energies thus become functions of mass asymmetry. Using the obtained potential, we solve the one-dimensional Schroedinger equation with a microscopic coordinate-dependent inertial mass to calculate the fragment mass-yield curve. The calculated mass yield, expressed in terms of the microscopic mass density, is consistent with the extremely narrow experimental mass distribution.

Moller, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ickhikawa, Takatoshi [RIKEN; Iwamoto, Akira [JAEA

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Origin of Mass and the Feebleness of Gravity  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

BSA Distinguished Lecture presented by Frank Wilczek, co-winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. Einstein's famous equation E=mc^2 asserts that energy and mass are different aspects of the same reality. The general public usually associates the equation with the idea that small amounts of mass can be converted into large amounts of energy, as in nuclear reactors and bombs. For physicists who study the basic nature of matter, however, the more important idea is just the opposite.

Frank Wilczek

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Fact #816: February 10, 2014 Natural Gas Refueling Stations Grow Over the Last Ten Years  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In 2003 there were 1,097 natural gas refueling stations nationwide. By 2013, that number increased by about 25% to a total of 1,374 natural gas refueling stations. In 2003, there were six states...

384

nAture methods | VOL.10 NO.7 | JULY2013 | 647 single-stranded oligonucleotides are important as research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to what biological systems produce. the number of errors in synthetic dnA increases- parison to what is produced in nature3. The number of errors in synthetic DNA increases with the number

Cai, Long

385

Response: Issue Numbers and Librarianship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some time. Put back the issue number. ALISON BAKER Librawy Jackson Laboratot), Bar...passage in which he supposes some unusually wise ape-like animal to have first thought...the approving nods and kindly grunts ofmy wise and most respected chief. And now I feel...

DANIEL E. KOSHLAND; JR.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

386

Natural Gas Annual 2010 (NGA) - With Data for 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections ‹ See All Natural Gas Reports Natural Gas Annual With Data for 2010 | Release Date: December 29, 2011 | Next Release: December 29, 2012 | full report Data Tablesall tables Overview 1 Summary Statistics for Natural Gas in the United States PDF CSV 2 Natural Gas Production, Transmission, and Consumption by State PDF CSV Supplies 3 Gross Withdrawals and Marketed Production of Natural Gas by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 4 Offshore Gross Withdrawals of Natural Gas by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 5 Number of Producing Gas Wells by State and the Gulf of Mexico PDF CSV 6 Wellhead Value and Marketed Production of Natural Gas, and by State PDF CSV 7 Natural Gas Processed, Liquids Extracted, and Estimated Extraction Loss by State PDF CSV

387

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF DALLASWhat Drives Natural Gas Prices?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: For many years, fuel switching between natural gas and residual fuel oil kept natural gas prices closely aligned with those for crude oil. More recently, however, the number of U.S. facilities able to switch between natural gas and residual fuel oil has declined, and over the past five years, U.S. natural gas prices have been on an upward trend with crude oil prices but with considerable independent movement. Natural gas market analysts generally emphasize weather and inventories as drivers of natural gas prices. Using an error-correction model, we show that when these and other additional factors are taken into account, movements in crude oil prices have a prominent role in shaping natural gas prices. Our findings imply a continuum of prices at which natural gas and petroleum products are substitutes.

Stephen P. A. Brown; Mine K. Yücel; Stephen P. A. Brown; Mine K. Yücel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview Net additions to storage during the fourth week of April were estimated to have been over 100 Bcf-a record high level for the first month of the refill season. Compared to last year when only 36 Bcf or 1.2 Bcf per day were added to stocks in April, this year the industry appears to be taking advantage of the reduction in demand that typically occurs in April, the first shoulder month of the year, and the recent price declines. After beginning the week down, spot prices at the Henry Hub trended down most days last week to end trading on Friday at $4.49 per MMBtu-the lowest price since early November. On the NYMEX futures market, the near-month (June) contract also moved down most days and ended last week at $4.490-down $0.377 from the previous Friday. Some-early summer high temperatures last week in the Northeast and winter-like weather in the Rockies (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) appear to have had little impact on the natural gas markets as prices declined most days at most major locations.

389

,"Kansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

S3","N3050KS3","N3010KS3","N3020KS3","N3035KS3","NA1570SKS3","N3045KS3" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kansas Natural Gas Pipeline...

390

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050WY3","N3010WY3","N3020WY3","N3035WY3","NA1570SWY3","N3045WY3" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Wyoming Natural Gas...

391

,"Montana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MT3","N3010MT3","N3020MT3","N3035MT3","NA1570SMT3","N3045MT3" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Montana Natural Gas Imports...

392

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","NA1570SOK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Natural Gas...

393

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","NA1570SMI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Natural Gas...

394

,"Vermont Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","NA1480SVT3","N3050VT3","N3010VT3","N3020VT3","N3035VT3","N3045VT3" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Imports Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Vermont Natural Gas Pipeline...

395

,"Arizona Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050AZ3","N3010AZ3","N3020AZ3","N3035AZ3","NA1570SAZ3","N3045AZ3" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Price of Arizona Natural...

396

,"Florida Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050FL3","N3010FL3","N3020FL3","N3035FL3","NA1570SFL3","N3045FL3" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Florida Natural Gas...

397

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","NA1570SKY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Natural Gas...

398

,"Ohio Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SOH3","N3050OH3","N3010OH3","N3020OH3","N3035OH3","NA1570SOH3","N3045OH3" "Date","Ohio Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Ohio Natural Gas Pipeline...

399

,"Utah Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

SUT3","N3050UT3","N3010UT3","N3020UT3","N3035UT3","NA1570SUT3","N3045UT3" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Wellhead Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Utah Natural Gas Pipeline...

400

Natural Gas Infrastructure Modernization  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In order to help modernize the nation’s natural gas transmission and distribution systems and reduce methane emissions through common-sense standards, smart investments, and innovative research to advance the state of the art in natural gas system performance, the Department of Energy has launched several new initiatives and enhanced existing programs.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

VALUING FLARED NATURAL GAS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

LAST YEAR , enough natural gas to supply 27% of U.S. needs was burned off as waste around the world, according to a new report by the World Bank. Flared natural gas is a by-product of petroleum production and is not generally considered worth capture and ...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Mass Spectroscope  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE handbook, prepared by M. G. Inghram of JL the University of Chicago, and R ... Committee on Nuclear Science of the National Research Council*, presents in some detail the fundamental design and operational techniques pertinent to the efficient utilization of the mass spectroscope. Attention ...

S. WEINTROUB

1955-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

Mass Media Science Fellows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alternative energy sources, including solar, bio-mass, and geothermal. The changing...assistant secretary for con-servation and solar applications, U.S. Department of Energy...representative of the United Re-public of Tanzania to the United Na-tions, the resolution...

1979-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

Residential Thermal Mass Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The southwest has long known the value of building homes with high mass materials. The ancient Pueblo Indians found that by using "adobe" they could capture the energy necessary to survive the harsh desert climate. Our ancestors knew that a heavy...

Thieken, J. S.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Top Quark Mass Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First observed in 1995 the top quark is one of a pair of third?generation quarks in the Standard Model of particle physics. It has charge +2/3e and a mass of 171.4 GeV about 40 times heavier than its partner the bottom quark. The CDF and DØ collaborations have identified several hundred events containing the decays of top?antitop pairs in the large dataset collected at the Tevatron proton?antiproton collider over the last four years. They have used these events to measure the top quark’s mass to nearly 1% precision and to study other top quark properties. The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model and knowledge of its value with small uncertainty allows us to predict properties of the as?yet?unobserved Higgs boson. This paper presents the status of the measurements of the top quark mass. It is based on a talk I gave at the Conference on the Intersections of Particle and Nuclear Physics in Puerto Rico May 2006 which also included discussion of measurements of other top quark properties.

A. P. Heinson; CDF Collaboration; DØ Collaboration

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Mass Extinctions Geology 331  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into shallow water and released to atmosphere. · Oxidation of coal and hydrocarbons by extensive erosion of sedimentary rocks, and/or massive volcanic eruptions in Siberia? CH2O + O2 CO2 +H2O · Release of methane by rapid influx of C12 caused by methane release and mass dying at the end of the Permian. Organisms

Kammer, Thomas

407

Gauge Invariance and Mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is argued that the gauge invariance of a vector field does not necessarily imply zero mass for an associated particle if the current vector coupling is sufficiently strong. This situation may permit a deeper understanding of nucleonic charge conservation as a manifestation of a gauge invariance, without the obvious conflict with experience that a massless particle entails.

Julian Schwinger

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 20, 2011) Natural gas prices rose at most market locations during the week, as consumption increased. The Henry Hub spot price increased 19 cents from $4.14 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, April 13 to $4.33 per MMBtu on Wednesday, April 20. Futures prices behaved similar to spot prices; at the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month natural gas contract (May 2011) rose from $4.141 per MMBtu to $4.310 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,654 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

409

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 10, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 2, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant decreases at both the spot and futures markets since last Wednesday. Spot prices fell at all market locations in the lower 48 States, with decreases ranging between 7 and 68 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). The price at the Henry Hub spot market fell to $2.25 per MMBtu, decreasing by 51 cents or 18 percent. As of yesterday, the price of natural gas at the Henry Hub was the lowest since February 15, 2002, when natural gas at this location traded at $2.18 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the natural gas futures

410

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 9, 2011) Natural gas spot prices remained soft at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price rose an insignificant 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) for the week ending March 9, to $3.81 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,674 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, March 4, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 71 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned 32 Bcf above year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the April 2011 natural

411

A3. Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Natural Gas Processed and Liquids Extracted at Natural Gas Processing Plants by State, 1996 Table Plant Location Volume of Natural Gas Delivered to Processing Plants a (million cubic feet) Total Liquids Extracted b (thousand barrels) Extraction Loss (million cubic feet) State Production Out of State Production Natural Gas Processed Alabama..................................... 111,656 1,212 112,868 4,009 5,361 Alaska ........................................ 2,987,364 0 2,987,364 33,346 38,453 Arkansas.................................... 214,868 4,609 219,477 383 479 California.................................... 240,566 0 240,566 9,798 12,169 Colorado .................................... 493,748 215 493,963 16,735 23,362 Florida........................................ 5,900 2,614 8,514 1,630 1,649 Illinois.........................................

412

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 4, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, February 23, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft again at nearly all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (2.5 percent) for the week ending February 23, to $3.83 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,830 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, February 18, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied draw for the week was 81 Bcf, with storage volumes shifting to 48 Bcf below year-ago levels. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 natural

413

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 30, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 22, 2011) Natural gas prices fell slightly at most market locations from Wednesday, June 15 to Wednesday, June 22. The Henry Hub price fell 10 cents from $4.52 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $4.42 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the July 2011 near-month futures contract fell by 26 cents, or about 6 percent, from $4.58 last Wednesday to $4.32 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,354 this week, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

414

What is a Natural SUSY scenario?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea of "Natural SUSY", understood as a supersymmetric scenario where the fine-tuning is as mild as possible, is a reasonable guide to explore supersymmetric phenomenology. In this paper, we re-examine this issue including several improvements, such as the mixing of the fine-tuning conditions for different soft terms and the presence of potential extra fine-tunings that must be combined with the electroweak one. We give tables and plots that allow to easily evaluate the fine-tuning and the corresponding naturalness bounds for any theoretical model defined at any high-energy (HE) scale. Then, we analyze in detail the complete fine-tuning bounds for the unconstrained MSSM, defined at any HE scale. We show that Natural SUSY does {\\em not} demand light stops. Actually, an average stop mass below 800~GeV is disfavored, though one of the stops might be very light. Regarding phenomenology, the most stringent upper bound from naturalness is the one on the gluino mass, which typically sets the present level fine-t...

Casas, J Alberto; Robles, Sandra; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Zaldivar, Bryan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What Consumers Should Know What Consumers Should Know An Assessment of Prices of Natural Gas Futures Contracts As A Predictor of Realized Spot Prices at the Henry Hub Overview of U.S. Legislation and Regulations Affecting Offshore Natural Gas and Oil Activity Changes in U.S. Natural Gas Transportation Infrastructure in 2004 Major Legislative and Regulatory Actions (1935 - 2004) U.S. Natural Gas Imports and Exports: Issues and Trends 2003 U.S. LNG Markets and Uses: June 2004 Natural Gas Restructuring Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage EIA's Natural Gas Division Survey Form Comments Overview: Thursday, December 1, 2005 (next release 2:00 p.m. on December 8) Colder-than-normal temperatures contributed to widespread price increases in natural gas spot markets since Wednesday, November 23 as heating demand increased. For the week (Wednesday to Wednesday), the spot price at the Henry Hub gained 59 cents per MMBtu, or about 5 percent, to trade at $11.73 per MMBtu yesterday (November 30). Similarly, at the NYMEX, the price for the futures contract for January delivery at the Henry Hub gained 54 cents since last Wednesday to close yesterday at $12.587 per MMBtu. Natural gas in storage as of Friday, November 25, decreased to 3,225 Bcf, which is 6.3 percent above the 5 year average. The spot price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil dropped $1.02 per barrel, or about 2 percent, since last Wednesday to trade yesterday at $57.33 per barrel or $9.88 per MMBtu.

416

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians method to compute Betti numbers of sim- plicial complexes. This has a number of advantages over are the Betti numbers, the i-th Betti number, bi= bi(X), being the rank of Hi(X). The Betti numbers often have

Friedman, Joel

417

A Planar Anode -Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Model with Internal Reforming of Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Planar Anode - Supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Model with Internal Reforming of Natural Gas of natural gas has been developed. The model simultaneously solves mass, energy transport equations emission level, and multiple fuel utilization. SOFC can operate with various kinds of fuels such as natural

Boyer, Edmond

418

A Comparison of Intermediate Mass Black Hole Candidate ULXs and Stellar-Mass Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cool thermal emission components have recently been revealed in the X-ray spectra of a small number of ultra-luminous X-ray (ULX) sources with L_X > 1 E+40 erg/s in nearby galaxies. These components can be well fitted with accretion disk models, with temperatures approximately 5-10 times lower than disk temperatures measured in stellar-mass Galactic black holes when observed in their brightest states. Because disk temperature is expected to fall with increasing black hole mass, and because the X-ray luminosity of these sources exceeds the Eddington limit for 10 Msun black holes (L_Edd = 1.3 E+39 erg/s), these sources are extremely promising intermediate-mass black hole candidates (IMBHCs). In this Letter, we directly compare the inferred disk temperatures and luminosities of these ULXs, with the disk temperatures and luminosities of a number of Galactic black holes. The sample of stellar-mass black holes was selected to include different orbital periods, companion types, inclinations, and column densities. These ULXs and stellar-mass black holes occupy distinct regions of a L_X -- kT diagram, suggesting these ULXs may harbor IMBHs. We briefly discuss the important strengths and weaknesses of this interpretation.

J. M. Miller; A. C. Fabian; M. C. Miller

2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

419

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752 Rosslyn, VA 22209

420

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

422

Natural Gas Annual, 2000  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. Natural Gas Annual, 2000 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas in the United States. Production, transmission, storage, deliveries, and price data are published by State for 2000. Summary data are presented for each Census Division and State for 1996 to 2000. A section of historical data at the National level shows industry activities back to the 1930's. The data that appear in the tables of the Natural Gas Annual, 2000 are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CSV file formats. This volume emphasizes information for 2000, although some tables show a five-year history. Please read the file entitled README.V1 for a description and documentation of information included in this file. Also available are files containing the following data: Summary Statistics - Natural Gas in the United States, 1996-2000 (Table 1) ASCII TXT, and Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 2000 (Table 2) ASCII TXT, are also available.

423

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of Interruptible Natural Gas Service A Snapshot of California Natural Gas Market: Status and Outlook EIA's Testimony on Natural Gas Supply and Demand Residential Natural Gas Price Brochure Status of Natural Gas Pipeline System Capacity Previous Issues of Natural Gas Weekly Update Natural Gas Homepage Overview: Monday, June 04, 2001 Stock builds slowed from their recent pace, even though spot prices continued their downward trend to end the week at the Henry Hub at $3.71 per MMBtu, which is a Friday-to-Friday decline of $0.14 per MMBtu. The NYMEX contract price for June delivery at the Henry Hub settled Tuesday at $3.738, the lowest close-out of a near month contract since the May 2000 contract. The July contract price was $3.930 per MMBtu on Friday, $0.103 lower than a week earlier. Mild weather in the Northeast and Midwest continued to suppress prices on the Eastern Seaboard, while a short burst of warm temperatures in southern California early in the week had the opposite effect on prices in that region. (See Temperature Map) (See Deviation from Normal Temperatures Map) Net injections to storage for the week ended Friday, May 25 were 99 Bcf, breaking a 4-week string of 100-plus net injections.

424

Evaluation of histone sequence and modifications by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

The histones, together with other specialized proteins and DNA, form the extraordinarily complex structure of chromatin. Electrospray ionization (ESI) permits the promotion of such protein species into the gas phase as intact, multiply charged molecular species. Mass spectrometry (MS), using a linear quadrupole mass filter, permits measurement of the relative molecular mass of these intact species with precision and accuracy. The latter are sufficient to evaluate variations in the primary structure of the histones and the type and extent of the natural and induced multiple covalent modifications. The locations of modifications are revealed by tandem mass spectrometry using tandem linear quadrupole or ion trap instruments on the intact species or the modified peptides derived by selective proteolysis. Experiments in applying this technique to histones from K562, a human-derived cell line, have demonstrated variations in the profile of modification through the normal cell cycle and in the presence of agents that inhibit enzymes responsible for reversal of the modification. The authors are currently testing the hypothesis that ESI-MS will permit the sensitive and selective identification of insult-induced modifications, distinguishing them from natural cell-cycle changes. This will be possible because ESI-MS reveals the full details of the profile of multiple posttranslational modifications of histones.

Edmonds, C.G.; Loo, J.A.; Smith, R.D.; Fuciarelli, A.F.; Thrall, B.D.; Morris, J.E.; Springer, D.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Nanoscale mass conveyors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass transport method and device for individually delivering chargeable atoms or molecules from source particles is disclosed. It comprises a channel; at least one source particle of chargeable material fixed to the surface of the channel at a position along its length; a means of heating the channel; and a means for applying an controllable electric field along the channel, whereby the device transports the atoms or molecules along the channel in response to applied electric field. In a preferred embodiment, the mass transport device will comprise a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT), although other one dimensional structures may also be used. The MWNT or other structure acts as a channel for individual or small collections of atoms due to the atomic smoothness of the material. Also preferred is a source particle of a metal such as indium. The particles move by dissociation into small units, in some cases, individual atoms. The particles are preferably less than 100 nm in size.

Regan, Brian C. (Oakland, CA); Aloni, Shaul (Albany, CA); Zettl, Alexander K. (Kensington, CA)

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

427

Fission product studies in the symmetric mass region  

SciTech Connect

Fission yields can be determined by radiochemical or mass spectrometric techniques. Mass spectrometry can provide more accurate data, particularly in the symmetric mass region where the probability of fission is low and uncertainties in isometric ratios occur. Fine structure in the mass distribution can usually only be determined by mass spectrometry. Many of the elements in the valley of symmetry have high ionization potentials and are therefore difficult to measure by solid source mass spectrometry. Analytical techniques have been developed to provide the sensitivity required to measure the small sample sizes available in fission product studies. Cumulative fission yields for ruthenium, palladium, cadmium, tin, and tellurium have been measured by mass spectrometry for the thermal and epicadmium fission of {sup 233}U and for thermal and epicadmium fission of {sup 239}Pu. These fission yields, which span the mass range 101 {le} A {le} 130, can be combined to give a mass yield curve for {sup 235}U in the valley region, which is symmetrical about A = 116.8 and exhibits fine structure in the mass 113 to 114 region. Fine structure in {sup 233}U is also present at mass 111. Mass spectrometric determinations of the fission yields of uranium ore at the Oklo mine site in Gabon enable the nuclear parameters of this natural reactor to be evaluated. This in turn enables the amounts of fission products produced in the reactor zone and the surrounding rocks enables an assessment to be made of the efficiency of this geological repository for containing radioactive waste. The elemental abundances can be determined by isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Unfortunately, the paucity of good fission yield data available for {sup 238}U by fast neutrons is a severe constraint in this evaluation.

De Laeter, J.R.; Rosman, K.J.R.; Loss, R.D. [Curtin Univ. of Technology, Perth (AU)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

Electrospray Ionization (ESI) is a process whereby gas phase ions are created from molecules in solution. As a solution exits a narrow tube in the presence of a strong electric field, an aerosol of charged droplets are is formed that produces gas phase ions as they it desolvates. ESI-MS comprises the creation of ions by ESI and the determination of their mass to charge ratio (m/z) by MS.

Kelly, Ryan T.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Top Mass and Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The top quark was discovered in 1995. The top quark mass is now well measured at the Tevatron, with uncertainty getting below 1% of the top mass. The world average from last year was 170.9 $\\pm$ 1.8 GeV/$c^2$. The new CDF measurement is 172 $\\pm$ 1.2 (stat) $\\pm$ 1.5 (sys) GeV/$c^2$, and D0 will soon present a new measurement. The top quark mass is an important parameter in the Standard Model, and should be measured as precisely as possible. To learn more about the top quark observed and study possible new physics, other properties also should be measured. At the Tevatron, the charge of the top quark can be measured directly. Examples of other properties studied and reported in this presentation are W helicity, top decay branching ratio to b ($R_b$), searches for $t \\to H b$ and for flavor changing neutral current (FCNC). The results are all consistent with the Standard Model within current statistics. With significantly more data being collected at the Tevatron, precision measurements of the top properties are just starting.

Yen-Chu Chen

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

47 Natural Gas Market Trends NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

47 Natural Gas Market Trends Chapter 5 NATURAL GAS MARKET TRENDS INTRODUCTION Natural gas discusses current natural gas market conditions in California and the rest of North America, followed on the outlook for demand, supply, and price of natural gas for the forecasted 20-year horizon. It also addresses

431

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, August 18, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, August 10, 2011) Natural gas prices fell across the board this week, likely in response to cooling temperatures as well as weak economic news. The Henry Hub spot price fell 17 cents from $4.26 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, August 3, to $4.09 per MMBtu yesterday, August 10. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month contract (September 2011) fell by $0.087 per MMBtu, from $4.090 last Wednesday to $4.003 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage was 2,783 Bcf as of Friday, August 5, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

432

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 5, 2009 Next Release: July 2, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 24, 2009) Natural gas spot prices generally declined this report week (June 17-24), with the largest decreases generally occurring in the western half of the country. During the report week, the Henry Hub spot price decreased by $0.19 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.80. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), futures prices for natural gas decreased as prices for most energy products fell amid concerns over the economy. The natural gas futures contract for July delivery decreased by 49 cents per MMBtu on the week to $3.761. Working gas in underground storage as of last Friday, June 19, is

433

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 7, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, February 3, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 26, 2011) Natural gas spot prices were soft at all domestic pricing points. The Henry Hub price fell 8 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (about 1.7 percent) for the week ending January 26, to $4.40 per MMBtu. The West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price settled at $86.15 per barrel ($14.85 per MMBtu), on Wednesday, January 26. This represents a decrease of $4.70 per barrel, or $0.81 per MMBtu, from the previous Wednesday. Working natural gas in storage fell to 2,542 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, January 21, according to the Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 16, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 8, 2011) Natural gas prices rose on the week across the board, with somewhat moderate increases in most areas and steep increases in the Northeast United States. The Henry Hub spot price rose 20 cents on the week from $4.63 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, June 1, to $4.83 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (July 2011) contract rose about 5 percent, from $4.692 last Wednesday to $4.847 yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,187 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, June 3, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 5, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Friday, November 13, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 4, 2009) Natural gas spot prices fell over the week at most market locations, declining on average 16 cents per million Btu (MMBtu). Decreases ranged between 2 cents and 77 cents per MMBtu. In the few trading locations where prices rose, increases were modest, ranging between 1 and 4 cents per MMBtu. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price fell 10 cents on the week, closing at $4.49 per MMBtu. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the December 2009 natural gas contract fell 34 cents per MMBtu, or 7 percent. The November contract expired on Wednesday, October 28, at $4.289 per MMBtu.

436

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1996 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1996. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1996. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1996. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

437

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2009 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: September 17, 2009 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 9, 2009) Natural gas prices posted significant increases at all market locations since last Wednesday, September 2. The Henry Hub spot price increased 47 cents from the previous Wednesday's price of $2.25 per MMBtu. However, intraweek trading was volatile, with natural gas prices falling below $2 per million Btu (MMBtu) at the Henry Hub on Friday, September 4 and rising to $2.72 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract for delivery in October 2009 rose by 11.4 cents to $2.829 per MMBtu, an increase of about 4 percent from the previous

438

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 1, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, July 28, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, July 20, 2011) Responding to extremely hot weather this week, natural gas prices moved up at market locations across the lower 48 States. The spot price at the Henry Hub increased 21 cents from $4.43 per million Btu (MMBtu) last Wednesday, July 13, to $4.64 per MMBtu yesterday, July 20. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (August 2011) increased from $4.403 per MMBtu to $4.500 per MMBtu. Working natural gas in storage rose to 2,671 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, July 15, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

439

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1997 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1997. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1997. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1997. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

440

Renewable Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Gas Natural Gas JOHN DAVIS: The use of clean, domestic natural gas as highway fuel in place of imported oil is growing in popularity with fleets and trucking companies. While natural gas from underground deposits is arguably a limited resource, there is a renewable, eco-friendly resource that we have right here in the U.S.A. And we're here now to give you the straight poop! Every family, farm animal and food processing plant in America produces organic waste that creates a mix of methane, CO2 and other elements called bio gas when it decomposes. Rotten vegetables, moldy bread, last night's leftovers --- they all break down when our garbage gets to the land fill. Incredibly, for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, June 10, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, June 2, 2010) Since Wednesday, May 26, natural gas spot prices increased across the lower 48 States, with gains of up to $0.18 per million Btu (MMBtu), at most market locations. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.13 per MMBtu, or about 3 percent, averaging $4.32 per MMBtu in trading yesterday, June 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for July delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday at $4.42 per MMBtu, climbing by $0.25 or about 6 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 2,357 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of May

442

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at selected points in the flow of gas from the wellhead to the burner-tip. Data include production, transmission within the United States, imports and exports of natural gas, underground storage activities, and deliveries to consumers. The publication presents historical data at the national level for 1930-1998 and detailed annual historical information by State for 1967-1998. The Historical Natural Gas Annual tables are available as self-extracting executable files in ASCII TXT or CDF file formats. Tables 1-3 present annual historical data at the national level for 1930-1998. The remaining tables contain detailed annual historical information, by State, for 1967-1998. Please read the file entitled READMEV2 for a description and documentation of information included in this file.

443

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, May 5, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 27, 2011) Mild temperatures coupled with continued strong domestic production resulted in natural gas cash market prices dropping modestly at nearly all domestic pricing points over the week. The lone exception was the Henry Hub price which rose a token 2 cents per million Btu (MMBtu) (0.5 percent) to $4.35 per MMBtu on April 27. Working natural gas in storage rose to 1,685 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, April 22, according to the U.S. Energy Information AdministrationÂ’s (EIA) Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The implied increase for the week was 31 Bcf, with storage volumes positioned

444

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

, 2008 , 2008 Next Release: October 9, 2008 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (Wednesday, September 24 to Wednesday, October 1) Natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the Lower 48 States this report week, as seasonably moderate temperatures minimized natural gas demand in many areas of the country. The return of some Gulf of Mexico supplies during the week provided further downward pressure on spot prices. As of yesterday, October 1, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) reported that 3.5 billion cubic feet (Bcf) per day of natural gas production remains shut-in, 16 percent lower than the 4.2 Bcf per day reported 1 week earlier. The Henry Hub spot price fell in the first three trading sessions of

445

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 at 2:00 P.M. 1 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, November 17, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, November 9, 2011) Continuing its recent trend of languishing below the $4 per million Btu (MMBtu) mark, the Henry Hub natural gas spot price oscillated this week, and posted an overall net increase of 16 cents, from $3.39 per MMBtu last Wednesday, November 2, to $3.55 per MMBtu yesterday, November 9. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month (December 2011) natural gas futures contract fell from $3.749 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.652 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,831 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, November 4, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas

446

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 0, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, January 27, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, January 19, 2011) Natural gas prices fell at most market locations across the country, as bitterly cold weather subsided. At the Henry Hub, the natural gas price fell 7 cents from $4.55 per million Btu (MMBtu) on Wednesday, January 12, to $4.48 per MMBtu on Wednesday, January 19. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the price of the near-month natural gas contract (February 2011) rose slightly, from $4.531 per MMBtu on January 12 to $4.561 yesterday. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate crude oil fell by $1 over the week, from $91.85 per barrel on January 12 ($15.84 per MMBtu) to

447

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 9, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 1, 2010) Since Wednesday, August 25, natural gas spot prices fell at most market locations in the lower 48 States, although prices generally rose in the Northeast and Rocky Mountain areas. The Henry Hub spot price fell on the week from $3.99 per million Btu (MMBtu) to $3.73 per MMBtu, its lowest value since April 1, 2010. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the October 2010 natural gas futures contract fell about 3 percent from $3.896 per MMBtu to $3.762 per MMBtu. During the report week, the September 2010 natural gas futures contract expired at $3.651, having lost about $1.176 per MMBtu during its

448

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 3, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, March 10, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, March 2, 2011) Natural gas prices showed continued relative weakness during the report week. The spot price at the Henry Hub fell from $3.83 per million Btu (MMBtu) on February 23 to $3.79 per MMBtu on March 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the March 2011 futures contract expired at $3.793 per MMBtu, having declined about 12 percent during its tenure as the near-month contract. Working natural gas in storage fell to 1,745 Bcf as of Friday, February 25, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report. The spot price of the West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil

449

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. 8, 2010 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, April 15, 2010 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Natural Gas Transportation Update Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, April 7, 2010) Since Wednesday, March 31, natural gas spot prices climbed at most market locations across the lower 48 States, with increases of as much as 8 percent. The Henry Hub natural gas spot price rose $0.15, or about 4 percent, to $4.08 per million Btu (MMBtu), in a week of trading shortened by the Good Friday holiday on April 2. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the futures contract for May delivery at the Henry Hub settled yesterday, April 7, at $4.02 per MMBtu, rising by $0.15 or about 4 percent since the previous Wednesday. Natural gas in storage was 1,669 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of

450

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 2, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, September 29, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 21, 2011) Natural gas spot prices declined at most market locations across the United States, as moderate temperatures led to declines in demand. Prices at the Henry Hub fell from $4.01 per MMBtu last Wednesday, September 14, to $3.78 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange, the price of the near-month futures contract (October 2011) dropped from $4.039 per MMBtu last Wednesday to $3.73 per MMBtu yesterday. Working natural gas in storage rose to 3,201 billion cubic feet (Bcf) as of Friday, September 16, according to EIAÂ’s Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report (WNGSR). The natural gas rotary rig count, as reported by Baker Hughes

451

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050KY3","N3010KY3","N3020KY3","N3035KY3","N3045KY3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Kentucky (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Kentucky Price...

452

,"Colorado Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CO3","N3010CO3","N3020CO3","N3035CO3","N3045CO3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Colorado (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Colorado Price...

453

,"Illinois Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050IL3","N3010IL3","N3020IL3","N3035IL3","N3045IL3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Illinois (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Illinois Price...

454

,"California Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050CA3","N3010CA3","N3020CA3","N3035CA3","N3045CA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in California (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","California...

455

,"Maryland Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MD3","N3010MD3","N3020MD3","N3035MD3","N3045MD3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Maryland (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Maryland Price...

456

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050AR3","N3010AR3","N3020AR3","N3035AR3","N3045AR3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Arkansas (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Arkansas Price...

457

,"Virginia Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050VA3","N3010VA3","N3020VA3","N3035VA3","N3045VA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Virginia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Virginia Price...

458

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050OK3","N3010OK3","N3020OK3","N3035OK3","N3045OK3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Oklahoma (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Oklahoma Price...

459

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050NE3","N3010NE3","N3020NE3","N3035NE3","N3045NE3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Nebraska (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Nebraska Price...

460

,"Washington Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050WA3","N3010WA3","N3020WA3","N3035WA3","N3045WA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Washington (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Washington...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050TN3","N3010TN3","N3020TN3","N3035TN3","N3045TN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Tennessee (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Tennessee...

462

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050LA3","N3010LA3","N3020LA3","N3035LA3","N3045LA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Louisiana (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Louisiana...

463

,"Minnesota Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MN3","N3010MN3","N3020MN3","N3035MN3","N3045MN3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Minnesota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Minnesota...

464

,"Michigan Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050MI3","N3010MI3","N3020MI3","N3035MI3","N3045MI3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Michigan (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Michigan Price...

465

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Prices" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3","N3010PA3","N3020PA3","N3035PA3","N3045PA3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

466

Natural Gas Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

issues Go CorrectionUpdate February 22, 2013 Two Year-To-Date values, for 2010 NGL Composite Spot Price and Natural Gas Spot Price, were incorrectly displayed in Table 3. These...

467

Natural Gas Hydrate Dissociation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Materials for hydrate synthesis mainly include methane gas of purity 99.9% (produced by Nanjing Special Gases Factory Co., Ltd.), natural sea sand of grain sizes 0.063?0.09,...

Qingguo Meng; Changling Liu; Qiang Chen; Yuguang Ye

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Oklo natural nuclear reactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although the possibility of natural was considered in the 1950s, this prediction was not confirmed until 1972, when a routine analysis of a uranium ore standard at the nuclear-fuel processing plant in Pierre...

Mark J. Rigali; Bartholomew Nagy

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Natural Toxicants in Foods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The purpose of exploring the potential naturally occurring toxic hazards of food plants is not to suggest an irrational avoidance of these common foods. However, it is important to identify, define, and invest...

Ross C. Beier; Herbert N. Nigg

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for natural gas in the electric power sector soared during the week in order to meet heating needs from the current cold spell. The operator for the electric power grid in Texas...

471

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

in waters up to 9000 feet deep. Southern Natural Gas Company has scheduled a shut-in test at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi for April 5 through April 11. Under the...

472

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

of 1 Tcf from the 1994 estimate of 51 Tcf. Ultimate potential for natural gas is a science-based estimate of the total amount of conventional gas in the province and is an...

473

Photoreceptors: Improving on Nature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... while it becomes too great a strain for molecular biologists to maintain their posture of humble seekers after truth, and they give way to the impulse to jolly nature along ...

Our Molecular Biology Correspondent

1970-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

474

Natural Gas for Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... AT a time when the Government is exhorting the gas and other major industries concerned with ... and other major industries concerned with natural fuel resources to give a forward boost to coal mining by contracting an annual intake ...

1965-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

475

Natural lighting and skylights  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are many physiological and psychological factors which enter into the proper design of space for human occupancy. One of these elements is light. Both natural light and manufactured light are basic tools with which any designer must work...

Evans, Benjamin Hampton

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Demand Shifting With Thermal Mass in Large Commercial Buildings: Case Studies and Tools Speaker(s): Peng Xu Date: March 9, 2007 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The idea of pre-cooling and demand limiting is to pre-cool buildings at night or in the morning during off-peak hours, storing cooling energy in the building thermal mass and thereby reducing cooling loads during the peak periods. Savings are achieved by reducing on-peak energy and demand charges. The potential for utilizing building thermal mass for load shifting and peak demand reduction has been demonstrated in a number of simulation, laboratory, and field studies. Case studies in a number of office buildings in California has found that a simple demand limiting strategy reduced the chiller power by 20-100% (0.5-2.3W/ft2) during six

477

EMSL: Capabilities: Mass Spectrometry: Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Additional Information Meet the Mass Spectrometry Experts Related EMSL User Projects Mass Spectrometry Tools are Applied to all Science Themes Next-Generation Mass Spectrometry Proteomics Research Resource for Integrative Biology Biological and Environmental Research - PNNL Proteomics PNNL's Biological MS Data and Software Distribution Center Mass Spectrometry brochure EMSL is committed to offering state-of-the-art instruments to its users. At a workshop in January of 2008, EMSL mass spectrometry experts joined experts from many universities, private companies, and government institutions and laboratories at a conference held at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory in Tallahassee Florida. Workshop participants reviewed the state of the art of high-performance mass spectrometers,

478

Mass spectrometry of proteins of known mass Andrew D. Miranker*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deter- mination has two significant advantages. First, the mass accuracy under these conditions to the orifice of the mass analyzer. As a result, there is a local separation of charges at the tip

Miranker, Andrew

479

THE INFLUENCE OF THE MASS RATIO ON THE ACCELERATION OF PARTICLES BY FILAMENTATION INSTABILITIES  

SciTech Connect

Almost all sources of high-energy particles and photons are associated with jet phenomena. Prominent sources of such highly relativistic outflows are pulsar winds, active galactic nuclei (AGNs), and gamma-ray bursts. The current understanding of these jets assumes diluted plasmas which are best described as kinetic phenomena. In this kinetic description, particle acceleration to ultrarelativistic speeds can occur in completely unmagnetized and neutral plasmas through insetting effects of instabilities. Even though the morphology and nature of particle spectra are understood to a certain extent, the composition of the jets is not known yet. While Poynting-flux-dominated jets (e.g., occurring in pulsar winds) are certainly composed of electron-positron plasmas, the understanding of the governing physics in AGN jets is mostly unclear. In this paper, we investigate how the constituting elements of an electron-positron-proton plasma behave differently under the variation of the fundamental mass ratio m{sub p} /m{sub e}. We initially studied unmagnetized counterstreaming plasmas using fully relativistic three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the influence of the mass ratio on particle acceleration and magnetic field generation in electron-positron-proton plasmas. We covered a range of mass ratios m{sub p}/m{sub e} between 1 and 100 with a particle number composition of n{sub p}{sup +}/ n{sub e}{sup +} of 1 in one stream, therefore called the pair-proton stream. Protons are injected in the other one, therefore from now on called the proton stream, whereas electrons are present in both to guarantee charge neutrality in the simulation box. We find that with increasing proton mass the instability takes longer to develop and for mass ratios >20 the particles seem to be accelerated in two phases which can be accounted for by the individual instabilities of the different species. This means that for high mass ratios the coupling between electrons/positrons and the heavier protons, which occurs in low mass ratios, disappears.

Burkart, Thomas; Elbracht, Oliver; Ganse, Urs; Spanier, Felix, E-mail: fspanier@astro.uni-wuerzburg.d [Lehrstuhl fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Wuerzburg, Am Hubland, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

480

Neutrino mass measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...swimming-pool-type nuclear reactors). This light is detected...side- branch in the nuclear reactions that power...which led to the next generation of experiments: Super-Kamiokande...are a large number of nuclear power reactors that sit in di erent...

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "mass number natural" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Natural gas fueling of a Catepillar 3406 diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a Caterpillar 3406 turbocharged diesel engine which was converted to operate in a natural gas with diesel pilot ignition mode and was evaluated for performance and emission characteristics for both diesel and natural gas operation. Full-load power was achieved with natural gas fueling without knock. Similar fuel efficiencies were obtained with natural gas fueling at high loads, but efficiencies were lower for low loads. Bosch smoke numbers were reduced by over 50 percent with natural gas fueling for all cases investigated. NO[sub x] emissions were found to be lower at low loads and at high speeds under high load. CO emissions were significantly increased for natural gas fueling while CO[sub 2] concentrations in the exhaust were reduced for natural gas fueling.

Doughty, G.E.; Bell, S.R.; Midkiff, K.C. (Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Joel Friedman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians Joel Friedman Department of Mathematics 1984 Abstract We use the Laplacian and power method to compute Betti numbers of sim­ plicial complexes. This has are the Betti numbers, the i­th Betti number, b i = b i (X), being the rank of H i (X). The Betti numbers often

Friedman, Joel

483

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Combined Natural Gas Transportation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps Combined Natural Gas Transportation Maps About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Map of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Network Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors Map of Major Natural Gas Supply Basins Relative to Natural Gas Pipeline Transportation Corridors see related text enlarge see related text enlarge U.S. Regional Breakdown Map of U.S. Regional Breakout States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies Map of States (in Grey) Highly Dependent on Interstate Pipelines for Natural Gas Supplies

484

Effective Neutrino Mass Operators: A Guide to Model Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective operators relevant for generating small Majorana masses for the neutrinos in the Standard Model will be considered. These operators serve as a useful guide for building models of neutrino mass. Some of these operators are represented by familiar models in the literature, and others lead to interesting new models. The number of relevant operators will be drastically reduced if neutrinoless double beta decays are observed in current experiments.

C. N. Leung

2001-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

485

Structure in the ??? System at the A2 Mass Region  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evidence is presented for an enhancement in the ??? mass spectrum at the A2 mass region in ?+p interactions at 5 GeV/c. Assuming this effect to be the A2, we calculate the decay rate relative to the ?? decay mode and obtain the results 0.29 ± 0.08 and 0.10 ± 0.04 for the two final states A20?++ and A2+p, respectively. Possible explanations of the discrepancy between these numbers are suggested.

U. Karshon; G. Mikenberg; S. Pitluck; Y. Eisenberg; E. E. Ronat; A. Shapira; G. Yekutieli

1974-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20–250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semiempirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of the symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhu-Xia Li; Feng-Shou Zhang

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

487

Nuclear symmetry energy at subnormal densities from measured nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The symmetry energy coefficients for nuclei with mass number A=20~250 are extracted from more than 2000 measured nuclear masses. With the semi-empirical connection between the symmetry energy coefficients of finite nuclei and the nuclear symmetry energy at reference densities, we investigate the density dependence of symmetry energy of nuclear matter at subnormal densities. The obtained results are compared with those extracted from other methods.

Min Liu; Ning Wang; Zhuxia Li; Fengshou Zhang

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

488

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

489

Natural Gas Technologies Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Center Technologies Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Gas Technologies Center Name Natural Gas Technologies Center Address 1350, Nobel, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada Place Montreal, Quebec Zip J4B 5H3 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 1992 Phone number 1.450.449.4774 Coordinates 45.5678623°, -73.4186892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.5678623,"lon":-73.4186892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

490

Natural Resources Canada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada Canada Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Natural Resources Canada Name Natural Resources Canada Address 580 Booth Place Ottawa, Ontario Zip K1A 0E4 Number of employees 1001-5000 Year founded 1995 Phone number 613-995-0947 Coordinates 45.4002635°, -75.7050135° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.4002635,"lon":-75.7050135,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

491

"Gravitational mass" of information?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We hypothesize possible new types of forces that would be the result of new types of interactions, static and a slow transient, between objects with related information contents (pattern). Such mechanism could make material composition dependence claimed by Fishbach, et al in Eotvos type experiments plausible. We carried out experiments by using a high-resolution scale with the following memories: USB-2 flash drives (1-16GB), DVD and CD disks to determine if such an interaction exist/detectable with a scale resolution of 10 microgram with these test objects. We applied zero information, white noise and 1/f noise type data. Writing or deleting the information in any of these devices causes peculiar negative weight transients, up to milligrams (mass fraction around 10^-5), which is followed by various types of relaxation processes. These relaxations have significantly different dynamics compared to transients observed during cooling after stationary external heating. Interestingly, a USB-1 MP3 player has also developed comparable transient mass loss during playing music. A classical interpretation of the negative weight transients could be absorbed water in hygroscopic components however comparison of relaxation time constants with air humidity data does not support an obvious explanation. Another classical interpretation with certain contribution is the lifting Bernoulli force caused by the circulation due to convection of the warm air. However, in this case all observed time constants with a device should have been the same unless some hidden parameter causes the observed variations. Further studies are warranted to clarify if there is indeed a new force, which is showing up as negative mass at weight measurement when high-density structural information is changed or read out (measured).

Laszlo B. Kish

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

492

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

493

Neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how a Majorana mass for the Neutron could result from non-perturbative quantum gravity effects peculiar to string theory. In particular, "exotic instantons" in un-oriented string compactifications with D-branes extending the (supersymmetric) standard model could indirectly produce an effective operator delta{m} n^t n+h.c. In a specific model with an extra vector-like pair of `quarks', acquiring a large mass proportional to the string mass scale (exponentially suppressed by a function of the string moduli fields), delta{m} can turn out to be as low as 10^{-24}-10^{-25} eV. The induced neutron-antineutron oscillations could take place with a time scale tau_{n\\bar{n}} > 10^8 s, that could be tested by the next generation of experiments. On the other hand, proton decay and FCNC's are automatically strongly suppressed and are compatible with the current experimental limits. Depending on the number of brane intersections, the model may also lead to the generation of Majorana masses for R-handed neutrini. Our proposal could also suggest neutron-neutralino or neutron-axino oscillations, with implications in UCN, Dark Matter Direct Detection, UHECR and Neutron-Antineutron oscillations. This suggests to improve the limits on neutron-antineutron oscillations, as a possible test of string theory and quantum gravity.

Andrea Addazi; Massimo Bianchi

2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

494

Gaugino and Scalar Masses in the Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we demonstrate the genericity of suppressed gaugino masses M_a \\sim m_{3/2}/ln(M_P/m_{3/2}) in the IIB string landscape, by showing that this relation holds for D7-brane gauginos whenever the associated modulus is stabilised by nonperturbative effects. Although m_{3/2} and M_a take many different values across the landscape, the above small mass hierarchy is maintained. We show that it is valid for models with an arbitrary number of moduli and applies to both the KKLT and exponentially large volume approaches to Kahler moduli stabilisation. In the latter case we explicitly calculate gaugino and moduli masses for compactifications on the two-modulus Calabi-Yau P^4_[1,1,1,6,9]. In the large-volume scenario we also show that soft scalar masses are approximately universal with m_i^2 \\sim m_{3/2}^2 (1 + \\epsilon_i), with the non-universality parametrised by \\epsilon_i \\sim 1/ln (M_P/m_{3/2})^2 \\sim 1/1000. We briefly discuss possible phenomenological implications of our results.

Joseph P. Conlon; Fernando Quevedo

2006-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

495

Neutron Majorana mass from exotic instantons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show how a Majorana mass for the Neutron could result from non-perturbative quantum gravity effects peculiar to string theory. In particular, "exotic instantons" in un-oriented string compactifications with D-branes extending the (supersymmetric) standard model could indirectly produce an effective operator delta{m} n^t n+h.c. In a specific model with an extra vector-like pair of `quarks', acquiring a large mass proportional to the string mass scale (exponentially suppressed by a function of the string moduli fields), delta{m} can turn out to be as low as 10^{-24}-10^{-25} eV. The induced neutron-antineutron oscillations could take place with a time scale tau_{n\\bar{n}} > 10^8 s, that could be tested by the next generation of experiments. On the other hand, proton decay and FCNC's are automatically strongly suppressed and are compatible with the current experimental limits. Depending on the number of brane intersections, the model may also lead to the generation of Majorana masses for R-handed neutrini. Ou...

Addazi, Andrea

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

497

Investigating the natural gas supply security: A new perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper assesses the natural gas supply security of 23 importing countries from divergent regions of the world for the period between 2001 and 2013. The indicators used for the study are the volume of imported natural gas, the number of natural gas suppliers, the level of dependency on one country, import dependency, the fragility of supplier countries, and the share of natural gas in primary energy consumption. The method used to establish the supply security index is the PCA (principal component analysis) over the indicators in the model for each country on a yearly basis for the period 2001 to 2013. The dispersed country sample enables the established index to measure the sensitivity of specific natural gas importer countries using a uniform framework. According to the results, the most effective indicators for the measurement of supply security are the number of supplier countries, supplier fragility, and the overall volume of imported gas.

Mehmet Efe Biresselioglu; Tezer Yelkenci; Ibrahim Onur Oz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

The Neutron-Hydrogen Mass Difference and the Neutron Mass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data in the literature leading to the neutron-hydrogen mass difference and the neutron mass are summarized. The disintegration energy of the deuteron together with the HH-D mass spectroscopic doublet separation apparently yields the best value of n-H=0.755±0.016 Mev and a neutron mass of 1.008,941±0.000,02 mass units. Other transmutation-radioactivity cycles check this value. Several inconsistencies in these data and their possible explanation are pointed out. Experiments of interest for improvement in accuracy and reliability of these values are noted.

W. E. Stephens

1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Primordial black hole minimum mass  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we revisit thermodynamic constraints on primordial black hole (PBH) formation in the early universe. Under the assumption that PBH mass is equal to the cosmological horizon mass, one can use the 2nd Law of Thermodynamics to put a lower limit on the PBH mass. In models of PBH formation, however, PBHs are created at some fraction of the horizon mass. We show that this thermodynamic constraint still holds for subhorizon PBH formation.

Chisholm, James R. [Institute for Fundamental Theory, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611-8440 (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

500

Natural Currents Energy Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Currents Energy Services Natural Currents Energy Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Natural Currents Energy Services Address 24 Roxanne Blvd Place Highland Zip 12528 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 845-691-4008 Website http://www.naturalcurrents.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Angoon Tidal Energy Plant Avalon Tidal BW2 Tidal Cape Cod Tidal Energy Project Cape May Tidal Energy Cohansey River Tidal Energy Cuttyhunk Tidal Energy Plant Dorchester Maurice Tidal Fishers Island Tidal Energy Project Gastineau Channel Tidal Highlands Tidal Energy Project Housatonic Tidal Energy Plant